WorldWideScience

Sample records for casei induced mucosal

  1. Studies on Mucosal Immunity Induced by Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Recombinant Lactobacillus casei in Mice and Sow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gui-hua; HOU Xi-lin; YU Li-yun; LIU Jian-kui; WEI Chun-hua

    2009-01-01

    Mucosal immunity plays an important role in protecting pigs against transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) infection. To elicit mucosal immune response against TGEV, we developed a surface antigen display system using the poly-γ-glutamate synthetase A (pgsA) protein of Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring matrix to express recombinant fusion proteins of pgsA and nucleocapsid protein of TGEV in Lactobacillus casei. Surface location of fusion protein was verified by ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence test. Oral and intranasal inoculations of pregnant sow and mice with recombinant L. casei resulted in high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and secretory immunogiobulin A (sIgA) against recombinant N protein as demonstrated by ELISA. More importantly, the level of specific slgA in colostrum significantly increased compared with that of IgG. The serum lgG levels of the piglets increased after suckling coiostrum produced by sows was previously inoculated with recombinant L. casei. These results indicate that immunization with recombinant L. casei expressing TGEV N protein on its surface elicited high levels of specific slgA and circulating lgG against TGEV N protein.

  2. Mucosal vaccination with recombinant Lactobacillus casei-displayed CTA1-conjugated consensus matrix protein-2 (sM2) induces broad protection against divergent influenza subtypes in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Y E; Li, Rui; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Park, Min-Eun; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Pathinayake, Prabuddha; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Song, Man Ki; Son, Hwa-Young; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2014-01-01

    To develop a safe and effective mucosal vaccine against pathogenic influenza viruses, we constructed recombinant Lactobacillus casei strains that express conserved matrix protein 2 with (pgsA-CTA1-sM2/L. casei) or without (pgsA-sM2/L. casei) cholera toxin subunit A1 (CTA1) on the surface. The surface localization of the fusion protein was verified by cellular fractionation analyses, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Oral and nasal inoculations of recombinant L. casei into mice resulted in high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal IgA. However, the conjugation of cholera toxin subunit A1 induced more potent mucosal, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. In a challenge test with 10 MLD50 of A/EM/Korea/W149/06(H5N1), A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1), A/Aquatic bird /Korea/W81/2005(H5N2), A/Aquatic bird/Korea/W44/2005(H7N3), and A/Chicken/Korea/116/2004(H9N2) viruses, the recombinant pgsA-CTA1-sM2/L. casei provided better protection against lethal challenges than pgsA-sM2/L. casei, pgsA/L. casei and PBS in mice. These results indicate that mucosal immunization with recombinant L. casei expressing CTA1-conjugated sM2 protein on its surface is an effective means of eliciting protective immune responses against diverse influenza subtypes. PMID:24714362

  3. Mucosal Vaccination with Recombinant Lactobacillus casei-Displayed CTA1-Conjugated Consensus Matrix Protein-2 (sM2) Induces Broad Protection against Divergent Influenza Subtypes in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Y. E.; Li, Rui; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Park, Min-Eun; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Pathinayake, Prabuddha; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Song, Man Ki; Son, Hwa-Young; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2014-01-01

    To develop a safe and effective mucosal vaccine against pathogenic influenza viruses, we constructed recombinant Lactobacillus casei strains that express conserved matrix protein 2 with (pgsA-CTA1-sM2/L. casei) or without (pgsA-sM2/L. casei) cholera toxin subunit A1 (CTA1) on the surface. The surface localization of the fusion protein was verified by cellular fractionation analyses, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Oral and nasal inoculations of recombinant L. casei into mice resulted in high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal IgA. However, the conjugation of cholera toxin subunit A1 induced more potent mucosal, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. In a challenge test with 10 MLD50 of A/EM/Korea/W149/06(H5N1), A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1), A/Aquatic bird /Korea/W81/2005(H5N2), A/Aquatic bird/Korea/W44/2005(H7N3), and A/Chicken/Korea/116/2004(H9N2) viruses, the recombinant pgsA-CTA1-sM2/L. casei provided better protection against lethal challenges than pgsA-sM2/L. casei, pgsA/L. casei and PBS in mice. These results indicate that mucosal immunization with recombinant L. casei expressing CTA1-conjugated sM2 protein on its surface is an effective means of eliciting protective immune responses against diverse influenza subtypes. PMID:24714362

  4. Mucosal Immunization with Surface-Displayed Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein on Lactobacillus casei Induces Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong-Soo; Poo, Haryoung; Han, Dong P.; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Kwang; Cho, Michael W.; Kim, Eun; Sung, Moon-Hee; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2006-01-01

    Induction of mucosal immunity may be important for preventing SARS-CoV infections. For safe and effective delivery of viral antigens to the mucosal immune system, we have developed a novel surface antigen display system for lactic acid bacteria using the poly-γ-glutamic acid synthetase A protein (PgsA) of Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring matrix. Recombinant fusion proteins comprised of PgsA and the Spike (S) protein segments SA (residues 2 to 114) and SB (residues 264 to 596) were stably exp...

  5. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    P S Satheesh Kumar; Anita Balan; Arun Sankar; Tinky Bose

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concer...

  6. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of Lactobacillus casei BL23 producing or not a manganese-dependant catalase on DSS-induced colitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corthier Gérard

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immune cells generate large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS throughout the respiratory burst that occurs during inflammation. In inflammatory bowel diseases, a sustained and abnormal activation of the immune system results in oxidative stress in the digestive tract and in a loss of intestinal homeostasis. We previously showed that the heterologous production of the Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC14431 manganese-dependant catalase (MnKat in Lb. casei BL23 successfully enhances its survival when exposed to oxidative stress. In this study, we evaluated the preventive effects of this antioxidative Lb. casei strain in a murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced moderate colitis. Results Either Lb. casei BL23 MnKat- or MnKat+ was administered daily to mice treated with DSS for 10 days. In contrast to control mice treated with PBS for which DSS induced bleeding diarrhea and mucosal lesions, mice treated with both Lb. casei strains presented a significant (p Conclusion No contribution of MnKat to the protective effect from epithelial damage has been observed in the tested conditions. In contrast, these results confirm the high interest of Lb. casei as an anti-inflammatory probiotic strain.

  8. Oral Mucositis Induced By Anticancer Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Ansari, S.; Zecha, J.A.E.M.; Barasch, A.; Lange, de, J.; Rozema, F.R.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis induced by conventional cytotoxic cancer therapies is a common and significant clinical problem in oncology. Mucositis symptoms, which include severe pain, may lead to dose reductions and unplanned interruptions of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, and often affect patients' quality of life. In addition, ulcerative mucositis represents a risk factor for local or systemic infectious complications that may be life-threatening in immunosuppressed patients. The development of biolo...

  9. Lactobacillus casei secreting alpha-MSH induces the therapeutic effect on DSS-induced acute colitis in Balb/c Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sun-Woo; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jeong-Yoon; Kim, Jie-Youn; Sung, Moon-Hee; Poo, Haryoung

    2008-12-01

    The neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha- MSH) has anti-inflammatory property by downregulating the expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Because alpha-MSH elicits the anti-inflammatory effect in various inflammatory disease models, we examined the therapeutic effect of oral administration of recombinant Lactobacillus casei, which secretes alpha-MSH (L. casei-alpha-MSH), on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in Balb/c mice. Thus, we constructed the alpha-MSH-secreting Lactobacillus casei by the basic plasmid, pLUAT-ss, which was composed of a PldhUTLS promoter and alpha-amylase signal sequence from Streptococcus bovis strain. Acute colitis was induced by oral administration of 5% DSS in drinking water for 7 days. To investigate the effect of L. casei-alpha-MSH on the colitis, L. casei or L. casei-alpha-MSH was orally administered for 7 days and their effects on body weight, mortality rate, cytokine production, and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were observed. Administration of L. casei-alpha-MSH reduced the symptom of acute colitis as assessed by body weight loss (DSS alone: 14.45+/-0. 2 g; L. casei-alpha- MSH: 18.2+/-0.12 g), colitis score (DSS alone: 3.6+/-0.4; L. casei-alpha-MSH: 1.4+/-0.6), MPO activity (DSS alone: 42.7+/-4.5 U/g; L. casei-alpha-MSH: 10.25+/-0.5 U/g), survival rate, and histological damage compared with the DSS alone mice. L. casei-alpha-MSH-administered entire colon showed reduced in vitro production of proinflammatory cytokines and NF-kappaB activation. The alpha-MSH-secreting recombinant L. casei showed significant anti-inflammatory effects in the murine model of acute colitis and suggests a potential therapeutic role for this agent in clinical inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:19131702

  10. Lactobacillus casei stimulates phase-II detoxification system and rescues malathion-induced physiological impairments in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaladevi, Arumugam; Ganguli, Abhijit; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Malathion, an organophosphorus insecticide, is renowned for its inhibitory action on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme that eventually leads to widespread disturbance in the normal physiological and behavioral activities of any organism. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are still an underexploited and inexhaustible source of significant pharmaceutical thrust. In the present study, Caenorhabditis elegans was employed to identify and characterize the indigenous LAB isolated from different traditional food against malathion-induced toxicity. The results demonstrated that malathion at its LD50 concentration decreased various C. elegans physiological parameters such as survival, feeding, and locomotion. Among the screened isolates, L. casei exhibited an excellent protective efficacy against malathion-induced toxicity by increasing the level of AChE and thereby rescued all physiological parameters of C. elegans. In addition, short-term exposure and food choice assay divulged that L. casei could serve as a better food to protect C. elegans from noxious environment. The expression analysis unveiled that L. casei gavage upregulated the phase-II detoxification enzymes coding genes metallothioneins (mtl-1 and mtl-2) and glutathione-S-transferase (gst-8) and thereby eliminated malathion from the host system. Furthermore, the upregulation of ace-3 along with down-regulation of cyp35a in the nematodes supplemented with L. casei could be attributed to attenuate the malathion-induced physiological defects in C. elegans. Thus, the present study reports that an indigenous LAB-L. casei could serve as a promising protective agent against the harmful effects of pesticide. PMID:26297616

  11. Chemotherapy induced intestinal mucositis; from bench to bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.E. Koning, de (Barbara)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPart 1 focuses primarily on the pathophysiology of mucositis, in order to gain more insight different experimental mouse models were used. Chapter 2 describes mucositis induced by high dose doxorubicin (DOX)- treatment. DOX is a frequently used cytostatic drug in childhood cancer,

  12. Lactobacillus casei prevents the development of dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis in Toll-like receptor 4 mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y W; Choi, J H; Oh, T-Y; Eun, C S; Han, D S

    2008-01-01

    Probiotics, defined as live or attenuated bacteria or bacterial products, confer a significant health benefit to the host. Recently, they have been shown to be useful in the treatment of chronic inflammatory bowel disease and infectious colitis. In this study, we investigated the effect of probiotics on the development of experimental colitis using Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) mutant (lps-/lps-) mice. TLR-4(lps-/lps-) and wild-type (WT) mice were given 2.5% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) in drinking water to induce colitis with or without Lactobacillus casei pretreatment. Clinical and histological activity of DSS-colitis was attenuated markedly both in TLR-4(lps-/lps-) and WT mice pretreated with L. casei. Interestingly, histological activity was less severe in TLR-4(lps-/lps-) mice than in WT mice. The levels of myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin (IL)-12p40 were attenuated in pretreated TLR-4(lps-/lps-) mice after DSS administration. By contrast, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and IL-10 mRNA and protein expressions were increased markedly in pretreated TLR-4(lps-/lps-) mice. The current results suggest that L. casei has a preventive effect in the development of acute DSS-induced colitis and its action depends largely upon TLR-4 status. L. casei modulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines and down-regulates neutrophilic infiltration in the case of incomplete TLR-4 complex signalling. PMID:18005362

  13. Radio-induced oral and pharyngeal mucositis: Management updates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucositis is a major side effect induced by radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy of head and neck cancer. This toxicity impacts patient's quality of life and may compromise optimal treatments. Pathophysiology, risk factors, incidence and consequences of mucositis will be discussed in this review. Its management remains principally supportive (pain medication and nutritional support); however, in recent years several studies have revealed that the use of low level energy laser is particularly useful in the prevention and treatment of chemo- and radio-induced mucositis. (authors)

  14. Allopurinol gel mitigates radiation-induced mucositis and dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has not been verified whether allopurinol application is beneficial in decreasing the severity of radiation-induced oral mucositis and dermatitis. Rats were divided into 4 groups and received 15 Gy irradiation on the left whisker pad. Group 1 received only irradiation. Group 2 was maintained by applying allopurinol/carrageenan-mixed gel (allopurinol gel) continuously from 2 days before to 20 days after irradiation. Group 3 had allopurinol gel applied for 20 days after radiation. Group 4 was maintained by applying carrageenan gel continuously from 2 days before to 20 days after irradiation. The intra oral mucosal and acute skin reactions were assessed daily using mucositis and skin score systems. The escape thresholds for mechanical stimulation to the left whisker pad were measured daily. In addition, the irradiated tissues at the endpoint of this study were compared with naive tissue. Escape threshold in group 2 was significantly higher than that in group 1, and mucositis and skin scores were much improved compared with those of group 1. Concerning escape threshold, mucositis and skin scores in group 3 began to improve 10 days after irradiation. Group 4 showed severe symptoms of mucositis and dermatitis to the same extent as that observed in group 1. In the histopathological study, the tissues of group 1 showed severe inflammatory reactions, compared with those of group 2. These results suggest that allopurinol gel application can mitigate inflammation reactions associated with radiation-induced oral mucositis and dermatitis. (author)

  15. Aegle Marmelos Enhances Gastric Mucosal Protection: Relevance for NSAIDS-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Singh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In order to study the gastroprotective effect of Aegle marmelos extract (AM, this study was undertaken on aspirin-induced ulcerogenesis in cannulated free-moving rats. Background: Most of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs including aspirin (ASP cause gastric ulcer. The efficacy of several plants for the treatment of gastroduodenal disease is confirmed by clinical research, while basic scientific research helps us to uncover the mechanisms by which these plants exert their therapeutic effects. Method: To assess the possible antiulcer effect of AM, lesion index, gastric secretions glycoprotein levels and mucosal histopathology were determined in ASP induced gastric mucosal injury in cannulated free-moving rats. Results: Pretreatment with AM significantly prevented the development of gastric mucosal lesion and decreased the gastric toxicity produced by ulcerogen. In addition, ulcerated rats showed depletion of gastric wall mucus, glycoproteins and enhanced gastric acid secretion whereas treatment with AM prevented these ASP induced responses in cannulated free-moving rats. Histological studies confirmed the results. Conclusion: The present finding suggests that AM promotes ulcer protection by the decrease in ulcer index, gastric secretions and increase in the glycoprotein level, gastric mucin content and maintenance of mucosal epithelium. AM protects the gastric mucosa against ulceration by its antisecretory and cytoprotective property.

  16. Radiation-induced mucositis pain in mesopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy in head and neck malignancy often triggers painful mucositis poorly controlled by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). To better understand how radiation-induced pain develops over time, we studied numerical rating scale (NRS 0-5) pain scores in 27 subjects undergoing 60-72 Gy radiation therapy for newly diagnosed cancer- 13 with mesopharynx and 14 with hypopharynx. Mucositis severity was evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 (CTCAE v3.0) based on mucositis pain, analgesic administration, and oral feedings of our subjects, with 8 mesopharyngeal and 10 with hypopharyngeal cancer had been pain-free before radiation therapy. The mucositis and pain course was severer in mesopharyngeal than in hypopharyngeal cancer. NSAIDs and opioid use was similar in both cancer types, which also required tube feeding in 7 subjects (38.9%). (author)

  17. Radiation-induced mucositis pain in laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy in those with head and neck malignancies often triggers painful mucositis poorly controlled by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). To better understand how radiation-induced pain develops over time, we studied the numerical rating scale (NRS 0-5) pain scores from 32 persons undergoing radiation therapy of 60-72 Gy for newly diagnosed laryngeal cancer. The degree of mucositis was evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version3.0 (CTCAE v3.0). We divided the 32 into a conventional fractionation (CF) group of 14 and a hyperfractionation (HF) group of 18, and further divided laryngeal cancer into a small-field group of 23 and a large-field group of 9. The mucositis pain course was similar in CF and HF, but mucositis pain was severer in the HF group, which also required more NSAIDs. Those in the large-field group had severer pain and mucositis and required more NSAIDs than those in the small-field group. We therefore concluded that small/large-field radiation therapy, rather fractionation type, was related to the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis pain. (author)

  18. Cough-induced Tracheobronchial Mucosal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Harmanjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with moderate hemoptysis. It was preceded by a severe bout of cough. Flexible bronchoscopy showed diffuse tracheobronchial mucosal petechiae and bleeding. The patient was not suffering with any coagulopathies. He did not receive antiplatelet drugs. Hemoptysis resolved with cough suppressant. Subsequent bronchoscopy revealed the complete resolution of petechiae. The mechanism of bleeding after the bout of coughing is discussed. PMID:23169019

  19. A phase trial of the oral Lactobacillus casei vaccine polarizes Th2 cell immunity against transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinpeng; Hou, Xingyu; Tang, Lijie; Jiang, Yanping; Ma, Guangpeng; Li, Yijing

    2016-09-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) is a member of the genus Coronavirus, family Coronaviridae, order Nidovirales. TGEV is an enteropathogenic coronavirus that causes highly fatal acute diarrhoea in newborn pigs. An oral Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) vaccine against anti-transmissible gastroenteritis virus developed in our laboratory was used to study mucosal immune responses. In this L. casei vaccine, repetitive peptides expressed by L. casei (specifically the MDP and tuftsin fusion protein (MT)) were repeated 20 times and the D antigenic site of the TGEV spike (S) protein was repeated 6 times. Immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus is crucial for investigations of the effect of immunization, such as the first immunization time and dose. The first immunization is more important than the last immunization in the series. The recombinant Lactobacillus elicited specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. Recombinant L. casei had a strong potentiating effect on the cellular immunity induced by the oral L. casei vaccine. However, during TGEV infection, the systemic and local immune responses switched from Th1 to Th2-based immune responses. The systemic humoral immune response was stronger than the cellular immune response after TGEV infection. We found that the recombinant Lactobacillus stimulated IL-17 expression in both the systemic and mucosal immune responses against TGEV infection. Furthermore, the Lactobacillus vaccine stimulated an anti-TGEV infection Th17 pathway. The histopathological examination showed tremendous potential for recombinant Lactobacillus to enable rapid and effective treatment for TGEV with an intestinal tropism in piglets. The TGEV immune protection was primarily dependent on mucosal immunity. PMID:27020282

  20. Does Short-Term High Dose Probiotic Supplementation Containing Lactobacillus casei Attenuate Exertional-Heat Stress Induced Endotoxaemia and Cytokinaemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Samantha K; Allerton, Dean M; Ansley-Robson, Paula; Hemmings, Krystal; Cox, Martin; Costa, Ricardo J

    2016-06-01

    The study aimed to determine if short-term high dose probiotic supplementation containing Lactobacillus casei (L.casei) attenuates the commonly reported exertional-heat stress (EHS) induced endotoxinaemia and cytokinaemia. Eight endurance trained male volunteers (mean± SD: age 26 ± 6 y, nude body mass 70.2 ± 8.8 kg, height 1.75 ± 0.05 m, VO2max 59 ± 5 ml·kg-1·min-1) completed a blinded randomized cross-over design, whereby oral ingestion of a commercially available probiotic beverage containing L.casei (volume equivalent for ×1011 colony forming units·day-1) (PRO) or placebo (PLA) was consumed for 7 consecutive days before exposure to EHS, which comprised of 2h running exercise at 60% VO2max in hot ambient conditions (34.0 °C and 32% RH). Blood samples were collected at baseline (7 days before EHS), pre-EHS, post-EHS (1 hr, 2 hr, 4 hr, and at 24 hr). Plasma samples were analyzed for gram-negative bacterial endotoxin, cytokine profile (IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-8, and IL-10) and plasma osmolality. Plasma osmolality did not differ between trials. Seven days of L.casei supplementation did not show significant changes in resting circulatory endotoxin concentration or plasma cytokine profile compared with PLA. A main effect of time was observed for IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-8; whereby levels increased in response to EHS (p < .05). Relative to pre-EHS concentrations, higher plasma concentrations of endotoxin (p = .05), and a trend for higher plasma TNF-α concentration (p = .09) was observed on PRO compared with PLA throughout recovery. Short-term high dose supplementation of a probiotic beverage containing L.casei before EHS did not attenuate EHS induced endotoxaemia and cytokinaemia; nor is it more positively favorable over a placebo. PMID:26568577

  1. EFFECT OF EDTA ON GASTRIC MUCOSAL LESION INDUCED BY ASPIRIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A FESHARAKI M.A

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gastric ulcer is a multifactorial disease, which its pathophysioligy has not been clear yet. The aim of this study was to obtain the prophylactic effects of EDTA on Aspirin induced gastric mucosal lesions. Methods. In fasted male rats the effect of a single oral dose of the EDTA was evaluated in the following test systems: combination of 1 ml EDTA 1.5% + 300 mg/kg aspirin and 1 ml EDTA 1.5%, 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% 30 minutes before 300 mg/kg aspirin. Then the gastric mucosal lesions were assessed microscopically and marcroscopically. Results. EDTA at different doses reduced macroscopic and microscpic gastric mucosal lesion induced by aspirin. Discussion. Combination therapy of EDTA and aspirin has distinct advantages regard to both low gastrointestinal toxicity and restored therapeutic activity.

  2. EFFECT OF EDTA ON GASTRIC MUCOSAL LESION INDUCED BY ASPIRIN

    OpenAIRE

    M.A FESHARAKI M.A; A SHARAITI KAMALABADI; R MOKHTARI

    2002-01-01

    Introduction. Gastric ulcer is a multifactorial disease, which its pathophysioligy has not been clear yet. The aim of this study was to obtain the prophylactic effects of EDTA on Aspirin induced gastric mucosal lesions. Methods. In fasted male rats the effect of a single oral dose of the EDTA was evaluated in the following test systems: combination of 1 ml EDTA 1.5% + 300 mg/kg aspirin and 1 ml EDTA 1.5%, 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% 30 minutes before 300 mg/kg aspirin. Then the gastric mucosal les...

  3. STARVATION INDUCED PROXIMAL GUT MUCOSAL ATROPHY DIMINISHED WITH AGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juquan; Wolf, Steven E.; Wu, Xiao-Wu; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Starvation induces small bowel atrophy with increased intestinal epithelial apoptosis and decreased proliferation. Here, we examined these parameters after starvation in aged animals. Methods Sixty-four 6 week-old and 26 month-old C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to either an ad libitum fed or fasted group. The small bowel was harvested at 12, 48, and 72 hours following starvation. Proximal gut mucosal height was measured and epithelial cells counted. Apoptosis was identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Proliferation was determined by immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Comparison of fed vs. fasted and adult vs. old groups was done by one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s test and unpaired t-test. Significance was accepted at p<0.05. Results Aged mice had higher proximal gut weights, mucosal heights and cell numbers at baseline compared with the adult group (p<0.05). The rate of apoptosis was lower in the aged (p<0.05) while proliferation was not different between groups before starvation. After starvation, proximal gut wet weight decreased only in adult mice (p<0.05); Gut mucosal height and mucosal cell number decreased greater in adult than in aged mice (p<0.05). This was related to decreased proliferation only in the adult group (p<0.05). The fold of epithelial apoptosis increased was higher in the aged group than in the adult after starvation (p<0.05). Conclusions Gut mucosal kinetics change with age had lower rates of apoptosis and greater mucosal mass; the character of starvation-induced atrophy is diminished with aging. PMID:19126762

  4. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotrim, Ana P. [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yoshikawa, Masanobu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baum, Bruce J., E-mail: bbaum@dir.nidcr.nih.gov [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  5. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation ± Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation ± cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, ∼8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses ± cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 × 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  6. Molecular mechanism of interleukin-2-induced mucosal homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Jayshree; Waters, Christopher M.; Kumar, Narendra

    2011-01-01

    Sustained damage to the mucosal lining in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) facilitates translocation of intestinal microbes to submucosal immune cells leading to chronic inflammation. Previously, we demonstrated the role of Jak3 in IL-2-induced intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) migration, one of the early events during intestinal wound repair. In this study, we demonstrate that IL-2 also plays a role in IEC homeostasis through concentration-dependent regulation of IEC proliferati...

  7. Documentation of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Scoring Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Radiation therapy of tumors in the head and neck region is frequently associated with severe side effects in the oral mucosa which often necessitate interruption of the prescribed treatment protocol. In order to compare therapeutic strategies and, more important, in order to perform multicenter studies, generally accepted scoring systems have to be applied for uniform documentation of the oral mucosal response. Methods: Different scoring protocols are found in the literature. The scoring protocols most widely accepted are the CTC classification and the RTOG/EORTC classification. These are compared with more detailed systems. Results: In the CTC classification, grading of stomatitis is included in the responses of the gastrointestinal tract and emphasizes dietary effects. For effects of radiation alone or of radiochemotherapy, the RTOG/EORTC system, focusing on therapeutic interventions, has been established. However, there are only minor differences in the grading of mucositis between these 2 protocols. Based on the RTOG/EORTC classification, Maciejewski et al. introduced a classification system with inclusion of the area affected, but also changed the sensitivity of the scores. The latter may be confusing if the source of the system used is not cited in a report. An alternative system was proposed by Dische, which in addition to objective morphologic criteria also includes the symptoms induced by the mucosal response, and hence includes some subjective aspects reported by the patient. Conclusions: For routine documentation of acute radiation side effects in the oral cavity, the German version of the RTOG/EORTC classification can be recommended. In studies with particular interest in oral mucositis, a more sensitive scoring system may be applied. In any publication concerning mucositis, a table or a detailed description of the system used should be included. (orig.)

  8. Radiation induced oral mucositis: a review of current literature on prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Rath, G K

    2016-09-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a major limiting acute side effect of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. The spectrum of problems associated with mucositis includes oral pain, odynophagia, reduced oral intake, and secondary infections. Incidence of mucositis is increased with addition of concurrent chemotherapy as well as altered fractionation schedules. This leads to treatment interruption and suboptimal disease control. Hence, prevention as well as timely management of OM is necessary for optimum tumor control. We reviewed the English literature with key words "Radiation induced mucositis, Mucositis, Oral Mucositis" to find relevant articles describing incidence, pathophysiology, prophylaxis, and treatment of oral mucositis. Prevention and treatment of OM is an active area of research. Maintenance of oral hygiene is an important part in prevention of OM. A battery of agents including normal saline and alkali (soda bicarbonate) mouth washes, low level laser therapy, and benzydamine (non-steroidal analgesic and anti-inflammatory) have effectiveness in the prevention and treatment of radiation induced oral mucositis. Chlorhexidine mouth gargles are recommended for prevention of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis but is not recommended for radiotherapy associated mucositis. Treatment of co-existing infection is also important and both topical (povidone iodine) and systemic anti fungals should be used judiciously. Radiation induced oral mucositis is a common problem limiting the efficacy of radiation by increasing treatment breaks. Adequate prophylaxis and treatment may limit the severity of radiation mucositis and improve compliance to radiation which may translate in better disease control and survival. PMID:26116012

  9. Molecular mechanism of interleukin-2-induced mucosal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Jayshree; Waters, Christopher M; Kumar, Narendra

    2012-03-01

    Sustained damage to the mucosal lining in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) facilitates translocation of intestinal microbes to submucosal immune cells leading to chronic inflammation. Previously, we demonstrated the role of Jak3 in IL-2-induced intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) migration, one of the early events during intestinal wound repair. In this study, we demonstrate that IL-2 also plays a role in IEC homeostasis through concentration-dependent regulation of IEC proliferation and cell death. At lower concentrations (≤50 U/ml), IL-2 promoted proliferation, while at higher concentrations (100 U/ml), it promoted apoptosis. Activation by IL-2 led to tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent interactions between Jak3 and p52ShcA only at lower concentrations. Phosphatase SHP1 dephosphorylated IL-2-induced phosphorylated p52ShcA. Higher concentrations of IL-2 decreased the phosphorylation of Jak3 and p52ShcA, disrupted their interactions, redistributed Jak3 to the nucleus, and induced apoptosis in IEC. IL-2 also induced dose-dependent upregulation of p52shcA and downregulation of jak3-mRNA. Constitutive overexpression and mir-shRNA-mediated knockdown studies showed that expression of both Jak3 and p52ShcA were necessary for IL-2-induced proliferation of IEC. Doxycycline-regulated sh-RNA expression demonstrated that IL-2-induced downregulation of jak3-mRNA was responsible for higher IL-2-induced apoptosis in IEC. Collectively, these data demonstrate a novel mechanism of IL-2-induced mucosal homeostasis through posttranslational and transcriptional regulation of Jak3 and p52ShcA. PMID:22116305

  10. Establishment of murine model of radiation-induced oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish a murine model of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Methods: Left-sided buccal mucosa of 70 Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with X-rays (10 Gy/d), then six rats, selected randomly, were sacrificed at the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 14th, and 21st day after the irradiation, left-sided buccal mucosa were excised, corresponding irradiation dose for the selected rats were 20, 40, 60 and 80 Gy following radiation. The right buccal mucosa was excised and treated as its auto-controls tissue. Results: Erythema was observed in the left-sided buecal mucosa in rates irradiated with X-rays of 60 Gy; a single or more ulcers observed in rates irradiated with 80 Gy X-rays; a large area of ulcer was observed at 4th day after 80 Gy irradiation. The radiation-induced ulcer in buccal mucosa was essentially recovered after about 2 weeks following 80 Gy irradiation. Conclusion: This murine model of radiation-induced oral mucositis was useful and practical in experimental studies. (authors)

  11. Natural Products for Management of Oral Mucositis Induced by Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohamamdi, Azar; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2016-03-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of systemic chemotherapy and radiotherapy of head and neck in patients with cancer. Severe oral mucositis is painful and affects oral functions, including intake of food and medications and speech. Prevention of oral mucositis affects the life quality of patients. Recent studies have been focused on natural products to improve or reduce this complication. Many clinical trials have been performed to assess natural products for treatment of mucositis and their results are promising. The authors reviewed the evidence for natural products in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:26306626

  12. Epithelial cell proliferation arrest induced by lactate and acetate from Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium breve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Matsuki

    Full Text Available In an attempt to identify and characterize how symbiotic bacteria of the gut microbiota affect the molecular and cellular mechanisms of epithelial homeostasis, intestinal epithelial cells were co-cultured with either Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium as bona fide symbionts to examine potential gene modulations. In addition to genes involved in the innate immune response, genes encoding check-point molecules controlling the cell cycle were among the most modulated in the course of these interactions. In the m-ICcl2 murine cell line, genes encoding cyclin E1 and cyclin D1 were strongly down regulated by L. casei and B. breve respectively. Cell proliferation arrest was accordingly confirmed. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA were the effectors of this modulation, alone or in conjunction with the acidic pH they generated. These results demonstrate that the production of SCFAs, a characteristic of these symbiotic microorganisms, is potentially an essential regulatory effector of epithelial proliferation in the gut.

  13. Effect of Epicatechin against Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Yoo Seob; Shin, Hyang Ae; Kang, Sung Un; Kim, Jang Hee; Oh, Young-Taek; Park, Keun Hyung; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced oral mucositis limits the delivery of high-dose radiation to head and neck cancer. This study investigated the effectiveness of epicatechin (EC), a component of green tea extracts, on radiation-induced oral mucositis in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design The effect of EC on radiation-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed in the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. Radiation-induced apoptosis, change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) g...

  14. Evaluation of the Effect of Low Level Laser on Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Farshid Arbabi-Kalati; Fatemeh Arbabi-Kalati; Tahora Moridi

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy in the head and neck region and chemotherapy might give rise to oral mucositis which is a severe and painful inflammation. There is no known definite cure for mucositis. A number of studies have attempted to evaluate the effect of low-power laser on radiotherapy- and chemotherapy-induced mucositis. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of low-power laser on the prevention of mucositis, xerostomia and pain as a result of chemotherapy. The subjects in this double-...

  15. Oral Candida as an aggravating factor of mucositis Induced by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antineoplastic treatment induces some undesirable consequences in head and neck cancer patients. Often, the emergence of major clinical manifestations, such as oral mucositis, results in temporary interruption of the treatment, decreasing the patients' quality of life, and increasing hospital costs. Radio-induced or chemo-induced oral mucositis is possibly aggravated by opportunist fungal infections, which turn the mucositis more resistant to the conventional treatments. Objective: this study aims to identify the presence of Candida sp. as a possible aggravating factor of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer under antineoplastic treatment. Method: all patients with radio- or chemo-induced oral mucositis from the Cancer Hospital of Pernambuco, treated between October 2008 and April 2009, were selected for the study. The prevalence of Candida sp was measured through the cytological analysis of oral mucosa in patients with oral mucositis. The fungal presence was correlated with the mucositis severity. Results: the results showed a positive association between fungal colonization and more several lesions (degrees III and IV of mucositis). Conclusion: The outcomes shown may contribute to a solution for unconventional mucosites, which do not respond to the usual treatment. (author)

  16. Effect of electroacupunture on gastric mucosal intestinal trefoil factor gene expression of stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Li; Jie Yan; Shou-Xiang Yi; Xiao-Rong Chang; Ya-Ping Lin; Zong-Bao Yang; Ai Huang; Rong Hu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate electroacupunture(EA) at the acupoints of Stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming(SMFY),Gallbladder Meridian of Foot-Yangming(SMFY) on gastric mucosal intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) gene expression detection in stress-induced rats with gastric mucosal lesion, and to explore the regulatory mechanism and significance of EA-related gastric mucosal protective effect.METHODS: Forty rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Blank group, Model group, Model group+EA at acupoints of SMFY group("SMFY group"), and Model group+EA at acupoints of GMFY group(GMFY group).All rats (except blank group) were made model by water immersion and restraint stress (WRS). Then the gastric mucosa tissue in each rat was taken off after assessment of gastric mucosal lesion index(GUI), and the expression of ITF mRNA of the tissues was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) method.RESULTS: Compared with Model group(54.3 ± 1.34),the GUI value in SMFY group (31±2.21) decreased significantly(P 0.05), in SMFY group(0.76± 0.01)with an extremely obvious difference (P<0.01), furthermore the expression in SMFY group was significantly higher than in GMFY group (P< 0.01).CONCLUSION: The gastric mucosal protective effect by EA at the acupoints of SMFY and GMFY was related to the expression variance of ITF, indicating certain meridian specificity exists. It could be one proof for the TCM theory "Relative particularity between SMFY and stomach".

  17. Single-Dose Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Syme, Alasdair; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The generation of a self-resolved radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) mouse model using the highest possibly tolerable single ionizing radiation (RT) dose was needed in order to study RIOM management solutions. We used 10-week-old male BALB/c mice with average weight of 23 g for model production. Mice were treated with an orthovoltage X-ray irradiator to induce the RIOM ulceration at the intermolar eminence of the animal tongue. General anesthesia was injected intraperitoneally for proper animal immobilization during the procedure. Ten days after irradiation, a single RT dose of 10, 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy generated a RIOM ulcer at the intermolar eminence (posterior upper tongue surface) with mean ulcer floor (posterior epithelium) heights of 190, 150, 25, 10, and 10 μm, respectively, compared to 200 μm in non-irradiated animals. The mean RIOM ulcer size % of the total epithelialized upper surface of the animal tongue was RT dose dependent. At day 10, the ulcer size % was 2, 5, 27, and 31% for 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy RT, respectively. The mean relative surface area of the total epithelialized upper surface of the tongue was RT dose dependent, since it was significantly decreased to 97, 95, 88, and 38% with 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy doses, respectively, at day 10 after RT. Subcutaneous injection of 1 mL of 0.9% saline/6 h for 24 h yielded a 100% survival only with 18 Gy self-resolved RIOM, which had 5.6 ± 0.3 days ulcer duration. In conclusion, we have generated a 100% survival self-resolved single-dose RIOM male mouse model with long enough duration for application in RIOM management research. Oral mucositis ulceration was radiation dose dependent. Sufficient hydration of animals after radiation exposure significantly improved their survival. PMID:27446800

  18. Pilot study of ice-ball cryotherapy for radiation-induced oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral mucositis caused by radiotherapy is intractable and may worsen the patient's nutritional condition and interrupt treatment. To reduce the incidence and severity of oral mucositis induced by cancer therapy and promote early improvement of its symptoms, we devised cryotherapy by ice balls using Elase (fibrinolysin and deoxyribonuclease, combined). The therapeutic effect of ice-ball cryotherapy was evaluated in 10 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity and pharynx who were undergoing radiotherapy. Cryotherapy was continued from the development of oral mucositis until its disappearance. The severity of various symptoms of mucositis were reduced by cryotherapy. Healing required 3 to 16 days (median, 7 days) after the end of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was not interrupted in any cases. This preliminary report suggests that ice-ball cryotherapy is an effective treatment for radiation-induced oral mucositis. (author)

  19. Pilot study of ice-ball cryotherapy for radiation-induced oral mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyama, Waichiro; Ebihara, Satoshi [National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-02-01

    Oral mucositis caused by radiotherapy is intractable and may worsen the patient`s nutritional condition and interrupt treatment. To reduce the incidence and severity of oral mucositis induced by cancer therapy and promote early improvement of its symptoms, we devised cryotherapy by ice balls using Elase (fibrinolysin and deoxyribonuclease, combined). The therapeutic effect of ice-ball cryotherapy was evaluated in 10 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity and pharynx who were undergoing radiotherapy. Cryotherapy was continued from the development of oral mucositis until its disappearance. The severity of various symptoms of mucositis were reduced by cryotherapy. Healing required 3 to 16 days (median, 7 days) after the end of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was not interrupted in any cases. This preliminary report suggests that ice-ball cryotherapy is an effective treatment for radiation-induced oral mucositis. (author).

  20. The role of sucralfate oral suspension in prevention of radiation induced mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Emami

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Mucositis is one of the most common complications of radiotherapy in head and neck cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate sucralfate mouthwash in prevention of radiation induced mucositis.
    • METHODS: A clinical randomized trial performed on 52 patients with head and neck cancers in Sayyed-Al-Shohada Hospital of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. These patients randomly assigned in 2 groups of 26 patients. Placebo and sucralfate was used for control and experimental patients respectiv ly, from the beginning of radiotherapy. Patients were visited weekly until the end of treatment. Grade of the mucositis was evaluated according to WHO grading scale.
    • RESULTS: Sucralfate significantly reduced the mean grade of mucositis in weeks one to four (with P-values of 0.02, 0.02, 0.001 and 0.004, respectively. Development of grade3 mucositis was also lower in sucralfate group (P-value = 0.0001. But, time interval between radiotherapy and appearance of mucositis was not statistically different in the two groups (P-value = 0.9
    • CONCLUSIONS: This study indicated that using oral suspension of sucralfate reduced the grade of radiation-induced mucositis, but did not prevent or delay it.
    • KEYWORDS: Mucositis, radiotherapy, sucralfate, head and neck cancers.

  1. Oral mucositis induced by anticancer treatments: physiopathology and treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Lionel, D'Hondt; Christophe, Lonchay; Marc, André; Jean-Luc, Canon

    2006-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a frequent and devastating side effect of anticancer treatments. It impairs the patient's quality of life and also can be life threatening because severe infections and delayed or incomplete anticancer treatments may result. This problem has been largely overlooked and underestimated in the past. However, recently studies have been performed to precisely identify the epidemiology, cost, consequences, physiopathology, and treatments of oral mucositis. Clinical guidelines have...

  2. Interleukin-17-dependent CXCL-13 mediates mucosal vaccine-induced immunity against tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gopal, Radha; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Slight, Samantha; Lin, Yinyao; Nawar, Hesham F.; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Reinhart, Todd A.; Kolls, Jay; Randall, Troy D.; Connell, Terry D.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2013-01-01

    The variable efficacy of tuberculosis (TB) vaccines and the emergence of drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) emphasize the urgency for not only generating new and more effective vaccines against TB, but also understanding the underlying mechanisms that mediate vaccine-induced protection. We demonstrate that mucosal adjuvants, such as type II heat labile enterotoxin (LT-IIb), delivered through the mucosal route induce pulmonary Mtb-specific T helper 17 (Th17) responses a...

  3. Clinical, biological, histological features and treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oral mucositis is a main side effect of radiotherapy on head and neck, initiating two weeks after the beginning of the treatment. It is characterized by sensation of local burning to intense pain, leading in several cases, to the interruption of the treatment. The purpose of this work is to review the main published studies that discuss the clinical, biological and histopathological features of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and to describe the main approaches recommended to prevent or to treat it. Although the clinical features of mucositis are intensively described in the literature, few studies address the histopathological alterations in oral mucositis and only recently, its biological processes have been investigated. The biological mechanisms involved in the radiation tissue damage have been only recently discussed and there is no consensus among treatment modalities. Yet, the progressive knowledge in the histopathology and biological characteristics of oral mucositis probably will lead to more effective in prevention and control strategies. (author)

  4. Can prophylactic application of immunoglobulin decrease radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mose, S; Adamietz, I A; Saran, F; Thilmann, C; Heyd, R; Knecht, R; Böttcher, H D

    1997-08-01

    Therapeutic application of immunoglobulin is reported to be successful in radiation-induced oral and oropharyngeal mucositis. In this study the efficacy of prophylactic application of immunoglobulin was investigated. In 42 patients with head and neck cancer, postoperative radiation treatment or radiation combined with chemotherapy was performed. In 20 consecutive patients, prophylactic mucositis treatment consisted of panthenol (4 x 10 ml/day) and nystatin (4 x 1 ml/day). The 22 following patients received, supplementary to panthenol and nystatin, 800 mg (5 ml) human immunoglobulin intramuscularly once weekly. During the treatment time, the degree of mucositis was examined 3 times a week. The distribution of maximal mucositis degree revealed slightly more severe mucous membrane reaction in the control group compared with the immunoglobulin group (n.s.). The analysis of mean mucositis degrees in both groups demonstrated statistically significant differences (t test, p = 0.031) related to the entire group (n = 42) and to those 16 patients receiving radiation combined with chemotherapy. There was no significant immunoglobulin-induced effect on mucositis in patients treated by radiation alone. The time from the beginning of therapy to the first interruption could be prolonged 5 days in the immunoglobulin group (n.s.). In conclusion, it is demonstrated that the prophylactic application of immunoglobulin seems to lower the degree of radiation-induced mucositis. In comparison to the published data about therapeutically given immunoglobulin, the clinical efficacy of the prophylactic application of immunoglobulin as it is performed in this study is less evident. PMID:9256900

  5. Search for compounds for prevention and treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the clinical setting, the frequency of adverse effects is directly linked to the results of treatment. However, in the case of head and neck radiotherapy for cancer, adverse effects are unavoidable and among them, oral mucositis is considered to be the most significant and debilitating acute complication associated with such radiation therapy. In patients receiving head and neck radiotherapy, the prevalence of mucositis is 85-100% and mucositis-associated pain is the main type of cancer treatment-related pain. A mouthwash or iceball containing sodium alginate, sodium azulene sulfonate and fibrinolysin deoxyribonuclease is widely used for the prevention and treatment of mucositis. In the USA, many strategies for the prevention of oral mucositis have been evaluated, but conflicting data has made the results inconclusive. Keratinocyte Growth Factor 1 (KGF1) has achieved promising results in therapy and is the only medication currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), though in Japan, it is not covered by the National Health Insurance scheme. Therefore, we feel it is important to establish useful strategies for the prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced mucositis based on significant scientific evidence. As oxidative stress is associated with radiation-induced mucositis, in this study, we used 60Co-γray-induced HO-1-N-1 cell injury to studying the characteristics of mucositis in this regard and found that two well-known antioxidants, N-Acetyl-L-cysteine and catechins, had preventive effects against γray-induced cytotoxicity. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine and catechins would therefore be good materials for the prevention of mucositis in patients undergoing cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  6. Effects of Probiotic Lactobacillus Casei DN-114 001 in Prevention of Radiation-Induced Diarrhea: Results From Multicenter, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Nutritional Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether a probiotic drink containing Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 reduces the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea in patients with gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy (45-50 Gy, conventional fractionation) for either cervical carcinoma (radiotherapy and weekly cisplatin) or endometrial adenocarcinoma (postoperative radiotherapy) were randomly assigned to a probiotic drink or placebo, in a double-blind fashion. The probiotic drink consisted of liquid yogurt containing L. casei DN-114 001 at 108 CFU/g. The patients recorded the daily the number of bowel movements and scored the stool consistency using the Bristol scale. Diarrhea was graded weekly according the Common Toxicity Criteria system. The primary endpoint was to reduce the incidence of diarrhea, defined by a Common Toxicity Criteria Grade of 2 or greater or the need for loperamide. Results: A total of 85 patients were enrolled. Grade 2 or greater diarrhea and/or the use of loperamide was observed in 24 of 41 patients in the placebo group and 30 of 44 in the probiotic group (p = 0.568). No differences were found in the median time to the presentation of the primary endpoint. Probiotic intervention had a significant effect on stool consistency (p = 0.04). The median time for patients to present with Bristol scale stools of Type 6 or greater was 14 days for patients receiving the probiotic drink vs. 10 days for those receiving placebo. Conclusion: Nutritional intervention with the probiotic drink containing L. casei DN-114 001 does not reduce the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea as defined by a Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 2 or greater. However, it had a significant effect on stool consistency as measured by the Bristol scale

  7. ٍEvaluating Baremoom Mouthwash Efficacy in Treatment of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Akhavan Karbasi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis is regarded as a painful and discomforting chemotherapy complication , affecting patient’s quality of life and endurance to continue the treatment. Hence, treatment of mucositis is of great significance. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of Baremoom mouthwash in treatment of chemotherapy-induced mucositis . Methods: This interventional double-blinded randomized clinical trial study was performed on 40 adult patients under chemotherapy in blood and oncology department of Shahid Sadouqhi hospital. The total of 40 patients were randomly divided into two groups: an experimental baremoom group and a control placebo group each containing 20 subjects. Baremoom mouthwash (30% extract, Soren Tektoos, Mashhad and placebo mouthwash ( Sterile water with allowable additives ,Soren Tektoos, Mashhad with same apparent properties were given to the patients (3 times a day for 7 days after mucositis detection. The patients were evaluated in regard with mucositis grade (0-4 WHO and wounds extension on 1th , 3th and 7th days after the study begining. In order to statistically analyze the collected data, Freidman, Mann–Whitney, and wilcoxon W tests were applied utilizing SPSS software (ver, 17. Results: On 3rd  and 7th  days, mean degree of wound extension and mucositis were demonstrated to be significantly different between the two groups. According to Friedman test, both experimental and control groups revealed a significant difference in regard with wound extension and mucositis grade within the three time periods. Conclusion: The study findings indicated that Baremoom mouthwash was more effective in chemotherapy- induced mucositis than placebo. Hence, this agent can be recommended as an appropriate medicine in order to eliminate mucositis symtoms and decrease oral ulcers.

  8. Preventive and therapeutic effects of Smad7 on radiation-induced oral mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Gangwen; Bian, Li; Li, Fulun; Cotrim, Ana; Wang, Donna; Lu, Jian Bo; Deng, Yu; Bird, Gregory; Sowers, Anastasia; Mitchell, James B.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Zhao, Rui; Raben, David; Dijke, Peter ten; Refaeli, Yosef

    2013-01-01

    We report that K5.Smad7 mice, which express Smad7 transgene by a keratin-5 promoter, were resistant to radiation-induced oral mucositis, a painful oral ulceration. In addition to NF-κB activation known to contribute to oral mucositis, we found activated TGF-β signaling in oral mucositis. Smad7 dampened both pathways to attenuate inflammation, growth inhibition and apoptosis. Additionally, Smad7 promoted oral epithelial migration to close the wound. Further analyses revealed that TGF-β signali...

  9. Investigation of how to prevent mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer is associated with a high incidence of severe oral mucositis; an adverse, painful event. Oral mucositis also causes nutritional deficiency by making oral feeding difficult. This may lead to prolongation of hospitalization due to complications caused by malnutrition. However, an effective way to prevent oral mucositis completely, remains to be found. In this study, we evaluated the occurrence of oral mucositis, and nutritional conditions such as hypoalbuminemia, reduction of body weight, and length of hospital stay (days) when the mouth was rinsed using rebamipide solution (R solution), or Poraprezinc-alginate sodium solution (P-A solution) (both considered to be effective for oral mucositis). A mouth rinsed with sodium azulene sulfonate (S solution) was used as a control. The mouth was rinsed out six times per day continuously during chemoradiotherapy. In the study, 31 patients were assigned to rinse their mouths using R solution, 11 patients using P-A solution, and 15 patients using S solution (reduction rate of body weight in 14 patients). For the evaluation, the criteria for adverse drug reactions CTCAE (v3.0) were used. Grade 1 and over, oral mucositis occurred in 48% of the R solution group, 36% of the P-A solution group, and 80% of the S solution group, indicating that the P-A solution group significantly prevented the occurrence of oral mucositis as opposed to the S solution group. A reduction in body weight was observed in 81% of the R solution group, 82% of the P-A solution group, and 79% of the S solution group, indicating a similar weight reduction rate among individual solution groups. Hypoalbuminemia equal to grade 2 or higher occurred in 3% of the R solution group, 18% of the P-A solution group, and 29% of the S solution group, indicating that the R group significantly prevented the occurrence of hypoalbuminemia compared to the S solution group. In addition, the length of hospital stays were 44±8.0 days for

  10. A survey of chinese medicinal herbal treatment for chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Sven Schröder; Matthias Rostock; Henry Johannes Greten; Thomas Efferth; Janine Radtke; Gesa Meyer-Hamme; Kathrin Beckmann

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the common side effects of chemotherapy treatment with potentially severe implications. Despite several treatment approaches by conventional and complementary western medicine, the therapeutic outcome is often not satisfactory. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) offers empirical herbal formulas for the treatment of oral ulceration which are used in adaptation to chemotherapy-induced mucositis. While standard concepts for TCM treatment do not exist and acceptance by co...

  11. Efficacy of topical phenytoin on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis; a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    M Baharvand; Sarrafi, M.; Alavi, K.; Jalali Moghaddam, E.

    2010-01-01

    "nBackground and the Purpose of the Study: Oral mucositis is one of the most common complications of malignancy chemotherapy. As yet, no absolute treatment has been demonstrated to be effective for chemotherapy- induced oral mucositis. This study evaluates the effectiveness of phenytoin mouthwash as a wound healing agent, on the basis of stimulating effects on fibroblast proliferation. "nMaterials and Methods: In this multicenter, randomized, placebo- controlled clinical trial; twel...

  12. The role of sucralfate oral suspension in prevention of radiation induced mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Emami; Mahshid Jalilian; Arash Parvizi

    2008-01-01

    • BACKGROUND: Mucositis is one of the most common complications of radiotherapy in head and neck cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate sucralfate mouthwash in prevention of radiation induced mucositis.
    • METHODS: A clinical randomized trial performed on 52 patients with head and neck cancers in Sayyed-Al-Shohada Hospital of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. These patients randomly as...

    • Polaprezinc reduces the severity of radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients

      OpenAIRE

      Doi, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hitomi; Niwa, Yasue; Nakayama, Masahiro; SHIKATA, TOSHIYUKI; Odawara, Soichi; Takada, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Takeshi; KAMIKONYA, NORIHIKO; Hirota, Shozo

      2014-01-01

      Polaprezinc (PZ), an antiulcer drug, has been reported to have antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of administering PZ for radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Patients with newly diagnosed head and neck cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. PZ was prepared as an oral rinse. The PZ oral rinse was used four times per day during the course of radiotherapy. Sequential changes in radiation mucositis wer...

    • Effect of minimal enteral feeding on recovery in a methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis rat model

      OpenAIRE

      Kuiken, Nicoline S. S.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Havinga, Rick; Albert K Groen; Tissing, Wim J. E.

      2015-01-01

      Purpose Patients suffering from gastrointestinal mucositis often receive parenteral nutrition as nutritional support. However, the absence of enteral nutrition might not be beneficial for the intestine. We aimed to determine the feasibility of minimal enteral feeding (MEF) administration in a methotrexate (MTX)-induced mucositis rat model and thereby determine the effect of MEF on recovery. Methods Male Wistar rats were attached to swivel systems from day 1 to 5 after 45 mg/kg MTX IV injectio...

    • Effect of glutathione on gastric mucosal lesion induced by restraint water-immersion in rats

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      Jun Li Wan; Chang Liu Wang

      2000-01-01

      AIM To determine the effect of glutathione (GSH) on stress gastric mucosal lesion.METHODS The stress gastric mucosal lesion as produced by restraint water-immersion in rats and gastricmucosal lesion, gastric mucosal GSH content, gastric acid secretion and gastric barrier mucus secretion wereexamined. We also observed the effect of GSH on gastric mucosal lesion and the effect of N-ethylmaleimine(NEM) and indomethacin on GSH protection. Comparisons between two groups were made using the Students t test.RESULTS GSH (100 and 200 mg/kg) intraperitoneally protected against stress gastric mucosal lesion(P0.05). The preinjection of NEM (10 mg/kg, sc.), a sulfhydryl-blocking reagent, or indomethacin(5 mg/kg, im.), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, had no effect on protection of GSH (P>0.05). GSH(100mg/kg) significantly increased secretion of gastric barrier mucus (P0.05).CONCLUSION GSH can inhibit the formation of gastric mucosal lesions induced by restraint water-immersion. The protective effect of GSH was due, in part, to promoting the secretion of gastric barriermucus, but not to suppress the gastric acid secretion. The protection effect of GSH has no relation withgastric mucosal GSH and PGs.

    • Development of an Escherichia coli-Lactobacillus casei shuttle vector for heterologous protein expression in Lactobacillus casei.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Suebwongsa, Namfon; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Mayo, Baltasar; Yotpanya, Panjamaporn; Panya, Marutpong

      2016-01-01

      There is an increasing interest to develop various lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species as mucosal delivery vehicles, for which the development of a variety of cloning and expression systems for these bacteria is of primary importance. This study reports the complete nucleotide sequence of the cryptic plasmid pRCEID7.6 derived from the chicken probiotic LAB strain Lactobacillus casei TISTR1341. Sequence analysis and comparison showed that pRCEID7.6 is composed of nine putative open reading frames. The replicon origin of pRCEID7.6 consisted of untranslated origin of replication and translated replication protein B sequences. This region was used to construct Escherichia coli/L. casei shuttle vectors carrying erythromycin and chloramphenicol resistance genes as selective markers. Segregation and structural stability of the vectors in L. casei was sufficient for most genetic applications. The feasibility of this vector for heterologous protein expression in L. casei was determined by cloning in pRCEID-LC7.6, the gene encoding the nucleocapsid protein (NP), from the influenza A virus under the control of the homologous promoter from the lactate dehydrogenase gene. L. casei carrying this recombinant plasmid was shown to successfully express the NP protein. Therefore, this shuttle vector can be used for further study in the development of mucosal delivery vehicles. PMID:27026866

    • Hwangryun-Haedok-Tang Fermented with Lactobacillus casei Suppresses Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Ki-Shuk Shim

      2012-01-01

      Full Text Available Hwangryun-haedok-tang (HRT is the common recipe in traditional Asian medicine, and microbial fermentation is used for the conventional methods for processing traditional medicine. We investigated the inhibitory effect of the n-butanol fraction of HRT (HRT-BU and fHRT (fHRT-BU on the RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in bone-marrow-derived macrophages. mRNA expression of osteoclastogenesis-related genes were evaluated by real-time QPCR. The activation of signaling pathways was determined by western blot analysis. The marker compounds of HRT-BU and fHRT-BU were analyzed by HPLC. The inhibitory effect of HRT or fHRT on ovariectomy-induced bone loss were evaluated using OVX rats with orally administered HRT, fHRT (300, 1000 mg/kg, or its vehicle for 12 weeks. fHRT-BU significantly inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis, and phosphorylation of p38, IKKα/β, and NF-κBp65 compared to HRT-BU. In addition, fHRT-BU also significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of Nfκb2, TNF-α, NFATc1, TRAP, ATPv0d2, and cathepsin K. Furthermore, administration of fHRT had a greater effect on the increase of BMD, and greater improved bone microstructure of the femora than that of HRT in ovariectomy rats. This study demonstrated that bacterial fermentation enhances the inhibitory effect of HRT on osteoclastogenesis and bone loss. These results suggest that fermented HRT might have the beneficial effects on bone disease by inhibiting osteoclastogenesis.

    • Effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: A randomized clinical trial

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Satheeshkumar P

      2010-01-01

      Full Text Available Introduction: Oral care in cancer patients is an important aspect in the quality of life of patients undergoing cancer therpay. Mucositis, trismus, salivary gland dysfunction are the main complications of the cancer therapy, which lead to long-term comlications such as radiation caries, poor oral hygiene and osteoradionecrosis. A timely oral evaluation and intervention in these patients can reduce the severity of the potential complications. Triclosan is an antibacterial agent widely used in periodontal therapy, the effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation induced oral mucositis is evaluated here. Aims: 1 To determine the effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis. 2 To compare the effectiveness of triclosan mouth rinse with conventional sodium bicarbonate mouth rinse. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four patients who underwent radiation therapy for oral cancer and subsequently developed oral mucositis were included in the study. They were randomly allocated into two groups on noticing grade I mucositis (erythema. The study group was advised to use triclosan mouthwash containing triclosan 0.03% W/V and sodium bicarbonate 2 mg mouth wash for the control group. A weekly follow-up evaluation of body weight, food intake, pain and grading of mucositis were made during the radiation treatment period and post radiation treatment period. Results: Both the groups were statistically identical. All the 24 patients in both the groups passed through grade 3 mucositis on the last day of radiotherapy. However, 10 patients in the control group and only one patient in the study group entered to grade 4 mucositis. A definite change was noticed in the severity of the mucositis, food intake and weight loss. The control group took more than 45 days to resolve while the study group took only less than 28 days. Discussion: The results of the study were evaluated and tried to formulate a hypothesis so as to explain

    • Treatment of radiation-induced acute oral mucositis in a rat model

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      The stem cells of the epithelial lining of the oral mucosa are non-specifically affected by many anti-cancer agents including radiation. Radiation-induced mucositis of upper aerodigestive tract is a major dose-limiting factor in the treatment of head and neck tumours. A new non-toxic drug (Compound A) consisting of Curcumin, -tocopherol and sun flower oil (SFO) was developed and its efficacy was tested in the treatment of radiation-induced normal tissue lesions. Mature (12 weeks old; 200-225g) female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in compliance with the Animal (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. While under anaesthesia the animals tongue was slightly extended outside and a region of the underside of the tongue was irradiated in-situ with single doses of 2.27 MeV -rays from a 5mm diameter 90Sr/90Y plaque. The dose-rate of the source was ∼10Gy/min at the surface of the mucus membrane. Irradiations and subsequent assessment of the lesion were carried out under general anesthesia maintained by a 1.5% Halothane, oxygen mixture. Four groups of 36 animals were irradiated with single doses of either 13.5, 15, 16.5 or 18 Gy. Following irradiation the animals in each dose group were subdivided into four treatment subgroups of 9 rats to receive 0.5 ml per day of either Compound A, SFO, -tocopherol or water by oral gavage until the end of experiments. Nine animals were used at each dose point in each treatment group. Mucosal ulceration (erosion of mucosal epithelium) was considered as an end-point and this is referred by radiation-induced mucositis in the context of present experiments. From the day after irradiation until any acute radiation-induced oral mucosal lesion had healed the animals tongue were assessed daily for the presence of radiation-induced mucositis (mucosal ulceration). Quantal data for the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis were analysed using logit analysis and dose modification factor (DMF) was obtained. There was a modest increase in the ED50 values

    • Dietary L-arginine supplementation reduces Methotrexate-induced intestinal mucosal injury in rat

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Koppelmann Tal

      2012-04-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginine (ARG and nitric oxide maintain the mucosal integrity of the intestine in various intestinal disorders. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of oral ARG supplementation on intestinal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis following methotrexate (MTX-induced intestinal damage in a rat. Methods Male rats were divided into four experimental groups: Control rats, CONTR-ARG rats, were treated with oral ARG given in drinking water 72 hours before and 72 hours following vehicle injection, MTX rats were treated with a single dose of methotrexate, and MTX-ARG rats were treated with oral ARG following injection of MTX. Intestinal mucosal damage, mucosal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and enterocyte apoptosis were determined 72 hours following MTX injection. RT-PCR was used to determine bax and bcl-2 mRNA expression. Results MTX-ARG rats demonstrated greater jejunal and ileal bowel weight, greater ileal mucosal weight, greater ileal mucosal DNA and protein levels, greater villus height in jejunum and ileum and crypt depth in ileum, compared to MTX animals. A significant decrease in enterocyte apoptosis in the ileum of MTX-ARG rats (vs MTX was accompanied by decreased bax mRNA and protein expression and increased bcl-2 protein levels. Conclusions Treatment with oral ARG prevents mucosal injury and improves intestinal recovery following MTX- injury in the rat.

  1. Effect of epicatechin against radiation-induced oral mucositis: in vitro and in vivo study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Seob Shin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Radiation-induced oral mucositis limits the delivery of high-dose radiation to head and neck cancer. This study investigated the effectiveness of epicatechin (EC, a component of green tea extracts, on radiation-induced oral mucositis in vitro and in vivo. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The effect of EC on radiation-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed in the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. Radiation-induced apoptosis, change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and changes in the signaling pathway were investigated. In vivo therapeutic effects of EC for oral mucositis were explored in a rat model. Rats were monitored by daily inspections of the oral cavity, amount of oral intake, weight change and survival rate. For histopathologic evaluation, hematoxylin-eosin staining and TUNEL staining were performed. RESULTS: EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis, change of MMP, and intracellular ROS generation in HaCaT cells. EC treatment markedly attenuated the expression of p-JNK, p-38, and cleaved caspase-3 after irradiation in the HaCaT cells. Rats with radiation-induced oral mucositis showed decreased oral intake, weight and survival rate, but oral administration of EC significantly restored all three parameters. Histopathologic changes were significantly decreased in the EC-treated irradiated rats. TUNEL staining of rat oral mucosa revealed that EC treatment significantly decreased radiation-induced apoptotic cells. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in keratinocytes and rat oral mucosa and may be a safe and effective candidate treatment for the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis.

  2. The efficacy of a steroid mixture for chemoradiotherapy-induced acute mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is an important therapeutic tool for malignant tumors in the head and neck and thoracic region. However, radiotherapy has also been known to cause acute mucositis and esophagitis during the early phase of treatment, for which there is no cure to date. A mixture of mucosal protective steroids has been shown to be beneficial in patients with these symptoms receiving radiotherapy alone. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of this agent to treat the mucositis that accompanies chemoradiotherapy. Moreover, the differences between the curative effects were examined retrospectively, according to the region irradiated. Radiotherapy was administered to the head and neck, and thoracic region, and the steroid mixture was prescribed for patients in the radiotherapy alone and chemoradiotherapy groups that exhibited acute radiation-induced mucositis symptoms. We then evaluated daily food consumption, total serum-protein value, serum-albumin value and body weight of the radiation-induced mucositis patients that were treated with the mixture. Moreover, we also examined the efficacy in patients undergoing irradiation of the oral cavity, and of the esophagus (which did not entail irradiation of the oral cavity). Two hundred and fourteen patients treated with the steroid mixture in this study had no treatment-related adverse events. In comparison between the radiotherapy alone and chemoradiotherapy groups, no significant differences were observed for daily food consumption. However, differences were observed for daily food consumption between the groups undergoing irradiation of the oral cavity and irradiation of the esophagus (p=0.0008). In the group experiencing irradiation of the mouth, decreased ability to swallow and digest food associated with the primary disease was also observed. Total serum-protein values, serum-albumin values and body weight exhibited a slight decrease despite the onset of radiation-induced mucositis, compared with the values

  3. Mucosal adaptation to aspirin induced gastric damage in humans. Studies on blood flow, gastric mucosal growth, and neutrophil activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Konturek, J W; Dembinski, A; Stoll, R.; Domschke, W; Konturek, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    The gastropathy associated with the ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin is a common side effect of this class of drugs, but the precise mechanisms by which they cause mucosal damage have not been fully explained. During continued use of an injurious substance, such as aspirin, the extent of gastric mucosal damage decreases and this phenomenon is named gastric adaptation. To assess the extent of mucosal damage by aspirin and subsequent adaptation the eff...

