WorldWideScience

Sample records for case community analysis

  1. Beacon communities' public health initiatives: a case study analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoudi, Barbara L; Marcial, Laura H; Haque, Saira; Bailey, Robert; Chester, Kelley; Cunningham, Shellery; Riley, Amanda; Soper, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The Beacon Communities for Public Health (BCPH) project was launched in 2011 to gain a better understanding of the range of activities currently being conducted in population- and public health by the Beacon Communities. The project highlighted the successes and challenges of these efforts with the aim of sharing this information broadly among the public health community. The Beacon Community Program, designed to showcase technology-enabled, community-based initiatives to improve outcomes, focused on: building and strengthening health information technology (IT) infrastructure and exchange capabilities; translating investments in health IT to measureable improvements in cost, quality, and population health; and, developing innovative approaches to performance measurement, technology, and care delivery. Four multimethod case studies were conducted based on a modified sociotechnical framework to learn more about public health initiative implementation and use in the Beacon Communities. Our methodological approach included using document review and semistructured key informant interviews. NACCHO Model Practice Program criteria were used to select the public health initiatives included in the case studies. Despite differences among the case studies, common barriers and facilitators were found to be present in all areas of the sociotechnical framework application including structure, people, technology, tasks, overarching considerations, and sustainability. Overall, there were many more facilitators (range = 7-14) present for each Beacon compared to barriers (range = 4-6). Four influential promising practices were identified through the work: forging strong and sustainable partnerships; ensuring a good task-technology fit and a flexible and iterative design; fostering technology acceptance; and, providing education and demonstrating value. A common weakness was the lack of a framework or model for the Beacon Communities evaluation work. Sharing a framework or approach

  2. Using Analysis of Governance to Unpack Community-Based Conservation: A Case Study from Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lance W; Makupa, Enock

    2015-11-01

    Community-based conservation policies and programs are often hollow with little real devolution. But to pass a judgment of community-based or not community-based on such initiatives and programs obscures what is actually a suite of attributes. In this paper, we analyze governance around a specific case of what is nominally community-based conservation-Ikona Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in Tanzania-using two complementary sets of criteria. The first relates to governance "powers": planning powers, regulatory powers, spending powers, revenue-generating powers, and the power to enter into agreements. The second set of criteria derive from the understanding of governance as a set of social functions: social coordination, shaping power, setting direction, and building community. The analysis helps to detail ways in which the Tanzanian state through policy and regulations has constrained the potential for Ikona WMA to empower communities and community actors. Although it has some features of community-based conservation, community input into how the governance social functions would be carried out in the WMA was constrained from the start and is now largely out of community hands. The two governance powers that have any significant community-based flavor-spending powers and revenue-generating powers-relate to the WMA's tourism activities, but even here the picture is equivocal at best. The unpacking of governance that we have done, however, reveals that community empowerment through the processes associated with creating and recognizing indigenous and community-conserved areas is something that can be pursued through multiple channels, some of which might be more strategic than others.

  3. Using Analysis of Governance to Unpack Community-Based Conservation: A Case Study from Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lance W.; Makupa, Enock

    2015-11-01

    Community-based conservation policies and programs are often hollow with little real devolution. But to pass a judgment of community-based or not community-based on such initiatives and programs obscures what is actually a suite of attributes. In this paper, we analyze governance around a specific case of what is nominally community-based conservation—Ikona Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in Tanzania—using two complementary sets of criteria. The first relates to governance "powers": planning powers, regulatory powers, spending powers, revenue-generating powers, and the power to enter into agreements. The second set of criteria derive from the understanding of governance as a set of social functions: social coordination, shaping power, setting direction, and building community. The analysis helps to detail ways in which the Tanzanian state through policy and regulations has constrained the potential for Ikona WMA to empower communities and community actors. Although it has some features of community-based conservation, community input into how the governance social functions would be carried out in the WMA was constrained from the start and is now largely out of community hands. The two governance powers that have any significant community-based flavor—spending powers and revenue-generating powers—relate to the WMA's tourism activities, but even here the picture is equivocal at best. The unpacking of governance that we have done, however, reveals that community empowerment through the processes associated with creating and recognizing indigenous and community-conserved areas is something that can be pursued through multiple channels, some of which might be more strategic than others.

  4. Integrated community case management in Malawi: an analysis of innovation and institutional characteristics for policy adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Daniela C; Banda, Hastings; Namakhoma, Ireen

    2015-12-01

    In 2007, Malawi became an early adopter of integrated community case management for childhood illnesses (iCCM), a policy aimed at community-level treatment for malaria, diarrhoea and pneumonia for children below 5 years. Through a retrospective case study, this article explores critical issues in implementation that arose during policy formulation through the lens of the innovation (i.e. iCCM) and of the institutions involved in the policy process. Data analysis is founded on a documentary review and 21 in-depth stakeholder interviews across institutions in Malawi. Findings indicate that the characteristics of iCCM made it a suitable policy to address persistent challenges in child mortality, namely that ill children were not interacting with health workers on a timely basis and consequently were dying in their communities. Further, iCCM was compatible with the Malawian health system due to the ability to build on an existing community health worker cadre of health surveillance assistants (HSAs) and previous experiences with treatment provision at the community level. In terms of institutions, the Ministry of Health (MoH) demonstrated leadership in the overall policy process despite early challenges of co-ordination within the MoH. WHO, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and implementing organizations played a supportive role in their position as knowledge brokers. Greater challenges were faced in the organizational capacity of the MoH. Regulatory issues around HSA training as well as concerns around supervision and overburdening of HSAs were discussed, though not fully addressed during policy development. Similarly, the financial sustainability of iCCM, including the mechanisms for channelling funding flows, also remains an unresolved issue. This analysis highlights the role of implementation questions during policy development. Despite several outstanding concerns, the compatibility between iCCM as a policy alternative and the local context laid the

  5. Burden and seasonality of testicular torsion in tropical Africa: Analysis of incident cases in a Nigerian community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibril O. Bello

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children, adolescents and young adults in tropical Africa occasionally presents to the emergency department with testicular torsion. However, no estimates of the burden of the condition is available and there is also sparse evidence of a seasonal variation in incidence. Objective: To determine the incidence and seasonality of the condition in a Nigerian community. Subjects and methods: A retrospective review of incident cases of testicular torsion occurring in a typical tropical sub-Saharan African community between January 2011 and December 2016 was performed. Incidence rates were calculated and trend analysis performed to evaluate for seasonality. Results: Twenty-three patients were seen during the study period and the average annual incidence of testicular torsion among ‘at risk’ males (<40 years was 2.7/100,000. Testicular salvage rate was 81%. Cases occurred 91% higher than average during the cold season (November to January. Trend analysis revealed a significant seasonal difference in the number of cases seen (p = 0.045 and Post Hoc tests (Tukey further showed that this is attributable to the seasonal difference between the cold season and the warmer early rains period (p = 0.036. Conclusion: The burden of testicular torsion found in the studied tropical sub-Saharan community is comparable to other regions of the world and seasonal variation in incidence does occur with a significant increase in cases during the cold season. Keywords: Testicular torsion, Seasonality, Disease burden, Orchiopexy, Orchiectomy

  6. A comparative analysis of the costs of onshore wind energy: Is there a case for community-specific policy support?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berka, Anna L.; Harnmeijer, Jelte; Roberts, Deborah; Phimister, Euan; Msika, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    There is growing policy interest in increasing the share of community-owned renewable energy generation. This study explores why and how the costs of community-owned projects differ from commercially-owned projects by examining the case of onshore wind in the UK. Based on cross-sectoral literature on the challenges of community ownership, cost differences are attributed to six facets of an organisation or project: internal processes, internal knowledge and skills, perceived local legitimacy of the project, perceived external legitimacy of the organisation, investor motivation and expectations, and finally, project scale. These facets impact not only development costs but also project development times and the probability that projects pass certain critical stages in the development process. Using survey-based and secondary cost data on community and commercial projects in the UK, a model is developed to show the overall impact of cost, time and risk differences on the value of a hypothetical 500 kW onshore wind project. The results show that the main factors accounting for differences are higher pre-planning costs and additional risks born by community projects, and suggest that policy interventions may be required to place community- owned projects on a level playing field with commercial projects. - Highlights: • Policy support for community energy projects should be targeted at reducing early costs and risk factors. • Hurdle rates are critical in determining the financial viability of projects. • Shared ownership arrangements may help remove some of key challenges to community-only projects.

  7. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Green Infrastructures on Community Stormwater Reduction and Utilization: A Case of Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Chen, Weiping; Feng, Qi; Peng, Chi; Kang, Peng

    2016-12-01

    Cost-benefit analysis is demanded for guiding the plan, design and construction of green infrastructure practices in rapidly urbanized regions. We developed a framework to calculate the costs and benefits of different green infrastructures on stormwater reduction and utilization. A typical community of 54,783 m2 in Beijing was selected for case study. For the four designed green infrastructure scenarios (green space depression, porous brick pavement, storage pond, and their combination), the average annual costs of green infrastructure facilities are ranged from 40.54 to 110.31 thousand yuan, and the average of the cost per m3 stormwater reduction and utilization is 4.61 yuan. The total average annual benefits of stormwater reduction and utilization by green infrastructures of the community are ranged from 63.24 to 250.15 thousand yuan, and the benefit per m3 stormwater reduction and utilization is ranged from 5.78 to 11.14 yuan. The average ratio of average annual benefit to cost of four green infrastructure facilities is 1.91. The integrated facilities had the highest economic feasibility with a benefit to cost ratio of 2.27, and followed by the storage pond construction with a benefit to cost ratio of 2.14. The results suggested that while the stormwater reduction and utilization by green infrastructures had higher construction and maintenance costs, their comprehensive benefits including source water replacements benefits, environmental benefits and avoided cost benefits are potentially interesting. The green infrastructure practices should be promoted for sustainable management of urban stormwater.

  8. A Community Organizing Case Study: An Analysis of Cap-It's Strategy to Prevent the Location of a Toxic Waste Incinerator in Their Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J

    1992-01-01

    With the great proliferation of chemical manufacturing in the past half-century, the dilemma of dealing with the waste produced has become an increasing problem facing communities. One method that is gaining increased acceptance by both government and industry is incineration. Many citizens have formed groups to protest these facilities because of their concerns about health risks, especially exposure to carcinogens. This case study profiles one such group, CAP-IT, a collection of middle-class residents living in a small working-class town and their successful battle to prevent the siting of a hazardous waste incinerator. CAP-IT's strategy will be critiqued using methods advanced by Lee Staples, Nicholas Freudenburg and Kurt Lewin to demonstrate the power of community organizing activities.

  9. Task shifting of HIV/AIDS case management to Community Health Service Centers in urban China: a qualitative policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuchang; Lv, Fan; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Dapeng; Meng, Sining; Ju, Lahong; Jiang, Huihui; Ma, Liping; Sun, Jiangping; Wu, Zunyou

    2015-07-02

    The growing number of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in China points to an increased need for case management services of HIV/AIDS. This study sought to explore the challenges and enablers in shifting the HIV/AIDS case management services from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCs) to Community Health Service Centers (CHSCs) in urban China. A qualitative method based on the Health Policy Triangle (HPT) framework was employed to gain in-depth insights into four elements of the task shifting strategy. This included a review on published literature and health policy documents, 15 focus group discussions (FGDs) and 30 in-depth interviews (IDIs) with four types of key actors from three cities in China. A total of 78 studies and 17 policy files at the national, municipal and local levels were obtained and reviewed comprehensively. Three semi-structured interview guides were used to explore key actors' views on shifting the HIV/AIDS case management services to CHSCs. It is necessary and feasible for CHSCs to engage in case management services for PLWHA in local communities. The increasing number of PLWHA and shortage of qualified health professionals in CDCs made shifting case management services downwards to CHSCs an urgent agenda. CHSCs' wide distribution, technical capacity, accessibility and current practice enabled them to carry out case management services for PLWHA. However our findings indicated several challenges in this task shifting process. Those challenges included lack of specific policy and stable financial support for CHSCs, inadequate manpower, relatively low capacity for health service delivery, lack of coordination among sectors, PLWHA's fear for discrimination and privacy disclosure in local communities, which may compromise the effectiveness and sustainability of those services. Shifting the HIV/AIDS case management services from CDCs to CHSCs is a new approach to cope with the rising number of PLWHA in China, but it should be

  10. Navigating digital publics for playful production: A cross-case analysis of two interest-driven online communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenia A. Korobkova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the set of skills and strategies associated with managing digital publics online represent an emergent literacy practice of importance to literacy researchers and educators. Drawing on two case studies of online communities popular with contemporary youth to learn, play, and socialize, we articulate how youth participants strategically negotiate multiple audiences online with varying levels of publicity in order to achieve learning outcomes. In one case, players of a popular production-centered video game share their content in ways that garner the specific kind of audience and feedback they need for their projects. In another, members of an online fan fiction community analyze and negotiate expectations of their audience in order to craft media that garners attention and sustains readership. Both examples identify how skills centered on navigating and managing publics – that is, multiple audiences that are permeable across a wider public online – constitute a recognizable and important “new literacy” in digitally mediated learning environments. We situate our empirical studies in sociocultural theories of learning and historicize the work in contemporary digital cultures and the general move from the writer-reader relationship to writer-audience relationships to more complex relationships within digital publics. The article ends with considerations for literacy researchers, policymakers, and practitioners interested in technology-mediated practices of today’s youth.

  11. Evaluating mobile solutions of integrated Community Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Africa Center of Excellence in Public Health and Herbal Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi. The current state of iCCM ... Organization and United Nations Children's Fund developed integrated Community Case .... Impact of the Integrated Community Case Management Strategy to Treat Childhood Infection.

  12. Hybrid Decentralised Energy for Remote Communities: Case Studies and the Analysis of the Potential Integration of Rain Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Miao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For remote underdeveloped and sparsely populated regions, the use of national power grids to provide electricity can be both unsustainable and impractical. In recent years, decentralised renewable power has gained popularity, endowing social benefits to the local inhabitants through clean rural electrification. However, power reliability and system autonomy are often the primary technical concerns as current systems are largely single source reliant. Hybrid power systems that utilise multiple complementary renewables can help to reduce the dependency on conventional unclean options. A few selected case studies for both single source and hybrid power systems are reviewed, analysing critical success factors and evaluating existing difficulties. The additional integration of the novel rain-powered kinetic-to-electric generator technology to the existing hybrid model is analysed. As with development in general, there is no one-size-fits-all solution to bringing power to remote communities and the most sustainable solution should be found through analysing local resources, environmental conditions and maximising local involvement.

  13. Analysis of the process of restitution in the case of religious communities in the municipality of Subotica

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    Lazić Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ownership is in the former Yugoslavia after World War II, saved the confiscation of property from private owners, and then, in accordance with the general trend of collectivization, by converting private property in national, and then to the state and social ownership. State, and then the social ownership dominated in all areas of economic and social life, while private property was suppressed to such an extent that it was statistically insignificant. The problem of indemnification of legal and physical entities, which in the period from 1945 to 1958 confiscated assets based on groups of regulations on nationalization, confiscation, agrarian reform and others. measures was a long time one of the most important unresolved issues, which conflicted public in Serbia. To adequately deal with this problem, are interested primarily former owners of confiscated property, but the current owners or users of nationalized property. The subject of this paper is the restitution of real estate and registration of legal consequences of restitution in public records, the case of religious communities in the municipality of Subotica.

  14. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  15. Relationship of Environmental Conditions to Filariasis Cases in Community (An Advanced Analysis of Basic Health Research 2007

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    Santoso

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis (elephantiasis disease in Indonesia is still a health problems, there are still areas with the patient chronic and acute. A total of 1553 villages in 647 health centers scattered in 231 districts in 26 provinces as the location of the endemic, with a number of chronic cases of 6233 people. Elimination program disease elephantiasis has been undertaken by the government, but until today there are still many areas with the number of microfilariae (Mf rate is still high (> 1%. One of the government's efforts in this regard Litbangkes RI in collecting basic data, including data filariasis is with the activities of the Basic Health Research (Riskesdas conducted simultaneously across Indonesia. Based on the results of data collection Riskesdas then further analysis is to look at the environmental conditions and demographic status associated with the incidence of filariasis. Based on the results of analysis show that there were a statistically significant relationship between the type of waste water reservoirs; types of sewage systems and types of livestock kept, the classification of villages with the incidence of filariasis.

  16. Community health nursing advocacy: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeonwu, Mabel C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an in-depth analysis of the concept of community health nursing (CHN) advocacy. Walker and Avant's (2010) 8-step concept analysis methodology was used. A broad inquiry into the literature between 1994 and 2014 resulted in the identification of the uses, defining attributes, empirical referents, antecedents, and consequences, as well as the articulation of an operational definition of CHN advocacy. Model and contrary cases were identified to demonstrate the concept's application and to clarify its meaning. This analysis contributes to the advancement of knowledge of CHN advocacy and provides nurse clinicians, educators, and researchers with some conceptual clarity to help improve community health outcomes.

  17. Cost-effectiveness analysis of the national implementation of integrated community case management and community-based health planning and services in Ghana for the treatment of malaria, diarrhoea and pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano Ferrer, Blanca; Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Gyapong, Margaret; Bruce, Jane; Narh Bana, Solomon A; Narh, Clement T; Allotey, Naa-Korkor; Glover, Roland; Azantilow, Naa-Charity; Bart-Plange, Constance; Sagoe-Moses, Isabella; Webster, Jayne

    2017-07-05

    Ghana has developed two main community-based strategies that aim to increase access to quality treatment for malaria, diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia: the integrated community case management (iCCM) and the community-based health planning and services (CHPS). The aim of the study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of these strategies under programme conditions. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment given was the effectiveness measure used. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment data was obtained from a household survey conducted 2 and 8 years after implementation of iCCM in the Volta and Northern Regions of Ghana, respectively. The study population was carers of children under-5 years who had fever, diarrhoea and/or cough in the last 2 weeks prior to the interview. Costs data was obtained mainly from the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP), the Ministry of Health, CHPS compounds and from a household survey. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of malaria, diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia was more cost-effective under the iCCM than under CHPS in the Volta Region, even after adjusting for different discount rates, facility costs and iCCM and CHPS utilization, but not when iCCM appropriate treatment was reduced by 50%. Due to low numbers of carers visiting a CBA in the Northern Region it was not possible to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis in this region. However, the cost analysis showed that iCCM in the Northern Region had higher cost per malaria, diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia case diagnosed and treated when compared to the Volta Region and to the CHPS strategy in the Northern Region. Integrated community case management was more cost-effective than CHPS for the treatment of malaria, diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia when utilized by carers of children under-5 years in the Volta Region. A revision of the iCCM strategy in the Northern Region is needed to improve its cost-effectiveness. Long-term financing

  18. Chapter 11. Community analysis-based methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y.; Wu, C.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Holden, P.A.