  4. Therapeutic management of radiation-induced oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Acute reactions of oral mucosa are a frequent side effect of radiotherapy, which often necessitates interruption of the treatment. Marked proliferation of tumor stem cells during treatment interruptions may occur in squamous cell carcinomata, which represent the majority of tumors in the head and neck area. Hence a fatal consequence of treatment breaks may be a significant decrease in tumor cure rates. Furthermore, marked acute responses frequently result in increased late sequelae ('consequential damage'). Therefore, amelioration of the mucosal response aiming at avoiding treatment breaks and at reduction of late reactions coul definitely increase the therapeutic success of radiation treatment. Results: A variety of prophylactic and therapeutic methods have been proposed for the management of acute radiation reactions of the oral mucosa. Frequently, their efficiacy has been established for chemotherapy or in combination with other immunosuppressive treatments. Hence, systemical rather than local effects have to be considered. Conclusions: In general, prophylaxis of oral mucositis is mainly based on dental restoration or edentation, in combination with frequent oral hygienic measures after the meals and with antiseptic mouthwashes. Intensive personal care is recommended. The necessity of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostoma is dependent on the status of the patient and on size and localization of the treatment area, i.e. the impairment of food uptake which is to be expected. Therapeutic intervention is restricted to local or systemic treatment of pain and local application of antimycotics and antibiotics. (orig./VHE)

  5. Aegle Marmelos Enhances Gastric Mucosal Protection: Relevance for NSAIDS-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, P; Guha, D

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In order to study the gastroprotective effect of Aegle marmelos extract (AM), this study was undertaken on aspirin-induced ulcerogenesis in cannulated free-moving rats. Background: Most of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including aspirin (ASP) cause gastric ulcer. The efficacy of several plants for the treatment of gastroduodenal disease is confirmed by clinical research, while basic scientific research helps us to uncover the mechanisms by which these plants ex...

  6. Clinical effectiveness of Ancer 20 injection for prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although radiotherapy is very useful for treatment of oral cancer, it can cause radiation-induced oral mucositis as a troublesome side effect. Ancer 20 injection is useful for enhancing macrophage function, and apart from its inductive effect on IL-3, it also enhances G-CSF production. Therefore, Ancer 20 injection might also prevent mucositis. This effect was tested by administering the drug to prevent oral mucositis during radiotherapy. Eleven patients (5 males and 6 females, aged 39 to 84 yr, mean 64.5 yr) with squamous cell carcinoma were examined. Radiation was applied externally with a linear accelerator up to a total dose of 20-70 Gy, mean 38.2 Gy. All patients received a small dose of cisplatin concomitantly. Ancer 20 injection 1 ml twice weekly was administered subcutaneously. There was almost no objective or subjective abnormality up to a dose of 30 Gy, and at doses higher than that, the symptoms were mild in comparison with general mucosal reactions. This showed that Ancer 20 injection is useful for prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis during radiotherapy of oral cancer. (author)

  7. Effectivity of 0.15% benzydamine on radiation-induced oral mucositis in nasopharynx carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remita Adya Prasetyo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nasopharynx carcinoma is the most common malignant tumour in head and neck region. Radiotherapy is the first choice of treatment for nasopharynx carcinoma that had not been metastases. The most common oral complications in radiotherapy is mucositis (± 80%. 0.15% benzydamine hydrochloride (HCl oral rinse can be used to prevent radiation-induced oral mucositis. Purpose: The aim of this research was to study the effectivity of 0.15% benzydamine HCl oral rinse for prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis in nasopharynx carcinoma. Methods: Samples were divided into 2 groups. Group A was using 0.15% benzydamine HCl oral rinse for 10 days. Group B was using placebo oral rinse for 10 days. Evaluation was conducted 3 times: first day, fifth day and tenth day of radiotherapy. The scoring used Spijkervet’s mucositis α score. Results: Independent t test analysis for initial occurrence of oral mucositis showed no significant difference between 2 groups. Paired t test analysis showed significant difference between initial mucositis α score and mucositis α score in tenth day in each group. Independent t test analysis showed no significant difference in mucositis α score in tenth day between 2 groups. Conclusion: In conclusion 0.15% benzydamine HCl oral rinse was not effective to prevent radiation-induced oral mucositis in nasopharynx carcinoma.Latar belakang: Karsinoma nasofaring (KNF merupakan tumor ganas terbanyak di daerah kepala-leher. Radioterapi merupakan terapi pilihan utama KNF yang belum mempunyai metastasis jauh. Komplikasi akibat radioterapi dalam rongga mulut yang terbanyak adalah mukositis (± 80%. Salah satu obat untuk pencegahan mukositis akibat radioterapi adalah benzydamine hydrochloride (HCl 0,15%. Tujuan: Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mempelajari efektivitas penggunaan obat kumur benzydamine HCl 0,15% sebagai pencegah mukositis akibat radioterapi pada karsinoma nasofaring. Metode: Sampel dibagi ke dalam 2

  8. Oral glutamine to alleviate radiation-induced oral mucositis: a pilot randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of oral glutamine on radiation-induced oral mucositis in the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From July 1997 through June 1998, 17 patients with head and neck cancer receiving primary or adjuvant irradiation were randomized to either glutamine suspension (16 g in 240 ml normal saline) (n = 8) or placebo (normal saline) (n = 9) arm. Patients were instructed to swish the test solutions (30 ml) four times per day. All patients received half-mouth irradiation at least. Patients were treated 1.8 Gy per fraction daily, 5 days a week. We evaluated the grading of oral mucositis daily fraction at each day of treatment until 45 Gy/25 fractions. World Health Organization (WHO) step analgesic medication and body weight change were compared between the two arms. Results: The duration of objective oral mucositis ≥ Grade 1 (p 0.0097), Grade 2 (p = 0.0232), and Grade 3 (p = 0.0168) was shorter in the glutamine arm. Mean maximum grade of objective oral mucositis was less severe in the glutamine arm (1.6 vs. 2.6) (p = 0.0058). Glutamine did not reduce the duration and severity of subjective oral mucositis except for duration ≥ Grade 3 (p = 0.0386). In the analysis of mean maximum WHO step of analgesic medication, there was no statistical difference (p = 0.5374) between the two arms. Mean body weight change was also not significantly different (p 0.8070). Conclusions: Oral glutamine may significantly reduce the duration and severity of objective oral mucositis during radiotherapy. It may shorten the duration of ≥ Grade 3 subjective mucositis

  9. Lactose maldigestion during methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijlstra, M.; Rings, E. H. H. M.; Verkade, H. J.; van Dijk, T. H.; Kamps, W. A.; Tissing, W. J. E.

    2011-01-01

    Fijlstra M, Rings EH, Verkade HJ, van Dijk TH, Kamps WA, Tissing WJ. Lactose maldigestion during methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in a rat model. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 300: G283-G291, 2011. First published November 18, 2010; doi:10.1152/ajpgi.00462.2010.-Patients wit

  10. Serum amyloid P ameliorates radiation-induced oral mucositis and fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Lynne A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the effect of the anti-fibrotic protein serum amyloid P (SAP on radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM and fibrosis in a hamster cheek-pouch model. Experimental Design Hamsters received a single dose of radiation (40 Gy to the left everted cheek pouch to induce significant OM. The protective therapeutic potential of SAP was evaluated using varying dosing regimens. The extent of OM was measured using a validated six-point scoring scheme ranging from 0 (normal tissue, no mucositis to 5 (complete ulceration. Fibrotic remodeling was also visualized histologically and quantified at later time points using collagen gene expression. Results SAP treatment attenuated the profile of radiation-induced oral mucositis by delaying the time of onset, reducing the peak value, and enhancing the resolution of injury. The peak mucositis score was reduced by approximately 0.5 grade in SAP-treated animals. The number of animal days with a score of ≥ 3 was reduced by 48% in the SAP-treated group, compared with the saline control group (P Conclusions SAP treatment significantly attenuated radiation-induced injury. In particular, SAP attenuated the severity of OM and inhibited pathogenic remodeling. This suggests that SAP may be a useful therapy for the palliation of side effects observed during treatment for head and neck cancer.

  11. Alteration of the Redox State with Reactive Oxygen Species for 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis in Hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshino, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Nakajima, Atsushi; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral muc...

  12. Efficacy of topical phenytoin on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis; a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Baharvand

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and the Purpose of the Study: Oral mucositis is one of the most common complications of malignancy chemotherapy. As yet, no absolute treatment has been demonstrated to be effective for chemotherapy- induced oral mucositis. This study evaluates the effectiveness of phenytoin mouthwash as a wound healing agent, on the basis of stimulating effects on fibroblast proliferation. "nMaterials and Methods: In this multicenter, randomized, placebo- controlled clinical trial; twelve patients received phenytoin mouthwash (0.5% or placebo for about two weeks. Oral pain severity was scored on the daily basis using a VAS (visual analogue scale of 10 centimeters. National Cancer Institute (NCI scale was used to grade the intensity of mucositis. To determine the effect of treatment, a quality of life questionnaire, consisting of 35 queries, was filled out for all patients. Statistical analyses of data was performed using Mann- Whitney test. "nResults: The average time for complete remission of mucositis in phenytoin- treated group was less than that of the placebo group. The quality of life improved dramatically in the phenytoin group with the healing process being more evident in the first week. Furthermore, reduction in the wound area was greater in the phenytoin group than controls at the end of the first week of treatment. Both groups eventually demonstrated reduction in pain intensity; however no statistically significant difference was observed between two groups. "nConclusion: Phenytoin mouthwash accelerated wound healing and resolution of mucositis and improved life quality impressively.

  13. Host immunity in the protective response to nasal immunization with a pneumococcal antigen associated to live and heat-killed Lactobacillus casei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vintiñi Elisa O

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, available pneumococcal vaccines have failed to eradicate infections caused by S. pneumoniae. Search for effective vaccine continues and some serotype independent pneumococcal proteins are considered as candidates for the design of new vaccines, especially a mucosal vaccine, since pneumococci enter the body through mucosal surfaces. Selection of the appropriate adjuvant is important for mucosal vaccines, and lactic acid bacteria (LAB with immunostimulant properties are promissory candidates. In this work, we assessed the adjuvant effect of a probiotic strain, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei, when nasally administered with a pneumococcal antigen (pneumococcal protective protein A: PppA for the prevention of pneumococcal infection. Adjuvanticity of both live (LcV and heat-killed (LcM was evaluated and humoral and cellular antigen-specific immune response was assessed in mucosal and systemic compartments. The potential mechanisms induced by nasal immunization were discussed. Results Nasal immunization of young mice with PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM induced anti-PppA IgA and IgG antibodies in mucosal and systemic compartments and levels of these specific antibodies remained high even at day 45 after the 3rd Immunization (3rd I. These results were correlated with IL-4 induction by the mixture of antigen plus LcV and LcM. Also, PppA+Lc (V and M induced stimulation of Th1 and Th17 cells involved in the defence against pneumococci. The protection against pneumococcal respiratory challenge at day 30 after the 3rd I showed that PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM immunizations significantly reduced pathogen counts in nasal lavages while prventing their passage into lung and blood. Survival of mice immunized with the co-application of PppA plus LcV and LcM was significantly higher than in mice immunized with PppA alone and control mice when intraperitoneal challenge was performed. No significant differences between the treatments involving LcV and

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines: Important Immunoregulatory Factors Contributing to Chemotherapy-Induced Gastrointestinal Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masooma Sultani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available “Mucositis” is the clinical term used to describe ulceration and damage of the mucous membranes of the entire gastrointestinal tract (GIT following cytotoxic cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy common symptoms include abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhoea, vomiting, and constipation resulting in both a significant clinical and financial burden. Chemotherapeutic drugs cause upregulation of stress response genes including NFκB, that in turn upregulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. These proinflammatory cytokines are responsible for initiating inflammation in response to tissue injury. Anti-inflammatory cytokines and specific cytokine inhibitors are also released to limit the sustained or excessive inflammatory reactions. In the past decade, intensive research has determined the role of proinflammatory cytokines in development of mucositis. However, a large gap remains in the knowledge of the role of anti-inflammatory cytokines in the setting of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This critical paper will highlight current literature available relating to what is known regarding the development of mucositis, including the molecular mechanisms involved in inducing inflammation particularly with respect to the role of proinflammatory cytokines, as well as provide a detailed discussion of why it is essential to consider extensive research in the role of anti-inflammatory cytokines in chemotherapy-induced mucositis so that effective targeted treatment strategies can be developed.

  15. Oral Candida as an aggravating factor of mucositis Induced by radiotherapy; Candida Oral como fator agravante da mucosite radioinduzida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoes, Cristiane Araujo; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de; Cazal, Claudia [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de odontologia

    2011-07-01

    Antineoplastic treatment induces some undesirable consequences in head and neck cancer patients. Often, the emergence of major clinical manifestations, such as oral mucositis, results in temporary interruption of the treatment, decreasing the patients' quality of life, and increasing hospital costs. Radio-induced or chemo-induced oral mucositis is possibly aggravated by opportunist fungal infections, which turn the mucositis more resistant to the conventional treatments. Objective: this study aims to identify the presence of Candida sp. as a possible aggravating factor of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer under antineoplastic treatment. Method: all patients with radio- or chemo-induced oral mucositis from the Cancer Hospital of Pernambuco, treated between October 2008 and April 2009, were selected for the study. The prevalence of Candida sp was measured through the cytological analysis of oral mucosa in patients with oral mucositis. The fungal presence was correlated with the mucositis severity. Results: the results showed a positive association between fungal colonization and more several lesions (degrees III and IV of mucositis). Conclusion: The outcomes shown may contribute to a solution for unconventional mucosites, which do not respond to the usual treatment. (author)

  16. S-nitrosoglutathione accelerates recovery from 5-fluorouracil-induced oral mucositis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Adriana Skeff

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mucositis induced by anti-neoplastic drugs is an important, dose-limiting and costly side-effect of cancer therapy. AIM: To evaluate the effect of the topical application of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, a nitric oxide donor, on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-induced oral mucositis in hamsters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Oral mucositis was induced in male hamsters by two intraperitoneal administrations of 5-FU on the first and second days of the experiment (60 and 40 mg/kg, respectively followed by mechanical trauma on the fourth day. Animals received saline, HPMC or HPMC/GSNO (0.1, 0.5 or 2.0 mM 1 h prior to the 5-FU injection and twice a day for 10 or 14 days. Samples of cheek pouches were harvested for: histopathological analysis, TNF-α and IL-1β levels, immunohistochemical staining for iNOS, TNF-α, IL-1β, Ki67 and TGF-β RII and a TUNEL assay. The presence and levels of 39 bacterial taxa were analyzed using the Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method. The profiles of NO released from the HPMC/GSNO formulations were characterized using chemiluminescence. RESULTS: The HPMC/GSNO formulations were found to provide sustained release of NO for more than 4 h at concentration-dependent rates of 14 to 80 nmol/mL/h. Treatment with HPMC/GSNO (0.5 mM significantly reduced mucosal damage, inflammatory alterations and cell death associated with 5-FU-induced oral mucositis on day 14 but not on day 10. HPMC/GSNO administration also reversed the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on cell proliferation on day 14. In addition, we observed that the chemotherapy significantly increased the levels and/or prevalence of several bacterial species. CONCLUSION: Topical HPMC/GSNO accelerates mucosal recovery, reduces inflammatory parameters, speeds up re-epithelization and decreases levels of periodontopathic species in mucosal ulcers.

  17. Ghrelin may reduce radiation-induced mucositis and anorexia in head-neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Yildiz; Ozel Turkcu, Ummuhani; Hicsonmez, Ayse; Nalca Andrieu, Meltem; Kurtman, Cengiz

    2007-01-01

    Body weight loss is common in cancer patients, and is often associated with poor prognosis, it greatly impairs quality of life (QOL). Radiation therapy (RT) is used in head and neck cancers (HNC) either as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant therapy to surgery. Patients with HNC are most susceptible to malnutrition especially due to anorexia, which is aggravated by RT. Multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-alpha), have been all associated with the development of both anorexia and oral mucositis. Radiation-induced mucositis occurs in almost all patients, who are treated for HNC, it could also cause weight loss. Ghrelin is a novel 28-amino acid peptide, which up-regulates body weight through appetite control, increase food intake, down-regulate energy expenditure and induces adiposity. Furthermore, ghrelin inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha which may cause oral mucositis and aneroxia, which are the results of weight loss. Thus weight loss during RT is an early indicator of nutritional decline, we propose that recombinant ghrelin used prophylactically could be useful as an appetite stimulant; and preventive of mucositis because of its anti-inflammatory effect, it might help patients maintain weight over the course of curative RT of the HNC and can improve specific aspects of QOL. This issue warrants further studies. PMID:17030099

  18. Spatial disturbances in altered mucosal and luminal gut viromes of diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-05-01

    Gut microbial biogeography is a key feature of host-microbe relationships. In gut viral ecology, biogeography and responses to dietary intervention remain poorly understood. Here, we conducted a metagenomic study to determine the composition of the mucosal and luminal viromes of the gut and to evaluate the impact of a Western diet on gut viral ecology. We found that mucosal and luminal viral assemblages comprised predominantly temperate phages. The mucosal virome significantly differed from the luminal virome in low-fat diet-fed lean mice, where spatial variation correlated with bacterial microbiota from the mucosa and lumen. The mucosal and luminal viromes of high-fat, high-sucrose 'Western' diet-fed obese mice were significantly enriched with temperate phages of the Caudovirales order. Interestingly, this community alteration occurred to a greater extent in the mucosa than lumen, leading to loss of spatial differences; however, these changes recovered after switching to a low-fat diet. Temperate phages enriched in the Western diet-induced obese mice were associated with the Bacilli, Negativicutes and Bacteroidia classes and temperate phages from the Bacteroidia class particularly encoded stress and niche-specific functions advantageous to bacterial host adaptation. This study illustrates a biogeographic view of the gut virome and phage-bacterial host connections under the diet-induced microbial dysbiosis. PMID:26690305

  19. Cracking Streptococcus thermophilus to stimulate the growth of the probiotic Lactobacillus casei in co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chengjie; Ma, Aimin; Gong, Guangyu; Liu, Zhenmin; Wu, Zhengjun; Guo, Benheng; Chen, Zhengjun

    2015-10-01

    Lactobacillus casei, a probiotic, and Streptococcus thermophilus, a fast acidifying lactic acid bacterial strain, are both used in the food industry. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between L. casei and S. thermophilus in the presence or absence of S. thermophilus-specific bacteriophage during milk fermentation. The acidification capability of L. casei co-cultured with S. thermophilus was significantly higher than that observed for L. casei or S. thermophilus cultured alone. However, the probiotic content (i.e., L. casei cell viability) was low. The fastest acidification and the highest viable L. casei cell count were observed in co-cultures of L. casei and S. thermophilus with S. thermophilus phage. In these co-cultures, S. thermophilus compensated for the slow acid production of L. casei in the early exponential growth phase. Thereafter, phage-induced lysis of the S. thermophilus cells eliminated the competition for nutrients, allowing L. casei to grow well. Additionally, the ruptured S. thermophilus cells released intracellular factors, which further promoted the growth and function of the probiotic bacteria. Crude cellular extract isolated from S. thermophilus also significantly accelerated the growth and propagation of L. casei, supporting the stimulatory role of the phage on this micro-ecosystem. PMID:26093989

  20. Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Using a Patient-Reported Oral Mucositis Experience Questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Gussgard, Anne Margrete; Hope, Andrew; Jokstad, Asbjørn; Tenenbaum, Howard; Wood, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment of oral mucositis (OM) is challenging. In order to develop and test useful treatment approaches, the development of reliable, reproducible and simpler methods than are currently available for assessment of OM is important. A Patient-Reported Oral Mucositis Symptom (PROMS) scale was assessed in patients with head and neck cancer to determine if the patient-reported OM experience, as determined by using the PROMS scale, correlate with OM assessed by clinician-based scori...

  1. Alteration of the redox state with reactive oxygen species for 5-fluorouracil-induced oral mucositis in hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko Yoshino

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral mucositis using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR technique. An oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with 10% acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch was used. Lipid peroxidation was measured as the level of malondialdehyde determined by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. The rate constants of the signal decay of nitroxyl compounds using in vivo L-band ESR were calculated from the signal decay curves. Firstly, we established the oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch. An increased level of lipid peroxidation in oral mucositis was found by measuring malondialdehyde using isolated hamster cheek pouch ulcer. In addition, as a result of in vivo L-band ESR measurements using our model animals, the decay rate constants of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which is a reagent for detecting the redox balance in tissue, were decreased. These results suggest that a redox imbalance might occur by excessive generation of ROS at an early stage of oral mucositis and the consumption of large quantities of antioxidants including glutathione in the locality of oral mucositis. These findings support the presence of ROS involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis with anti-cancer therapy, and is useful for the development of novel therapies drugs for oral mucositis.

  2. Prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis have still not been fully defined. The current study thus involved a literature search aimed at identifying preventive and therapeutic measures in relation to oral mucositis in patients submitted to radiotherapy, analyzing the level of evidence in the selected studies, identifying which indications for prevention and treatment in the literature pertain to the field of nursing, and critically analyzing the results and their implications for nursing care. This was a systematic literature survey without a meta analysis, consulting the following databases: BIREME, Medline, CancerLit, Scirus, CAPES, Free medical journal, High wire press, SCIELO, and Medscape, from 2000 to 2005. According to observations, nursing care was capable of improving patient's quality of life, promoting education of patients, implementing and supervising oral care programs, and providing guidance on hygiene, prevention, and treatment of oral mucositis, including pain management. However, no Brazilian nursing publications were found on the subject. Research and publications focusing on nursing experience in the prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-related oral mucositis and the implications for patients and nurses are important to provide evidence-based nursing guidelines. (author)

  3. Lack of correlation between fecal blood loss and drug-induced gastric mucosal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedenbro, J.L.; Wetterberg, P.; Vallgren, S.; Bergqvist, L.

    1988-05-01

    Increased fecal blood loss was produced in healthy volunteers by the administration of two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), naproxen or fenflumizole. Basal as well as drug-induced gastrointestinal blood loss was measured using /sup 51/Cr erythrocyte labeling. Median rise in daily fecal blood loss was 432%. All subjects were endoscoped at the initiation and at the completion of the study. Endoscopic findings were assessed quantitatively by two observers in two different ways. All subjects but three had gastric mucosal lesions at follow-up endoscopy. There was a good correlation between the endoscopic assessments but no statistical correlation between the endoscopic assessment and the increase in fecal blood loss. The data suggest that factors other than gastric mucosal lesions have to be taken into account when investigating NSAID-induced gastrointestinal bleeding.

  4. Lack of correlation between fecal blood loss and drug-induced gastric mucosal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased fecal blood loss was produced in healthy volunteers by the administration of two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), naproxen or fenflumizole. Basal as well as drug-induced gastrointestinal blood loss was measured using 51Cr erythrocyte labeling. Median rise in daily fecal blood loss was 432%. All subjects were endoscoped at the initiation and at the completion of the study. Endoscopic findings were assessed quantitatively by two observers in two different ways. All subjects but three had gastric mucosal lesions at follow-up endoscopy. There was a good correlation between the endoscopic assessments but no statistical correlation between the endoscopic assessment and the increase in fecal blood loss. The data suggest that factors other than gastric mucosal lesions have to be taken into account when investigating NSAID-induced gastrointestinal bleeding

  5. Systemic but not mucosal immunity induced by AVA prevents inhalational anthrax

    OpenAIRE

    Klinman, Dennis M.; Currie, Debra; Lee, Gloria; Grippe, Vanessa; Merkel, Tod

    2007-01-01

    Improved vaccines and adjuvants are being developed to reduce the threat posed by a terrorist attack involving aerosolized anthrax spores. Nevertheless, uncertainty persists concerning the relative benefits of inducing mucosal vs systemic immunity to host survival following inhalational exposure to anthrax spores. This work examines the effect of delivering the licensed human vaccine (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed, AVA) combined with a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) adjuvant intraperitoneally or i...

  6. Effect of Oral Cryotherapy on Combination Chemotherapy-induced Oral Mucositis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas Heydari; Hassan Sharifi; Roham Salek

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study assesses the effect of oral cryotherapy on the incidence and severity of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in combined chemotherapy regimens.Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial that enrolled 80 cancer patients. We evaluated the primary oral status of all patients prior to chemotherapy. Patients were divided into two groups, experimental and control. The experimental group was given ice to place in their mouths from 5 min before to 5 min after chemotherapy....

  7. Effects of professional oral health care on reducing the risk of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Yutaka; Sato, Kazumichi; Ikawa, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Yoshifumi; Katakura, Akira; Takayama, Shin; Sato, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent years have seen remarkable progress in cancer therapy, although treatment-induced adverse reactions and complications are not uncommon. Approximately 40 % of patients undergoing chemotherapy for cancer experience adverse reactions in the oral cavity, with nearly half of them developing severe oral mucositis that necessitates postponing therapy and/or changing the drug dosage. The objective of this study was to assess the usefulness of prophylactic professional oral health care ...

  8. Prophylactic bundle for radiation-induced oral mucositis in oral or oropharyngeal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kawashita Y; Hayashida S; Funahara M; Umeda M; Saito T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In order to prevent and treat radiation-induced adverse events, especially oral mucositis, in patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer receiving radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy, a prophylactic bundle, i.e., a set of oral care management procedures, is conducted and assessed. Subjects and methods: The subjects were 30 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity or oropharynx who underwent radiotherapy. The patients received the prophylactic bundle to prevent radiati...

  9. A pilot study of rebamipide-gargle for chemoradiotherapy-induced mucositis in oral cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy is one of the serious side effects of cancer therapy for oral cancer. It is caused by toxic free radicals (activated oxygen) produced by these therapeutic modalities. Rebamipide is a novel anti-ulcer drug which possesses various cytoprotective activities such as free radical scavenging, induction of prostaglandin-E and acceleration of ulcer healing. We report the results of a pilot study on rebamipide-gargle for inhibition of mucositis induced by chemo-radiotherapy. The present study was conducted on 13 patients (7 men and 6 women; age range 53-88) with oral cancer. They received radiotherapy (30-60 Gy) for the oro-facial area and chemotherapy (docetaxel: 11 cases; tegafur-uracil (UFT): 1 case; radiotherapy alone: 1 case) with simultaneous addition of 1% rebamipide-gargle treatment (10-15 times/day) to prevent the onset of mucositis. Informed consent was obtained prior to entry. Nine cases had grade 1-2 according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, and 4 patients were classified as grade 3-4. No adverse reactions that could be caused by the rebamipide gargle were observed. These results suggested that rebamipide gargle could inhibit the occurrence of stomatitis induced by chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  10. Futile xylitol cycle in Lactobacillus casei.

    OpenAIRE

    Hausman, S Z; Thompson, J; London, J

    1984-01-01

    A futile xylitol cycle appears to be responsible for xylitol-mediated inhibition of growth of Lactobacillus casei Cl-16 at the expense of ribitol. The gratuitously induced xylitol-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase accumulates the pentitol as xylitol-5-phosphate, a phosphatase cleaves the latter, and an export system expels the xylitol. Operation of the cycle rapidly dissipates the ribitol-5-phosphate pool (and ultimately the energy supply of the cell), thereby producin...

  11. Side effects and opioid addiction in radiation-induced mucositis pain control in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy in head and neck malignancy may trigger mucositis poorly controlled by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Having already reported early opioid efficacy in radiation-induced mucositis pain in head and neck cancer, we discuss whether this resulted in severe side effects and opioid addiction. Of 11 persons (26.2%) with nausea, 3 could not tolerate opioid. Of 33 (78.6%) with constipation, all were controlled by purgatives. Seven had mild sleepiness. None had severe opioid side effects in radiation-induced mucositis pain treatment, but I showed opioid dependence after 128-days opioid administration. While opioid administration in radiation-induced mucositis pain may not cause addiction, lomg-term opioid use should be carefully monitored. (author)

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease Induced Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage Associated with Intestinal Oxidative Stress Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Chunyu; Kang, Xin; Zhao, Shuang; Liu, Shuai; Fu, Huijun; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate whether intestinal mucosal barrier was damaged or not in chronic kidney disease progression and the status of oxidative stress. Methods. Rats were randomized into two groups: a control group and a uremia group. The uremia rat model was induced by 5/6 kidney resection. In postoperative weeks (POW) 4, 6, 8, and 10, eight rats were randomly selected from each group to prepare samples for assessing systemic inflammation, intestinal mucosal barrier changes, and the status of intestinal oxidative stress. Results. The uremia group presented an increase trend over time in the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10, serum D-lactate and diamine oxidase, and intestinal permeability, and these biomarkers were significantly higher than those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Chiu's scores in uremia group were also increased over time, especially in POW 8 and 10. Furthermore, the intestinal malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels were significantly higher in uremia group when compared with those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Conclusions. The advanced chronic kidney disease could induce intestinal mucosal barrier damage and further lead to systemic inflammation. The underlying mechanism may be associated with the intestinal oxidative stress injury. PMID:27493661

  13. Protective role of intracellular glutathione against ethanol-induced damage in cultured rat gastric mucosal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated whether intracellular glutathione is cytoprotective against ethanol-induced injury to cultured rat gastric mucosal cells in vitro. Secondly, it investigated whether reduced glutathione or oxidized glutathione is responsible for this cytoprotection. Cytolysis was quantified by measuring 51Cr release from prelabeled cells. Concentrations of ethanol greater than 12% caused cell damage and increased 51Cr release in a dose-dependent and time-related fashion. When a substrate for glutathione synthesis, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, was provided to cultured cells for 4 h before challenge with ethanol, cytolysis was significantly decreased corresponding with an increase in cellular glutathione content. Pretreatment with diethyl maleate, which depletes reduced glutathione without forming oxidized glutathione, potentiated ethanol-induced cell damage in a dose-dependent manner with the decrease of cellular glutathione content. The administration of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (which is specifically reduced by glutathione peroxidase to generate oxidized glutathione from reduced glutathione) or diamide (which nonenzymatically oxidizes reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione) enhanced ethanol injury. We conclude that in cultured gastric mucosal cells, (a) intracellular glutathione maintains integrity of gastric mucosal cells against ethanol in vitro; and (b) reduced glutathione rather than oxidized glutathione is responsible for this cytoprotection. We postulate that the presence of reduced glutathione is essential to allow glutathione peroxidase to catalyze the ethanol-generated toxic oxygen radical, hydrogen peroxide

  14. Mucosal exposure to cockroach extract induces allergic sensitization and allergic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arizmendi Narcy G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic sensitization to aeroallergens develops in response to mucosal exposure to these allergens. Allergic sensitization may lead to the development of asthma, which is characterized by chronic airway inflammation. The objective of this study is to describe in detail a model of mucosal exposure to cockroach allergens in the absence of an exogenous adjuvant. Methods Cockroach extract (CE was administered to mice intranasally (i.n. daily for 5 days, and 5 days later mice were challenged with CE for 4 consecutive days. A second group received CE i.n. for 3 weeks. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR was assessed 24 h after the last allergen exposure. Allergic airway inflammation was assessed by BAL and lung histology 48 h after the last allergen exposure. Antigen-specific antibodies were assessed in serum. Lungs were excised from mice from measurement of cytokines and chemokines in whole lung lysate. Results Mucosal exposure of Balb/c mice to cockroach extract induced airway eosinophilic inflammation, AHR and cockroach-specific IgG1; however, AHR to methacholine was absent in the long term group. Lung histology showed patchy, multicentric damage with inflammatory infiltrates at the airways in both groups. Lungs from mice from the short term group showed increased IL-4, CCL11, CXCL1 and CCL2 protein levels. IL4 and CXCL1 were also increased in the BAL of cockroach-sensitized mice in the short-term protocol. Conclusions Mucosal exposure to cockroach extract in the absence of adjuvant induces allergic airway sensitization characterized by AHR, the presence of Th2 cytokines in the lung and eosinophils in the airways.

  15. Mucosal Antibodies Induced by Intranasal but Not Intramuscular Immunization Block Norovirus GII.4 Virus-Like Particle Receptor Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminen, Kirsi; Malm, Maria; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) account for the majority of diagnosed cases of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines against NoV are currently under development. Serum antibodies that block the binding of NoV VLPs to histo-blood group antigens, the putative receptors for NoV, correlate with protection against NoV infection. The role of functional mucosal antibodies in protection is largely unknown, even though the intestinal mucosa is the entry port for NoV. Balb/c mice were immunized intramuscularly (IM) or intranasally (IN) with NoV GII.4 VLPs, and systemic and mucosal blocking antibody responses were studied. IN immunization elicited NoV-specific serum and mucosal IgG and IgA antibodies, whereas IM immunized animals completely lacked IgA. Both immunization routes induced similar blocking activity in serum but only IN route generated blocking antibodies in mucosa. The level of IgA in the mucosal (nasal) lavages strongly correlated (r = 0.841) with the blocking activity, suggesting that IgA, but not IgG, is the major NoV blocking antibody on mucosal surfaces. The results indicate that only mucosal immunization route induces the development of functional anti-NoV IgA on mucosal surface. PMID:27135874

  16. The Effect of Topical Application of Royal Jelly on Chemoradiotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Head and Neck Cancer: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kohichi Yamauchi; Yasunao Kogashiwa; Yorihisa Moro; Naoyuki Kohno

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. One of the common side effects experienced by head and neck cancer patients on chemoradiotherapy is mucositis. Severe mucositis may be controllable by limiting cancer therapy, but it has resulted in decreasing the completion rate of chemoradiotherapy. The efficacy of royal jelly (RJ) as prophylaxis against chemoradiotherapy-induced mucositis was evaluated through clinical scoring of oral and pharyngeal mucositis. Methods. In this randomized, single-blind (physician-blind), clinical t...

  17. Modeling pegylated liposomal doxorubicin-induced hand-foot syndrome and intestinal mucositis in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yau-Hung Chen,1 Ya-Ting Lee,1 Chi-Chung Wen,2 Yun-Chen Chen,3 Yu-Jen Chen4,5 1Department of Chemistry, 2Department of Mathematics, 3Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tamkang University, New Taipei City, Taiwan; 4Graduate Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Radiation Oncology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD has been widely used to treat cancer. The adverse effects of PLD noted in clinical practice, especially hand-foot syndrome (HFS, are regarded as unique, and the management methods for them remain limited. This study was aimed at developing a feasible experimental model for translational medicine to solve this clinical issue by using skin fluorescent transgenic zebrafish. We established an optimal protocol for the administration of Lipo-Dox™, a PLD in current clinical use, to the Tg(k18:dsred zebrafish line expressing red fluorescence in keratinocytes. We made use of bodyweight, survival rate, gross observation, flssuorescent microscopic assessment, and pathological examination of the zebrafish to assess this model. The consecutive administration protocol of PLD resulted in growth retardation of the zebrafish embryo and survival impairment, indicating establishment of a significant toxicity. We observed fin necrosis and keratinocyte dissociation phenotypes in the PLD-treated fish after consecutive administration. The skin toxicity induced by the Lipo-Dox injection was subsequently reversible, which might be compatible with a clinical course of skin recovery after discontinuation of Lipo-Dox administration. Furthermore, we found that the number of intestinal goblet cells, an important marker of intestinal inflammation, in the Lipo-Dox-injected zebrafish was markedly increased, accompanied by impaired mucosal integrity. The intestinal inflammation induced by Lipo-Dox resembled the intestinal mucositis the clinical patients

  18. The anti-obesity effects of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota versus Orlistat on high fat diet-induced obese rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golgis Karimi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity and overweight are major public health problems. Various factors, such as daily nutritional habits, physical inactivity, and genetic, are related to the prevalence of obesity. Recently, it was revealed that the gut microflora may also play an important role in weight management. Thus, this study aimed to determine the anti-obesity effects of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS compared with those of orlistat in an animal model fed a high-fat diet (HFD. Design: Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four groups fed various diets as follows: a standard diet group, HFD group, HFD supplemented with LcS (108109 colony-forming units (HFD-LcS group, and HFD group treated with Orlistat (10 mg/kg body weight. After 15 weeks, the weights of organs, body weight, body fat mass and serological biomarkers were measured. In addition, histological analysis of the liver and adipose tissue was performed. Results: Body weight, body mass index, fat mass, leptin and glucose levels were lower, and high-density lipoprotein and adiponectin levels were higher in the HFD-LcS and HFD-orlistat groups than in the HFD group. In addition a significant difference in body fat mass was observed between HFD-LcS group with HFD-orlistat group (19.19±5.76 g vs. 30.19±7.98 g. Although the interleukin-6 level was significantly decreased in the HFD-LcS and HFD-orlistat groups compared with the HFD group, no significant change was observed in other inflammatory biomarkers. Conclusion: The results of the present study show that LcS supplementation improves body weight management and the levels of some related biomarkers. In addition, LcS supplementation showed a better result in fat mass and alanine aminotransferase reduction than Orlistat. Further studies are needed to elucidate the anti-obesity effects of LcS, with a longer period of supplementation.

  19. Modulation of radiation-induced oral mucositis (mouse) by selective inhibition of β1 integrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Oral mucositis is a severe side effect of radio(chemo)therapy for head and neck tumors, for which β1 integrins have been proposed as potential therapeutic targets. The present study was initiated to determine the effect of selective inhibition of β1 integrin on the oral epithelial radiation response. Materials and methods: Daily fractionated irradiation was given with 5 × 3 Gy/week over 1 or 2 weeks with/without the β1 integrin-inhibiting monoclonal antibody AIIB2 or an IgG control. Each protocol was terminated by graded test doses to generate full dose–effect curves for mucosal ulceration. The same technique was used for single dose irradiation. Results: Combined single dose irradiation plus AIIB2 resulted in a significant decrease of the ED50 compared to irradiation alone or control IgG. No effect of AIIB2 was found with fractionated irradiation over 1 week. With 2 weeks of fractionation, AIIB2 induced a significant increase in the ED50 for the terminating test irradiation when administered in week 2. The time course of the response was largely unaffected by β1 integrin inhibition. Conclusions: A reduction of mucosal reactions by β1 integrin inhibition later in a course of fractionation was observed, i.e. when epithelial repopulation processes were active. Further mechanistic studies are required.

  20. A comparison between zinc sulfate and chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwashes in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdipour, M.; A Taghavi Zenoz; I Asvadi Kermani; Hosseinpour, A.

    2011-01-01

    "n Background and the Purpose of the Study: Patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy for hematological malignancies are susceptible to development of oral mucositis, and no effective modality has been reported for its prophylaxis and treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of zinc mouthwash on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis lesions. "nMethods: In this double-blind randomized trial, patients under chemotherapy for acute leukemia were divided...

  1. Preventive Effect of Rebamipide Gargle on Chemoradiotherpy-Induced Oral Mucositis in Patients with Oral Cancer: a Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Yasuda; Hiroshige Chiba; Takafumi Satomi; Akira Matsuo; Tadayoshi Kaneko; Daichi Chikazu; Hironobu Miyamatsu

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of rebamipide in preventing chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with oral cancer. Material and Methods Patients with oral cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy (daily radiotherapy plus docetaxel hydrate once a week) were enrolled for this study. They were assigned in a double-blind fashion to receive either rebamipide gargle or placebo on the days of chemoradiotherapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using the WHO grading syst...

  2. Role of oral glutamine in alleviation and prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis: A prospective randomized study

    OpenAIRE

    Subrata Chattopadhyay; Aramita Saha; Mohammad Azam; Anindya Mukherjee; Prabir Kumar Sur

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral mucositis is the most frequently occurring painful and dose-limiting side-effect of radiation of the head and neck region. Few studies demonstrated that oral glutamine suspension may significantly reduce the duration and severity of objective oral mucositis during radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: A randomized, prospective single institutional case control study was performed between April 2012 and November 2012 comparing the influence of oral glutamine on radiation induce...

  3. Recombinant human epidermal growth factor treatment of radiation-induced severe oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    HONG, JP; Lee, S-W; SONG, SY; AHN, SD; SHIN, SS; CHOI, EK; Kim, JH

    2009-01-01

    Mucositis of the oral cavity and pharynx is a major dose-limiting factor in the application of radiotherapy (RT) to patients with head and neck cancer. Therefore, we evaluated the wound healing effect of human recombinant epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) in head and neck cancer and lymphoma patients with irradiation (with or without combined chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis). Patients at Asan Medical Center who had undergone definitive RT of the head and neck region with or without combined...

  4. Oral ecology and virulence of Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans in gnotobiotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, S M; Hirasawa, M; Kiyono, H; Ochiai, K; McGhee, J R

    1981-01-01

    Lactobacilli comprise a small percentage of the normal oral microbial flora of humans and are isolated commonly from saliva and frequently from an active caries lesion. We have compared the pathogenesis and colonization pattern of Lactobacillus casei with that of Streptococcus mutans strain 6715 in gnotobiotic rats. Of the two L. casei strains tested, L. casei strain ATCC 4646 caused slightly more caries than L. casei strain ATCC 11578. However, the level of caries induced by either L. casei strain was significantly lower (P less than 0.01) than that observed in similar-aged rats monoassociated with S. mutans strain 6715. When groups of rats were infected with mixtures of L. casei strain ATCC 4646 and S. mutans strain 6715, or with L. casei followed by S. mutans, higher numbers of L. casei than S. mutans were found associated with the tongue and in saliva; S. mutans always predominated in plaque. The level of caries observed in these groups of rats was similar to that seen with rats monoassociated with S. mutans except when L. casei comprised greater than 1% of the plaque microflora. In this latter situation, the level of caries was significantly lower (P less than or equal to 0.05) than that obtained in S. mutans-monoassociated rats. The results of this study suggest that L. casei colonizes sites in the oral cavity (including the tongue and saliva) other than the tooth surface in rats. The effect of L. casei in plaque toward reduction of S. mutans-induced dental caries in rats is discussed. PMID:6793515

  5. The Role of Intestinal Microbiota in the Development and Severity of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    van Vliet, Michel J.; Hermie J M Harmsen; Eveline S. J. M. de Bont; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Mucositis, also referred to as mucosal barrier injury, is one of the most debilitating side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment. Clinically, mucositis is associated with pain, bacteremia, and malnutrition. Furthermore, mucositis is a frequent reason to postpone chemotherapy treatment, ultimately leading towards a higher mortality in cancer patients. According to the model introduced by Sonis, both inflammation and apoptosis of the mucosal barrier result in its discontinuity, th...

  6. The role of intestinal microbiota in the development and severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis.

    OpenAIRE

    van Vliet, Michel J.; Hermie J M Harmsen; Eveline S. J. M. de Bont; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Mucositis, also referred to as mucosal barrier injury, is one of the most debilitating side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment. Clinically, mucositis is associated with pain, bacteremia, and malnutrition. Furthermore, mucositis is a frequent reason to postpone chemotherapy treatment, ultimately leading towards a higher mortality in cancer patients. According to the model introduced by Sonis, both inflammation and apoptosis of the mucosal barrier result in its discontinuity, th...

  7. Aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage: prevention by enteric-coating and relation to prostaglandin synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hawthorne, A. B.; Mahida, Y R; Cole, A. T.; Hawkey, C. J.

    1991-01-01

    1. Gastric damage induced by low-dose aspirin and the protective effect of enteric-coating was assessed in healthy volunteers in a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial using Latin square design. Each was administered placebo, plain aspirin 300 mg daily, plain aspirin 600 mg four times daily, enteric-coated aspirin 300 mg daily, or enteric-coated aspirin 600 mg four times daily for 5 days. Gastric damage was assessed endoscopically, and gastric mucosal bleeding measured. 2. Aspirin...

  8. Radioprotective agents to reduce BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) induced mucositis in the hamster cheek pouch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: BNCT is based on the capture reaction between boron, selectively targeted to tumor tissue, and thermal neutrons which gives rise to lethal, short-range high linear energy transfer particles that selectively damage tumor tissue, sparing normal tissue. We previously evidenced a remarkable therapeutic success of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer and pre cancer model. Despite therapeutic efficacy, mucositis induced in premalignant tissue was dose limiting and favored, in some cases, tumor development. In a clinical scenario, oral mucositis limits the dose administered to head and neck tumors. Aim: Our aim was to evaluate the effect of the administration of different radioprotective agents, seeking to reduce BNCT-induced mucositis to acceptable levels in dose-limiting premalignant tissue; without compromising therapeutic effect evaluated as inhibition on tumor development in premalignant tissue; without systemic or local side effects; and without negative effects on the biodistribution of the boron compound used for treatment. Materials and methods: Cancerized hamsters with DMBA (dimethylbenzanthracene) were treated with BPA-BNCT 5 Gy total absorbed dose to premalignant tissue, at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor, divided into different groups: 1-treated with FLUNIXIN; 2- ATORVASTATIN; 3-THALIDOMIDE; 4-HISTAMINE (two concentrations: Low -1 mg/ml- and High -5 mg/ml-); 5-JNJ7777120; 6-JNJ10191584; 7-SALINE (vehicle). Cancerized animals without any treatment (neither BNCT nor radioprotective therapy) were also analyzed. We followed the animals during one month and evaluated the percentage of animals with unacceptable/severe mucositis, clinical status and percentage of animals with new tumors post treatment. We also performed a preliminary biodistribution study of BPA + Histamine “low” concentration to evaluate the potential effect of the radioprotector on BPA biodistribution. Results: Histamine

  9. Epidemiology, control and prevention of tobacco induced oral mucosal lesions in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Sridharan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one of the leading causes of human morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries like India. Tobacco consumption in smokeless and smoking form along with alcohol is considered as the primary risk factors. Tobacco is a major health challenge with various tobacco products available for use which are known to have deleterious effects on the oral mucosa. The oral lesions caused by tobacco are inclusive of those that are less likely to progress to cancer; lesions with increased tendency to develop into cancer and cancerous lesions. Prevention and control of tobacco induced oral mucosal lesions is the prime requisite currently and mainly involves measures undertaken at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. Primary prevention plays a pivotal role in tobacco induced lesions and steps can be taken at policy level, community as well as individual level. This review paper focuses on the epidemiological data of tobacco induced oral mucosal lesions in India available in the literature with an overview on various strategies for their prevention and control.

  10. Palifermin for management of treatment-induced oral mucositis in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Barasch

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Andrei Barasch1, Joel Epstein2, Ken Tilashalski11Department of Diagnostic Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences and Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Oral mucositis (OM remains a major side effect of various cancer therapies, which exacts a significant price in terms of morbidity and cost of care. Efforts aimed at prevention and/or therapy of OM have been largely unsuccessful. Few agents have shown efficacy, and even those were applicable to limited types of patients. The advent of small-molecule targeted agents opened new possibilities for intervention in the mucopathogenic processes induced by cancer therapies. One of these agents, recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, has been studied extensively and has shown promising results in reducing chemotherapy induced OM. This drug’s effects on stem cell engraftment, graft-versus-host disease and other treatment-induced morbidities remain undefined. In this article we evaluate the pre-clinical and clinical evidence and discuss the clinical applications of KGF as an adjunct therapeutic agent in oncology.Keywords: mucositis, cancer, therapy, palifermin 

  11. Low-energy laser in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral mucositis is a common, dose-limiting, and potentially serious complication of cancer therapy. Severe mucositis can lead to modifications of treatment planning and even suspension of therapy, with a negative impact on local tumor control and patient survival, increasing the risk of local and systemic infections. The lesions generally develop in non-keratinized mucosa, which is most vulnerable to this complication. Symptoms can range from a burning sensation to severe pain that impairs nutrient and fluid intake. Low-energy laser has been proposed for treatment of mucositis, with good clinical and functional results, accelerating the healing process and decreasing the pain. The aim of this article, illustrated by two clinical cases at the Pernambuco Cancer Hospital in Recife, Brazil, was to report on the efficacy of low-energy laser in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis.(author)

  12. Management of radiation therapy-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Part I: Clinical significance, pathophysiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cheong Ngeow

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal mucositis is the acute inflammatory and ulcerative reaction of the oral mucosa following radiation therapy to the head and neck region. It is such a common problem that nearly all head and neck cancer patients develop some degree of mucositis. This complication is usually transient in nature but it also represents an important clinical problem as it is a painful, debilitating, dose-dependent side effect for which there is no widely acceptable prophylaxis or effective treatment. As several authoritative groups have recently either undertaken systematic reviews or issued guidelines on the management of mucositis, it is the aim of this review to provide instead an overview of all the possible remedies available, as well as highlighting to researchers the gaps that need to be filled. The first part of this review outlines the clinical significance and pathophysiology of radiation-induced mucositis, and looks into some of the preventive approaches available.

  13. Efficient production and secretion of bovine β-lactoglobulin by Lactobacillus casei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wal Jean-Michel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are attractive tools to deliver therapeutic molecules at the mucosal level. The model LAB Lactococcus lactis has been intensively used to produce and deliver such heterologous proteins. However, compared to recombinant lactococci, lactobacilli offer some advantages such as better survival in the digestive tract and immunomodulatory properties. Here, we compared different strategies to optimize the production of bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG, a major cow's milk allergen, in the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei BL23. Results Using a nisin-inducible plasmid system, we first showed that L. casei BL23 strain could efficiently secrete a reporter protein, the staphylococcal nuclease (Nuc, with the lactococcal signal peptide SPUsp45 fused to its N-terminus. The fusion of SPUsp45 failed to drive BLG secretion but led to a 10-fold increase of intracellular BLG production. Secretion was significantly improved when the synthetic propeptide LEISSTCDA (hereafter called LEISS was added to the N-terminus of the mature moiety of BLG. Secretion rate of LEISS-BLG was 6-fold higher than that of BLG alone while intracellular production reached then about 1 mg/L of culture. The highest yield of secretion was obtained by using Nuc as carrier protein. Insertion of Nuc between LEISS and BLG resulted in a 20-fold increase in BLG secretion, up to 27 μg/L of culture. Furthermore, the lactococcal nisRK regulatory genes were integrated into the BL23 chromosome. The nisRK insertion allowed a decrease of BLG synthesis in uninduced cultures while BLG production increased by 50% after nisin induction. Moreover, modification of the induction protocol led to increase the proportion of soluble BLG to around 74% of the total BLG production. Conclusion BLG production and secretion in L. casei were significantly improved by fusions to a propeptide enhancer and a carrier protein. The resulting recombinant strains will be further tested

  14. Sublingual vaccination with sonicated Salmonella proteins and mucosal adjuvant induces mucosal and systemic immunity and protects mice from lethal enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Feng; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Lo, Wen-Tsung; Hwang, Kwei-Shuai; Hsu, Mu-Ling; Peng, Ho-Jen

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enteritidis is one of the most common pathogens of enteritis. Most experimental vaccines against Salmonella infection have been applied through injections. This is a new trial to explore the effect of sublingual administration of Salmonella vaccines on systemic and mucosal immunity. Adult BALB/c mice were sublingually vaccinated with sonicated Salmonella proteins (SSP) alone, or plus adjuvant CpG DNA (CpG) or cholera toxin (CT). They were boosted 2 weeks later. Saliva specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody responses were significantly stimulated in the mice vaccinated with SSP only or together with CpG or CT. Whereas the mice sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG had higher spleen cell IFN-γ production and serum specific IgG2a antibody responses, those receiving SSP and CT showed enhanced spleen cell IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 production, and serum specific IgG1 antibody responses. After oral challenge with live S. enteritidis, the same strain of the source of SSP, immune protection in those sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG or CT was found to prevent intestinal necrosis and to render a higher survival rate. In conclusion, sublingual vaccination together with mucosal adjuvant CpG or CT is a simple but effective way against enteric bacterial pathogens. PMID:21635554

  15. Potential prevention: Aloe vera mouthwash may reduce radiation-induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, more head and neck cancer patients have been treated with radiotherapy. Radiation-induced mucositis is a common and dose limiting toxicity of radiotherapy among patients with head and neck cancers. Patients undergoing radiation therapy for head and neck cancer are also at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. A number of new agents applied locally or systemically to prevent or treat radiation-induced mucositis have been investigated, but there is no widely accepted prophylactic or effective treatment for mucositis. Topical Aloe vera is widely used for mild sunburn, frostbites, and scalding burns. Studies have reported the beneficial effects of Aloe gel for wound healing, mucous membrane protection, and treatment of oral ulcers, in addition to antiinflammatory, immunomudulation, antifungal, scavenging free radicals, increasing collagen formation and inhibiting collagenase. Herein the author postulates that oral Aloe vera mouthwash may not only prevent radiation-induced mucositis by its wound healing and antiinflammatory mechanism, but also may reduce oral candidiasis of patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy due to its antifungal and immunomodulatory properties. Hence, Aloe vera mouthwash may provide an alternative agent for treating radiation-induced oral mucositis and candidiasis in patients with head and neck cancers. PMID:22855041

  16. Outcome of local application of amifostine (WR-1065) on epirubicin-induced oral mucositis. A phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, MA; Wachters, FM; Koopmans, P; Burgerhof, JGM; Groen, HJM; Spijkervet, FKL; Uges, DRA; Hospers, GAP

    2004-01-01

    Background: Intravenous administration of amifostine reduces chemotherapy-induced toxicity. Preclinical experiments showed a reduction in radiation-induced mucositis after local application of the active metabolite of amifostine (WR-1065). This study evaluated the effect of local application of WR-1

  17. Effect of epidermal growth factor against radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We tested the efficacy of oral recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) against radiation-induced oral mucositis in a rat model. Methods and Materials: Each of 35 Sprague-Dawley rats, 7 to 8 weeks of age and weighing 178 ± 5 grams, was irradiated once in the head region with 25 Gy, using a 4-MV therapeutic linear accelerator at a rate of 2 Gy/min. The irradiated rats were randomly divided into four groups: those receiving no treatment (Group 1), those treated with vehicle only three times per day (Group 2), and those treated with 50 μg/mL (Group 3), or 100 μg/mL (Group 4) rhEGF three times per day. Results: Rats were monitored for survival rate and daily activity, including hair loss, sensitivity, and anorexia. We found that survival rate and oral intake were significantly increased and histologic changes were significantly decreased in the rhEGF-treated rats. There was no difference, however, between rats treated with 50 μg/mL or 100 μg/mL rhEGF. Conclusion: These findings suggest that orally administered rhEGF decreased radiation-induced oral mucositis in rats

  18. Mucosal injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion in the piglet intestine: Influences of age and feeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crissinger, K.D.; Granger, D.N. (Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, Shreveport (USA))

    1989-10-01

    The pathogenesis of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis is unknown, but enteral alimentation, infectious agents, and mesenteric ischemia have been frequently invoked as primary initiators of the disease. To define the vulnerability of the intestinal mucosa to ischemia and reperfusion in the developing piglet, we evaluated changes in mucosal permeability using plasma-to-lumen clearance of chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in the ileum of anesthetized 1-day-, 3-day-, 2-wk-, and 1-mo-old piglets as a function of (a) duration of intestinal ischemia (20, 40, or 60 min of total superior mesenteric artery occlusion), (b) feeding status (fasted or nursed), and (c) composition of luminal perfusate (balanced salt solution vs. predigested cow milk-based formula). Baseline chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid clearance was not significantly altered by ischemia, irrespective of duration, or feeding in all age groups. However, clearances were significantly elevated during reperfusion after 1 h of total intestinal ischemia in all age groups, whether fasted or fed. Reperfusion-induced increases in clearance did not differ among age groups when the bowel lumen was perfused with a balanced salt solution. However, luminal perfusion with formula resulted in higher clearances in 1-day-old piglets compared with all older animals. Thus, the neonatal intestine appears to be more vulnerable to mucosal injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion in the presence of formula than the intestine of older animals.

  19. Study of Clinical and Genetic Risk Factors for Aspirin-induced Gastric Mucosal Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Wu; Ying Hu; Peng You; Yu-Jing Chi; Jian-Hua Zhou; Yuan-Yuan Zhang; Yu-Lan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Current knowledge about clinical and genetic risk factors for aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury is not sufficient to prevent these gastric mucosal lesions.Methods:We recruited aspirin takers as the exposed group and healthy volunteers as the control group.The exposed group was categorized into two subgroups such as subgroup A as gastric mucosal injury diagnosed by gastroscopy,including erosion,ulcer or bleeding of the esophagus,stomach,or duodenum;subgroup B as no injury of the gastric mucosa was detected by gastroscopy.Clinical information was collected,and 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms were evaluated.Results:Among 385 participants,234 were in the aspirin-exposed group.According to gastroscopy,82 belonged to subgroup A,91 belonged to subgroup B,and gastroscopic results of 61 participants were not available.Using the Chi-square test and logistic regression,we found that peptic ulcer history (odds ratio [OR] =5.924,95% confidence intervals [CI]:2.115-16.592),dual anti-platelet medication (OR =3.443,95% CI:1.154-10.271),current Helicobacterpylori infection (OR =2.242,95% CI:1.032-4.870),male gender (OR =2.211,95% CI:1.027-4.760),GG genotype ofrs2243086 (OR =4.516,95% CI:1.180-17.278),and AA genotype ofrs 1330344 (OR =2.178,95% CI:1.016-4.669) were more frequent in subgroup A than subgroup B.In aspirin users who suffered from upper gastrointestinal bleeding,the frequency of the TT genotype ofrs2238631 and TT genotype ofrs2243100 was higher than in those without upper gastrointestinal bleeding.Conclusions:Peptic ulcer history,dual anti-platelet medication,H.pylori current infection,and male gender were possible clinical risk factors for aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury.GG genotype of rs2243086 and AA genotype of rs 1330344 were possible genetic risk factors.TT genotype ofrs2238631 and TT genotype of rs2243100 may be risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in aspirin users.

  20. Effect of diallyl disulfide on acute gastric mucosal damage induced by alcohol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-C; Baek, H-S; Kim, S-H; Moon, C; Park, S-H; Kim, S-H; Shin, I-S; Park, S-C; Kim, J-C

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the gastroprotective effects of diallyl disulfide (DADS), a secondary organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.) on experimental model of ethanol (EtOH)-induced gastric ulcer in rats. The antiulcerogenic activity of DADS was evaluated by gross/histopathological inspection, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and lipid peroxidation with antioxidant enzyme activities in the stomach. DADS (100 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 2 h prior to EtOH treatment (5 ml/kg). The animals were killed 1 h after receiving EtOH treatment. Pretreatment with DADS attenuated EtOH-induced gastric mucosal injury, as evidenced by decreased severity of hemorrhagic lesions and gastric ulcer index upon visual inspection. DADS also prevented histopathological alterations and gastric apoptotic changes caused by EtOH. An increase in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase was observed in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats that coincided with increased serum TNF-α and interleukin 6 levels. In contrast, DADS effectively suppressed production of pro-inflammatory mediators induced by EtOH. Furthermore, DADS prevented the formation of gastric malondialdehyde and the depletion of reduced glutathione content and restored antioxidant enzyme activities, such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats. These results indicate that DADS prevents gastric mucosal damage induced by acute EtOH administration in rats and that the protective effects of DADS may be due to its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24972622

  1. Cancer Treatment-Induced Mucositis Pain: Strategies for Assessment and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Debra J

    2006-01-01

    Mucositis pain is a major clinical problem associated with cancer treatment. Mucosal tissue injury is a dose-limiting side effect and also limits nutritional intake and oral function, resulting in weight loss and nutritional deficits for many patients. The pathophysiology of mucositis is thought to be a complex array of cytokine-mediated events, which begins with mucosal atrophy and eventually leads to the painful ulceration of the mucosa. This article reviews current research related to pain...

  2. Protective Effects of the Traditional Herbal Formula Oryeongsan Water Extract on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Injury in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Lim, Hye-Sun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effect and safety of Oryeongsan water extract (OSWE) on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury and an acute toxicity study in rats. Acute gastric lesions were induced via intragastric oral administration of absolute ethanol at a dose of 5 mL/kg. OSWE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was administered to rats 2 h prior to the oral administration of absolute ethanol. The stomach of animal models was opened and gastric mucosal lesions were examined. Ga...

  3. Lactobacillus casei-01 facilitates the ameliorative effects of proanthocyanidins extracted from lotus seedpod on learning and memory impairment in scopolamine-induced amnesia mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xiao

    Full Text Available Learning and memory abilities are associated with alterations in gut function. The two-way proanthocyanidins-microbiota interaction in vivo enhances the physiological activities of proanthocyanidins and promotes the regulation of gut function. Proanthocyanidins extracted from lotus seedpod (LSPC have shown the memory-enhancing ability. However, there has been no literature about whether Lactobacillus casei-01 (LC enhances the ameliorative effects of LSPC on learning and memory abilities. In this study, learning and memory abilities of scopolamine-induced amnesia mice were evaluated by Y-maze test after 20-day administration of LC (10(9 cfu/kg body weight (BW, LSPC (low dose was 60 mg/kg BW (L-LSPC and high dose was 90 mg/kg BW (H-LSPC, or LSPC and LC combinations (L-LSPC+LC and H-LSPC+LC. Alterations in antioxidant defense ability and oxidative damage of brain, serum and colon, and brain cholinergic system were investigated as the possible mechanisms. As a result, the error times of H-LSPC+LC group were reduced by 41.59% and 68.75% relative to those of H-LSPC and LC groups respectively. LSPC and LC combinations ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairment by improving total antioxidant capacity (TAOC level, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD activities of brain, serum and colon, suppressing malondialdehyde (MDA level of brain, serum and colon, and inhibiting brain acetylcholinesterase (AchE, myeloperoxidase, total nitric oxide synthase and neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS activities, and nNOS mRNA level. Moreover, LC facilitated the ameliorative effects of H-LSPC on GSH-Px activity of colon, TAOC level, GSH-Px activity and ratio of T-SOD to MDA of brain and serum, and the inhibitory effects of H-LSPC on serum MDA level, brain nNOS mRNA level and AchE activity. These results indicated that LC promoted the memory-enhancing effect of LSPC in scopolamine-induced amnesia mice.

  4. Altered systemic bioavailability and organ distribution of azathioprine in methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf A Karbelkar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Study outcome has thrown light on altered fate of AZA when administered to individuals with mucositis which suggests modified drug therapy. These findings can further be investigated in different drug classes which might be administered concomitantly in mucositis and study outcome can be further confirmed in mucositis patients in clinical practice also.

  5. Bakumondo-to appears to alleviate radiation-induced mucositis in early laryngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsumura Co.'s Bakumondo-to (TJ-29) is a Chinese herb medicine prescribed widely in Japan for bronchitis and laryngitis. It is well known that TJ-29 not only has a variety of effects including anti-inflammatory and antitussive properties, but also is capable of increasing salivary secretions. The purpose of this study is to examine whether TJ-29 can reduce mucosal toxicity caused by radiotherapy in patients with early laryngeal carcinoma. Between 1993 and 1999, 20 patients with primary early laryngeal carcinoma were treated by radiotherapy at Nagato General Hospital. All patients were treated with 2 Gy per fraction daily, 5 days a week. Eight patients formed the control group (no TJ-29) and 12 patients received TJ-29 throughout the radiation therapy. The severity of daily subjective symptoms such as hoarseness, xerostomia or pharyngoxerosis, cough, and sore throat were graded 0 to 3 according to descriptions on the clinical charts. No statistically significant between-group differences were seen in subjective hoarseness, xerostomia or pharyngoxerosis, and cough. However the mean final grade of subjective sore throat was less severe in the TJ-29 group (p=0.0023). Despite the limited number of patients, this study suggests that TJ-29 was able to reduce the severity of mucositis induced by radiotherapy. Further intensive research is needed. (author)

  6. Role of Honey in Prevention of Radiation induced Mucositis in Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of honey in preventing radiation induced mucositis (RIM) in patients with head and neck cancers. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Oncology Department of Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from July 2011 to September 2012. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer requiring radiotherapy to the oropharyngeal mucosa were randomized into two groups to receive either radiation alone or radiation and natural honey. Patients were treated using 6-MV X-ray beams from linear accelerator at a dose rate of 2 Gy per day five times a week up to a dose of 66 Gy. In the treatment group, patients were advised to take 20 ml of pure honey 15 minutes before, 15 minutes after and 6 hours after radiotherapy. Patients were evaluated every week for the development of RIM using the WHO oral mucositis grading system. Results: In treatment group, out of 30 patients, 4(13%) developed grade 3 RIM and none developed grade 4 RIM. In control group, out of 30 patients, 12 (40%) developed grade 3 or 4 RIM (p=0.039). Four patients (13%) in treatment group lost more than 5 Kg weight during the course of radiotherapy compared to 16 patients (53%) in control group (p=0.002). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that honey is a simple and cost effective treatment to prevent RIM. Large scale randomized trials are needed to confirm the results of our study. (author)

  7. Oral immunization of mice against Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin with a Lactobacillus casei vector vaccine expressing epsilon toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimolaei, Mojtaba; Golchin, Mehdi; Daneshvar, Hamid

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D infects ruminants and causes the enterotoxemia disease by ε-toxin. A mutated ε-toxin gene lacking toxicity was designed, synthesized, and cloned into the pT1NX vector and electroporated into Lactobacillus casei competent cells to yield LC-pT1NX-ε recombinant strain. BALB/c mice, immunized orally with this strain, highly induced mucosal, humoral, and cell-mediated immune responses and developed a protection against 200 MLD/ml of the activated ε-toxin. This study showed that the LC-pT1NX-ε could be a promising vaccine candidate against the enterotoxemia disease. PMID:27012151

  8. Assessment of cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis using a patient-reported oral mucositis experience questionnaire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Margrete Gussgard

    Full Text Available Treatment of oral mucositis (OM is challenging. In order to develop and test useful treatment approaches, the development of reliable, reproducible and simpler methods than are currently available for assessment of OM is important. A Patient-Reported Oral Mucositis Symptom (PROMS scale was assessed in patients with head and neck cancer to determine if the patient-reported OM experience, as determined by using the PROMS scale, correlate with OM assessed by clinician-based scoring tools.Fifty patients with head and neck cancer and undergoing radiotherapy consented to participate. They were examined before cancer treatment and twice weekly during 6-7 weeks of therapy and once 4-6 weeks after therapy. Signs of OM were evaluated using the 3 clinician-based scoring tools; NCI-CTCAE v.3, the OMAS criteria and the Total VAS-OMAS. The participants' OM experiences were recorded using PROMS-questionnaires consisting of 10 questions on a visual analogue scale. Spearman rank correlation test were applied between the PROMS scale values and the clinician-determined scores. Repeated measures mixed linear models were applied to appraise the strengths of correlation at the different time points throughout the observation period.Thirty-three participants completed all stages of the study. The participant experience of OM using the PROMS scale demonstrates good correlations (Spearman's Rho 0.65-0.78, p<0.001 with the clinician-determined scores on the group level over all time points and poor to good correlations (Spearman's Rho -0.12-0.70, p<0.001 on the group level at different time points during and after therapy. When mouth opening was problematic, i.e. during the 6th and 7th week after commencing cancer treatment, the Spearman's Rho varied between 0.19 and 0.70 (p<0.001.Patient experience of OM, as reported by the PROMS scale may be a feasible substitute for clinical assessment in situations where patients cannot endure oral examinations.

  9. Effects of bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on oral mucositis (mouse) induced by fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Haagen, J.; Noack, R.; Siegemund, A.; Gabriel, P. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, W. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. of Radiation Oncology/Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-04-15

    Oral mucositis is a severe and dose limiting early side effect of radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors. This study was initiated to determine the effect of bone marrow- and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on oral mucositis (mouse tongue model) induced by fractionated irradiation. Daily fractionated irradiation (5 x 3 Gy/week) was given over 1 (days 0-4) or 3 weeks (days 0-4, 7-11, 14-18). Each protocol was terminated (day 7 or 21) by graded test doses (5 dose groups, 10 animals each) in order to generate complete dose-effect curves. The incidence of mucosal ulceration, corresponding to confluent mucositis grade 3 (RTOG/EORTC), was analyzed as the primary, clinically relevant endpoint. Bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted intravenously at various time points within these fractionation protocols. Transplantation of 6 x 10{sup 6}, but not of 3 x 10{sup 6} bone marrow stem cells on day -1, +4, +8, +11 or +15 significantly increased the ED{sub 50} values (dose, at which an ulcer is expected in 50% of the mice); transplantation on day +2, in contrast, was ineffective. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on day -1, 2 or +8 significantly, and on day +4 marginally increased the ED{sub 50} values. Transplantation of bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cells has the potential to modulate radiation-induced oral mucositis during fractionated radiotherapy. The effect is dependent on the timing of the transplantation. The mechanisms require further investigation. (orig.)

  10. Mucosal Inducible NO Synthase-Producing IgA+ Plasma Cells in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Laura; Mueller, Mattea; Moos, Verena; Heller, Frank; Meyer, Thomas F; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Bojarski, Christian; Fehlings, Michael; Doerner, Thomas; Allers, Kristina; Aebischer, Toni; Ignatius, Ralf; Schneider, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The mucosal immune system is relevant for homeostasis, immunity, and also pathological conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS)-dependent production of NO is one of the factors linked to both antimicrobial immunity and pathological conditions. Upregulation of iNOS has been observed in human Helicobacter pylori infection, but the cellular sources of iNOS are ill defined. Key differences in regulation of iNOS expression impair the translation from mouse models to human medicine. To characterize mucosal iNOS-producing leukocytes, biopsy specimens from H. pylori-infected patients, controls, and participants of a vaccination trial were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, along with flow cytometric analyses of lymphocytes for iNOS expression and activity. We newly identified mucosal IgA-producing plasma cells (PCs) as one major iNOS(+) cell population in H. pylori-infected patients and confirmed intracellular NO production. Because we did not detect iNOS(+) PCs in three distinct infectious diseases, this is not a general feature of mucosal PCs under conditions of infection. Furthermore, numbers of mucosal iNOS(+) PCs were elevated in individuals who had cleared experimental H. pylori infection compared with those who had not. Thus, IgA(+) PCs expressing iNOS are described for the first time, to our knowledge, in humans. iNOS(+) PCs are induced in the course of human H. pylori infection, and their abundance seems to correlate with the clinical course of the infection. PMID:27456483

  11. Effects of bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on oral mucositis (mouse) induced by fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral mucositis is a severe and dose limiting early side effect of radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors. This study was initiated to determine the effect of bone marrow- and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on oral mucositis (mouse tongue model) induced by fractionated irradiation. Daily fractionated irradiation (5 x 3 Gy/week) was given over 1 (days 0-4) or 3 weeks (days 0-4, 7-11, 14-18). Each protocol was terminated (day 7 or 21) by graded test doses (5 dose groups, 10 animals each) in order to generate complete dose-effect curves. The incidence of mucosal ulceration, corresponding to confluent mucositis grade 3 (RTOG/EORTC), was analyzed as the primary, clinically relevant endpoint. Bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted intravenously at various time points within these fractionation protocols. Transplantation of 6 x 106, but not of 3 x 106 bone marrow stem cells on day -1, +4, +8, +11 or +15 significantly increased the ED50 values (dose, at which an ulcer is expected in 50% of the mice); transplantation on day +2, in contrast, was ineffective. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on day -1, 2 or +8 significantly, and on day +4 marginally increased the ED50 values. Transplantation of bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cells has the potential to modulate radiation-induced oral mucositis during fractionated radiotherapy. The effect is dependent on the timing of the transplantation. The mechanisms require further investigation. (orig.)

  12. Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in the development of radiotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucositis is a toxic side effect of anti-cancer treatments and is a major focus in cancer research. Pro-inflammatory cytokines have previously been implicated in the pathophysiology of chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis. However, whether they play a key role in the development of radiotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the gastrointestinal tract using a rat model of fractionated radiotherapy-induced toxicity. Thirty six female Dark Agouti rats were randomly assigned into groups and received 2.5 Gys abdominal radiotherapy three times a week over six weeks. Real time PCR was conducted to determine the relative change in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF in the jejunum and colon. Protein expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF in the intestinal epithelium was investigated using qualitative immunohistochemistry. Radiotherapy-induced sub-acute damage was associated with significantly upregulated IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF mRNA levels in the jejunum and colon. The majority of pro-inflammatory cytokine protein expression in the jejunum and colon exhibited minimal change following fractionated radiotherapy. Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in radiotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in the sub-acute onset setting

  13. Enhancement of host resistance against Listeria infection by Lactobacillus casei: Role of macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the 10 species of the genus Lactobacillus, L. casei showed the strongest protective action against Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice. The activity of L. casei differed with regard to the dose of administration. The anti-L. monocytogenes resistance in mice intravenously administered 5.5 X 10(7), 2.8 X 10(8), or 1.1 X 10(9) L. casei cells was most manifest at ca. 2, 2 and 13, and 3 to 21 days after its administration, respectively. The growth of L. monocytogenes in the liver of mice injected with L. casei (10(7), 10(8), or 10(9) cells) 48 h after infection was suppressed, particularly when 10(8) or 10(9) L. casei cells were given 2 or 13 days before the induced infection, respectively. This suppression of L. monocytogenes growth was overcome by carrageenan treatment or X-ray irradiation. [3H]thymidine incorporation into the liver DNA increased 13 days after administration of L. casei, and augmentation of [3H]thymidine incorporation during 6 to 48 h after infection was dependent on the dose of L. casei. Peritoneal macrophage accumulation observed 1 to 5 days after intraperitoneal injection of UV-killed L. monocytogenes was markedly enhanced when the mice were treated with L. casei cells 13 days before macrophage elicitation. Therefore, the enhanced host resistance by L. casei to L. monocytogenes infection may be mediated by macrophages migrating from the blood stream to the reticuloendothelial system in response to L. casei injection before or after L. monocytogenes infection

  14. A case of buccal mucosal and maxillary tumor seemed to be radiation induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of radiation-induced cancer was reported. A 46-year-old man developed buccal mucosal and maxillary cancer (squamous cell carcinoma) 19 years after external radiation therapy for buccal papilloma. Previous irradiation was 60Co, 186.5 Gy. Latent period was 19 years, but 7 years after the irradiation osteomyelitis arose in the mandible. X-ray films of the mandible revealed an osteolytic and osteosclerotic lesion. Conservative treatment of the osteomyelitis was not so effective. Partital resection of the mandible and resection of buccal scar tissue combined with reconstructive surgery of the cheek using a pectoralis major myocutaneous flap were performed in September, 1984. The histological examination of the resected specimen showed squamous cell carcinoma and the ultrastructural study on this case was further performed. In spite of wide excision and intra-arterial chemotherapy combined with irradiation, the patient died of the carcinoma in October, 1986. (author)

  15. A randomized controlled multicenter trial of actovegin against acute oral mucositis induced by chemo-radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of actovegin against acute oral mucositis through a randomized controlled multicenter trial for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated by chemo-radiotherapy. Methods: From February 2006 to May 2007, a total of 161 patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IVA(1992 Fuzhou Stage) NPC were randomly assigned to the prevention group, the treatment group and the control group. All patients received current chemo-radiotherapy ± neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Radiation technique and dose were similar among the three groups. Intravenous infusion of actovegin was started when radiation started in the prevention group and when grade 2 mucositis occurred in the treatment group, which was given 30 ml daily, 5 times per week until the end of radiotherapy. Criteria of NCI CTC 2.0 and VRS were used to evaluate acute oral mucositis and pain degree, respectively. Results: 154 patients were eligible for the efficacy analysis, including 49 in the prevention group, 53 in the treatment group and 52 in the control group. In the prevention group and the control group, the incidence was 31% and 56% (P= 0.011) for grade 3-4 mucositis, 59% and 83% (P=0.009) for grade 2-3 pain. In the treatment group and the control group, the corresponding number was 38% and 60% (P=0.023), 70% and 90%, (P=0.014). The prevention group had a lower incidence (P=0.021) and longer average interval (P=0.009) of grade 2 mucositis when comparing with the control group. No drug-related adverse event was observed. Conclusions: Prophylactic or therapeutic use of actovegin by intravenous infusion can significantly reduce the severity of chemo-radiotherapy induced oral mucositis and pain. The prophylactic use may also postpone and decrease the incidence of grade 2 mucositis, which deserves clinic application. (authors)

  16. Reduced absorption of long-chain fatty acids during methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijlstra, Margot; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Stellaard, Frans; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background & aims: Patients with chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis suffer from weight loss and possibly malabsorption. Since long-chain fatty acids serve important functions in the body, we aimed to determine the intestinal capacity of fat absorption in rats with and without methotrexa

  17. The Effects of Oral Cryotherapy on Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Autologous Transplantation of Blood Stem Cells: A Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Askarifar, Marzieh; Lakdizaji, Sima; Ramzi, Mani; Rahmani, Azad; Jabbarzadeh, Faranak

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral mucositis is one of the irritating side effects of chemotherapy in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. However, up until now, the common methods of oral mucositis therapy have failed to show significant effects. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of local cryotherapy on the intensity of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in autologous bone marrow transplantation patients. Patients and Methods In this single, blinded, randomized clinic...

  18. Preventive Effect of Rebamipide Gargle on Chemoradiotherpy-Induced Oral Mucositis in Patients with Oral Cancer: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yasuda

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the efficacy and safety of rebamipide in preventing chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with oral cancer.Material and Methods: Patients with oral cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy (daily radiotherapy plus docetaxel hydrate once a week were enrolled for this study. They were assigned in a double-blind fashion to receive either rebamipide gargle or placebo on the days of chemoradiotherapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using the WHO grading system. The primary endpoint of this study was the incidence of grade 3 - 4 mucositis after exposure to 40 Gy radiation (4 weeks. The secondary endpoint was the effect of rebamipide gargle on tumour response to chemoradiotherapy.Results: Twenty-four patients were randomly assigned to receive rebamipide gargle (n = 12 or placebo-gargle (n = 12 during chemoradiotherapy. The number of patients with severe mucositis (WHO ≥ 3 was higher in the placebo group than in the rebamipide group (83.3% vs. 33.3%, P = 0.036. In addition, no effect of rebamipide gargle on tumour response to chemoradiotherapy was recognized compared with the placebo group.Conclusions: For patients with oral cancer undergoing chemoradiotherapy, rebamipide gargle may contribute to decrease the severity of oral mucositis.

  19. Comprehensive Assessment of Host Responses to 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis through Transcriptomic Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ta Chang

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy plays an important role in current cancer therapy; however, several problems remain unsolved on the issue of host-therapeutics interaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the host responses after 5-flurouracil (5-FU administration and to find the target genes and their relationship with other cytokines in the 5-FU-induced oral mucositis (OM mouse model through transcriptomic analysis.Thirty-six 6 to 8 week-old male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into the control group and 5-FU-treated group. In the 5-FU group, mice received 5-FU (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally on day 1, day 8, day 15, day 22, and day 29, respectively. We evaluated the oral mucosal change under macroanalysis and histological examination at indicated periods, and then applied transcriptomic analysis of gene expression profile and Immunohistochemical stain to identify the target molecules related to 5-FU-induced OM.The most prominent histological change in this model was observed in the fifth week. The gene expression of Bone gamma-carboxyglutamate protein, related sequence 1 (Bglap-rs1 (-12.69-fold and Chitinase 3-like 4 (Chi3l4 (-6.35-fold were significantly down-regulated in this phase. The quantitative real-time PCR results also revealed the expression levels were 0.62-fold in Bglap-rs1 and 0.13-fold in Chi3l4 compared with the control group. Immunohistochemical stain showed significant expression of cluster of differentiation 11b (p<0.01, interleukin-1β (p<0.001 and tumor necrosis factor-α (p<0.05, and down-regulation of Bglap-rs1 (p<0.01 compared with the control group. By Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis, there were twenty-three pathways significantly participated in this study (p<0.05.Through comprehensively transcriptomic analysis and IHC stain, we discovered several valuable pathways, verified the main pro-inflammatory cytokines, and revealed two significantly down-regulated genes in the 5-FU-induced OM model. These

  20. Taurine Prevents Ibuprofen-Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions and Influences Endogenous Antioxidant Status of Stomach in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian, T.; Somasundaram, M.; A. John William Felix

    2004-01-01

    Recently, free radical–induced tissue damage is implicated in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)–involved gastric mucosal lesion. Administration of taurine, an endogenous antioxidant, is reported to be beneficial in various clinical conditions. Therefore, we decided to study the protective effect of taurine in ibuprofen-induced gastropathy and the effects of administration of taurine on the endogenous antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and g...

  1. The effect of a calcium phosphate mouth rinse on (chemo) radiation induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, M. A.; Burlage, F. R.; Spijkervet, F. K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Promising results of a calcium phosphate (CP) mouth rinse on reduced severity of oral mucositis have been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a CP mouth rinse on the frequency, duration and severity of (chemo) radiation induced oral mucositis in patients with h

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 as a treatment for chemotherapy-induced mucositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kissow, Hannelouise; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2012-01-01

    . RESULTS: GLP-1 and GLP-2 significantly prevented the loss of mucosal mass and villus height and significantly decreased the mucositis severity score in the duodenum and jejunum 48 h after chemotherapy. The effect was equivalent. Exendin (9-39) reduced the intestinal weight 96 h after chemotherapy. The GLP...

  3. Expression analysis of cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway genes in the intestinal mucosal layer of necrotic enteritis-induced chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Truong, Anh Duc; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Hong, Yeong Ho

    2016-02-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a serious problem to the poultry farms, which report NE outbreaks more than once per year, as a result of the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the feed. The NE affected bird die rapidly as a result of various pathophysiological complications in the intestine and immune system. Also, several studies have reported that the genes exclusively related to intestine and immune functions are significantly altered in response to NE. In this study, NE was induced in two genetically disparate chicken lines that are resistant (line 6.3) and sensitive (line 7.2) to avian leukosis and Marek's disease. The intestinal mucosal layer was collected from NE-induced and control chickens, and subjected to RNA-sequencing analysis. The involvement of differentially expressed genes in the intestinal mucosal layer of line 6.3 and 7.2 with the immune system-related pathways was investigated. Among the identified immune system-related pathways, a candidate pathway known as chicken cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway (CDS pathway) was selected for further investigation. RNA-sequencing and pathway analysis identified a total of 21 genes that were involved in CDS pathway and differentially expressed in the intestinal mucosal layer of lines 6.3 and 7.2. The expression of CDS pathway genes was further confirmed by real-time qPCR. In the results, a majority of the CDS pathway genes were significantly altered in the NE-induced intestinal mucosal layer from lines 6.3 and 7.2. In conclusion, our study indicate that NE seriously affects several genes involved in innate immune defense and foreign DNA sensing mechanisms in the chicken intestinal mucosal layer. Identifying the immune genes affected by NE could be an important evidence for the protective immune response to NE-causative pathogens. PMID:26872625

  4. Distinct TRPV1- and TRPA1-based mechanisms underlying enhancement of oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain by 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kiichiro; Ono, Kentaro; Hitomi, Suzuro; Ito, Misa; Nodai, Tomotaka; Goto, Tetsuya; Harano, Nozomu; Watanabe, Seiji; Inoue, Hiromasa; Miyano, Kanako; Uezono, Yasuhito; Matoba, Motohiro; Inenaga, Kiyotoshi

    2016-05-01

    In many patients with cancer, chemotherapy-induced severe oral ulcerative mucositis causes intractable pain, leading to delays and interruptions in therapy. However, the pain mechanism in oral ulcerative mucositis after chemotherapy has not been extensively studied. In this study, we investigated spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia in a preclinical model of oral ulcerative mucositis after systemic administration of the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil, using our proprietary pain assay system for conscious rats. 5-Fluorouracil caused leukopenia but did not induce pain-related behaviors. After 5-fluorouracil administration, oral ulcers were developed with topical acetic acid treatment. Compared with saline-treated rats, 5-fluorouracil-exposed rats showed more severe mucositis with excessive bacterial loading due to a lack of leukocyte infiltration, as well as enhancements of spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia. Antibacterial drugs, the lipid A inhibitor polymyxin B and the TRPV1/TRPA1 channel pore-passing anesthetic QX-314, suppressed both the spontaneous pain and the mechanical allodynia. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin and the TRPV1 antagonist SB-366791 inhibited the spontaneous pain, but not the mechanical allodynia. In contrast, the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 and the N-formylmethionine receptor FPR1 antagonist Boc MLF primarily suppressed the mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that 5-fluorouracil-associated leukopenia allows excessive oral bacterial infection in the oral ulcerative region, resulting in the enhancement of spontaneous pain through continuous TRPV1 activation and cyclooxygenase pathway, and mechanical allodynia through mechanical sensitization of TRPA1 caused by neuronal effects of bacterial toxins. These distinct pain mechanisms explain the difficulties encountered with general treatments for oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain in patients with cancer and suggest more effective approaches. PMID:26808144

  5. Modulation of radiation-induced oral mucositis by pentoxifylline: Preclinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral mucositis is a frequent early side effect of radio(chemo)therapy of head-and-neck malignancies. The epithelial radiation response is accompanied by inflammatory reactions; their interaction with epithelial processes remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pentoxifylline (PTX) on the oral mucosal radiation response in the mouse tongue model. Irradiation comprised fractionation (5 fractions of 3 Gy/week) over 1 (days 0-4) or 2 weeks (days 0-4, 7-11), followed by graded local top-up doses (day 7/14), in order to generate complete dose-effect curves. PTX (15 mg/kg subcutaneously) was applied once daily over varying time intervals. Ulceration of mouse tongue epithelium, corresponding to confluent mucositis, was analyzed as the clinically relevant endpoint. With fractionated irradiation over 1 week, PTX administration significantly reduced the incidence of mucosal reactions when initiated before (day - 5) the onset of fractionation; a trend was observed for start of PTX treatment on day 0. Similarly, PTX treatment combined with 2 weeks of fractionation had a significant effect on ulcer incidence in all but one experiment. This clearly illustrates the potential of PTX to ameliorate oral mucositis during daily fractionated irradiation. PTX resulted in a significant reduction of oral mucositis during fractionated irradiation, which may be attributed to stimulation of mucosal repopulation processes. The biological basis of this effect, however, needs to be clarified in further, detailed mechanistic studies. (orig.)

  6. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotective Role of M. pruriens in Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500 mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg). After 1 h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5 g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. PMID:23781513

  7. A comparison between zinc sulfate and chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwashes in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mehdipour

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available "n Background and the Purpose of the Study: Patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy for hematological malignancies are susceptible to development of oral mucositis, and no effective modality has been reported for its prophylaxis and treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of zinc mouthwash on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis lesions. "nMethods: In this double-blind randomized trial, patients under chemotherapy for acute leukemia were divided into two test and control groups of 15 patients each. The groups were homogeneous with respect to medical history, tumor characteristics, and therapeutic details. The test group received 10ml 0.2% zinc sulfate mouthwash, and the control group received 10ml 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash, twice a day for a period of two weeks. Spijkervet scale was used to grade the severity of mucositis at every other week during eight weeks. The severity scores were analyzed with repeated measure ANOVA using SPSS 13.0 computer software. "nResults: Mean severity scores were generally lower in the test group compared to the controls at all four time intervals evaluated; but only, the differences in weeks of 2 and 3 were statistically significant (P=0.025. Conclusion: Zinc mouthwash used in conjunction with chemotherapy may reduce the severity of oral mucositis lesions in patients with leukaemia.

  8. Acute toxicity and gastroprotective role of M. pruriens in ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbabapour, Shahram; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A Hamid A; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500 mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg). After 1 h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5 g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. PMID:23781513

  9. Genomic Adaptation of the Lactobacillus casei Group

    OpenAIRE

    Toh, Hidehiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Nakano, Akiyo; Takahata, Muneaki; Murakami, Masaru; Takaki, Takashi; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Igimi, Shizunobu; Hattori, Masahira; Morita, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus form a closely related taxonomic group (Lactobacillus casei group) within the facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of L. paracasei JCM 8130 and L. casei ATCC 393, and the draft genome sequence of L. paracasei COM0101, all of which were isolated from daily products. Furthermore, we re-annotated the genome of L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (also known as L. rhamnosus GG), which we have previousl...

  10. Eyedrop Vaccination Induced Systemic and Mucosal Immunity against Influenza Virus in Ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchul Yoon

    Full Text Available We investigated eyedrop vaccination (EDV in pre-clinical development for immunological protection against influenza and for potential side effects involving ocular inflammation and the central nervous system (CNS. Live attenuated influenza EDV, CA07 (H1N1, PZ-4 (H1N2 and Uruguay (H3N2, induced both systemic and mucosal virus-specific antibody responses in ferrets. In addition, EDV resulted in a clinically significant protection against viral challenge, and suppression of viral replication in nasal secretion and lung tissue. Regarding safety, we found that administered EDV flow through the tear duct to reach the base of nasal cavity, and thus do not contact the olfactory bulb. All analyses for potential adverse effects due to EDV, including histological and functional examinations, did not reveal significant side effects. On the basis of these findings, we propose that EDV as effective, while being a safe administration route with minimum local side effects, CNS invasion, or visual function disturbance.

  11. Eyedrop Vaccination Induced Systemic and Mucosal Immunity against Influenza Virus in Ferrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Suk; Han, Soo Jung; Park, Tae Kwann; Choi, Kyoung Sub; Choi, Young-Ki; Seo, Kyoung Yul

    2016-01-01

    We investigated eyedrop vaccination (EDV) in pre-clinical development for immunological protection against influenza and for potential side effects involving ocular inflammation and the central nervous system (CNS). Live attenuated influenza EDV, CA07 (H1N1), PZ-4 (H1N2) and Uruguay (H3N2), induced both systemic and mucosal virus-specific antibody responses in ferrets. In addition, EDV resulted in a clinically significant protection against viral challenge, and suppression of viral replication in nasal secretion and lung tissue. Regarding safety, we found that administered EDV flow through the tear duct to reach the base of nasal cavity, and thus do not contact the olfactory bulb. All analyses for potential adverse effects due to EDV, including histological and functional examinations, did not reveal significant side effects. On the basis of these findings, we propose that EDV as effective, while being a safe administration route with minimum local side effects, CNS invasion, or visual function disturbance. PMID:27333331

  12. Apolipoprotein E COG 133 mimetic peptide improves 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Orleâncio Gomes R

    2012-07-01

    can reduce 5-FU-induced intestinal changes and potentially benefit mucositis.

  13. The role of losartan and enalapril in the protection against stress-induced gastric mucosal ulceration in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Sanaa A.; Mahmoud H. Abdel-Rahim; Hytham M. Abdel-latif

    2016-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin II (ANG II) is a stress hormone and its level dramatically increases in the stomach during stress. In addition, it generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) with cellular damage and inflammation. So the aim of this study is to evaluate the mechanism of losartan and enalapril in the prevention of stress-induced gastric ulcer through their action on mucosal prostaglandin (PGs) and antioxidant enzymes and compare between them. Methods: Thirty- six adult male wistar albin...

  14. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotective Role of M. pruriens in Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shahram Golbabapour; Maryam Hajrezaie; Pouya Hassandarvish; Nazia Abdul Majid; A. Hamid A. Hadi; Noraziah Nordin; Mahmood A. Abdulla

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The e...

  15. Effects of Pithecellobium Jiringa Ethanol Extract against Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Fouad Hussain AL-Bayaty; Siddig Ibrahim Abdelwahab; Nimir, Amal R.; Suhailah Wasmn Qader; Mahmood Ameen Abdulla; Ibrahim Abdel Aziz Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Current anti-gastric ulcer agents have side effects, despite the progression and expansion of advances in treatment. This study aimed to investigate the gastroprotective mechanisms of Pithecellobium jiringa ethanol extract against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal ulcers in rats. For this purpose, Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: Group 1 (normal control) rats were orally administered with vehicle (carboxymethyl cellulose), Group 2 (ulcer control) rats were also orally...

  16. Efficacy of Sucralfate Mouth Wash in Prevention of 5-fluorouracil Induced Oral Mucositis: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala, Shahram; Saeedi, Majid; Janbabai, Ghasem; Ganji, Reza; Azhdari, Elham; Shiva, Afshin

    2016-04-01

    Sucralfate has been used for the prevention and treatment of radiotherapy- and chemotherapy-induced stomatitis and mucositis in a number of studies, but the results are contradictory. To answer such discrepancies, the present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of sucralfate mouthwash in prevention of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced oral mucositis in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. Patients with gastrointestinal cancers receiving 5-FU-based chemotherapy regimens were included in this randomized, blinded, controlled trial and were randomly allocated to either sucralfate mouthwash (every 6 h) or placebo. The patients were visited at fifth and tenth day of trial; the presence and severity of oral mucositis and the intensity of pain were assessed. The patients receiving sucralfate experienced lower frequency and severity of mucositis (76% vs. 38.5%, P = 0.005 and 84 vs. 38.5%, P mucositis was observed throughout the trial period, while in the placebo group no such effect was observed. Sucralfate mouthwash reduced the frequency and severity of 5-FU-induced oral mucositis in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies compared with placebo, indicating its efficacy in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. PMID:27007594

  17. A Lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea Agglomerans Is a Promising Adjuvant for Sublingual Vaccines to Induce Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice via TLR4 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasaka, Masahiro; Asari, Daisuke; Kiyotoh, Eiji; Okazaki, Arimichi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Hori, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSpa) has been applied to various fields for human use as a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand and its safety has been confirmed. Here, we showed for the first time the application of LPSpa as an effective mucosal adjuvant for activating vaccine-induced antigen specific immune responses. Mice sublingually immunized with influenza vaccine (HA split vaccine) with LPSpa induced both HA-specific IgG (systemic) and IgA (mucosal) antibody responses, which led to a significant increase in survival rate against lethal influenza virus challenge compared with subcutaneous vaccination. After sublingual administration of ovalbumin with LPSpa, ovalbumin-specific mucosal IgA responses were induced at both mucosal surfaces close to the immunized site and at remote mucosal surfaces. Sublingual administration of LPSpa evoked local antigen-uptake by dendritic cells in cervical lymph nodes. LPSpa induced cytokine production and the maturation and proliferation of innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 in dendritic cells. Collectively, these results suggest that LPSpa can be used as an effective mucosal adjuvant to stimulate and activate local innate immune cells to improve and enhance mucosal vaccine potency against various pathogens. PMID:25978818

  18. A Lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea Agglomerans Is a Promising Adjuvant for Sublingual Vaccines to Induce Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice via TLR4 Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Fukasaka

    Full Text Available A lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSpa has been applied to various fields for human use as a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand and its safety has been confirmed. Here, we showed for the first time the application of LPSpa as an effective mucosal adjuvant for activating vaccine-induced antigen specific immune responses. Mice sublingually immunized with influenza vaccine (HA split vaccine with LPSpa induced both HA-specific IgG (systemic and IgA (mucosal antibody responses, which led to a significant increase in survival rate against lethal influenza virus challenge compared with subcutaneous vaccination. After sublingual administration of ovalbumin with LPSpa, ovalbumin-specific mucosal IgA responses were induced at both mucosal surfaces close to the immunized site and at remote mucosal surfaces. Sublingual administration of LPSpa evoked local antigen-uptake by dendritic cells in cervical lymph nodes. LPSpa induced cytokine production and the maturation and proliferation of innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 in dendritic cells. Collectively, these results suggest that LPSpa can be used as an effective mucosal adjuvant to stimulate and activate local innate immune cells to improve and enhance mucosal vaccine potency against various pathogens.

  19. Gastroprotective activity of Nigella sativa L oil and its constituent, thymoquinone against acute alcohol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kanter, Mehmet; Demir, Halit; Karakaya, Cengiz; Ozbek, Hanefi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathogenesis of acute ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions and the effect of Nigella sativa L oil (NS) and its constituent thymoquinone (TQ) in an exper-imental model.

  20. Risk, Outcomes, and Costs of Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the risk, outcomes, and costs of radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM) among patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to head and neck primary cancers. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort consisting of 204 consecutive head-and-neck cancer patients who received RT with or without chemotherapy during 2002 was formed; their records were reviewed for clinical and resource use information. Patients who had received prior therapy, had second primary cancers, or received palliative radiation therapy were excluded. The risk of OM was analyzed by multiple variable logistic regression. The cost of care was computed from the provider's perspective in 2006 U.S. dollars and compared among patients with and without OM. Results: Oral mucositis occurred in 91% of patients; in 66% it was severe (Grade 3-4). Oral mucositis was more common among patients with oral cavity or oropharynx primaries (odds ratio [OR], 44.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2 to >100; p < 0.001), those who received chemotherapy (OR = 7.8; 95% CI, 1.5-41.6; p 0.02), and those who were treated with altered fractionation schedules (OR 6.3; 95% CI, 1.1-35.1; p = 0.03). Patients with OM were significantly more likely to have severe pain (54% vs. 6%; p < 0.001) and a weight loss of ≥5% (60% vs. 17%; p < 0.001). Oral mucositis was associated with an incremental cost of $1700-$6000, depending on the grade. Conclusions: Head-and-neck RT causes OM in virtually all patients. Oral mucositis is associated with severe pain, significant weight loss, increased resource use, and excess cost. Preventive strategies are needed

  1. DNA damage, apoptosis and cell cycle changes induced by fluoride in rat oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Fei He; Jian-Gang Chen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of fluoride on oxidativestress,DNA damage and apoptosis as well as cell cycle of rat oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes.METHODS: Ten male SD rats weighing 80~120 g were randomly divided into control group and fluoride group,5 animals each group. The animals in fluoride group had free access to deionized water containing 150 mg/L sodium fluoride (NaF). The animals in control group were given distilled water. Four weeks later, the animals were killed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) in oral mucosa and liver were measured by Fenton reaction, lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde (MDA), was detected by thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reaction, reduced glutathione (GSH) was assayed by dithionitrobenzoic acid (DTNB)reaction. DNA damage in oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes was determined by single cell gel (SCG) electrophoresis or comet assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle in oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes were detected by flow cytometry.RESULTS: The contents of ROS and MDA in oral mucosa and liver tissue of fluoride group were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.01), but the level of GSH was markedly decreased (P<0.01). The contents of ROS, MDA and GSH were (134.73±12.63) U/mg protein,(1.48±0.13) mmol/mg protein and (76.38±6.71) mmol/mg protein in oral mucosa respectively, and (143.45±11.76) U/mg protein, (1.44±0.12) mmol/mg protein and (78.83±7.72) mmol/mg protein in liver tissue respectively. The DNA damage rate in fluoride group was 50.20%in oral mucosal cells and 44.80% in hepatocytes, higher than those in the control group (P<0.01). The apoptosis rate in oral mucosal cells was (13.63±1.81) % in fluoride group, and (12.76±1.67) % in hepatocytes,higher than those in control group. Excess fluoride could differently lower the number of oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes at G0/G1 and S G2/M phases (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Excess fluoride can induce oxidative stress and DNA damage and lead to apoptosis and cell cycle

  2. Phenytoin mouthwash to treat cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Baharvand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral mucositis is one of the most common side effects of cancer therapy with no definite treatment. Phenytoin has positive effects on healing of mucosal and dermal wounds. In this study efficacy of 1% phenytoin mouthwash on severity of mucositis (on the basis of WHO scale, pain relief (based on Visual Analogue Scale, and improvement of patients' quality of life (on the basis of EORTC-QLQ-H and N35 questionnaire was evaluated. Materials And Methods: In a pilot -double-blind randomized clinical trial, eight patients in study group were given 1% phenytoin mouthwash while eight patients in control group used normal saline. Data analysis was performed by Mann-Whitney and Repeated Measured ANOVA tests. Results: Reduction of mucositis severity was observed, but the difference was not significant. On the other hand, patients on phenytoin therapy had better pain relief (VAS# 6.75 ± 1.58 at the beginning of the study reached to # 3.75 ± 1.16 after 3 weeks in phenytoin group and improvement in quality of life (score of QOL was 70.63 ± 5.5 that reached to 63.61 ± 6.39 in phenytoin group than normal saline group significantly (P < 0.05. Conclusion: One percent phenytoin mouthwash caused pain relief and improvement of life quality significantly in patients with mucositis due to cancer therapy, but it did not reduce the severity of mucositis in a statistically significant scale.

  3. A Novel Replication-Competent Vaccinia Vector MVTT Is Superior to MVA for Inducing High Levels of Neutralizing Antibody via Mucosal Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xiaoxing; Lu, Bin; Yu, Wenbo; Fang, Qing; Liu, Li; Zhuang, Ke; Shen, Tingting; Wang, Haibo; Tian, Po; Zhang, Linqi; Chen, Zhiwei

    2009-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT) for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallp...

  4. A novel replication-competent vaccinia vector MVTT is superior to MVA for inducing high levels of neutralizing antibody via mucosal vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoxing Huang; Bin Lu; Wenbo Yu; Qing Fang; Li Liu; Ke Zhuang; Tingting Shen; Haibo Wang; Po Tian; Linqi Zhang; Zhiwei Chen

    2009-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT) for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallp...

  5. EFFECT OF GRANULOCYTE-MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR ON CHEMOTHERAPY-INDUCED ORAL MUCOSITIS IN NON-NEUTROPENIC CANCER PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Ezzeldin M.; Al-Mulhim, Fatma A.; Al-Muhanna, Fahd A.; Al-Amri, Ali

    1998-01-01

    Objective: The study was designed to assess prospectively the efficacy of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the management of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in non-neutropenic cancer patients. Material and Methods: In a prospective open study, adult cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced, neutropenia-independent oral mucositis were treated with GM-CSF (Schering Plough Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ) prepared as mouthwash solution (5 to 10 μgm /ml). GM-CSF was a...

  6. A Lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea Agglomerans Is a Promising Adjuvant for Sublingual Vaccines to Induce Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice via TLR4 Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Fukasaka, Masahiro; Asari, Daisuke; Kiyotoh, Eiji; Okazaki, Arimichi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Hori, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSpa) has been applied to various fields for human use as a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand and its safety has been confirmed. Here, we showed for the first time the application of LPSpa as an effective mucosal adjuvant for activating vaccine-induced antigen specific immune responses. Mice sublingually immunized with influenza vaccine (HA split vaccine) with LPSpa induced both HA-specific IgG (systemic) and IgA (mucosal) antibody responses, which le...

  7. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carol L Fischer; Katherine S Walters; David R Drake; Deborah V Dawson; Derek R Blanchette; Kim A Brogden; Philip W Wertz

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria;however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  8. A protective role for keratinocyte growth factor in a murine model of chemotherapy and radiotherapy-induced mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the activity of palifermin (rHuKGF) in a murine model of mucosal damage induced by a radiotherapy/chemotherapy (RT/CT) regimen mimicking treatment protocols used in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A model of mucosal damage induced by RT/CT was established by injecting female BDF1 mice with cisplatin (10 mg/kg) on Day 1; 5-fluorouracil (40 mg/kg/day) on Days 1-4, and irradiation (5 Gy/day) to the head and neck on Days 1-5. Palifermin was administered subcutaneously on Days -2 to 0 (5 mg/kg/day) and on Day 5 (5 mg/kg). Evaluations included body weight, organ weight, keratinocyte growth factor receptor expression, epithelial thickness, and cellular proliferation. Results: Initiation of the radiochemotherapeutic regimen resulted in a reduction in body weight in control animals. Palifermin administration suppressed weight loss and resulted in increased organ weight (salivary glands and small intestine), epithelial thickness (esophagus and tongue), and cellular proliferation (tongue and salivary glands). Conclusions: Administration of palifermin before RT/CT promotes cell proliferation and increases in epithelial thickness in the oral mucosa, salivary glands, and digestive tract. Palifermin administration before and after RT/CT mitigates weight loss and a trophic effect on the intestinal mucosa and salivary glands, suggesting that palifermin use should be investigated further in the RT/CT settings, in which intestinal mucositis and salivary gland dysfunction are predominant side effects of cytotoxic therapy

  9. Protective Effect of Zanthoxylum nitidum Bark in Chemical and Stress Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Male Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zanthoxylum nitidum (Roxb. DC (Rutaceae, called Tez-mui or Tejamool in Assamese, is a large prickly shrub occurring in North-Eastern India and its roots are used traditionally for several medicinal purposes. In the present study, the aqueous extract from the stem bark of Zanthoxylum nitidum (ZNA was evaluated for its protective effects on gastric mucosal lesions in male Wistar albino rats against acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, ethanol and water immersion restraint stress induced gastric mucosal damage. In each model, ZNA was administered orally to rats at the doses of 100 and 200 mg kg-1 body weight, prior to chemical or stress challenge, followed by determination of ulcer index. Ranitidine hydrochloride at the dose of 35 mg kg-1, p.o. served as the reference drug. The test extract exhibited dose dependent and significant amelioration of gastric mucosal lesions in chemical (ASA and ethanol as well as in stress-induced ulcers in male Wistar albino rats, thus confirming its antiulcer potential.

  10. Exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) prevents chemotherapy-induced mucositis in rat small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kissow, Hannelouise; Viby, Niels-Erik; Hartmann, Bolette;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Gastrointestinal mucositis is an unwanted and often dose-limiting side effect to most cancer treatments. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a peptide secreted from intestinal L-cells in response to nutrient intake. The peptide is involved in the regulation of apoptosis and proliferation in...... the intestine. We aimed to investigate the role of GLP-2 in experimental chemotherapy-induced mucositis. METHODS STUDY 1: Rats were given a single injection with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and killed in groups of five each day for 5 days. Blood samples were analysed for GLP-2 concentrations. The intestine...... was analysed for weight loss, morphometric estimates and proliferation. Study 2 Rats were treated with GLP-2 or control vehicle 2 days before a single injection of 5-FU or saline. The treatments continued until kill 2 days after. The intestine was investigated for influx of myeloperoxidase (MPO...

  11. Therapeutic effects of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) in a murine model of concurrent chemo- and radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concurrent chemotherapy with radiotherapy (CCRT) has been applied for the treatment of advanced stage of head and neck cancer patients. However CCRT is associated with several complications including mucositis, dermatitis, stomatitis, etc. This study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic effect of systemically administrated recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) in CCRT-induced oral mucositis in a mouse model. Oral mucositis was induced in male BALB/c mice through combination treatment with cisplatin (11 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) and irradiation (17 Gy) of the head and neck area. rhEGF (1.0 mg/kg/day for consecutive 3 days) was administered systemically, and the therapeutic effect was determined by histological evaluation of the oral mucosa. To elucidate optimal dose of rhEGF on CCRT-induced mucositis, various concentrations (0.04-3 mg/kg) of rhEGF were injected for 3 days. Systemic rhEGF administration accelerated the recovery of body weight. Histologically, rhEGF-treated mice showed significantly increased epithelial cell layer thickness, basal cell number, and expression of Ki-67 compared to control mice. Most effective dose was 1 mg/kg among other doses tested. Systemic administration of 1 mg/kg of rhEGF reduces the severity of oral mucositis induced by CCRT in a mouse model, suggesting that rhEGF can be used for treating CCRT-induced mucositis during the cancer treatment. (author)

  12. Effects of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) on experimental radiation-induced oral mucositis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral mucositis is a common toxicity of radiation or chemotherapy, which is used a treatment for head and neck cancer. We investigated effects of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) on radiation-induced oral mucositis in rat model. Spraque-Dawley rats (7 per group) exposed to a single dose of 25 Gy (day 0) on their head, except for one group, were randomly divided into un-treated, vehicle-treated, and two rhEGF-treated groups. Rats were topically applied with rhEGF (15 or 30 μ g/oral cavity/day) or vehicle to their oral mucosa. Survival rate of rats, weight changes, and food intakes were examined from day 0 to 18 after radiation. Histology study was performed from oral mucosa of rats at day 7 and 18 after radiation. rhEGF-treated groups (15 or 30 μ g/day) showed all survival rate 33%, whereas un-treated and vehicle-treated groups showed all survival rate 0% at the end of experiment. rhEGF-treated groups statistically had less weight loss compared to vehicle-treated group from day 2 to 7 after radiation. Food intake of rats with rhEGF treatment turned to increase at day 14 after radiation. At 7 day after radiation, un-treated and vehicle-treated groups showed severe pseudomembraneous of ulcerative oral mucositis. On the other hand, rhEGF-treated groups had no more than cellular swelling and degeneration of epidermal cells in oral mucosa of rats. These results suggest that rhEGF has significantly positive effects on radiation-induced oral mucositis in rats. rhEGF display a therapeutic potential on a clinical level

  13. Effects of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) on experimental radiation-induced oral mucositis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kwon Il; Kim, Sun Hee [Daewoong Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Soo Young; Kim, Yeon Wha; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang Wook [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Sook [Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    Oral mucositis is a common toxicity of radiation or chemotherapy, which is used a treatment for head and neck cancer. We investigated effects of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) on radiation-induced oral mucositis in rat model. Spraque-Dawley rats (7 per group) exposed to a single dose of 25 Gy (day 0) on their head, except for one group, were randomly divided into un-treated, vehicle-treated, and two rhEGF-treated groups. Rats were topically applied with rhEGF (15 or 30 {mu} g/oral cavity/day) or vehicle to their oral mucosa. Survival rate of rats, weight changes, and food intakes were examined from day 0 to 18 after radiation. Histology study was performed from oral mucosa of rats at day 7 and 18 after radiation. rhEGF-treated groups (15 or 30 {mu} g/day) showed all survival rate 33%, whereas un-treated and vehicle-treated groups showed all survival rate 0% at the end of experiment. rhEGF-treated groups statistically had less weight loss compared to vehicle-treated group from day 2 to 7 after radiation. Food intake of rats with rhEGF treatment turned to increase at day 14 after radiation. At 7 day after radiation, un-treated and vehicle-treated groups showed severe pseudomembraneous of ulcerative oral mucositis. On the other hand, rhEGF-treated groups had no more than cellular swelling and degeneration of epidermal cells in oral mucosa of rats. These results suggest that rhEGF has significantly positive effects on radiation-induced oral mucositis in rats. rhEGF display a therapeutic potential on a clinical level.

  14. Randomized trial of opioids versus tricyclic antidepressants for radiation-induced mucositis pain in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrnrooth, E.; Grau, C.; Zachariae, R.; Andersen, Joern [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    2001-11-01

    Patients who receive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are likely to develop painful mucositis. The pain is characterized by a burning or stinging sensation similar to neuropathic pain sensations. The purpose of the present study was to compare the analgesic effect of a tricyclic antidepressant (TC), commonly used in the treatment of neuropathic pain, with the effect of opioids on radiation-induced mucositis pain. Forty-three patients receiving 66-68 Gy external radiation according to the DAHANCA guidelines (the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Study Group) were randomized to either morphine or TC when mucositis pain was insufficiently managed with weak analgesics. Patients with insufficient pain control in either treatment arm received supplementary medication from the opposite treatment arm. Pain was evaluated weekly using a VAS scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The degree of mucositis and the degree of depression were measured at the same time intervals. Twenty-two patients entered the opioid arm and 21 the TC arm. Two patients in each arm were non-evaluable. VAS pain scores were significantly reduced in the opioid treatment arm one week after randomization (p=0.01). Eight patients in the TC arm were managed with TC alone, but for 11 patients it was necessary to add morphine. The 20 evaluable patients in the morphine arm required no additional treatment. There were no significant differences in side effects between the two groups. Higher pain scores in the TC arm, but not in the opioid arm, were significantly correlated with higher BDI scores. Some head and neck cancer patients with radiation-induced nucositis pain may have sufficient pain control on TC alone. This might be useful in patients with relative counter-indications to opioid treatment.

  15. Randomized trial of opioids versus tricyclic antidepressants for radiation-induced mucositis pain in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients who receive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are likely to develop painful mucositis. The pain is characterized by a burning or stinging sensation similar to neuropathic pain sensations. The purpose of the present study was to compare the analgesic effect of a tricyclic antidepressant (TC), commonly used in the treatment of neuropathic pain, with the effect of opioids on radiation-induced mucositis pain. Forty-three patients receiving 66-68 Gy external radiation according to the DAHANCA guidelines (the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Study Group) were randomized to either morphine or TC when mucositis pain was insufficiently managed with weak analgesics. Patients with insufficient pain control in either treatment arm received supplementary medication from the opposite treatment arm. Pain was evaluated weekly using a VAS scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The degree of mucositis and the degree of depression were measured at the same time intervals. Twenty-two patients entered the opioid arm and 21 the TC arm. Two patients in each arm were non-evaluable. VAS pain scores were significantly reduced in the opioid treatment arm one week after randomization (p=0.01). Eight patients in the TC arm were managed with TC alone, but for 11 patients it was necessary to add morphine. The 20 evaluable patients in the morphine arm required no additional treatment. There were no significant differences in side effects between the two groups. Higher pain scores in the TC arm, but not in the opioid arm, were significantly correlated with higher BDI scores. Some head and neck cancer patients with radiation-induced nucositis pain may have sufficient pain control on TC alone. This might be useful in patients with relative counter-indications to opioid treatment

  16. Low-level laser therapy in the prevention of radiotherapy-induced xerostomia and oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to verify if the use of InGaAIP laser with 685 nm wave length can reduce the xerostomy incidence, the oral mucositis severity and the pain related to mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiotherapy. Objective: sixty patients presenting head and neck carcinoma were submitted to radiotherapy with daily doses of 1.8 to 2.0 Gy and a final dose of 45 to 72 Gy. The salivary volume was evaluated in the first and fifteenth days, at the end of the treatment and after 15 and 30 days. The oral mucositis was evaluated on a weekly basis. Twenty-nine patients were submitted to radiotherapy without laser and 31 were submitted to radiotherapy and laser with daily doses of 2 joules/cm2 in predetermined areas of the oral mucosa and the parotid and submandibular glands. Results: in the group submitted to radiotherapy and laser the incidence of mucositis (p < 0.001) and pain (p < 0.016) was significantly lower and the salivary volume (p < 0.001) was kept higher during and after the treatment. Conclusion: the group of patients submitted to radiotherapy and laser had lower incidence of xerostomy, oral mucositis and pain when compared to the group treated with radiotherapy without laser, producing statistically significant results. (author)

  17. Intra-amniotic Candida albicans infection induces mucosal injury and inflammation in the ovine fetal intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforou, Maria; Jacobs, Esmee M R; Kemp, Matthew W; Hornef, Mathias W; Payne, Matthew S; Saito, Masatoshi; Newnham, John P; Janssen, Leon E W; Jobe, Alan H; Kallapur, Suhas G; Kramer, Boris W; Wolfs, Tim G A M

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is caused by intrauterine infection with microorganisms including Candida albicans (C.albicans). Chorioamnionitis is associated with postnatal intestinal pathologies including necrotizing enterocolitis. The underlying mechanisms by which intra-amniotic C.albicans infection adversely affects the fetal gut remain unknown. Therefore, we assessed whether intra-amniotic C.albicans infection would cause intestinal inflammation and mucosal injury in an ovine model. Additionally, we tested whether treatment with the fungistatic fluconazole ameliorated the adverse intestinal outcome of intra-amniotic C.albicans infection. Pregnant sheep received intra-amniotic injections with 10(7) colony-forming units C.albicans or saline at 3 or 5 days before preterm delivery at 122 days of gestation. Fetuses were given intra-amniotic and intra-peritoneal fluconazole treatments 2 days after intra-amniotic administration of C.albicans. Intra-amniotic C.albicans caused intestinal colonization and invasive growth within the fetal gut with mucosal injury and intestinal inflammation, characterized by increased CD3(+) lymphocytes, MPO(+) cells and elevated TNF-α and IL-17 mRNA levels. Fluconazole treatment in utero decreased intestinal C.albicans colonization, mucosal injury but failed to attenuate intestinal inflammation. Intra-amniotic C.albicans caused intestinal infection, injury and inflammation. Fluconazole treatment decreased mucosal injury but failed to ameliorate C.albicans-mediated mucosal inflammation emphasizing the need to optimize the applied antifungal therapeutic strategy. PMID:27411776

  18. The Effect of Topical Application of Royal Jelly on Chemoradiotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Head and Neck Cancer: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohichi Yamauchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. One of the common side effects experienced by head and neck cancer patients on chemoradiotherapy is mucositis. Severe mucositis may be controllable by limiting cancer therapy, but it has resulted in decreasing the completion rate of chemoradiotherapy. The efficacy of royal jelly (RJ as prophylaxis against chemoradiotherapy-induced mucositis was evaluated through clinical scoring of oral and pharyngeal mucositis. Methods. In this randomized, single-blind (physician-blind, clinical trial, 13 patients with head and neck cancer requiring chemoradiation were randomly assigned to two groups. Seven patients assigned to the study group received RJ, and 6 patients were assigned to the control group. RJ group patients took RJ three times per day during treatment. The patients in both groups were evaluated twice a week for the development of mucositis using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results. A significant reduction in mucositis was seen among RJ-treated patients compared with controls (P<0.001. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that prophylactic use of RJ was effective in reducing mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. However, further studies are needed because of the small sample size and the absence of double blinding.

  19. Studies on the gastric mucosal microcirculation. 2. Helicobacter pylori water soluble extracts induce platelet aggregation in the gastric mucosal microcirculation in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Kalia, N; Jacob, S.; Brown, N; Reed, M.; Morton, D.; Bardhan, K

    1997-01-01

    Background—The exact mechanisms by which Helicobacter pylori infection results in gastric mucosal injury are unclear. 
Aims—To assess in vivo whether H pylori extracts could initiate an inflammatory response in the rat gastric mucosal microcirculation. 
Methods—Extracts of H pylori, Escherichia coli, or distilled water were administered topically to the gastric mucosa of anaesthetised animals. Fluorescence in vivo microscopy assessed macromolecular leakage of labelled alb...

  20. Effect of chlorhexidine and benzydamine mouthwashes on mucositis induced by therapeutic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaranayake, L.P.; MacFarlane, T.W.; Hunter, I.P.; Robertson, A.G.; MacFarlane, G.; Soutar, D.S.; Ferguson, M.M.

    1988-05-01

    The efficacy of Benzydamine as a mouthwash was compared with chlorhexidine in two groups of patients receiving radiotherapy for oral carcinoma. Mucositis and pain were recorded over a 6 week period and oral carriage of Candida species, coliforms and Staphylococcus aureus was assessed using an oral rinse technique. There was no significant difference in the mucositis scores, overall pain scores or the yeast and bacterial species isolated between the two treatment groups. However, 58% (7 out of 12) and 92% (12 out of 13) patients reported oral discomfort when rinsing the mouth with chlorhexidine and benzydamine, respectively. In both groups, the most common coliform isolated was Klebsiella pneumoniae and the carriage of yeasts was significantly greater than that of coliforms. These results indicate that, although the individual patient acceptance of chlorhexidine is better than benzydamine, there is little difference between the two mouthwashes both in controlling pain and mucositis or in the oral carriage of the micro-organisms studied.

  1. The effect of chlorhexidine and benzydamine mouthwashes on mucositis induced by therapeutic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of Benzydamine as a mouthwash was compared with chlorhexidine in two groups of patients receiving radiotherapy for oral carcinoma. Mucositis and pain were recorded over a 6 week period and oral carriage of Candida species, coliforms and Staphylococcus aureus was assessed using an oral rinse technique. There was no significant difference in the mucositis scores, overall pain scores or the yeast and bacterial species isolated between the two treatment groups. However, 58% (7 out of 12) and 92% (12 out of 13) patients reported oral discomfort when rinsing the mouth with chlorhexidine and benzydamine, respectively. In both groups, the most common coliform isolated was Klebsiella pneumoniae and the carriage of yeasts was significantly greater than that of coliforms. These results indicate that, although the individual patient acceptance of chlorhexidine is better than benzydamine, there is little difference between the two mouthwashes both in controlling pain and mucositis or in the oral carriage of the micro-organisms studied. (author)

  2. Chimeric plant virus particles administered nasally or orally induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brennan, F.R.; Bellaby, T.; Helliwell, S.M.; Jones, T.D.; Kamstrup, Søren; Dalsgaard, Kristian; Flock, J.I.; Hamilton, W.D.O.

    1999-01-01

    of CVPs to generate antibody at distant mucosal sites. IgG2a and TgG2b were the dominant IgG subclasses in sera to both CPMV and FnBP, demonstrating a bias in the response toward the T helper 1 type. The sera completely inhibited the binding of human fibronectin to the S. aureus FnBP. Oral......The humoral immune responses to the D2 peptide of fibronectin-binding protein B (FnBP) of Staphylococcus aureus, expressed on the plant virus cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), were evaluated after mucosal delivery to mice. Intranasal immunization of these chimeric virus particles (CVPs), either alone or....... These studies demonstrate for the first time that recombinant plant viruses have potential as mucosal vaccines without the requirement for adjuvant and that the nasal route is most effective for the delivery of these nonreplicating particles....

  3. Chimeric plant virus particles administered nasally or orally induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brennan, F.R.; Bellaby, T.; Helliwell, S.M.;

    1999-01-01

    The humoral immune responses to the D2 peptide of fibronectin-binding protein B (FnBP) of Staphylococcus aureus, expressed on the plant virus cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), were evaluated after mucosal delivery to mice. Intranasal immunization of these chimeric virus particles (CVPs), either alone or...... of CVPs to generate antibody at distant mucosal sites. IgG2a and TgG2b were the dominant IgG subclasses in sera to both CPMV and FnBP, demonstrating a bias in the response toward the T helper 1 type. The sera completely inhibited the binding of human fibronectin to the S. aureus FnBP. Oral...

  4. Mucosal immunization with high-mobility group box 1 in chitosan enhances DNA vaccine-induced protection against coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Maowei; Yue, Yan; Dong, Chunsheng; Li, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wei; Xiong, Sidong

    2013-11-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a small single-stranded RNA virus, belongs to the Picornaviridae family. Its infection is the most common cause of myocarditis, with no vaccine available. Gastrointestinal mucosa is the major entry port for CVB3; therefore, the induction of local immunity in mucosal tissues may help control initial viral infections and alleviate subsequent myocardial injury. Here we evaluated the ability of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) encapsulated in chitosan particles to enhance the mucosal immune responses induced by the CVB3-specific mucosal DNA vaccine chitosan-pVP1. Mice were intranasally coimmunized with 4 doses of chitosan-pHMGB1 and chitosan-pVP1 plasmids, at 2-week intervals, and were challenged with CVB3 4 weeks after the last immunization. Compared with chitosan-pVP1 immunization alone, coimmunization with chitosan-pHMGB1 significantly (P loads, decreased myocardial injury, and increased survival rates. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that HMGB1 enhanced dendritic cell (DC) recruitment to mesenteric lymph nodes and promoted DC maturation, which might partly account for its mucosal adjuvant effect. This strategy may represent a promising approach to candidate vaccines against CVB3-induced myocarditis. PMID:24027262

  5. Genomic adaptation of the Lactobacillus casei group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiro Toh

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus form a closely related taxonomic group (Lactobacillus casei group within the facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of L. paracasei JCM 8130 and L. casei ATCC 393, and the draft genome sequence of L. paracasei COM0101, all of which were isolated from daily products. Furthermore, we re-annotated the genome of L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (also known as L. rhamnosus GG, which we have previously reported. We confirmed that ATCC 393 is distinct from other strains previously described as L. paracasei. The core genome of 10 completely sequenced strains of the L. casei group comprised 1,682 protein-coding genes. Although extensive genome-wide synteny was found among the L. casei group, the genomes of ATCC 53103, JCM 8130, and ATCC 393 contained genomic islands compared with L. paracasei ATCC 334. Several genomic islands, including carbohydrate utilization gene clusters, were found at the same loci in the chromosomes of the L. casei group. The spaCBA pilus gene cluster, which was first identified in GG, was also found in other strains of the L. casei group, but several L. paracasei strains including COM0101 contained truncated spaC gene. ATCC 53103 encoded a higher number of proteins involved in carbohydrate utilization compared with intestinal lactobacilli, and extracellular adhesion proteins, several of which are absent in other strains of the L. casei group. In addition to previously fully sequenced L. rhamnosus and L. paracasei strains, the complete genome sequences of L. casei will provide valuable insights into the evolution of the L. casei group.

  6. Assessment of the effect of local application of amifostine on acute radiation-induced oral mucositis in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang Jiang; Wang, Sheng Zi; Wang, Shu Yi; Zhang, Yan Ping

    2014-09-01

    The aim of present study was to assess the radioprotective effects of the local application of amifostine to treat acute buccal mucositis in guinea pigs. A total of 32 guinea pigs were randomized into four groups: (Group A) topically administered 50 mg of amifostine plus radiotherapy (RT); (Group B) 100 mg amifostine plus RT; (Group C) normal saline plus RT; and (Group D) normal saline plus sham RT. The opportunity for administration was 15 min before irradiation. When administered, the cotton pieces that had been soaked with 0.5 ml amifostine solution or saline were applied gently on the buccal mucosa of each guinea pig for 30 min. The animals in Groups A, B and C were irradiated individually with a single dose of 30 Gy to the bilateral buccal mucosa. Eight days after irradiation, the animals were scored macroscopically; they were then euthanized, and the buccal mucosal tissues were processed for hematoxylin-eosin staining and ICAM-1 immunohistochemical analysis. In Groups A and B, the mean macroscopic scores were 2.9 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 1.1, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, when they were separately compared with Group C (4.4 ± 0.7), a noticeable difference was obtained (P amifostine-treated groups were better than in Group C. The results demonstrated that topical administration of amifostine to the oral mucosa is effective treatment of acute radiation-induced mucositis. PMID:24706999

  7. The effects of sucralfate suspension and diphenhydramine syrup plus kaolin-pectin on radiotherapy-induced mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective, double-blind study compared the effectiveness of sucralfate suspension with diphenhydramine syrup plus kaolin-pectin in reducing severity and pain of radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis. Fourteen patients who received at least 4600 cGy to the oral cavity used one of the mouth rinses four times a day, beginning at 1600 cGy. Data were collected on daily perceived pain and helpfulness of mouth rinse, weekly mucositis grade, weight change, and interruption of therapy. Analysis of data revealed no statistically significant differences between the two groups in any parameter. A retrospective review of 15 patients who had received at least 4600 cGy radiation to the oropharynx but had not used a daily mouth-coating rinse, was compared with the study group. Comparison of the two groups suggested that consistent daily oral hygiene and use of a mouth-coating agent will result in less pain and may reduce weight loss and interruption of radiation because of severe mucositis

  8. Chemotherapy-Induced and/or Radiation Therapy-Induced Oral Mucositis-Complicating the Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddireddy Umameshwar Rao Naidu

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The term mucositis is coined to describe the adverse effects of radiation and chemotherapy treatments. Mucositis is one of the most common adverse reactions encountered in radiation therapy for head and neck cancers, as well as in chemotherapy, in particular with drugs affecting DNA synthesis (Sphase-specific agents such as fluorouracil, methotrexate, and cytarabine. Mucositis may limit the patient's ability to tolerate chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and nutritional status is compromised. It may drastically affect cancer treatment as well as the patient's quality of life. The incidence and severity of mucositis will vary from patient to patient. It will also vary from treatment to treatment. It is estimated that there is 40% incidence of mucositis in patients treated with standard chemotherapy and this will not only increase with the number of treatment cycles but also with previous episodes. Similarly, patients who undergo bone marrow transplantation and who receive high doses of chemotherapy have a 76% chance of getting mucositis. Patients receiving radiation, in particular to head and neck cancers, have a 30% to 60% chance. The exact pathophysiology of development is not known, but it is thought to be divided into direct and indirect mucositis. Chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy will interfere with the normal turnover of epithelial, cells leading to mucosal injury; subsequently, it can also occur due to indirect invasion of Gram-negative bacteria and fungal species because most of the cancer drugs will cause changes in blood counts. With the advancement in cytology, a more precise mechanism has been established. With this understanding, we can select and target particular mediators responsible for the mucositis. Risk factors such as age, nutritional status, type of malignancy, and oral care during treatment will play important roles in the development of mucositis. Many treatment options are available to prevent and treat this

  9. Assessment of the effect of local application of amifostine on acute radiation-induced oral mucositis in guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of present study was to assess the radioprotective effects of the local application of amifostine to treat acute buccal mucositis in guinea pigs. A total of 32 guinea pigs were randomized into four groups: (Group A) topically administered 50 mg of amifostine plus radiotherapy (RT); (Group B) 100 mg amifostine plus RT; (Group C) normal saline plus RT; and (Group D) normal saline plus sham RT. The opportunity for administration was 15 min before irradiation. When administered, the cotton pieces that had been soaked with 0.5 ml amifostine solution or saline were applied gently on the buccal mucosa of each guinea pig for 30 min. The animals in Groups A, B and C were irradiated individually with a single dose of 30 Gy to the bilateral buccal mucosa. Eight days after irradiation, the animals were scored macroscopically; they were then euthanized, and the buccal mucosal tissues were processed for hematoxylin-eosin staining and ICAM-1 immunohistochemical analysis. In Groups A and B, the mean macroscopic scores were 2.9 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 1.1, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, when they were separately compared with Group C (4.4 ± 0.7), a noticeable difference was obtained (P < 0.05). No mucositis was observed in Group D. Comparisons of the expression of ICAM-1 were in agreement with the macroscopic data. Histologically, superficial erosion, exudate and ulcer formation were all observed in the RT groups; only the severity and extent were different. The microscopic observations in the amifostine-treated groups were better than in Group C. The results demonstrated that topical administration of amifostine to the oral mucosa is effective treatment of acute radiation-induced mucositis. (author)

  10. Preventive effects of amino-acid-rich elemental diet Elental® on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with colorectal cancer: a prospective pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Yutaka; Ishibashi, Nobuya; Yamaguchi, Keizou; UCHIDA, SHINJI; Kamei, Hideki; Nakayama, Goichi; Hirakawa, Hiroaki; Tanigawa, Masahiko; Akagi, Yoshito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The prospective pilot study was designed to evaluate the preventive effects of amino-acid-rich elemental diet (ED), Elental®, on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with colorectal cancer. The factors influencing its efficacy are also investigated. Methods A total of 22 eligible patients with colorectal cancer experiencing grade 1–3 oral mucositis during treatment with fluorouracil-based chemotherapy entered the current study. Their average age was 67 years. There were 10 ...