    2010-05-01

    Microbial communities are each a composite of populations whose presence and relative abundance in water or other environmental samples are a direct manifestation of environmental conditions, including the introduction of microbe-rich fecal material and factors promoting persistence of the microbes therein. As shown by culture-independent methods, different animal-host fecal microbial communities appear distinctive, suggesting that their community profiles can be used to differentiate fecal samples and to potentially reveal the presence of host fecal material in environmental waters. Cross-comparisons of microbial communities from different hosts also reveal relative abundances of genetic groups that can be used to distinguish sources. In increasing order of their information richness, several community analysis methods hold promise for MST applications: phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), cloning/sequencing, and PhyloChip. Specific case studies involving TRFLP and PhyloChip approaches demonstrate the ability of community-based analyses of contaminated waters to confirm a diagnosis of water quality based on host-specific marker(s). The success of community-based MST for comprehensively confirming fecal sources relies extensively upon using appropriate multivariate statistical approaches. While community-based MST is still under evaluation and development as a primary diagnostic tool, results presented herein demonstrate its promise. Coupled with its inherently comprehensive ability to capture an unprecedented amount of microbiological data that is relevant to water quality, the tools for microbial community analysis are increasingly accessible, and community-based approaches have unparalleled potential for translation into rapid, perhaps real-time, monitoring platforms.

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of the national implementation of integrated community case management and community-based health planning and services in Ghana for the treatment of malaria, diarrhoea and pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escribano Ferrer, Blanca; Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Gyapong, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ghana has developed two main community-based strategies that aim to increase access to quality treatment for malaria, diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia: the integrated community case management (iCCM) and the community-based health planning and services (CHPS). The aim of the study......CCM in the Northern Region had higher cost per malaria, diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia case diagnosed and treated when compared to the Volta Region and to the CHPS strategy in the Northern Region. Conclusions: Integrated community case management was more cost-effective than CHPS for the treatment of malaria...... Insurance Scheme (NHIS) benefit package. An acceptability study of including iCCM in the NHIS should be conducted....

  20. Final base case community analysis: Indian Springs, Nevada for the Clark County socioeconomic impact assessment of the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-06-18

    This document provides a base case description of the rural Clark County community of Indian Springs in anticipation of change associated with the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. As the community closest to the proposed site, Indian Springs may be seen by site characterization workers, as well as workers associated with later repository phases, as a logical place to live. This report develops and updates information relating to a broad spectrum of socioeconomic variables, thereby providing a `snapshot` or `base case` look at Indian Springs in early 1992. With this as a background, future repository-related developments may be analytically separated from changes brought about by other factors, thus allowing for the assessment of the magnitude of local changes associated with the proposed repository. Given the size of the community, changes that may be considered small in an absolute sense may have relatively large impacts at the local level. Indian Springs is, in many respects, a unique community and a community of contrasts. An unincorporated town, it is a small yet important enclave of workers on large federal projects and home to employees of small- scale businesses and services. It is a rural community, but it is also close to the urbanized Las Vega Valley. It is a desert community, but has good water resources. It is on flat terrain, but it is located within 20 miles of the tallest mountains in Nevada. It is a town in which various interest groups diverge on issues of local importance, but in a sense of community remains an important feature of life. Finally, it has a sociodemographic history of both surface transience and underlying stability. If local land becomes available, Indian Springs has some room for growth but must first consider the historical effects of growth on the town and its desired direction for the future.

  1. Final base case community analysis: Indian Springs, Nevada for the Clark County socioeconomic impact assessment of the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a base case description of the rural Clark County community of Indian Springs in anticipation of change associated with the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. As the community closest to the proposed site, Indian Springs may be seen by site characterization workers, as well as workers associated with later repository phases, as a logical place to live. This report develops and updates information relating to a broad spectrum of socioeconomic variables, thereby providing a 'snapshot' or 'base case' look at Indian Springs in early 1992. With this as a background, future repository-related developments may be analytically separated from changes brought about by other factors, thus allowing for the assessment of the magnitude of local changes associated with the proposed repository. Given the size of the community, changes that may be considered small in an absolute sense may have relatively large impacts at the local level. Indian Springs is, in many respects, a unique community and a community of contrasts. An unincorporated town, it is a small yet important enclave of workers on large federal projects and home to employees of small- scale businesses and services. It is a rural community, but it is also close to the urbanized Las Vega Valley. It is a desert community, but has good water resources. It is on flat terrain, but it is located within 20 miles of the tallest mountains in Nevada. It is a town in which various interest groups diverge on issues of local importance, but in a sense of community remains an important feature of life. Finally, it has a sociodemographic history of both surface transience and underlying stability. If local land becomes available, Indian Springs has some room for growth but must first consider the historical effects of growth on the town and its desired direction for the future

  2. Analysis of barriers and levers to the implementation of strategies of adaptation to climate changes - 2014-2015. The case of urban communities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, Guillaume; Leseur, Alexia

    2015-12-01

    This is the final report of a research project (ABSTRACT-colurba) which aimed at exploring decision mechanisms and organisational dynamics underlying the elaboration of strategies of adaptation to climate changes by using results of a field study among ten previously selected French local communities. The objectives were to determine priority local social and economic challenges associated with expected impacts of climate changes, to identify economic, organisational and cognitive barriers and levers (at the State, representative or collectivity level) to an optimal implementation of measures of reduction of local vulnerabilities to climate changes, to identify possible or already used diagnosis tools for the assessment of costs and of priority investments, and to make comparisons with other referenced cases and to assess possibilities to bypass barriers thanks to a dialogue with stakeholders. After a presentation of the project (objectives, institutional context, guides and methodologies, scientific approach for data acquisition and analysis), the report presents and discusses the obtained results regarding the place given to adaptation in local policies (PCET, the French local climate-energy plans), representations of adaptation, the inclusion of adaptation in the agenda of public climatic action, tools to make adaptation operational, barriers and levers to action implementation

  3. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccination in community-dwelling elderly people: an individual participant data meta-analysis of test-negative design case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishian, Maryam; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Bissielo, Ange; Castilla, Jesus; Cohen, Cheryl; Englund, Helene; Gefenaite, Giedre; Huang, Wan-Ting; la Bastide-van Gemert, Sacha; Martinez-Baz, Iván; McAnerney, Johanna M; Ntshoe, Genevie M; Suzuki, Motoi; Turner, Nikki; Hak, Eelko

    2017-03-01

    Several aggregate data meta-analyses have provided estimates of the effectiveness of influenza vaccination in community-dwelling elderly people. However, these studies ignored the effects of patient-level confounders such as sex, age, and chronic diseases that could bias effectiveness estimates. We aimed to assess the confounder-adjusted effectiveness of influenza vaccines on laboratory-confirmed influenza among elderly people by conducting a global individual participant data meta-analysis. In this individual participant data meta-analysis, we considered studies included in a previously conducted aggregate data meta-analysis that included test-negative design case-control studies published up to July 13, 2014. We contacted all authors of the included studies on Dec 1, 2014, to request individual participant data. Patients were excluded if their unique identifier was missing, their vaccination status was unknown, their outcome status was unknown, or they had had suspected influenza infection more than once in the same influenza season. Cases were patients with influenza-like illness symptoms who tested positive for at least one of A H1N1, A H1N1 pdm09, A H3N2, or B viruses; controls were patients with influenza-like illness symptoms who tested negative for these virus types or subtypes. Influenza vaccine effectiveness against overall and subtype-specific laboratory-confirmed influenza were the primary and secondary outcomes. We used a generalised linear mixed model to calculate adjusted vaccine effectiveness according to vaccine match to the circulating strains of influenza virus and intensity of the virus activity (epidemic or non-epidemic). Vaccine effectiveness was defined as the relative reduction in risk of laboratory-confirmed influenza in vaccinated patients compared with unvaccinated patients. We did subgroup analyses to estimate vaccine effectiveness according to hemisphere, age category, and health status. We received 23 of the 53 datasets included in the

  4. Community case management of malaria: exploring support, capacity and motivation of community medicine distributors in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banek, Kristin; Nankabirwa, Joaniter; Maiteki-Sebuguzi, Catherine; DiLiberto, Deborah; Taaka, Lilian; Chandler, Clare I R; Staedke, Sarah G

    2015-05-01

    In Uganda, community services for febrile children are expanding from presumptive treatment of fever with anti-malarials through the home-based management of fever (HBMF) programme, to include treatment for malaria, diarrhoea and pneumonia through Integrated Community Case Management (ICCM). To understand the level of support available, and the capacity and motivation of community health workers to deliver these expanded services, we interviewed community medicine distributors (CMDs), who had been involved in the HBMF programme in Tororo district, shortly before ICCM was adopted. Between October 2009 and April 2010, 100 CMDs were recruited to participate by convenience sampling. The survey included questionnaires to gather information about the CMDs' work experience and to assess knowledge of fever case management, and in-depth interviews to discuss experiences as CMDs including motivation, supervision and relationships with the community. All questionnaires and knowledge assessments were analysed. Summary contact sheets were made for each of the 100 interviews and 35 were chosen for full transcription and analysis. CMDs faced multiple challenges including high patient load, limited knowledge and supervision, lack of compensation, limited drugs and supplies, and unrealistic expectations of community members. CMDs described being motivated to volunteer for altruistic reasons; however, the main benefits of their work appeared related to 'becoming someone important', with the potential for social mobility for self and family, including building relationships with health workers. At the time of the survey, over half of CMDs felt demotivated due to limited support from communities and the health system. Community health worker programmes rely on the support of communities and health systems to operate sustainably. When this support falls short, motivation of volunteers can wane. If community interventions, in increasingly complex forms, are to become the solution to

  5. Ion Torrent PGM as tool for fungal community analysis: a case study of endophytes in Eucalyptus grandis reveals high taxonomic diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kemler

    Full Text Available The Kingdom Fungi adds substantially to the diversity of life, but due to their cryptic morphology and lifestyle, tremendous diversity, paucity of formally described specimens, and the difficulty in isolating environmental strains into culture, fungal communities are difficult to characterize. This is especially true for endophytic communities of fungi living in healthy plant tissue. The developments in next generation sequencing technologies are, however, starting to reveal the true extent of fungal diversity. One of the promising new technologies, namely semiconductor sequencing, has thus far not been used in fungal diversity assessments. In this study we sequenced the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 nuclear encoded ribosomal RNA of the endophytic community of the economically important tree, Eucalyptus grandis, from South Africa using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM. We determined the impact of various analysis parameters on the interpretation of the results, namely different sequence quality parameter settings, different sequence similarity cutoffs for clustering and filtering of databases for removal of sequences with incomplete taxonomy. Sequence similarity cutoff values only had a marginal effect on the identified family numbers, whereas different sequence quality filters had a large effect (89 vs. 48 families between least and most stringent filters. Database filtering had a small, but statistically significant, effect on the assignment of sequences to reference sequences. The community was dominated by Ascomycota, and particularly by families in the Dothidiomycetes that harbor well-known plant pathogens. The study demonstrates that semiconductor sequencing is an ideal strategy for environmental sequencing of fungal communities. It also highlights some potential pitfalls in subsequent data analyses when using a technology with relatively short read lengths.

  6. THE ANALYSIS AND THE DESIGN OF E-MARKETING STRATEGY AT SME’S (A CASE STUDY: THE DARE TO DREAM INDONESIA COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henkie Ongowarsito

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of the research are to analyze the e-marketing strategy and to design e-marketing application which is a website that is appropriate for SME’S of Dare to Dream Indonesia (D2DI community. The methodology of analysis used consists of 4 stages from 7 stages of e-marketing and the design method consists of three last stages of e-marketing. The result achieved is a website as an e-marketing application that can support marketing and promoting activities, expanding the target market, giving complete information and facilitating the customers to access product information, and supporting the communication between D2DI community, SME’S, and the customers. The conclusions obtained are that e-marketing can be a solution to solve customer needs of the availability of complete and current information and communication.Keywords: Information System, content management system, academic development

  7. Mobile Elderly Living Community (MELCO: The Development of the Social Community Model: a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Kouta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elderly prefer to be in their own homes rather than being in hospital or residential homes. Communication between elderly and community nurses is essential in caring and mutual interaction andmodern technologies like MELCO provides the elderly the feeling of independence and safety.Aim: The aim of this paper is to describe the development of the social community model within the objectives of the MELCO project and its application within the community.Methodology: Three axes were taken in consideration: a ontology, b ecological theory and c social network and information systems analyses for the development of the social community model. Fourelderly women participated as a case study in piloting the mobile virtual system. The participants also responded to a short closed ended questionnaire.Results: The analysis of the questionnaire and the discussions with the participants showed that elders found the mobile system useful, easy to use and expressed the actual use of this would help them maintain active. Participants concern of social isolation or dependency on others seems to be trounced through the use of the mobile technology.Conclusions: MELCO social community model is a centric network that enables effective management and collaboration of social and health care teams around the elderly in the community. The teams arevirtual, dynamic and collaborative.

  8. Research impact in the community-based health sciences: an analysis of 162 case studies from the 2014 UK Research Excellence Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Fahy, Nick

    2015-09-21

    The 2014 UK Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) generated a unique database of impact case studies, each describing a body of research and impact beyond academia. We sought to explore the nature and mechanism of impact in a sample of these. The study design was manual content analysis of a large sample of impact case studies (producing mainly quantitative data), plus in-depth interpretive analysis of a smaller sub-sample (for qualitative detail), thereby generating both breadth and depth. For all 162 impact case studies submitted to sub-panel A2 in REF2014, we extracted data on study design(s), stated impacts and audiences, mechanisms of impact, and efforts to achieve impact. We analysed four case studies (selected as exemplars of the range of approaches to impact) in depth, including contacting the authors for their narratives of impact efforts. Most impact case studies described quantitative research (most commonly, trials) and depicted a direct, linear link between research and impact. Research was said to have influenced a guideline in 122 case studies, changed policy in 88, changed practice in 84, improved morbidity in 44 and reduced mortality in 25. Qualitative and participatory research designs were rare, and only one case study described a co-production model of impact. Eighty-two case studies described strong and ongoing linkages with policymakers, but only 38 described targeted knowledge translation activities. In 40 case studies, no active efforts to achieve impact were described. Models of good implementation practice were characterised by an ethical commitment by researchers, strong institutional support and a proactive, interdisciplinary approach to impact activities. REF2014 both inspired and documented significant efforts by UK researchers to achieve impact. But in contrast with the published evidence on research impact (which depicts much as occurring indirectly through non-linear mechanisms), this sub-panel seems to have captured mainly direct

  9. A role for communities in primary prevention of chronic illness? Case studies in regional Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Judy; Braunack-Mayer, Annette; Cargo, Margaret; Larkins, Sarah; Preston, Robyn

    2013-08-01

    In regional Australia "communities of place," defined as bounded geographic locations with a local society, undertake community-wide primary prevention programs. In helping to prevent chronic illness, communities provide valuable resources to the health system. To understand the role of community-health sector partnerships for primary prevention and the community contextual factors that affect them, we studied eight partnerships. We used an embedded multiple case study design and collected data through interviews, nonparticipant observation, and document analysis. These data were analyzed using a typology of community-health sector partnerships and community interaction theory to frame the key community contextual factors that affected partnerships. The dominant factor affecting all partnerships was the presence of a collective commitment that communities brought to making the community a better place through developing health. We call this a communitarian approach. Additional research to investigate factors influencing a communitarian approach and the role it plays in partnerships is required.

  10. Community forestry resources: a case study of selected woodlots in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community forestry resources: a case study of selected woodlots in the Eastern Cape Province. Cori Ham, Francois Theron. Abstract. Community surveys were conducted through the use of participatory community meetings and a questionnaire in the Butterworth area of the Eastern Cape. The objectives of these surveys ...

  11. Multiple timescale analysis of the urban heat island effect based on the Community Land Model: a case study of the city of Xi'an, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meiling; Shen, Huanfeng; Han, Xujun; Li, Huifang; Zhang, Liangpei

    2017-12-06

    Urban heat islands (UHIs) are the phenomenon of urban regions usually being warmer than rural regions, which significantly impacts both the regional ecosystem and societal activities. Numerical simulation can provide spatially and temporally continuous datasets for UHI analysis. In this study, a spatially and temporally continuous ground temperature dataset of Xi'an, China was obtained through numerical simulation based on the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5), at a temporal resolution of 30 min and a spatial resolution of 0.05 ∘ × 0.05 ∘ . Based on the ground temperature, the seasonal average UHI intensity (UHII) was calculated and the seasonal variation of the UHI effect was analyzed. The monthly variation tendency of the urban heat stress was also investigated. Based on the diurnal cycle of ground temperature and the UHI effect in each season, the variation tendencies of the maximum, minimum, and average UHII were analyzed. The results show that the urban heat stress in summer is the strongest among all four seasons. The heat stress in urban areas is very significant in July, and the UHII is the weakest in January. Regarding the diurnal cycle of UHII, the maximum always appears at 06:30 UTC to 07:30 UTC, while the minimum intensity of the UHI effect occurs at different times in the different seasons. The results of this study could provide a reference for policymakers about how to reduce the damage caused by heat stress.

  12. Research partnerships with local communities: two case studies from Papua New Guinea and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almany, G. R.; Hamilton, R. J.; Williamson, D. H.; Evans, R. D.; Jones, G. P.; Matawai, M.; Potuku, T.; Rhodes, K. L.; Russ, G. R.; Sawynok, B.

    2010-09-01

    Partnerships between scientists and local communities can increase research capacity and data delivery while improving management effectiveness through enhanced community participation. To encourage such collaboration, this study demonstrates how these partnerships can be formed, drawing on two case studies in coral reef ecosystems in very different social settings (Papua New Guinea and Australia). In each case, steps towards successfully engaging communities in research were similar. These included: (1) early engagement by collaborating organizations to build trust, (2) ensuring scientific questions have direct relevance to the community, (3) providing appropriate incentives for participation, and (4) clear and open communication. Community participants engaged in a variety of research activities, including locating and capturing fishes, collecting and recording data (weight, length and sex), applying external tags, and removing otoliths (ear bones) for ageing and elemental analysis. Research partnerships with communities enhanced research capacity, reduced costs and, perhaps more importantly, improved the likelihood of long-term community support for marine protected areas (MPAs).

  13. Developing Online Communities for Librarian Researchers: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lili; Kennedy, Marie; Brancolini, Kristine; Stephens, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the role of online communities in connecting and supporting librarian researchers, through the analysis of member activities in the online community for academic librarians that attended the 2014 Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL). The 2014 IRDL cohort members participated in the online community via Twitter…

  14. A Comparative Case Study Analysis of Administrators Perceptions on the Adaptation of Quality and Continuous Improvement Tools to Community Colleges in the State of Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattis, Ted B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether community college administrators in the state of Michigan believe that commonly known quality and continuous improvement tools, prevalent in a manufacturing environment, can be adapted to a community college model. The tools, specifically Six Sigma, benchmarking and process mapping have played a…

  15. Two energy system analysis - cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Antonoff, Jayson; Andersen, Anders N.

    2004-01-01

    The chapter presents tow cases of energy system analysis, illustrating the types of tools and methodologies presently being used for these studies in Denamrk and elsewhere.......The chapter presents tow cases of energy system analysis, illustrating the types of tools and methodologies presently being used for these studies in Denamrk and elsewhere....

  16. RURAL COMMUNITIES AND POLICY PARTICIPATION: THE CASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    This paper adopted the political systems theory. According to Laszlo and Krippner (1998) systems theories include contributions from such seminal thinkers as Alfred North Whitehead, Ludwig von Bertalanffy,. Anatol Rapoport, Kenneth ... people, district level government officials and the general community. All the people ...

  17. Collaborative communities through coproduction : Two case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frieling, M.A.; Lindenberg, S.M.; Stokman, F.N.

    2014-01-01

    Many local councils aim to (re)connect citizens to public planning. This article presents the Collaborative Communities through Coproduction (3C) method as a way to establish cooperation between residents and professionals in improving neighborhood livabiliy. The authors describe common challenges

  18. Collaborative Communities Through Coproduction : Two Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frieling, Margreet A.; Lindenberg, Siegwart M.; Stokman, Frans N.

    Many local councils aim to (re)connect citizens to public planning. This article presents the Collaborative Communities through Coproduction (3C) method as a way to establish cooperation between residents and professionals in improving neighborhood livabiliy. The authors describe common challenges

  19. LYNX community advocacy & service engagement (CASE) project final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This report is a final assessment of the Community Advocacy & Service Engagement (CASE) project, a LYNX-FTA research project designed : to study transit education and public engagement methods in Central Florida. In the Orlando area, as in other part...

  20. Cases of Lyme disease reported in a military community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, P K; Armour, V M

    1993-02-01

    Lyme disease, a growing public health problem in the United States, is also an increasing threat in Europe. Cases identified in a military community in West Germany are presented and problems of diagnosis and treatment discussed.

  1. Ensuring Healthy Youth Development through Community Schools: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Butcher, Dawn; Paluta, Lauren; Sterling, Karen; Anderson, Carol

    2018-01-01

    Using mixed methods, this case study explored outcomes associated with the adoption and implementation of a community schools approach in four Title I schools using the Community Collaboration Model for School Improvement. Trends in school data demonstrate academic achievement improvements in three of the four schools. Absenteeism and the number…

  2. Community-based Tourism and Rural Development: The Case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community-based Tourism and Rural Development: The Case of the Wechiau Hippo Sanctuary in the Wa West District of Ghana. ... the sustainable management of the Sanctuary. KEY DESCRIPTORS: Community-based Tourism, Nature Conservation, Eco-system maintenance, Participatory Planning; Rural Development.

  3. The World of Wonder Accelerated Learning Community: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Julie K.

    This report presents a case study of the World of Wonders Accelerated Learning Community School (WOW). A community school in Ohio is a new kind of public school-an independent public school that is nonsectarian and nondiscriminatory. The report presents three contexts for the study--historical, local and methodological--and highlights some of the…

  4. “An Analysis of the Farmers’ Community Perception and Awareness About Crop Insurance as a Risk Coping Strategy”: A case from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Ghazanfar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the awareness and perception of farmers of Pakistan about the crop insurance. This study was conducted in two tehsils of RajanPur district of Punjab province of Pakistan. Using various statistical tools like arithmetic mean, standard deviation, counting, percentage and analysis of variance, the collected data was analyzed using SPSS. A five-point Likert scale was also used to measure different variables. The findings revealed that majority of the respondents i.e. 64.17% respondents were aware with the term “crop insurance” while the understanding level with crop insurance varied among those who had general awareness about crop insurance i.e. only 29.87 % respondents among those who were aware claimed that they understand well about crop insurance. The major sources of awareness about crop insurance were found to be friends/coworkers and financial institutes. Climatic risk and crop diseases were declared as the most important risks faced by respondents in the study area. There were found considerable misperceptions about crop insurance among farmers i.e. majority of the farmers declared the crop insurance as a scheme which does not compensate their losses as it should be and as well as a kind of a tax which can reduce their income as well as they believed that it is only designed for a specific group of farmers i.e. large scale farmers. Farmers believed that a crop insurance plan with low premium and offering maximum compensation against losses can be acceptable to them. Using ANOVA and CHI SQUARE test, it was found that education and landholdings were significant with the level of awareness while age was not found to be significant with awareness. Before launching crop insurance plans in Pakistan and to make such scheme more successful, government institutes related to agriculture can create awareness among farmers about crop insurance and take steps to reduce the misunderstandings and misperception

  5. Preliminary Context Analysis of Community Informatics Social ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preliminary context analysis is always part of the feasibility study phase in the development of information system for Community Development (CD) purposes. In this paper, a context model and a preliminary context analysis are presented for Social Network Web Application (SNWA) for CD in the Niger Delta region of ...

  6. Barriers to Healthcare in the Transgender Community: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vipul; Asp, Alex; Dwyer, Mary; Georgescu, Claudiu; Duggan, Joan

    2014-09-01

    The transgender community has many unique health needs that are often inadequately addressed by the current medical system. Healthcare workers may lack adequate training to deal with these unique issues, compromising care. Healthcare workers must understand the major barriers to healthcare and heath disparities experienced by the transgender community in order to work to overcome them. This article presents a case illustrating some of the issues that may compromise healthcare for the transgender community as well as measures taken by the providers in response to this case to improve caring for this population in the future.

  7. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccination in community-dwelling elderly people : An individual participant data meta-analysis of test-negative design case-control studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darvishian, Maryam; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Bissielo, Ange; Castilla, Jesus; Cohen, Cheryl; Englund, Helene; Gefenaite, Giedre; Huang, Wan-Ting; la Bastide-van Gemert, Sacha; Martinez-Baz, Ivan; McAnerney, Johanna M; Ntshoe, Genevie M; Suzuki, Motoi; Turner, Nikki; Hak, Eelko

    Background Several aggregate data meta-analyses have provided estimates of the effectiveness of influenza vaccination in community-dwelling elderly people. However, these studies ignored the effects of patient-level confounders such as sex, age, and chronic diseases that could bias effectiveness

  8. Benchmarking Alumni Relations in Community Colleges: Findings from a 2012 CASE Survey. CASE White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradise, Andrew; Heaton, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, CASE founded the Center for Community College Advancement to provide training and resources to help community colleges build and sustain effective fundraising, alumni relations and communications and marketing programs. This white paper summarizes the results of a groundbreaking survey on alumni relations programs at community colleges…

  9. Community case management improves use of treatment for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ethiopia's Health Extension Workers (HEW) deliver preventive interventions and treat childhood diarrhea and malaria, but not pneumonia. Most of Ethiopia's annual estimated 4 million childhood pneumonia cases go untreated. Objective: Evaluate the performance of volunteers in providing Community Case ...

  10. Participatory evaluation of community actions as a learning methodology for personal and community empowerment: case studies and empowerment processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Úcar Martínez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Participatory evaluation (PE is a hybrid methodology that can be used simultaneously to investigate and act in groups and communities. It can generate new knowledge about reality, but italso allows changes in the participants and their sociocultural context. This research project, developed over three years, aims to find out whether PE processes are useful and appropriate to evaluate community actionsand to generate learning that contribute to the empowerment of people who develop them.Method: The methodological structure of the research process design Participatory Evaluation processes that are applied in three selected communities-cases, over one year. The steering groups in each caseevaluated four dimensions of Community Development Plans: context, evolution, performance and results, using different techniques and group dynamics. Throughout this process, participants identify the acquiredknowledge and this is linked to indicators of empowerment, using questionnaires, content analysis and semi-structured interviews.Results: The development PE process in the three analyzed cases confirmed that PE is a useful strategy to assess participatory community actions of a territory; to report them to the people of the community; andto make shared decisions, about initiatives in order to improve community actions. The obtained results also verify that, throughout PE, there has been learning in the participants.Conclusions: The involvement of community members in the evaluation makes it more useful, fairer and more valid, but also a fourth positive consequence of PE is empowerment. From the process and the resultsof these cases of Participatory Evaluation, we consider that community EP is social transformation.

  11. Network Analysis in Community Psychology: Looking Back, Looking Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Neal, Zachary P.; Neal, Jennifer Watling

    2017-01-01

    Highlights Network analysis is ideally suited for community psychology research because it focuses on context. Use of network analysis in community psychology is growing. Network analysis in community psychology has employed some potentially problematic practices. Recommended practices are identified to improve network analysis in community psychology.

  12. Evolutionary conceptual analysis: faith community nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebarth, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to report an evolutionary concept analysis of faith community nursing (FCN). FCN is a source of healthcare delivery in the USA which has grown in comprehensiveness and complexity. With increasing healthcare cost and a focus on access and prevention, FCN has extended beyond the physical walls of the faith community building. Faith communities and healthcare organizations invest in FCN and standardized training programs exist. Using Rodgers' evolutionary analysis, the literature was examined for antecedents, attributes, and consequences of the concept. This design allows for understanding the historical and social nature of the concept and how it changes over time. A search of databases using the keywords FCN, faith community nurse, parish nursing, and parish nurse was done. The concept of FCN was explored using research and theoretical literature. A theoretical definition and model were developed with relevant implications. The search results netted a sample of 124 reports of research and theoretical articles from multiple disciplines: medicine, education, religion and philosophy, international health, and nursing. Theoretical definition: FCN is a method of healthcare delivery that is centered in a relationship between the nurse and client (client as person, family, group, or community). The relationship occurs in an iterative motion over time when the client seeks or is targeted for wholistic health care with the goal of optimal wholistic health functioning. Faith integrating is a continuous occurring attribute. Health promoting, disease managing, coordinating, empowering and accessing health care are other essential attributes. All essential attributes occur with intentionality in a faith community, home, health institution and other community settings with fluidity as part of a community, national, or global health initiative. A new theoretical definition and corresponding conceptual model of FCN provides a basis for future nursing

  13. Power, peasant communities and mining industry: community government and access to resources in Michiquillay’s case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Burneo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes changes in community governance in the contextof negotiations with a mining company. We focus on three issues:the role played by the community government on the regulation ofcommunity resources and territory, the diverse and complex intereststhat emerge in the presence of mining activity; and, the communityas a political institution confronting external pressures over its land.We develop a study case focusing on the negotiation process betweenthe Michiquillay peasant community and Anglo American MiningCompany in Cajamarca, Peru. This information was obtained doingfieldwork in the community in 2009. In our analysis we observe thatchanges on community resources regulation, its uses and valorization,as well as changes on the balance of power between economicand political actors, have created a greater level of complexity in thecommunity, creating new levels of community decision and spaces fordisputing resources’ control. At the same time, new inter communalconflicts emerge and fragmentation of community lands increases.In this context the community as an institution plays a central rolein the negotiation process over access productive resource and thedistribution of financial capital.

  14. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine in community-dwelling elderly people : a meta-analysis of test-negative design case-control studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darvishian, Maryam; Bijlsma, Maarten J.; Hak, Eelko; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.

    2014-01-01

    Background The application of test-negative design case-control studies to assess the effectiveness of influenza vaccine has increased substantially in the past few years. The validity of these studies is predicated on the assumption that confounding bias by risk factors is limited by design. We

  15. Community-Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission among Households of Infected Cases: a Pooled Analysis of Primary Data from Three Studies across International Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, J.; Van Rijen, M.; Uhlemann, A.-C.; Miller, M.; Hafer, C.; Vavagiakis, P.; Shi, Q.; Johnson, P. D. R.; Coombs, G.; Van Den Bergh, M. Kluytmans; Kluytmans, J.; Bennett, C. M.; Lowy, F. D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Diverse strain types of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cause infections in community settings worldwide. To examine heterogeneity of spread within households and to identify common risk factors for household transmission across settings, primary data from studies conducted in New York, US, Breda, NL, and Melbourne, AU were pooled. Following MRSA infection of the index patient, household members completed questionnaires and provided nasal swabs. Swabs positive for S. aureus were genotyped by spa-sequencing. Poisson regression with robust error variance was used to estimate prevalence odds ratios for transmission of the clinical isolate to non-index household members. Great diversity of strain types existed across studies. Despite differences between studies, the index patient being colonized with the clinical isolate at the home visit (ptransmission. Targeted decolonization strategies could be used across geographic settings to limit household MRSA transmission. PMID:24763185

  16. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission in households of infected cases: a pooled analysis of primary data from three studies across international settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, J; Van Rijen, M; Uhlemann, A-C; Miller, M; Hafer, C; Vavagiakis, P; Shi, Q; Johnson, P D R; Coombs, G; Kluytmans-Van Den Bergh, M; Kluytmans, J; Bennett, C M; Lowy, F D

    2015-01-01

    Diverse strain types of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cause infections in community settings worldwide. To examine heterogeneity of spread within households and to identify common risk factors for household transmission across settings, primary data from studies conducted in New York (USA), Breda (The Netherlands), and Melbourne (Australia) were pooled. Following MRSA infection of the index patient, household members completed questionnaires and provided nasal swabs. Swabs positive for S. aureus were genotyped by spa sequencing. Poisson regression with robust error variance was used to estimate prevalence odds ratios for transmission of the clinical isolate to non-index household members. Great diversity of strain types existed across studies. Despite differences between studies, the index patient being colonized with the clinical isolate at the home visit (P transmission. Targeted decolonization strategies could be used across geographical settings to limit household MRSA transmission.

  17. Innovation technological energetics in rural communities. Case of study community of “Manantiales”, Villa Clara, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Olalde Font

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This investigation is framed in the analysis of impacts in the local development starting from the taking of decisions on projects of rural energy in Cuban communities that have as economic main activity the agricultural sector, illustrated the results of a case study where the technological most viable options are selected under the optics of the improvement of indicators of community resources. The methods and used materials are characteristic of a field work with application model are characterized for the taking of decisions in the energy area and their sources SURE, as geographical region the community isolated rural “Manantiales” linked to the agrarian sector in the republic of Cuba and the present period review in the thematic one approached. The main indicators are sketched in each resource of the rural community under the optics of the SURE in their version 3.0, as well the characterization of the prediction of the impacts at each technological option on the resources, is exhibited a mean of impacts and the classification of the technologies according to the level of achievements contribute to the indicators of community resources, obtaining as a result that the hydro energy technology is the most viable option with a value of 100 points in the scale from 0 to 100, followed by the GRID with 91.11 and of the photovoltaic systems based on silicon panels with 90.57, in this case all technologies contribute a significant level of achievements to the local community development.

  18. "E-tivities from the Front Line”: A Community of Inquiry Case Study Analysis of Educators’ Blog Posts on the Topic of Designing and Delivering Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phemie Wright

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Designing and implementing successful online learning has been at the forefront of institutional agendas since digital learning increased in market demand over the last decade. However there is still ongoing debate as to the “how” of this arduous task. The Community of Inquiry (CoI is one learning design method that has seen potential in the field, but practical implementation of designing for the important components of Social, Cognitive and Teaching Presence have yet to be fully realised. This paper researches an e-learning design strategy called E-tivities as a suggested possible method for designing for CoI components. The research explored recent online blog posts of experienced learning designers’ and educators’ experience in designing successful online learning using E-tivities. Results suggest the E-tivities do have the potential to cater for all Presences of CoI. Specifically when using E-tivities to design online learning Affective Expression was the highest reported Social Presence design factor. All four components of Cognitive Presence appeared to be present in E-tivities design. The most important component for adequate Teaching Presence factors was the initial Design and Organisation of the course. E-tivities and the 5-Stage Model provides a solid framework for this to occur.

  19. Metagenomic analysis of microbial communities and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    From small clone libraries to large next-generation sequencing datasets – the field of community genomics or metagenomics has developed tremendously within the last years. This chapter will summarize some of these developments and will also highlight pitfalls of current metagenomic analyses. It w...... heterologous expression of metagenomic DNA fragments to discover novel metabolic functions. Lastly, the chapter will shortly discuss the meta-analysis of gene expression of microbial communities, more precisely metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics.......From small clone libraries to large next-generation sequencing datasets – the field of community genomics or metagenomics has developed tremendously within the last years. This chapter will summarize some of these developments and will also highlight pitfalls of current metagenomic analyses...

  20. Setting health priorities in a community: a case example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Alexandre Melo do Rego Sousa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the methodology used in the process of setting health priorities for community intervention in a community of older adults. METHODS Based on the results of a health diagnosis related to active aging, a prioritization process was conceived to select the priority intervention problem. The process comprised four successive phases of problem analysis and classification: (1 grouping by level of similarity, (2 classification according to epidemiological criteria, (3 ordering by experts, and (4 application of the Hanlon method. These stages combined, in an integrated manner, the views of health team professionals, community nursing and gerontology experts, and the actual community. RESULTS The first stage grouped the identified problems by level of similarity, comprising a body of 19 issues for analysis. In the second stage these problems were classified by the health team members by epidemiological criteria (size, vulnerability, and transcendence. The nine most relevant problems resulting from the second stage of the process were submitted to expert analysis and the five most pertinent problems were selected. The last step identified the priority issue for intervention in this specific community with the participation of formal and informal community leaders: Low Social Interaction in Community Participation. CONCLUSIONS The prioritization process is a key step in health planning, enabling the identification of priority problems to intervene in a given community at a given time. There are no default formulas for selecting priority issues. It is up to each community intervention team to define its own process with different methods/techniques that allow the identification of and intervention in needs classified as priority by the community.