  11. Relief with Rapamycin: mTOR inhibition protects against radiation-induced mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Finkel, Toren

    2012-01-01

    In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Iglesias-Bartolome et al (2012) show that mTOR inhibition with rapamycin protects against mucositis in mice, suggesting potential treatment strategies against this harmful side effect of anti-cancer therapies. In normal tissues, rapamycin prevents epithelial stem cell senescence by reducing oxidative stress through increased MnSOD.

  12. Laser phototherapy as a treatment for radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lino, Maira Doria Martinez da Costa; Carvalho, Fabola Bastos de; Magalhaes, Edval Barreto; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa [Federal University of Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dental School. Center of Biophotonics; Oliveira, Lara Ramalho de [Metropolitan Union of Culture and Education, Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dental School. Oral Diagnosis Specialization Program; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira, E-mail: lucianaramalho@uol.com.b [Metropolitan Union of Culture and Education (UNIME), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dental School. Lab. of Pathology

    2011-07-01

    Oral mucositis is a harmful side effect of radiotherapy (RT) on the head and neck region. There are encouraging reports on the beneficial aspects of the use of laser light on the treatment of oral mucositis. This paper reports the efficacy of laser phototherapy (LPT) on the treatment of oral mucositis in a patient undergoing RT after surgical removal of a squamous cell carcinoma with osseous invasion of the maxilla. Palatal and commissural lesions were treated with {lambda}660 nm, 40 mW, {phi}=4 mm{sup 2}, in contact mode, 5 x 2.4 J/cm{sup 2} per point, 14.4 J/cm{sup 2} per session. For treating the lesion on the patient's nasal mucosa, LPT ({phi}=4 mm{sup 2}, {lambda}780 nm, 70 mW, 3 x 2.1 J/cm{sup 2} per point, 6.3 J/cm{sup 2} per session, contact mode) was used on the external area of the nose. A single dose (2.4 J/cm{sup 2}) with the {lambda}660 nm laser, as described before, was applied on the entrance of each nostril. LPT was used 3 times/week during 4 weeks. Treatment results indicate that the use of LPT on oral mucositis was effective and allowed the patient to carry on the RT without interruption. However, long-term and controlled clinical trials are necessary to establish both preventive and curative protocols using LPT. (author)

  13. Citrulline as a Marker for Chemotherapy Induced Mucosal Barrier Injury in Pediatric Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vilet, Michel J.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Koetse, Harma A.; Stellaard, Frans; Kamps, Willem A.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. The Currently used National Cancer Institute (NCI) adverse events criteria for mucosal barrier injury (MBI) are insufficient for use in children. We searched for objective, easily measurable indicators for MBI in children with cancer. Purpose. In children with acute myeloid leukemia, var

  14. Laser phototherapy as a treatment for radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral mucositis is a harmful side effect of radiotherapy (RT) on the head and neck region. There are encouraging reports on the beneficial aspects of the use of laser light on the treatment of oral mucositis. This paper reports the efficacy of laser phototherapy (LPT) on the treatment of oral mucositis in a patient undergoing RT after surgical removal of a squamous cell carcinoma with osseous invasion of the maxilla. Palatal and commissural lesions were treated with λ660 nm, 40 mW, φ=4 mm2, in contact mode, 5 x 2.4 J/cm2 per point, 14.4 J/cm2 per session. For treating the lesion on the patient's nasal mucosa, LPT (φ=4 mm2, λ780 nm, 70 mW, 3 x 2.1 J/cm2 per point, 6.3 J/cm2 per session, contact mode) was used on the external area of the nose. A single dose (2.4 J/cm2) with the λ660 nm laser, as described before, was applied on the entrance of each nostril. LPT was used 3 times/week during 4 weeks. Treatment results indicate that the use of LPT on oral mucositis was effective and allowed the patient to carry on the RT without interruption. However, long-term and controlled clinical trials are necessary to establish both preventive and curative protocols using LPT. (author)

  15. Early radiation-induced mucosal changes evaluated by proctoscopy: Predictive role of dosimetric parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Late rectal complications are assessed according to different scoring systems. Endoscopy can provide a more sensitive estimation of early radiation damage. The aim of this paper is to investigate the correlation between dosimetric parameters and rectal mucosal changes after radiotherapy (RT). Materials and methods: Patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with curative or adjuvant RT underwent endoscopy 1 year after RT. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed to analyze the predictive capability of the dosimetric variables in determining mucosal changes classified by Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Results: The best dosimetric predictors of grade ⩾2 telangiectasia were rectal (r) V60Gy (p = 0.014), rV70Gy (p = 0.017) and rDmean (p = 0.018). Similar results were obtained for grade ⩾2 VRS. The set of rV60Gy 70Gy mean 60Gy, rV70Gy and rDmean were the strongest predictors of rectal mucosal alterations. In-depth analysis is required to correlate each mucosal alteration with late rectal toxicity in order to suggest early proctoscopy as surrogate end-point for rectal late toxicity in studies aimed at reducing this important complication.

  16. Local application of GM-CSF for treatment of chemoirradiation-induced mucositis in patients with advanced carcinoma of the head and neck: results of controlled clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: the study was designed to assess prospectively the efficacy of GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) mouthwash solution in the management of chemoirradiation induced oral mucositis for head and neck cancer patients. Methods and materials: thirty-five patients with advanced carcinoma of the head and neck were evaluated for mucositis during the first cycle of chemoirradiation therapy. GM-CSF 400 μg in 250 cc of water for 1 h of mouth washing was prescribed. Active comparator was a conventional mucositis therapy combination. The procedure started once mucositis grade 1 (using the WHO grading) was detected. Patients, examined twice a week, were evaluated for oral mucositis and oral infections. Assessment of subjective pain was provided using a visual analogue scale. Blood tests were taken weekly. Results: the results of statistical evaluation of mucositis using the WHO-grading showed no significant differences between the two treatment groups. Local application of GM-CSF significantly reduced subjective pain during the second week of chemoirradiation therapy. Statistical analysis of the leucocytes-, platelet count, haemoglobin level and development of oral infections revealed no significant differences between the two treatment groups. Conclusion: in combined chemoirradiation therapy schemes the RTOG/EORTC toxicity scale should be used. In selected cases of mucositis attended with severe pain, GM-CSF should be observed within the therapeutic considerations. Controlled clinical trials with larger patient population are required to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in this indication. (author)

  17. Preliminary study on radio-chemo-induced oral mucositis and low level laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merigo, Elisabetta; Fontana, Matteo; Fornaini, Carlo; Clini, Fabio; Cella, Luigi; Vescovi, Paolo; Oppici, Aldo

    2012-09-01

    Background: Oral mucositis remains one of the most common and troubling side effects of antineoplastic radiation and drug therapy: its incidence in onco-hematological radio-chemotreated patients is variable between 50 and 100% and its impact on this populations is directly linked with the experience of intense pain causing reduction and modification of therapy regimens, decreased survival rates and increased cost of care. Purpose: Aim of this study is the preliminary evaluation of a Low Level Laser therapy (LLLT) protocol on healing process of oral mucositis and on pain and quality of life of patients experiencing this dramatic side-effect. Materials and methods: Patients were evaluated and treated at the Unita` Operativa Semplice Dipartimentale di Odontostomatologia e Chirurgia Maxillo-Facciale of the Hospital of Piacenza were they were treated for primary disease with protocols of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. LLLT protocol was performed with a diode laser (808 nm -XD Smile - Fotona -Slovenia) on a two weeks-6 treatments schedule with power of 0.5 W and application of 30 seconds. Mucositis grading was scored on the basis of WHO classification by two blind operators at each treatment and at 1 and 2 weeks after treatment. Pain and capability of deglutition were described by patients by means questionnaires based on Visual Analogue Scale, Numerical Rating Scale and Quality of Life. Results: A relevant improvement of healing of oral mucositis, in terms of reduction of grading score, and of pain, swallowing discomfort and quality of life was recorded. Discussion and conclusion: Results of this preliminary study are encouraging for the realization of larger studies focused on the application of LLLT protocols in management of radio-chemotreated patients with oral mucositis.

  18. Systemic BCG immunization induces persistent lung mucosal multifunctional CD4 T(EM cells which expand following virulent mycobacterial challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryan A Kaveh

    Full Text Available To more closely understand the mechanisms of how BCG vaccination confers immunity would help to rationally design improved tuberculosis vaccines that are urgently required. Given the established central role of CD4 T cells in BCG induced immunity, we sought to characterise the generation of memory CD4 T cell responses to BCG vaccination and M. bovis infection in a murine challenge model. We demonstrate that a single systemic BCG vaccination induces distinct systemic and mucosal populations of T effector memory (T(EM cells in vaccinated mice. These CD4+CD44(hiCD62L(loCD27⁻ T cells concomitantly produce IFN-γ and TNF-α, or IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α and have a higher cytokine median fluorescence intensity MFI or 'quality of response' than single cytokine producing cells. These cells are maintained for long periods (>16 months in BCG protected mice, maintaining a vaccine-specific functionality. Following virulent mycobacterial challenge, these cells underwent significant expansion in the lungs and are, therefore, strongly associated with protection against M. bovis challenge. Our data demonstrate that a persistent mucosal population of T(EM cells can be induced by parenteral immunization, a feature only previously associated with mucosal immunization routes; and that these multifunctional T(EM cells are strongly associated with protection. We propose that these cells mediate protective immunity, and that vaccines designed to increase the number of relevant antigen-specific T(EM in the lung may represent a new generation of TB vaccines.

  19. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araújo, C.V. [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Lazzarotto, C.R. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular e do Desenvolvimento, Universidade de Fortaleza, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Aquino, C.C.; Figueiredo, I.L.; Costa, T.B.; Oliveira Alves, L.A. de [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Ribeiro, R.A. [Laboratório da Inflamação e Câncer, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Bertolini, L.R. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular e do Desenvolvimento, Universidade de Fortaleza, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Lima, A.A.M. [Laboratório de Doenças Infecciosas, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Brito, G.A.C. [Laboratório da Inflamação e Câncer, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Oriá, R.B. [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2015-04-28

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein) is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE{sup -/-}) and wild-type (APOE{sup +/+}) C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86) were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection). Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001) in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05) were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE{sup -/-} mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE{sup +/+} mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE{sup -/-}-challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU

  20. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.V. Araújo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE-/- and wild-type (APOE+/+ C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86 were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM or phosphate buffered saline (PBS by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection. Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001 in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05 were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE-/- mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE+/+ mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE-/--challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU challenge.

  1. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein) is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE-/-) and wild-type (APOE+/+) C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86) were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection). Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001) in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05) were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE-/- mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE+/+ mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE-/--challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU challenge

  2. Mucosa-adhesive water-soluble polymer film for treatment of acute radiation-induced oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the usefulness and safety of a mucosa-adhesive water-soluble polymer film (AD film) containing anesthetics and antibiotics for the treatment of acute radiation-induced oral mucositis. Materials and Methods: To prepare AD films, 600 mg of hydroxy-propyl-cellulose was dissolved in ethyl alcohol, and mixed with a solution containing tetracaine, ofloxacine, miconazole, guaiazulene, and triacetin. The gel obtained was dried to form 30 translucent round sheets (20 mg per sheet) of 7.5 cm in diameter and 0.2 mm in thickness. The AD film showed excellent adhesive and coating properties when placed on wet oral mucosa. From 1993 to 1994, we used the AD film in 25 patients with acute radiation-induced oral mucositis, in an attempt to alleviate their pain and prevent secondary oral infection. All patients had received definitive radiotherapy for oral carcinoma. Intensity and duration of oral pain from mucositis, relief rates at rest and while eating, and presence of bacterial and/or fungal infection were compared with those of 27 patients treated with topical anesthetics (viscous lidocaine, XylocaineTM) and/or general systemic analgesics from 1990 to 1992 (NonAD Group). Results: The intensity of oral pain was the same in the two groups. The mean duration of pain of the AD film Group (10 days) was significantly shortened compared with the NonAD Group (15 days). The rates of complete pain relief at rest and while eating of the AD film Group were statistically higher than those of the NonAD Group: 82% vs. 44%, and 68% vs. 22%, respectively. No secondary bacterial or fungal infections were observed in the AD film Group, whereas 4 cases of documented infections were found in the NonAD Group. No acute or chronic adverse effects of AD film were observed during the 3-year follow-up period. The rates for local control of oral carcinoma and overall survival, at the end of the follow-up period, were 96% and 87% for the AD film Group vs. 92% and 85% for the NonAD Group

  3. Comparative study of the effects of rhKGF, CBLB502 and WR2721 on radiation-induced oral mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Li-Mei; Cui, Yu; Tie-zhu XU; ZHAO, ZHI-WEI; Zhong-tang LI; Wang, Jun-Ke; Ya-jun SHAN; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Hong-wei TANG; Yu-wen CONG

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the protective effect of rhKGF, CBLB502 and WR2721 on radiation-induced oral mucositis (ROM). Methods Fifty male 6-8-week-old C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into normal group, irradiation control group, rhKGF group, CBLB502 group, and WR2721 group (n=10 each). The 30-day survival rate and change in body weight of mice that had received 17Gy irradiation of head and neck area were recorded. In another group of 20 mice, 1% toluidine blue staining and HE staining were us...

  4. The Effects of Oral Cryotherapy on Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Autologous Transplantation of Blood Stem Cells: A Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarifar, Marzieh; Lakdizaji, Sima; Ramzi, Mani; Rahmani, Azad; Jabbarzadeh, Faranak

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral mucositis is one of the irritating side effects of chemotherapy in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. However, up until now, the common methods of oral mucositis therapy have failed to show significant effects. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of local cryotherapy on the intensity of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in autologous bone marrow transplantation patients. Patients and Methods In this single, blinded, randomized clinical trial, 29 patients undergoing stem cell transplantation in Iran were selected by convenience sampling, and randomly allocated to control (n = 13) and intervention groups (n = 16). In the intervention group, cryotherapy was applied, while the control group received a normal saline mouthwash. The severity of the mucositis and neutrophil rate were investigated in five periods, based on the world health organization (WHO) scales. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney test, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), and linear regression. Results In both groups, the mucositis reached its peak intensity on the 7th day, and the least intensity was obtained on the 21st day. The neutrophil rate reached the minimum value on the 7th day, then increased up to the 21st day. The two groups showed no significant differences between the mucositis severity on the 14th and 21st days (P = 0.164), while the severity of the mucositis in the cryotherapy group was significantly less than that in the saline mouthwash group (1.81 groups. Conclusions The results showed that cryotherapy is more effective than the saline mouthwash in reducing the severity of mucositis. This method is recommended for the prevention of mucositis in bone marrow transplantation. PMID:27257512

  5. Reversing gastric mucosal alterations during ethanol-induced chronic gastritis in rats by oral administration of Opuntia ficus- indica mucilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ricardo Vázquez-Ramírez; Marisela Olguín-Martínez; Carlos Kubli-Garfias; Rolando Hernández-Mu(n)oz

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of mucilage obtained from cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae) on the healing of ethanol-induced gastritis in rats.METHODS: Chronic gastric mucosa injury was treated with mucilage (5 mg/kg per day) after it was induced by ethanol. Lipid composition, activity of 5'-nucleotidase (a membrane-associated ectoenzyme) and cytosolic activities of lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases in the plasma membrane of gastric mucosa were determined.Histological studies of gastric samples from the experimental groups were included.RESULTS: Ethanol elicited the histological profile of gastritis characterized by loss of the surface epithelium and infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.Phosphatidylcholine (PC) decreased and cholesterol content increased in plasma membranes of the gastric mucosa. In addition, cytosolic activity increased while the activity of alcohol dehydrogenases decreased. The administration of mucilage promptly corrected these enzymatic changes. In fact, mucilage readily accelerated restoration of the ethanol-induced histological alterations and the disturbances in plasma membranes of gastric mucosa, showing a univocal anti-inflammatory effect.The activity of 5'-nucleotidase correlated with the changes in lipid composition and the fluidity of gastric mucosal plasma membranes.CONCLUSION: The beneficial action of mucilage seems correlated with stabilization of plasma membranes of damaged gastric mucosa. Molecular interactions between mucilage monosaccharides and membrane phospholipids,mainly PC and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), may be the relevant features responsible for changing activities of membrane-attached proteins during the healing process after chronic gastric mucosal damage.

  6. Prophylactic use of amifostine to prevent radiochemotherapy-induced mucositis and xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the prophylactic properties of amifostine against acute and late toxicities from radiochemotherapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients were randomized to receive conventional radiotherapy (RT) (2-Gy fractions, 5 days weekly, to a total of 60-74 Gy, depending on the tumor localization and TNM classification) and carboplatin (90 mg/m2 infusion once per week before RT). Amifostine (300 mg/m2) was administered in the study group only 15-30 min before RT for 6-7.5 weeks. The primary study end point was the grading of acute and late nonhematologic toxicities (mucositis, dysphagia, xerostomia) induced by radiochemotherapy. Secondary end points included treatment duration, hematologic toxicity, and clinical outcome. Results: The treatment duration was significantly shorter in the amifostine-treated group (p=0.013), because treatment interruptions were more frequent in the control group. Acute toxicities (mucositis and dysphagia) were less severe in the amifostine-treated group. By Week 3, all in the control group experienced Grade 2 mucositis compared with only 9% in the amifostine-treated group (p<0.0001). By Week 5, 52.2% of the patients in the control group experienced Grade 4 mucositis compared with 4.5% in the amifostine-treated group (p=0.0006). Similar results were obtained for dysphagia. At 3 months of follow-up, only 27% of patients in the study group experienced Grade 2 xerostomia compared with 73.9% in the control group (p=0.0001). Eighteen months after cessation of therapy, the proportion of patients with Grade 2 xerostomia was 4.5% vs. 30.4% for each respective treatment group (p=0.047). Cytoprotection with amifostine did not affect treatment outcome, with 90.9% complete responses in the amifostine-treated group compared with 78.3% in the control group (p=0.414). Conclusion: Amifostine was effective in reducing mucositis and dysphagia resulting from radiochemotherapy in patients with head

  7. The Effect of Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor on Cisplatin and Radiotherapy Induced Oral Mucositis in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Jae Boem; Kim, Hye Jung; Chai, Gyu Young [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Purpose: To study the effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) on oral mucositis induced by cisplatin and radiotherapy in a mouse model. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four ICR mice were divided into three groups. the normal control group, the no rhEGF group (treatment with cisplatin and radiation) and the rhEGF group (treatment with cisplatin, radiation and rhEGF). A model of mucositis induced by cisplatin and radiotherapy was established by injecting mice with cisplatin (10 mg/kg) on day 1 and with radiation exposure (5 Gy/day) to the head and neck on days 1{approx}5. rhEGF was administered subcutaneously on days -1 to 0 (1 mg/kg/day) and on days 3 to 5 (1 mg/kg/day). Evaluation included body weight, oral intake, and histology. Results: For the comparison of the change of body weight between the rhEGF group and the no rhEGF group, a statistically significant difference was observed in the rhEGF group for the 5 days after day 3 of the experiment. The rhEGF group and no rhEGF group had reduced food intake until day 5 of the experiment, and then the mice demonstrated increased food intake after day 13 of the of experiment. When the histological examination was conducted on day 7 after treatment with cisplatin and radiation, the rhEGF group showed a focal cellular reaction in the epidermal layer of the mucosa, while the no rhEGF group did not show inflammation of the oral mucosa. Conclusion: These findings suggest that rhEGF has a potential to reduce the oral mucositis burden in mice after treatment with cisplatin and radiation. The optimal dose, number and timing of the administration of rhEGF require further investigation.

  8. The Effect of Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor on Cisplatin and Radiotherapy Induced Oral Mucositis in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) on oral mucositis induced by cisplatin and radiotherapy in a mouse model. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four ICR mice were divided into three groups. the normal control group, the no rhEGF group (treatment with cisplatin and radiation) and the rhEGF group (treatment with cisplatin, radiation and rhEGF). A model of mucositis induced by cisplatin and radiotherapy was established by injecting mice with cisplatin (10 mg/kg) on day 1 and with radiation exposure (5 Gy/day) to the head and neck on days 1∼5. rhEGF was administered subcutaneously on days -1 to 0 (1 mg/kg/day) and on days 3 to 5 (1 mg/kg/day). Evaluation included body weight, oral intake, and histology. Results: For the comparison of the change of body weight between the rhEGF group and the no rhEGF group, a statistically significant difference was observed in the rhEGF group for the 5 days after day 3 of the experiment. The rhEGF group and no rhEGF group had reduced food intake until day 5 of the experiment, and then the mice demonstrated increased food intake after day 13 of the of experiment. When the histological examination was conducted on day 7 after treatment with cisplatin and radiation, the rhEGF group showed a focal cellular reaction in the epidermal layer of the mucosa, while the no rhEGF group did not show inflammation of the oral mucosa. Conclusion: These findings suggest that rhEGF has a potential to reduce the oral mucositis burden in mice after treatment with cisplatin and radiation. The optimal dose, number and timing of the administration of rhEGF require further investigation

  9. Attenuation of gastric mucosal inflammation induced by aspirin through activation of A2A adenosine receptor in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaru Odashima; Reina Ohba; Sumio Watanabe; Joel Linden; Michiro Otaka; Mario Jin; Koga Komatsu; Isao Wada; Youhei Horikawa; Tamotsu Matsuhashi; Natsumi Hatakeyama; Jinko Oyake

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether a specific adenosine A2A receptor agonist (ATL-146e) can ameliorate aspirin-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats, and reduce neutrophil accumulation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines.METHODS: Gastric lesions were produced by oral gavage of aspirin (200 mg/kg) and HCl (0.15 mol/L,8.0 mL/kg). 4-{3-[6-Amino-9-(5-ethylcarbamoyl-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydro-furan-2-yl)-9H-purin-2-yl]-prop-2-ynyl}-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid methyl ester (ATL-146e,2.5-5 μg/kg, IP) was injected 30 min before the administration of aspirin. Tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentration in gastric mucosa was measured as an index of neutrophil infiltration. Gastric mucosal concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were determined by ELISA. Also, we examined the effect of ATL-146e on tissue prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and gastric secretion.RESULTS: Intragastric administration of aspirin induced multiple hemorrhagic erosions in rat gastric mucosa. The total length of gastric erosions (ulcer index) in control rats was 29.8±7.75 mm and was reduced to 3.8±1.42 mm after pretreatment with 5.0 g/kg ATL-146e (P< 0.01).The gastric contents of MPO and pro-inflammatory cytokines were all increased after the administration of aspirin and reduced to nearly normal levels by ATL-146e.Gastric mucosal PGE2 concentration was not affected by intraperitoneal injection of ATL-146e.CONCLUSION: The specific adenosine A2A receptor agohist, ATL-146e, has potent anti-ulcer effects presumably mediated by its anti-inflammatory properties.

  10. Systemic and Mucosal T-Lymphocyte Activation Induced by Recombinant Adenovirus Vaccines in Rhesus Monkeys▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yue; Bailer, Robert T.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Koup, Richard A.; Letvin, Norman L.

    2009-01-01

    The administration of vectors designed to elicited cell-mediated immune responses may have other consequences that are clinically significant. To explore this possibility, we evaluated T-cell activation during the first 2 months after recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) prime or boost immunizations in rhesus monkeys. We also evaluated the kinetics of T-lymphocyte activation in both the systemic and the mucosal compartments after rAd5 administration in monkeys with preexisting immunity to...

  11. Effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: A randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Satheeshkumar P; Chamba Moideen; Balan Anita; Sreelatha K; Bhatathiri V; Bose Tinky

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Oral care in cancer patients is an important aspect in the quality of life of patients undergoing cancer therpay. Mucositis, trismus, salivary gland dysfunction are the main complications of the cancer therapy, which lead to long-term comlications such as radiation caries, poor oral hygiene and osteoradionecrosis. A timely oral evaluation and intervention in these patients can reduce the severity of the potential complications. Triclosan is an antibacterial agent widely used in ...

  12. The modifying effect of beta-carotene on radiation and chemotherapy induced oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study of 20 patients with advanced squamous carcinoma of the mouth was to monitor the dose modifying effect of supplemental dietary beta-carotene on the progression of the oral mucosal reaction and treatment outcome during an intensive course of synchronous radiation and chemotherapy. Tumour response and long term normal tissue changes have been carefully recorded. Results and freedom from toxic side effects suggest further studies. (author)

  13. Mouth-rinses for the prevention of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis in children: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemi, A; Bahrololoumi, Z; Khaksar, Y; Saffarzadeh, N; Neamatzade, H; Foroughi, E

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this review was to evaluate studies in basic oral care interventions to update evidence based practice guidelines for preventing oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Material & Methods Pub Med database and Google Scholar were searched for all papers published between 2000 and December 2014 in English that were conducted using the search terms including ‘‘mocusitis, chemotherapy, mouth-rinses, oral care, oral care protocol, dental care,denta...

  14. Polaprezinc (Zinc L-carnosine) is a potent inducer of anti-oxidative stress enzyme, heme oxygenase (HO)-1 - a new mechanism of gastric mucosal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kazuki; Ueyama, Takashi; Oka, Masashi; Ito, Takao; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Ichinose, Masao

    2009-07-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is implicated in cytoprotection in various organs. We tested a possibility that polaprezinc (PZ), an anti-ulcer drug, could induce HO-1 in the gastric mucosa. Male 6-week-old Wistar rats were intragastrically administered PZ. Gastric expression of HO-1 was assessed by real time RT-PCR and western blotting, and localization of HO-1 was observed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. The levels of HO-1 mRNA were increased in a dose-dependent manner. The levels of HO-1 mRNA were increased 4-fold by PZ at the dose of 200 mg/kg at 3 h as compared with control levels. The levels of immunoreactive HO-1 were increased 3-fold at 6 h. Signals for HO-1 mRNA and immunoreactivity were detected strongly in the surface gastric mucosal cells and moderately in the gastric macrophages. Treatment with an HO-1 inhibitor, stannous mesoporphyrin (SnMP) significantly worsened the HCl-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions and increased the apoptosis of mucosal cells. Mucosal lesions were decreased by pretreatment with PZ, while they were increased by co-administration with SnMP. These data indicate for the first time that PZ is an effective inducer of HO-1 in the stomach. PZ-induced HO-1 functions as a part of the mucosal protective effects of PZ. PMID:19542683

  15. Comparative study of the effects of rhKGF, CBLB502 and WR2721 on radiation-induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao YANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the protective effect of rhKGF, CBLB502 and WR2721 on radiation-induced oral mucositis (ROM. Methods Fifty male 6-8-week-old C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into normal group, irradiation control group, rhKGF group, CBLB502 group, and WR2721 group (n=10 each. The 30-day survival rate and change in body weight of mice that had received 17Gy irradiation of head and neck area were recorded. In another group of 20 mice, 1% toluidine blue staining and HE staining were used to observe oral ulcers and pathological changes in the tongue tissue. The proliferation of keratinocyte cells was assessed by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Results Compared with the irradiation control group, administration of rhKGF and WR2721 could significantly improve the 30-day survival rate, accelerate the recovery of body weight, and promote the proliferation of keratinized epithelial cells of mice after irradiation, without inducing obvious oral mucositis. However, There was no significant difference between CBLB502 group and irradiation control group in survival rate, body weight and pathological changes in tongue tissues of mice. Conclusion rhKGF and WR2721 could alleviate ROM and improve the survival of mice, while CBLB502 has no such effect. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.05.19

  16. Cinitapride protects against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats: role of 5-hydroxytryptamine, prostaglandins and sulfhydryl compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón-de-la-Lastra Romero, C; López, A; Martín, M J; la Casa, C; Motilva, V

    1997-04-01

    This study was designed to determine the gastroprotective properties of cinitapride (CNT), a novel prokinetic benzamide derivative agonist of 5-HT4 and 5-HT1 receptors and 5-HT2 antagonist, on mucosal injury produced by 50% (v/v) ethanol. Results were compared with those for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT: 10 mg kg-1). The possible involvements of gastric mucus secretion, endogenous prostaglandins (PGs) and sulfhydryl compounds (SH) in the protection mediated by CNT were also examined. Intraperitoneal administration of CNT (0.50 and 1 mg kg-1), 30 min before ethanol, significantly prevented gastric ulceration and increased the hexosamine content of gastric mucus. CNT (1 mg kg-1) also produced a significant increase in gastric mucosal levels of PGE2, but did not induce any significant changes in SH values. On the contrary, pretreatment with 5-HT worsened ethanol-induced erosions, however, did not affect gastric mucus secretion, glycoprotein content or PGE2 levels, although the non-protein SH fraction was significantly decreased. The present results demonstrate that the gastroprotective effects of CNT could be partly explained by a complex PG dependent mechanism. We suggest that 5-HT dependent mechanisms through 5-HT2 receptor blockade and 5-HT1 receptor activation could be also involved. PMID:9211565

  17. Modulation of radiation-induced oral mucositis by pentoxifylline: Preclinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Sylvia; Bozsaky, Eva [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Schmidt, Margret [Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site Dresden; Wolfram, Kathrin; Haagen, Julia; Habelt, Bettina; Puttrich, Martin [Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-10-29

    Oral mucositis is a frequent early side effect of radio(chemo)therapy of head-and-neck malignancies. The epithelial radiation response is accompanied by inflammatory reactions; their interaction with epithelial processes remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pentoxifylline (PTX) on the oral mucosal radiation response in the mouse tongue model. Irradiation comprised fractionation (5 fractions of 3 Gy/week) over 1 (days 0-4) or 2 weeks (days 0-4, 7-11), followed by graded local top-up doses (day 7/14), in order to generate complete dose-effect curves. PTX (15 mg/kg subcutaneously) was applied once daily over varying time intervals. Ulceration of mouse tongue epithelium, corresponding to confluent mucositis, was analyzed as the clinically relevant endpoint. With fractionated irradiation over 1 week, PTX administration significantly reduced the incidence of mucosal reactions when initiated before (day - 5) the onset of fractionation; a trend was observed for start of PTX treatment on day 0. Similarly, PTX treatment combined with 2 weeks of fractionation had a significant effect on ulcer incidence in all but one experiment. This clearly illustrates the potential of PTX to ameliorate oral mucositis during daily fractionated irradiation. PTX resulted in a significant reduction of oral mucositis during fractionated irradiation, which may be attributed to stimulation of mucosal repopulation processes. The biological basis of this effect, however, needs to be clarified in further, detailed mechanistic studies. (orig.) [German] Die orale Mukositis ist eine haeufige fruehe Nebenwirkung der Radio(chemo)therapie von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Die epitheliale Strahlenreaktion wird von Entzuendungserscheinungen begleitet; deren Interaktion mit epithelialen Prozessen ist derzeit unklar. Ziel der vorliegenden Untersuchung war die quantitative Erfassung des Effekts einer Behandlung mit Pentoxifyllin (PTX) auf die Strahlenreaktion der Mundschleimhaut

  18. Adjuvant Effects for Oral Immunization Provided by Recombinant Lactobacillus casei Secreting Biologically Active Murine Interleukin-1β▿

    OpenAIRE

    KAJIKAWA, Akinobu; MASUDA, Kazuya; Katoh, Mitsunori; Igimi, Shizunobu

    2009-01-01

    Vaccine delivery systems using lactic acid bacteria are under development, but their efficiency is insufficient. Autologous cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), are potential adjuvants for mucosal vaccines and can be provided by recombinant lactic acid bacteria. The aim of this study was the construction and evaluation of recombinant Lactobacillus casei producing IL-1β as an adjuvant delivery agent. The recombinant strain was constructed using an expression/secretion vector plasmid, inc...

  19. The effect of three mouthwashes on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies: A randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Kumar P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The present study was done to assess the effect of three alcohol-free mouthwashes on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with head and neck malignancies, scheduled to undergo curative radiotherapy, were randomly assigned to receive one of the three alcohol-free test mouthwashes (0.12% chlorhexidine, 1% povidone-iodine, or salt/soda or a control. The patients were instructed to rinse with 10 ml of the mouthwash, twice a day, for a period of 6 weeks. Mucositis was assessed at baseline and at weekly intervals during radiation therapy, using the World Health Organization criteria for grading of mucositis. The baseline demography of the four groups was matched for age, sex, stage of cancer, and whether the patient had cancer of oral or extraoral regions. A post hoc test for repeated measures was used to find the difference of mean mucositis scores between the groups at various week intervals. Results: Among the 76 patients who completed the study, patients in the povidone-iodine group had significantly lower mucositis scores when compared to the control group from the first week of radiotherapy. Their scores were also significantly lower when compared to the salt/soda and chlorhexidine groups from the fourth and fifth week, respectively, after radiotherapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that use of alcohol-free povidone-iodine mouthwash can reduce the severity and delay the onset of oral mucositis due to antineoplastic radiotherapy.

  20. Inhalation tolerance is induced selectively in thoracic lymph nodes but executed pervasively at distant mucosal and nonmucosal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, David; Swirski, Filip K; Yang, Teng-Chih; Fattouh, Ramzi; Croitoru, Ken; Bramson, Jonathan L; Stämpfli, Martin R; Jordana, Manel

    2006-02-15

    Under immunogenic conditions, both the site of initial Ag exposure and consequent T cell priming in specific draining lymph nodes (LNs) imprint the ensuing immune response with lasting tissue-selective tropism. With respect to immune tolerance, whether the site of tolerance induction leads to compartmentalized or, alternatively, pervasive tolerance has not been formally investigated. Using a murine model of inhalation tolerance, we investigated whether the induction of respiratory mucosal tolerance precludes the development of de novo Th2 sensitization upon subsequent exposure to the same Ag at distant mucosal (gut) and nonmucosal (cutaneous) sites. By tracking the proliferation of CFSE-labeled OVA-TCR transgenic CD4(+) T cells upon OVA inhalation in vivo, we defined the site of tolerance induction to be restricted to the thoracic LNs. Expectedly, inhalation tolerance prevented de novo Th2 sensitization upon subsequent exposure to the same Ag at the same site. Importantly, although gut- and skin-draining LNs were not used during tolerance induction, de novo Ag-specific proliferation and Th2 differentiation in these LNs, as well as memory/effector Th2 responses in the gut (allergic diarrhea) and skin (late-phase cutaneous responses) were inhibited upon immunogenic challenge to the same Ag. Interestingly, this pervasive tolerogenic phenotype was not associated with the presence of suppressive activity throughout the lymphatics; indeed, potent suppressive activity was detected solely in the spleen. These data indicate that while inhalation tolerance is selectively induced in local thoracic LNs, its tolerogenic activity resides systemically and leads to pervasive immune tolerance in distant mucosal and nonmucosal sites. PMID:16456019

  1. The M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck Module, a Patient-Reported Outcome Instrument, Accurately Predicts the Severity of Radiation-Induced Mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) module, a symptom burden instrument, with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-HN) module, a quality-of-life instrument, for the assessment of mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with radiotherapy and to identify the most distressing symptoms from the patient's perspective. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with head-and-neck cancer (n = 134) completed the MDASI-HN and FACT-HN before radiotherapy (time 1) and after 6 weeks of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (time 2). The mean global and subscale scores for each instrument were compared with the objective mucositis scores determined from the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: The global and subscale scores for each instrument showed highly significant changes from time 1 to time 2 and a significant correlation with the objective mucositis scores at time 2. Only the MDASI scores, however, were significant predictors of objective Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events mucositis scores on multivariate regression analysis (standardized regression coefficient, 0.355 for the global score and 0.310 for the head-and-neck cancer-specific score). Most of the moderate and severe symptoms associated with mucositis as identified on the MDASI-HN are not present on the FACT-HN. Conclusion: Both the MDASI-HN and FACT-HN modules can predict the mucositis scores. However, the MDASI-HN, a symptom burden instrument, was more closely associated with the severity of radiation-induced mucositis than the FACT-HN on multivariate regression analysis. This greater association was most likely related to the inclusion of a greater number of face-valid mucositis-related items in the MDASI-HN compared with the FACT-HN

  2. Mucosite bucal rádio e quimioinduzida Radiation therapy and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Evaristo Ricci Volpato

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O aumento da intensidade da quimioterapia e radioterapia no tratamento do câncer tem elevado a incidência de efeitos colaterais, em especial da mucosite bucal. OBJETIVO E MÉTODO: Através de revisão bibliográfica realizou-se atualizar informações quanto à definição, características clínicas, incidência, etiologia, patofisiologia, morbidade associada, prevenção e tratamento dessa manifestação clínica. RESULTADOS: Estudos atuais definem a mucosite bucal como uma inflamação e ulceração dolorosa bastante freqüente na mucosa bucal apresentando formação de pseudomembrana. Sua incidência e severidade são influenciadas por variáveis associadas ao paciente e ao tratamento a que ele é submetido. A mucosite é conseqüência de dois mecanismos maiores: toxicidade direta da terapêutica utilizada sobre a mucosa e mielossupressão gerada pelo tratamento. Sua patofisiologia é composta por quatro fases interdependentes: fase inflamatória/vascular, fase epitelial, fase ulcerativa/bacteriológica e fase de reparação. É considerada fonte potencial de infecções com risco de morte, sendo a principal causa de interrupção de tratamentos antineoplásicos. Algumas intervenções mostraram-se potencialmente efetivas para sua prevenção e tratamento. Entretanto, faz-se necessária a realização de novos estudos clínicos mais bem conduzidos para obtenção de melhor evidência científica acerca do agente terapêutico de escolha para o controle da mucosite bucal, permitindo a realização da quimioterapia e radioterapia do câncer em parâmetros ideais.Tincreasing the intensity of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the management of cancer has increased the incidence of adverse effects, especially oral mucositis. AIM AND METHODS: a bibliographical review was conducted on the definition of oral mucositis, its clinical findings, the incidence, its etiology, the pathofisiology, associated morbidity, prevention and treatment

  3. Effects of acute chemotherapy-induced mucositis on spontaneous behaviour and the grimace scale in laboratory rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, A L; Leach, M C; Preston, F L; Lymn, K A; Howarth, G S

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a frequent side-effect of chemotherapy treatment. Many oncological research programs aim to identify novel treatments for this distressing condition, and these programs frequently use rat models. Little is known about the presence and progression of pain in these models and how this can best be treated by analgesic therapy. We used a number of behaviour-based methods of pain assessment to determine which tools were best suited for pain identification. Baseline measures for behavioural assessment, rat grimace score and sociability were determined through analysis of continuously recorded video data and an applied social interaction test (n = 16). Mucositis was then induced by intraperitoneal injection of 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) and further behavioural analyses undertaken. An assessment of enrichment interaction was also made by determining the mass of a plastic chew toy gnawed both pre- and post-chemotherapy injection. Behavioural scoring was performed 1, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after injection, with facial expression being scored at the 12, 24 and 48 h time-points. Sociability testing was performed once during the post-injection period. No significant differences were found in grimace scores between baseline and later daily measures. Behaviours similar to those previously reported post-laparotomy were observed. Writhing, twitching and back-arching behaviours were most evident in rats affected by mucositis and were increased in frequency (respectivePvalues: 0.002, 0.004 and 0.008) 48 h after chemotherapy injection compared with baseline, implying that pain onset occurred around this time-point. Social investigatory behaviour was also increased (P = 0.002) following disease onset. Each day, rats post-5FU injection gnawed a greater percentage of their nylabone enrichment by weight than the saline-injected control rats (P = 0.046). These data suggest that, of the tools tested, behavioural assessment scoring may find greatest

  4. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and sucralfate in prevention of radiation-induced mucositis: a prospective randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare subcutaneously given molgramostim (GM-CSF) and sucralfate mouth washings to sucralfate mouth washings in prevention of radiation-induced mucositis. Methods and Materials: Forty head and neck cancer patients were randomly assigned to use either GM-CSF and sucralfate (n = 20) or sucralfate alone (n = 20) during radiotherapy. Sucralfate was used as 1.0 g mouth washing 6 times daily after the first 10 Gy of radiotherapy, and 150-300 μg GM-CSF was given subcutaneously. The grade of radiation mucositis and blood cell counts were monitored weekly. Salivary lactoferrin was measured as a surrogate marker for oral mucositis. Results: We found no significant difference between the molgramostim and the control groups in the oral mucositis grade, oral pain, use of analgesic drugs, weight loss, or survival. The median maximum neutrophil counts (median, 9.2 x 109/L vs. 5.9 x 109/L, p = 0.0005), eosinophil counts (median, 1.3 x 109/L vs. 0.2 x 109/L, p = 0.0004), and salivary lactoferrin concentrations were higher in patients who received GM-CSF. The most common toxicities in the GM-CSF plus sucralfate group were skin reactions at the GM-CSF injection site (65%), fever (30%), bone pain (25%), and nausea (15%), whereas the toxicity of sucralfate given alone was minimal. Conclusion: We found no evidence indicating that subcutaneously given GM-CSF reduces the severity of radiation-induced mucositis

  5. Per-oral immunization with antigen-conjugated nanoparticles followed by sub-cutaneous boosting immunization induces long-lasting mucosal and systemic antibody responses in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah E Howe

    Full Text Available Food or water-borne enteric pathogens invade their hosts via intestinal mucosal surfaces, thus developing effective oral vaccines would greatly reduce the burden of infectious diseases. The nature of the antigen, as well as the mode of its internalization in the intestinal mucosa affects the ensuing immune response. We show that model protein antigen ovalbumin (Ova given per-orally (p.o. induces oral tolerance (OT, characterized by systemic IgG1-dominated antibody response, which cannot be boosted by sub-cutaneous (s.c. immunization with Ova in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA. Intestinal IgA generated in response to Ova feeding diminished over time and was abrogated by s.c. immunization with Ova+CFA. Humoral response to Ova was altered by administering Ova conjugated to 20 nm nanoparticles (NP-Ova. P.o. administration of NP-Ova induced systemic IgG1/IgG2c, and primed the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA. These responses were boosted by secondary s.c. immunization with Ova+CFA or p.o. immunization with NP-Ova. However, only in s.c.-boosted mice serum and mucosal antibody titers remained elevated for 6 months after priming. In contrast, s.c. priming with NP-Ova induced IgG1-dominated serum antibodies, but did not prime the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA, even after secondary p.o. immunization with NP-Ova. These results indicate that Ova conjugated to NPs reaches the internal milieu in an immunogenic form and that mucosal immunization with NP-Ova is necessary for induction of a polarized Th1/Th2 immune response, as well as intestinal IgA response. In addition, mucosal priming with NP-Ova, followed by s.c. boosting induces superior systemic and mucosal memory responses. These findings are important for the development of efficacious mucosal vaccines.

  6. Different effects of cytoprotective drugs on ethanol- and aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in pylorus-ligated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, K.; Nishiwaki, H.; Niida, H.; Okabe, S. (Kyoto Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan))

    1990-02-01

    In anesthetized rats oral administration (2 ml) of both ethanol (50% in 150 mM HCl) and aspirin (80 mM in 150 mM HCl) produced bandlike lesions in the stomach, while more generalized lesions occurred in the pylorus-ligated stomach when the irritant was given intragastrically through the fistula prepared in the rumen and the mucosal folds were removed by stomach distension. The bandlike lesions induced in the intact stomach by both irritants were significantly and dose-dependently prevented by 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 (dmPGE2: 3 and 10 micrograms/kg, subcutaneously), cysteamine (30 and 100 mg/kg, subcutaneously) or timoprazole (10 and 30 mg/kg, per os) at the doses which significantly inhibited gastric motility. In the pylorus-ligated stomach, however, neither of these agents showed any protection against the generalized lesions induced by ethanol, but such lesions caused by aspirin were significantly prevented only by dmPGE2. These agents also showed similar effects against the reduction of transmucosal PD in the pylorus-ligated stomach exposed to ethanol and aspirin. These results suggest that (1) the formation of bandlike lesions caused by ethanol and aspirin depends on the presence of mucosal folds and may be prevented by the agents that inhibit gastric motility, (2) the pathogenesis of the lesions induced by aspirin and ethanol may be different in the pylorus-ligated stomach, and (3) dmPGE2 has a unique protective ability that is not shared by usual cytoprotective agents.

  7. Lactobacillus casei reduces susceptibility to type 2 diabetes via microbiota-mediated body chloride ion influx

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Zhang; Xiao Guo; Jianlin Guo; Qiuwen He; He Li; Yuqin Song; Heping Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota mediated low-grade inflammation is involved in the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). In this study, we used a high fat sucrose (HFS) diet-induced pre-insulin resistance and a low dose-STZ HFS rat models to study the effect and mechanism of Lactobacillus casei Zhang in protecting against T2DM onset. Hyperglycemia was favorably suppressed by L. casei Zhang treatment. Moreover, the hyperglycemia was connected with type 1 immune response, high plasma bile acids and urine chloride io...

  8. Relevance of keratinocyte growth factor administration protocol for amelioration of acute radiation-induced oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keratinocyte growth factor (rHuKGF) significantly reduces oral mucositis in the mouse tongue model. The present study was initiated to optimise the KGF treatment protocol, using mucosal ulceration as the endpoint. Fractionated irradiation with 5x3 Gy/week was followed by test irradiation on day 7 or 14. In the first experiment, 1 or 3 injections (5 mg/kg/day) were applied either before the onset of fractionation (day -3, day -2, days -3 to -1) or over the first weekend (day +4. day +5, days +4 to +6), followed by one further injection at the subsequent weekend (day +4/day +11). In a second experiment, graded doses of KGF (1-30 mg/kg) were administered on days -3, +4 +11. After 5 or 10 fractions of 3 Gy, the ED50 for test irradiation was 5.1±1.9 Gy or 5.7±1.5 Gy, respectively, compared to 10.7±1.0 Gy for test irradiation alone. This indicates effective repopulation in week 2. KGF administration over the weekend before irradiation plus on day +4 increased the ED50 to 12.1-12.3 Gy, independent of the number of injections. Injections over the first weekend plus on day +11 resulted in ED50 values of 12.8-14.3 Gy, again independent of KGF injection number. In the dose optimisation study, KGF doses as low as 1 mg/kg resulted in a significant increase in ED50s for all days studied. Maximum efficacy was found with doses of 15-22.5 mg/kg, with ED50 values of 12.1±1.3 Gy (day -3), 14.4±1.3 Gy (day +4), and 13.7 Gy (day +11) Higher KGF doses did not result in a further increase in ED50. In conclusion, a marked increase in oral mucosal radiation tolerance by KGF was observed in all protocols tested. Repeated injections on consecutive days did not increase the effect. A significant effect of dose per injection was demonstrated, with optimum doses (mouse tongue mucosa) of 15-22.5 mg/kg

  9. Immunological evaluation of Lactobacillus casei Zhang: a newly isolated strain from koumiss in Inner Mongolia, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Ruiting

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence to suggest an immunomodulation function both within the intestines and systemically upon consuming probiotic species. We recently isolated a novel LAB, Lactobacillus caseiZhang (LcZhang from koumiss. LcZhang exhibited favorable probiotic properties, such as acid resistance, bile resistance, gastrointestinal (GI colonization ability, etc. In order to examine the immunomodulatory qualities of LcZhang, we administered LcZhang to healthy mice with varying doses of either live or heat-killed LcZhang and measured various parameters of the host immune response. Results The study was performed in four separate experiments via oral administration of live and heat-killed LcZhang to BALB/c mice for several consecutive days. We investigated the immunomodulating capacity of LcZhang in vivo by analyzing the profile of cytokines, T cell subpopulations, and immunoglobulin concentrations induced in blood serum and intestinal fluid in BALB/c mice. Only live bacteria elicited a wide range of immune responses, which include the increased production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ, and depression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α levels. In addition, interleukin-2 (IL-2 and IL-2 receptor gene transcription increased significantly, but the proportion of T cell subsets appeared to be unaffected. We also observed that LcZhang was capable of inducing gut mucosal responses by enhancing the production of secretory Immunoglobulin A (sIgA as well influencing the systemic immunity via the cytokines released to the circulating blood. Conclusion The present work shows that the dose-dependent administration of LcZhang is capable of influencing immune responses, implying that it may be a valuable strain for probiotic use in humans.

  10. Physiopathology, prevention and treatment of the oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oral mucositis is a frequent and potentially severe complication of the antineoplasic therapy; it is considered that approximately 400.000 new patients per year in United States will develop acute or chronic complications in oral cavity after the beginning of its treatment. Some of the basic manifestations that are inside the clinical descriptions understand the erythema, the desquamation, formation of ulcers, the bled, and exudation. The epithelial oropharynge surface has a quick replication rate, and for this reason it is highly exposed to the direct insult due to the cytotoxic effects of the chemotherapy, the radiotherapy, and indirectly the infectious agents. The paper includes topics like physiopathology, risk factors, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, the patient's evaluation and conclusions

  11. Systematic review of mucosal immunity induced by oral and inactivated poliovirus vaccines against virus shedding following oral poliovirus challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Hird

    Full Text Available Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV may be used in mass vaccination campaigns during the final stages of polio eradication. It is also likely to be adopted by many countries following the coordinated global cessation of vaccination with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV after eradication. The success of IPV in the control of poliomyelitis outbreaks will depend on the degree of nasopharyngeal and intestinal mucosal immunity induced against poliovirus infection. We performed a systematic review of studies published through May 2011 that recorded the prevalence of poliovirus shedding in stool samples or nasopharyngeal secretions collected 5-30 days after a "challenge" dose of OPV. Studies were combined in a meta-analysis of the odds of shedding among children vaccinated according to IPV, OPV, and combination schedules. We identified 31 studies of shedding in stool and four in nasopharyngeal samples that met the inclusion criteria. Individuals vaccinated with OPV were protected against infection and shedding of poliovirus in stool samples collected after challenge compared with unvaccinated individuals (summary odds ratio [OR] for shedding 0.13 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.08-0.24. In contrast, IPV provided no protection against shedding compared with unvaccinated individuals (summary OR 0.81 [95% CI 0.59-1.11] or when given in addition to OPV, compared with individuals given OPV alone (summary OR 1.14 [95% CI 0.82-1.58]. There were insufficient studies of nasopharyngeal shedding to draw a conclusion. IPV does not induce sufficient intestinal mucosal immunity to reduce the prevalence of fecal poliovirus shedding after challenge, although there was some evidence that it can reduce the quantity of virus shed. The impact of IPV on poliovirus transmission in countries where fecal-oral spread is common is unknown but is likely to be limited compared with OPV.

  12. Mucosal immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woof, Jenny M; Mestecky, Jiri

    2005-08-01

    Due to their vast surface area, the mucosal surfaces of the body represent a major site of potential attack by invading pathogens. The secretions that bathe mucosal surfaces contain significant levels of immunoglobulins (Igs), which play key roles in immune defense of these surfaces. IgA is the predominant antibody class in many external secretions and has many functional attributes, both direct and indirect, that serve to prevent infective agents such as bacteria and viruses from breaching the mucosal barrier. This review details current understanding of the structural and functional characteristics of IgA, including interaction with specific receptors (such as Fc(alpha)RI, Fc(alpha)/microR, and CD71) and presents examples of the means by which certain pathogens circumvent the protective properties of this important Ig. PMID:16048542

  13. Expression of bifidobacterial phytases in Lactobacillus casei and their application in a food model of whole-grain sourdough bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mantrana, Izaskun; Yebra, María J; Haros, Monika; Monedero, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Phytases are enzymes capable of sequentially dephosphorylating phytic acid to products of lower chelating capacity and higher solubility, abolishing its inhibitory effect on intestinal mineral absorption. Genetic constructions were made for expressing two phytases from bifidobacteria in Lactobacillus casei under the control of a nisin-inducible promoter. L. casei was able of producing, exporting and anchoring to the cell wall the phytase of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum. The phytase from Bifidobacterium longum spp. infantis was also produced, although at low levels. L. casei expressing any of these phytases completely degraded phytic acid (2mM) to lower myo-inositol phosphates when grown in MRS medium. Owing to the general absence of phytase activity in lactobacilli and to the high phytate content of whole grains, the constructed L. casei strains were applied as starter in a bread making process using whole-grain flour. L. casei developed in sourdoughs by fermenting the existing carbohydrates giving place to an acidification. In this food model system the contribution of L. casei strains expressing phytases to phytate hydrolysis was low, and the phytate degradation was mainly produced by activation of the cereal endogenous phytase as a consequence of the drop in pH. This work shows the capacity of lactobacilli to be modified in order to produce enzymes with relevance in food technology processes. The ability of these strains in reducing the phytate content in fermented food products must be evaluated in further models. PMID:26384212

  14. Prevention of ethanol and aspirin-induced gastric mucosal lesions by paracetamol and salicylate in rats: role of endogenous prostaglandins.

    OpenAIRE

    Konturek, S. J.; Brzozowski, T; Piastucki, I; Radecki, T

    1982-01-01

    Paracetamol or sodium salicylate given intragastrically 30 minutes before the administration of absolute ethanol or acidified aspirin dose-dependently reduced the formation of mucosal lesions. The generation of gastric mucosal prostaglandin-like activity increased with ethanol and was completely suppressed by acidified aspirin. Paracetamol or sodium salicylate given alone increased the generation of mucosal prostaglandin-like material. Indomethacin, the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, supp...

  15. Effects of keratinocyte growth factor (palifermin) administration protocols on oral mucositis (mouse) induced by fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Aim of this study was to assess the impact of the administration protocol of palifermin on amelioration of oral mucositis after fractionated irradiation. Materials and methods: Mouse tongue ulceration was analysed as the clinically relevant endpoint. Daily fractionated irradiation (5x3 Gy/week, days 0 to +4, +7 to +11, with a weekend gap on days +5 and +6) was followed by graded test doses on day +14, i.e. after a second weekend gap. Palifermin (5 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously. In the first series of experiments, the effect of three daily injections (days -3, -2 and -1) was compared with a single administration either on day -2 or -1; all animals received a further injection on day +4. In the second series, a single or three injections were given in the weekend gap between fractionated irradiation (days +5 to +6), with an additional administration on day +11. In a final protocol, single weekly injections of palifermin were given either on days -3, +4 and +11, days +4, +11 and +18, or on days -3, +4, +11 and +18. Results: The ED50 (dose after which ulcer induction is expected in 50% of the mice) to single dose irradiation was 11.5±0.7 Gy. The ED50 for test irradiation after 10x3 Gy was 5.7±1.6 Gy. Palifermin administration before the start of fractionated irradiation and on day +4 increased the ED50 to 10-12 Gy, administration over the first weekend and on day +11 to 11-15 Gy. Administration over three consecutive weekends, starting on day -3 or day +4, increased the ED50 to 13.0±0.1 and 14.9±0.3 Gy. Single weekly KGF administrations over four weekends, including the weekend prior to and after completion of radiotherapy, showed no further increase in ED50. Conclusions: A single palifermin injection during the weekend gap before or during fractionated irradiation is as effective as three applications. Onset of the palifermin treatment during the first weekend gap between fractionated irradiation is more effective than during the

  16. Lansoprazole prevents experimental gastric injury induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs through a reduction of mucosal oxidative damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Corrado Blandizzi; Matteo Fornai; Rocchina Colucci; Gianfranco Natale; Valter Lubrano; Cristina Vassalle; Luca Antonioli; Gloria Lazzeri; Mario Del Tacca

    2005-01-01

    AIM: This study investigated the mechanisms of protection afforded by the proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole against gastric injury induced by different non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in rats.METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were orally treated with indomethacin (100 μmol/kg), diclofenac (60 μmol/kg),piroxicam (150 μmol/kg) or ketoprofen (150 μmol/kg).Thirty minutes before NSAIDs, animals were orally treated with lansoprazole 18 or 90 μmol/kg. Four hours after the end of treatments, the following parameters were assessed: gastric mucosal PGE2, malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO) or non-proteic sulfhydryl compounds (GSH) levels; reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of mucosal COX-2 mRNA; gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated animals; in vitro effects of lansoprazole (1-300 μmol/L) on the oxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDLs) induced by copper sulphate.RESULTS: All NSAIDs elicited mucosal necrotic lesions which were associated with neutrophil infiltration and reduction of PGE2 levels. Increments of MPO and MDA contents, as well as a decrease in GSH levels were detected in the gastric mucosa of indomethacin- or piroxicam-treated animals. Indomethacin enhanced mucosal cyclooxygenase-2 expression, while not affecting cyclooxygenase-1. At the oral dose of 18 μmol/kg lansoprazole partly counteracted diclofenac-induced mucosal damage, whereas at 90 μmol/kg it markedly prevented injuries evoked by all test NSAIDs. Lansoprazole at 90 μmol/kg reversed also the effects of NSAIDs on MPO, MDA and GSH mucosal contents, without interfering with the decrease in PGE2 levels or indomethacin-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression. However, both lansoprazole doses markedly inhibited acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats. Lansoprazole concentration-dependently reduced the oxidation of LDLs in vitro.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that, besides the inhibition of acid secretion, lansoprazole protection against NSAID-induced

  17. Reduction of radiochemotherapy-induced early oral mucositis by recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (palifermin): Experimental studies in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the effect of recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (rHuKGF or palifermin) on oral mucositis induced by radiochemotherapy in a mouse model. Methods and Materials: Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin) and/or 5-fluorouracil were given before single dose irradiation, combined with palifermin before or after the treatment, or both. Daily fractionated irradiation for 2 weeks was followed by graded test doses. With additional chemotherapy in Week 1, palifermin was given before radiotherapy and at the end of the first week, or additionally at the end of Week 2. Radiochemotherapy in Week 2 was combined with palifermin at the end of Weeks 1 and 2, Weeks 1, 2, and 3, or additionally before radiotherapy. Ulceration of mouse tongue mucosa was analyzed as the endpoint. Results: The dose associated with ulcer induction in 50% of the mice (ED50) for single-dose irradiation was 11.5 ± 0.7 Gy. Palifermin increased the ED50 to about 19 Gy in all protocols tested. Similar values were observed when chemotherapy was added before irradiation. With fractionated irradiation, palifermin increased the ED50 for test irradiation from 5.7 ± 1.5 Gy to 12-15 Gy, depending on the administration protocol. With chemotherapy in Week 1, two palifermin injections had no significant effect, but a third injection increased the ED50 to 13 Gy. With chemotherapy in Week 2, all palifermin protocols resulted in ED50 values of 13-14 Gy. Conclusion: A marked increase in oral mucosal radiation tolerance by palifermin was found, which was preserved in combinations with chemotherapy using cisplatin and/or 5-fluorouracil

  18. Two cases of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis alleviated with hange-shashin-to

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been reported that concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) can result in a superior treatment response and survival outcome compared with radiotherapy alone in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and it has become the standard of care for locally advanced disease and organ preservation. However, the major limitation to radiotherapy or CCRT is locoregional treatment-related toxicities, particularly oral mucositis (OM). We experienced two cases of pain-uncontrolled OM in which the Traditional Oriental Medicine Hange-shashin-to (TJ-14) was effective. A 44-year-old man with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and neck metastases underwent CCRT and suffered from OM of grade 3 according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects (CTCAE). His pain was uncontrolled with a variety of analgesics, so we prescribed TJ-14 for him as a gargle. Even during CCRT, the pain significantly diminished and OM was improved to grade 1. TJ-14 contributed to completion of CCRT and improvement of the patient's nutrition status. A 67-year-old man with unknown primary and neck metastases underwent neck dissection and adjuvant radiotherapy. During adjuvant radiotherapy, he had OM of grade 3 and was unable to eat, so he was hospitalized and was started to have TJ-14. Although his OM remained grade 3 during the therapy, his pain was alleviated, leading to completion of the treatment. TJ-14 can be an effective supportive therapy for OM caused by radiotherapy. (author)

  19. Melatonin is more effective than ascorbic acid and β-carotene in improvement of gastric mucosal damage induced by intensive stress

    OpenAIRE

    Akinci, Aysin; Esrefoglu, Mukaddes; Cetin, Asli; Ates, Burhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress has been considered to play a primary role in the pathogenesis of stress-induced gastric damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin, ascorbic acid and β-carotene on stress-induced gastric mucosal damage. Material and methods Fifty-six male Wistar albino rats were divided into control, stress, stress + standard diet, stress + saline, stress + melatonin, stress + ascorbic acid and stress + β-carotene groups. The rats from stress group...

  20. Exploration of the Protection of Riboflavin Laurate on Oral Mucositis Induced by Chemotherapy or Radiotherapy at the Cellular Level: What Is the Leading Contributor?

    OpenAIRE

    Shanshan Wang; Qishou Xu; Dexuan Yang; Zixue Xuan; Yinghong An; Shoujun Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Oral or gastrointestinal mucositis is a frequent phenomenon in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In addition, several clinical investigations have demonstrated in recent years that riboflavin laurate has the potential to protect the patients from the disease induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In our studies, it is observed that riboflavin laurate can ameliorate either chemotherapy- or radiotherapy-induced toxicities on Helf cells, and the effect is greater than tha...

  1. Enhanced mucosal immune responses induced by a combined candidate mucosal vaccine based on Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus structural proteins linked to tuftsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gao

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A virus (HAV and Hepatitis E virus (HEV are the most common causes of infectious hepatitis. These viruses are spread largely by the fecal-oral route and lead to clinically important disease in developing countries. To evaluate the potential of targeting hepatitis A and E infection simultaneously, a combined mucosal candidate vaccine was developed with the partial open reading frame 2 (ORF2 sequence (aa 368-607 of HEV (HE-ORF2 and partial virus protein 1 (VP1 sequence (aa 1-198 of HAV (HA-VP1, which included the viral neutralization epitopes. Tuftsin is an immunostimulatory peptide which can enhance the immunogenicity of a protein by targeting it to macrophages and dendritic cells. Here, we developed a novel combined protein vaccine by conjugating tuftsin to HE-ORF2 and HA-VP1 and used synthetic CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs as the adjuvant. Subsequent experiments in BALB/c mice demonstrated that tuftsin enhanced the serum-specific IgG and IgA antibodies against HEV and HAV at the intestinal, vaginal and pulmonary interface when delivered intranasally. Moreover, mice from the intranasally immunized tuftsin group (HE-ORF2-tuftsin + HA-VP1-tuftsin + CpG showed higher levels of IFN-γ-secreting splenocytes (Th1 response and ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T cells than those of the no-tuftsin group (HE-ORF2 + HA-VP1 + CpG. Thus, the tuftsin group generated stronger humoral and cellular immune responses compared with the no-tuftsin group. Moreover, enhanced responses to the combined protein vaccine were obtained by intranasal immunization compared with intramuscular injection. By integrating HE-ORF2, HA-VP1 and tuftsin in a vaccine, this study validated an important concept for further development of a combined mucosal vaccine against hepatitis A and E infection.

  2. Experience with registered mucosal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Guido; Griot-Wenk, Monika; Metcalfe, Ian C; Lang, Alois B; Viret, Jean-François

    2003-01-30

    Most pathogens gain access to their host through mucosal surfaces. It is therefore desirable to develop vaccination strategies that lead to mucosal immune responses. Ideally, a vaccine should be administered mucosally in order to elicit mucosal protection. Several attenuated live viral and bacterial pathogens are registered as oral vaccines for human use, including the oral polio vaccine (Sabin) as well as attenuated strains of Salmonella typhi and Vibrio cholerae. These attenuated bacterial live vaccines-S. typhi Ty21a as well as V. cholerae CVD 103-HgR-are employed as vaccines against typhoid and cholera, respectively. In this manuscript, we review the immune responses that are induced by these vaccines, with a focus on mucosal immunity. PMID:12531339

  3. Vitamin E and L-carnitine, separately or in combination, in the prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis and myelosuppression. A controlled study in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of vitamin E (VE) and L-carnitine (LC) supplementation, separately or in combination, on radiation-induced oral mucositis and myelosuppression. Group 1 received no treatment (control). Group 2 received 15 Gray of 60Co gamma irradiation as a single dose to total cranium (IR). Group 3, 4, and 5 received irradiation plus 40 mg/kg/day VE (IR+VE) or 200 mg/kg day LC (IR+LC) or in combination (IR+VE+LC) respectively. Clinically and histopathologically, assessments of mucosal reactions were performed by two independent experts in Radiation Oncology and Pathology, respectively. Hematologic analyses and antioxidant enzyme evaluations were also performed. Irradiation significantly increased oral mucositis, and decreased thrombocyte and White Blood Cell counts. A significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in plasma were found in the IR group. VE and LC administration, separately, plus irradiation significantly delayed the starting day, and reduced the severity of, oral mucositis. This administration also reduced a fall in the numbers of thrombocyte and white blood cell (WBC) caused by irradiation, and decreased the MDA level, and increased the activity of SOD and CAT enzymes in the plasma. VE and LC, in combination, plus irradiation did not provide a superior radioprotection against radiation-induced toxicities. (author)

  4. Preventing and Therapeutic Effect of Propolis in Radiotherapy Induced Mucositis of Head and Neck Cancers: A Triple-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Javadzadeh Bolouri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mucositis is one of the acute complications of radiotherapy which can ulcerate oral mucosa and cause severe pain and discomfort which can affect oral normal function. Propolis is a natural source of flavenoid which has antiulcer, antibacterial, antifungal, healing and anti-inflammatory effects. Using such an affordable compound without any bad smell or taste that has reasonable price can help the radiotherapy undergoing patients. Objectives: Our goal is assessing the preventing and therapeutic effect of propolis in radiotherapy induced mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: In a randomized triple blind clinical trial, 20 patient were selected randomly to swish and swallow 15 ml of water based extract of propolis mouth wash 3 times a day in the case group (n = 10 and 15 ml placebo mouth wash in control group (n = 10. we use NIC-CTC scale for determining mucositis grading. Results: We use T-test, Man-Whitney, Chi-square, and Friedman as analyzing tests. Case group had significantly (P 0.05. Conclusions: This is a pilot study which shows water based extract of propolis efficiently prevents and heals radiotherapy induced mucositis.