  1. Social network analysis community detection and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Missaoui, Rokia

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to recent progress in social network analysis with a high focus on community detection and evolution. The eleven chapters cover the identification of cohesive groups, core components and key players either in static or dynamic networks of different kinds and levels of heterogeneity. Other important topics in social network analysis such as influential detection and maximization, information propagation, user behavior analysis, as well as network modeling and visualization are also presented. Many studies are validated through real social networks such as Twitter. This edit

  2. Analysis of importance level and quality achievement aspect in dental health service (A case study on Waru Sidoarjo Community Dental Health Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufan Bramantoro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients as customers of health services actually have expectation and assessment of health services perceived. During the initial interview conducted at Waru Sidoarjo Community Dental Health Service (Waru Sidoarjo CDHS, it is known that one hundred percent of initial respondents were not satisfied with dental care service provided. All of those respondents assessed that Waru Sidoarjo CDHS still has not met their expectations of service quality factors considered to be important for them. It is even known that there is usually a gap between the expectations of quality dental care service and the assessment of services perceived. As a result, further researches are needed to be conducted regarding the level of importance and achievement-related with factors that affect the quality of health services. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the level of importance and achievement of the quality aspects of the health service provided by Waru Sidoarjo CDHS. Methods: This study can be considered as a descriptive observational study. The instrument used in this study was measurement instruments of service quality. Respondents in the study were 200 patients who visited to dental care services in Waru Sidoarjo CDHS in July 2011. Results: All of the attributes had a mean value of dominant importance and assessments at four. The attributes of the appearance feasibility of medical staffs had the highest interest, about 4.780. Meanwhile, the mean value of the lowest importance was on the attributes of the service suitability, about 4.595. During the observation of the service value, it is also known that the highest mean value was on the non-discriminative services, about 4.600. Conclusion: It can be concluded that there were attributes considered to be important for patients, but still not being fully met by health services provided by the service provider or Community Dental Health Care. Those attributes involving waiting room

  3. Engineering Hybrid Learning Communities: The Case of a Regional Parent Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Strickroth

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an approach (and a corresponding system design for supporting regionally bound hybrid learning communities (i.e., communities which combine traditional face-to-face elements with web based media such as online community platforms, e-mail and SMS newsletters. The goal of the example community used to illustrate the approach was to support and motivate (especially hard-to-reach underprivileged parents in the education of their young children. The article describes the design process used and the challenges faced during the socio-technical system design. An analysis of the community over more than one year indicates that the hybrid approach works better than the two separated “traditional” approaches separately. Synergy effects like advertising effects from the offline trainings for the online platform and vice versa occurred and regular newsletters turned out to have a noticeable effect on the community.

  4. Veterans' Transitions to Community College: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Holly A.

    2012-01-01

    Veterans on college campuses are not new; however, the recent influx of veterans returning home from war-time service present challenges to the colleges they attend. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the transition process experienced by veterans leaving military service and attending community college for the first time.…

  5. A case study of Ghana's Community- Based Rural Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-02

    Oct 2, 2012 ... 9, No. 2, October, 2012. Kwadwo Adusei-Asante and Peter Hancock. When Empowerment Disempowers: A case study of Ghana's Community-Based Rural Development Projects. Nussbaum, M. (2000). Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  6. Putting the Community Back into Community Networks: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horning, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the role that community networks can take in fulfilling McQuail's call for a more democratic-participant form of mass media. Community networks, which are online grassroots organizations designed to promote local community initiatives, increased their Internet presence in the 1990s. However, their number has declined in recent…

  7. Results from the 2014 CASE Survey of Community College Foundations. CASE White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradise, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) founded the Center for Community College Advancement to provide training and resources to help community colleges build and sustain effective fundraising, alumni relations, and communications and marketing programs. A goal for the center is to collect data on best practices at…

  8. Benchmarking Alumni Relations in Community Colleges: Findings from a 2015 CASE Survey. CASE White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradise, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Building on the inaugural survey conducted three years prior, the 2015 CASE Community College Alumni Relations survey collected additional insightful data on staffing, structure, communications, engagement, and fundraising. This white paper features key data on alumni relations programs at community colleges across the United States. The paper…

  9. [A phylogenetic analysis of plant communities of Teberda Biosphere Reserve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulakov, A A; Egorov, A V; Onipchenko, V G

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of communities is based on the comparison of distances on the phylogenetic tree between species of a community under study and those distances in random samples taken out of local flora. It makes it possible to determine to what extent a community composition is formed by more closely related species (i.e., "clustered") or, on the opposite, it is more even and includes species that are less related with each other. The first case is usually interpreted as a result of strong influence caused by abiotic factors, due to which species with similar ecology, a priori more closely related, would remain: In the second case, biotic factors, such as competition, may come to the fore and lead to forming a community out of distant clades due to divergence of their ecological niches: The aim of this' study Was Ad explore the phylogenetic structure in communities of the northwestern Caucasus at two spatial scales - the scale of area from 4 to 100 m2 and the smaller scale within a community. The list of local flora of the alpine belt has been composed using the database of geobotanic descriptions carried out in Teberda Biosphere Reserve at true altitudes exceeding.1800 m. It includes 585 species of flowering plants belonging to 57 families. Basal groups of flowering plants are.not represented in the list. At the scale of communities of three classes, namely Thlaspietea rotundifolii - commumties formed on screes and pebbles, Calluno-Ulicetea - alpine meadow, and Mulgedio-Aconitetea subalpine meadows, have not demonstrated significant distinction of phylogenetic structure. At intra level, for alpine meadows the larger share of closely related species. (clustered community) is detected. Significantly clustered happen to be those communities developing on rocks (class Asplenietea trichomanis) and alpine (class Juncetea trifidi). At the same time, alpine lichen proved to have even phylogenetic structure at the small scale. Alpine (class Salicetea herbaceae) that

  10. Cohorts and community: a case study of community engagement in the establishment of a health and demographic surveillance site in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allotey, Pascale; Reidpath, Daniel D.; Devarajan, Nirmala; Rajagobal, Kanason; Yasin, Shajahan; Arunachalam, Dharmalingam; Imelda, Johanna Debora; Soyiri, Ireneous; Davey, Tamzyn; Jahan, Nowrozy

    2014-01-01

    Background Community engagement is an increasingly important requirement of public health research and plays an important role in the informed consent and recruitment process. However, there is very little guidance about how it should be done, the indicators for assessing effectiveness of the community engagement process and the impact it has on recruitment, retention, and ultimately on the quality of the data collected as part of longitudinal cohort studies. Methods An instrumental case study approach, with data from field notes, policy documents, unstructured interviews, and focus group discussions with key community stakeholders and informants, was used to explore systematically the implementation and outcomes of the community engagement strategy for recruitment of an entire community into a demographic and health surveillance site in Malaysia. Results For a dynamic cohort, community engagement needs to be an ongoing process. The community engagement process has likely helped to facilitate the current response rate of 85% in the research communities. The case study highlights the importance of systematic documentation of the community engagement process to ensure an understanding of the effects of the research on recruitment and the community. Conclusions A critical lesson from the case study data is the importance of relationships in the recruitment process for large population-based studies, and the need for ongoing documentation and analysis of the impact of cumulative interactions between research and community engagement. PMID:24804983

  11. The Social Acceptance of Community Solar: A Portland Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Anne

    Community solar is a renewable energy practice that's been adopted by multiple U.S. states and is being considered by many more, including the state of Oregon. A recent senate bill in Oregon, called the "Clean Electricity and Coal Transition Plan", includes a provision that directs the Oregon Public Utility Commission to establish a community solar program for investor-owned utilities by late 2017. Thus, energy consumers in Portland will be offered participation in community solar projects in the near future. Community solar is a mechanism that allows ratepayers to experience both the costs and benefits of solar energy while also helping to offset the proportion of fossil-fuel generated electricity in utility grids, thus aiding climate change mitigation. For community solar to achieve market success in the residential sector of Portland, ratepayers of investor-owned utilities must socially accept this energy practice. The aim of this study was to forecast the potential social acceptance of community solar among Portland residents by measuring willingness to participate in these projects. Additionally, consumer characteristics, attitudes, awareness, and knowledge were captured to assess the influence of these factors on intent to enroll in community solar. The theory of planned behavior, as well as the social acceptance, diffusion of innovation, and dual-interest theories were frameworks used to inform the analysis of community solar adoption. These research objectives were addressed through a mixed-mode survey of Portland residents, using a stratified random sample of Portland neighborhoods to acquire a gradient of demographics. 330 questionnaires were completed, yielding a 34.2% response rate. Descriptive statistics, binomial logistic regression models, and mean willingness to pay were the analyses conducted to measure the influence of project factors and demographic characteristics on likelihood of community solar participation. Roughly 60% of respondents

  12. Urban Community, poverty and corruption: the case of Annaba, Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadji KAHOUA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The population in the most Mediterranean countries, particularly in Algeria, is concentrated to the urban communities, cities with more or less importance, urban and coastal regions. This trend of rapid growth of the urban communities leads to multiple consequences both economically and socially on the use of resources and their distribution. The urban is the area where cross the resources, the population and the production activities and yours management. To analyze the corruption as a phenomenon triple (economic, social and institutional through an urban community (as Annaba’s case in this research it may well prove very fruitful in terms of lessons on this central phenomenon and its impacts in the North African countries.

  13. COMPLEXITY OF ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS (THE CASE OF MARINE CILIATE COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Burkovsky

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the seasonal and long-term dynamics of marine interstitial ciliates communities as a result of the processes of system self-organization (of increasing complexity in constantly fluctuating environment. The traits of simple structure of ciliate community include substantial variability in the composition (even in case of stable environment and the lack of sustainable combinations of species. The mechanism of the current state maintenance is the lack of energy supply in certain periods or in specific loci of space, as well as large amplitude and unpredictable fluctuations of environmental factors. An indication of the community’s complexity is availability of stable combinations of species in time and space. The mechanisms of formation of stable species combinations are a constant flow of external energy, optimal values and stability of environmental factors (including repeatability of seasonal cycles and the use of space resources by species according the principle of complementarity of ecological niches.

  14. A Legal Analysis of Safeguard Measures in the European Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Ma

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2002, the European Community imposed its first safeguard measure since the establishment of the WTO. And in 2003, it introduced two new regulations on safeguard measures, namely the “Council Regulation on a transitional product- specific safeguard mechanism for imports originating in the People's Republic of China” and the “Council Regulation on measures that the Community may take in relation to the combined effect of anti-dumping or anti-subsidy measures with safeguard measures." In this article, the author analyzes these safeguard measures and the European Commission's practice of such measures. By comparing the safeguard laws and their practice, it is the author's intention to clarify whether the safeguard measures in thIn 2002, the European Community imposed its first safeguard measure since the establishment of the WTO. And in 2003, it introduced two new regulations on safeguard measures, namely the "Council Regulation on a transitional product- specific safeguard mechanism for imports originating in the People's Republic of China" and the "Council Regulation on measures that the Community may take in relation to the combined effect of anti-dumping or anti-subsidy measures with safeguard measures." In this article, the author analyzes these safeguard measures and the European Commission's practice of such measures. By comparing the safeguard laws and their practice, it is the author's intention to clarify whether the safeguard measures in the European Community comply with the WTO Agreement on Safeguards. In conclusion, based on the analysis of safeguard measures in the European Community's legal system and their practice in actual cases, it apparent that the European Community is making a serious effort to comply with the standards of the WTO Safeguards Agreement. In certain respects, the European Community has a comparatively higher level of standards than the WTO. Nevertheless, there continue to be challenges to WTO

  15. First 101 Robotic General Surgery Cases in a Community Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Robertson, Jarrod C; Alrajhi, Sharifah

    2016-01-01

    The general surgeon's robotic learning curve may improve if the experience is classified into categories based on the complexity of the procedures in a small community hospital. The intraoperative time should decrease and the incidence of complications should be comparable to conventional laparoscopy. The learning curve of a single robotic general surgeon in a small community hospital using the da Vinci S platform was analyzed. Measured parameters were operative time, console time, conversion rates, complications, surgical site infections (SSIs), surgical site occurrences (SSOs), length of stay, and patient demographics. Between March 2014 and August 2015, 101 robotic general surgery cases were performed by a single surgeon in a 266-bed community hospital, including laparoscopic cholecystectomies, inguinal hernia repairs; ventral, incisional, and umbilical hernia repairs; and colorectal, foregut, bariatric, and miscellaneous procedures. Ninety-nine of the cases were completed robotically. Seven patients were readmitted within 30 days. There were 8 complications (7.92%). There were no mortalities and all complications were resolved with good outcomes. The mean operative time was 233.0 minutes. The mean console operative time was 117.6 minutes. A robotic general surgery program can be safely implemented in a small community hospital with extensive training of the surgical team through basic robotic skills courses as well as supplemental educational experiences. Although the use of the robotic platform in general surgery could be limited to complex procedures such as foregut and colorectal surgery, it can also be safely used in a large variety of operations with results similar to those of conventional laparoscopy.

  16. Identity theft in community mental health patients: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, Jonathon; Konrad, Shane; Yanofski, Jason; Everett, Anita

    2007-05-01

    Identity theft is a serious problem in the United States, and persons with enduring mental illnesses may be particularly vulnerable to becoming victims of this crime. Victims of identity theft experience a variety of consequences that include financial loss and serious emotional distress. Little is known about the impact of identity theft on individuals with mental illnesses. The two cases from a community mental health center presented in this article demonstrate many of the facets that may be associated with an increased risk for becoming the victim of identity theft. A summary of preventive steps as well as steps involved in resolving the crime once one has become a victim are presented.

  17. Stakeholders' perceptions of integrated community case management by community health workers: a post-intervention qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise L Buchner

    Full Text Available Integrated community case management (iCCM involves delivery of simple medicines to children with pneumonia, diarrhea and/or malaria by community health workers (CHWs. Between 2010 and 2012, an iCCM intervention trial was implemented by Healthy Child Uganda. This study used qualitative tools to assess whether project stakeholders perceived that iCCM improved access to care for children under five years of age.The intervention involved training and equipping 196 CHWs in 98 study villages in one sub-county in Uganda in iCCM. During the eight-month intervention, CHWs assessed sick children, provided antimalarials (coartem for fever, antibiotics (amoxicillin for cough and fast breathing, oral rehydration salts/zinc for diarrhea, and referred very sick children to health facilities. In order to examine community perceptions and acceptability of iCCM, post-intervention focus groups and key respondent interviews involving caregivers, health workers, CHWs and local leaders were carried out by experienced facilitators using semi-structured interview guides. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis techniques.Respondents reported increased access to health care for children as a result of iCCM. Access was reportedly closer to home, available more hours in a day, and the availability of CHWs was perceived as more reliable. CHW care was reported to be trustworthy and caring. Families reported saving money especially due to reduced transportation costs, and less time away from home. Respondents also perceived better health outcomes. Linkages between health facilities and communities were reportedly improved by the iCCM intervention due to the presence of trained CHWs in the community.iCCM delivered by CHWs may improve access to health care and is acceptable to families. Policymakers should continue to seek opportunities to implement and support iCCM, particularly in remote communities where there are health worker shortages.

  18. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowash, Madeleine G.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the landscape of S. aureus infections around the globe. Initially recognized for its ability to cause disease in young and healthy individuals without healthcare exposures as well as for its distinct genotype and phenotype, this original description no longer fully encompasses the diversity of CA-MRSA as it continues to expand its niche. Using four case studies, we highlight a wide range of the clinical presentations and challenges of CA-MRSA. Based on these cases we further explore the globally polygenetic background of CA-MRSA with a special emphasis on generally less characterized populations. PMID:24085688

  19. Language and culture in the Deaf community: a case study in a South African special school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stander, Marga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An ethnographic case study on Deaf culture was done at the Thiboloha Special School in a rural area of the Free State province in South Africa. Two Deaf learners and three Deaf teaching assistants participated in this study. Although they were all part of the hearing Sotho culture, they were also full participants in the Deaf community. The study was done by means of video recordings, interviews, and questionnaires. The study reveals the diversity of the Deaf community with a vibrant and unique culture associated with this school, which gives them a sense of belonging. The analysis of the questionnaires, interviews, and recordings in this study shows how significant it is for the Deaf to be part of a Deaf community and culture, as well as part of a hearing community. It is important for them to be Deaf (with a capital ‘D’ and have a Deaf identity. It became evident in this study that Deaf people prefer to use Sign Language for communication purposes in the Deaf community. The study also shows the key role the school plays in introducing Deaf learners to Deaf culture and community, and South African Sign Language, which connects them to a wider Deaf and hearing community. The school became the participants’ new community where they found their Deaf identity, their own language and culture. The school fulfilled its role to realise the importance and value of Deaf culture and community and succeeded in de-pathologising deafness. This study confirms the responsibility of and opportunity for schools to educate their Deaf learners about their culture and community.

  20. Community engagement in global health research: case studies from the developing world—the Zomba District, Malawi case study

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Emma R. M. Cohen

    2008-01-01

    Community engagement influences the success of research. Investigators conducting international research necessitate an understanding of effective practices in community engagement. This case study examines the practice of community engagement in Zomba District, Malawi as part of a larger multiple case studies design with the objective of elucidating global practices of community engagement. Poverty and disease are widespread in Malawi. Dignitas International, an academic NGO, implemented a c...

  1. Establishing new nursing roles: a case study of the English community matron initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Vari; Goodman, Claire; Manthorpe, Jill; Davies, Sue; Scott, Cherill; Gage, Heather; Iliffe, Steve

    2011-10-01

    To examine the factors affecting the extent to which English policy on the introduction of community matrons for people with chronic conditions was implemented. Improving health services for people with chronic diseases (long-term conditions) is an international priority. In England, the new post of community matron, a case management role, was introduced. A target was set for 3000 community matrons to be in post by 2008, but this was not achieved. A realist, pragmatic evaluation of the introduction of community matron posts. The study used mixed methods at multiple levels: an analysis of national and local strategy and planning documents, a national survey and a stakeholder analysis using semi-structured interviews in three primary care organisation case study sites. National policy established targets for the introduction of community matron posts, but there was local variation in implementation. Pragmatic decisions reflected the history of local service configurations, available finance, opportunities or challenges created by other service redesigns and scepticism about the value of the community matron role. There was resistance to 'bolt on' nursing roles in primary care. The implementation of the community matron role is an example of how a policy imperative that valued the clinical skills and expertise of nurses was reinterpreted to fit with local patterns of service delivery. Before new nursing roles are introduced through national policies, a more nuanced understanding is required of the local factors that resist or support such changes. There is a need for consultation and understanding of local conditions before the implementation of workforce initiatives. For clinicians, it is important to understand how the context of care shapes priorities and definitions of new nursing roles and how their expertise is recognised and used. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Using Correspondence Analysis in Multiple Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienstra, Natascha; van der Heijden, Peter G.M.

    2015-01-01

    In qualitative research of multiple case studies, Miles and Huberman proposed to summarize the separate cases in a so-called meta-matrix that consists of cases by variables. Yin discusses cross-case synthesis to study this matrix. We propose correspondence analysis (CA) as a useful tool to study

  3. Worst-case analysis of heap allocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puffitsch, Wolfgang; Huber, Benedikt; Schoeberl, Martin

    2010-01-01

    In object oriented languages, dynamic memory allocation is a fundamental concept. When using such a language in hard real-time systems, it becomes important to bound both the worst-case execution time and the worst-case memory consumption. In this paper, we present an analysis to determine...... the worst-case heap allocations of tasks. The analysis builds upon techniques that are well established for worst-case execution time analysis. The difference is that the cost function is not the execution time of instructions in clock cycles, but the allocation in bytes. In contrast to worst-case execution...... time analysis, worst-case heap allocation analysis is not processor dependent. However, the cost function depends on the object layout of the runtime system. The analysis is evaluated with several real-time benchmarks to establish the usefulness of the analysis, and to compare the memory consumption...

  4. Análise espacial dos casos humanos de esquistossomose em uma comunidade horticultora da Zona da Mata de Pernambuco, Brasil Spatial analysis of schistosomiasis human cases in the horticultural community of Zona da Mata of Pernambuco state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onicio Batista Leal Neto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi descrever a distribuição espacial da esquistossomose na comunidade horticultora de Natuba, Vitória de Santo Antão, Pernambuco. Foi conduzido um inquérito parasitológico, onde foi examinado o material fecal de 310 moradores da comunidade. Os casos positivos para Schistosoma mansoni foram georreferenciados e incluídos no croqui da localidade, gerando os mapas de distribuição espacial com estimadores de kernel. Os resultados apresentaram uma alta prevalência para esquistossomose, com 28,4% da população parasitada. Outros parasitos foram encontrados em 25,8% da população. O uso das ferramentas de geoprocessamento permitiu mapear e compreender a distribuição dos casos de esquistossomose no espaço ocupado pela comunidade, destacando e relacionando locais de menor altitude (passíveis de alagamento, com uma maior frequência de casos humanos. Estudos como este fornecem informações para que os serviços de saúde local possam intervir e promover mudanças para que indivíduos residentes em áreas com baixas condições habitacionais minimizem sua exposição ao risco de contrair a esquistossomose.The objective of this study was to describe the spatial distribution of schistosomiasis in horticultural community of Natuba, district of Vitória de Santo Antão, Pernambuco state. It was conducted a parasitological survey, examined the fecal material of 310 community residents. The cases positive for Schistosoma mansoni were geocoded and included in the computerized template of the community, generating maps of spatial distribution with kernel estimators. The results showed a high prevalence of schistosomiasis, with 28.4% of the parasites. Other parasites were found in 25.8% of the population. The use of GIS tools to map and understand the possible distribution of cases of schistosomiasis in the space occupied by the community highlighting and listing locations of lower elevation (able to flooding, with a

  5. Performance of community health workers under integrated community case management of childhood illnesses in eastern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyango Joan N

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curative interventions delivered by community health workers (CHWs were introduced to increase access to health services for children less than five years and have previously targeted single illnesses. However, CHWs in the integrated community case management of childhood illnesses strategy adopted in Uganda in 2010 will manage multiple illnesses. There is little documentation about the performance of CHWs in the management of multiple illnesses. This study compared the performance of CHWs managing malaria and pneumonia with performance of CHWs managing malaria alone in eastern Uganda and the factors influencing performance. Methods A mixed methods study was conducted among 125 CHWs providing either dual malaria and pneumonia management or malaria management alone for children aged four to 59 months. Performance was assessed using knowledge tests, case scenarios of sick children, review of CHWs’ registers, and observation of CHWs in the dual management arm assessing respiratory symptoms. Four focus group discussions with CHWs were also conducted. Results CHWs in the dual- and single-illness management arms had similar performance with respect to: overall knowledge of malaria (dual 72%, single 70%; eliciting malaria signs and symptoms (50% in both groups; prescribing anti-malarials based on case scenarios (82% dual, 80% single; and correct prescription of anti-malarials from record reviews (dual 99%, single 100%. In the dual-illness arm, scores for malaria and pneumonia differed on overall knowledge (72% vs 40%, p vs 96%, p  Conclusion CHWs providing dual-illness management handled malaria cases as well as CHWs providing single-illness management, and also performed reasonably well in the management of pneumonia. With appropriate training that emphasizes pneumonia assessment, adequate supervision, and provision of drugs and necessary supplies, CHWs can provide integrated treatment for malaria and pneumonia.

  6. Initial Impressions of Community-Dwelling Older Adults and Case Managers about Community-Based Telehealth Kiosks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Karen L.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Mecca, Laurel Person; Garlock, Laurie A.; Schulz, Richard; Dick, Andrew W.; Olshansky, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Community-based (multi-user) telehealth interventions may be beneficial for older adults, but there is little research regarding community-based telehealth. We used a qualitative descriptive approach to examine the acceptability and perceived value of community-based telehealth kiosks with regard to current health self-management practices of community-dwelling older adults as a first step in feasibility assessment. Participants included residents (n=6) and community agency case managers (n=3) of a HUD-subsidized senior apartment building. Both positive impressions and concerns of each group are presented. Findings helped guide the plans for future telehealth kiosk implementation and training. PMID:20509594

  7. Plant community analysis and ecology of afromontane and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plant communities of the forests of southwestern Ethiopia were described based on floristic analysis of the data collected between February 1995 and May 1996. Floristic analysis is based on the cover-abundance values of both woody and herbaceous species. Plant community-environment relationship was assessed ...

  8. Livelihood Strategy of Bote Community: A Case Study of Bote Community of Patihani VDC of Chitwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Prasad Acharya

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses upon the changes of Bote community of Nepal, in case of Patihani V.D.C. These changes are influenced by process of urbanization, globalization which has created constraints and opportunities on "Bote people of Patihani VDC". Historically these people had their livelihood from agriculture. Land was a major household asset and crop production (maize, millet, paddy, wheat etc. was the means of survival. But the rapid process of urbanization and globalization has pushed them in transition both with opportunities as well as constraints. The household assets have undergone rapid modification. Now they have no option other than modifying the traditional occupation. Land fragmentation and change in social institution are resulted from the urbanization and globalization. The livelihood diversification and foreign employment have recently emerged as how livelihood strategies in the study area. Due to the proximity to the market, the influence of the urbanization is more apparent in the Bote Village. Most of the households follow the multiple occupations besides agriculture. The role of agriculture activities in their life is substantial. Although a few households sell their crops however most of them sell vegetables. The livelihood strategy of Bote community in the study area is in transition. It is shifted from agriculture to non-agricultural one. It is necessary to ensure access to resources and increase social and political participation of Bote community for integral development of rural community in Nepal. Keywords: poverty; urbanization; commercial farming; tarai ethnic group; traditional occupation DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v4i0.4524 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.4 2010 pp.247-260

  9. Sensitivity analysis for matched pair analysis of binary data: From worst case to average case analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Raiden; Small, Dylan

    2017-12-01

    In matched observational studies where treatment assignment is not randomized, sensitivity analysis helps investigators determine how sensitive their estimated treatment effect is to some unmeasured confounder. The standard approach calibrates the sensitivity analysis according to the worst case bias in a pair. This approach will result in a conservative sensitivity analysis if the worst case bias does not hold in every pair. In this paper, we show that for binary data, the standard approach can be calibrated in terms of the average bias in a pair rather than worst case bias. When the worst case bias and average bias differ, the average bias interpretation results in a less conservative sensitivity analysis and more power. In many studies, the average case calibration may also carry a more natural interpretation than the worst case calibration and may also allow researchers to incorporate additional data to establish an empirical basis with which to calibrate a sensitivity analysis. We illustrate this with a study of the effects of cellphone use on the incidence of automobile accidents. Finally, we extend the average case calibration to the sensitivity analysis of confidence intervals for attributable effects. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  10. Case Study: Chicago. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  11. Case Study: Nashville. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  12. Case Study: Philadelphia. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  13. Case Study: Parramore. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  14. Setting health priorities in a community: a case example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Fábio Alexandre Melo do Rego; Goulart, Maria José Garcia; Braga, Antonieta Manuela Dos Santos; Medeiros, Clara Maria Oliveira; Rego, Débora Cristina Martins; Vieira, Flávio Garcia; Pereira, Helder José Alves da Rocha; Tavares, Helena Margarida Correia Vicente; Loura, Marta Maria Puim

    2017-03-02

    To describe the methodology used in the process of setting health priorities for community intervention in a community of older adults. Based on the results of a health diagnosis related to active aging, a prioritization process was conceived to select the priority intervention problem. The process comprised four successive phases of problem analysis and classification: (1) grouping by level of similarity, (2) classification according to epidemiological criteria, (3) ordering by experts, and (4) application of the Hanlon method. These stages combined, in an integrated manner, the views of health team professionals, community nursing and gerontology experts, and the actual community. The first stage grouped the identified problems by level of similarity, comprising a body of 19 issues for analysis. In the second stage these problems were classified by the health team members by epidemiological criteria (size, vulnerability, and transcendence). The nine most relevant problems resulting from the second stage of the process were submitted to expert analysis and the five most pertinent problems were selected. The last step identified the priority issue for intervention in this specific community with the participation of formal and informal community leaders: Low Social Interaction in Community Participation. The prioritization process is a key step in health planning, enabling the identification of priority problems to intervene in a given community at a given time. There are no default formulas for selecting priority issues. It is up to each community intervention team to define its own process with different methods/techniques that allow the identification of and intervention in needs classified as priority by the community. Descrever a metodologia utilizada no processo de estabelecimento de prioridades em saúde para intervenção comunitária, numa comunidade idosa. Partindo dos resultados de um diagnóstico de saúde no âmbito da promoção do envelhecimento

  15. Community referral for presumptive TB in Nigeria: a comparison of four models of active case finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Adejumo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engagement of communities and civil society organizations is a critical part of the Post-2015 End TB Strategy. Since 2007, many models of community referral have been implemented to boost TB case detection in Nigeria. Yet clear insights into the comparative TB yield from particular approaches have been limited. Methods We compared four models of active case finding in three Nigerian states. Data on presumptive TB case referral by community workers (CWs, TB diagnoses among referred clients, active case finding model characteristics, and CWs compensation details for 2012 were obtained from implementers and CWs via interviews and log book review. Self-reported performance data were triangulated against routine surveillance data to assess concordance. Analysis focused on assessing the predictors of presumptive TB referral. Results CWs referred 4–22 % of presumptive TB clients tested, and 4–24 % of the total TB cases detected. The annual median referral per CW ranged widely among the models from 1 to 48 clients, with an overall average of 13.4 referrals per CW. The highest median referrals (48 per CW/yr and mean TB diagnoses (7.1/yr per CW (H =70.850, p < 0.001 was obtained by the model with training supervision, and $80/quarterly payments (Comprehensive Quotas-Oriented model. The model with irregularly supervised, trained, and compensated CWs contributed the least to TB case detection with a median of 13 referrals per CW/yr and mean of 0.53 TB diagnoses per CW/yr. Hours spent weekly on presumptive TB referral made the strongest unique contribution (Beta = 0.514, p < 0.001 to explaining presumptive TB referral after controlling for other variables. Conclusion All community based TB case-finding projects studied referred a relative low number of symptomatic individuals. The study shows that incentivized referral, appropriate selection of CWs, supportive supervision, leveraged treatment support roles, and a

  16. ANALYSIS OF VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES IN TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvena DENCHEVA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet has changed the way companies interact with customers. Customers have become the active part of the communication with business. Virtual communities are the most popular implication of the usage of Internet into business world. The article presents the nature of virtual communities and how they are functioning in the hospitality industry. The web site of hotel Dobruzda-Dobrich has been analyzed regarding its Internet presence. Internet marketing strategy for improving its internet presence is presented in the paper.

  17. Putting Community Back in the Community College: The Case for a Localized and Problem-Based Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Chad

    2008-01-01

    In this article the move toward international education in the community college is questioned. Who benefits when two-year schools are globalized? An alternative to the current international approach is suggested. The case is made that community colleges serve the public interest when curricula are centered on solving problems unique to the…

  18. Bacterial communities in tetrachloroethene-polluted groundwaters: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotik, Michael; Davidová, Anna; Voříšková, Jana; Baldrian, Petr

    2013-06-01

    The compositions of bacterial groundwater communities of three sites contaminated with chlorinated ethenes were analyzed by pyrosequencing their 16S rRNA genes. For each location, the entire and the active bacterial populations were characterized by independent molecular analysis of the community DNA and RNA. The sites were selected to cover a broad range of different environmental conditions and contamination levels, with tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) being the primary contaminants. Before sampling the biomass, a long-term monitoring of the polluted locations revealed high concentrations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC), which are toxic by-products of the incomplete bacterial degradation of PCE and TCE. The applied pyrosequencing technique enabled known dechlorinators to be identified at a very low detection level (study revealed that only a few species dominated the bacterial communities, with Albidiferax ferrireducens being the only highly prominent member found at all three sites. Only a limited number of OTUs with abundances of up to 1% and high sequence identities to known dechlorinating microorganisms were retrieved from the RNA pools of the two highly contaminated sites. The dechlorinating consortium was likely to be comprised of cDCE-assimilating bacteria (Polaromonas spp.), anaerobic organohalide respirers (mainly Geobacter spp.), and Burkholderia spp. involved in cometabolic dechlorination processes, together with methylotrophs (Methylobacter spp.). The deep sequencing results suggest that the indigenous dechlorinating consortia present at the investigated sites can be used as a starting point for future bioremediation activities by stimulating their anaerobic and aerobic chloroethene degradation capacities (i.e. reductive dechlorination, and metabolic and cometabolic oxidation). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Designing a Virtual Simulation Case for Cultural Competence Using a Community-Based Participatory Research Approach: A Puerto Rican Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Lilly; Brewer, Barbara B; Crist, Janice D; Poedel, Robin J

    In this study, a community-based participatory research approach was used for developing content for a virtual simulation case. The virtual simulation case was designed to develop the cultural competence of prelicensure nursing students in caring for a Puerto Rican patient with diabetes. This article presents the method used to establish a Puerto Rican community advisory board to develop content for a virtual simulation case for cultural competency.

  20. Economic evaluation of community-based case management of patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sabrina S; Pedersen, Kjeld Møller; Weinreich, Ulla M

    2017-01-01

    was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) as cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) from the perspective of the healthcare sector. Costs were valued in British Pounds (£) at price level 2016. Scenario analyses and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted in order to assess uncertainty......Objectives: To analyse the cost effectiveness of community-based case management for patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: The study took place in the third largest municipality in Denmark and was conducted as a randomised controlled trial with 12 months...... of follow-up. A total of 150 patients with COPD were randomised into two groups receiving usual care and case management in addition to usual care. Case management included among other things self care proficiency, medicine compliance, and care coordination. Outcome measure for the analysis...

  1. International Education at Community Colleges: Themes, Practices, and Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latiner Raby, Rosalind, Ed.; Valeau, Edward J., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    This book brings together distinguished scholars, community college practitioners, and emerging leaders to expand upon existing theories, provide reflection on practice, and demonstrate the dynamic nature of community college internationalization. There is a special challenge for United States community colleges to move from selected international…

  2. Leadership in Community Schools: A Frame Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Daniel; Harris, Mary M.

    2003-01-01

    Creating community schools requires changes in collaborating organizations. The authors describe how a major project has been initiated and sustained from the perspectives of key leaders/participants. They discuss four different perspectives or frames for identifying organizational change. (Contains 13 references.) (Author)

  3. Molecular Analysis of Soil Bacterial Communities Following

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analyses (ARDRA) and Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism ... The diversity index measured before ... D concentrations in sites where the herbicide has been applied for sometime. Microbial community could be different in sites that have a prior 2,4-D history as compared to.

  4. Community succession analysis and environmental biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2011-02-14

    Feb 14, 2011 ... The community succession of natural colonized plants on abandoned hilly lands in. Shanxi are below: Assoc. Potentilla ..... during the preceding regeneration stages. In the study area, the area of scrubland ...... pine stands and certain associated physical properties of the soil. Ecological Monographs, 8: ...

  5. Analysis to design test cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Locarti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Test the software is a necessary question in the process to achieve reliability, safety and quality of products, but most testers not aware of the importance of this activity. This article makes a reflection about this topic, and are described some myths and realities of the design and implement test cases. Parts of the concept that software testing should be viewed and applied as a parallel phase the entire product life cycle, and not leave it to the end as an imposition before delivery. Furthermore, is described the essence of the test cases design, while the challenge of this process are discussed. The objective is to present points of view based on experience everyday of this activity within the software engineering view.