  5. Development of oral mucositis model induced by radiation in hamsters: prevention and treatment with low power laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the benefits for the prognosis of patients treated with radiotherapy for oral cancer treatment, it might cause local side effects such as oral mucositis. The oral mucositis is a pathological condition that may appear in affected oral mucosa by ionizing radiation, and the pain related can alter and even stop the antineoplastic treatment, decreasing tumor control rates. Oral mucositis has several treatment modalities, although it remains as a problem since therapies available are not enough to treat efficiently this inflammatory process. Many pharmacological solutions (anti-inflammatory, antibiotics, antiseptic, lubricant agents) are used to alleviate oral mucositis symptoms. Laser treatment has been used as an option, but there is lack of studies to verify the process of laser therapy in oral mucositis caused by ionizing radiation. This work accomplishes follow-up of oral mucositis evolution, comparing laser and benzydamine therapies in an animal model. Forty-two animals were irradiated at head and neck in a single dose of 30 Grays, by means of a Co60 source. After irradiation, treatments were applied daily, once a day, for 20 days, in which severity of lesions were clinically classified by two calibrated examiners. Histological evaluation was performed to search for mucosal alterations at treated tissues. Statistical analysis of data showed that laser treatment was more efficient than benzydamine treatment, diminishing severity and duration of oral mucosal lesions caused by ionizing irradiation. (author)

  6. Development of oral mucositis model induced by radiation in hamsters: prevention and treatment with low power laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galletta, Vivian C.; Folgosi-Correa, Melissa S.; Zezell, Denise M., E-mail: vivian.galletta@gmail.com, E-mail: melfolgosi@gmail.com, E-mail: zezell@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gouw-Soares, Sheila, E-mail: sheilagouw@hotmail.com [Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul (UNICSUL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia; Correa, Luciana, E-mail: lcorrea@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FO/USP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia

    2013-07-01

    Despite the benefits for the prognosis of patients treated with radiotherapy for oral cancer treatment, it might cause local side effects such as oral mucositis. The oral mucositis is a pathological condition that may appear in affected oral mucosa by ionizing radiation, and the pain related can alter and even stop the antineoplastic treatment, decreasing tumor control rates. Oral mucositis has several treatment modalities, although it remains as a problem since therapies available are not enough to treat efficiently this inflammatory process. Many pharmacological solutions (anti-inflammatory, antibiotics, antiseptic, lubricant agents) are used to alleviate oral mucositis symptoms. Laser treatment has been used as an option, but there is lack of studies to verify the process of laser therapy in oral mucositis caused by ionizing radiation. This work accomplishes follow-up of oral mucositis evolution, comparing laser and benzydamine therapies in an animal model. Forty-two animals were irradiated at head and neck in a single dose of 30 Grays, by means of a Co{sup 60} source. After irradiation, treatments were applied daily, once a day, for 20 days, in which severity of lesions were clinically classified by two calibrated examiners. Histological evaluation was performed to search for mucosal alterations at treated tissues. Statistical analysis of data showed that laser treatment was more efficient than benzydamine treatment, diminishing severity and duration of oral mucosal lesions caused by ionizing irradiation. (author)

  7. 8-prenylnaringenin and tamoxifen inhibit the shedding of irradiated epithelial cells and increase the latency period of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Cell culture and murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major component in the pathogenesis of oral radiation-induced mucositis is progressive epithelial hypoplasia and eventual ulceration. Irradiation inhibits cell proliferation, while cell loss at the surface continues. We conceived to slow down this desquamation by increasing intercellular adhesion, regulated by the E-cadherin/catenin complex. We investigated if 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) or tamoxifen (TAM) decrease the shedding of irradiated human buccal epithelial cells in vitro and thus delay the ulcerative phase of radiation-induced mucositis in vivo. In vitro, aggregates of buccal epithelial cells were irradiated and cultured in suspension for 11 days. 8-PN or TAM were investigated regarding their effect on cell shedding. In vivo, the lower tongue surface of mice was irradiated with graded single doses of 25 kV X-rays. The incidence, latency, and duration of the resulting mucosal ulcerations were analyzed after topical treatment with 8-PN, TAM or solvent. 8-PN or TAM prevented the volume reduction of the irradiated cell aggregates during the incubation period. This was the result of a higher residual cell number in the treated versus the untreated irradiated aggregates. In vivo, topical treatment with 8-PN or TAM significantly increased the latency of mucositis from 10.9 to 12.1 and 12.4 days respectively, while the ulcer incidence was unchanged. 8-PN and TAM prevent volume reduction of irradiated cell aggregates in suspension culture. In the tongues of mice, these compounds increase the latency period. This suggests a role for these compounds for the amelioration of radiation-induced mucositis in the treatment of head and neck tumors. (orig.)

  8. Novel ISCOMs from Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce mucosal and systemic antibody production, T-cell responses and improved antigen uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Quirici, Lenora; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Ferreira, Fernando; Silveira, Fernando

    2016-02-24

    In the last decades, significant efforts have been dedicated to the search for novel vaccine adjuvants. In this regard, saponins and its formulations as "immunostimulating complexes" (ISCOMs) have shown to be capable of stimulating potent humoral and cellular immune responses, enhanced cytokine production and activation of cytotoxic T cells. The immunological activity of ISCOMs formulated with a saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis (QB-90 fraction) as an alternative to classical ISCOMs based on Quil A(®) (IQA) is presented here. The ISCOMs prepared with QB-90, named IQB-90, typically consist of 40-50nm, spherical, cage-like particles, built up by QB-90, cholesterol, phospholipids and antigen (ovalbumin, OVA). These nanoparticles were efficiently uptaken in vitro by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Subcutaneously inoculated IQB-90 induced strong serum antibody responses encompassing specific IgG1 and IgG2a, robust DTH reactions, significant T cell proliferation and increases in Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) cytokine responses. Intranasally delivered IQB-90 elicited serum IgG and IgG1, and mucosal IgA responses at distal systemic sites (nasal passages, large intestine and vaginal lumen). These results indicate that IQB-90 is a promising alternative to classic ISCOMs as vaccine adjuvants, capable of enhancing humoral and cellular immunity to levels comparable to those induced by ISCOMs manufactured with Quillaja saponaria saponins. PMID:26826546

  9. Mucosal Immunization Induces a Higher Level of Lasting Neutralizing Antibody Response in Mice by a Replication-Competent Smallpox Vaccine: Vaccinia Tiantan Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible bioterrorism threat using the variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, has promoted us to further investigate the immunogenicity profiles of existing vaccines. Here, we study for the first time the immunogenicity profile of a replication-competent smallpox vaccine (vaccinia Tiantan, VTT strain for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs through mucosal vaccination, which is noninvasive and has a critical implication for massive vaccination programs. Four different routes of vaccination were tested in parallel including intramuscular (i.m., intranasal (i.n., oral (i.o., and subcutaneous (s.c. inoculations in mice. We found that one time vaccination with an optimal dose of VTT was able to induce anti-VTT Nabs via each of the four routes. Higher levels of antiviral Nabs, however, were induced via the i.n. and i.o. inoculations when compared with the i.m. and s.c. routes. Moreover, the i.n. and i.o. vaccinations also induced higher sustained levels of Nabs overtime, which conferred better protections against homologous or alternating mucosal routes of viral challenges six months post vaccination. The VTT-induced immunity via all four routes, however, was partially effective against the intramuscular viral challenge. Our data have implications for understanding the potential application of mucosal smallpox vaccination and for developing VTT-based vaccines to overcome preexisting antivaccinia immunity.

  10. Prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a literature review; Prevencao e tratamento da mucosite oral induzida por radioterapia: revisao de literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, Ieda Lessa de Souza [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital do Cancer I. Servico de Enfermagem]. E-mail: iedalessa@yahoo.com.br; Camargo, Teresa Caldas [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital do Cancer III. Servico de Enfermagem]. E-mail: tcamargo@inca.gov.br

    2007-04-15

    The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis have still not been fully defined. The current study thus involved a literature search aimed at identifying preventive and therapeutic measures in relation to oral mucositis in patients submitted to radiotherapy, analyzing the level of evidence in the selected studies, identifying which indications for prevention and treatment in the literature pertain to the field of nursing, and critically analyzing the results and their implications for nursing care. This was a systematic literature survey without a meta analysis, consulting the following databases: BIREME, Medline, CancerLit, Scirus, CAPES, Free medical journal, High wire press, SCIELO, and Medscape, from 2000 to 2005. According to observations, nursing care was capable of improving patient's quality of life, promoting education of patients, implementing and supervising oral care programs, and providing guidance on hygiene, prevention, and treatment of oral mucositis, including pain management. However, no Brazilian nursing publications were found on the subject. Research and publications focusing on nursing experience in the prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-related oral mucositis and the implications for patients and nurses are important to provide evidence-based nursing guidelines. (author)

  11. Effect of acid secretion blockade on acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by Tityus serrulatus scorpion toxin in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Júnio Rios; de Araújo, Gnana Keith Marques; da Luz, Magda Maria Profeta; da Conceição, Sérgio Alexandre; Lisboa, Felipe Assis; Moraes-Santos, Tasso; Cunha-Melo, José Renan

    2006-10-01

    Scorpion venom (TX) promotes gastric acid and pepsin secretion leading to acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML), when injected in animals. The goal of the present study was to observe the effects of acid gastric secretion blockers over the incidence of TX-induced AGML in vivo. To verify this model, we used male albino rats, fasted 18-20 h (n=122) and anaesthetized with urethane (1.4 g/kg, i.p.). Their trachea and left femoral vein were both cannulated; the first to avoid airway obstructions during scorpion intoxication and the second for administration of saline, TX and acid blockers. Following the surgical procedure, the animals were divided in 10 groups of at least 10 animals each. Control groups were injected with NaCl 0.9% 1 ml/kg (n=10) or TX 375 microg/kg (n=32). Test groups (n=10, each) received atropine 5 mg/kg, cimetidine 10mg/kg, ranitidine 2.5mg/kg, ranitidine 5mg/kg, omeprazol 1 mg/kg, omeprazol 4 mg/kg, octreotide 80 and octreotide 100 microg/kg 10 min before the TX was injected. After 1h of intoxication, the stomach was resected for macroscopic study and the gastric secretion was collected for volume, pH and acid output assessment. We observed that all blockers were able to completely or partially prevent the TX-induced acid secretion as well as the AGML (p<0.05). Our data suggest the TX-induced AGML can be prevented by different class of acid blockers injected before the intoxication. PMID:16926041

  12. Antioxidant Properties and Gastroprotective Effects of 2-(EthylthioBenzohydrazones on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafal Nazarbahjat

    Full Text Available A series of new 2-(ethylthiobenzohydrazone derivatives (1-6 were prepared and characterised by IR, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The newly prepared compounds were screened for their in vitro antioxidant activities using free radical scavenging 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays. Among them, most powerful antioxidant, compound 1 has been selected in order to illustrate anti-ulcer effect on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. Four groups of Sprague Dawley rats were respectively treated with 10% Tween 20 as ulcer control group, 20 mg/kg omeprazole as reference group, 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg compound 1 as experimental animals. Macroscopically, ulcer control group showed extensive hemorrhagic lesions of gastric mucosa compared with omeprazole or compound 1. Rats pre-treated with compound 1 showed increased in gastric pH and gastric mucus. Histologically, ulcer control group showed severe damage to gastric mucosa with edema and leucocytes infiltration of submucosal layer. In immunohistochemical analysis, rats which were pre-treated with compound 1 showed up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax proteins. In conclusion, the gastroprotective effect of compound 1 may be due to its antioxidant activity, and/or due to up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax protein in stained tissue section.

  13. Mucosal-associated invariant T cells from induced pluripotent stem cells: A novel approach for modeling human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Chie; Fujita, Hiroyoshi; Wakao, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Mice have frequently been used to model human diseases involving immune dysregulation such as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. These models help elucidate the mechanisms underlying the disease and in the development of novel therapies. However, if mice are deficient in certain cells and/or effectors associated with human diseases, how can their functions be investigated in this species? Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, a novel innate-like T cell family member, are a good example. MAIT cells are abundant in humans but scarce in laboratory mice. MAIT cells harbor an invariant T cell receptor and recognize nonpeptidic antigens vitamin B2 metabolites from bacteria and yeasts. Recent studies have shown that MAIT cells play a pivotal role in human diseases such as bacterial infections and autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. MAIT cells possess granulysin, a human-specific effector molecule, but granulysin and its homologue are absent in mice. Furthermore, MAIT cells show poor proliferation in vitro. To overcome these problems and further our knowledge of MAIT cells, we have established a method to expand MAIT cells via induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this review, we describe recent advances in the field of MAIT cell research and our approach for human disease modeling with iPSC-derived MAIT cells. PMID:27114747

  14. Anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy significantly reduces Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric mucosal damage in Mongolian gerbils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Chao Chang; Sheng-Hsuan Chen; Gi-Shih Lien; Yuarn-Jang Lee; Horng-Yuan Lou; Ching-Ruey Hsieh; Chia-Lang Fang; Shiann Pan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of 4 d' anti-Helicobacter pyloritherapy on the H pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils based on physiological and pathological changes.METHODS: We used 6-wk-old male gerbils orally inoculated with H pylori (ATCC43504, 2x108 CFU/mL).Seven weeks after H pylori inoculation, the animals of study group received 4 d' anti-H pylori triple therapy (H pylorieradicated group). Seven days later, all animals of the H pylori-eradicated and control groups (H pylori-infected& H pylori-uninfected groups) were sacrificed. We examined gastric mucosal lesions macroscopically, studied gastritis microscopically and determined the stomach weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and prostaglandin (PG) E2 level.RESULTS: The results showed that both macroscopic and histological gastric damages were significantly less in H pylori-eradicated group than H pylori-infected group.Stomach weight ratio, MPO activity and PGE2 levels were significantly higher in H pylori-infected group than those in the other two groups.CONCLUSION: Four days' anti-H pylori therapy was effective in the improvement of H pylori-induced gastric lesions in Mongolian gerbils.

  15. Electron microscopic observations comparing the gastric mucosal damage induced in rats and pigs by benoxaprofen and aspirin, reflecting their differing actions as prostaglandin-synthesis-inhibitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Rainsford, K. D.; Willis, C. M.; Walker, S A; Robins, P. G.

    1982-01-01

    The ultrastructural changes in the gastric mucosa induced by oral administration of aspirin (2 x 125 mg/kg/day) were compared with the effects of benoxaprofen (20 mg/kg/day) in pigs and normal and arthritic rats after 10 or 14 days' treatment respectively. The object was to compare the effects of drugs having different effects on prostaglandin-synthesizing systems on the development of gastric mucosal damage. Benoxaprofen caused less gastric damage than aspirin. There were fewer lesions in be...

  16. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Taghi Kazemi; Mahmoud Baradaran; Ali Bijani; Yasaman Moghadamnia; Fatemeh Vejdani; Mohammad Khalilpour; Dariush Moslemi; Neda Babaee; Asieh Khalilpour; Mahdi Pouramir; Ali Akbar Moghadamnia

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (...

  17. Mucosal Immunization Induces a Higher Level of Lasting Neutralizing Antibody Response in Mice by a Replication-Competent Smallpox Vaccine: Vaccinia Tiantan Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Lu; Wenbo Yu; Xiaoxing Huang; Haibo Wang; Li Liu; Zhiwei Chen

    2011-01-01

    The possible bioterrorism threat using the variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, has promoted us to further investigate the immunogenicity profiles of existing vaccines. Here, we study for the first time the immunogenicity profile of a replication-competent smallpox vaccine (vaccinia Tiantan, VTT strain) for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) through mucosal vaccination, which is noninvasive and has a critical implication for massive vaccination programs. Four different routes ...

  18. Intranasal Delivery of Group B Meningococcal Native Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine Induces Local Mucosal and Serum Bactericidal Antibody Responses in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Shoemaker, David R.; Saunders, Nancy B.; Brandt, Brenda L.; Moran, E. Ellen; LaClair, Andrew D.; Zollinger, Wendell D.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that intranasal immunization of mice with meningococcal native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) induces both a good local mucosal antibody response and a good systemic bactericidal antibody response. However, in the intranasal mouse model, some of the NOMV entered the lung and caused an acute granulocytic response. We therefore developed an alternate animal model using the rabbit. This model reduces the probability of lung involvement and more closely mimics intranasal ...

  19. The effect of three mouthwashes on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies: A randomized control trial

    OpenAIRE

    Madan Kumar P; Sequeira P; Shenoy Kamalaksha; Shetty Jayaram

    2008-01-01

    Aims: The present study was done to assess the effect of three alcohol-free mouthwashes on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with head and neck malignancies, scheduled to undergo curative radiotherapy, were randomly assigned to receive one of the three alcohol-free test mouthwashes (0.12% chlorhexidine, 1% povidone-iodine, or salt/soda) or a control. The patients were instructed to rinse with 10 ...

  20. Probiotic sonicates selectively induce mucosal immune cells apoptosis through ceramide generation via neutral sphingomyelinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Angulo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probiotics appear to be beneficial in inflammatory bowel disease, but their mechanism of action is incompletely understood. We investigated whether probiotic-derived sphingomyelinase mediates this beneficial effect. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Neutral sphingomyelinase (NSMase activity was measured in sonicates of the probiotic L. brevis (LB and S. thermophilus (ST and the non-probiotic E. coli (EC and E. faecalis (EF. Lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC were obtained from patients with Crohn's disease (CD and Ulcerative Colitis (UC, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy volunteers, analysing LPMC and PBMC apoptosis susceptibility, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and JNK activation. In some experiments, sonicates were preincubated with GSH or GW4869, a specific NSMase inhibitor. NSMase activity of LB and ST was 10-fold that of EC and EF sonicates. LB and ST sonicates induced significantly more apoptosis of CD and UC than control LPMC, whereas EC and EF sonicates failed to induce apoptosis. Pre-stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 induced a significant and time-dependent increase in LB-induced apoptosis of LPMC and PBMC. Exposure to LB sonicates resulted in JNK activation and ROS production by LPMC. NSMase activity of LB sonicates was completely abrogated by GW4869, causing a dose-dependent reduction of LB-induced apoptosis. LB and ST selectively induced immune cell apoptosis, an effect dependent on the degree of cell activation and mediated by bacterial NSMase. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that induction of immune cell apoptosis is a mechanism of action of some probiotics, and that NSMase-mediated ceramide generation contributes to the therapeutic effects of probiotics.

  1. Role of mucus in gastric mucosal injury induced by local ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, K; Joh, T; Yokoyama, Y; Itoh, M

    1995-09-01

    The role of gastric mucus was evaluated in a rat model of gastric epithelial damage induced by local ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) stress. In this model, blood-to-lumen chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) clearance served as an index of injury. Tetraprenyl acetone (TPA; 100 mg, 200 mg/kg IP) was used to stimulate mucus production. Administration of TPA increased both the hexosamine content in gastric tissue and the amount of alcian blue-periodic acid Schiff (AB-PAS) stained mucus in the mucosa in a dose-dependent manner. Increases in 51Cr-EDTA clearance induced by I/R were significantly attenuated by TPA in a dose-dependent manner. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC; 0.6%, 0.8%) was perfused into the gastric lumen to assess the effect of reduction in mucus on the injury induced by I/R. Although mean values of hexosamine content were increased by perfusion with NAC, AB-PAS-stained mucus in the mucosa was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Perfusion of NAC did not change basal 51Cr-EDTA clearance but significantly exacerbated the increase in clearance induced by I/R in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that gastric mucus protects the gastric mucosa against I/R stress in vivo. PMID:7665977

  2. Dietary transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGF-β2 supplementation reduces methotrexate-induced intestinal mucosal injury in a rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shani Ben-Lulu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Dietary supplementation with transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β has been proven to minimize intestinal damage and facilitate regeneration after mucosal injury. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of oral TGF-β2 supplementation on intestinal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis following methotrexate (MTX-induced intestinal damage in a rat and in a cell culture model. METHODS: Caco-2 cells were treated with MTX and were incubated with increasing concentrations of TGF-β2. Cell apoptosis was assessed using FACS analysis by annexin staining and cell viability was monitored using Trypan Blue assay. Male rats were divided into four experimental groups: Control rats, CONTR- TGF-β rats were treated with diet enriched with TGF-β2, MTX rats were treated with a single dose of methotrexate, and MTX- TGF-β rats were treated with diet enriched with TGF-β2. Intestinal mucosal damage, mucosal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and enterocyte apoptosis were determined at sacrifice. Real Time PCR and Western blot were used to determine bax and bcl-2 mRNA, p-ERK, β-catenin, IL-1B and bax protein expression. RESULTS: Treatment of MTX-pretreated Caco-2 cells with TGF-B2 resulted in increased cell viability and decreased cell apoptosis. Treatment of MTX-rats with TGF-β2 resulted in a significant increase in bowel and mucosal weight, DNA and protein content, villus-height (ileum, crypt-depth (jejunum, decreased intestinal-injury score, decreased level of apoptosis and increased cell proliferation in jejunum and ileum compared to the untreated MTX group. MTX-TGF-β2 rats demonstrated a lower bax mRNA and protein levels as well as increased bcl-2 mRNA levels in jejunum and ileum compared to MTX group. Treatment with TGF-β2 also led to increased pERK, IL-1B and β-catenin protein levels in intestinal mucosa. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with TGF-β2 prevents mucosal-injury, enhances p-ERK and

  3. Effects of huoxiangzhengqi liquid on enteric mucosal immune responses in mice with Bacillus dysenteriae and Salmonella typhimurium induced diarrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Hui He; Hong-Yan Zhao; Zhen-Li Liu; Cheng Lu; Xiao-Jian Luo; Se-Qi Lin; Xing-Wen Qian; Shi-Lin Chen; Ai-Ping Lu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore effects of huoxiangzhengqi liquid (HXZQ)on enteric mucosal immune responses in mice with Bacillus dysenteriae and Salmonella typhimurium induced diarrhea (BSD).METHODS: BSD was induced in Balb/c mice by oral administration with Bacillus dysenteriae and Salmonella typhimurium. HXZQ was administrated from the day of diarrhea induction at dosages of 5.21 g/kg and 0.52 g/kg,respectively. The onset of diarrhea and lasting time were recorded. Peyer's patches and peripheral lymphocytes were prepared for flow cytometry, and levels of TNF-αin peripheral blood and enteric tissue homogenates were determined with ELISA. Student's t test was employed for statistics.RESULTS: Mice in BSD group started showing continuous diarrhea on the day of induction until the fourth day when they were sacrificed. Diarrhea in the mice of HXZQ high and low dose groups lasted for 36 and 54 h, respectively. There were more CD4+ and CD8+cells in peripheral blood, fewer CD4+ cells in Peyer's patches in BSD mice compared to normal mice. Fewer CD4+ and CD8+ cells was shown in the mice in HXZQ high group compared to BSD mice. In Peyer's patch, there were more CD8+ cells in mice in HXZQ high and low dose groups and more CD4+ in mice in HXZQ high group.Higher levels of TNF-α in peripheral blood and intestinal tissue homogenates in BSD group were observed. Mice in HXZQ high group showed decreased levels of TNF-αin peripheral blood and enteric tissue homogenates.CONCLUSION: The immune regulation of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in Peyer's patch and suppression of TNF-α levels in enteric homogenates may partially explain the effect of HXZQ on improvement of BSD.

  4. Clinical, biological, histological features and treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy: a literature review; Aspectos clinicos, biologicos, histopatologicos e tratamentos propostos para a mucosite oral induzida por radioterapia: revisao da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonan, Paulo Rogerio Ferreti [Universidade Estadual de Montes Claros e Faculdades Unidas do Norte de Minas, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Odontologia]. E-mail: pbonan@yahoo.com; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; Almeida, Oslei Paes de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Diagnostico Oral; Alves, Fabio de Abreu [Hospital do Cancer AC Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Estomatologia

    2005-07-01

    The oral mucositis is a main side effect of radiotherapy on head and neck, initiating two weeks after the beginning of the treatment. It is characterized by sensation of local burning to intense pain, leading in several cases, to the interruption of the treatment. The purpose of this work is to review the main published studies that discuss the clinical, biological and histopathological features of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and to describe the main approaches recommended to prevent or to treat it. Although the clinical features of mucositis are intensively described in the literature, few studies address the histopathological alterations in oral mucositis and only recently, its biological processes have been investigated. The biological mechanisms involved in the radiation tissue damage have been only recently discussed and there is no consensus among treatment modalities. Yet, the progressive knowledge in the histopathology and biological characteristics of oral mucositis probably will lead to more effective in prevention and control strategies. (author)

  5. Effect of sucralfate on aspirin induced mucosal injury and impaired haemostasis in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, N; Murray, F. E.; Cole, A. T.; Filipowicz, B; Hawkey, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sucralfate does not have potent anti-ulcerogenic actions in users of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, sucralfate may influence intragastric haemostasis favourably. AIM: To investigate separately the effects of sucralfate on acute gastric and duodenal injury and on changes in intragastric bleeding induced by aspirin. METHOD: On three occasions, 24 healthy volunteers received three days' treatment with aspirin 900 mg twice daily together with placebo, sucralf...

  6. Accidental miasis caused by Piophila casei: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Espedito Nocera; Daniele Crotti

    2009-01-01

    Miasis are infestations caused by larvae ingested with damaged food or food washed with contaminated water. Musca domestica (muscidi), Sarcophaga carnaria (sarcofagidi) and Piophila casei (piofilidi) are usually involved. The above miasis are known as involuntary, while the voluntary ingestion of larvae regards, in fact, only P. casei. In this paper we describe the case of a patient who ingested some larvae of P. casei, taking back a remarkable clinical picture.

  7. Accidental miasis caused by Piophila casei: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espedito Nocera

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Miasis are infestations caused by larvae ingested with damaged food or food washed with contaminated water. Musca domestica (muscidi, Sarcophaga carnaria (sarcofagidi and Piophila casei (piofilidi are usually involved. The above miasis are known as involuntary, while the voluntary ingestion of larvae regards, in fact, only P. casei. In this paper we describe the case of a patient who ingested some larvae of P. casei, taking back a remarkable clinical picture.

  8. Antioxidant capacity of calendula officinalis flowers extract and prevention of radiation induced oropharyngeal mucositis in patients with head and neck cancers: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee, Neda; Moslemi, Dariush; Khalilpour, Mohammad; Vejdani, Fatemeh; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Bijani, Ali; Baradaran, Mahmoud; Kazemi, Mohammad Taghi; Khalilpour, Asieh; Pouramir, Mahdi; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM) in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group). Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30-35 fractions within 4-7 weeks). The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist), using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019), week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect. PMID:23497687

  9. A novel replication-competent vaccinia vector MVTT is superior to MVA for inducing high levels of neutralizing antibody via mucosal vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Huang

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallpox vaccine for millions of Chinese people. The spike glycoprotein (S of SARS-CoV was used as the test antigen after the S gene was constructed in the identical genomic location of two vectors to generate vaccine candidates MVTT-S and MVA-S. Using identical doses, MVTT-S induced lower levels ( approximately 2-3-fold of anti- SARS-CoV neutralizing antibodies (Nabs than MVA-S through intramuscular inoculation. MVTT-S, however, was capable of inducing consistently 20-to-100-fold higher levels of Nabs than MVA-S when inoculated via either intranasal or intraoral routes. These levels of MVTT-S-induced Nab responses were substantially (approximately 10-fold higher than that induced via the intramuscular route in the same experiments. Moreover, pre-exposure to the wild-type VTT via intranasal or intraoral route impaired the Nab response via the same routes of MVTT-S vaccination probably due to the pre-existing anti-VTT Nab response. The efficacy of intranasal or intraoral vaccination, however, was still 20-to-50-fold better than intramuscular inoculation despite the subcutaneous pre-exposure to wild-type VTT. Our data have implications for people who maintain low levels of anti-VTT Nabs after historical smallpox vaccination. MVTT is therefore an attractive live viral vector for mucosal vaccination.

  10. Exploration of the Protection of Riboflavin Laurate on Oral Mucositis Induced by Chemotherapy or Radiotherapy at the Cellular Level: What Is the Leading Contributor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Oral or gastrointestinal mucositis is a frequent phenomenon in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In addition, several clinical investigations have demonstrated in recent years that riboflavin laurate has the potential to protect the patients from the disease induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In our studies, it is observed that riboflavin laurate can ameliorate either chemotherapy- or radiotherapy-induced toxicities on Helf cells, and the effect is greater than that of riboflavin. In addition, riboflavin laurate is able to transport through the Caco-2 cell monolayer as the prototype, indicating the protective effects may be produced by the prototype of riboflavin laurate, rather than simply by the released riboflavin.

  11. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in radiation-induced oral mucositis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To detect the mRNA and protein levels of COX-2 in the tissues with radiation- induced oral mucosa(ROM) in rats and explore the mechanism of COX-2 in ROM. Methods: The Sprague- Dawley (SD) rat model of ROM was established. Both sides of buccal mucosa were excised. The cDNA of COX- 2 was synthesized using the semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The Streptavidin-Biotin-Complex Method (SABC Method) was employed to determine the localization, intensity and distribution of COX-2 protein expression. Results: The SD rat model of ROM was established. The results of RT-PCR showed that mRNA of COX-2 could be expressed in the left buccal mucosa but rarely in the right buccal mucosa. Immunohistochemical analysis of COX-2 demonstrates that COX-2 protein can be expressed in the left side mucosa. Conclusions: The mRNA and protein of COX-2 can be expressed in the mucosa of ROM. The expressions of COX-2 have correlation with the severity of ROM. (authors)

  12. Induction of Immune Responses in Mice after Intragastric Administration of Lactobacillus casei Producing Porcine Parvovirus VP2 Protein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yigang; Li, Yijing

    2007-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 was selected as an antigen delivery vehicle for mucosal immunization against porcine parvovirus (PPV) infection. A 64-kDa fragment of PPV major protective antigen VP2 protein was used as the parvovirus antigen model. A recombinant Lactobacillus expressing VP2 protein was constructed with plasmid pPG611.1, where expression and localization of the VP2 protein from recombinant Lc393-rPPV-VP2 was detected via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, ...

  13. Inactivated Eyedrop Influenza Vaccine Adjuvanted with Poly(I:C Is Safe and Effective for Inducing Protective Systemic and Mucosal Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Do Kim

    Full Text Available The eye route has been evaluated as an efficient vaccine delivery routes. However, in order to induce sufficient antibody production with inactivated vaccine, testing of the safety and efficacy of the use of inactivated antigen plus adjuvant is needed. Here, we assessed various types of adjuvants in eyedrop as an anti-influenza serum and mucosal Ab production-enhancer in BALB/c mice. Among the adjuvants, poly (I:C showed as much enhancement in antigen-specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibody production as cholera toxin (CT after vaccinations with trivalent hemagglutinin-subunits or split H1N1 vaccine antigen in mice. Vaccination with split H1N1 eyedrop vaccine antigen plus poly(I:C showed a similar or slightly lower efficacy in inducing antibody production than intranasal vaccination; the eyedrop vaccine-induced immunity was enough to protect mice from lethal homologous influenza A/California/04/09 (H1N1 virus challenge. Additionally, ocular inoculation with poly(I:C plus vaccine antigen generated no signs of inflammation within 24 hours: no increases in the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines nor in the infiltration of mononuclear cells to administration sites. In contrast, CT administration induced increased expression of IL-6 cytokine mRNA and mononuclear cell infiltration in the conjunctiva within 24 hours of vaccination. Moreover, inoculated visualizing materials by eyedrop did not contaminate the surface of the olfactory bulb in mice; meanwhile, intranasally administered materials defiled the surface of the brain. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the use of eyedrop inactivated influenza vaccine plus poly(I:C is a safe and effective mucosal vaccine strategy for inducing protective anti-influenza immunity.

  14. Management of radiation therapy-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Part II: supportive treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cheong Ngeow

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal mucositis is the acute inflammatory and ulcerative reaction of the oral mucosa following radiation therapy to the head and neck region. It is such a common problem that nearly all head and neck cancer patients develop some degree of mucositis. This complication is usually transient in nature but it also represents an important clinical problem as it is a painful, debilitating, dose-dependent side effect for which there is no widely acceptable prophylaxis or effective treatment. As several authoritative groups have recently either undertaken systematic reviews or issued guidelines on the management of mucositis, it is the aim of this review instead, to provide an overview of all the remedies and pharmaceutical agents available, as well as highlighting to researchers the gaps that need to be filled.

  15. Reducing the Bitterness of Tuna (Euthynnus pelamis) Dark Meat with Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoldi, Fabiano Cleber; Ernani S. Sant’Anna; Luiz H. Beirão

    2004-01-01

    During the process of canning tuna fish, considerable amounts of dark tuna meat are left over because of its bitterness, which are then used in the production of animal food. Fermentation with Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393 was used as an alternative to reduce this bitter taste. Samples of meat were prepared, vacuum packed and then stored at –18 °C. The frozen dark meat was used immediately after defrosting and the experiment was carried out with 2 and 4 % of NaCl with the addition...

  16. Probiotic (yogurt) containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 is effective for preventing Candida albicans-induced mucosal inflammation and proliferation in the forestomach of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terayama, Yui; Matsuura, Tetsuro; Uchida, Masayuki; Narama, Isao; Ozaki, Kiyokazu

    2016-06-01

    Oral and esophageal candidiasis sometimes leads to mucosal hyperplasia, and progresses to carcinoma. We have produced an animal model for hyperplastic mucosal candidiasis in the forestomach that has a proliferative lesion of the squamous epithelium with chronic inflammation and C. albicans infection, some of which advanced to squamous cell carcinoma. There are many reports of the antibacterial effects of probiotics, but consensus about their antifungal effect has not been reached. In the present study, we investigate whether probiotic (yogurt) containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 (LG21 yogurt) can prevent proliferative and inflammatory changes caused by C. albicans in this mucosal candidiasis animal model. Diabetes was induced in 8-week-old WBN/Kob rats by intravenous administration of alloxan. One group of diabetic rats received a saline containing C. albicans and LG21 yogurt orally (DC+LG21 group) for 30 weeks, and another group received only C. albicans (DC group) for 30 weeks. They were sacrificed at 40 weeks of age, and analyzed histopathologically. In the DC+LG21 group, squamous hyperplasia at the greater curvature was significantly milder, and the Ki-67 positive index was significantly lower compared with the DC group. Suppurative inflammation with C. albicans also tended to be suppressed at the greater curvature. These findings suggest that probiotic (yogurt) containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 can suppress squamous hyperplastic change and inflammation associated with C. albicans infection in the forestomach. PMID:26691696

  17. Xylitol-mediated transient inhibition of ribitol utilization by Lactobacillus casei.

    OpenAIRE

    London, J; Hausman, S

    1982-01-01

    The growth of Lactobacillus casei strain Cl-16 at the expense or ribitol was inhibited if the non-metabolizable substrate xylitol was included in the medium at concentrations of 6 mM or greater. At these concentrations, xylitol, did not competitively inhibit ribitol transport. The cessation of growth was caused by the intracellular accumulation of xylitol-5-phosphate, which occurred because growth on ribitol had gratuitously induced a functional xylitol-specific phosphotransferase system but ...

  18. Irradiation mucositis and oral flora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study, which is motivated by the substantial morbidity of local signs of mucositis and generalized symptoms that result from mucositis induced by therapeutic irradiation, has the following objectives: To investigate if it is possible to prevent irradiation mucositis via oral flora elimination, and, if it is true that flora plays a role in irradiation mucositis, what fraction of the oral flora may be involved; to evaluate oral Gram-negative bacillary carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate Gram-negative bacilli from the oral cavity; to evaluate oral yeast carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate yeasts stomatitis and the 'selectivity' of elimination of flora. Two methods are described for monitoring alterations of mucositis of the oral cavity and changes in oral flora. Chlorhexidine has been tested as the commonly used prophylaxis. The effect of chlorhexidine 0.1% rinses on oral flora and mucositis has been studied in a prospective placebo controlled double blind randomized programme. The results of the influence of saliva on the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine and the results of selective elimination of oral flora in irradiated patients who have head and neck cancer are reported. Salivary inactivation of the topical antimicrobials used for selective elimination of oral flora has been studied and the results are reported. Finally, the objectives that have been achieved (or not) are delineated. The significance of the results of the study are discussed in terms of published information and further lines of research are suggested. (author). 559 refs.; 29 figs.; 20 tabs

  19. L-glutamine decreases the severity of mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    TSUJIMOTO, TAKAE; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; WASA, MASAFUMI; Takenaka, Yukinori; Nakahara, Susumu; TAKAGI, TASTUYA; TSUGANE, MAMIKO; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Inohara, Hidenori; Uejima, Etsuko; Ito, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of severe mucositis in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx is high among patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) receiving chemoradiotherapy (CRT), resulting in significant pain and impairment of quality of life. The present study investigated whether L-glutamine (glutamine) decreases the severity of mucositis in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx induced by CRT. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 40 untreated patients with squamous cell carcinoma...

  20. Brevibacterium casei isolated as a cause of relapsing peritonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Althaf, Mohammed Mahdi; Abdelsalam, Mohamed Said; Alsunaid, Mohammed Sunaid; Hussein, Maged Hassan

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of relapsing peritonitis in a 33-year-old woman on automated peritoneal dialysis. End-stage renal disease was secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus complicated with lupus nephritis. The organism isolated was Brevibacterium casei that was not readily identified, delaying appropriate management with an extended antibiotic course. Definite management of B casei peritonitis was peritoneal dialysis catheter removal.

  1. Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction injury induced by altitude hypoxia in rats and the protective effect of glutamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-zhou YANG

    2011-03-01

    .Compared with the C group(serum endotoxin 0.032±0.003kEU/L,serum DAO 0.861±0.359kU/L,serum Gln 3.083±0.186mmol/L,small intestine DAO 0.516±0.062kU/L,small intestine Gln 0.573±0.032mmol/L,the serum endotoxin(0.277±0.053kEU/L and serum DAO(3.533±0.584kU/L increased significantly,and serum Gln(1.472±0.079mmol/L,intestinal DAO(0.325±0.053kU/L and Gln(0.377±0.010mmol/L decreased significantly in H group(P < 0.05 or P < 0.01;Compared with H group,the levels of serum endotoxin(0.113±0.015kEU/L and DAO(1.810±0.450kU/L decreased significantly,serum Gln(1.951±0.070mmol/L,small intestine DAO(0.431±0.049kU/L and Gln(0.448±0.021mmol/L increased obviously(P < 0.05 in HG group.Conclusions Hypoxia may induce severe primary intestinal barrier dysfunction,promote bacterial and endotoxic translocation,cause systemic inflammatory response,and is the major factor causing high altitude MODS.Gln may provide a protection against intestinal mucosa injury in high altitude,attenuate the intestinal mucosal permeability,and reduce bacterial translocation and systemic inflammatory response.

  2. Effects of near-infrared laser radiation on the survival and inflammatory potential of Candida spp. involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, A M; Rizzetto, L; Castronovo, G; Perissi, E; Tanturli, M; Cozzolino, F; Cavalieri, D; Fusi, F; Cialdai, F; Vignali, L; Torcia, M G; Monici, M

    2015-10-01

    Candida spp. usually colonize ulcerative lesions of atrophic mucosa in patients with chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis inducing severe inflammation. The spread of antifungal-resistant strains strongly encouraged the search of complementary or alternative therapeutic strategies to cure inflamed mucosa. In this paper, we studied the effects of a near-infrared (NIR) laser system with dual-wavelength emission (808 nm + 904 nm) on the survival and inflammatory potential of C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. Laser treatment was performed with a Multiwave Locked System laser. Survival and apoptosis of fungal strains were evaluated by colony-forming units (CFU) counting and annexin V staining. Cytokine production was evaluated by ImmunoPlex array. Laser treatment significantly affected the survival of Candida spp. by inducing apoptosis and induced a lower production of inflammatory cytokines by dendritic cells compared to untreated fungi. No differences in the survival and inflammatory potential were recorded in treated or untreated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, used as the control non-pathogenic microorganism. Laser treatment altered the survival and inflammatory potential of pathogenic Candida spp. These data provide experimental support to the use of NIR laser radiation as a co-adjuvant of antifungal therapy in patients with oral mucositis (OM) complicated by Candida infections. PMID:26173694

  3. XRCC1 codon 399Gln polymorphism is associated with radiotherapy-induced acute dermatitis and mucositis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the 194 and 399 codons of XRCC1, and the risk of severe acute skin and oral mucosa reactions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients in China. 114 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were sequentially recruited in this study. Heparinized peripheral blood samples were taken for SNPs analysis before the start of radiation treatment. SNPs in XRCC1 (194Arg/Trp and 399Arg/Gln) gene were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Dermatitis at upper neck and oral mucositis were clinically recorded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v.3.0. The variant allele frequencies were 0.289 for XRCC1 194Trp and 0.263 for XRCC1 399Gln. Of the 114 patients, 24 experienced grade 3 acute dermatitis and 48 had grade 3 acute mucositis. The XRCC1 399Arg/Gln was significantly associated with the development of grade 3 dermatitis (Odds Ratio, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.04–6.73; p = 0.037, χ2 = 4.357). In addition, it was also associated with higher incidence of grade 3 mucositis with a borderline statistical significance (Odds Ratio, 2.11; 95% CI, 0.951–4.66; p = 0.065, χ2 = 3.411). The relationship between XRCC1 194Arg/Trp and acute dermatitis, and mucositis was not found. Our investigation shows, for the first time, that patients with the XRCC1 399Arg/Gln genotype were more likely to experience severe acute dermatitis and oral mucositis. With further validation, the information can be used to determine personalized radiotherapy strategy

  4. Nutrition and Gut Mucositis in Pediatric Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Peter Erik Lotko

    . Unfortunately, effective treatment strategies against mucositis are not in general available. The overall aim of the present PhD was to study interactions between mucositis, inflammation and nutrition. We hypothesized that toxic reactions in the alimentary tract, induced by chemotherapy, followed by release...

  5. The anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of gallic acid against mucosal inflammation- and erosions-induced by gastric ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Mard, Seyyed Ali; Mojadami, Shahnaz; Farbood, Yaghoob; Gharib Naseri, Mohammad Kazem

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of gallic acid on gastric mucosal lesions caused by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat. Forty male rats were randomly divided into sham, control (I/R injury) and three gallic acid-pretreated groups. To induce I/R lesions, the celiac artery was clamped for 30 min and then the clamp was removed to allow reperfusion for 6 hr. Pretreated rats received gallic acid (15, 30 or 60 mg kg-1, intraperitoneally) 30 min prior to the induction...

  6. Low-energy laser in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: report of two cases; Laser de baixa intensidade no tratamento da mucosite oral induzida pela radioterapia: relato de casos clinicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelner, Natalie; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Disciplina de Patologia Oral]. E-mail: nataliekelner@yahoo.com.br

    2007-01-15

    Oral mucositis is a common, dose-limiting, and potentially serious complication of cancer therapy. Severe mucositis can lead to modifications of treatment planning and even suspension of therapy, with a negative impact on local tumor control and patient survival, increasing the risk of local and systemic infections. The lesions generally develop in non-keratinized mucosa, which is most vulnerable to this complication. Symptoms can range from a burning sensation to severe pain that impairs nutrient and fluid intake. Low-energy laser has been proposed for treatment of mucositis, with good clinical and functional results, accelerating the healing process and decreasing the pain. The aim of this article, illustrated by two clinical cases at the Pernambuco Cancer Hospital in Recife, Brazil, was to report on the efficacy of low-energy laser in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis.(author)

  7. Antioxidant Capacity of Calendula Officinalis Flowers Extract and Prevention of Radiation Induced Oropharyngeal Mucositis in Patients with Head and Neck Cancers: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Kazemi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group. Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30–35 fractions within 4–7 weeks. The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist, using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS. Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019, week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001 and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031. Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect.

  8. Assessment of the effect of local application of amifostine on acute radiation-induced oral mucositis in guinea pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chang Jiang; Wang, Sheng Zi; Wang, Shu Yi; Zhang, Yan Ping

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study was to assess the radioprotective effects of the local application of amifostine to treat acute buccal mucositis in guinea pigs. A total of 32 guinea pigs were randomized into four groups: (Group A) topically administered 50 mg of amifostine plus radiotherapy (RT); (Group B) 100 mg amifostine plus RT; (Group C) normal saline plus RT; and (Group D) normal saline plus sham RT. The opportunity for administration was 15 min before irradiation. When administered, the cotto...

  9. Prophylaxis of radiochemotherapy-induced mucositis. Efficacy of the prophylactic oral rinsing with povidone-iodine solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An open, randomised, prospective comparative trial was conducted with 40 patients undergoing radiochemotherapy of head and neck region due to malignant disease. The treatment scheme consisted of irradiation to tumor region and adjacent lymph nodes with a total dose of 71.3 Gy and simultaneous chemotherapy with carboplatin (60 mg/m2) on days 1 to 5 and 29 to 34. In all patients, a prophylaxis of mucosistis with nystatine, rutosides, panthenol and immunoglobulin was undertaken. In addition, 20 patients rinsed oral cavity 4 times daily with povidone-iodine-solution, the comparative group rinsed with sterile water. Clinical examination of the oral mucosa was performed weekly. Onset, grading and duration of mucositis were used as main variables. Clinically manifested oral mucositis was observed in 14 patients of the iodine group (mean grading: 1.0) and all 20 patients of the control group (mean grading: 3.0). Total duration (mean) of clinically observed mucositis was 2.75 weeks in treatment patients and 9.25 in control patients. Median AUC (area under curve for grade vs duration) was 2.5 in iodine rinsing patients and 15.75 in control patients. All differences found between the 2 groups were statistically significant. Increased iodine incorporation was not observed. A pathological increase of thyroid hormone levels in the iodine group was not found. (orig./MG)

  10. Mucosal immunity induced by adenovirus-based H5N1 HPAI vaccine confers protection against a lethal H5N2 avian influenza virus challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of effective vaccines against highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses is a global public health priority. Considering the difficulty in predicting HPAI H5N1 pandemic strains, one strategy used in their design includes the development of formulations with the capacity of eliciting broad cross-protective immunity against multiple viral antigens. To this end we constructed a replication-defective recombinant adenovirus-based avian influenza virus vaccine (rAdv-AI) expressing the codon-optimized M2eX-HA-hCD40L and the M1-M2 fusion genes from HPAI H5N1 human isolate. Although there were no significant differences in the systemic immune responses observed between the intramuscular prime-intramuscular boost regimen (IM/IM) and the intranasal prime-intramuscular boost regimen (IN/IM), IN/IM induced more potent CD8+ T cell and antibody responses at mucosal sites than the IM/IM vaccination, resulting in more effective protection against lethal H5N2 avian influenza (AI) virus challenge. These findings suggest that the strategies used to induce multi-antigen-targeted mucosal immunity, such as IN/IM delivery of rAdv-AI, may be a promising approach for developing broad protective vaccines that may be more effective against the new HPAI pandemic strains.

  11. Mucosal immunity induced by adenovirus-based H5N1 HPAI vaccine confers protection against a lethal H5N2 avian influenza virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki Seok; Lee, Jiyeung; Ahn, So Shin; Byun, Young-Ho; Seong, Baik Lin; Baek, Yun Hee; Song, Min-Suk; Choi, Young Ki; Na, Yun Jeong; Hwang, Inhwan; Sung, Young Chul; Lee, Chang Geun

    2009-12-20

    Development of effective vaccines against highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses is a global public health priority. Considering the difficulty in predicting HPAI H5N1 pandemic strains, one strategy used in their design includes the development of formulations with the capacity of eliciting broad cross-protective immunity against multiple viral antigens. To this end we constructed a replication-defective recombinant adenovirus-based avian influenza virus vaccine (rAdv-AI) expressing the codon-optimized M2eX-HA-hCD40L and the M1-M2 fusion genes from HPAI H5N1 human isolate. Although there were no significant differences in the systemic immune responses observed between the intramuscular prime-intramuscular boost regimen (IM/IM) and the intranasal prime-intramuscular boost regimen (IN/IM), IN/IM induced more potent CD8(+) T cell and antibody responses at mucosal sites than the IM/IM vaccination, resulting in more effective protection against lethal H5N2 avian influenza (AI) virus challenge. These findings suggest that the strategies used to induce multi-antigen-targeted mucosal immunity, such as IN/IM delivery of rAdv-AI, may be a promising approach for developing broad protective vaccines that may be more effective against the new HPAI pandemic strains. PMID:19836045

  12. Stress responses in probiotic Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Nezhad, Marzieh; Hussain, Malik Altaf; Britz, Margaret Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Survival in harsh environments is critical to both the industrial performance of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their competitiveness in complex microbial ecologies. Among the LAB, members of the Lactobacillus casei group have industrial applications as acid-producing starter cultures for milk fermentations and as specialty cultures for the intensification and acceleration of flavor development in certain bacterial-ripened cheese varieties. They are amongst the most common organisms in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humans and other animals, and have the potential to function as probiotics. Whether used in industrial or probiotic applications, environmental stresses will affect the physiological status and properties of cells, including altering their functionality and biochemistry. Understanding the mechanisms of how LAB cope with different environments is of great biotechnological importance, from both a fundamental and applied perspective: hence, interaction between these strains and their environment has gained increased interest in recent years. This paper presents an overview of the important features of stress responses in Lb. casei, and related proteomic or gene expression patterns that may improve their use as starter cultures and probiotics. PMID:24915363

  13. Gastroprotective activity of Nigella sativa L oil and its constituent, thymoquinone against acute alcohol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet Kanter; Halit Demir; Cengiz Karakaya; Hanefi Ozbek

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathogenesis of acute ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions and the effect of Nigella sativa L oil (NS) and its constituent thymoquinone (TQ) in an experimental model.METHODS: Male Wistar albino rats were assigned into 4groups. Control group was given physiologic saline orally (10 mL/kg body weight) as the vehicle (gavage); ethanol group was administrated 1 mL (per rat) absolute alcohol by gavage; the third and fourth groups were given NS (10 mL/kg body weight) and TQ (10 mg/kg body weight p.o) respectively 1 h prior to alcohol intake. One hour after ethanol administration, stomach tissues were excised for macroscopic examination and biochemical analysis.RESULTS: NS and TQ could protect gastric mucosa against the injurious effect of absolute alcohol and promote ulcer healing as evidenced from the ulcer index (UI) values. NS prevented alcohol-induced increase in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), an index of lipid peroxidation. NS also increased gastric glutathione content (GSH), enzymatic activities of gastric superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Likewise, TQ protected against the ulcerating effect of alcohol and mitigated most of the biochemical adverse effects induced by alcohol in gastric mucosa, but to a lesser extent than NS. Neither NS nor TQ affected catalase activity in gastric tissue.CONCLUSION: Both NS and TQ, particularly NS can partly protect gastric mucosa from acute alcohol-induced mucosal injury, and these gastroprotective effects might be induced, at least partly by their radical scavenging activity.

  14. Low-level laser therapy for treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in childhood: a randomized double-blind controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadori, Francesca; Bardellini, Elena; Conti, Giulio; Pedrini, Nicola; Schumacher, Richard Fabian; Majorana, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to verify if low-level laser therapy could be useful to reduce chemotherapy-related oral mucositis grading and pain in childhood undergoing chemotherapy. A randomized double-blind clinical trial was carried out. Patients from 3 to 18 years of age undergoing cancer therapy and presenting OM grade 2 or more were eligible for this study. Patients were randomly divided in two groups: group A received laser therapy from the day of OM diagnosis and other 3 consecutive days (830 nm wavelength, power 150 mW, spot size 1 cm(2), 30 s per cm(2), energy density 4.5 J/cm(2)); group B received sham therapy (placebo) with the same timing. Two blind clinicians performed OM scoring and pain evaluation at day 1 (immediately before the beginning of laser treatment-T0), day 4 (after finishing laser therapy cycle-T1) and at day 7 (T2) as follow-up. A total of 123 patients were included in the study. Group A was composed of 62 children while group B is 61; in both groups, there was a progressive reduction in grade of OM, and at day 7, not every mucosal lesion disappeared. The difference in the decline of OM grading between the two groups resulted not statistically significant (p = 0.07). A statistically significant difference in pain reduction between two groups both at T1 and at T2 (p < 0.005) was observed. This study demonstrated the efficacy of LLLT in reducing pain due to chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in children, while no significant benefit was noted in reducing OM grade. PMID:27272517

  15. 8-prenylnaringenin and tamoxifen inhibit the shedding of irradiated epithelial cells and increase the latency period of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Cell culture and murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryck, Tine de; Impe, Annouchka van; Bracke, Marc E. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Experimental Cancer Research, Department Radiation Oncology and Experimental Cancer Research, Ghent (Belgium); Vanhoecke, Barbara W. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Experimental Cancer Research, Department Radiation Oncology and Experimental Cancer Research, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University, Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent (Belgium); Heyerick, Arne [Ghent University, Laboratory of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Ghent (Belgium); Vakaet, Luc; Neve, Wilfried de [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent (Belgium); Mueller, Doreen [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Margret [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site Dresden and German Cancer Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, CCC, and CD-Laboratory RadOnc, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-05-01

    The major component in the pathogenesis of oral radiation-induced mucositis is progressive epithelial hypoplasia and eventual ulceration. Irradiation inhibits cell proliferation, while cell loss at the surface continues. We conceived to slow down this desquamation by increasing intercellular adhesion, regulated by the E-cadherin/catenin complex. We investigated if 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) or tamoxifen (TAM) decrease the shedding of irradiated human buccal epithelial cells in vitro and thus delay the ulcerative phase of radiation-induced mucositis in vivo. In vitro, aggregates of buccal epithelial cells were irradiated and cultured in suspension for 11 days. 8-PN or TAM were investigated regarding their effect on cell shedding. In vivo, the lower tongue surface of mice was irradiated with graded single doses of 25 kV X-rays. The incidence, latency, and duration of the resulting mucosal ulcerations were analyzed after topical treatment with 8-PN, TAM or solvent. 8-PN or TAM prevented the volume reduction of the irradiated cell aggregates during the incubation period. This was the result of a higher residual cell number in the treated versus the untreated irradiated aggregates. In vivo, topical treatment with 8-PN or TAM significantly increased the latency of mucositis from 10.9 to 12.1 and 12.4 days respectively, while the ulcer incidence was unchanged. 8-PN and TAM prevent volume reduction of irradiated cell aggregates in suspension culture. In the tongues of mice, these compounds increase the latency period. This suggests a role for these compounds for the amelioration of radiation-induced mucositis in the treatment of head and neck tumors. (orig.) [German] Die wesentliche Komponente in der Pathogenese der radiogenen Mukositis ist eine progressive epitheliale Hypoplasie und letztendlich Ulzeration. Die Bestrahlung hemmt die Zellproliferation, waehrend der Zellverlust an der Oberflaeche fortbesteht. Wir versuchten, diese Desquamation durch eine Stimulation der

  16. D-methionine as a protector for heavy ion radiation-induced oral mucositis. Evaluation of RBE of carbon-ion beams for epithelial thickness on mouse tongues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate if D-methionine, the dextro-isomer of the common amino acid L-methionine, can prevent oral mucositis resulting from heavy ion irradiation during treatment for head and neck cancers. For the first study, relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon-ion beams for epithelial thickness on mouse tongues was evaluated. The head of female C3H mice, 8 weeks old, were irradiated by five fractionated doses of carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u) or 150 kV X-rays to induce oral mucositis (ulcers on tongue). Six days after the last irradiation, mice were sacrificed. Excised tongues were evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. The thickness of the lingual epithelium was measured. The RBE of 6-cm spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) (290 MeV/u) for epithelium on mouse tongues after fractionated doses is 1.82. It was almost the equivalent value as that for gut crypt survivals reported by enormous studies. (author)

  17. The optimal use of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor in radiation induced mucositis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patni Nidhi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluation of response of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF on acute radiation toxicity profile in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Thirty three patients with proven stage I or II head & neck carcinoma received conventional external beam radiation therapy. Out of these, six patients received postoperative adjuvant therapy while remaining 27 received definitive RT. Patients were given 100 mcg GM-CSF subcutaneously per day along with radiation after they developed grade 2 mucositis and /or grade 2 dysphagia and / or complained of moderate pain. GM-CSF was administered till there was a subjective relief or objective response. Patients were evaluated for oral ulceration, swallowing status, pain and weight loss. Response to the treatment and patient outcome was assessed. Results: There was a decreased severity of mucositis and dysphagia in the evaluated patients. None of the patients suffered severe pain or required opioids. The mean weight loss was only 1.94%. Minimal side effects were experienced with GM-CSF. Conclusions: GM-CSF reduces the severity of acute side effects of radiation therapy thereby allowing completion of the treatment without interruption. Its remarkable response needs to be evaluated further in large randomized trials. The time of initiation and cessation of GM-CSF during radiation therapy and the required dose needs to be established.

  18. Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 attenuates cyclophosphamide-induced intestinal mucosal injury, metabolism and intestinal microbiota disorders in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun-Hua; Fan, Song-Tao; Nie, Shao-Ping; Yu, Qiang; Xiong, Tao; Gong, Deming; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2016-03-16

    Anticancer drugs at high doses often damage the intestinal mucosa and metabolism. Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 (NCU116) isolated from pickled vegetables was orally given to cyclophosphamide-treated mice to determine its effects on intestinal mucosal injury, nutrient metabolism and colon microbiota, and investigate the mechanisms accounting for its effects. Mice treated with the bacterium were found to favorably recover intestine morphology of villus height and crypt depth, and have improved mucins expression and quantity of goblet cells, as well as intestinal metabolism by increasing the level of short-chain fatty acids and reducing the concentration of ammonia in the colon feces. In addition, NCU116-treated mice showed a higher diversity of colonic microbiota than the group without bacterium supplementation. The number of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in the mouse colon was increased after bacterium intake, which decreased the number of potentially pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas. These results indicated that NCU116 could be of significant advantage in reducing intestinal mucosal injury and improving the intestinal metabolism and the intestinal microbiota. PMID:26906433

  19. Brevibacterium casei isolated as a cause of relapsing peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althaf, Mohammed Mahdi; Abdelsalam, Mohamed Said; Alsunaid, Mohammed Sunaid; Hussein, Maged Hassan

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of relapsing peritonitis in a 33-year-old woman on automated peritoneal dialysis. End-stage renal disease was secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus complicated with lupus nephritis. The organism isolated was Brevibacterium casei that was not readily identified, delaying appropriate management with an extended antibiotic course. Definite management of B casei peritonitis was peritoneal dialysis catheter removal. PMID:24648477

  20. Enteral feeding induces diet-dependent mucosal dysfunction, bacterial proliferation, and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs on parenteral nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnvad, Charlotte R.; Thymann, Thomas; Deutz, Nicolaas E.;

    2008-01-01

    Preterm neonates have an immature gut and metabolism and may benefit from total parenteral nutrition (TPN) before enteral food is introduced. Conversely,delayed enteral feeding may inhibit gut maturation and sensitize to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intestinal mass and NEC lesions were first...... recorded in preterm pigs fed enterally (porcine colostrum, bovine colostrum, or formula for 20–40 h), with or without a preceding 2- to 3-day TPN period (n 435). Mucosal mass increased during TPN and further after enteral feeding to reach an intestinal mass similar to that in enterally fed pigs without TPN...... (60–80% relative to birth). NEC developed only after enteral feeding but more often after a preceding TPN period for both sow’s colostrum (26 vs. 5%) and formula (62 vs. 39%, both P 0.001, n 43–170). Further studies in 3-day-old TPN pigs fed enterally showed that formula feeding decreased villus...

  1. Effect of Oral Zinc Sulphate in Preventionof Radiation Induced OropharyngealMucositis During and After Radiotherapyin Patients with Head and Neck Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadianpanah

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Mucositis is a disturbing side effect of radiotherapy treatment forhead and neck cancer. To date, no effective modality for its prophylaxis and treatmenthas been found. We performed this study to evaluate the efficacy of oral zincsulphate in delaying the onset of oral and pharyngeal mucositis and decreasing theirseverity.Materials and Methods: Atotal of 58 patients who were treated for head andneck squamous cell carcinoma with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy wererandomly assigned to receive oral zinc sulphate (220 mg or an oral placebo 3 timesa day during their radiotherapy course. Total radiation dose was 6000 cGy to 7000cGy by conventional radiotherapy. Seventy nine percent of the patients also receivedconcurrent chemotherapy. Oral and pharyngeal mucositis were scored according toan RTOG protocol. Results:Time to onset of mucositis did not vary between the two groups.However, oral mucositis scores were less severe in the zinc group in weeks 4 to 6.The difference was statistically significant and the Pvalues for weeks 4, 5 and 6 were0.02, 0.007, and 0.012, respectively. Treatment interruptions in both groups were thesame (four cases each and all were due to dysphagia (pharyngeal mucositis.Conclusion:Our results suggest that zinc is effective in reducing the severity oforal mucositis but not pharyngeal mucositis. Treatment interruptions were morefrequently caused by pharyngeal mucositis which presented as dysphagia, rather thanoral pain that was a manifestation of oral mucositis.

  2. Comparison of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and sucralfate mouthwashes in the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis: a double-blind prospective randomized phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) mouthwashes with sucralfate mouthwashes in the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with radically operated head-and-neck cancer were randomly allocated to use either GM-CSF (n=21) or sucralfate (n=19) mouthwashes during postoperative radiotherapy (RT). All patients received conventionally fractionated RT to a total dose of 50-60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions during 5-6 weeks to the primary site and regional lymphatics. A minimum of 50% of the oral cavity and oropharyngeal mucosa was included in the clinical target volume. GM-CSF mouthwashes consisted of 37.5 μg GM-CSF and sucralfate mouthwashes of 1.0 g of sucralfate distilled in water. Both washes were used 4 times daily, beginning after the first week of RT and continued to the end of the RT course. Symptoms related to radiation mucositis and body weight, serum prealbumin level, and blood cell counts were monitored weekly. Results: Oral mucositis tended to be less severe in the GM-CSF group (p=0.072). Complete (n=1) or partial (n=4) healing of mucositis occurred during the RT course in 5 patients (24%) in the GM-CSF group and in none of the patients in the sucralfate group (p=0.049). Patients who received GM-CSF had less mucosal pain (p=0.058) and were less often prescribed opioids for pain (p=0.042). Three patients in the sucralfate group needed hospitalization for mucositis during RT compared with none in the GM-CSF group. Four patients (21%) in the sucralfate group and none in the GM-CSF group required an interruption in the RT course (p=0.042). No significant differences in weight, prealbumin level, or blood cell count were found between the groups, and both mouthwashes were well tolerated. Conclusion: GM-CSF mouthwashes may be moderately more effective than sucralfate mouthwashes in preventing radiation-induced mucositis and mucositis-related pain, and their use may lead to less frequent

  3. Mycobacteria Bypass Mucosal NF-kB Signalling to Induce an Epithelial Anti-Inflammatory IL-22 and IL-10 Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutay, Nataliya; Håkansson, Gisela; Alaridah, Nader; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Godaly, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which mycobacteria subvert the inflammatory defence to establish chronic infection remain an unresolved question in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. Using primary epithelial cells, we have analysed mycobacteria induced epithelial signalling pathways from activation of TLRs to cytokine secretion. Mycobacterium bovis bacilli Calmette-Guerin induced phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 by PI3K–Akt in the signalling pathway downstream of TLR2 and TLR4. Mycobacteria did not supress NF-κB by activating the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. Instead the pro-inflammatory NF-κB was bypassed by mycobacteria induced GSK3 inhibition that promoted the anti-inflammatory transcription factor CREB. Mycobacterial infection did not thus induce mucosal pro-inflammatory response as measured by TNFα and IFNγ secretion, but led to an anti-inflammatory IL-10 and IL-22 production. Apart from CREB, MAP3Ks p38 and ERK1/2 activated the transcription factor AP-1 leading to IL-6 production. Interestingly, blocking of TLR4 before infection decreased epithelial IL-6 secretion, but increased the CREB-activated IL-10 production. Our data indicate that mycobacteria supress epithelial pro-inflammatory production by supressing NF-κB activation thereby shifting the infection towards an anti-inflammatory state. This balance between the host immune response and the pathogen could determine the outcome of infection. PMID:24489729

  4. Lactobacillus casei Exerts Anti-Proliferative Effects Accompanied by Apoptotic Cell Death and Up-Regulation of TRAIL in Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarmaki, Valentina; Aindelis, Georgios; Tompoulidou, Evgenia; Lamprianidou, Eleftheria E.; Saxami, Georgia; Ypsilantis, Petros; Lampri, Evangeli S.; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Kotsianidis, Ioannis; Galanis, Alex; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Chlichlia, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB) exert a number of strain-specific health-promoting activities attributed to their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. Despite recent attention, our understanding of the biological processes involved in the beneficial effects of LAB strains is still limited. To this end, the present study investigated the growth-inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 against experimental colon cancer. Administration of live Lactobacillus casei (as well as bacterial components thereof) on murine (CT26) and human (HT29) colon carcinoma cell lines raised a significant concentration- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect, determined by cell viability assays. Specifically, a dramatic decrease in viability of colon cancer cells co-incubated with 109 CFU/mL L. casei for 24 hours was detected (78% for HT29 and 52% for CT26 cells). In addition, live L. casei induced apoptotic cell death in both cell lines as revealed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining. The significance of the in vitro anti-proliferative effects was further confirmed in an experimental tumor model. Oral daily administration of 109 CFU live L. casei for 13 days significantly inhibited in vivo growth of colon carcinoma cells, resulting in approximately 80% reduction in tumor volume of treated mice. Tumor growth inhibition was accompanied by L. casei-driven up-regulation of the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL and down-regulation of Survivin. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for beneficial tumor-inhibitory, anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects driven by this probiotic LAB strain. PMID:26849051

  5. Lactobacillus casei Exerts Anti-Proliferative Effects Accompanied by Apoptotic Cell Death and Up-Regulation of TRAIL in Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Tiptiri-Kourpeti

    Full Text Available Probiotic microorganisms such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB exert a number of strain-specific health-promoting activities attributed to their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. Despite recent attention, our understanding of the biological processes involved in the beneficial effects of LAB strains is still limited. To this end, the present study investigated the growth-inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 against experimental colon cancer. Administration of live Lactobacillus casei (as well as bacterial components thereof on murine (CT26 and human (HT29 colon carcinoma cell lines raised a significant concentration- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect, determined by cell viability assays. Specifically, a dramatic decrease in viability of colon cancer cells co-incubated with 10(9 CFU/mL L. casei for 24 hours was detected (78% for HT29 and 52% for CT26 cells. In addition, live L. casei induced apoptotic cell death in both cell lines as revealed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining. The significance of the in vitro anti-proliferative effects was further confirmed in an experimental tumor model. Oral daily administration of 10(9 CFU live L. casei for 13 days significantly inhibited in vivo growth of colon carcinoma cells, resulting in approximately 80% reduction in tumor volume of treated mice. Tumor growth inhibition was accompanied by L. casei-driven up-regulation of the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL and down-regulation of Survivin. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for beneficial tumor-inhibitory, anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects driven by this probiotic LAB strain.

  6. Elements Involved in Catabolite Repression and Substrate Induction of the Lactose Operon in Lactobacillus casei

    OpenAIRE

    Gosalbes, María José; Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    1999-01-01

    In Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393, the chromosomally encoded lactose operon, lacTEGF, encodes an antiterminator protein (LacT), lactose-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) elements (LacE and LacF), and a phospho-β-galactosidase. lacT, lacE, and lacF mutant strains were constructed by double crossover. The lacT strain displayed constitutive termination at a ribonucleic antiterminator (RAT) site, whereas lacE and lacF mutants showed an inducer-independent antite...

  7. Characterization and functional studies of forkhead box protein 3(-) lymphocyte activation gene 3(+) CD4(+) regulatory T cells induced by mucosal B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, K-H; Chiang, B-L

    2015-05-01

    The induction of mucosal tolerance has been demonstrated to be an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic diseases. Our previous study demonstrated that Peyer's patch B cells could convert naive T cells into regulatory T cells (so-called Treg -of-B(P) cells); however, it is important to characterize this particular subset of Treg -of-B cells for future applications. This study aimed to investigate the role of lymphocyte activating gene 3 (LAG3) in mediating the regulatory function of Treg -of-B(P) cells induced by mucosal follicular B (FOB) cells. Microarray analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to assess the gene expression pattern of Treg -of-B(P) cells. To evaluate the role of LAG3, the in-vitro suppressive function and the alleviation of airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma was assessed. Our data indicated that FOB cells isolated from Peyer's patches had the ability to generate more suppressive Treg -of-B cells with LAG3 expression, compared with CD23(lo) CD21(lo) B cells. LAG3 is not only a marker for Treg -of-B(P) cells, but also participate in the suppressive ability. Moreover, CCR4 and CCR6 could be detected on the LAG3(+) , not LAG3(-) , Treg -of-B(P) cells and would help cells homing to allergic lung. In the murine model of asthma, the adoptive transfer of LAG3(+) Treg -of-B(P) cells was able to sufficiently suppress T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine production, eosinophil infiltration and alleviate asthmatic symptoms. LAG3 was expressed in Treg -of-B(P) cells and was also involved in the function of Treg -of-B(P) cells. In the future, this particular subset of Treg -of-B cells might be used to alleviate allergic symptoms. PMID:25581421

  8. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  9. Enteral feeding induces diet-dependent mucosal dysfunction, bacterial proliferation, and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs on parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornvad, Charlotte R; Thymann, Thomas; Deutz, Nicolaas E; Burrin, Douglas G; Jensen, Søren K; Jensen, Bent B; Mølbak, Lars; Boye, Mette; Larsson, Lars-Inge; Schmidt, Mette; Michaelsen, Kim F; Sangild, Per T

    2008-11-01

    Preterm neonates have an immature gut and metabolism and may benefit from total parenteral nutrition (TPN) before enteral food is introduced. Conversely, delayed enteral feeding may inhibit gut maturation and sensitize to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intestinal mass and NEC lesions were first recorded in preterm pigs fed enterally (porcine colostrum, bovine colostrum, or formula for 20-40 h), with or without a preceding 2- to 3-day TPN period (n = 435). Mucosal mass increased during TPN and further after enteral feeding to reach an intestinal mass similar to that in enterally fed pigs without TPN (+60-80% relative to birth). NEC developed only after enteral feeding but more often after a preceding TPN period for both sow's colostrum (26 vs. 5%) and formula (62 vs. 39%, both P colostrum (bovine or porcine, P gut permeability increased, relative to colostrum (all P gut dysfunction, microbial imbalance, and NEC in preterm pigs, especially in pigs fed formula after TPN. Conversely, colostrum milk diets improve gut maturation and NEC resistance in preterm pigs subjected to a few days of TPN after birth. PMID:18818317

  10. Protective Effects of Ibuprofen and L-Carnitine Against Whole Body Gamma Irradiation-Induced Duodenal Mucosal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Akpolat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ibuprofen and L-carnitine have been demonstrated to provide radioprotective activity to the hamster against whole body sublethal irradiation. The purpose of this study is to test those antioxidant drugs, each of which has the capacity of inhibiting mucosal injury, as topical radioprotectants for the intestine. Material and Methods: The male hamsters were divided into the following four groups (n=6: group 1: control group, received saline, 1 ml/100 g by gavage, as placebo. Group 2: irradiated-control group, received whole body irradiation of 8 Gy as a single dose plus physiological saline. The animals in groups 3 and 4 were given a daily dose of 10 mg/kg of ibuprofen and 50 mg/kg of L-carnitine for 15 days respectively, before irradiation with a single dose of 8 Gy. Twenty-four hours after radiation exposure, the hamsters were sacrificed and samples were taken from the duodenum, and the histopatological determinations were carried out. Results: Morphologically, examination of the gamma irradiated duodenum revealed the presence of shortening and thickening of villi and flattening of enterocytes, massive subepithelial lifting. Pretreatment of ibuprofen and L-carnitine with irradiation reduced these histopathological changes. Conclusion: Ibuprofen and L-carnitine administrated by the oral route may be a good radioprotector against small intestinal damage in patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  11. The impact of concurrent granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: A double-blind placebo-controlled prospective Phase III study by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9901

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Based on early clinical evidence of potential mucosal protection by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the efficacy and safety of GM-CSF in reducing the severity and duration of mucosal injury and pain (mucositis) associated with curative radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with head-and-neck cancer with radiation ports encompassing >50% of oral cavity and/or oropharynx. Standard RT ports were used to cover the primary tumor and regional lymphatics at risk in standard fractionation to 60-70 Gy. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was allowed. Patients were randomized to receive subcutaneous injection of GM-CSF 250 μg/m2 or placebo 3 times a week. Mucosal reaction was assessed during the course of RT using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and the protocol-specific scoring system. Results: Between October 2000 and September 2002, 130 patients from 36 institutions were accrued. Nine patients (7%) were excluded from the analysis, 3 as a result of drug unavailability. More than 80% of the patients participated in the quality-of-life endpoint of this study. The GM-CSF did not cause any increase in toxicity compared with placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in the average mean mucositis score in the GM-CSF and placebo arms by a t test (p = 0.4006). Conclusion: This placebo-controlled, randomized study demonstrated no significant effect of GM-CSF given concurrently compared with placebo in reducing the severity or duration of RT-induced mucositis in patients undergoing definitive RT for head-and-neck cancer

  12. Validation of a new scoring system for the assessment of clinical trial research of oral mucositis induced by radiation or chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonis, ST; Eilers, JP; Epstein, JB; LeVeque, FG; Liggett, WH; Mulagha, MT; Peterson, DE; Rose, AH; Schubert, MM; Spijkervet, FK; Wittes, JP

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND. An impediment to mucositis research has been the lack of an accepted, validated scoring system. The objective of this study was to design, test, and validate a new scoring system for mucositis that can be used easily, is reproducible, and provides an accurate system for research applicat

  13. Genomic and Functional Characterization of the Unusual pLOCK 0919 Plasmid Harboring the spaCBA Pili Cluster in Lactobacillus casei LOCK 0919.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, Tamara; Koryszewska-Bagińska, Anna; Grynberg, Marcin; Nowak, Adriana; Cukrowska, Bożena; Kozakova, Hana; Bardowski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the extensive bioinformatic and functional analyses of the unusual pLOCK 0919, a plasmid originating from the probiotic Lactobacillus casei LOCK 0919 strain. This plasmid is atypical because it harbors the spaCBA-srtC gene cluster encoding SpaCBA pili. We show that all other spaCBA-srtC sequences of the Lactobacillus genus that have been previously described and deposited in GenBank are present in the chromosomal DNA. Another important observation for pLOCK 0919 is that the spaCBA-srtC gene cluster and its surrounding genes are highly similar to the respective DNA region that is present in the most well-known and active SpaCBA pili producer, the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain. Our results demonstrate that the spaCBA-srtC clusters of pLOCK 0919 and L. rhamnosus GG are genealogically similar, located in DNA regions that are rich in transposase genes and are poorly conserved among the publicly available sequences of Lactobacillus sp. In contrast to chromosomally localized pilus gene clusters from L. casei and Lactobacillus paracasei, the plasmidic spaC of L. casei LOCK 0919 is expressed and undergoes a slight glucose-induced repression. Moreover, results of series of in vitro tests demonstrate that L. casei LOCK 0919 has an adhesion potential, which is largely determined by the presence of the pLOCK 0919 plasmid. In particular, the plasmid occurrence positively influenced the hydrophobicity and aggregation abilities of L. casei LOCK 0919. Moreover, in vivo studies indicate that among the three Lactobacillus strains used to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of germ-free mice, already after 2 days of colonization, L. casei LOCK 0919 became the dominant strain and persisted there for at least 48 days. PMID:26637469

  14. Isolated mucosal Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak Sundriyal; Naveen Kumar; Raj Kumar; Brijesh Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term used to define a group of clinical syndrome caused by various species of parasite Leishmania. Three main clinical types of leishmaniasis are visceral leishmaniasis, cutaneous leishmaniasis and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. However, isolated presentation as mucosal disease is rare. We report a case of primarily mucosal leishmaniasis.

  15. Management of chemo/radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer: A review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemi, Dariush; Nokhandani, Akram Mohammadi; Otaghsaraei, Mahsa Taheri; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Kazemi, Sohrab; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2016-07-01

    Oropharyngeal mucositis is an important complication in non-surgical cancer treatments. It represents the major complication in radiotherapy of tumors located in head and neck areas. Many results have been published in order to define the best clinical protocol for prophylaxis or treatment of mucositis, but a consensus has not been attained yet. In this review, some recent topics in prophylaxis and treatment of mucositis related to radiation therapy are reconsidered using PUBMED and GOOGLE SCHOOLAR search engines from 2000 to 2015. In this review, more than 100 clinical studies have been selected and divided into the prophylactic or therapeutic uses of the evaluated treatment agents. The number of patients and kind of study design, the clinical features, prevalence, risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis, complication, prophylaxis and the treatment of mucositis were also specified. Nevertheless, it has not been truly achieved a consensus protocol of prophylaxis and treatment of oral mucositis. PMID:27113797

  16. Protective role of 1,25(OH2vitamin D3 in the mucosal injury and epithelial barrier disruption in DSS-induced acute colitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Hongwei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal hyper-permeability plays a critical role in the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD by affecting the penetration of pathogens, toxic compounds and macromolecules. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH2D3], the active form of vitamin D, has been shown to be an important regulator of IBD and recent epidemiology suggests that patients with IBD have an impaired vitamin D status. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible protective effects of 1,25(OH2D3 on mucosal injury and epithelial barrier disruption on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced acute colitis model. Methods We used DSS-induced acute colitis model to investigate the protective effects of 1,25(OH2D3 on mucosal injury and epithelial barrier integrity. Severity of colitis was evaluated by disease activity index (DAI, body weight (BW change, colon length, histology, myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, and proinflammatory cytokine production including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ. In vitro the protective role of 1,25(OH2D3 was assessed by incubating Caco-2 cells with or without DSS and measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-D. The intestinal permeability was analyzed by FITC-D, bacterial translocation and measurement of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Ultrastructural features of the colon tissue and Caco-2 cell monolayer were observed by electron microscopy. Expressions of tight junction (TJ proteins in the colon mucosa and Caco-2 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, Western blot and real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR, respectively. Results DSS-induced acute colitis model was characterized by a reduced BW, AUC of BW, serum calcium, higher DAI, AUC of DAI, shortened colon length, elevated MPO activity, worsened histologic inflammation, increased mononuclear cell numbers in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs and colonic lamina propria

  17. Role of curcumin in protection of gastric mucosa against stress-induced gastric mucosal damage. Involvement of hypoacidity, vasoactive mediators and sensory neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekaj, R; Majka, J; Ptak-Belowska, A; Szlachcic, A; Targosz, A; Magierowska, K; Strzalka, M; Magierowski, M; Brzozowski, T

    2016-04-01

    The antioxidizing properties of curcumin, a highly pleiotropic substance used for centuries in traditional medicine has been confirmed by numerous experimental and clinical studies. Curcumin exhibits anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative and anti-angiogenic actions inhibiting the development and progression of tumors but the efficacy of this compound to influence gastric acid secretion n in the stomach and to affect the gastric mucosal damage induced by non-topical ulcerogenes such as stress has been little studied. We determined the effect of curcumin on basal and pentagastrin- or histamine-stimulated gastric secretion, in rats with surgically implemented gastric fistulas and we assessed the contribution of gastric secretion, endogenous prostaglandin (PG), endogenous nitric oxide (NO), as well as sensory afferent nerves in the mechanisms underlying the potential gastroprotective effects of curcumin against stress-induced gastric mucosal lesions. Rats exposed to water immersion and restraint stress (WRS) for 3.5 h were pretreated either with: 1) vehicle (saline); 2) curcumin (2.5 - 100 mg/kg i.g.) or 3) curcumin (50 mg/kg i.g.) combined with or without indomethacin (5 mg/kg i.p.), SC-560 (5 mg/kg i.g.) or rofecoxib (10 mg/kg i.g.); 4) curcumin (50 mg/kg i.g.) co-administered with (L-NNA (20 mg/kg i.p.) with or without L-arginine (200 mg/kg i.g.), a substrate for NO-synthase; 5) curcumin (50 mg/kg i.g.) administered in rats with intact or capsaicin-induced functional ablation of sensory nerve fibers, and 6) curcumin (50 mg/kg i.g.) administered with capsazepine (5 mg/kg i.g.), the antagonist of vanilloid TRPV1 receptor. The number of gastric lesions was determined by planimetry, the gastric blood flow (GBF) was assessed by H2-gas clearance technique, the plasma gastrin concentrations were measured using the radioimmunoassay (RIA) and the expression of mRNA for tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in

  18. Evaluation of the usefulness of colonoscopy with mucosal biopsies in the follow-up of TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Wendelbo, Ingvild Haukaas; Gundersen, Doris; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Hausken, Trygve

    2013-08-01

    Animal models are required for research regarding the pathogenesis and efficacy of anti-inflammatory agents in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis closely mimics Crohn's disease. The present study was undertaken in order to determine the reliability of following the inflammatory course of TNBS-induced colitis using colonoscopy together with biopsy samples obtained during the examination. In this study we used 20 adult male Wistar rats, with a mean weight of 201.9 g. The rats were divided into two groups, control and TNBS, with ten rats in each group. Following the induction of TNBS colitis, the rats underwent colonoscopy with mucosal biopsies. At the end of the experiment, the rats were sacrificed and whole-wall colonic samples were obtained. The degree of inflammation was assessed endoscopically, macroscopically and microscopically. There was no significant change in the body weight of the control group but significant weight loss was observed in the TNBS group. Examination of the control group did not reveal any inflammation. Severe colitis was observed in the TNBS-induced colitis rats, as assessed endoscopically, macroscopically and microscopically. The endoscopic inflammation score obtained through colonoscopy examinations correlated with that obtained macroscopically, and those obtained microscopically from the whole-wall colon and biopsy samples collected during the colonoscopy. Moreover, the inflammation scores obtained from the whole-wall colon and biopsy samples collected during colonoscopy correlated markedly. In conclusion, colonoscopy is a reliable method for following up the course of inflammation in experimentally induced colitis. Although biopsy samples collected during colonoscopies may be used to assess the degree of inflammation, whole-wall samples are superior in this regard. PMID:23778962

  19. Egg yolk IgY: protection against rotavirus induced diarrhea and modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in newborn calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, C; Bok, M; Chacana, P; Saif, L; Fernandez, F; Parreño, V

    2011-08-15

    Bovine rotavirus (BRV) is an important cause of diarrhea in newborn calves. Local passive immunity is the most efficient protective strategy to control the disease. IgY technology (the use of chicken egg yolk immunoglobulins) is an economic and practical alternative to prevent BRV diarrhea in dairy calves. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection and immunomodulation induced by the oral administration of egg yolk enriched in BRV specific IgY to experimentally BRV infected calves. All calves in groups Gp 1, 2 and 3 received control colostrum (CC; BRV virus neutralization Ab titer - VN=65,536; ELISA BRV IgG(1)=16,384) prior to gut closure. After gut closure, calves received milk supplemented with 6% BRV-immune egg yolk [(Gp 1) VN=2048; ELISA IgY Ab titer=4096] or non-immune control egg yolk [(Gp 2) VNcolostrum deprived calves (CD) fed antibody (Ab) free milk served as controls (Gp 3 and 4, respectively). Calves were inoculated with 10(5.85)focus forming units (FFU) of virulent BRV IND at 2 days of age. Control calves (Gp 3 and 4) and calves fed control IgY (Gp 2) were infected and developed severe diarrhea. Around 80% calves in Gp 1 (IgY 4096) were infected, but they showed 80% (4/5) protection against BRV diarrhea. Bovine RV-specific IgY Ab were detected in the feces of calves in Gp 1, indicating that avian antibodies (Abs) remained intact after passage through the gastrointestinal tract. At post infection day 21, the duodenum was the major site of BRV specific antibody secreting cells (ASC) in all experimental groups. Mucosal ASC responses of all isotypes were significantly higher in the IgY treated groups, independently of the specificity of the treatment, indicating that egg yolk components modulated the immune response against BRV infection at the mucosal level. These results indicate that supplementing newborn calves' diets for the first 14 days of life with egg yolk enriched in BRV-specific IgY represents a promising strategy to prevent BRV

  20. Salmonella typhi Ty21a bacterial ghost vector augments HIV-1 gp140 DNA vaccine-induced peripheral and mucosal antibody responses via TLR4 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Guangyu; Tong, Shuang; Yu, Hong; Jin, Xia; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2012-08-24

    Because of their stability and ease of manipulation, DNA vaccines have considerable potential for eliciting immune responses. However, they are limited by their weak immunogenicity, especially in humans. To address this challenge, we explored a new strategy of HIV vaccine delivery using Salmonella typhi Ty21a bacterial ghosts (BGs). We found that Ty21a BGs loaded with an HIV gp140 DNA vaccine (Ty21a BG-DNA) were readily taken up by murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, and gp140 was efficiently expressed in these cells. Peripheral and intestinal mucosal anti-gp120 antibody responses in mice vaccinated with BGs-DNA vaccine were significantly higher than those in mice immunized with naked DNA vaccine. The enhancement of antibody responses was associated with BG-induced production of IL-10 through TLR4 pathway. These results demonstrate that Ty21a BGs is a novel and effective delivery vehicle for DNA vaccines, which could therefore be used as a new strategy for development of HIV vaccines. PMID:22819719

  1. The effect of antioxidants on Lactobacillus casei cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Duda-Chodak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The growing popularity of functional foods causes increasing interest in raw materials, which can raise the pro-health value of food when supplemented. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of compounds with antioxidant properties on Lactobacillus casei, as a representative of probiotic microorganisms. In the experiments the pure antioxidants and plant extracts were used. The results showed that catechin at concentration of 100-400 M and chlorogenic acid (400 M had a stimulatory effect on L. casei growth. Quercetin at concentrations of 25-50 M showed an inhibitory effect when incubation time was  6 h. The lingonberry leaves extract caused a slight increase in the dry substance of biomass in comparison with control. Extracts of coffee, chokeberry, and dog rose should not be used as additives for probiotic food as they significantly inhibited L. casei. We conclude that: 1 antioxidants at concentrations higher than 100 M may stimulate growth of L. casei; 2 except the antioxidants, some other compounds which are present in plants extracts e.g. tannins and alkaloids may exert an antibacterial influence; 3 the probiotic yoghurts supplementation with fruit and other plant materials should be preceded by careful studies about their influence on the bacteria.

  2. Multiple Mucosal Neuroma Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thami Gurvinder P

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of multiple mucosal neuroma syndrome recently classified as Multiple Endocrinal Neoplasia (MEN, type 2b, is reported for its rarity and importance of diagnosis at an early age.

  3. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  4. Study of a bland dentifrice for persons with radiation-induced mucositis and vesiculo-erosive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persons with lesions of the mucous membrane induced by radiation or vesiculo-erosive disease often find commercial dentifrices irritating to the tissues, yet maintenance of their oral hygiene practices is important. A bland monofluorophosphate dentifrice was formulated for use by these persons and tested in a double-blind cross-over study

  5. Effect of Oral Zinc Sulphate in Preventionof Radiation Induced OropharyngealMucositis During and After Radiotherapyin Patients with Head and Neck Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mohammadianpanah; Shapour Omidvari; Mohammad Amin Mosleh-Shirazi; Mansour Ansari; Niloofar Ahmadloo; Hamid Nasrolahi; Ahmad Mosalaei; Amin Shafizad

    2010-01-01

    Introduction:Mucositis is a disturbing side effect of radiotherapy treatment forhead and neck cancer. To date, no effective modality for its prophylaxis and treatmenthas been found. We performed this study to evaluate the efficacy of oral zincsulphate in delaying the onset of oral and pharyngeal mucositis and decreasing theirseverity.Materials and Methods: Atotal of 58 patients who were treated for head andneck squamous cell carcinoma with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy wererandomly assign...

  6. Low level laser therapy for concurrent chemoradiotherapy induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients – A triple blinded randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Oral mucositis (OM) is most cumbersome acute side effect of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). OM associated pain affects oral functions and nutrition of the patient that may result in discontinuity of treatment. Several modalities have been tried to prevent and treat OM, but none proved completely successful until date. We used prophylactic low level laser therapy (LLLT) for the prevention and treatment of CCRT induced OM. Materials and methods: In this triple blinded study, 221 HNC patients scheduled to undergo CCRT (Cisplatin (1, 22, 43 day) + RT = 66 Grays (2 Gy/fraction), 33 fractions, 5 fractions/week, for 45 days) were block randomized into laser (n = 111) and placebo (n = 110) group. Laser group received LLLT (HeNe, λ = 632.8 nm, power-density = 24 mW, dosage = 3.0 J/point, total dosage/session = 36–40 J, spot-size = 1 cm2, 5 sessions/week) while placebo received sham treatment daily prior to radiation. OM (RTOG/EORTC Scale), oral pain (VAS), dysphagia (FIS), weight loss and CCRT break were assessed. Data were analyzed using frequencies and percentage, generalized estimating equations (GEE) and odds ratio. Results: There was significant reduction in incidence of severe OM (F = 16.64, df = 8876, p < 0.0001) and its associated pain (F = 25.06, df = 8876, p < 0.0001), dysphagia (F = 20.17, df = 8876, p < 0.0001) and opioid analgesics use (p < 0.0001) in laser than placebo group patients. Conclusions: LLLT decreased the incidence of CCRT induced severe OM and its associated pain, dysphagia and opioid analgesics use.

  7. [Immunoglobulin for prevention of radiogenic mucositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mose, S; Adamietz, I A; Thilmann, C; Saran, F; Heyd, R; Knecht, R; Böttcher, H D

    1995-07-01

    Among various therapies administered during radiation-induced mucositis, treatment with immunoglobulin has proven clinically successful. In this study the efficacy of prophylactic applications of immunoglobulin was investigated from January 1992 through August 1993. Forty-two patients with histologically-proven head and neck cancer were given postoperative radiation treatment. In cases with macroscopic tumor residues or inoperability, combined radio-chemotherapy was given. This included 51.3 Gy at 1.9 Gy 5x/week, boosted to 10-26 Gy at 2 Gy 5x/week and carboplatin 60 mg/m2 at days 1-5 and 29-33. Panthenol (4x10 ml/day) and nystatin (4 x 1 ml/day) were given to 20 patients as prophylactic treatment for mucositis. Twenty-two subsequent patients also received intramuscular 800 mg (5 ml) human immunoglobulin (1x/week). According to the Seegenschmiedt/Sauer classification the extent of mucositis was determined 3x/week. Comparison of the distribution of maximal mucositis revealed a slightly more severe mucosal reaction in the control group (n.s.). Analysis of the mean degree of mucositis in both groups demonstrated statistically significant differences (p = 0.031) related to the whole collective and patients receiving concomitant chemotherapy while no effect of immunoglobulin was found in patients treated by radiation alone. In the immunoglobulin-treated-group, the time from the beginning of therapy to the first interruption was prolonged 5 days (37.5 +/- 13.1 vs. 42.7 +/- 13.3 days), but this difference was not significant. Although prophylactic application of immunoglobulin seemed to lower the degree of radiation-induced mucositis, this effect was less significant when compared to the immunoglobulin given in a therapeutic manner. PMID:7672999

  8. Effect of Lactobacillus casei- casei and Lactobacillus reuteri on acrylamide formation in flat bread and Bread roll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastmalchi, Farnaz; Razavi, Seyed Hadi; Faraji, Mohammad; Labbafi, Mohsen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of fermentation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) contains lactobacillus (L.) casei- casei and L. reuteri on acrylamide formation and physicochemical properties of the Iranian flat bread named, Sangak, and Bread roll. Sangak and Bread roll were made with whole and white wheat flour, respectively. Whole-wheat flour had upper content of protein, sugar, ash, fiber, damaged starch and the activity of amylase than the white wheat flour. After 24 h of fermentation, the pH values of the sourdoughs made from whole-wheat flour (3.00, 2.90) were lower, in compared to sourdoughs prepared from white wheat flour (3.60, 3.58). In addition, in Sangak bread, glucose, and fructose were completely utilized after fermentation, but in bread roll, the reduced sugar levels increased after fermentation and baking that represent microorganisms cannot be activated and utilized sugars. Acrylamide formation was impacted by pH of sourdough and total reducing sugar (r = 0.915, r = 0.885 respectively). Bread roll and Sangak bread were fermented by L. casei- casei contained lowest acrylamide content, in two bread types (219.1, 104.3 μg/kg respectively). As an important result, the acrylamide content of Sangak bread in all cases was lower than in the Bread roll. PMID:27570278

  9. Protective effects of alginate–chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss. Benth. (Zuojin Pill against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang QS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Qiang-Song Wang,1,2,* Xiao-Ning Zhu,1,* Heng-Li Jiang,1,* Gui-Fang Wang,3 Yuan-Lu Cui1 1Tianjin State Key Laboratory of Modern Chinese Medicine, Research Center of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 2Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science & Peking Union Medical College, 3Pharmacy Department, Baokang Hospital, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Zuojin Pill (ZJP, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss. Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w and was first recorded in “Danxi’s experiential therapy” for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss. Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the

  10. Does Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) Plus Ascorbic Acid Induce More Mucosal Injuries than Split-Dose 4-L PEG during Bowel Preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Sung; Park, Jongha; Park, Jae hyun; Kim, Hyung Jun; Jang, Hyun Jeong; Joo, Hee Rin; Kim, Ji Yeon; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Heo, Nae Yun; Park, Seung Ha; Kim, Tae Oh; Yang, Sung Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The aims of this study were to compare the bowel-cleansing efficacy, patient affinity for the preparation solution, and mucosal injury between a split dose of poly-ethylene glycol (SD-PEG) and low-volume PEG plus ascorbic acid (LV-PEG+Asc) in outpatient scheduled colonoscopies. Methods Of the 319 patients, 160 were enrolled for SD-PEG, and 159 for LV-PEG+Asc. The bowel-cleansing efficacy was rated according to the Ottawa bowel preparation scale. Patient affinity for the preparation solution was assessed using a questionnaire. All mucosal injuries observed during colonoscopy were biopsied and histopathologically reviewed. Results There was no significant difference in bowel cleansing between the groups. The LV-PEG+Asc group reported better patient acceptance and preference. There were no significant differences in the incidence or characteristics of the mucosal injuries between the two groups. Conclusions Compared with SD-PEG, LV-PEG+Asc exhibited equivalent bowel-cleansing efficacy and resulted in improved patient acceptance and preference. There was no significant difference in mucosal injury between SD-PEG and LV-PEG+Asc. Thus, the LV-PEG+Asc preparation could be used more effectively and easily for routine colonoscopies without risking significant mucosal injury. PMID:26260754

  11. Comparative Genomic and Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strains Marketed as Probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Douillard, François P.; Ribbera, Angela; Järvinen, Hanna M.; Kant, Ravi; Pietilä, Taija E.; Randazzo, Cinzia; Paulin, Lars; Laine, Pia K; Caggia, Cinzia; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; Satokari, Reetta; Salminen, Seppo; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M

    2013-01-01

    Four Lactobacillus strains were isolated from marketed probiotic products, including L. rhamnosus strains from Vifit (Friesland Campina) and Idoform (Ferrosan) and L. casei strains from Actimel (Danone) and Yakult (Yakult Honsa Co.). Their genomes and phenotypes were characterized and compared in detail with L. casei strain BL23 and L. rhamnosus strain GG. Phenotypic analysis of the new isolates indicated differences in carbohydrate utilization between L. casei and L. rhamnosus strains, which...

  12. MUCOSAL IMMUNOLOGY. Individual intestinal symbionts induce a distinct population of RORγ⁺ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefik, Esen; Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Oh, Sungwhan; Konnikova, Liza; Zemmour, David; McGuire, Abigail Manson; Burzyn, Dalia; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Lobera, Mercedes; Yang, Jianfei; Ghosh, Shomir; Earl, Ashlee; Snapper, Scott B; Jupp, Ray; Kasper, Dennis; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-08-28

    T regulatory cells that express the transcription factor Foxp3 (Foxp3(+) T(regs)) promote tissue homeostasis in several settings. We now report that symbiotic members of the human gut microbiota induce a distinct T(reg) population in the mouse colon, which constrains immuno-inflammatory responses. This induction—which we find to map to a broad, but specific, array of individual bacterial species—requires the transcription factor Rorγ, paradoxically, in that Rorγ is thought to antagonize FoxP3 and to promote T helper 17 (T(H)17) cell differentiation. Rorγ's transcriptional footprint differs in colonic T(regs) and T(H)17 cells and controls important effector molecules. Rorγ, and the T(regs) that express it, contribute substantially to regulating colonic T(H)1/T(H)17 inflammation. Thus, the marked context-specificity of Rorγ results in very different outcomes even in closely related cell types. PMID:26272906

  13. Histamine-induced airway mucosal exudation of bulk plasma and plasma-derived mediators is not inhibited by intravenous bronchodilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, C; Alkner, U; Pipkorn, U; Persson, C G

    1994-01-01

    Experimental data suggest the possibility that common bronchodilators, such as the xanthines and beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, may produce microvascular anti-permeability effects in the subepithelial microcirculation of the airways. In this study, we have examined the effect of bronchodilators given intravenously on exudation of different-sized plasma proteins (albumin and fibrinogen) and the generation of plasma-derived peptides (bradykinins) in human nasal airways challenged with histamine. In a double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled and randomised trial, 12 normal volunteers were given i.v.infusions of terbutaline sulphate, theophylline and enprofylline to produce therapeutic drug levels. The effect of topical nasal provocation with histamine was closely followed by frequently nasal lavage with saline. The lavage fluid levels of albumin, fibrinogen and bradykinins increased significantly after each histamine provocation. The ratio of albumin-to-fibrinogen in plasma and the lavage fluid was 24 and 56, respectively, indicating that topical histamine provocation induced a largely non-sieved flux of macromolecules across the endothelial-epithelial barriers. The systemically administered drugs did not affect the nasal symptoms (sneezing, secretion and blockage), nor did they significantly reduce the levels of plasma proteins and plasma-derived mediators in the nasal lavage fluids. The present data suggest that systemic xanthines and beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, at clinically employed plasma levels, may not affect the microvascular (and epithelial) exudative permeability and the bradykinin forming capacity of human airways. PMID:8005188

  14. Topical morphine for oral mucositis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bettina Nygaard; Aagaard, Gitte; Henneberg, Steen W;

    2012-01-01

    Systemic opioids for painful chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in children often result in unsatisfactory pain relief and a high frequency of side effects. Opioids applied topically can produce analgesia by binding to opioid receptors on peripheral terminals of sensory neurons. These receptors...

  15. Mucosal Immunization with Helicobacter, CpG DNA, and Cholera Toxin Is Protective

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Weiwen; Baker, Henry J.; Smith, Bruce F.

    2003-01-01

    The mucosal delivery of antigens requires an effective adjuvant to induce mucosal immunity. Current mucosal adjuvants include cholera toxin (CT) and Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin. Unmethylated CpG immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) have been proposed as novel mucosal adjuvants. In this study, mice were immunized with sonicated Helicobacter felis with CT and/or CpG ODN adjuvants. All groups receiving either adjuvant singly or in combination developed increased serum anti-H. fe...

  16. The effect of antioxidants on Lactobacillus casei cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Duda-Chodak; Tomasz Tarko; Mateusz Statek

    2008-01-01

    The growing popularity of functional foods causes increasing interest in raw materials, which can raise the pro-health value of food when supplemented. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of compounds with antioxidant properties on Lactobacillus casei, as a representative of probiotic microorganisms. In the experiments the pure antioxidants and plant extracts were used. The results showed that catechin at concentration of 100-400 M and chlorogenic acid (400 M...

  17. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of...

  18. The effect of gamma irradiation on piophila casei (Linnae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a study on insects infesting sun-dried salted mackerell, samples were collected from six markets in South Jakarta. It was found that piophila casei was the only insect infesting the sun-dried salted mackerell. The eggs, larvae and pupae of the flies were generally found in the head cavity and in the stomach of the fish. For the determination of disinfestation dose, the larvae and the pupae were irradiated by gamma rays. It was found that the larvae was more sensitive to irradiation than the pupae. The LD99 of pupae was 0.366 kGy. Various combinations of salting and drying processes have been done for the preservation of mackerell. It could be concluded that the growth of piophila casei was influenced more by water content than by salt content. Other aspects such as the occurence of mold and yeast, have to be considered in the preservation of fish. It was also found that ten and twenty hours salting time and thirty hours drying are the best treatments. Piophila casei did not infest on the surface of fish. (author)

  19. Mucosal immunity in invertebrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bilej, Martin

    Vol. 1. Elsevier: Academic Press, 2015 - (Městecký, J.; Strober, W.; Russell, M.; Kelsall, B.; Cheroutre, H.; Lambrecht, B.), s. 135-144. (Fourth Edition). ISBN 978-0-12-415847-4 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : mucosal immunity * invertebrates Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Intraurethrally Administered Probiotic Lactobacillus casei in a Murine Model of Escherichia coli Urinary Tract Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Asahara, Takashi; Nomoto, Koji; Watanuki, Masaaki; Yokokura, Teruo

    2001-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the intraurethrally administered probiotic Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota against Escherichia coli in a murine urinary tract infection (UTI) model was examined. UTI was induced by intraurethral administration of Escherichia coli strain HU-1 (a clinical isolate from a UTI patient, positive for type 1 and P fimbriae), at a dose of 1 × 106 to 2 × 106 CFU in 20 μl of saline, into a C3H/HeN mouse bladder which had been traumatized with 0.1 N HCl followed immediate...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Respiration-Competent Strain Lactobacillus casei N87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Annamaria; Parente, Eugenio; Reale, Anna; Ianniello, Rocco G.

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei is used as a starter, adjunct, and/or probiotic culture in the production of fermented and functional foods. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the respiration-competent strain L. casei N87, isolated from infant feces. This genome information may be useful for the study of respiratory metabolism in lactic acid bacteria. PMID:27151805

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Respiration-Competent Strain Lactobacillus casei N87

    OpenAIRE

    Zotta, Teresa; Ricciardi, Annamaria; Parente, Eugenio; Reale, Anna; Ianniello, Rocco G.; Bassi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei is used as a starter, adjunct, and/or probiotic culture in the production of fermented and functional foods. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the respiration-competent strain L. casei N87, isolated from infant feces. This genome information may be useful for the study of respiratory metabolism in lactic acid bacteria.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Respiration-Competent Strain Lactobacillus casei N87.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotta, Teresa; Ricciardi, Annamaria; Parente, Eugenio; Reale, Anna; Ianniello, Rocco G; Bassi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei is used as a starter, adjunct, and/or probiotic culture in the production of fermented and functional foods. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the respiration-competent strain L. casei N87, isolated from infant feces. This genome information may be useful for the study of respiratory metabolism in lactic acid bacteria. PMID:27151805

  4. [Immunogenicity of recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing VP2 protein of infectious bursal disease virus in chickens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongli; Hou, Shenda; Wang, Song; Wang, Yupeng; LuanI, Yunyan; Hou, Xilin

    2014-11-01

    In order to determine immunogenicity and protective effect in chickens, we used the IBDV (Infectious bursal disease virus)-Vp2/Lactobacillus casei as antigen transfer system. First, the immunized and control chickens were challenged by IBDV/DQ at lethal dose to determine the protective ratio. Second, chickens were orallyand intranasally vaccinated twice with 10(9) CFU/mL pLA-VP2/L. casei, pLA/L. casei and PBS as negativecontrol and commercial vaccine as positive control. The bursa injury and the lesion score wererecorded post challenge. The level of specific IgG and sIgA in pLA-VP2/L. casei and positive control groups was significantly higher than that in negativecontrol groups. The protection efficacy in pLA-VP2/L. casei oral group was higher than that inintranasal group. The SI. of pLA-VP2/L. casei oral group was significant higher than other groups. The lesion score indicated the pLA-VP2/L. casei was safer than commercial vaccine for bursa. Collectively, the pLA-VP2/L. casei could be a vaccine candidate for IBDV. PMID:25985519

  5. Brevibacterium casei Sepsis in an 18-Year-Old Female with AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Brazzola, P; Zbinden, R; Rudin, C.; Schaad, U B; HEININGER, U.

    2000-01-01

    Brevibacterium sp. was isolated from the blood of an acutely ill 18-year-old female with AIDS. The isolate was identified as Brevibacterium casei by use of carbohydrate assimilation tests. Treatment was successful with intravenously administered ciprofloxacin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of sepsis caused by B. casei in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient.

  6. Brevibacterium casei as a Cause of Brain Abscess in an Immunocompetent Patient ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, V. Anil; Augustine, Deepthi; Panikar, Dilip; Nandakumar, Aswathy; Kavitha R Dinesh; Karim, Shamsul; Philip, Rosamma

    2011-01-01

    Coryneform bacteria belonging to the genus Brevibacterium have emerged as opportunistic pathogens. Of the nine known species of Brevibacterium isolated from human clinical samples, Brevibacterium casei is the most frequently reported species from clinical specimens. We report the first case of B. casei brain abscess in an immunocompetent patient successfully treated by surgery and antimicrobial therapy.

  7. Low-level laser therapy: a standard of supportive care for cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Jadaud, E.; Bensadoun, RJ

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims: Oral mucositis (OM) is still a common and severe acute side-effect of many oncologic treatments, especially in patients treated for head and neck cancer. It may affect quality of life, require supportive care and impact treatment planning and its efficacy. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) seems to promote pain relief and reduces OM incidence and its severity. It has been recommended for these patients as a treatment option but without any consensus in the LLLT procedure. Ne...

  8. Enhanced Mucosal Immunoglobulin A Response and Solid Protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Challenge Induced by a Novel Dendrimeric Peptide▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Cubillos, Carolina; de la Torre, Beatriz G.; Jakab, Annamaria; Clementi, Giorgia; Borrás, Eva; Bárcena, Juan; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco; Blanco, Esther

    2008-01-01

    The successful use of a dendrimeric peptide to protect pigs against challenge with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), which causes the most devastating animal disease worldwide, is described. Animals were immunized intramuscularly with a peptide containing one copy of a FMDV T-cell epitope and branching out into four copies of a B-cell epitope. The four immunized pigs did not develop significant clinical signs upon FMDV challenge, neither systemic nor mucosal FMDV replication, nor was its t...

  9. Mucosal regeneration during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Regeneration of the aerodigestive mucosa is known to occur during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. The circumstances surrounding its time of onset and magnitude are not well understood, however. Material and methods: Mucosal reactions were observed in 100 patients undergoing conventionally fractionated treatment at 2 Gy/day over 7 weeks and 88 receiving accelerated treatment at 1.8 Gy twice daily over 3(1(2)) weeks on the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group head and neck cancer trials. Similar observations in 61 patients treated palliatively at dose rates between 0.8 and 240 Gy/h using ten 3.0-4.2 Gy fractions over 2 weeks are compared. Results: Several findings emerged from these studies: 1. Reactions evolved more quickly at oropharyngeal sites than in the hypopharynx. 2. Reactions at both sites evolved more rapidly at greater rates of dose accumulation. 3. The timing of reactions suggested the presence of a strong regenerative mucosal response that started before the manifestation of 'patchy' (grade II) mucosal reactions. 4. The regenerative response was strong enough to 'make good' damage accumulated at a rate of 2 Gy/day in over a third of cases. 5. The linear quadratic model without time correction failed to provide an adequate prediction of the frequency or intensity of mucosal reactions produced by any of the regimes. A simple model of the regenerative response is presented. Conclusions: This study suggests that the timing and magnitude of the regenerative response vary between sites and individuals but are linked to the amount of epithelial cellular depletion occurring during treatment

  10. Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium delivering DNA vaccine encoding duck enteritis virus UL24 induced systemic and mucosal immune responses and conferred good protection against challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Orally delivered DNA vaccines against duck enteritis virus (DEV were developed using live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (SL7207 as a carrier and Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB as a mucosal adjuvant. DNA vaccine plasmids pVAX-UL24 and pVAX-LTB-UL24 were constructed and transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7207 resulting SL7207 (pVAX-UL24 and SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 respectively. After ducklings were orally inoculated with SL7207 (pVAX-UL24 or SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24, the anti-DEV mucosal and systemic immune responses were recorded. To identify the optimum dose that confers maximum protection, we used different doses of the candidate vaccine SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 during oral immunization. The strongest mucosal and systemic immune responses developed in the SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 (1011 CFU immunized group. Accordingly, oral immunization of ducklings with SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 showed superior efficacy of protection (60-80% against a lethal DEV challenge (1000 LD50, compared with the limited survival rate (40% of ducklings immunized with SL7207 (pVAX-UL24. Our study suggests that the SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 can be a candidate DEV vaccine.

  11. Patient experiences with oral mucositis caused by chemo-/radiotherapy: a critical qualitative literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Zanolin; Christine Widmer; Eva-Maria Panfil

    2014-01-01

    Mucositis is one of the most common side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In order to develop an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the management of tumor therapy-induced-oral mucositis, it was necessary to capture the patients’ perspective. Therefore the aim of this critical literature review was to explore the experience of patients with therapy-induced-oral mucositis. Searches were carried out using a systematic search strategy in CINAHL and Medline. Qualitative studi...

  12. New Pathways for Alimentary Mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Keefe, Dorothy M. K.; Joanne M. Bowen

    2008-01-01

    Alimentary mucositis is a major dose-limiting toxicity associated with anticancer treatment. It is responsible for reducing patient quality of life and represents a significant economic burden in oncology. The pathobiology of alimentary mucositis is extremely complex, and an increased understanding of mechanisms and pathway interactions is required to rationally design improved therapies. This review describes the latest advances in defining mechanisms of alimentary mucositis pathobiology in ...

  13. Mucosal immunity to the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum

    OpenAIRE

    Alkazmi, Luay Mahmood M. A.

    2004-01-01

    The host-parasite relationship of the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum was explored in a hamster model system, focusing on intestinal mucosal responses to infection. Primary infection induced a rapid reduction in villous height culminating in excess of 75% reduction by day 35. Crypts of Lieberkuhn increased in depth achieving maximum depth by day 35. Mitotic figures in crypts and mast cells increased until day 28. Goblet cells increased continuously from background levels of 50 cell/mm² to...

  14. Characterization of the Lactobacillus casei group and the Lactobacillus acidophilus group by automated ribotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, C S; Czajka, J W; Sakamoto, M; Benno, Y

    2001-01-01

    A total of 91 type and reference strains of the Lactobacillus casei group and the L acidophilus group were characterized by the automated ribotyping device Riboprinter microbial characterization system. The L. casei group was divided into five (C1-C5) genotypes by ribotyping. Among them, the strain of L. casei ATCC 334 was clustered to the same genotype group as most of L. paracasei strains and L casei JCM 1134T generated a riboprint pattern that was different from the type strain of L. zeae. These results supported the designation of L. casei ATCC 334 as the neotype strain, but were not consistent with the reclassification of L. casei JCM 1134T as L. zeae. The L. acidophilus group was also divided into 14 (A1-A11, B1-B3) genotypes by ribotyping. L. acidophilus, L. amylovorus, L. crispatus and L. gallinarum generated ribotype patterns that were distinct from the patterns produced by L. gasseri and L. johnsonii. This result confirmed previous data that the L. acidophilus group divided to two major clusters. Five strains of L. acidophilus and two strains of L. gasseri were correctly reidentified by ribotyping. Most strains belonging to the L. casei group and the L. acidophilus group were discriminated at the species level by automated ribotyping. Thus this RiboPrinter system yields rapid, accurate and reproducible genetic information for the identification of many strains. PMID:11386416

  15. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on rat gastric mucosal leukotriene C4 and prostanoid release: relation to ethanol-induced injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Peskar, B M; Hoppe, U; Lange, K; Peskar, B A

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of oral and subcutaneous administration of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs sodium salicylate, aspirin and indomethacin on ex vivo gastric mucosal release of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) were investigated in rats under basal conditions as well as after challenge with ethanol. 2. Basal release of PGE2, 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha and TXB2 was inhibited by oral administration of aspirin (0.6-400 mgkg-1) and indomethacin (...

  16. Transdermal fentanyl for pain due to chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in nasopharyngeal cancer patients: evaluating efficacy, safety, and improvement in quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo SP

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Su-Ping Guo,1,* San-Gang Wu,2,* Juan Zhou,3,* Hui-Xia Feng,1 Feng-Yan Li,1 Ying-Jia Wu,1 Jia-Yuan Sun,1 Zhen-Yu He1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Xiamen Cancer Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Xiamen Cancer Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: This study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and quality of life (QoL measure of transdermal fentanyl (TDF for moderate-to-severe pain due to oral mucositis caused by chemoradiotherapy in patients with advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Patients with NPC who experienced moderate-to-severe oral mucosal pain during chemoradiotherapy (n=78 received TDF for pain relief. Pain relief and QoL were compared before and after treatment. The mean numeric rating scale score was reduced from 7.41±0.96 before treatment to 5.54±0.86, 3.27±0.73, 2.88±0.62, and 2.82±0.68 on days 1, 4, 7, and 10, respectively, after treatment (P<0.001. Karnofsky performance status and SPAASMS (Score for pain, Physical activity levels, Additional pain medication, Additional physician/emergency room visits, Sleep, Mood, and Side effects scores showed significant improvement after treatment, indicating an improved QoL of patients (both P<0.001. The most common adverse reactions were nausea and vomiting (10.26%. No serious life-threatening adverse events and no symptoms of drug withdrawal were observed. TDF is effective, safe, and improves QoL in treating pain due to oral mucositis caused by chemoradiotherapy in NPC patients. Keywords: nasopharyngeal cancer, transdermal fentanyl, noncancerous pain

  17. Roles of Mucosal Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, is one of the world's leading infectious causes of morbidity and mortality. As a mucosal-transmitted pathogen, Mtb infects humans and animals mainly through the mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Apart from providing a physical barrier against the invasion of pathogen, the major function of the respiratory mucosa may be to serve as the inductive sites to initiate mucosal immune responses and sequentially provide the first line of defense for the host to defend against this pathogen. A large body of studies in the animals and humans have demonstrated that the mucosal immune system, rather than the systemic immune system, plays fundamental roles in the host’s defense against Mtb infection. Therefore, the development of new vaccines and novel delivery routes capable of directly inducing respiratory mucosal immunity is emphasized for achieving enhanced protection from Mtb infection. In this paper, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding the mucosal immunity against Mtb infection, including the development of TB vaccines, and respiratory delivery routes to enhance mucosal immunity are discussed.

  18. Mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Coskun, Mehmet; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2013-01-01

    . With the introduction of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors for the treatment of UC, it has become increasingly evident that the disease course is influenced by whether or not the patient achieves mucosal healing. Thus, patients with mucosal healing have fewer flare-ups, a decreased risk of...

  19. A food-grade fimbrial adhesin FaeG expression system in Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W W; Wang, T; Wang, Y; Xin, M; Kong, J

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is the major cause of diarrhea in neonatal piglets. The fimbriae as colonizing factor in the pathogenesis of ETEC constitute a primary target for vaccination against ETEC. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are attractive tools to deliver antigens at the mucosal level. With the safety of genetically modified LAB in mind, a food-grade secretion vector (pALRc or pALRb) was constructed with DNA entirely from LAB, including the replicon, promoter, signal peptide, and selection marker alanine racemase gene (alr). To evaluate the feasibility of the system, the nuclease gene (nuc) from Staphylococcus aureus was used as a reporter to be expressed in both Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei. Subsequently, the extracellular secretion of the fimbrial adhesin FaeG of ETEC was confirmed by Western blot analysis. These results showed that this food-grade expression system has potential as the delivery vehicle for the safe use of genetically modified LAB for the development of vaccines against ETEC infection. PMID:26825016

  20. An overview of challenges limiting the design of protective mucosal vaccines for finfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetron Mweemba Munang'andu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Research in mucosal vaccination in finfish has gained prominence in the last decade in pursuit of mucosal vaccines that would lengthen the duration of protective immunity in vaccinated fish. However, injectable vaccines have continued to dominate in the vaccination of finfish because they are perceived to be more protective than mucosal vaccines. Therefore, it has become important to identify the factors that limit developing protective mucosal vaccines in finfish as an overture to identifying key areas that require optimization in mucosal vaccine design. Some of the factors that limit the success for designing protective mucosal vaccines for finfish identified in this review include the lack optimized protective antigen doses for mucosal vaccines, absence of immunostimulants able to enhance the performance of non-replicative mucosal vaccines, reduction of systemic antibodies due to prolonged exposure to oral vaccination and the lack of predefined correlates of protective immunity for use in the optimization of newly developed mucosal vaccines. This review also points out the need to develop prime-boost vaccination regimes able to induce long-term protective immunity in vaccinated fish. By overcoming some of the obstacles identified herein it is anticipated that future mucosal vaccines shall be designed to induce long-term protective immunity in finfish.

  1. KARAKTERISTIK DADIH PROBIOTIK MENGGUNAKAN KOMBINASI LACTOBACILLUS CASEI, LACTOBACILLUS PLANTARUM, DAN BIFIDOBACTERIUM LONGUM SELAMA PENYIMPANAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Usmiati

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Some test results hedonic by ordinary people who consume the dadih in West Sumatra in 2009 on dadih made from cow's milk using Lactobacillus casei culture couldn’t be accepted because it was still too acidic than dadih from buffalo milk. One solution to reduce the sour taste is to combine the bacterial culture L. casei with other lactic acid bacteria that produce flavor relatively low acidity. The study aimed to determine the characteristics of probiotic dadih using a combination starter L. casei, L. plantarum and B. longum during storage at room temperature (ambient and cold temperature. The study was designed using randomized block design with 6x3 factorial patterns of three groups as replication. Treatment A (combination of probiotic bacteria that L. casei (A1, B. longum (A2, L. plantarum (A3, L. casei: L. plantarum 1:5 (A4, L. casei: B. longum 1:5 (A5 and L. casei: L. plantarum: B. longum 1:4:1 (A6, and factor B (storage conditions, namely: (B1 room temperature (27oC, and (B2 cold temperature (4-10oC. The results showed that viability and the total lactic acid bacteria in all formulas of cow's milk dadih during storage at room temperature and cold temperature of more than 106 cfu/ml which could be categorized as a probiotic products. The combination of C1L5 (L.casei: B.longum 1: 5 has the lowest acidity value and excellence in character color, flavor, and was generally preferred by the panelists. In terms of flavor and texture characteristics of cow's milk dadih with a combination of C1L5 had a level of hedonic as with other formulas.       Keywords: dadih, cows milk, probiotic, storage

  2. KARAKTERISTIK DADIH PROBIOTIK MENGGUNAKAN KOMBINASI LACTOBACILLUS CASEI, LACTOBACILLUS PLANTARUM, DAN BIFIDOBACTERIUM LONGUM SELAMA PENYIMPANAN

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Usmiati; . Juniawati

    2012-01-01

    Some test results hedonic by ordinary people who consume the dadih in West Sumatra in 2009 on dadih made from cow's milk using Lactobacillus casei culture couldn’t be accepted because it was still too acidic than dadih from buffalo milk. One solution to reduce the sour taste is to combine the bacterial culture L. casei with other lactic acid bacteria that produce flavor relatively low acidity. The study aimed to determine the characteristics of probiotic dadih using a combination starter L....

  3. Post-traumatic endophthalmitis due to Brevibacterium casei : A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Asima Banu; Sriprakash KS; Vidyadevi M; ER, Nagraj

    2013-01-01

    Endophthalmitis is a serious post-traumatic ocular complication that can lead to loss of vision. We report a case of acute post-traumatic endophthalmitis following a penetrating injury caused by an unusual organism, Brevibacterium casei . The patient was successfully treated with intravitreal antibiotics like ceftazidime and vancomycin, along with topical cefazolin and tobramycin. Brevibacterium casei can be added to the list of rare bacteria causing endophthalmitis and should be kept in mind...

  4. Human infections caused by Brevibacterium casei, formerly CDC groups B-1 and B-3.

    OpenAIRE

    Gruner, E; Steigerwalt, A G; Hollis, D G; Weyant, R S; Weaver, R E; Moss, C W; M Daneshvar; J. M. Brown; Brenner, D J

    1994-01-01

    Forty-one clinical strains of CDC coryneform groups B-1 and B-3 were compared biochemically, by analysis of cell wall sugars, amino acids, and cellular fatty acids, and by DNA relatedness to the type strains of Brevibacterium casei, Brevibacterium epidermidis, and Brevibacterium linens. Twenty-two strains were shown to be B. casei, while five other strains formed a phenotypically inseparable genomospecies in the same genus. The remaining isolates were genetically heterogeneous, and most are p...

  5. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems in Probiotic Lactobacillus casei

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Shuijing; Peng, Yanping; Chen, Wanyi; Deng, Yangwu; Guo, Yanhua

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei has traditionally been recognized as a probiotic, thus needing to survive the industrial production processes and transit through the gastrointestinal tract before providing benefit to human health. The two-component signal transduction system (TCS) plays important roles in sensing and reacting to environmental changes, which consists of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). In this study we identified HKs and RRs of six sequenced L. casei strains. Ortholo...

  6. Morphine mouthwash for the management of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Sarvizadeh; Simin Hemati; Mohsen Meidani; Moghtada Ashouri; Mahnaz Roayaei; Armindokht Shahsanai

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral mucositis is a debilitating side effect of cancer treatment for which there is not much successful treatments at yet. We evaluated the effectiveness of topical morphine compared with a routine mouthwash in managing cancer treatment-induced mucositis. Materials and Methods: Thirty head and neck cancer patients with severe mucositis (World Health Organization Grade III or IV) were randomized into the morphine and magic mouthwash groups. Patients received morphine sulfate 2%...

  7. Mechanism by which bile salt disrupts the gastric mucosal barrier in the dog.

    OpenAIRE

    Duane, W C; Wiegand, D M

    1980-01-01

    Bile salts disrupt a functional "gastric mucosal barrier" increasing net forward-diffusion (+) of Na+ and back-diffusion (-) of H+. Studying canine Heidenhain pouches, we attempted to distinguish between two possible mechanisms for this effect: (a) mucosal uptake of bile salt with subsequent cellular injury or (b) dissolution of mucosal lipids by intralumenal bile salt. A 10 mM mixture of six conjugated bile salts simulating the proportions found in human bile induced net Na+ flux of 15.5 +/-...

  8. Protection Against ETEC F41 After Intranasal Immunization with Recombinant Lactobacillus casei%表达产肠毒素性大肠杆菌F41重组干酪乳杆菌免疫小鼠的保护性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建奎; 魏春华; 侯喜林; 余丽芸; 王桂华

    2009-01-01

    [Objective] The use of live Lactobacillus casei as an antigen delivery system elicit mucnsal immunity and thus represents a promising strategy for mucosal vaccination to prevent ETEC F41 infection. [Method] The recombinant fusion proteins were detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Surface localization of the fusion protein was verified by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Intranasal immunization of SPF Balb/c mice was performed with recombinant strain harboring pLA-F41/L, casei and pLA/L, casei. Specific anti-F41 IgG antibody in the serum and specific anti-F41 secret immunoglobulin A (slgA) antibody in the lung, intestines, vigna fluid and feces of mice were detected by indirect ELISA after intranasal immunization. The mice intranasaly immunized with pLA-F41/L, casei and pLA/L, casei were challenged with standard-type ETEC F41(C83919). [Result] Mice immunized with pLA-F41/L.casei could produce remarkable anti-F41 antibody level. More than 80% of mice survived after challenged with C83919 (2×10~3LD_(50)). All the mice immunized with a control L. casei harboring pLA vector were died. Eighty-five percent of the pups survived after challenged with C83919, but only a 5% survival rate for pups that were either immunized with a control L. casei harboring pLA vector or unimmunized. [Conclusion] These results indicate that mucosal immunization with recombinant L. casei expressing ETEC F41 fimbriae protein on its surface provides an effective means for eliciting protective immune response against the ETEC F41.%[目的]利用干酪乳酸菌作为抗原传递系统来刺激机体产生黏膜免疫反应,从而研制有效的黏膜疫苗预防ETEC F41的感染.[方法]重组菌在MRS培养基中进行表达,经SDS-PAGE.Western blot检测目的蛋白的表达,间接免疫荧光分析及流式细胞术检测外源蛋白展示到菌体表面.将重组菌及空质粒菌株分别滴鼻接种SPF级Balb/c小鼠,采集血液样品测定小鼠产生抗F41的特

  9. Effect of 16.16 dimethyl prostaglandin E2, N-acetyl-cysteine and the proton pump inhibitor BY 831-78 on hydrogen peroxide-induced mucosal damage in the rat stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürer-Maly, C C; Haussner, V; Halter, F

    1990-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are noxious to gastrointestinal mucosa and contribute to a variety of gastrointestinal diseases. We examined whether 16.16 dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (PG) is protective against the oxidizing action of 6% H2O2 causing gross hemorrhagic lesions in rat gastric mucosa. Male Wistar rats were treated with PG, 0.005-5 micrograms/kg, either intragastrically (i.g.) or subcutaneously, 30 min prior to i.g. administration of 6% H2O2, 0.5 ml/100 g. Further animals received 25 mg of the mucus dissolvent N-acetyl-cystein (NAC) following oral PG treatment or 30 mumol/kg of the H+K(+)-ATPase inhibitor BY 831-78 (BY), 4 h before onset of the experiments. Volume, pH and beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase and lactate dehydrogenase as parameters of cell damage were determined in the gastric juice. i.g. PG treatment achieved 60 and 55% reduction of the mucosal lesions in doses between 5 and 0.05 micrograms/kg, respectively. i.p. PG administration was effective in all doses tested. Gastric juice volume was only slightly and enzymes were not significantly affected by PG treatment. NAC did not diminish PG efficacy or aggravate mucosal lesions. Gastric acid suppression did not increase PG-induced protection but was strongly protective by itself, reducing damage by 75%. Low-dose PG treatment achieves an effective protection against oxidative damage in gastric mucosa, which is not the result of dilution or enhanced mucus production. PMID:2147665

  10. Mucositis Grades and Yeast Species

    OpenAIRE

    Ognjenović, Marina; Milatić, Katja; Parat, Katica; Kovačić, Ivan; Ježina Bušelić, Marina A.; Božić, Joško

    2013-01-01

    Surgically treated patients with oral, head and neck cancer commonly develop mucositis during additional irradiation therapy. Oral mucosa inflammation other than irradiation is mostly caused by Candida albicans, yeast of Candida genus. This study evaluated possible connection between grades of oral mucositis and oral yeast profile in irradiated patients before, during and after irradiation. In 25 examined patients mucosits grades »0« to »2« before irradiation with 20% positive smears and o...

  11. Cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes are characterized by pain, burning sensation, numbness or paraesthesia of a particular part of the skin or mucosal surface without any visible signs. They are usually sensory disorders, sometimes with a great deal of psychologic overlay. In this article various conditions have been listed and are described. The possible causative mechanisms are discussed when they are applicable and the outline of their management is described.