  6. Erythroderma: analysis of 247 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cidia Vasconcellos

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The profile of 247 patients with erythroderma during a 23 year period from January, 1962 through March, 1985, with a follow-up period ranging from 1 to 26 years were analysed. The patients presented with diffuse erythema, scaling and pruritus of more than 2 months' duration, and the age ranged from 16 to 60 years. Psoriasis was the most frequent underlying disease with an estimated frequency of 44.9%, the reaction to the use of drugs appeared in 7.3% of total cases and association with reticulosis showed a frequency of 4.1%. The cause of the erythroderma could not be determined in 29.2% of the cases. Sex differences in terms of underlying diseases were not observed. One or more skin biopsies along with the clinical findings were diagnostic or suggestive of the underlying disease in 63.6% of the cases. Repeated skin biopsies are recommended as the best method for etiologic diagnosis of erythroderma. At P=0.05 significance level, masculine/feminine ratio of 2 : 1 was found. The question arises wether causal agent of erythroderma may not be somehow related to different exposure by sex to environmental antigens.

  7. Development programmes in rural communities affected by industrial sites. The case of nuclear plants in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuncal, A.

    2000-01-01

    A socioeconomic analysis performed for rural communities affected by industrial sites, namely for the case of nuclear power plants in Spain a common proposal for all the European countries is made. Existence of a common European program that could cover the following aspects: Creation of a Committee to enhance the participation in decision making process on different aspects, information policies, security, transport, waste management, investments, economic development; Contract between local authorities, State and companies responsibilities and financing; Legal framework of political organization; common socio-economic program including environment, employment, companies activities, responsibilities, taxes

  8. Sport tourism event impacts on the host community – a case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus of this article is on the management and social impacts of sport tourism events on the host community. This article specifically evaluates the Red Bull Big Wave Africa (RBBWA) event as a case study. Of cognisance is the host community\\'s involvement, perceptions, attitudes and an understanding of costs and ...

  9. Establishing a Learning Community to Support Research and Scholarly Training: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jane; Birks, Melanie; Francis, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of learning communities as defined in the literature. An existing case study is described, and the issues that facilitated and constrained the development of this learning community are considered and discussed. Strategies to address threats to the ongoing viability and usefulness of a learning community to support…

  10. Overlapping communities detection based on spectral analysis of line graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Chun; Zhang, Ruisheng; Hu, Rongjing; Huang, Guoming; Wei, Jiaxuan

    2018-05-01

    Community in networks are often overlapping where one vertex belongs to several clusters. Meanwhile, many networks show hierarchical structure such that community is recursively grouped into hierarchical organization. In order to obtain overlapping communities from a global hierarchy of vertices, a new algorithm (named SAoLG) is proposed to build the hierarchical organization along with detecting the overlap of community structure. SAoLG applies the spectral analysis into line graphs to unify the overlap and hierarchical structure of the communities. In order to avoid the limitation of absolute distance such as Euclidean distance, SAoLG employs Angular distance to compute the similarity between vertices. Furthermore, we make a micro-improvement partition density to evaluate the quality of community structure and use it to obtain the more reasonable and sensible community numbers. The proposed SAoLG algorithm achieves a balance between overlap and hierarchy by applying spectral analysis to edge community detection. The experimental results on one standard network and six real-world networks show that the SAoLG algorithm achieves higher modularity and reasonable community number values than those generated by Ahn's algorithm, the classical CPM and GN ones.

  11. Enhancing voluntary participation in community collaborative forest management: a case of Central Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, Sri; Kotani, Koji; Kakinaka, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    This paper examines voluntary participation in community forest management, and characterizes how more participation may be induced. We implemented a survey of 571 respondents and conducted a case study in Central Java, Indonesia. The study's novelty lies in categorizing the degrees of participation into three levels and in identifying how socio-economic factors affect people's participation at each level. The analysis finds that voluntary participation responds to key determinants, such as education and income, in a different direction, depending on each of the three levels. However, the publicly organized programs, such as information provision of benefit sharing, are effective, irrespective of the levels of participation. Overall, the results suggest a possibility of further success and corrective measures to enhance the participation in community forest management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cognitive Presence and Online Learner Engagement: A Cluster Analysis of the Community of Inquiry Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Peter; Bidjerano, Temi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we make the case that online learning continues to grow at a rapid rate and that understanding this innovative mode of education requires analysis that is both conceptually and empirically driven. This study inquires into the concept of "cognitive presence" a multivariate measure of significant learning derived from the Community of…

  13. The case for the community partner in economic development

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Steiger; Tessa Hebb; Lisa A. Hagerman

    2007-01-01

    Community-based organizations promote economic development by assembling investments in affordable housing, mixed-use real estate, community facilities, and small business in specific geographies. A principal way that community-based organizations tap institutional investors for deals is by partnering with investment intermediaries who manage the risk of these transactions by pooling assets, spreading risk across investors, and pricing the transaction up to the associated risk. Such a partner...

  14. [Retrospective Analysis of 17 Family Homicide Cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W J; Ji, P

    2016-12-01

    To summarize the characteristics of family homicide cases and to provide reference for the analysis and prevention of such cases. Seventeen solved family homicide cases in Liyang from 2004 to 2014 were investigated. The original registration information, record of scene investigation, corpse inspection report and case situation were analyzed statistically. The characteristics of the 17 family homicides cases showed that most victims were female and most suspects were male, and spouse infidelity and suspected spouse infidelity have higher proportion in the motives for the killings. Murders by patients with psychosis, camouflage murders and murder-suicides occupied a certain proportion in the family homicide cases. The family homicide cases are correlated with the family factors such as extramarital sexual intercourse and murder by patients with psychosis. Some suspects suicided after murder. The tools for committing crimes have the features of simplicity, randomness and easy source availability. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  15. Erythroderma: analysis of 247 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cidia Vasconcellos

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The profile of 247 patients with erythroderma during a 23 year period from January, 1962 through March, 1985, with a follow-up period ranging from 1 to 26 years were analysed. The patients presented with diffuse erythema, scaling and pruritus of more than 2 months' duration, and the age ranged from 16 to 60 years. Psoriasis was the most frequent underlying disease with an estimated frequency of 44.9%, the reaction to the use of drugs appeared in 7.3% of total cases and association with reticulosis showed a frequency of 4.1%. The cause of the erythroderma could not be determined in 29.2% of the cases. Sex differences in terms of underlying diseases were not observed. One or more skin biopsies along with the clinical findings were diagnostic or suggestive of the underlying disease in 63.6% of the cases. Repeated skin biopsies are recommended as the best method for etiologic diagnosis of erythroderma. At P=0.05 significance level, masculine/feminine ratio of 2 : 1 was found. The question arises wether causal agent of erythroderma may not be somehow related to different exposure by sex to environmental antigens.Foi analisado o perfil de 247 doentes com eritrodermia em um período de 23 anos, de Janeiro de 1962 a março de 1985, com o período de seguimento variando de 1 a 26 anos. Os doentes se apresentavam com eritema universal, descamação e prurido com mais de 2 meses de duração e a idade variava de 16 a 60 anos. A psoríase foi a doença associada mais freqüente, com uma proporção estimada de 44,9%, as reações cutâneas ao uso de drogas contribuíram com 7,3% do total de casos e a associação com reticuloses mostrou uma proporção de 4,1%. A eritrodermia permaneceu como de causa desconhecida em 29,2% dos casos. Não foram observadas diferenças entre os sexos no que diz respeito à doença associada. Um ou mais resultados anátomo patológicos das biópsias de pele, em conjunto com o quadro clínico, foi diagnóstico ou sugestivo do

  16. Emergence of Virtual Communities as Means of Communication: A Case Study on Virtual Health Care Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argan, Mehpare Tokay; Argan, Metin; Suher, Idil K.

    2011-01-01

    Like in all areas, virtual communities make their presence felt in the area of healthcare too. Virtual communities play an important role in healthcare in terms of gathering information on healthcare, sharing of personal interests and providing social support. Virtual communities provide a way for a group of peers to communicate with each other.…

  17. Part-Time Community College Instructors Teaching in Learning Communities: An Exploratory Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Community colleges have a greater portion of students at-risk for college completion than four-year schools and faculty at these institutions are overwhelmingly and increasingly part-time. Learning communities have been identified as a high-impact practice with numerous benefits documented for community college instructors and students: a primary…

  18. Public Policy by Anecdote: The Case of Community College Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombley, William H.

    As part of an effort to end the California budget stalemate, an agreement was reached among state legislators to increase tuition fees for community college students and to impose a $50-per-unit "differential fee" on students already holding a baccalaureate degree. A survey by the Chancellor's Office for the California Community Colleges…

  19. Role of Women Organizations in Community Development: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper analysed the role of women organizations in the development of rural communities in Orlu Agricultural zone of Imo state. Six communities were purposively selected from three Local Government Areas of the Zone for the study. Semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 120 randomly selected ...

  20. Community participation in river monitoring using diatoms: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study demonstrates that there is great potential for the use of diatoms in community monitoring programmes, mainly due to the ease and rapidity with which samples can be collected. The participation of communities is also vital in gaining a more complete overview of the diatom species occurring in South Africa.

  1. From Homeschool to the Community College: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    The number of U.S. homeschooled students has steadily risen from the 1980's to the present, and many eventually choose to attend community colleges (Cogan, 2010; Mason, 2004; Ray, 2004a; Sorey & Duggan, 2008a). Homeschoolers who make community colleges their first structured educational setting outside the home do so for various reasons: (a)…

  2. Community owned solutions for fire management in tropical ecosystems: case studies from Indigenous communities of South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Jayalaxshmi; Bilbao, Bibiana A; Berardi, Andrea

    2016-06-05

    Fire plays an increasingly significant role in tropical forest and savanna ecosystems, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and impacting on biodiversity. Emerging research shows the potential role of Indigenous land-use practices for controlling deforestation and reducing CO2 emissions. Analysis of satellite imagery suggests that Indigenous lands have the lowest incidence of wildfires, significantly contributing to maintaining carbon stocks and enhancing biodiversity. Yet acknowledgement of Indigenous peoples' role in fire management and control is limited, and in many cases dismissed, especially in policy-making circles. In this paper, we review existing data on Indigenous fire management and impact, focusing on examples from tropical forest and savanna ecosystems in Venezuela, Brazil and Guyana. We highlight how the complexities of community owned solutions for fire management are being lost as well as undermined by continued efforts on fire suppression and firefighting, and emerging approaches to incorporate Indigenous fire management into market- and incentive-based mechanisms for climate change mitigation. Our aim is to build a case for supporting Indigenous fire practices within all scales of decision-making by strengthening Indigenous knowledge systems to ensure more effective and sustainable fire management.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Measuring disaster-resilient communities: a case study of coastal communities in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, Shesh Kanta

    2012-01-01

    Vulnerability reduction and resilience building of communities are central concepts in recent policy debates. Although there are fundamental linkages, and complementarities exist between the two concepts, recent policy and programming has focused more on the latter. It is assumed here that reducing underlying causes of vulnerabilities and their interactions with resilience elements is a prerequisite for obtaining resilience capabilities. An integrated approach, incorporating both the vulnerability and resilience considerations, has been taken while developing an index for measuring disaster-resilient communities. This study outlines a method for measuring community resilience capabilities using process and outcome indicators in 43 coastal communities in Indonesia. An index was developed using ten process and 25 outcome indicators, selected on the basis of the ten steps of the Integrated Community Based Risk Reduction (ICBRR) process, and key characteristics of disaster resilient communities were taken from various literatures. The overall index value of all 43 communities was 63, whereas the process and outcome indicator values were measured as 63 and 61.5 respectively. The core components of this index are process and outcome indicators. The tool has been developed with an assumption that both the process and outcome indicators are equally important in building disaster-resilient communities. The combination of both indicators is an impetus to quality change in the community. Process indicators are important for community understanding, ownership and the sustainability of the programme; whereas outcome indicators are important for the real achievements in terms of community empowerment and capacity development. The process of ICBRR approach varies by country and location as per the level of community awareness and organisational strategy. However, core elements such as the formation of community groups, mobilising those groups in risk assessment and planning

  4. The brain injury case management taxonomy (BICM-T); a classification of community-based case management interventions for a common language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukersmith, Sue; Fernandez, Ana; Millington, Michael; Salvador-Carulla, Luis

    2016-04-01

    Case management is a complex intervention. Complexity arises from the interaction of different components: the model (theoretical basis), implementation context (service), population and health condition, focus for the intervention (client and/or their family), case manager's actions (interventions) and the target of case management (integrated care and support, client's community participation). There is a lack of understanding and a common language. To our knowledge there is no classification (taxonomy) for community-based case management. To develop a community-based case management in brain injury taxonomy (BICM-T), as a common language and understanding of case management for use in quality analysis, policy, planning and practice. The mixed qualitative methods used multiple sources of knowledge including scoping, framing and a nominal group technique to iteratively develop the Beta version (draft) of the taxonomy. A two part developmental evaluation involving case studies and mapping to international frameworks assessed the applicability and acceptability (feasibility) before finalization of the BICM-T. The BICM-T includes a definition of community-based case management, taxonomy trees, tables and a glossary. The interventions domain tree has 9 main actions (parent category): engagement, holistic assessment, planning, education, training and skills development, emotional and motivational support, advising, coordination, monitoring; 17 linked actions (children category); 8 related actions; 63 relevant terms defined in the glossary. The BICM-T provides a knowledge map with the definitions and relationships between the core actions (interventions domain). Use of the taxonomy as a common language will benefit practice, quality analysis, evaluation, policy, planning and resource allocation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of medications returned to community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Tess H; Helms, Margaret L; Braund, Rhiannon

    2009-10-01

    There are many causes of medication waste, including excess supply, treatment changes, and patient nonadherence to therapy. Investigating medication returns may indicate areas for targeting interventions to reduce waste. To identify and quantify the types and amounts of medications returned to community pharmacies and, specifically, to quantify the percentage of medication returned from the original dispensing, its therapeutic category, and reasons for not being used. Unsolicited medication returned for disposal to the 24 community pharmacies in the Taranaki region (approximately 37,000 households) of New Zealand over a 6-week period was analyzed. The results were entered into a database, recording medication, amount originally issued (if known), date of issue, Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification, and reason for nonuse. Cross-tabulation of ATC category versus percentage returned as well as ATC category versus reason for returns was performed. Adjusted standardized residuals were investigated to determine specific cells that were in excess of the expected counts. Complete information was available for 2704 items. The majority (51%) of returns contained 75-100% of the original dispensed amount of medication. For the respiratory category, 77% of the returns were in the 75-100% group, significantly more than for any other therapeutic group. Reasons for returns were recorded as bereavement (22%), surplus to requirements (17%), expired (8%), medication change (11%), dose change (3%), and unknown (39%). The cardiovascular group and respiratory groups had a higher rate of returned drugs due to medication changes and surplus to requirements, respectively. The majority of returned medications contained greater than 75% of the original amount issued. Identification of therapeutic groups having higher rates of returns due to medication changes or surplus to requirements may suggest areas to target to reduce medication waste.

  6. Drugs for some but not all: inequity within community health worker teams during introduction of integrated community case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercader, Hannah Faye G; Kyomuhangi, Teddy; Buchner, Denise L; Kabakyenga, Jerome; Brenner, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    The Ugandan health system now supports integrated community case management (iCCM) by community health workers (CHWs) to treat young children ill with fever, presumed pneumonia, and diarrhea. During an iCCM pilot intervention study in southwest Uganda, two CHWs were selected from existing village teams of two to seven CHWs, to be trained in iCCM. Therefore, some villages had both 'basic CHWs' who were trained in standard health promotion and 'iCCM CHWs' who were trained in the iCCM intervention. A qualitative study was conducted to investigate how providing training, materials, and support for iCCM to some CHWs and not others in a CHW team impacts team functioning and CHW motivation. In 2012, iCCM was implemented in Kyabugimbi sub-county of Bushenyi District in Uganda. Following seven months of iCCM intervention, focus group discussions and key informant interviews were conducted alongside other end line tools as part of a post-iCCM intervention study. Study participants were community leaders, caregivers of young children, and the CHWs themselves ('basic' and 'iCCM'). Qualitative content analysis was used to identify prominent themes from the transcribed data. The five main themes observed were: motivation and self-esteem; selection, training, and tools; community perceptions and rumours; social status and equity; and cooperation and team dynamics. 'Basic CHWs' reported feeling hurt and overshadowed by 'iCCM CHWs' and reported reduced self-esteem and motivation. iCCM training and tools were perceived to be a significant advantage, which fueled feelings of segregation. CHW cooperation and team dynamics varied from area to area, although there was an overall discord amongst CHWs regarding inequity in iCCM participation. Despite this discord, reasonable personal and working relationships within teams were retained. Training and supporting only some CHWs within village teams unexpectedly and negatively impacted CHW motivation for 'basic CHWs', but not necessarily team

  7. The Journey to Meet Emerging Community Benefit Requirements in a Rural Hospital: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Allison V; Levin, Pamela F

    2015-10-22

    The Affordable Care Act requires nonprofit hospitals to collaborate with public health agencies and community stakeholders to identify and address community health needs. As a rural organization, Wabash County (Indiana) Hospital pursued new approaches to achieve these revised requirements of the community benefit mandate. Using a case study approach, the authors provide a historical review of governmental relationships with nonprofit community hospitals, offer a case study application for implementing legislative mandates and community benefit requirements, share the insights they garnered on their journey to meet the mandates, and conclude that drawing upon the existing resources in the community and using current community assets in novel ways can help conserve time, and also financial, material, and human resources in meeting legislative mandates.

  8. Online Communities: The Case of Immigrants in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaretou, Ioannis; Karousos, Nikos; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Foteinou, Georgia-Barbara; Pavlidis, Giorgos

    Immigrants in Greece are an increasing population, very often threatened by poverty and social exclusion. At the same time Greek government has no formal policy concerning their assimilation in Greek society and this situation generates multiple problems in both immigrants and native population. In this work we suggest that new technology can alleviate these effects and we present specific tools and methodologies adopted by ANCE, in order to support online communities and specifically immigrant communities in Greece. This approach has the potential to support immigrant communities' in terms of the organization of personal data, communication, and provision of a working space for dedicated use. The Information System's operational features are also presented, along with other characteristics and state-of-the-art features in order to propose a general direction to the design of online communities' mechanisms.

  9. Community-based tourism in Cape Verde - a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas Lopez-Guzman; Osvaldo Borges; Ana Maria Castillo-Canalejo

    2011-01-01

    Community-based tourism is taking its place in the world as an alternative to traditional tourist destinations, especially in developing countries. This form of tourism allows for greater contact with the local community and for the tourist to experience new sensations while enabling the economic and social development of the geographic area. In this paper, the results of fieldwork carried out in the island of Fogo (Cape Verde) are presented, assessing the opinion and perception tourists visi...

  10. Head raising analysis and case revaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ager Gondra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that Basque relative clause construction follows the Head Raising Analysis: the CP of the relative clause is a complement to the external D and the Head of the relative clause, base-generated inside the TP, moves to the specifier position of the CP. This analysis predicts that the raised DPwill show a TP-internal Case. However, this is not the case, and the DP manifests the Case associated with the main clause. In order to address these Case inconsistencies, Precariousness Condition is proposed. This condition states that a DCase valued u-feature is precarious until it is sent to Spell-Out and therefore, the value is visible for further targeting by a c-commanding Probe.  Evidence for this multiple Agree operation comes from a DP long distance extraction.

  11. The Social Structure of Peasent Community and Its Implicationto Welfare Differentiation.A case Study on Cocoa Peasant Community in Central Sulawesi and Nangroe Aceh Darussalam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Undang Fajar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of commercial crop cocoa have altered the structure of agrarian : from collective owners to individual owners. For the cocoa peasant communities, the agrarian resources are a base of their life. So, the changing of agrarian structure gives a way to changing process of the social structure community. This research means to analyze the social structure that emergence on cocoa peasant community and the implication of it to the differentiation of peasant welfare. The result of this research indicate that the inequalities of agrarian resources control on cocoa peasant communities have developed the form of peasant community social structure : “stratification which progressively unequal”. Furthermore, these social structure have implication to the increasing of welfare differentiation. In this case, a cocoa peasant community divided to three levels, that is: rich farmer (upper level, middle farmer (middle level, and the poor farmer (low level. The result of research also indicates that on Outside Java generally owning a lower agrarian density – the landless and he poor farmer have been occur, and the poor farmer not only lay at land less farmer (tunakisma but also on an owner farmer. Base on gini ratio analysis, the equality of agrarian resource ownership generally have resided in high level. Even though, the equality of farmer household income and farmer household expenditure generally have resided in low level.Key words: social structure, welfare differentiation, peasant, cocoa.

  12. PROPOSAL FOR AN USE CASE POINT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio G. Bernardo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present Analysis by Use Case Point that is used for specifying requirements in different systems. This tool is important for software development, cost versus time for states prepared to help in planning any activity. A proposal to solve a case of calculations in a lawyers’ association, which has the priority map all your processes and create systems that can improve customer service while remaining competitive in your market.

  13. Keys to the Community : A multiple case study into professional legitimation in community development practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradener, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how community development professionals obtain a sense of legitimacy in their work with local communities. In a comparative study derived from field research in Chelsea (USA), Amsterdam (The Netherlands ) and Doornkop (South Africa) the building blocks of their sense of

  14. The Teacher and the Community: A Case Study of Teacher-Community Relations among the Zapotec and Mixtec Indians of Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Kathleen

    1998-01-01

    Studies teacher-community relations in a community where teachers are becoming more involved in indigenous community issues. Argues that formal teacher education tends to emphasize modernity and consumer culture at the expense of distinct local customs. Draws connections between the case study and low-income minority communities in the United…

  15. Ecotourism and community development: case studies from Hainan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mike; Wall, Geoffrey

    2004-01-01

    The connections between people, parks, and tourism have received significant attention in recent years, recognizing the potential for mutually beneficial relationships. Ecotourism has been promoted and widely adopted as a strategy for funding conservation initiatives, while at the same time contributing to the socioeconomic development of host communities and providing for quality tourism experiences. Parks are among the most common ecotourism destinations. Employing interviews, observations and secondary sources, this study assesses the current status of ecotourism at two protected areas in Hainan, China, where it is being promoted as a strategy for balancing regional economic growth and conservation objectives. Through an evaluation of the existing tourism-park-community relationships, opportunities and constraints are identified. Ecotourism development was found to be at an early stage at both study sites. Socioeconomic benefits for the local communities have been limited and tourism activity has not contributed revenues towards conservation to date. Community residents, nevertheless, generally support conservation and are optimistic that tourism growth will yield benefits. In light of the study findings and the salient literature, planning direction is offered with the intention of enhancing the capacity of ecotourism to generate benefits for both communities and the parks, and thus contribute to the sustainable development of the region more generally. Lessons derived have broad applicability for ecotourism destinations elsewhere.

  16. Digital Technology, Diabetes and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities: A Case Study with Elderly Women from the Vietnamese Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Ben; Gill, Gurjeet K.; Babacan, Hurriyet; Donahoo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To report the processes and outcomes of a case study on digital technology, diabetes and culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. Design: The qualitative study was based on a literature review, consultations and testing of a framework through workshops and an interactive information session. Setting: Consultations,…

  17. Acceptability by community health workers in Senegal of combining community case management of malaria and seasonal malaria chemoprevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tine, Roger Ck; Ndiaye, Pascal; Ndour, Cheikh T

    2013-01-01

    Community case management of malaria (CCMm) and seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) are anti-malarial interventions that can lead to substantial reduction in malaria burden acting in synergy. However, little is known about the social acceptability of these interventions. A study was undertaken...

  18. Qualitative Secondary Analysis: A Case Exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Judith Ann; Happ, Mary Beth

    2017-12-15

    Qualitative secondary analysis (QSA) is the use of qualitative data that was collected by someone else or was collected to answer a different research question. Secondary analysis of qualitative data provides an opportunity to maximize data utility, particularly with difficult-to-reach patient populations. However, qualitative secondary analysis methods require careful consideration and explicit description to best understand, contextualize, and evaluate the research results. In this article, we describe methodologic considerations using a case exemplar to illustrate challenges specific to qualitative secondary analysis and strategies to overcome them. Copyright © 2017 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. SmashCommunity: A metagenomic annotation and analysis tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Harrington, Eoghan D; Foerstner, Konrad U

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY: SmashCommunity is a stand-alone metagenomic annotation and analysis pipeline suitable for data from Sanger and 454 sequencing technologies. It supports state-of-the-art software for essential metagenomic tasks such as assembly and gene prediction. It provides tools to estimate the quanti......SUMMARY: SmashCommunity is a stand-alone metagenomic annotation and analysis pipeline suitable for data from Sanger and 454 sequencing technologies. It supports state-of-the-art software for essential metagenomic tasks such as assembly and gene prediction. It provides tools to estimate...

  20. Approaches to dog health education programs in Australian rural and remote Indigenous communities: four case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, S E; Dixon, R M; Dixon, R J; Toribio, J-A

    2013-09-01

    Dog health in rural and remote Australian Indigenous communities is below urban averages in numerous respects. Many Indigenous communities have called for knowledge sharing in this area. However, dog health education programs are in their infancy, and lack data on effective practices. Without this core knowledge, health promotion efforts cannot progress effectively. This paper discusses a strategy that draws from successful approaches in human health and indigenous education, such as dadirri, and culturally respectful community engagement and development. Negotiating an appropriate education program is explored in its practical application through four case studies. Though each case was unique, the comparison of the four illustrated the importance of listening (community consultation), developing and maintaining relationships, community involvement and employment. The most successful case studies were those that could fully implement all four areas. Outcomes included improved local dog health capacity, local employment and engagement with the program and significantly improved dog health.

  1. Cultivating the Under-Mined: Cross-Case Analysis as Knowledge Mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Khan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a plethora of case studies in the social sciences, it is the authors' opinion that case studies remain relatively under-mined sources of expertise. Cross-case analysis is a research method that can mobilize knowledge from individual case studies. The authors propose that mobilization of case knowledge occurs when researchers accumulate case knowledge, compare and contrast cases, and in doing so, produce new knowledge. In this article, the authors present theories of how people can learn from sets of cases. Second, existing techniques for cross-case analysis are discussed. Third, considerations that enable researchers to engage in cross-case analysis are suggested. Finally, the authors introduce a novel online database: the Foresee (4C database. The purpose of the database is to mobilize case knowledge by helping researchers perform cross-case analysis and by creating an online research community that facilitates dialogue and the mobilization of case knowledge. The design of the 4C database is informed by theories of how people learn from case studies and cross-case analysis techniques. We present evidence from case study research that use of the 4C database helps to mobilize previously dormant case study knowledge to foster greater expertise. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0801348

  2. Archives as Extended Memory of Communities: The Case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Archives and the archivists are critical elements in the construction and reconstruction of social history. Archival institutions should not be viewed simply as repository institutions, but as this article argues, should be considered as extended memories of those communities whose records they house. It is through the archive ...

  3. Demystifying Virtual Communities of Practice: A Case Study of IBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Ayse

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this proposed research study is to empirically explore the nature of virtual communities of practice (CoP) in a global organisation within the context of its International Corporate Volunteer (ICV) Program. This study investigates whether and how the use of virtual CoP evolves and becomes embedded within this organization. Following…

  4. Suicide Prevention Strategies in Tennessee Community Colleges: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death for college students; annually approximately 1,100 students in institutions of higher education die by suicide. However, most research related to college student suicide was conducted using the sample of 4-year institutions. Community colleges have seldom been included in the sample of suicide research…

  5. Language Choice in Multilingual Communities: The Case of Larteh, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercy Akrofi Ansah

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In a multilingual community, the multilingual speaker needs to make the right language choice which principally depends on the domain of usage and the linguistic repertoire of speech participants. This paper investigates factors that govern language choices that multilingual speakers make in Larteh, a multilingual community. The study is informed by insights from the Markedness Model, developed by Myers- Scotton (1993, 1998. Larteh is a non-reciprocal bilingual community, where the people speak Leteh 2 and Akuapem Twi (Johnson, 1973, p. i. English is the third language for those who have had formal education. In this paper, three domains of language use are examined: education, tradition, and religion. Data from an interview survey on language use and participant observations are employed. The paper notes that due to changes in various spheres of life in Larteh, current language use patterns in the community differ from what pertained about three decades ago (Johnson, 1973, 1975. Subsequently, factors that determine language choice are gradually undergoing some modification.

  6. Community Awareness for Archives in Tanzania: a Case Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study focuses on the assessment of community awareness and challenges facing Zanzibar National Archives (ZNA). The study utilised convenient sampling to collect data from the members of the public (93 respondents) in Stone Town in Zanzibar. Data were augmentedthrough interviews with the staff of the Zanzibar ...

  7. Impact of Community Driven Development Project: A Case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper evaluates impact of Community Driven Development programme on infrastructure under National Fadama II Project in Oyo State Nigeria. Data were collected from two hundred and sixty-four farmers using multistage sampling procedures. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and infrastructure index.

  8. Language Choice in Multilingual Communities: The Case of Larteh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a multilingual community, the multilingual speaker needs to make the right language choice which principally depends on the domain of usage and the linguistic repertoire of speech participants. This paper investigates factors that govern language choices that multilingual speakers make in Larteh, a multilingual ...

  9. Community College Budgeting and Financial Planning Issues: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Soon after his election in 1995, Kentucky governor Paul E. Patton instituted a plan to restructure the commonwealth's system of postsecondary education to create a more efficient system designed to prepare Kentuckians for jobs in the new era. While Patton looked at all of postsecondary education, he focused on the 29 community and technical…

  10. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Newman

    Full Text Available Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations.From 2008-2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement.Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of "community"; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted.This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the GPP Blueprint, as well as

  11. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Peter A; Rubincam, Clara; Slack, Catherine; Essack, Zaynab; Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Chuang, Deng-Min; Tepjan, Suchon; Shunmugam, Murali; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Logie, Carmen; Koen, Jennifer; Lindegger, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations. From 2008-2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement. Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of "community"; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted. This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the GPP Blueprint, as well as highlighting

  12. Community referral for presumptive TB in Nigeria: a comparison of four models of active case finding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adejumo, A. O.; Azuogu, B.; Okorie, O.; Lawal, O. M.; Onazi, O. J.; Gidado, M.; Daniel, O. J.; Okeibunor, J. C.; Klinkenberg, E.; Mitchell, E. M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Engagement of communities and civil society organizations is a critical part of the Post-2015 End TB Strategy. Since 2007, many models of community referral have been implemented to boost TB case detection in Nigeria. Yet clear insights into the comparative TB yield from particular approaches have

  13. Auditing and Evaluating University-Community Engagement: Lessons from a UK Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Angie; Northmore, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The growing importance of community and public engagement activities in universities has led to an increasing emphasis on auditing and evaluating university-community partnerships. However, the development of effective audit and evaluation tools is still at a formative stage. This article presents a case study of the University of Brighton's…

  14. 44 CFR 66.3 - Establishment of community case file and flood elevation study docket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... case file and flood elevation study docket. 66.3 Section 66.3 Emergency Management and Assistance... file and flood elevation study docket. (a) A file shall be established for each community at the time... elevation study consultation docket and shall be established for each community at the time the contract is...

  15. Cultural Capital and Innovative Pedagogy: A Case Study among Indigenous Communities in Mexico and Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorcic, Marta

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces case studies of innovative approaches to pedagogy among indigenous Mayan communities in Chiapas (Mexico) and Lencan communities in Intibuca (Honduras). Innovative approaches to researching alternative theories and practices of pedagogy are used by the author to develop an epistemology of critical pedagogy and its potential…

  16. Child Sexual Abuse: A Case Study in Community Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Kathleen Coulborn; Henry, James

    2000-01-01

    A study investigated the effectiveness of a collaborative approach to the case management of child sexual abuse. Data from 323 criminal court files found a sex offense confession rate of 64 percent and plea rate of 70 percent. Fifteen cases went to trial and in six the offender was convicted. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  17. Developing a rural transitional care community case management program using clinical nurse specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen M; Black, Denice; Hammond, Sheri

    2014-01-01

    This quality improvement project developed a community nursing case management program to decrease preventable readmissions to the hospital and emergency department by providing telephonic case management and, if needed, onsite assessment and treatment by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with prescriptive authority. As more people reach Medicare age, the number of individuals with worsening chronic diseases with dramatically increases unless appropriate disease management programs are developed. Care transitions can result in breakdown in continuity of care, resulting in increased preventable readmissions, particularly for indigent patients. The CNS is uniquely educated to managing care transitions and coordination of community resources to prevent readmissions. After a thorough SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis, we developed and implemented a cost-avoidance model to prevent readmissions in our uninsured and underinsured patients. The project CNS used a wide array of interventions to decrease readmissions. In the last 2 years, there have been a total of 22 less than 30-day readmissions to the emergency department or hospital in 13 patients, a significant decrease from readmissions in these patients prior to the program. Three of them required transfer to a larger hospital for a higher level of care. Using advanced practice nurses in transitional care can prevent readmissions, resulting in cost avoidance. The coordination of community resources during transition from hospital to home is a job best suited to CNSs, because they are educated to work within organizations/systems. The money we saved with this project more than justified the cost of hiring a CNS to lead it. More research is needed into this technology. Guidelines for this intervention need to be developed. Replicating our cost-avoidance transitional care model can help other facilities limit that loss.

  18. Policy challenges facing integrated community case management in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sara; George, Asha; Rodriguez, Daniela; Shearer, Jessica; Diallo, Brahima; Konate, Mamadou; Dalglish, Sarah; Juma, Pamela; Namakhoma, Ireen; Banda, Hastings; Chilundo, Baltazar; Mariano, Alda; Cliff, Julie

    2014-07-01

    To report an in-depth analysis of policy change for integrated community case management of childhood illness (iCCM) in six sub-Saharan African countries. We analysed how iCCM policies developed and the barriers and facilitators to policy change. Qualitative retrospective case studies drawing from document reviews, semi-structured interviews and in-country validation workshops were conducted in Burkina Faso, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique and Niger. These countries were selected to maximise variation in iCCM policy status, community health worker (CHW) models and different African regions. Country iCCM policies evolved in an ad hoc fashion, but were substantially influenced by the history of primary health care and the nature of CHW programmes. Technical officers within Ministries of Health led iCCM policy change with support from international donors, but neither communities nor political leadership was mobilised. Concerns about achieving the Millennium Development Goals, together with recognition of the shortcomings of existing child health programmes, led to the adoption of iCCM policies. Availability of external financing played a critical role in facilitating policy change. iCCM policy change has been promoted by international agencies, but national governments have struggled to align iCCM with country health systems. Greater investment is needed in tailoring global policy initiatives to match country needs. High-level, political ownership of iCCM policies could facilitate policy change, as could clearer strategies for ensuring the long-term sustainability of such policies. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Risk prediction in the community: A systematic review of case-finding instruments that predict adverse healthcare outcomes in community-dwelling older adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Caoimh, Rónán

    2015-09-01

    Few case-finding instruments are available to community healthcare professionals. This review aims to identify short, valid instruments that detect older community-dwellers risk of four adverse outcomes: hospitalisation, functional-decline, institutionalisation and death. Data sources included PubMed and the Cochrane library. Data on outcome measures, patient and instrument characteristics, and trial quality (using the Quality In Prognosis Studies [QUIPS] tool), were double-extracted for derivation-validation studies in community-dwelling older adults (>50 years). Forty-six publications, representing 23 unique instruments, were included. Only five were externally validated. Mean patient age range was 64.2-84.6 years. Most instruments n=18, (78%) were derived in North America from secondary analysis of survey data. The majority n=12, (52%), measured more than one outcome with hospitalisation and the Probability of Repeated Admission score the most studied outcome and instrument respectively. All instruments incorporated multiple predictors. Activities of daily living n=16, (70%), was included most often. Accuracy varied according to instruments and outcomes; area under the curve of 0.60-0.73 for hospitalisation, 0.63-0.78 for functional decline, 0.70-0.74 for institutionalisation and 0.56-0.82 for death. The QUIPS tool showed that 5\\/23 instruments had low potential for bias across all domains. This review highlights the present need to develop short, reliable, valid instruments to case-find older adults at risk in the community.