  12. Systematic review of cytokines and growth factors for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; von Bultzingslowen, Inger; Logan, Richard M.; Bowen, Joanne; Al-Azri, Abdul Rahman; Everaus, Hele; Gerber, Erich; Garcia Gomez, Jess; Pettersson, Bo G.; Soga, Yoshihiko; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Epstein, Joel B.; Elad, Sharon; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this project was to review the literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of cytokines and growth factor agents for the prevention or treatment of oral mucositis induced by cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study Gr

  13. Polymer nanomicelles for efficient mucus delivery and antigen-specific high mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Young-Woock; Hong, Ji Hyun; Shim, Sang-Mu; Park, Hye Sun; Bae, Hee Ho; Ryu, Eun Kyoung; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chul-Ho; Cho, Seong Hun; Sung, Moon-Hee; Poo, Haryoung; Lim, Yong Taik

    2013-07-22

    Micelles for mucosal immunity: A mucosal vaccine system based on γ-PGA nanomicelles and viral antigens was synthesized. The intranasal administration of the vaccine system induces a high immune response both in the humoral and cellular immunity (see picture). PMID:23765547

  14. Multilocus sequence typing of Lactobacillus casei isolates from naturally fermented foods in China and Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qiuhua; Song, Yuqin; Xu, Haiyan; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Wenyi; Menghe, Bilige; Zhang, Heping; Sun, Zhihong

    2016-07-01

    Lactobacillus casei is a lactic acid bacterium used in manufacturing of many fermented food products. To investigate the genetic diversity and population biology of this food-related bacterium, 224 Lb. casei isolates and 5 reference isolates were examined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Among them, 224 Lb. casei isolates were isolated from homemade fermented foods, including naturally fermented dairy products, acidic gruel, and Sichuan pickles from 38 different regions in China and Mongolia. The MLST scheme was developed based on the analysis of 10 selected housekeeping genes (carB, clpX, dnaA, groEL, murE, pyrG, pheS, recA, rpoC, and uvrC). All 229 isolates could be allocated to 171 unique sequence types, including 25 clonal complexes and 71 singletons. The high index of association value (1.3524) and standardized index of association value (0.1503) indicate the formation of an underlying clonal population by all the isolates. However, split-decomposition, relative frequency of occurrence of recombination and mutation, and relative effect of recombination and mutation in the diversification values confirm that recombination may have occurred, and were more frequent than mutation during the evolution of Lb. casei. Results from Structure analyses (version 2.3; http://pritch.bsd.uchicago.edu/structure.html) demonstrated that there were 5 lineages in the Lb. casei isolates, and the overall relatedness built by minimum spanning tree showed no clear relationship between the clonal complexes with either the isolation sources or sampling locations of the isolates. Our newly developed MLST scheme of Lb. casei was an easy and valuable tool that, together with the construction of an MLST database, will contribute to further detailed studies on the evolution and population genetics of Lb. casei from various niches. PMID:27179867

  15. Correlation of dynamic changes in γ-H2AX expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes from head and neck cancer patients with radiation-induced oral mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the role of γ-H2AX in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) as a predictive biomarker of the severity of oral mucositis (OM) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients with receiving radiotherapy. In vitro assays for evaluating DNA damage and repair kinetics were performed on blood samples withdrawn from 25 HNC patients undergoing radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy before radiotherapy. As for the in vivo study, blood samples were also withdrawn before radiotherapy, and 1 hour after radiotherapy on the fourth and last days. Flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of γ-H2AX in PBLs. OM was assessed using the World Health Organization (WHO) scores twice a week and correlated with the expression of γ-H2AX. The in vitro assay results showed that patients with severe OM had higher γ-H2AX-specific relative fluorescence at various irradiation doses in the damage kinetics assay, with significantly higher γ-H2AX expression at 8 Gy (p = 0.039), and also at 24 hours after irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy in the repair kinetics assay, compared to the patients with mild OM (p = 0.008). The optimal cutoff value for relative fluorescence of γ-H2AX was 0.960, 24 hours post-irradiation. However, there were no significant differences in γ-H2AX expression at different times between the two groups, as assessed with the in vivo assay. These results suggest that the damage and repair kinetics of γ-H2AX from PBLs in the in vitro study may have predictive value for identifying the grades of OM among HNC patients prior to radiotherapy

  16. Mucosal immunization with the Moraxella catarrhalis porin m35 induces enhanced bacterial clearance from the lung: a possible role for opsonophagocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna eEaston

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Moraxella catarrhalis is a significant cause of respiratory tract infection against which a vaccine is sought. Several outer membrane proteins are currently under investigation as potential vaccine antigens, including the porin M35. We have previously shown that the third external loop of M35 was immunodominant over the remainder of the protein for antibody produced in mice against the refolded recombinant protein. However, as this loop is predicted to fold inside the porin channel we also predicted that it would not be accessible to these antibodies when M35 is expressed on the surface of the bacteria in its native conformation. This study investigated the functional activity of antibodies against M35 and those specific for the loop 3 region of M35 in vitro and in vivo. Antisera from mice immunized with M35 or the loop 3-deletion, M35loop3–, recombinant proteins were not bactericidal but did have enhanced opsonic activity, whereas antibodies raised against the loop 3 peptide were not opsonising indicating that the immunodominant loop 3 of M35 was not accessible to antibody as we had previously predicted. Mucosal immunization with M35, M35 that had an antigenically altered loop 3 (M35(ID78 and M35loop3– enhanced the clearance of M. catarrhalis from the lungs of mice challenged with live M. catarrhalis. The in vivo clearance of bacteria in the mice with the M35-derived protein constructs correlated significantly (p<0.001 with the opsonic activity assessed an in vitro opsonophagocytosis assay. This study has demonstrated that the immunodominat B-cell epitope to loop 3 of the M. catarrhalis outer membrane protein M35 is not associated with immune protection and that M35-specific antibodies are not bactericidal but are opsonising. The opsonising activity correlated with in vivo clearance of the bacteria suggesting that opsonising antibody may be a good correlate of immune protection.

  17. Genome-scale reconstruction of metabolic networks of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 and 12A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vinay-Lara

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus casei strains are widely used in industry and the utility of this organism in these industrial applications is strain dependent. Hence, tools capable of predicting strain specific phenotypes would have utility in the selection of strains for specific industrial processes. Genome-scale metabolic models can be utilized to better understand genotype-phenotype relationships and to compare different organisms. To assist in the selection and development of strains with enhanced industrial utility, genome-scale models for L. casei ATCC 334, a well characterized strain, and strain 12A, a corn silage isolate, were constructed. Draft models were generated from RAST genome annotations using the Model SEED database and refined by evaluating ATP generating cycles, mass-and-charge-balances of reactions, and growth phenotypes. After the validation process was finished, we compared the metabolic networks of these two strains to identify metabolic, genetic and ortholog differences that may lead to different phenotypic behaviors. We conclude that the metabolic capabilities of the two networks are highly similar. The L. casei ATCC 334 model accounts for 1,040 reactions, 959 metabolites and 548 genes, while the L. casei 12A model accounts for 1,076 reactions, 979 metabolites and 640 genes. The developed L. casei ATCC 334 and 12A metabolic models will enable better understanding of the physiology of these organisms and be valuable tools in the development and selection of strains with enhanced utility in a variety of industrial applications.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus casei Zhang, a New Probiotic Strain Isolated from Traditional Homemade Koumiss in Inner Mongolia, China▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyi; Yu, Dongliang; Sun, Zhihong; Wu, Rina; Chen, Xia; Chen, Wei; Meng, He; Hu, Songnian; Zhang, Heping

    2010-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei Zhang is a new probiotic bacterium isolated from koumiss collected in Inner Mongolia, China. Here, we report the main genome features of L. casei Zhang and the identification of several predicted proteins implicated in interactions with the host. PMID:20675486

  19. Topical protection of human esophageal mucosal integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, P; Batista-Lima, F; Lee, C; Preston, S L; Dettmar, P; Sifrim, D

    2015-06-15

    Patients with nonerosive reflux disease exhibit impaired esophageal mucosal integrity, which may underlie enhanced reflux perception. In vitro topical application of an alginate solution can protect mucosal biopsies against acid-induced changes in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). We aimed to confirm this finding in a second model using 3D cell cultures and to assess prolonged protection in a biopsy model. We assessed the protective effect of a topically applied alginate solution 1 h after application. 3D cell cultures were grown by using an air-liquid interface and were studied in Ussing chambers. The apical surface was "protected" with 200 μl of either alginate or viscous control or was unprotected. The tissue was exposed to pH 3 + bile acid solution for 30 min and TER change was calculated. Distal esophageal mucosal biopsies were taken from 12 patients and studied in Ussing chambers. The biopsies were coated with either alginate or viscous control solution. The biopsies were then bathed in pH 7.4 solution for 1 h. The luminal chamber solution was replaced with pH 2 solution for 30 min. Percentage changes in TER were recorded. In five biopsies fluorescein-labeled alginate solution was used to allow immunohistological localization of the alginate after 1 h. In the cell culture model, alginate solution protected tissue against acid-induced change in TER. In biopsies, 60 min after protection with alginate solution, the acidic exposure caused a -8.3 ± 2.2% change in TER compared with -25.1 ± 4.5% change after protection with the viscous control (P < 0.05). Labeled alginate could be seen coating the luminal surface in all cases. In vitro, alginate solutions can adhere to the esophageal mucosa for up to 1 h and exert a topical protectant effect. Durable topical protectants can be further explored as first-line/add-on therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25907692

  20. Protective effects of melatonin on gastric mucosal lesions in rats induced by sleep deprivation%褪黑素对睡眠剥夺大鼠胃黏膜损伤的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩俊; 王彬; 马珂; 闫昱博; 董开源; 刘芳娥

    2013-01-01

    目的:研究褪黑素对睡眠剥夺大鼠胃黏膜损伤的保护作用及机制。方法:将24只SD大鼠采用随机数字表法分为3组,分别为对照组(生理盐水腹腔注射)、模型组(生理盐水腹腔注射+睡眠剥夺)和实验组(15 mg/kg褪黑素腹腔注射+睡眠剥夺)。采用小平台水环境法建立大鼠睡眠剥夺模型,睡眠剥夺前大鼠适应环境7 d,从适应环境开始至睡眠剥夺期间继续给药。睡眠剥夺72 h后用相应试剂盒检测各组大鼠血清丙二醛( MDA)、还原型谷胱甘肽(GSH)及前列腺素E2(PEG2)含量。观察胃黏膜组织病理损伤情况并进行胃黏膜损伤指数测定。结果:3组大鼠血清MDA、GSH、PEG2及胃黏膜损伤指数比较,差异均有统计学意义( F=9.441、9.667、9.747、486.804,P均<0.05)。与对照组比较,模型组胃黏膜损伤指数升高(P<0.05),血清MDA和PEG2含量升高、GSH含量降低(P均<0.05);与模型组比较,实验组胃黏膜损伤指数降低(P<0.05),血清MDA和PEG2含量降低、GSH含量升高(P均<0.05)。结论:褪黑素可通过降低血清MDA和升高GSH减轻睡眠剥夺造成的胃黏膜损伤。%Aim:To study the protective effects of melatonin on gastric mucosal lesions in rats induced by sleep depri-vation and the mechanism .Methods:A total of 24 SD rats were randomly allocated into 3 groups:the control group ( intra-peritoneal injection of normal saline ) , the model group ( sleep deprivation+intraperitoneal injection of normal saline ) and the experimental group (sleep deprivation +intraperitoneal injection of 15 mg/kg melatonin).The rats in the model group and the experimental group were set up sleep deprivation model with a small platform of water situation .The rats adapted to the situation for 7 days before sleep deprivation , and injection was kept during acclimation and the sleep deprivation days . After 72 h

  1. Use of lac regulatory elements for gene expression in Lactobacillus casei

    OpenAIRE

    Gosalbes, María; Pérez-Arellano, Isabel; Esteban, Carlos; GalÁn, José; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2001-01-01

    Usage des éléments régulateurs de l'opéron lactose pour l'expression de gènes chez Lactobacillus casei . Les gènes du lactose Lactobacillus casei ssp. casei ATCC393 [ pLZ15$^-$] sont regroupés dans un même opéron, lacTEGF, codant pour un antiterminateur (LacT), pour les éléments spécifiques du transport du lactose par le système phosphotransferase dépendant du phosphoénolpyruvate (PTS) (LacE et LacF) et pour une phospho-$\\beta$-galactosidase (LacG). L'opéron lac est soumis à une répression pa...

  2. Effectiveness of polaprezinc for low-dose aspirin-induced small-bowel mucosal injuries as evaluated by capsule endoscopy: a pilot randomized controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Watari, Ikue; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Aoyama, Taiki; Imagawa, Hiroki; Shishido, Takayoshi; Yoshida, Shigeto; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment of low-dose aspirin (LDA)-induced small-bowel injury has not been established. Polaprezinc, a chelate of zinc and L-carnosine, may be efficacious for such injury. We conducted a pilot randomized controlled study to investigate whether polaprezinc is effective against LDA-induced small-bowel injuries. Methods Consecutive patients under long-term (>3 months) LDA treatment and who agreed to participate in our study underwent initial capsule endoscopy (CE). Patients with LDA-...

  3. Oral mucosal alterations among the institutionalized elderly in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Conceição Ferreira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the prevalence of oral mucosal alterations and associated factors among the institutionalized elderly in Brazil. Data were collected through a structured questionnaire, a review of their medical records and an intra-oral examination. A sample of 335 individuals over 60 years of age was randomly selected. In total, 646 alterations were diagnosed; 59.1% were variations of the normal oral mucosa. The most frequent variation consisted of sublingual varicosities (51.6%. Denture stomatitis (15.2% and denture hyperplasia (12.8% were the most frequent lesions. Elderly patients who wore dentures had a significantly higher prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (p = 0.00 than those that didn't wear dentures. There was a high prevalence of variations of the normal oral mucosa and of mucosal lesions, especially denture-induced lesions, among the institutionalized elderly.

  4. Curcumin Ameliorates Reserpine-Induced Gastrointestinal Mucosal Lesions Through Inhibiting IκB-α/NF-κB Pathway and Regulating Expression of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide and Gastrin in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lingli; Wang, Jingnan; Chen, Ningning; Zheng, Shuhui; Shi, Lanying; Xu, Yuxia; Luo, Canqiao; Deng, Yubin

    2016-06-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate whether curcumin protects against reserpine-induced gastrointestinal mucosal lesions (GMLs) in rats and to explore the mechanism of curcumin's action. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: control group, reserpine-treated group, reserpine treatment group with curcumin at high dose (200 mg/kg), and reserpine treatment group with curcumin at low dose (100 mg/kg). Rats in reserpine-treated group were induced by intraperitoneally administered reserpine (0.5 mg/kg) for 28 days. TUNEL staining and hematoxylin and eosin staining were used to evaluate the apoptotic cells and morphologic changes. In addition, to explore the mechanism of curcumin in protecting GMLs, we used serum of experimental rats to assess the level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ by ELISA and radioimmunoassay. The protein levels of NF-κB, p-IκB-α, IκB-α, Bcl-2, Bax, and cleaved-caspase-3 were examined by western blot analysis. Data were analyzed with SPSS 19.0 software package. Curcumin treatment prevented tissue damage and cell death in the reserpine-treated rats and effectively decreased inflammatory response and balanced the expression of VIP and gastrin in the reserpine-treated rats. NF-κB, p-IκB-α, Bax, and cleaved-caspase-3 were increased in the reserpine group, but the curcumin high-dose group inhibited them. Curcumin can target the IκB-α/NF-κB pathway to inhibit inflammatory response and regulate the level of VIP and gastrin in reserpine-induced GML rats. PMID:26872103

  5. The Effects of Combined Adiponectin-Metformin on Glucose and Lipids Levels in Mice and Acute Toxicity and Anti-Ulcerogenic Activity of Adiponectin Against Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Alshawsh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Adiponectin is a protein hormone secreted entirely by abdominal fat tissue. It exhibits various biological activities. The present study was performed to evaluate the effects of metformin alone or in combination with adiponectin on blood glucose, TG (triglyceride, CHOL (Total cholesterol, LDL (Low density lipoprotein and HDL (High density lipoprotein levels in mice and also to evaluate the anti-ulcerogenic activity of adiponectin against ethanol induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. Three groups of mice were gavaged with 1% volume/body weight high fat-sucrose. Metformin at a dosage of 250 mg/kg was added to the feed and a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg adiponectin was injected intraperitoneally (i.p. Blood glucose was measured at one hour intervals for five hours. Blood concentrations of TG, CHOL, LDL and HDL were also measured at the end of the fifth hour of the experiment. On the other hand, four groups of adult healthy rats were i.p. injected with distilled water, omeprazole 20 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg adiponectin one hour before oral administration of absolute ethanol to generate gastric mucosal injury. After an additional hour the rats were sacrificed and the ulcer areas of the gastric walls were determined. Furthermore, an acute toxicity study has indicated no mortality with 5 mg/kg dose of adiponectin injected i.p in rats and no major clinical signs of toxicity were observed. The results indicate that the effect of a combination of metformin and adiponectin on blood glucose and HDL is quite effective. Histology of the gastric wall of negative control rats revealed severe damage of gastric mucosa, along with edema and leucocyte infiltration of the submucosal layer compared to rats pre-treated with either omeprazole or adiponectin extract where there was marked gastric protection along with reduction or inhibition of edema and leucocytes infiltration. The results suggest that combination of metfomin and adiponectin give a promising antidiabetic

  6. Functional Analysis of the p40 and p75 Proteins from Lactobacillus casei BL23

    OpenAIRE

    Bäuerl, Christine; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yan, Fang; Polk, D. Brent; Monedero, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    The genomes of Lactobacillus casei/paracasei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains carry two genes encoding homologues of p40 and p75 from L. rhamnosus GG, two secreted proteins which display anti-apoptotic and cell protective effects on human intestinal epithelial cells. p40 and p75 carry cysteine, histidine-dependent aminohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) and NLPC/P60 domains, respectively, which are characteristic of proteins with cell-wall hydrolase activity. In L. casei BL23 both proteins were se...

  7. Post-traumatic endophthalmitis due to Brevibacterium casei : A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asima Banu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Endophthalmitis is a serious post-traumatic ocular complication that can lead to loss of vision. We report a case of acute post-traumatic endophthalmitis following a penetrating injury caused by an unusual organism, Brevibacterium casei . The patient was successfully treated with intravitreal antibiotics like ceftazidime and vancomycin, along with topical cefazolin and tobramycin. Brevibacterium casei can be added to the list of rare bacteria causing endophthalmitis and should be kept in mind by clinicians as a potential source of pathology.

  8. Examination of antimicrobial potential in natural isolates of lactobacillus casei/paracasei group

    OpenAIRE

    Tolinački Maja; Lozo Jelena; Veljović Katarina; Kojić Milan; Fira Đorđe; Topisirović Ljubiša

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial potential of 52 natural isolates of Lactobacillus casei/paracasei. The incidence of relevant genes encoding BacSJ (bacSJ2-8/bacSJ2-8i gene cluster), acidocin 8912 (acdT), ABC-transporter (abcT) and accessory protein (acc) was also studied. These genes were found to be widespread amongst the analyzed L. casei/paracasei strains. The bacSJ2-8/bacSJ2-8i gene cluster was present in 49 (94.23%) and acdT i...

  9. Oral mucositis in radiotherapy of head and neck cancer and the possibilities of therapeutic intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral mucositis represents the key limiting toxicity of radiotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. In many cases,it disables to keep the full dose intensity of the treatment and thereby decreases its effectiveness. To the patient, it means suffering, associated with pain and inability of normal food intake. In spite of high incidence an clinical importance of this problem, at present time, there is no approved medication or treatment procedure which could effectively prevent the development of radiation induced mucositis. This paper provides an evidence based review of possible therapeutic interventions with the aim of decreasing the extent and severity of oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy.(author)

  10. Protective effect of melatonin against multistress condition induced lipid peroxidation via measurement of gastric mucosal lesion and plasma malondialdehyde levels in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V Kiarostami; L Samini; M Ghazi-Khansari

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the protective effect of a natural antioxidant, melatonin, against multistress condition induced lipid peroxidation via determination of gastric damage and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) level by high performance liquid chromatography in rats.METHODS: We compared indomethacin-induced gastric damage and MDA plasma level in three groups of rats: unoperated, bile duct ligated and sham-operated and evaluated the role of the melatonin on gastric damage and plasma MDA level. Indomethacin and melatonin were injected intraperitoneally in doses of 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg, respectively. Animals were killed 4 h after indomethacin injection.RESULTS: Indomethacin induced more severe gastric damage and plasma MDA level in bile duct ligated animals was significantly higher (3.1 ± 0.04 μmol/L) than sham (2.8 ± 0.04 μmol/L) and unoperated animals (1.4± 0.08 μmol/L). Pretreatment with melatonin reduced indomethacin-induced gastric damage and plasma MDA level.CONCLUSION: Considering the results of this study,we suggest that in multistress conditions the intensity of gastric damage and the plasma MDA level are great and melatonin reduces the negative effect of lipid peroxidation and cell damage by oxidative stress in multistress conditions due to its antioxidizing activity.

  11. Egg Yolk IgY: Protection against Rotavirus induced Diarrhea and Modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in newborn calves

    OpenAIRE

    Vega, C.; De Bok, M; Chacana, P.; Saif, L; Fernandez, F; Parreño, V.

    2011-01-01

    Bovine rotavirus (BRV) is an important cause of diarrhea in newborn calves. Local passive immunity is the most efficient protective strategy to control the disease. IgY technology (the use of chicken egg yolk immunoglobulins) is an economic and practical alternative to prevent BRV diarrhea in dairy calves. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection and immunomodulation induced by the oral administration of egg yolk enriched in BRV specific IgY to experimentally BRV infected calves. ...

  12. Implication of Nerve Growth Factor in intestinal mucosal mast cell activity and colonic motor alterations in a model of ovalbumin-induced gut dysfunction in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jardí Pujol, Ferran

    2011-01-01

    We determined NGF involvement in MMCs and colonic motor alterations in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced gut dysfunction model in rats. Animals received OVA (6 weeks), with/without simultaneous K252a (TrkA antagonist) treatment. MMCs, rat mast cell protease II (RMCPII) levels and colonic contractility in vitro were assessed. OVA increased MMC density and RMCPII concentration. Spontaneous contractility was similar in both groups and inhibited by K252a. Carbachol responses were increased by OVA in a K...

  13. Pharmacotherapy of Oral Mucositis with Palifermin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Rzepecki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis (OM is one of the most debilitating and common side effects of intensive anti-cancer treatment. OM is associated with adverse clinical and economic outcomes. In addition to its symptomatic impact, OM increases the likelihood of unplanned breaks or delays in anti-cancer treatment, reduction in dose of chemotherapy, use of feeding tube placement or total parenteral nutrition, the need for an intravenous line, opioid use and hospitalization. Palifermin is a N-truncated recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF family, which binds specifically to the human KGF receptor and induces proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells, including gastrointestinal epithelial cells, hepatocytes, type II pneumocytes, and transitional urothelial cells. It is the first agent approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory authorities around the world for use in the prevention of oral mucositis caused by high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation. The following review aims to cover the recent peer-reviewed literature pertaining to the role of palifermin in the prevention of OM in different groups of patients treated with radiation therapy or chemotherapy against cancers.

  14. Gastroprotective Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Leaf against Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhidayah Ab. Rahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines appeared promising in prevention of many diseases. This study was conducted to investigate the gastroprotective effect of Curcuma xanthorrhiza leaf in the rats induced gastric ulcer by ethanol. Normal and ulcer control received carboxymethycellulose (5 mL/kg orally, positive control was administered with 20 mg/kg omeprazole (reference drug and 2 groups were received 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg of the leaf extract, respectively. To induce of gastric ulcers formation, ethanol (5 mL/kg was given orally to all groups except normal control. Gross ulcer areas, histology, and amount of prostaglandin E2, superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde were assessed to determine the potentiality of extract in prevention against gastric ulcers. Oral administration of extract showed significant gastric protection effect as the ulcer areas was remarkably decreased. Histology observation showed less edema and leucocytes infiltration as compared with the ulcer control which exhibited severe gastric mucosa injury. Furthermore, the leaf extract elevated the mucus weight, level of prostaglandin E2 and superoxide dismutase. The extract also reduced malondialdehyde amount significantly. Results showed leaf extract of Curcuma xanthorrhiza can enhanced the gastric protection and sustained the integrity of gastric mucosa structure. Acute toxicity test did not showed any sign of toxicity (2 g/kg and 5 g/kg.

  15. Survival of Lactobacillus casei in the Human Digestive Tract after Consumption of Fermented Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Oozeer, Raish; Lepinglard, Antony; Mater, Denis; Mogenet, Agnès; Michelin, Rachel; Seksek, Isabelle; Marteau, Philippe; Dore, Joel; Bresson, Jean-Louis; Corthier, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    A human trial was carried out to assess the ileal and fecal survival of Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 ingested in fermented milk. Survival rates were up to 51.2% in the ileum and 28.4% in the feces. The probiotic bacterium has the capacity to survive during its transit through the human gut.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Bacterium Lactobacillus casei LC2W▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chen; Ai, Lianzhong; Zhou, Fangfang; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei(Department of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China); Guo, Benheng

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei LC2W, a patented probiotic strain (Z. Wu, European patent EP 1642963 B1, February 2009), has been isolated from Chinese traditional dairy products and implemented in industrial production as starter culture. Here we present the complete genome sequence of LC2W and the identification of a gene cluster implicated in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus casei BD-II ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ai, Lianzhong; Chen, Chen; Zhou, Fangfang; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei(Department of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China); Guo, Benheng

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei BD-II, a patented probiotic strain (U.S. patent 7,270,994 B2), was isolated from homemade koumiss in China and has been implemented in the industrial production as starter cultures. Here we report the complete genome sequence of BD-II, which shows high similarity with the well-studied probiotic BL23.

  18. PCR method for detection and identification of Lactobacillus casei/paracasei bacteriophages in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binetti, Ana G; Capra, M Luján; Alvarez, Miguel A; Reinheimer, Jorge A

    2008-05-31

    Bacteriophage infections of starter lactic acid bacteria (LAB) pose a serious risk to the dairy industry. Nowadays, the expanding use of valuable Lactobacillus strains as probiotic starters determines an increase in the frequency of specific bacteriophage infections in dairy plants. This work describes a simple and rapid Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method that detects and identifies bacteriophages infecting Lactobacillus casei/paracasei, the main bacterial species used as probiotic. Based on a highly conserved region of the NTP-binding genes belonging to the replication module of L. casei phages phiA2 and phiAT3 (the only two whose genomes are completely sequenced), a pair of primers was designed to generate a specific fragment. Furthermore, this PCR detection method proved to be a useful tool for monitoring and identifying L. casei/paracasei phages in industrial samples since specific PCR signals were obtained from phage contaminated milk (detection limit: 10(4) PFU/mL milk) and other commercial samples (fermented milks and cheese whey) that include L. casei/paracasei as probiotic starter (detection limit: 10(6) PFU/mL fermented milk). Since this method can detect the above phages in industrial samples and can be easily incorporated into dairy industry routines, it might be readily used to earmark contaminated milk for use in processes that do not involve susceptible starter organisms, or processes which involve phage-deactivating conditions. PMID:18471918

  19. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Biogenic Amine-Degrading Strain Lactobacillus casei 5b

    OpenAIRE

    Ladero Losada, Víctor Manuel; Herrero, Ana; Martínez Álvarez, Noelia; Río Lagar, Beatriz del; Linares, Daniel M.; Fernández García, María; Martín, M. Cruz; Álvarez González, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    We here report a 3.02-Mbp annotated draft assembly of the Lactobacillus casei 5b genome. The sequence of this biogenic amine-degrading dairy isolate may help identify the mechanisms involved in the catabolism of biogenic amines and perhaps shed light on ways to reduce the presence of these toxic compounds in food.

  20. The spxB gene as a target to identify Lactobacillus casei group species in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savo Sardaro, Maria Luisa; Levante, Alessia; Bernini, Valentina; Gatti, Monica; Neviani, Erasmo; Lazzi, Camilla

    2016-10-01

    This study focused on the spxB gene, which encodes for pyruvate oxidase. The presence of spxB in the genome and its transcription could be a way to produce energy and allow bacterial growth during carbohydrate starvation. In addition, the activity of pyruvate oxidase, which produces hydrogen peroxide, could be a mechanism for interspecies competition. Because this gene seems to provide advantages for the encoding species for adaptation in complex ecosystems, we studied spxB in a large set of cheese isolates belonging to the Lactobacillus casei group. Through this study, we demonstrated that this gene is widely found in the genomes of members of the L. casei group and shows variability useful for taxonomic studies. In particular, the HRM analysis method allowed for a specific discrimination between Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus paracasei and L. casei. Regarding the coding region, the spxB functionality in cheese was shown for the first time by real-time PCR, and by exploiting the heterogeneity between the L. casei group species, we identified the bacterial communities encoding the spxB gene in this ecosystem. This study allowed for monitoring of the active bacterial community involved in different stages of ripening by following the POX pathway. PMID:27375244

  1. Reconstruction and analysis of the genome-scale metabolic model of Lactobacillus casei LC2W.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nan; Liu, Jie; Ai, Lianzhong; Liu, Liming

    2015-01-10

    Lactobacillus casei LC2W is a recently isolated probiotic lactic acid bacterial strain, which is widely used in the dairy and pharmaceutical industries and in clinical medicine. The first genome-scale metabolic model for L. casei, composed of 846 genes, 969 metabolic reactions, and 785 metabolites, was reconstructed using both manual genome annotation and an automatic SEED model. Then, the iJL846 model was validated by simulating cell growth on 15 reported carbon sources. The iJL846 model explored the metabolism of L. casei on a genome scale: (1) explanation of the genetic codes-metabolic functions of 342 genes were reannotated in this model; (2) characterization of the physiology-10 amino acids and 7 vitamins were identified to be essential nutrients for L. casei LC2W growth; (3) analyses of metabolic pathways-the transport and metabolism of the 17 essential nutrients and exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis-were performed; (4) exploration of metabolic capacity was conducted-for lactate, the importance of genes in its biosynthetic pathways was evaluated, and the requirements of amino acids were predicted for mixed acid fermentation; for flavor compounds, the effects of oxygen were analyzed, and three new knockout targets were selected for acetoin production; for EPS, 11 types of nutrients in the rich medium and important reactions in the biosynthetic pathway were identified that enhanced EPS production. In conclusion, the iJL846 model serves as a useful tool for understanding and engineering the metabolism of this probiotic strain. PMID:25452194

  2. Low-level laser therapy in the prevention of radiotherapy-induced xerostomia and oral mucositis; Prevencao da xerostomia e da musosite oral induzidas por radioterapia com uso do laser de baixa potencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Carlos de Oliveira [Instituto de Radioterapia do Vale do Paraiba Ltda., Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: colopes@uol.com.br; Mas, Josepa Rigau I. [Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain). Facultat Medicine i la Ciencies Salut; Zangaro, Renato Amaro [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento

    2006-03-15

    Objective: to verify if the use of InGaAIP laser with 685 nm wave length can reduce the xerostomy incidence, the oral mucositis severity and the pain related to mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiotherapy. Objective: sixty patients presenting head and neck carcinoma were submitted to radiotherapy with daily doses of 1.8 to 2.0 Gy and a final dose of 45 to 72 Gy. The salivary volume was evaluated in the first and fifteenth days, at the end of the treatment and after 15 and 30 days. The oral mucositis was evaluated on a weekly basis. Twenty-nine patients were submitted to radiotherapy without laser and 31 were submitted to radiotherapy and laser with daily doses of 2 joules/cm{sup 2} in predetermined areas of the oral mucosa and the parotid and submandibular glands. Results: in the group submitted to radiotherapy and laser the incidence of mucositis (p < 0.001) and pain (p < 0.016) was significantly lower and the salivary volume (p < 0.001) was kept higher during and after the treatment. Conclusion: the group of patients submitted to radiotherapy and laser had lower incidence of xerostomy, oral mucositis and pain when compared to the group treated with radiotherapy without laser, producing statistically significant results. (author)

  3. Gastric mucosal blood flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertechnetate clearance (C/sub Tc/) by the stomach before and after betazole stimulation was compared to regional measurements of gastric blood flow utilizing nuclide (Chromium-51 and Cerium-141)-labeled microspheres in five piglets. Pertechnetate clearance closely correlated (correlation coefficient 0.926) with mucosal blood flow in the gastric corpus measured by the microsphere technique. Betazole increased blood flow in the corpus region by 100 percent but did not alter this relationship. Except in one experiment, microsphere blood flow valves in the antrum and fundus were unchanged by betazole and did not significantly correlate with pertechnetate clearance. Pertechnetate clearance appears to be a reliable method of determining gastric mucosal blood flow in experimental animals and may be considered as a noninvasive method for measuring such flow in humans. (U.S.)

  4. Mucosal SIV vaccines comprising inactivated virus particles and bacterial adjuvants induce CD8+T-regulatory cells that suppress SIV positive CD4+cell activation and prevent SIV infection in the macaque model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Marie eAndrieu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A new paradigm of mucosal vaccination against HIV infection has been investigated in the macaque model. A vaccine consisting of inactivated SIVmac239 particles together with a living bacterial adjuvant (either the Calmette & Guerin bacillus, lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus rhamnosus was administered to macaques via the vaginal or oral/intragastic route. In contrast to all established human and veterinary vaccines, these three vaccine regimens did not elicit SIV-specific antibodies nor cytotoxic T-lymphocytes but induced a previously unrecognized population of non-cytolytic MHCIb/E-restricted CD8+T regulatory cells that suppressed the activation of SIV positive CD4+ T-lymphocytes. SIV reverse transcription was thereby blocked in inactivated CD4+ T-cells; the initial burst of virus replication was prevented and the vaccinated macaques were protected from a challenge infection. Three to 14 months after intragastric immunization, 24 macaques were challenged intrarectally with a high dose of SIVmac239 or with the heterologous strain SIV B670 (both strains grown on macaques PBMC. Twenty-three of these animals were found to be protected for up to 48 months while all 24 control macaques became infected. This protective effect against SIV challenge together with the concomitant identification of a robust ex-vivo correlate of protection suggests a new approach for developing an HIV vaccine in humans. The induction of this new class of CD8+ T regulatory cells could also possibly be used therapeutically for suppressing HIV replication in infected patients and this novel tolerogenic vaccine paradigm may have potential applications for treating a wide range of immune disorders and is likely to may have profound implications across immunology generally.

  5. A MLST Clade 2 Clostridium difficile strain with a variant TcdB induces severe inflammatory and oxidative response associated with mucosal disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cecília Leite; López-Ureña, Diana; de Oliveira Assis, Thiago; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Rupnik, Maja; Wilcox, Mark H; de Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; do Carmo, Anderson Oliveira; Dias, Adriana Abalen Martins; de Carvalho, Cibele Barreto Mano; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Rodríguez, César; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne

    2016-08-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections is highly dynamic as new strains continue to emerge worldwide. Here we present a detailed analysis of a new C. difficile strain (ICC-45) recovered from a cancer patient in Brazil that died from severe diarrhea. A polyphasic approach assigned a new PCR-ribotype and PFGE macrorestriction pattern to strain ICC-45, which is toxigenic (tcdA(+), tcdB(+) and ctdB(+)) and classified as ST41 from MLST Clade 2 and toxinotype IXb. Strain ICC-45 encodes for a variant TcdB that induces a distinct CPE in agreement with its toxinotype. Unlike epidemic NAP1/027 strains, which are also classified to MLST Clade 2, strain ICC-45 is susceptible to fluoroquinolones and does not overproduce toxins TcdA and TcdB. However, supernatants from strain ICC-45 and a NAP1/027 strain produced similar expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, epithelial damage, and oxidative stress response in the mouse ileal loop model. These results highlight inflammation and oxidative stress as common features in the pathogenesis of C. difficile Clade 2 strains. Finally, this work contributes to the description of differences in virulence among various C. difficile strains. PMID:27311833

  6. Evaluating the effectiveness of topical application of natural honey and benzydamine hydrochloride in the management of radiation mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaksharam Jayachandran

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Pure natural honey can be an effective agent in managing radiation induced oral mucositis. Honey could be a simple, potent and inexpensive agent, which is easily available, and it can be a better therapeutic agent in managing radiation mucositis in developing countries like India for the management of this morbidity.

  7. Hydrophobicity of mucosal surface and its relationship to gut barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaofa; Caputo, Francis J; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2008-03-01

    Loss of the gut barrier has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and, thus, understanding the intestinal barrier is of potential clinical importance. An important, but relatively neglected, component of the gut barrier is the unstirred mucus layer, which through its hydrophobic and other properties serves as an important barrier to bacterial and other factors within the gut lumen. Thus, the goal of this study was to establish a reproducible method of measuring mucosal hydrophobicity and test the hypothesis that conditions that decrease mucosal hydrophobicity are associated with increased gut permeability. Hydrophobicity was measured in various segments of normal gut by measuring the contact angle of an aqueous droplet placed on the mucosal surface using a commercial goniometer. Second, the effect of the mucolytic agent N-acetyl cysteine on mucosal hydrophobicity and gut permeability was measured, as was the effects of increasing periods of in vivo gut ischemia on these parameters. Gut ischemia was induced by superior mesenteric artery occlusion, and gut permeability was measured by the mucosal-to-serosal passage of fluoresceine isothiocyanate-dextran (4.3 kDa) (FD4) across the everted sacs of ileum. Intestinal mucosal hydrophobicity showed a gradual increase from the duodenum to the end of the ileum and remained at high level in the cecum, colon, and rectum. Both N-acetyl cysteine treatment and ischemia caused a dose-dependent decrease in mucosal hydrophobicity, which significantly correlated increased gut permeability. Mucosal hydrophobicity of the intestine can be reproducibly measured, and decreases in mucosal hydrophobicity closely correlate with increased gut permeability. These results suggest that mucosal hydrophobicity can be a reliable method of measuring the barrier function of the unstirred mucus layer and a useful parameter in evaluating the pathogenesis of gut barrier dysfunction. PMID:17693944

  8. Parâmetros de produção de leite de búfala fermentado por Lactobacillus casei Production parameters of buffalo milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Puerari Faria

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available O leite de búfala foi fermentado por Lactobacillus casei, com diferentes concentrações de açúcar e tempos de fermentação, e estocado durante 30 dias a 5 e 10°C. Avaliaram-se a acidez, o pH e a viabilidade de L. casei nos diferentes tratamentos. O leite fermentado por 18 horas não apresentou os parâmetros requeridos para o produto, enquanto os fermentados por 22 e 24 horas apresentaram acidez e pH adequados. O tempo e a temperatura de estocagem influenciaram esses parâmetros. A viabilidade de L. casei inicial foi maior que 9 log UFC mL-1 e a final, maior que 8 log UFC mL-1, com influência da acidez.Buffalo milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei was elaborated with different sugar concentrations and fermentation times, and stored during 30 days at 5 and 10°C. Acidity, pH and L. casei viability were evaluated in the different treatments. Milk fermented for 18 hours did not show adequate parameters for this product. Milk fermented for 22 and 24 hours presented adequate acidity and pH. Storage time and temperature influenced these parameters. The L. casei initial viability was greater than 9 log CFU mL-1 and the final was greater than 8 log CFU mL-1, with influence from acidity.

  9. Photobiomodulation reduces oral mucositis by modulating NF-kB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curra, Marina; Pellicioli, Ana Carolina Amorim; Filho, Nélson Alexandre Kretzmann; Ochs, Gustavo; Matte, Úrsula; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate NF-kB during 5-fluorouracil (FU)-induced oral mucositis and ascertain whether photobiomodulation (PBM), as a preventive and/or therapeutic modality, influences this transcription factor. Ninety-six male golden Syrian hamsters were allocated into four groups: control (no treatment); PBM therapeutic, PBM preventive, and PBM combined. Animals received an injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched. Irradiation was carried out using a 660-nm, 40-mW diode laser at 6 J/cm2 during 6 s/point, 0.24 J/point, for a total dose of 1.44 J/day of application. Animals were euthanized on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 (n=6). Buccal mucosa was removed for protein quantification by Western blot. Clinical analysis revealed that PBM groups exhibited less mucositis than controls on day 10. Control animals exhibited lower levels of NF-kB during mucositis development and healing. The preventive and combined protocols were associated with higher NF-kB levels at day 5; however, the therapeutic group had higher levels at days 10 and 15. These findings suggest that the preventive and/or therapeutic PBM protocols reduced the severity of oral mucositis by activating the NF-kB pathway.

  10. Regulation of lactose-phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system and beta-D-phosphogalactoside galactohydrolase activities in Lactobacillus casei.

    OpenAIRE

    Chassy, B. M.; Thompson, J.

    1983-01-01

    The lactose-phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (lac-PTS) and beta-D-phosphogalactoside galactohydrolase (P-beta-gal) mediate the metabolism of lactose by Lactobacillus casei. Starved cells of L. casei contained a high intracellular concentration of phosphoenolpyruvate, and this endogenous energy reserve facilitated characterization of phosphotransferase system activities in physiologically intact cells. Data obtained from transport studies with whole cells and from in vit...

  11. Reversal of airway hyperresponsiveness by induction of airway mucosal CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah H Strickland; Stumbles, Philip A.; Zosky, Graeme R.; Subrata, Lily S.; Thomas, Jenny A.; Turner, Debra J.; Sly, Peter D.; Holt, Patrick G.

    2006-01-01

    An important feature of atopic asthma is the T cell–driven late phase reaction involving transient bronchoconstriction followed by development of airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Using a unique rat asthma model we recently showed that the onset and duration of the aeroallergen-induced airway mucosal T cell activation response in sensitized rats is determined by the kinetics of functional maturation of resident airway mucosal dendritic cells (AMDCs) mediated by cognate interactions with CD4+...

  12. Critical Roles of Intestinal Epithelial Vitamin D Receptor Signaling in Controlling Gut Mucosal Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yan Chun; Chen, Yunzi; Du, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Although vitamin D receptor (VDR) is highly expressed in the intestine, the role of VDR signaling in the gut is not fully understood. Our recent studies unveil a regulatory circuit that centers gut epithelial VDR as a key molecule in the control of mucosal inflammation and colitis development. On the one hand, intestinal epithelial VDR signaling protects the integrity of the mucosal barrier by inhibiting inflammation-induced epithelial cell apoptosis. This barrier-protecting, anti-colitic act...

  13. Dysregulated Circulating Dendritic Cell Function in Ulcerative Colitis Is Partially Restored by Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Mann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dendritic cells regulate immune responses to microbial products and play a key role in ulcerative colitis (UC pathology. We determined the immunomodulatory effects of probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS on human DC from healthy controls and active UC patients. Methods. Human blood DC from healthy controls (control-DC and UC patients (UC-DC were conditioned with heat-killed LcS and used to stimulate allogeneic T cells in a 5-day mixed leucocyte reaction. Results. UC-DC displayed a reduced stimulatory capacity for T cells (P<0.05 and enhanced expression of skin-homing markers CLA and CCR4 on stimulated T cells (P<0.05 that were negative for gut-homing marker β7. LcS treatment restored the stimulatory capacity of UC-DC, reflecting that of control-DC. LcS treatment conditioned control-DC to induce CLA on T cells in conjunction with β7, generating a multihoming profile, but had no effects on UC-DC. Finally, LcS treatment enhanced DC ability to induce TGFβ production by T cells in controls but not UC patients. Conclusions. We demonstrate a systemic, dysregulated DC function in UC that may account for the propensity of UC patients to develop cutaneous manifestations. LcS has multifunctional immunoregulatory activities depending on the inflammatory state; therapeutic effects reported in UC may be due to promotion of homeostasis.

  14. Lactobacillus casei Is Able To Survive and Initiate Protein Synthesis during Its Transit in the Digestive Tract of Human Flora-Associated Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Oozeer, R; Goupil-Feuillerat, N.; Alpert, C A; van de Guchte, M; Anba, J.; Mengaud, J; Corthier, G

    2002-01-01

    Live Lactobacillus casei is present in fermented dairy products and has beneficial properties for human health. In the human digestive tract, the resident flora generally prevents the establishment of ingested lactic acid bacteria, the presence of which is therefore transient. The aim of this work was to determine if L. casei DN-114 001 survives during transit and how this bacterium behaves in the digestive environment. We used the human flora-associated (HFA) mouse model. L. casei DN-114 001...

  15. Voice disorders in mucosal leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Nunes Ruas

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases-Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. RESULTS: 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81% were male and five (19% female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years. The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%, followed by dysphonia (38.5%, odynophagia (30.8% and dysphagia (26.9%. 23 patients (84.6% presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. CONCLUSION: We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some

  16. Topical and mucosal liposomes for vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Eder Lilia; Morilla, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal (and in minor extent transcutanous) stimulation can induce local or distant mucosa secretory IgA. Liposomes and other vesicles as mucosal and transcutaneous adjuvants are attractive alternatives to parenteral vaccination. Liposomes can be massively produced under good manufacturing practices and stored for long periods, at high antigen/vesicle mass ratios. However, their uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APC) at the inductive sites remains as a major challenge. As neurotoxicity is a major concern in intranasal delivery, complexes between archaeosomes and calcium as well as cationic liposomes complexed with plasmids encoding for antigenic proteins could safely elicit secretory and systemic antigen-specific immune responses. Oral bilosomes generate intense immune responses that remain to be tested against challenge, but the admixing with toxins or derivatives is mandatory to reduce the amount of antigen. Most of the current experimental designs, however, underestimate the mucus blanket 100- to 1000-fold thicker than a 100-nm diameter liposome, which has first to be penetrated to access the underlying M cells. Overall, designing mucoadhesive chemoenzymatic resistant liposomes, or selectively targeted to M cells, has produced less relevant results than tailoring the liposomes to make them mucus penetrating. Opposing, the nearly 10 µm thickness stratum corneum interposed between liposomes and underlying APC can be surpassed by ultradeformable liposomes (UDL), with lipid matrices that penetrate up to the limit with the viable epidermis. UDL made of phospholipids and detergents, proved to be better transfection agents than conventional liposomes and niosomes, without the toxicity of ethosomes, in the absence of classical immunomodulators. PMID:21360692

  17. PEMANFAATAN MILK CLOTTING ENZYME DARI Lactobacillus casei D11 UNTUK PEMBUATAN KEJU MOZZARELLA [Utilization of Milk Clotting Enzyme from Lactobacillus casei D11 for Mozzarella Cheese Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohmatussolihat -

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Milk Clotting Enzyme (MCE is an active agent for cheese making which may be produced by Lactic acid bacteria (LAB. MCE activity differs according to the LAB strains used. Lactobacillus casei D11 could produced MCE when it is grown in MRS broth medium. In this study, MCE of L. casei D11 with the addition of rennet is used and optimized for the production of mozzarella cheese using Response Surface Method (RSM with Central Composite Design (CCD. The organoleptic properties were determined by hedonics test involving 30 respondents and analyzed statistically which was followed by a Duncan's test. Furthermore, a proximate analysis of mozzarella cheese was conducted. Our results show that the MCE activity produced by L. casei D11 was 8.471 Soxhlet Unit with protease activity of 3.28 U/mL. The ANOVA results showed that the concentration of MCE significantly influence the production of curd. Theoptimum concentration of MCE and rennet for the production of curd suited for the production of mozzarella cheese were 20 and 0.002%, respectively, with a maximum predicted curd yield of 14.996% (g/100 mL milk which is increased by 13.9% as compared to the curd yield before optimization. The statistical analysis on taste, color, flavor, and cheese texture by respondents shows that mozzarella cheese made by a combination of 15% of MCE and 0.00079 and 0.0015% of rennet, were organoleptically superior to the commercial mozzarella used in this experiment. The proximate analysis shows that mozzarella produced has a moisture content of 33.34%(w/w, 3.48% ash, 30.44% fat, 25.12% protein, 7.53% carbohydrate and energy of 404 kkal/100g.

  18. Efecto de Lactobacillus casei sobre la incidencia de procesos infecciosos en niños/as Effect of lactobacillus casei on the incidence of infectious conditions in children

    OpenAIRE

    J. M.ª Cobo Sanz; J. A. Mateos; A. Muñoz Conejo

    2006-01-01

    Objetivo: Analizar el efecto del consumo continuado de leche fermentada con Lactobacillus casei (DN-114001) (Actimel") sobre la incidencia de los trastornos infecciosos comunes en niños. Ámbito: Población escolar infantil. Sujetos: alumnos de 3 a 12 años de dos centros de educación infantil y primaria de Barcelona. En el estudio participaron un total de 251 niños de ambos sexos. Intervenciones: Se realizó un estudio de intervención nutricional durante 20 semanas con un diseño paralelo, prospe...

  19. Erythropoietin -induced proliferation of gastric mucosal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Kazuro; Sawasaki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Kyoko; Kato, Shingo; Imai, Nobuhiro; Kato, Yoichiro; Shibata, Noriyuki; KOBAYASHI, MAKIO; Moriguchi, Yoshiyuki; Higuchi, Masato; Ishihata, Fumio; Sudoh, Yushi; Miura, Soichiro

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the localization of erythropoietin receptor on gastric specimens and characterize the effects of erythropoietin on the normal gastric epithelial proliferation using a porcine gastric epithelial cell culture model.

  20. Use of {sup 60}Co panoramic source in the induction of oral mucositis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Maira F.; Benetti, Carolina; Zezell, Denise M., E-mail: mairandrade@yahoo.com, E-mail: zezell@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Correa, Luciana, E-mail: lcorrea@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FO/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia

    2013-07-01

    Oral Mucositis is a well-known side effect of chemo-radiotherapy in cancer patients or transplant recipients that could induce hospitalization or impairs therapy in different levels of severity. This study is devoted to define the first steps in the research of low level laser treatments in oral mucositis, proposing a {sup 60}Co radiation to experimentally induce oral mucositis in rats using Panoramic gamma irradiator, simulating usual radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. Fifteen male Wistar rats, above 250g, were irradiated at Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes (IPEN - CNEN/SP) and divided in three experimental groups, with different single doses of radiation (30 Gy, 25 Gy and 20 Gy). The animals were observed for a 20 days period. Animals that received 30 Gy and 25 Gy developed greater severity of mucositis and premature euthanasia was performed in these groups on the 7th and 11th day after the irradiation, respectively. The 20 Gy group developed oral mucositis grading from moderated to severe between the days 7 and 11 after irradiation, with progressive body mass loss and decrease in the intake of food and water. These animals recovered from oral mucositis around the 18th day and clinical remission at the 20th day. The single dose of 20 Gy Gamma radiation proved to be efficient way for inducing oral mucositis in rats, allowing the establishment of an experimental model for oral mucositis in rats for future use on interventions of this serious aspect of radiation therapy, such as laser therapy using different wave lengths and power densities. (author)

  1. Use of 60Co panoramic source in the induction of oral mucositis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral Mucositis is a well-known side effect of chemo-radiotherapy in cancer patients or transplant recipients that could induce hospitalization or impairs therapy in different levels of severity. This study is devoted to define the first steps in the research of low level laser treatments in oral mucositis, proposing a 60Co radiation to experimentally induce oral mucositis in rats using Panoramic gamma irradiator, simulating usual radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. Fifteen male Wistar rats, above 250g, were irradiated at Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes (IPEN - CNEN/SP) and divided in three experimental groups, with different single doses of radiation (30 Gy, 25 Gy and 20 Gy). The animals were observed for a 20 days period. Animals that received 30 Gy and 25 Gy developed greater severity of mucositis and premature euthanasia was performed in these groups on the 7th and 11th day after the irradiation, respectively. The 20 Gy group developed oral mucositis grading from moderated to severe between the days 7 and 11 after irradiation, with progressive body mass loss and decrease in the intake of food and water. These animals recovered from oral mucositis around the 18th day and clinical remission at the 20th day. The single dose of 20 Gy Gamma radiation proved to be efficient way for inducing oral mucositis in rats, allowing the establishment of an experimental model for oral mucositis in rats for future use on interventions of this serious aspect of radiation therapy, such as laser therapy using different wave lengths and power densities. (author)

  2. Comparison of bioactive components in pressurized and pasteurized longan juices fortified with encapsulated Lactobacillus casei 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikham, Pittaya; Apichartsrangkoon, Arunee

    2012-06-01

    In this study, longan juice was subjected to a high pressure of 500 MPa for 30 min and compared with a juice pasteurized at 90°C/2 min. Probiotic Lactobacillus casei 01 was fortified into both juices and the shelf life of these products was studied. Their bioactive components such as ascorbic acid, gallic acid and ellagic acid were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Total phenolic compounds and 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrythydrazyl radical-scavenging activity were determined by colorimetric and spectrophotometric methods. It was found that the pressurized longan juice retained higher amounts of bioactive compounds than the pasteurized juice. In terms of storage stability, bioactive compounds in both processed juices decreased according to the increase in storage time. The survivability of probiotic L. casei 01 in both processed juices declined from 9 to 6 log CFU/mL after 4 weeks of storage.

  3. Metabolism of azo dyes by Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 and effects of various factors on decolorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Takenaka, Shinji; Kuntiya, Ampin; Klayraung, Srikarnjana; Murakami, Shuichiro; Aoki, Kenji

    2007-03-01

    Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 was isolated from soil of a dairy wastewater treatment plant and selected as the most active azo dye degrader of 19 isolates. Growing cells and freely suspended cells of this strain completely degraded methyl orange, thereby decolorizing the medium. The strain stoichiometrically converted methyl orange to N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and 4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, which were identified by HPLC, GC, and GC-MS analyses. The enzyme activity responsible for the cleavage of the azo bond of methyl orange was localized to the cytoplasm of cells grown on modified MRS medium containing methyl orange. The effect of sugars, oligosaccharides, organic acids, metal ions, pHs, oxygen and temperatures on methyl orange decolorization by freely suspended cells was investigated. The optimal conditions for the decolorization of methyl orange by the Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 are incubation at 35 degrees C and pH 6 with sucrose provided as the energy source. PMID:17254626

  4. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF FRESH AND FERMENTED FRUIT JUICES PROBIOTICATED WITH LACTOBACILLUS CASEI

    OpenAIRE

    Bathal Vijaya Kumar; Mannepula Sreedharamurthy; Obulam Vijaya Sarathi Reddy

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find out the suitability of different fruit juices for probiotication by using Lactobacillus casei. Phyto-chemical analysis of different fruit juices (mango, sapota, grape and cantaloupe) were carried out using the standard methods. Carbohydrates, flavoniods, tannins, glycosides were present and alkaloids and saponins were absent in all the above fruit juices. Further analysis by TLC and DPPH methods indicated good antioxidant activity in all the fruit juice...

  5. Optimization of probiotic lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 production using date powder as carbon source

    OpenAIRE

    Shahravy A.; Tabandeh F.; Bambai B.; Zamanizadeh H.R.; Mizani M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to optimize culture conditions for economic production of a probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, in which palm date powder was applied for the first time as a low-cost main carbon source. The effect of eleven factors on bacterial growth was investigated using the Taguchi experimental design, and three factors including palm date powder, tryptone and agitation rate were found to be the most significant parameters. The optimum conditions including da...

  6. Preparation and Purification of Xylitol-5-Phosphate from a Cell Extract of Lactobacillus casei Cl-16

    OpenAIRE

    Trahan, L.; Néron, S.; Bareil, M.

    1988-01-01

    A simple procedure which yields pure xylitol-5-phosphate is described. A cell extract of Lactobacillus casei Cl-16 from a 6-liter culture was used to synthesize up to 70 mg of xylitol-5-phosphate overnight from xylitol and phosphoenolpyruvate via a xylitol phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase system with a 53% yield. Centrifugation, filtration, precipitation as a barium salt, and ion-exchange batch chromatography permitted recovery of nearly 90% of the phosphorylated product synthesized. Th...

  7. Effect of Total Inoculum Size Containing Lactobacillus acidophilus or Lactobacillus casei on Fermentation of Goat Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain the optimum inoculum size of goat milk fermented by probiotics, the total inoculum size containing L. acidophilus or L. casei on pH, acidity and viable counts and sensory during fermentation were studied on the basis of S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus as starter cultures. The results showed as follows: the optimum inoculum size of L. acidophilus or L. casei were all 7% and goat milk was fermented at 39°C for 4.5 h. The pH, acidity, the viable counts of L. acidophilus and the total viable counts were respectively 4.48, 91°T, 1.60×107 cfu/mL and 1.69×109 cfu/mL. The pH, acidity, the viable counts of L. casei and the total viable counts were respectively 4.38, 96°T, 2.80×108 cfu/mL and 2.20×109 cfu/mL.

  8. Lactobacillus strains belonging to Casei group display various adherence to enterocytes and mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Markowicz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The ability of lactobacilli to adhere to the surface of the intestine is an important functional characteristic which can largely determine the effective colonization of the intestinal tract by probiotics. The following study compares the adhesion efficiency of the twenty strains of Lactobacillus genus belonging to Casei group to the Caco-2 cells and gastrointestinal mucus. Material and methods. Twenty isolates of lactobacilli belonging to Casei group were tested. The ability of bacterial cells to adhere to mucus was examined using adhesion assay to gastrointestinal mucus. Obtained results were compared with adhesion efficiency to Caco-2 cells. Phylogenetic relationship between isolates was analysed by rep-PCR. Results. The results showed large differences in adhesion efficiency between strains, as well as differences in the efficiency of adhesion to the intestinal epithelial cells and mucus. Group similarity highlighted by a rep-PCR technique does not correspond with groups of similarity in terms of the characteristics of the ability to adhere to mucus or the epithelial cells of intestinal tract. Conclusions. Strains having a high adhesion efficiency to enterocytes do not always show a high adhesion efficiency to the mucus. This may indicate the presence of different and multiple factors responsible for adhesion efficiency of Lactobacillus group Casei strains to epithelial cells and mucus.

  9. Performance in nondairy drinks of probiotic L. casei strains usually employed in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, Mario; Cárdenas, Pamela; Staffolani, Martín; Ciappini, María C; Vinderola, Gabriel

    2013-05-01

    The increase in vegetarianism as dietary habit and the increased allergy episodes against dairy proteins fuel the demand for probiotics in nondairy products. Lactose intolerance and the cholesterol content of dairy products can also be considered two additional reasons why some consumers are looking for probiotics in other foods. We aimed at determining cell viability in nondairy drinks and resistance to simulated gastric digestion of commercial probiotic lactobacilli commonly used in dairy products. Lactobacillus casei LC-01 and L. casei BGP 93 were added to different commercial nondairy drinks and viability and resistance to simulated gastric digestion (pH 2.5, 90 min, 37 °C) were monitored along storage (5 and 20 °C). For both strains, at least one nondairy drink was found to offer cell counts around 7 log orders until the end of the storage period. Changes in resistance to simulated gastric digestion were observed as well. Commercial probiotic cultures of L. casei can be added to commercial fruit juices after a carefull selection of the product that warrants cell viability. The resistance to simulated gastric digestion is an easy-to-apply in vitro tool that may contribute to product characterization and may help in the choice of the food matrix when no changes in cell viability are observed along storage. Sensorial evaluation is mandatory before marketing since the product type and storage conditions might influence the sensorial properties of the product due to the possibility of growth and lactic acid production by probiotic bacteria. PMID:23527588

  10. Efficacy of benzydamine hydrochloride, chlorhexidine, and povidone iodine in the treatment of oral mucositis among patients undergoing radiotherapy in head and neck malignancies: A drug trail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Roopashri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Oral mucositis is a common and debilitating complication of radiotherapy, which is associated with significant morbidity. It is therefore extremely important that mucositis be prevented, or at least treated to reduce its severity and sequelae. The objective of the study was to manage oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy and to reduce pain by using Benzydamine hydrochloride (0.15%, Chlorhexidine (0.2%, and Povidone iodine (5%. Results: Benzydamine hydrochloride was observed to be effective and delayed the development of severe form of mucositis and appears more efficient in the management of radiation-induced mucositis. Conclusion: Benzydamine hydrochloride (0.15% is safe, well tolerated, helps not just in delaying the progression of mucositis but also reduces the intensity of pain.

  11. Protective Effect of Ssanghwa-Tang Fermented by Lactobacillus Fermentum Against Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Acute Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Eum, Hyun-Ae; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yang, Min-Cheol; Shim, Ki Shuk; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2011-01-01

    Ssanghwa-tang (SHT) is a traditional herbal medicine formula that has been used for the development of physical strength, relief of pain, and the reduction of fatigue. In this study, we fermented SHT with Lactobacillus fermentum (L. fermentum), Lactobacillus gasseri (L.gasseri), or Lactobacillus casei (L.casei) to investigate the hepatoprotective effects of SHT and fermented SHT with Lactobacillus on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury in rats. Rats were given CCl4 (1 ml/kg, 50% ...

  12. Mucosal SIV vaccines comprising inactivated virus particles and bacterial adjuvants induce CD8+T-regulatory cells that suppress SIV positive CD4+cell activation and prevent SIV infection in the macaque model.

    OpenAIRE

    Jean Marie eAndrieu; song echen; Chunhui eLAI; weizhong eguo; Wei eLu

    2014-01-01

    A new paradigm of mucosal vaccination against HIV infection has been investigated in the macaque model. A vaccine consisting of inactivated SIVmac239 particles together with a living bacterial adjuvant (either the Calmette & Guerin bacillus, lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus rhamnosus) was administered to macaques via the vaginal or oral/intragastic route. In contrast to all established human and veterinary vaccines, these three vaccine regimens did not elicit SIV-specific antibodies n...

  13. Mucosal SIV Vaccines Comprising Inactivated Virus Particles and Bacterial Adjuvants Induce CD8+ T-Regulatory Cells that Suppress SIV-Positive CD4+ T-Cell Activation and Prevent SIV Infection in the Macaque Model

    OpenAIRE

    Andrieu, Jean-Marie; Chen, Song; Lai, Chunhui; Guo, Weizhong; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A new paradigm of mucosal vaccination against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been investigated in the macaque model. A vaccine consisting of inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 particles together with a living bacterial adjuvant (either the Calmette and Guerin bacillus, Lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus rhamnosus) was administered to macaques via the vaginal or oral/intragastric route. In contrast to all established human and veterinary vaccines, the...

  14. Oral mucositis and selective elimination of oral flora in head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a double-blind randomised clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Stokman, MA; Spijkervet, FKL; Burlage, FR; Dijkstra, PU; Manson, WL; de Vries, EGE; Roodenburg, JLN

    2003-01-01

    Mucositis is an acute inflammation of the oral mucosa because of radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. All patients receiving radiotherapy in the head and neck region develop oral mucositis. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of selective oral flora elimination on radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis, in a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Sixty-five patients with a malignant tumour in the head and neck regions to be treated with primary curative or postoperative ra...

  15. Efficacy of benzydamine hydrochloride, chlorhexidine, and povidone iodine in the treatment of oral mucositis among patients undergoing radiotherapy in head and neck malignancies: A drug trail

    OpenAIRE

    G Roopashri; Jayanthi, K.; R. Guruprasad

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Oral mucositis is a common and debilitating complication of radiotherapy, which is associated with significant morbidity. It is therefore extremely important that mucositis be prevented, or at least treated to reduce its severity and sequelae. The objective of the study was to manage oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy and to reduce pain by using Benzydamine hydrochloride (0.15%), Chlorhexidine (0.2%), and Povidone iodine (5%). Results: Benzydamine hydrochloride ...

  16. Isolation, Identification and Partial Characterization of a Lactobacillus casei Strain with Bile Salt Hydrolase Activity from Pulque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vázquez, R; Azaola-Espinosa, A; Mayorga-Reyes, L; Reyes-Nava, L A; Shah, N P; Rivera-Espinoza, Y

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate, from pulque, Lactobacillus spp. capable of survival in simulated gastrointestinal stress conditions. Nine Gram-positive rods were isolated; however, only one strain (J57) shared identity with Lactobacillus and was registered as Lactobacillus casei J57 (GenBank accession: JN182264). The other strains were identified as Bacillus spp. The most significant observation during the test of tolerance to simulated gastrointestinal conditions (acidity, gastric juice and bile salts) was that L. casei J57 showed a rapid decrease (p ≤ 0.05) in the viable population at 0 h. Bile salts were the stress condition that most affected its survival, from which deoxycholic acid and the mix of bile salts (oxgall) were the most toxic. L. casei J57 showed bile salt hydrolase activity over primary and secondary bile salts as follows: 44.91, 671.72, 45.27 and 61.57 U/mg to glycocholate, taurocholate, glycodeoxycholate and taurodeoxycholate. In contrast, the control strain (L. casei Shirota) only showed activity over tauroconjugates. These results suggest that L. casei J57 shows potential for probiotic applications. PMID:26566892

  17. Identification and functional characterization of AclB, a novel cell-separating enzyme from Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Wang, Ting; Kong, Jian; Wang, Hui-Li

    2015-06-16

    Autolysis of nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) was favorable for the development of flavor compounds during cheese manufacture. Among these bacteria, Lb. casei was regarded as the most important microbiota involved in cheese processes. In this study, a novel autolysin named AclB was identified in the genome of Lb. casei BL23 and its modular structure was predicted through bioinformatic approaches. Subsequently, its transcription profile in the exponential phase, hydrolytic activities against cell walls, enzymatic properties under different conditions, physiological function via gene inactivation and upregulation assays, as well as potential applications to NSLAB's autolysis were fully investigated. According to the results, AclB was recognized as a species-specific cell-separating enzyme, responsible for cell separation after cell division in Lb. casei BL23. The purified AclB showed considerable hydrolyzing activities towards cell walls, indicating its enzymatic nature as peptidoglycan hydrolase, or autolysin. The highest activity of AclB was determined at pH5.0 and 37°C, and the expression vector constructed based on AclB was shown to facilitate the controlled lysis of Lb. casei BL23 hosts. In summary, this study provided insight into the enzymatic properties of a novel autolysin involved in cell separation of Lb. casei BL23, which is promising to accelerate cheese ripening and improve cheese quality. PMID:25797034

  18. Prevenção da xerostomia e da mucosite oral induzidas por radioterapia com uso do laser de baixa potência Low level laser therapy in the prevention of radiotherapy-induced xerostomia and oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos de Oliveira Lopes

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar se o uso do laser de InGaAlP com comprimento de onda de 685 nm pode reduzir a incidência de xerostomia, gravidade da mucosite oral e da dor associada à mucosite em pacientes portadores de câncer de cabeça e pescoço submetidos a radioterapia. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Sessenta pacientes portadores de carcinoma de cabeça e pescoço foram submetidos a radioterapia com dose diária de 1,8 a 2,0 Gy e dose final de 45 a 72 Gy. O volume salivar foi medido nos dias um, 15, ao final do tratamento e após 15 e 30 dias, e a mucosite oral em avaliações semanais. Vinte e nove pacientes se submeteram a radioterapia sem laser e 31 foram submetidos a radioterapia e laser com dose diária de 2 joules/cm² em pontos pré-determinados da mucosa oral e glândulas parótida e submandibular. RESULTADOS: No grupo submetido a radioterapia e laser, a incidência de mucosite (p OBJECTIVE: To verify if the use of InGaAIP laser with 685 nm wave length can reduce the xerostomy incidence, the oral mucositis severity and the pain related to mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty patients presenting head and neck carcinoma were submitted to radiotherapy with daily doses of 1.8 to 2.0 Gy and a final dose of 45 to 72 Gy. The salivary volume was evaluated in the first and fifteenth days, at the end of the treatment and after 15 and 30 days. The oral mucositis was evaluated on a weekly basis. Twenty-nine patients were submitted to radiotherapy without laser and 31 were submitted to radiotherapy and laser with daily doses of 2 joules/cm² in predetermined areas of the oral mucosa and the parotid and submandibular glands. RESULTS: In the group submitted to radiotherapy and laser the incidence of mucositis (p < 0.001 and pain (p < 0.016 was significantly lower and the salivary volume (p < 0.001 was kept higher during and after the treatment. CONCLUSION: The group of patients submitted to

  19. Evaluation of mucosal and systemic immune responses elicited by GPI-0100- adjuvanted influenza vaccine delivered by different immunization strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    Full Text Available Vaccines for protection against respiratory infections should optimally induce a mucosal immune response in the respiratory tract in addition to a systemic immune response. However, current parenteral immunization modalities generally fail to induce mucosal immunity, while mucosal vaccine delivery often results in poor systemic immunity. In order to find an immunization strategy which satisfies the need for induction of both mucosal and systemic immunity, we compared local and systemic immune responses elicited by two mucosal immunizations, given either by the intranasal (IN or the intrapulmonary (IPL route, with responses elicited by a mucosal prime followed by a systemic boost immunization. The study was conducted in BALB/c mice and the vaccine formulation was an influenza subunit vaccine supplemented with GPI-0100, a saponin-derived adjuvant. While optimal mucosal antibody titers were obtained after two intrapulmonary vaccinations, optimal systemic antibody responses were achieved by intranasal prime followed by intramuscular boost. The latter strategy also resulted in the best T cell response, yet, it was ineffective in inducing nose or lung IgA. Successful induction of secretory IgA, IgG and T cell responses was only achieved with prime-boost strategies involving intrapulmonary immunization and was optimal when both immunizations were given via the intrapulmonary route. Our results underline that immunization via the lungs is particularly effective for priming as well as boosting of local and systemic immune responses.

  20. Evaluation of Mucosal and Systemic Immune Responses Elicited by GPI-0100- Adjuvanted Influenza Vaccine Delivered by Different Immunization Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng; Patil, Harshad P.; de Vries-Idema, Jacqueline; Wilschut, Jan; Huckriede, Anke

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines for protection against respiratory infections should optimally induce a mucosal immune response in the respiratory tract in addition to a systemic immune response. However, current parenteral immunization modalities generally fail to induce mucosal immunity, while mucosal vaccine delivery often results in poor systemic immunity. In order to find an immunization strategy which satisfies the need for induction of both mucosal and systemic immunity, we compared local and systemic immune responses elicited by two mucosal immunizations, given either by the intranasal (IN) or the intrapulmonary (IPL) route, with responses elicited by a mucosal prime followed by a systemic boost immunization. The study was conducted in BALB/c mice and the vaccine formulation was an influenza subunit vaccine supplemented with GPI-0100, a saponin-derived adjuvant. While optimal mucosal antibody titers were obtained after two intrapulmonary vaccinations, optimal systemic antibody responses were achieved by intranasal prime followed by intramuscular boost. The latter strategy also resulted in the best T cell response, yet, it was ineffective in inducing nose or lung IgA. Successful induction of secretory IgA, IgG and T cell responses was only achieved with prime-boost strategies involving intrapulmonary immunization and was optimal when both immunizations were given via the intrapulmonary route. Our results underline that immunization via the lungs is particularly effective for priming as well as boosting of local and systemic immune responses. PMID:23936066

  1. Viability of Lactobacillus casei in chocolate flan and its survival to simulated gastrointestinal conditionsViabilidade de Lactobacillus casei em flan de chocolate e sua sobrevivência em condições gastrintestinais simuladas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Casale Aragon-Alegro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to verify the viability of Lactobacillus casei in chocolate flan as well as its survival under simulated human gastrointestinal conditions. After 1 and 15 days of manufacture, the dessert was evaluated for L. casei population and subsequently submitted to acidic solution for 30, 60, 90 and 120 min and to bile salts solution for 150 min. After each time, L. casei population was evaluated. The results were evaluated by variance analysis (ANOVA and Tukey’s test. The population of L. casei in the flan was above 109 CFU/g during the shelf life, whose value is above the limit established for a probiotic food by the Brazilian legislation. L. casei was relatively resistant to the simulated gastrointestinal conditions tested in this study, once the population reduced during the in vitro tests but remained above 106 CFU/g. Chocolate flan showed to be an excellent food for addition of probiotic microorganisms, especially L. casei, once it was observed high populations in the product even after in vitro resistance tests simulating the human digestive process.Neste trabalho, verificou-se a viabilidade de Lactobacillus casei em flan de chocolate, além de sua sobrevivência em condições que simulam o trato gastrointestinal humano. Após 1 e 15 dias da produção, a população de L. casei presente na sobremesa foi avaliada, e o flan foi submetido, em seguida, a uma solução ácida, durante 30, 60, 90 e 120 minutos, e a uma solução de sais biliares, por um período de 150 minutos. Após cada um desses tempos, a população de L. casei foi observada. Os resultados foram avaliados por meio de análise de variância (ANOVA e teste de Tukey. A população de L. casei no flan foi maior que 109 UFC/g durante a vida de prateleira do produto, valor este, maior que o estabelecido para um alimento probiótico pela legislação brasileira. L. casei mostrou-se relativamente resistente às condições simuladas do trato gastrointestinal

  2. Oral mucositis. A complication of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral mucositis is a complication of head and neck radiotherapy. It is understood what causes the inflammation and what biological tissue changes occur, however, a definite cure for oral mucositis has not yet been found. Supportive treatments, analgesics, antimicrobials and anti-inflammatory agents have been prescribed, none of which has been a thorough measure of treatment. An effective cure for oral mucositis is still in the midst of scientific research. In the interim local palliative treatments will help to alleviate the patients', debilitating symptoms

  3. Bundle Evidence-based Nursing for Patients with Radiation-induced Oral Mucositis%放射性口腔黏膜炎患者的集束化循证护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凤玲; 刘美; 陈凤菊; 曾铁英

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop a bundle clinical nursing pathway for patients with RTOM (radiation-induced oral mucositis). Methods An evidence-based nursing team was established to retrieve and analyze articles on RTOM from The Cochrane Library, JBI, PubMed, CNKI, WANGFANG Database and SinoMed then evidence-based nursing pathway was developed and related training was conducted for nursing staff. Forty-two patients with RTOM receiving evidence-based nursing from December 2014 to June 2015 were included in intervention group and another forty patients from May to November 2014 in control group. Symptoms of patients in both groups were compared. Results In terms of decreasing of body mass, duration of symptoms, oral pain, xerostomia, feeding disturbance and sleep quality, patients in intervention group performed better and the difference was statistical significant ( P<0.05). Conclusion Bundle evidence-based nursing plays a significant role in clinical nursing and comprehensive nursing with evidences foster the efficiency of nursing and the improvement of patients comfort.%目的:形成一种集束化的临床护理路径为放射性口腔黏膜炎患者提供优质的护理。方法建立循证护理专家团队,检索The Cochrane Library、JBI、PubMed、中国知网、万方数据库和中国生物医学文献数据库等关于放射性口腔黏膜炎护理干预的相关文献,并进行评价、整理和归类,制定放射性口腔黏膜炎的循证护理实践路径,对相关人员进行培训,应用于临床实践。将2014年12月—2015年6月运用循证护理实践路径的42例放射性口腔黏膜炎患者作为干预组,2014年5—11月未纳入循证实践流程的40例患者作为对照组,比较2组患者相关症状。结果干预组患者在体质量下降、症状持续时间、口腔疼痛、口腔干燥、进食困扰、睡眠受损方面均显著优于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论循证护理

  4. Polaprezinc prevents oral mucositis associated with radiochemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tomoko; Ishihara, Masashi; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Mizuta, Keisuke; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2010-10-15

    Oral mucositis is frequent but serious adverse event associated with radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy in head and neck cancer severely impairs health-related quality of life, leading to poor prognosis due to discontinuation of the therapy. Although a number of compounds have been tested for prophylaxis of oral mucositis, few of them are satisfactory. We investigated the effect of polaprezinc (zinc L-carnosine), a gastric mucosal protective drug, on radiochemotherapy-induced oral mucositis, pain, xerostomia and taste disturbance in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients were randomly assigned to receive polaprezinc (n = 16) or azulene oral rinse as the control (n = 15). The incidence rates of mucositis, pain, xerostomia and taste disturbance were all markedly lower in polaprezinc group than in control. Moreover, the use of analgesics was significantly (p = 0.003) less frequent and the amount of food intake was significantly (p = 0.002) higher in polaprezinc group than in control. On the other hand, tumor response rate in patients with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy was not significantly affected by polaprezinc, in which the response rate (complete plus partial response) was 88% for polaprezinc and 92% for control (p = 1.000). Therefore, it is highly assumable that polaprezinc is potentially useful for prevention of oral mucositis and improvement of quality of life without reducing the tumor response. PMID:20104529

  5. Mucosal effects of tenofovir 1% gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, Florian; Burgener, Adam; Ballweber, Lamar; Gottardo, Raphael; Vojtech, Lucia; Fourati, Slim; Dai, James Y; Cameron, Mark J; Strobl, Johanna; Hughes, Sean M; Hoesley, Craig; Andrew, Philip; Johnson, Sherri; Piper, Jeanna; Friend, David R; Ball, T Blake; Cranston, Ross D; Mayer, Kenneth H; McElrath, M Juliana; McGowan, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Tenofovir gel is being evaluated for vaginal and rectal pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV transmission. Because this is a new prevention strategy, we broadly assessed its effects on the mucosa. In MTN-007, a phase-1, randomized, double-blinded rectal microbicide trial, we used systems genomics/proteomics to determine the effect of tenofovir 1% gel, nonoxynol-9 2% gel, placebo gel or no treatment on rectal biopsies (15 subjects/arm). We also treated primary vaginal epithelial cells from four healthy women with tenofovir in vitro. After seven days of administration, tenofovir 1% gel had broad-ranging effects on the rectal mucosa, which were more pronounced than, but different from, those of the detergent nonoxynol-9. Tenofovir suppressed anti-inflammatory mediators, increased T cell densities, caused mitochondrial dysfunction, altered regulatory pathways of cell differentiation and survival, and stimulated epithelial cell proliferation. The breadth of mucosal changes induced by tenofovir indicates that its safety over longer-term topical use should be carefully monitored. PMID:25647729

  6. [Prevention and treatment of mucositis in children with oral cancers: Practical recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bousaadani, A; Eljahd, L; Abada, R; Rouadi, S; Roubal, M; Mahtar, M

    2016-05-01

    Oral mucositis is an inflammation of the mucosa of the oral cavity of various etiologies. This is a common and debilitating complication in children treated with chemoradiotherapy for cancer. Its management remains a major concern both for the doctor than the patient. It affects the quality of life of patients and families. It may initiate the functional and vital prognosis because of the judgment of cancer treatment. Several treatment options are available, but there is no clear consensus therapeutic especially for the pediatric population. We have identified, through a comprehensive literature search indexed publications on this subject in order to review the pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches that have been used to prevent and treat oral mucositis. Thus, current recommendations for the management of oral mucositis are very limited, and therefore the standard of care for this complication was palliative. In recent years several studies have revealed that the use of low-energy laser was particularly interesting in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced or chemically induced mucositis. It significantly reduces the pain, the severity and duration of the ulcer by promoting wound healing. Randomized controlled trials with a large number of patients are expected to establish preventive and therapeutic protocols. Treatment with low power laser, known devoid of side effects, is a very promising oncology care to support radio-induced mucositis and chemotherapy. PMID:27032624

  7. Exploiting Mucosal Immunity for Antiviral Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-20

    Mucosal surfaces provide a remarkably effective barrier against potentially dangerous pathogens. Therefore, enhancing mucosal immunity through vaccines-strengthening that first line of defense-holds significant promise for reducing the burden of viral diseases. The large and varied class of viral pathogens, however, continues to present thorny challenges to vaccine development. Two primary difficulties exist: Viruses exhibit a stunning diversity of strategies for evading the host immune response, and even when we understand the nature of effective immune protection against a given virus, eliciting that protection is technically challenging. Only a few mucosal vaccines have surmounted these obstacles thus far. Recent developments, however, could greatly improve vaccine design. In this review, we first sketch out our understanding of mucosal immunity and then compare the herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and influenza virus to illustrate the distinct challenges of developing successful vaccines and to outline potential solutions. PMID:27168245

  8. Effect of ageing on colonic mucosal regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferenc Sipos; Katalin Leiszter; Zsolt Tulassay

    2011-01-01

    The physiologic and pathologic cellular and molecular changes occurring with age in the human colon affect both the inflammatory process leading to mucosal injury and the regenerative capacity of the epithelium. On the one hand, age-related telomere shortening and inflamm-ageing may lead to the development of colonic inflammation, which results in epithelial damage. On the other hand, the altered migration and function of regenerative stem cells, the age-related methylation of mucosal healing-associated genes, together with the alterations of growth factor signaling with age, may be involved in delayed mucosal regeneration. The connections of these alterations to the process of ageing are not fully known. The understanding and customtailored modification of these mechanisms are of great clinical importance with regard to disease prevention and modern therapeutic strategies. Here, we aim to summarize the age-related microscopic and molecular changes of the human colon, as well as their role in altered mucosal healing.

  9. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M Colombo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last twenty years we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacterias, archeas and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: i the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and ii the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  10. A DNA prime-oral Listeria boost vaccine in rhesus macaques induces a SIV-specific CD8 T cell mucosal response characterized by high levels of α4β7 integrin and an effector memory phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Neeson, Paul; Boyer, Jean; Kumar, Sanjeev; Lewis, Mark G.; Veazey, Lennox MattiasRon; Weiner, David; Paterson, Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    In this study in Rhesus macaques, we tested whether IL-12 or IL-15 in a DNA prime-oral Listeria boost amplifies the SIV-Gag specific CD8 mucosal response. SIV-specific CD8 T cells were demonstrated in the peripheral blood (PB) in all test vaccine groups, but not the control group. SIV Gag-specific CD8 T cells in the PB expressed α4β7 integrin, the gut-homing receptor; a minor subset co-express αEβ7 integrin. SIV Gag-specific CD8 T cells were also detected in the gut tissue, intraepithelial (I...

  11. Primary Mucosal Melanoma: Uncommonly Described Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Yadav

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of rarity and clinical challenges arising from different anatomic location, our understanding of optimal management of mucosal melanoma remains limited. The most common sites for primary mucosal melanoma are head and neck followed by anorectal, and vulvovaginal regions. Data are limited but improved understanding has led to change in management from more radical excision to conservative surgery with negative margins. We try to summarize available evidences for management this uncommonly described entity.

  12. Establishment of a Single Dose Radiation Model of Oral Mucositis in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy to the head and neck area, is a common acute complication and is considered as the most severe symptom for cancer patients in the early stages of treatment. This study was proposed to establish the oral mucositis mouse model induced by a single dose of radiation for the facility of testing therapeutic candidates which can be used for the oral mucositis treatments. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: control, 16 Gy, 18 Gy, and 20 Gy. Oral mucositis was induced by a single dose of radiation to the head and neck using 6 MV x-Ray from linear accelerator. After irradiation, body weight and physical abnormalities were checked daily. Tongue tissues from all groups were taken on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 14, respectively and H and E staining was conducted to examine morphological changes. Results: Body weight dramatically decreased after day 5 in all irradiated mice. In the 16 Gy treatment group, body weight was recovered on day 14. The histology data showed that the thickness of the epithelial cell layer was decreased by the accumulated time after radiation treatment, up to day 9. Severe ulceration was revealed on day 9. Conclusion: A single dose of 16 Gy is sufficient dose to induce oral mucositis in Balb/C mice. Significant changes were observed in the Balb/C mice on days 7 and 9 after radiation. It is suggested that this mouse model might be a useful standard tool for studying oral mucositis induced by radiation

  13. Establishment of a Single Dose Radiation Model of Oral Mucositis in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seung Hee; Moon, Soo Young; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Song, Si Yeol; Park, Jin Hong; Noh, Young Ju; Lee, Sang Wook [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy to the head and neck area, is a common acute complication and is considered as the most severe symptom for cancer patients in the early stages of treatment. This study was proposed to establish the oral mucositis mouse model induced by a single dose of radiation for the facility of testing therapeutic candidates which can be used for the oral mucositis treatments. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: control, 16 Gy, 18 Gy, and 20 Gy. Oral mucositis was induced by a single dose of radiation to the head and neck using 6 MV x-Ray from linear accelerator. After irradiation, body weight and physical abnormalities were checked daily. Tongue tissues from all groups were taken on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 14, respectively and H and E staining was conducted to examine morphological changes. Results: Body weight dramatically decreased after day 5 in all irradiated mice. In the 16 Gy treatment group, body weight was recovered on day 14. The histology data showed that the thickness of the epithelial cell layer was decreased by the accumulated time after radiation treatment, up to day 9. Severe ulceration was revealed on day 9. Conclusion: A single dose of 16 Gy is sufficient dose to induce oral mucositis in Balb/C mice. Significant changes were observed in the Balb/C mice on days 7 and 9 after radiation. It is suggested that this mouse model might be a useful standard tool for studying oral mucositis induced by radiation.

  14. Ingeniería metabólica y desarrollos fermentativos en Lactobacillus casei.

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Martínez, Gaspar

    2005-01-01

    Con el fin de diseñar procedimientos para el aprovechamiento biotecnológico de la lactosa, el principal contaminante del lactosuero, nuestro laboratorio ha desarrollado una herramienta para la inserción de genes metabólicos, por recombinación, en el operón de la lactosa de L. casei. Las cepas resultantes presentan una inserción “limpia”, es decir que no poseen genes de resistencia a antibióticos (grado alimentario) y, además, expresan los genes de interés de forma coordinada con los genes de ...

  15. Batch production of L(+) lactic acid from whey by Lactobacillus casei (NRRL B-441)

    OpenAIRE

    Büyükkileci, Ali Oğuz; Harsa, Hayriye Şebnem

    2004-01-01

    The effects of temperature, pH, and medium composition on lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei were investigated. The highest lactic acid productivity values were obtained at 37 °C and pH 5.5. The productivity was 1.87 g dm-3 h-1 at 37 °C in shake flasks. In the fermenter, a productivity of 3.97 g dm-3 h-1 was obtained at pH 5.5. The most appropriate yeast extract concentration was 5.0 g dm-3. Whey yielded a higher productivity value than the analytical lactose and glucose. Initial w...

  16. Mucosal priming of newborn mice with S. Typhi Ty21a expressing anthrax protective antigen (PA) followed by parenteral PA-boost induces B and T cell-mediated immunity that protects against infection bypassing maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Karina; Ditamo, Yanina; Galen, James E; Baillie, Les W J; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2010-08-23

    The currently licensed anthrax vaccine has several limitations and its efficacy has been proven only in adults. Effective immunization of newborns and infants requires adequate stimulation of their immune system, which is competent but not fully activated. We explored the use of the licensed live attenuated S. Typhi vaccine strain Ty21a expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen [Ty21a(PA)] followed PA-alum as a strategy for immunizing the pediatric population. Newborn mice primed with a single dose of Ty21a(PA) exhibited high frequencies of mucosal IgA-secreting B cells and IFN-gamma-secreting T cells during the neonatal period, none of which was detected in newborns immunized with a single dose of PA-alum. Priming with Ty21a(PA) followed by PA-boost resulted in high levels of PA-specific IgG, toxin neutralizing and opsonophagocytic antibodies and increased frequency of bone marrow IgG plasma cells and memory B cells compared with repeated immunization with PA-alum alone. Robust B and T cell responses developed even in the presence of maternal antibodies. The prime-boost protected against systemic and respiratory infection. Mucosal priming with a safe and effective S. Typhi-based anthrax vaccine followed by PA-boost could serve as a practical and effective prophylactic approach to prevent anthrax early in life. PMID:20619377

  17. Neurotoxic Effects of Dichlorophenyl Methylsulphones Related to Olfactory Mucosal Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsson, Carina

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with the highly potent olfactory mucosa toxicant 2,6-dichlorophenyl methylsulphone (2,6-diClPh-MeSO2) and its non-toxic 2,5-chlorinated isomer (2,5-diClPh-MeSO2). In mice, both substances bind firmly in the olfactory mucosa and the olfactory bulb, which are important components of the sensory system. The 2,6-isomer induces olfactory mucosal necrosis with permanent loss of olfactory neuroepithelium and olfactory nerves. A major objective was to clarify the cause of this isome...

  18. Evaluation of low-level laser therapy in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced mucositis%低能量激光照射治疗对肿瘤患者放化疗后口腔黏膜炎的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王传杰; 杨颖

    2016-01-01

    目的:观察低能量激光照射治疗对肿瘤患者放化疗后口腔黏膜炎的预防作用。方法:肿瘤科放化疗患者60例,用数字随机表法随机分为实验组(n=30)和对照组(n=30),两组患者放化疗方案根据肿瘤科方案进行,口腔护理采用相同的标准进行,实验组进行低能量激光照射,每天1次,每周5次,对照组无低能量激光照射,两组患者分别与实验开始后1、2、3、4周由口腔医师检查患者口腔黏膜炎严重程度及疼痛程度,进行评定。结果:实验组患者口腔黏膜炎的严重程度和疼痛程度较对照组明显降低,口腔黏膜炎3级、4级发生率两组间差异均有统计学意义。结论:低能量激光照射对肿瘤患者放化疗后的口腔黏膜炎具有明显的预防作用。%Objective: To investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy in the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis. Method: A total of 60 tumor patients with the treatment of radiation and chemotherapy were randomly assigned to two groups. The treatment group(n=30) were used low-level laser therapy one time a day, five times a week. The control group(n=30) were without low-level laser therapy. Both the patients in the two groups with the experimental began after 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks were assessed by professional oral physician for the serious and pain degree of oral mucositis. Result: The severity of the experimental group patients with mucositis and pain levels significantly lower than the control group. There were statistically significant difference in the incidence of mucositis level 3 and level 4, respectively. Conlusion: Low-level laser therapy has obvious effect to prevent the chemotherapy-induced mucositis of tumor patients.

  19. Prophylaxis with povidone-iodine against induction of oral mucositis by radiochemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamietz, I A; Rahn, R; Böttcher, H D; Schäfer, V; Reimer, K; Fleischer, W

    1998-07-01

    Oral mucositis is a frequent complication of radiochemotherapy. The origin of radiation-induced mucosal lesions is iatrogenic in nature, although further development of mucositis is essentially influenced by infection. It can be assumed that disinfection measures should decrease the severity of mucositis induced by radiochemotherapy. Therefore, in a prospective randomised study the efficacy of prophylactic oral rinsing with a disinfection agent was investigated. A randomised, prospective comparative trial was conducted with 40 patients undergoing radiochemotherapy of the head and neck region because of malignant disease. The treatment scheme consisted of irradiation to the tumour region and adjacent lymph nodes, with a total dose of 71.3 Gy, and simultaneous chemotherapy with carboplatin (60 mg/m2) on days 1-5 and 29-34. In all patients mucositis prophylaxis with nystatin, rutosides, panthenol and immunoglobulin was undertaken. In addition, 20 patients rinsed the oral cavity 4 times daily with povidone-iodine solution, while the group for comparison rinsed with sterile water. Clinical examination of the oral mucosa was performed weekly. Onset, grading and duration of mucositis were used as the main variables. Clinically manifest oral mucositis was observed in 14 patients in the iodine group (mean grading: 1.0) and in all 20 patients in the control group (mean grading: 3.0). The total duration (mean) of clinically observed mucositis was 2.75 weeks in treatment patients and 9.25 weeks in control patients. Median AUC (area under curve for grade vs duration) was 2.5 in the iodine rinsing patients and 15.75 in control patients. All differences found between the two groups were statistically significant. Increased iodine incorporation was not observed. A pathologic rise in thyroid hormone levels was not found in the iodine group. The results obtained indicate that incidence, severity and duration of radiochemotherapy-induced mucositis can be significantly reduced by oral

  20. Inside the mucosal immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry R McGhee

    Full Text Available An intricate network of innate and immune cells and their derived mediators function in unison to protect us from toxic elements and infectious microbial diseases that are encountered in our environment. This vast network operates efficiently by use of a single cell epithelium in, for example, the gastrointestinal (GI and upper respiratory (UR tracts, fortified by adjoining cells and lymphoid tissues that protect its integrity. Perturbations certainly occur, sometimes resulting in inflammatory diseases or infections that can be debilitating and life threatening. For example, allergies in the eyes, skin, nose, and the UR or digestive tracts are common. Likewise, genetic background and environmental microbial encounters can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs. This mucosal immune system (MIS in both health and disease is currently under intense investigation worldwide by scientists with diverse expertise and interests. Despite this activity, there are numerous questions remaining that will require detailed answers in order to use the MIS to our advantage. In this issue of PLOS Biology, a research article describes a multi-scale in vivo systems approach to determine precisely how the gut epithelium responds to an inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, given by the intravenous route. This article reveals a previously unknown pathway in which several cell types and their secreted mediators work in unison to prevent epithelial cell death in the mouse small intestine. The results of this interesting study illustrate how in vivo systems biology approaches can be used to unravel the complex mechanisms used to protect the host from its environment.

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Interleukin 1β Up-Regulate Gastric Mucosal Fas Antigen Expression in Helicobacter pylori Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, JeanMarie; Macera-Bloch, Lisa S.; Harrison, Lawrence; Kim, Kyung H.; Korah, Reju M.

    2000-01-01

    Fas-mediated gastric mucosal apoptosis is gaining attention as a cause of tissue damage due to Helicobacter pylori infection. We explored the effects of H. pylori directly, and the effects of the inflammatory environment established subsequent to H. pylori infection, on Fas-mediated apoptosis in a nontransformed gastric mucosal cell line (RGM-1). Exposure to H. pylori-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), but not H. pylori itself, induced Fas antigen (Fas Ag) expression, indic...

  2. The effect of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei L. casei W8® on blood levels of triacylglycerol is independent of colonisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, A.T.; Sørensen, M.B.; Krych, L.;

    2015-01-01

    group); whether L. casei W8 consumption affected GM composition as determined by 16S rRNA gene targeted 454/FLX amplicon sequencing; and whether these changes were associated with changes in TAG concentration and SCD1 activity. Faecal samples were collected at baseline, after four weeks supplementation...... and two weeks after the supplementation was ended, and fasting blood samples were collected at baseline and after 4 weeks. Four weeks supplementation with L. casei W8 did not affect the overall composition of the GM; however, an increase in the relative abundance of the L. casei group from 8...

  3. Simultaneous chromate reduction and azo dye decolourization by Brevibacterium casei: Azo dye as electron donor for chromate reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Tsz Wai; Cai Qinhong [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Wong, Chong-Kim [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Environmental Science Programme, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Chow, Alex T. [Department of Biosystems Engineering, Clemson University, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Clemson University, SC 29634 (United States); Wong, Po-Keung, E-mail: pkwong@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Environmental Science Programme, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong)

    2010-10-15

    Chromate [Cr(VI)] and azo dyes are common pollutants which may co-exist in some industrial effluents. Hence studies of biological treatment of industrial wastewater should include investigation of the co-removal of these two pollutants. Brevibacterium casei, which can reduce Cr(VI) in the presence of the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) under nutrient-limiting condition, was isolated from a sewage sludge sample of a dyeing factory. Response surface methodology, which is commonly used to optimize growth conditions for food microorganisms to maximize product(s) yield, was used to determine the optimal conditions for chromate reduction and dye decolourization by B. casei. The optimal conditions were 0.24 g/L glucose, 3.0 g/L (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.2 g/L peptone at pH 7 and 35 deg. C. The predicted maximum chromate reduction efficiencies and dye decolourization were 83.4 {+-} 0.6 and 40.7 {+-} 1.7%, respectively. A new mechanism was proposed for chromate reduction coupling with AO7 decolourization by B. casei. Under nutrient-limiting condition, AO7 was used as an e{sup -} donor by the reduction enzyme(s) of B. casei for the reduction of Cr(VI). The resulted Cr(III) then complexed with the oxidized AO7 to form a purple coloured intermediate.

  4. Simultaneous chromate reduction and azo dye decolourization by Brevibacterium casei: Azo dye as electron donor for chromate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromate [Cr(VI)] and azo dyes are common pollutants which may co-exist in some industrial effluents. Hence studies of biological treatment of industrial wastewater should include investigation of the co-removal of these two pollutants. Brevibacterium casei, which can reduce Cr(VI) in the presence of the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) under nutrient-limiting condition, was isolated from a sewage sludge sample of a dyeing factory. Response surface methodology, which is commonly used to optimize growth conditions for food microorganisms to maximize product(s) yield, was used to determine the optimal conditions for chromate reduction and dye decolourization by B. casei. The optimal conditions were 0.24 g/L glucose, 3.0 g/L (NH4)2SO4 and 0.2 g/L peptone at pH 7 and 35 deg. C. The predicted maximum chromate reduction efficiencies and dye decolourization were 83.4 ± 0.6 and 40.7 ± 1.7%, respectively. A new mechanism was proposed for chromate reduction coupling with AO7 decolourization by B. casei. Under nutrient-limiting condition, AO7 was used as an e- donor by the reduction enzyme(s) of B. casei for the reduction of Cr(VI). The resulted Cr(III) then complexed with the oxidized AO7 to form a purple coloured intermediate.

  5. Effect of gastrointestinal application of probiotic Lactobacillus casei/paracasei strains on bacteria translocation and cytokine production

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozáková, Hana; Witoslaw, U.; Rosiak, I.; Czarnowska, E.; Klewicka, E.; Motyl, I.; Sližewska, K.; Libudzisz, Z.; Cukrowska, B.

    Krakow : MidMad, 2005, s. 25-26. [European Confference on Probiotic s and Their Applications. Krakow (PL), 06.10.2005-08.10.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/05/2249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : lactobacillus casei * probiotic s Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  6. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study of chlorhexidine prophylaxis for 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis with nonblinded randomized comparison to oral cooling (cryotherapy) in gastrointestinal malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, T.; Bork, E.; Damstrup, L.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose was to evaluate prevention of oral mucositis (OM) using chlorhexidine compared with placebo and with oral cooling (cryotherapy) during fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy in gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. METHODS: Patients with previously untreated GI cancer receiving...... bolus 5-FU/leucovorin chemotherapy were randomized to chlorhexidine mouthrinse 3 times a day for 3 weeks (Arm A), double-blind placebo (normal saline) with the same dose and frequency (Arm B), or cryotherapy with crushed ice 45 minutes during chemotherapy (Arm C). Patients self-reported on severity (CTC...... in Arm B (33%) than in A (13%, P< .01) and C (11%, P< .005). Duration was significantly longer in B than in both A (P= .035) and C (P= .003). CONCLUSIONS: The frequency and duration of OM are significantly improved by prophylactic chlorhexidine and by cryotherapy. The latter is easy and inexpensive...

  7. Enhancement of Mucosal Immunogenicity of Viral Vectored Vaccines by the NKT Cell Agonist Alpha-Galactosylceramide as Adjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailbala Singh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene-based vaccination strategies, specifically viral vectors encoding vaccine immunogens are effective at priming strong immune responses. Mucosal routes offer practical advantages for vaccination by ease of needle-free administration, and immunogen delivery at readily accessible oral/nasal sites to efficiently induce immunity at distant gut and genital tissues. However, since mucosal tissues are inherently tolerant for induction of immune responses, incorporation of adjuvants for optimal mucosal vaccination strategies is important. We report here the effectiveness of alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, a synthetic glycolipid agonist of natural killer T (NKT cells, as an adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of vaccine antigens delivered using viral vectors by mucosal routes in murine and nonhuman primate models. Significant improvement in adaptive immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues was observed by including α-GalCer adjuvant for intranasal immunization of mice with vesicular stomatitis virus vector encoding the model antigen ovalbumin and adenoviral vectors expressing HIV env and Gag antigens. Activation of NKT cells in systemic and mucosal tissues along with significant increases in adaptive immune responses were observed in rhesus macaques immunized by intranasal and sublingual routes with protein or adenovirus vectored antigens when combined with α-GalCer adjuvant. These results support the utility of α-GalCer adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of mucosal vaccines delivered using viral vectors.

  8. Treatment for Cancer Patients with Oral Mucositis: Assessment Based on the Mucositis Study Group of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer in International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) in 2013 and Proposal of Possible Novel Treatment with a Japanese Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, Kanako; Ueno, Takao; Yatsuoka, Wakako; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    The cancer patients who received chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplant and terminal care often have a wide range of stomatitis, which induces severe pain and limits fundamental life behaviors such as "eating, drinking and talking". In addition, oral mucositis frequently leads to systemic infection through opportunistic microorganisms, which causes extension of hospitalization. Severe oral mucositis often causes cancer patients to partially or completely discontinue/modify cancer therapy regimen, which adversely affects the curative effects of cancer. Therefore, the control of oral mucositis is important and indispensable for improvement of quality of life and prognosis. In this review, we introduce recent trends of the oral mucositis management in cancer patients, according to the following sentences; 1) pathophysiological mechanisms of oral mucositis, 2) assessment, 3) risk factors, 4) prevention and treatment, and 5) development of novel therapy for oral mucositis. PMID:26891806

  9. The influence of food, beverages and NSAIDs on gastric acid secretion and mucosal integrity.

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, W L

    1996-01-01

    Gastric acid secretion is stimulated by all foods, especially proteins, and many beverages, the most potent beverages are milk and fermented substances such as beer and wine. The effects of food on mucosal integrity have been little studied, whereas non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are well known to induce tissue injury.

  10. Morphine mouthwash for the management of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sarvizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Topical morphine is more effective and more satisfactory to patients than the magic mouthwash in reducing severity of cancer treatment-induced oral mucositis. More studies with larger sample size and longer follow-up are required in this regard.

  11. A pilot study of the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients during x-radiation therapy: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in reduction of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients who were going to be irradiated with a total dose of 50-70 Gy for head and neck malignancies were included in the study. After the second week of radiotherapy, with the experience of oral pain, GM-CSF 400 μg was administered locally, once a day, until completion of radiotherapy. Patients were evaluated weekly for mucosal reaction and functional impairment. Results: Three patients with gross and functional mucositis grade I after the second week, completed the planned radiotherapy showing mucositis grade I. Eleven patients who experienced, after 2 weeks of radiotherapy, mucositis grade II and III, presented after the third week with gross mucositis grade I and II and functional impairment grade I. One of these 11 patients was then lost to follow-up and the remaining 10 completed their planned radiotherapy having an almost asymptomatic mucositis grade I. The 15th patient with gross mucositis grade III after the 2 weeks of radiotherapy, had a 2-day interruption because of painful mucositis and then continued and completed radiotherapy with gross and functional mucositis grade I. The 16th patient with mucositis grade III after the second week, did not show any improvement, and completed her planned radiotherapy with mucositis grade III which finally healed after the administration of acyclovir. The last, 17th patient discontinued radiotherapy at the third week because of mucositis grade IV and severe ulceration in apposition to an extensive gold prosthesis. Conclusion: The local administration of GM-CSF significantly reduced and almost healed radiation-induced oral mucositis in 14 of 17 patients during the radiotherapy, which was completed within the preplanned time and without any significant patient weight loss or functional impairment

  12. Self-adjuvanting modular virus-like particles for mucosal vaccination against group A streptococcus (GAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Hernandez, Tania; Hartas, Jon; Wu, Yang; Chuan, Yap P; Lua, Linda H L; Good, Michael; Batzloff, Michael R; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2013-04-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a wide range of diseases, some of them related to autoimmune diseases triggered by repeated GAS infections. Despite the fact that GAS primarily colonizes the mucosal epithelium of the pharynx, the main mechanism of action of most vaccine candidates is based on development of systemic antibodies that do not cross-react with host tissues, neglecting the induction of mucosal immunity that could potentially block disease transmission. Peptide antigens from GAS M-surface protein can confer protection against infection; however, translation of such peptides into immunogenic mucosal vaccines that can be easily manufactured remains a challenge. In this work, a modular murine polyomavirus (MuPyV) virus-like particle (VLP) was engineered to display a GAS antigenic peptide, J8i. Heterologous modules containing one or two J8i antigen elements were integrated with the MuPyV VLP, and produced using microbial protein expression, standard purification techniques and in vitro VLP assembly. Both modular VLPs, when delivered intranasally to outbred mice without adjuvant, induced significant titers of J8i-specific IgG and IgA antibodies, indicating significant systemic and mucosal responses, respectively. GAS colonization in the throats of mice challenged intranasally was reduced in these immunized mice, and protection against lethal challenge was observed. This study shows that modular MuPyV VLPs prepared using microbial synthesis have potential to facilitate cost-effective vaccine delivery to remote communities through the use of mucosal immunization. PMID:23422147

  13. Mutants of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin and cholera toxin as mucosal adjuvants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Qiang; CAI Shaoxi; ZOU Quanming

    2003-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination has been getting more and more recognition because of its compliance and low risk of spreading infectious disease by contaminated syringes used in subcutaneous immunization. However, most vaccines are unable to induce immune responses when given mucosally, and require the use of strong adjuvant for effective delivery systems. Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and Cholera toxin(CT) are powerful mucosal adjuvants when co-administered with soluble antigens. But high toxicity hampers their use in humans. Thanks to the fine knowledge of the structure-function relationship of LT and CT, many nontoxic or low toxic mutants have been generated, part of them retain high adjuvanticity of mucosal immunization. Among these mutants, LTS63K, LTA72R, LTR192G and CTE29H, CTE112K have been widely investigated. LTS63K and CTE112K are fully non toxic, whereas LTA72R and CTE29H are low toxic, and LTR192G is nontoxic in vitro(it remains the same toxicity as wild type LT in vivo). These mutants are extremely active as mucosal adjuvants when co-administrated with a variety of antigens in different animal models. They will be investigated more widely and deeply in the future. Some of them will be tested soon in human bodies.

  14. Iron Regulatory Proteins Control a Mucosal Block to Intestinal Iron Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Galy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated “mucosal block.” We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin “mucosal block” and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  15. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chaveli-López, Begonya; Bagán-Sebastián, José V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the bool...

  16. Oral mucositis in myelosuppressive cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, J B; Schubert, M M

    1999-09-01

    Because the etiology of mucositis is multifactorial , approaches to prevention and management have also been multifactorial. Effective prevention and management of mucositis will reduce the pain and suffering experienced during cancer treatment. Oropharyngeal pain in cancer patients frequently requires systemic analgesics, adjunctive medications, physical therapy, and psychologic therapy in addition to oral care and topical treatments. Good oral hygiene reduces the severity of oral mucositis and does not increase the risk of bacteremia. Current approaches to management include frequent oral rinsing with saline or bicarbonate rinses, maintaining excellent oral hygiene, and using topical anesthetics and analgesics. Cryotherapy is a potential adjunctive approach in some cases. There are a number of approaches that appear to represent viable candidates for further study. Biologic response modifiers offer the potential for prevention and for acceleration of healing. Various cytokines will enter clinical trials in the near future; these offer the potential for reduction of epithelial cell sensitivity to the toxic effects of cancer therapy or for stimulation of repair of the damaged tissue. Other approaches include the use of medications to reduce exposure of the oral mucosa to chemotherapeutic drugs that are secreted in saliva. Antimicrobial approaches have met with conflicting results, little effect being seen with chlorhexidine and systemic antimicrobials in the prevention of mucositis in radiation patients. In patients with BMT and patients with leukemia, chlorhexidine may not be effective in preventing mucositis, although there may be reduction in oral colonization by Candida. Initial studies of topical antimicrobials that affect the gram-negative oral flora have shown reductions in ulcerative mucositis during radiation therapy but have not been assessed in leukemia/BMT. Among other approaches that require further study are low-energy lasers and anti

  17. Immunogenicity of Recombinant Classic Swine Fever Virus CD8+ T Lymphocyte Epitope and Porcine Parvovirus VP2 Antigen Coexpressed by Lactobacillus casei in Swine via Oral Vaccination ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yigang; Cui, Lichun; Tian, Changyong; Zhang, Guocai; Huo, Guicheng; Tang, Lijie; Li, Yijing

    2011-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and porcine parvovirus (PPV) are highly contagious pathogens, resulting in enormous economic losses in pig industries worldwide. Because vaccines play an important role in disease control, researchers are seeking improved vaccines that could induce antiviral immune responses against CSFV and PPV at the mucosal and systemic levels simultaneously. In this study, a genetically engineered Lactobacillus strain coexpressing the CSFV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte...

  18. The Antifungal Properties of Lactobacillus casei AST18 and Its Application as Adjunct Culture in Yogurt%Lactobacillus casei AST18抗真菌特性及其在酸奶保鲜中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红娟; 刘鹭; 张书文; 孔凡丕; 孙卓; 吕加平

    2011-01-01

    [目的]考察来源于中国传统发酵制品中乳酸菌的抑真菌特性,研究其在酸奶贮藏中的抑制霉菌效果.[方法]高效液相色谱法( HPLC)检测7株具有抗真菌效果的乳杆菌发酵液中苯乳酸(PLA)含量,研究PLA与乳杆菌发酵液抗真菌活性的相关性.选取抑菌活性最强的菌株Lactobacillus casei AST18进行抑菌特性研究.Lactobacillus casei AST18分别以2%、4%、6%、8%接种量作为辅助发酵剂添加至酸奶发酵工艺中,成品酸奶贮藏期间,监测酸奶中霉菌生长状况,检测酸奶理化指标并进行感官评定.[结果]乳杆菌发酵液中苯乳酸含量与其抑真菌直径间相关关系不显著.Lactobacillus casei AST18发酵上清液经胃蛋白酶和胰蛋白酶处理后不影响其抑菌活性,而环境pH对其抑菌活性的影响显著,热处理可使其丧失抑菌活性.Lactobacillus casei AST18以2%添加量作为辅助发酵剂应用在酸奶中可抑制霉菌菌丝生长和孢子生成,且对酸奶产品风味、感官品质无显著影响.[结论]Lactobacillus casei AST18具有较好的抑制霉菌生长能力,应用在酸奶中具有显著的防霉保鲜效果.%[Objective] The antifungal activities of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Chinese traditional fermented products were detected. The selected strain was used as adjunct culture in yogurt to control the fungal pollution. [Method] The production of phenyl lactic acid (PLA) was detected with HPLC and the correlation between PL A and the antifungal activities was studied. Then the antifungal properties of Lactobacillus casei AST 18 culture supernatants were detected. Lactobacillus casei AST 18 was used as adjunct culture in the yogurt production process. Four different inoculums of AST 18, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and a control group which used the commercial starter only were added in yogurt. After fermentation, sensory evaluation, physical and chemical indicators, the fungal growth conditions were

  19. Effects of formulation variables on viability of L. casei loaded in whey protein-Ca alginate microparticles in simulated in vivo conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Smilkov, Katarina; Petrusevska Tozi, Lidija; Petreska Ivanovska, Tanja; Geskovski, Nikola; Petkovska, Rumenka; Glavas Dodov, Marija; Baceva, Katerina; Dimitrovski, Dejan; MLADENOVSKA, KRISTINA

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the influence of formulation variables of L. casei loaded whey protein-Ca-alginate microparticles on probiotic survival under different conditions, representing simulated in vivo environment.

  20. Four weeks supplementation with Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei L. casei W8® shows modest effect on triacylglycerol in young healthy adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Anne Toksvig; Kristensen, Mette Bredal; Ritz, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    participants completed the double-blinded, randomised, controlled, parallel four weeks study with supplementation of L. casei W8 (1010 cfu) or placebo capsules. A meal test was conducted before and after the intervention, where subjective appetite, ad libitum energy intake, GLP-1, glucose and insulin response......The microbiota has been shown to have the potential to affect appetite and blood lipids positively in animal studies. We investigated if four weeks supplementation with Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei L. casei W8® (L. casei W8) had an effect on subjective appetite sensation, ad libitum...... energy intake, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP- 1), glucose and insulin response in humans. Secondarily, we explored potential effects on blood lipids, fatty acids and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1) activity in humans as well as SCD1 expression in piglets given L. casei W8 for two weeks. 64 healthy...

  1. Rectal dexmedetomidine in rats: evaluation of sedative and mucosal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Hanci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, we investigated the anesthetic and mucosal effects of the rectal application of dexmedetomidine to rats. METHODS: Male Wistar albino rats weighing 250-300 g were divided into four groups: Group S (n = 8 was a sham group that served as a baseline for the normal basal values; Group C (n = 8 consisted of rats that received the rectal application of saline alone; Group IPDex (n = 8 included rats that received the intraperitoneal application of dexmedetomidine (100 µg kg-1; and Group RecDex (n = 8 included rats that received the rectal application of dexmedetomidine (100 µg kg-1. For the rectal drug administration, we used 22 G intravenous cannulas with the stylets removed. We administered the drugs by advancing the cannula 1 cm into the rectum, and the rectal administration volume was 1 mL for all the rats. The latency and anesthesia time (min were measured. Two hours after rectal administration, 75 mg kg-1 ketamine was administered for intraperitoneal anesthesia in all the groups, followed by the removal of the rats' rectums to a distal distance of 3 cm via an abdominoperineal surgical procedure. We histopathologically examined and scored the rectums. RESULTS: Anesthesia was achieved in all the rats in the Group RecDex following the administration of dexmedetomidine. The onset of anesthesia in the Group RecDex was significantly later and of a shorter duration than in the Group IPDEx (p < 0.05. In the Group RecDex, the administration of dexmedetomidine induced mild-moderate losses of mucosal architecture in the colon and rectum, 2 h after rectal inoculation. CONCLUSION: Although 100 µg kg-1 dexmedetomidine administered rectally to rats achieved a significantly longer duration of anesthesia compared with the rectal administration of saline, our histopathological evaluations showed that the rectal administration of 100 µg kg-1 dexmedetomidine led to mild-moderate damage to the mucosal structure of the

  2. Changes in intestinal mucosal immune barrier in rats with endotoxemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Liu; Ang Li; Yi-Bing Weng; Mei-Li Duan; Bao-En Wang; Shu-Wen Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the dysfunction of the immunological barrier of the intestinal mucosa during endotoxemia and to elucidate the potential mechanism of this dysfunction. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into two groups: control group and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group. Endotoxemia was induced by a single caudal venous injection of LPS. Animals were sacrificed in batches 2, 6, 12 and 24 h after LPS infusion. The number of microfold (M)-cells, dendritic cells (DCs), CD4~+ T cells, CD8~+ T cells, regulatory T (Tr) cells and IgA~+ B cells in the intestinal mucosa were counted after immunohistochemical staining. Apoptotic lymphocytes were counted after TUNEL staining. The levels of interleukin (IL)-4, interferon (IFN)-γ and forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) in mucosal homogenates were measured by ELISA. The secretory IgA (sIgA) content in the total protein of one milligram of small intestinal mucus was detected using a radioimmunological assay. RESULTS: This research demonstrated that LPS LPSinduced endotoxemia results in small intestinal mucosa injury. The number of M-cells, DCs, CD8~+ T cells, and IgA~+ B cells were decreased while Tr cell and apoptotic lymphocyte numbers were increased significantly. The number of CD4~+ T cells increased in the early stages and then slightly decreased by 24 h. The level of IL-4 significantly increased in the early stages and then reversed by the end of the study period. The level of IFN-γ increased slightly in the early stages and then decreased markedly by the 24 h time point. Level of Foxp3 increased whereas sIgA level decreased. CONCLUSION: Mucosal immune dysfunction forms part of the intestinal barrier injury during endotoxemia. The increased number and function of Tr cells as well as lymphocyte apoptosis result in mucosal immunode- ficiency.

  3. Low energy laser in prevention of oral mucositis in patients receiving radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy in Pernambuco Cancer Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral mucositis induced by antineoplastic therapy causes wide-range pain and discomfort resulting in decreased quality of life. The present study evaluated the benefits of low intensity laser and 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate in the prevention of oral mucositis induced by radiation, associated or not with chemotherapy, and considered degrees/severity, time of appearance of the lesions and functional loss. Eighty-four outpatients were considered and 49 were included in this study and divided into two groups: Group 1 received laser treatments in three stages, starting three days before treatment until the end of therapy. Group 2 was instructed to do daily mouth rinses with chlorhexidine gluconate. The prevalence of clinical mucositis was 49%, and of functional mucositis, 28.6%, when the two groups were considered together. This percentage was smaller in the laser group, 44% for the clinical mucositis group and 24% for the functional. The two protocols were well tolerated and showed benefits, mainly from the point of view of functionality, and delayed the onset and development of mucositis. (author)

  4. Low energy laser in prevention of oral mucositis in patients receiving radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy in Pernambuco Cancer Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelner, Natalie; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de [Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil). Dept. of Clinics and Preventive Dentistry. Discipline of Oral Pathology]. E-mail: jlisboa72@hotmail.com

    2007-07-01

    Oral mucositis induced by antineoplastic therapy causes wide-range pain and discomfort resulting in decreased quality of life. The present study evaluated the benefits of low intensity laser and 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate in the prevention of oral mucositis induced by radiation, associated or not with chemotherapy, and considered degrees/severity, time of appearance of the lesions and functional loss. Eighty-four outpatients were considered and 49 were included in this study and divided into two groups: Group 1 received laser treatments in three stages, starting three days before treatment until the end of therapy. Group 2 was instructed to do daily mouth rinses with chlorhexidine gluconate. The prevalence of clinical mucositis was 49%, and of functional mucositis, 28.6%, when the two groups were considered together. This percentage was smaller in the laser group, 44% for the clinical mucositis group and 24% for the functional. The two protocols were well tolerated and showed benefits, mainly from the point of view of functionality, and delayed the onset and development of mucositis. (author)

  5. Prophylaxis of radiochemotherapy-induced mucositis. Efficacy of the prophylactic oral rinsing with povidone-iodine solution; Prophylaxe der radiochemotherapeutisch bedingten Mukositis. Wertigkeit der prophylaktischen Mundspuelung mit PVP-Iodloesung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamietz, I.A.; Boettcher, H.D. [Univ. Frankfurt (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Rahn, R. [Univ. Frankfurt (Germany). Zentrum der Zahn-, Mund- und Kieferheilkunde; Schaefer, V. [Univ. Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Bakteriologie; Reimer, K.; Fleischer, W. [Mundipharma GmbH, Limburg/Lahn (Germany)

    1998-03-01

    An open, randomised, prospective comparative trial was conducted with 40 patients undergoing radiochemotherapy of head and neck region due to malignant disease. The treatment scheme consisted of irradiation to tumor region and adjacent lymph nodes with a total dose of 71.3 Gy and simultaneous chemotherapy with carboplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1 to 5 and 29 to 34. In all patients, a prophylaxis of mucosistis with nystatine, rutosides, panthenol and immunoglobulin was undertaken. In addition, 20 patients rinsed oral cavity 4 times daily with povidone-iodine-solution, the comparative group rinsed with sterile water. Clinical examination of the oral mucosa was performed weekly. Onset, grading and duration of mucositis were used as main variables. Clinically manifested oral mucositis was observed in 14 patients of the iodine group (mean grading: 1.0) and all 20 patients of the control group (mean grading: 3.0). Total duration (mean) of clinically observed mucositis was 2.75 weeks in treatment patients and 9.25 in control patients. Median AUC (area under curve for grade vs duration) was 2.5 in iodine rinsing patients and 15.75 in control patients. All differences found between the 2 groups were statistically significant. Increased iodine incorporation was not observed. A pathological increase of thyroid hormone levels in the iodine group was not found. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Die Untersuchung erfolgte in einer offenen, randomisierten, prospektiven Vergleichsstudie an 40 Patienten, die wegen maligner Erkrankung einer Radiochemotherapie im Kopf-Hals-Bereich unterzogen wurden. Das Therapieschema bestand aus Bestrahlung der Tumorregion und der Lymphabflusswege mit einer Gesamtdosis von 71,3 Gy sowie einer simultanen Chemotherapie mit Carboplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} der Koerperoberflaeche) an den Tagen 1 bis 5 und 29 bis 34. Bei saemtlichen Patienten wurde eine Mukositisprophylaxe mit Nystatin, Rutosiden, Panthenol und Immunglobulin vorgenommen. Bei 20 Patienten erfolgte

  6. The role of Smad7 in oral mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Li; Han, Gangwen; Zhao, Carolyn W.; Garl, Pamela J.; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis, a severe oral ulceration, is a common toxic effect of radio- or chemoradio-therapy and a limiting factor to using the maximum dose of radiation for effective cancer treatment. Among cancer patients, at least 40% and up to 70%, of individuals treated with standard chemotherapy regimens or upper-body radiation, develop oral mucositis. To date, there is no FDA approved drug to treat oral mucositis in cancer patients. The key challenges for oral mucositis treatment are to repair a...

  7. Plasma Cell Mucositis of Oro- and Hypopharynx: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Puvanendran; Anja Lieder; Wolfgang Issing

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To raise awareness of plasma cell mucositis as a rare differential diagnosis for oral mucosal ulceration and its macroscopic similarity to malignancy. Method. We report a patient who presented with oral features suggestive of malignancy. A biopsy revealed plasma cell mucositis. Results. The patient successfully had a full excision of one lesion and a spontaneous resolution of the other. Conclusion. With the increasing incidence of oral mucosal pathology, physicians should be aware ...

  8. Effects of formulation variables on the particle size and viability of L.casei-loaded in whey protein-Ca-alginate microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Smilkov, Katarina; Petreska Ivanovska, Tanja; Petrusevska Tozi, Lidija; GROZDANOV, Anita; Dodov Glavas, Marija; Geskovski, Nikola; PETKOVSKA, RUMENKA; MLADENOVSKA, KRISTINA

    2011-01-01

    The health benefits of the probiotics are becoming more recognized and utilized nowadays. Among lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus casei has been found to colonize human GIT and exert meany health benefits. The aim of this research was to evaluate the influence of the formulation variables of L. casei-loaded whey-protein-Ca-alginate microparticles on the particle size and the survival of the mentioned probiotic during the processing.Overall effects of the formulation variables pointed to the...

  9. Entwicklung und Einsatz von 16S rRNA Gensonden zur Identifizierung biotechnologisch genutzter Laktobazillen-Stämme der L. acidophilus- und der L. casei-Gruppe

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Development and application of 16S rRNA-targeted gene probes for the identification of biotechnologically used Lactobacillus-strains of the L. acidophilus- and L. casei-group Due to numerous desirable metabolic properties lactobacilli have long been used as starter cultures in food production, as feed additives in animal nutrition, and as therapeutic agents in the pharmaceutical industry. Members of the L. acidophilus- and the L. casei-group are increasingly appl...

  10. Mucosal Vaccination and Therapy with Genetically Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that

  11. Management of mucositis in oral irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucositis significantly affects quality of life and tolerance of treatment in oral irradiation. Effective management of this complication is therefore very important. However, there is a scarcity of up-to-date oral care protocols, with most centres using ritualized regimens. The literature on oral rinses in radiation mucositis is at best inconclusive and at worst confusing. In this study, patients undergoing radical radiotherapy treatment (55-60 Gy in 4 weeks) to more than 50% of the oral cavity and oropharynx were randomized to a research based oral care protocol with either saline 0.9% or hydrogen peroxide 3.5 volumes (HP) as rinses. The results of this study show that, on average, the group receiving saline rinses appeared to do better on some outcomes than the group receiving HP. This suggests that frequent mechanical cleansing of the mouth may be more important than the antiseptic properties of a mouthwash. Antiseptic mouthwashes may be contra-indicated in radiation mucositis. In order to determine best practice in mucositis management, multicentre, multidisciplinary trials should be conducted. (Author)

  12. Oral Mucositis: understanding the pathology and management

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiou, M; Patapatiou, G; S. Domoxoudis; Pistevou-Gompaki, K; A. Papanikolaou

    2012-01-01

    Oral Mucositis is a common complication of cancer therapy which may limit the completion of treatment and affect the quality of life of the patient. As we have come to understand its pathogenesis new developments in its management and prevention have allowed us minimize this side effect.

  13. Mucosal biofilm detection in chronic otitis media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessman, Marcus; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Eickhardt-Sørensen, Steffen Robert; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Homøe, Preben

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine middle ear biopsies from Greenlandic patients with chronic otitis media (COM) for the presence of mucosal biofilms and the bacteria within the biofilms. Thirty-five middle ear biopsies were obtained from 32 Greenlandic COM patients admitted to ear surg...

  14. Craniofacial mucosal immune system: importance of its unique organogenesis and function in the development of a mucosal vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kazunari; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) play a critical role as inductive sites for the initiation of antigen-specific protective immunity against pathogens penetrating the mucus membranes. Nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), situated at the bottom of the rodent nasal cavity, is thought to be an important site for the induction of antigen-specific immune response to inhaled antigens. In addition, we have recently shown that tear duct-associated lymphoid tissue (TALT), present in the murine tear duct bridging the ocular and nasal cavities, is involved in the induction and regulation of both nasal and ocular immunity. Interestingly, cellular requirements for the organogenesis of NALT and TALT are quite different from those of other MALT (e.g. Peyer's patches; PPs) and peripheral lymphoid tissues. Moreover, mucosal imprinting molecules of NALT and TALT inducer cells are totally independent of currently known chemokines and adhesion molecules in PPs and lymph nodes, such as the CXCR5-CXCL13, α4β1 integrin-vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM1), and CCR9-CCL25 axes. NALT and TALT lymphocytes are also independent of these tissue-specific migration molecules. Together with already-characterized conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue (CALT ), which has been demonstrated to play a critical role in ocular defense, the MALT associated with the head region seems to be coordinately organizing the unique craniofacial mucosal immune system of the ocular, nasal, oral-pharynx mucus membranes. Clarification of the immunological network of this unique craniofacial immune system will facilitate the development of a safe and effective mucosal vaccine against respiratory and ocular infections. PMID:21865684

  15. Identification and molecular cloning of glutamate decarboxylase gene from Lactobacillus casei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Tavakoli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA possesses several physiological functions such as neurotransmission, induction of hypotension, diuretic and tranquilizer effects. Production of GABA-enriched products by lactic acid bacteria has been a focus of different researches in recent years because of their safety and health-promoting specifities. In this study, glutamate decarboxylase (gad gene of a local strains Lactobacillus casei was identified and cloned. In order to clone the gad gene from this strain, the PCR was carried out using primers designed based on conserved regions. The PCR product was purified and ligated into PGEM-T vector. Comparison of obtained sequences shows that this fragment codes the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate binding region. This strain could possibly be used for the industrial GABA production and also for development of functional fermented foods. Gad gene manipulation can also either decrease or increase the activity of enzyme in bacteria.

  16. Effect of heavy water on structure-function relationship of lactate dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus casei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural and functional behaviour of lactate dehydrogenase purified from Lactobacillus casei was compared in H2O and heavy water (D2O). The enzyme showed reduced activity in D2O, being only 45% of that observed in H2O. The modulations of the enzyme caused by the substrate and fructose 1,6-diphosphate examined at varying pH and pD values indicated decreased cooperativity in D2O. The elution profiles of the enzyme on Sephadex G-200 in the presence of the substrate and fructose 1, 6-diphosphate at varying pD values showed a shift towards lower molecular weight species. At pD 5,4 fructose diphosphate did not cause any further shift in the elution pattern which was otherwise observed in H2O. (author)

  17. Identification of lactobacillus casei-BDI and Streptococcus thermophilus by fluorescence spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Wu; Tuo Zhu; Wei Chen; Hao Zhang; Jianlei Yang

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence analysis applied in the study of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) provides a new method and theory to study probiotics and realize the detection and identification of the strains.It is also possible to achieve automation and computerization.In this letter,the differences between the fluorescence spectra of lactobacillus casei-BDI (Lc-BDI) and Streptococcus thermophilus (St) are shown,and the second-order derivative spectra are used to further study the diversity of these two strains.According to the results,with thc excitation wavelengths of 285 and 340 nm,there are significant differences between them.The experiment is repeated for 6 times,showing good repetitiveness.

  18. A novel mucosal RORγt+NKp46+ cell subset is a source of interleukin-22

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasello, Elena; Reynders, Ana; Vivier, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Lymphoid tissue-inducer cells are hematopoietic cells essential for the organogenesis of several lymphoid structures during both fetal and adult life, whereas natural killer cells are key effector lymphocytes of the innate immune system. A series of recent reports has identified RORγt+NKp46+ interleukin-22-producing cells in gut and tonsils that share features with both lymphoid tissue-inducer cells and natural killer cells and that may be involved in mucosal immunity and homeostasis.

  19. A rare aggravation of severe mucositis post chemotherapy in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1tf

    OpenAIRE

    Adlette Inati; Grace Akouri; Abbas, Hussein A.

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a debilitating manifestation in children undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Children with mucositis should be properly managed in order to prevent further exacerbation and adverse complications. We hereby present the first report of a severe chemotherapy-induced mucositis, plausibly aggravated by improper dental hygiene leading to shedding of the ventral part of the tongue in a child with pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The patient steadily and gradually rec...

  20. Mucosal barrier, bacteria and inflammatory bowel disease: possibilities for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merga, Yvette; Campbell, Barry J; Rhodes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal barrier has three major components, the mucus layer, the epithelial glycocalyx and the surface epithelium itself, whose integrity largely depends on tight junction function. In health, there is relatively little direct interaction between the luminal microbiota and the epithelium - the continuous mucus layer in the colon keeps the surface epithelium out of contact with bacteria and the ileo-caecal valve ensures that the distal small intestine is relatively microbe free. Most interaction takes place at the Peyer's patches in the distal ileum and their smaller colonic equivalents, the lymphoid follicles. Peyer's patches are overlain by a 'dome' epithelium, 5% of whose cells are specialised M (microfold) epithelial cells, which act as the major portal of entry for bacteria. There are no goblet cells in the dome epithelium and M cells have a very sparse glycocalyx allowing easy microbial interaction. It is intriguing that the typical age range for the onset of Crohn's disease (CD) is similar to the age at which the number of Peyer's patches is greatest. Peyer's patches are commonly the sites of the initial lesions in CD and the 'anti-pancreatic' antibody associated with CD has been shown to have as its epitope the glycoprotein 2 that is the receptor for type-1 bacterial fimbrial protein (fimH) on M cells. There are many reasons to believe that the mucosal barrier is critically important in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These include (i) associations between both CD and ulcerative colitis (UC) with genes that are relevant to the mucosal barrier; (ii) increased intestinal permeability in unaffected relatives of CD patients; (iii) increased immune reactivity against bacterial antigens, and (iv) animal models in which altered mucosal barrier, e.g. denudation of the mucus layer associated with oral dextran sulphate in rodents, induces colitis. Whilst some IBD patients may have genetic factors leading to weakening of the mucosal barrier