  20. Community-Based Tourism - Option for Forest-Dependent Communities in 1A IUCN Protected Areas? Cameroon Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgin Shelley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries, ‘exponential’ growth in IUCN protected lands has occurred in the last 25 years. Approximately 6% of protected areas are ‘Strict Nature Reserve[s]’ (1A with emphasis on conservation and strict restrictions on human access. Before Bakossi Forest Reserve (Cameroon had 1A protection, 95% of local families used the Reserve for their livelihood. They farmed cash crops, collected fire wood, timber, and food with incomes equivalent to US$35,000/annually/family. Post-protection, the Reserve’s local communities lacked support to develop alternative livelihoods, and 75% reported being intercepted illegally trespassing by Reserve guards. Without illegal activity economic impacts would have been substantially greater. Protection has also meant foregone national income from timber and coffee exports. We used Bakossi Forest Reserve as a case study to identify issues facing local communities excluded from the Reserve that traditionally provided their livelihood. We also investigated potential alternative family livelihoods based on critical evaluation of the literature. We identified ‘exceptional’ community-based tourism potential. We also found that Cameroon was the first African country to develop community-based forestry with the dual roles of conservation and poverty alleviation. Using this model, community-based tourism could be a cost-effectively initiative to deliver the same dual roles as community-based forestry.

  1. Exploring Twitter communication dynamics with evolving community analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Konstantinidis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Online Social Networks (OSNs have been widely adopted as a means of news dissemination, event reporting, opinion expression and discussion. As a result, news and events are being constantly reported and discussed online through OSNs such as Twitter. However, the variety and scale of all the information renders manual analysis extremely cumbersome, and therefore creating a storyline for an event or news story is an effort-intensive task. The main challenge pertains to the magnitude of data to be analyzed. To this end, we propose a framework for ranking the resulting communities and their metadata on the basis of structural, contextual and evolutionary characteristics such as community centrality, textual entropy, persistence and stability. We apply the proposed framework on three Twitter datasets and demonstrate that the analysis that followed enables the extraction of new insights with respect to influential user accounts, topics of discussion and emerging trends. These insights could primarily assist the work of social and political analysis scientists and the work of journalists in their own story telling, but also highlight the limitations of existing analysis methods and pose new research questions. To our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the ranking of dynamic communities. In addition, our findings suggest future work regarding the determination of the general context of the communities based on structure and evolutionary behavior alone.

  2. EMERGENCE OF VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES AS MEANS OF COMMUNICATION: A Case Study On Virtual Health Care Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehpare Tokay ARGAN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, like in all areas, the Internet has had an important effect in the area of health as well. With the development of the Internet many new and different applications have developed and one of the most important of these are probably virtual communities. Virtual communities, which are used as a tool for providing information and word of mouth communication, have become a widely used marketing tool in the area of healthcare services in recent years. A virtual community is a group that does not depend on space and time to maintain ties or participation in the group whose members share the same interest and to maintain closeness, that is based on internet communications and whose membership is based on free will. In these kinds of communities whose services are provided on a membership basis, health services of various kinds are offered to the members. In virtual communities, virtual interactive communications established between the members can be an important determining factor when choosing a product, service or doctor.

  3. Mining Community-Level Influence in Microblogging Network: A Case Study on Sina Weibo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Social influence analysis is important for many social network applications, including recommendation and cybersecurity analysis. We observe that the influence of community including multiple users outweighs the individual influence. Existing models focus on the individual influence analysis, but few studies estimate the community influence that is ubiquitous in online social network. A major challenge lies in that researchers need to take into account many factors, such as user influence, social trust, and user relationship, to model community-level influence. In this paper, aiming to assess the community-level influence effectively and accurately, we formulate the problem of modeling community influence and construct a community-level influence analysis model. It first eliminates the zombie fans and then calculates the user influence. Next, it calculates the user final influence by combining the user influence and the willingness of diffusing theme information. Finally, it evaluates the community influence by comprehensively studying the user final influence, social trust, and relationship tightness between intrausers of communities. To handle real-world applications, we propose a community-level influence analysis algorithm called CIAA. Empirical studies on a real-world dataset from Sina Weibo demonstrate the superiority of the proposed model.

  4. Integrated community case management for childhood illnesses: explaining policy resistance in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juma, Pamela A; Owuor, Karen; Bennett, Sara

    2015-12-01

    There has been a re-emphasis recently on community health workers to provide child health care services including integrated community case management for childhood illness (iCCM). This research analysed iCCM policy development in Kenya and in particular the types of decision-making criteria used by Kenyan policy-makers in considering whether to advance iCCM policy. Data were collected through document reviews (n = 41) and semi-structured interviews (n = 19) with key stakeholders in iCCM policy including government officials, development partners, bilateral donors, and civil society organizations. Initial analysis was guided by the policy triangle with further analysis of factors affecting policy decision-making drawing upon a simple framework developed by Grindle and Thomas (Policy makers, policy choices and policy outcomes: the political economy of reform in developing countries. 1989; Policy Sci 22: :213-48.). Policy development for iCCM has been slow in Kenya, compared with other Sub-Saharan African countries. At the time of the study, the Government had just completed the Community Health Training Manual which incorporated iCCM as a module, but this was the only formal expression of iCCM in Kenya. We found technical considerations, notably concerns about community health workers dispensing antibiotics to be a key factor slowing iCCM policy development, but this also overlapped with bureaucratic considerations, such as how the development of community health worker cadres may affect clinicians, as well as initial concerns about how an integrated approach might affect vertically oriented programs. International actors through agreements such as the Millennium Development Goals helped to get child survival onto the national policy agenda and such actors were active promoters of iCCM policy change. However international funders had not committed funding to scale-up iCCM policy, and this probably constrained their influence over iCCM policy debate. Kenyan actors

  5. Data management for community research projects: A JGOFS case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Roy K.

    1992-01-01

    Since the mid 1980s, much of the marine science research effort in the United Kingdom has been focused into large scale collaborative projects involving public sector laboratories and university departments, termed Community Research Projects. Two of these, the Biogeochemical Ocean Flux Study (BOFS) and the North Sea Project incorporated large scale data collection to underpin multidisciplinary modeling efforts. The challenge of providing project data sets to support the science was met by a small team within the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) operating as a topical data center. The role of the data center was to both work up the data from the ship's sensors and to combine these data with sample measurements into online databases. The working up of the data was achieved by a unique symbiosis between data center staff and project scientists. The project management, programming and data processing skills of the data center were combined with the oceanographic experience of the project communities to develop a system which has produced quality controlled, calibrated data sets from 49 research cruises in 3.5 years of operation. The data center resources required to achieve this were modest and far outweighed by the time liberated in the scientific community by the removal of the data processing burden. Two online project databases have been assembled containing a very high proportion of the data collected. As these are under the control of BODC their long term availability as part of the UK national data archive is assured. The success of the topical data center model for UK Community Research Project data management has been founded upon the strong working relationships forged between the data center and project scientists. These can only be established by frequent personal contact and hence the relatively small size of the UK has been a critical factor. However, projects covering a larger, even international scale could be successfully supported by a

  6. Community Environment and Education of Girls: The Case of Communities in Marsabit County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyaka, Jafred

    2018-01-01

    The study sought to investigate the role of the community in inhibiting girls' access and participation in formal education in Marsabit County-Kenya. As one of the marginalized counties in Kenya, the county had among the highest rate of illiteracy in Kenya with 68 per cent of residents with no formal education. The study involved a total of 128…

  7. A case of community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis - has the threat moved beyond the hospital?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowman, Warren; Kalk, Thomas; Menezes, Colin N.; John, Melanie A.; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2008-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a prolific nosocomial pathogen renowned for its multidrug-resistant nature. We report a case of community-acquired meningitis due to A. baumannii. The case highlights the potential pathogenicity of this organism and raises concerns that this highly adaptable organism may

  8. Community led total sanitation for community based disaster risk reduction: A case for non-input humanitarian relief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Mlenga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sanitation related diseases have become endemic in southern Africa resulting in increased sanitation and hygiene morbidity and mortality. The region has experienced 318 400 cases of cholera and diarrhoea outbreaks between 2006 and 2012. There is insufficient financing for sanitation and hygiene activities, as people lack basic sanitation services, they engage in open defecation, the primary cause of faecal oral disease transmission. This study investigated Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS, subsidy free, community based disaster risk reduction approach, for open defecation reduction, in four constituencies in Swaziland. Data collected from households, through a knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP survey illustrated that with appropriate training, involvement of traditional and community leaders, CLTS minimises open defecation. There is need of participatory rural appraisal through regular community monitoring and feedback meetings, as the disgust generated especially for women and youth, through the meetings, as well as group dynamics, steer the sustained construction and use of sanitation facilities. Lack of coordination between Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs leads to slow improvement of sanitation coverage, wherein the same communities are promoting CLTS and others are promoting Subsidy Based Sanitation Intervention (SBSI which involves subsidies. It is recommended that there be coordination between partners for harmonisation of messages and an integration of the CLTS and SBSI approaches.

  9. Microbial community analysis of ambient temperature anaerobic digesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciotola, R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Food, Agriculture and Biological Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on a study in which designs for Chinese and Indian fixed-dome anaerobic digesters were modified in an effort to produce smaller and more affordable digesters. While these types of systems are common in tropical regions of developing countries, they have not been used in colder climates because of the low biogas yield during the winter months. Although there is evidence that sufficient biogas production can be maintained in colder temperatures through design and operational changes, there is a lack of knowledge about the seasonal changes in the composition of the microbial communities in ambient temperature digesters. More knowledge is needed to design and operate systems for maximum biogas yield in temperate climates. The purpose of this study was to cultivate a microbial community that maximizes biogas production at psychrophilic temperatures. The study was conducted on a 300 gallon experimental anaerobic digester on the campus of Ohio State University. Culture-independent methods were used on weekly samples collected from the digester in order to examine microbial community response to changes in ambient temperature. Microbial community profiles were established using universal bacterial and archaeal primers that targeted the 16S rRNA gene. In addition to the methanogenic archaea, this analysis also targeted some of the other numerically and functionally important microbial taxa in anaerobic digesters, such as hydrolytic, fermentative, acetogenic and sulfate reducing bacteria. According to preliminary results, the composition of the microbial community shifts with changes in seasonal temperature.

  10. Subject Access through Community Partnerships: A Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitz, Patricia A

    2003-01-01

    Innovations in scholarly communication have resulted in changing roles for authors, publishers and libraries. Traditionally roles are disappearing and players are actively seeking or reluctantly assuming new roles. Library roles are changing as they become involved in building and indexing electronic(e-)repositories and support new modes of e-research. A library-run service, the SPIRES particle physics databases, has not only weathered, but also lead, many of the transitions that have shaped the landscape of e-publishing and e-research. This has been possible through intense and in-depth partnership with its user community. The strategies used and lessons learned can help other libraries craft cost-effective roles in this new environment

  11. Subject Access through Community Partnerships: A Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitz, Patricia A

    2003-08-12

    Innovations in scholarly communication have resulted in changing roles for authors, publishers and libraries. Traditionally roles are disappearing and players are actively seeking or reluctantly assuming new roles. Library roles are changing as they become involved in building and indexing electronic(e-)repositories and support new modes of e-research. A library-run service, the SPIRES particle physics databases, has not only weathered, but also lead, many of the transitions that have shaped the landscape of e-publishing and e-research. This has been possible through intense and in-depth partnership with its user community. The strategies used and lessons learned can help other libraries craft cost-effective roles in this new environment.

  12. Socioeconomic effects of operating reactors on two host communities: a case study of Pilgrim and Millstone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peelle, E.

    1976-01-01

    This exploratory case study examines the social, economic, and political/institutional impacts of two operating nuclear power complexes on two New England communities. This work is one of a series planned to broaden knowledge of the effects of large energy generating facilities upon the social structure of local communities. Its primary objectives are to investigate and assess social and economic impacts resulting from construction and operation of nuclear power plants and to generate hypotheses about such impacts for future testing. The study concludes that construction impacts were minor due to a dispersed commuting pattern by construction workers and that the only significant construction impact that can be identified retrospectively is construction-worker traffic. The primary impact of the nuclear power plants in both communities was the massive increase in property tax payments paid to the local communities by the utilities and the option chosen by each community to maintain the existing tax rate while using the additional revenue to significantly increase and enhance the public service delivery systems and facilities within the community. Second-order consequences of the direct, first-order economic impact were: (1) changes in community land use policies, (2) increase in salience of growth issues, and (3) alteration of both inter- and intra-community relationships. The majority of residents in both communities express favorable attitudes toward the nuclear plants, primarily because of the substantial increase in the tax base of their communities

  13. Immigrant Communities from Eastern Europe: The Case of the Romanian Community in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Pajares Alonso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2000, Romanians barely figured in statistics for immigration into Spain, but since then it is the immigrant community that has grown most rapidly. By January 2007, this community had become the second-largest in terms of numbers (after that of the Moroccan community. The intensity of this migration flow has resulted from what has taken place in Romania since the mid-1990s, as well as from the characteristics of the Spanish labour market. Though Romanian immigration has mainly taken place through irregular channels, this has not prevented them from achieving access to the labour market, given that Spain’s “black economy” is large enough to easily absorb irregular immigration. Furthermore, the social network created between Romanian immigrants has encouraged the intensity of the migration flow, even though it is a network which – beyond the most direct family links – is extremely weak, at least for the largest sector of Romanian immigration (minorities such as gypsies and members of religious orders have very extensive, binding social networks. Thus, the job placement of the largest sector has been determined by their initial incorporation onto the “informal economy”, a fact that has meant that they have mainly been doing lowskilled jobs; nevertheless, they have now achieved a significant presence in skilled employment, and this trend is expected to continue in the future.

  14. Community socioeconomic status and public access defibrillators: A multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Young; Do, Young Kyung; Shin, Sang Do; Park, Yong Joo; Ro, Young Sun; Lee, Eui Jung; Lee, Kyoung Won; Lee, Yu Jin

    2017-11-01

    Although current guidelines recommend that distribution of public-access defibrillators (PADs) should take into account area-level risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), community socioeconomic status (SES) can unduly influence policy implementation in positioning PADs. Using recent, complete data from Seoul Metropolitan City, Korea, this study aims to examine whether community SES is associated with distribution of PADs, in terms of per capita count and risk-grid coverage. A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted using three sources of administrative data: (1) PAD registry data (2007-2015), (2) OHCA database (2010-2014), and (3) community socioeconomic characteristics of two sub-city levels (neighborhoods nested in districts). We examined the relationship between neighborhood per capita tax, an SES proxy, with each of the two outcome variables. After examining per capita number of PADs and risk-grid coverage by neighborhood tax quartile, multilevel linear regression analysis was conducted to account for the nested nature of data and also to control for OHCA risk in the model. A total of 6609 PADs in 405 neighborhoods were included in the analysis. The average number of positioned PADs per 10,000 persons was 7.45, showing a gradient by neighborhood SES (4.92 in the lowest SES quartile vs 12.66 in the highest). Risk-grid coverage was around 10% across all neighborhood SES quartiles. These findings remained valid in the multilevel analysis: per capita number of PADs was still positively associated with neighborhood SES, while risk-grid coverage of PADs was not. More affluent neighborhoods in Seoul exhibit higher per capita PADs, even accounting for OHCA risk, while risk-grid coverage is generally low regardless of community SES. Seoul's ongoing program aimed to increase PAD coverage should also pay attention to improving community-level inequality as well as distributional efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Barriers to community case management of malaria in Saraya, Senegal: training, and supply-chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanas, Demetri A; Ndiaye, Youssoupha; Nichols, Kim; Jensen, Andrew; Siddiqui, Ammar; Hennig, Nils

    2013-03-14

    Health workers in sub-Saharan Africa can now diagnose and treat malaria in the field, using rapid diagnostic tests and artemisinin-based combination therapy in areas without microscopy and widespread resistance to previously effective drugs. This study evaluates communities' perceptions of a new community case management of malaria programme in the district of Saraya, south-eastern Senegal, the effectiveness of lay health worker trainings, and the availability of rapid diagnostic tests and artemisinin-based combination therapy in the field. The study employed qualitative and quantitative methods including focus groups with villagers, and pre- and post-training questionnaires with lay health workers. Communities approved of the community case management programme, but expressed concern about other general barriers to care, particularly transportation challenges. Most lay health workers acquired important skills, but a sizeable minority did not understand the rapid diagnostic test algorithm and were not able to correctly prescribe arteminisin-based combination therapy soon after the training. Further, few women lay health workers participated in the programme. Finally, the study identified stock-outs of rapid tests and anti-malaria medication products in over half of the programme sites two months after the start of the programme, thought due to a regional shortage. This study identified barriers to implementation of the community case management of malaria programme in Saraya that include lay health worker training, low numbers of women participants, and generalized stock-outs. These barriers warrant investigation into possible solutions of relevance to community case management generally.

  16. Fracture Penis: An Analysis of 26 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V.Soundra Pandyan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to review the pattern of penile fracture occurrence, its clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and outcome at our center. A retrospective analysis of 26 patients with penile fractures treated at our hospital from January 1997 to January 2005 was carried out. We noted an incidence of 3.5 cases per year, occurring more commonly in unmarried men. Of our study group, 28 episodes of penile fractures occurred in 26 patients. Hospital presentation after trauma varied from 2 h to 21 days. Masturbation was the main initiating causative factor and penile hematoma was the most common clinical finding. Nearly 81% noticed the characteristic click prior to the fracture. Clinical diagnosis was adequate in a majority of the cases. Midshaft fractures with right-sided laterality were more frequent in this series. The tear size ranged from 0.5—2.5 cm with a mean of 1.1 cm. All cases, but one, were treated by surgical repair using absorbable sutures. Out of three cases treated conservatively, two failed to respond and had to be treated surgically. False fracture with dorsal vein tear was present in two cases. Involvement of bilateral corpora was seen in one patient. Infection was the most common early complication, while pain with deviation was the late complication. In our experience, clinical findings are adequate enough to diagnose fracture penis in a majority of cases. Surgical exploration with repair of the tear is recommended both in early and delayed presentations. There was no noticeable relationship to the time of initial presentation or with the size and site of tear to the final outcome.

  17. Analysis of judicial cases at emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Seviner

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we aimed to analyze the demographic and epidemiological features of judicial cases admitted to emergency department, the content of life-threatening of forensic reports, the status of simple medical intervention and outcomes in the emergency department. Material and Methods: Judicial cases, admitted to the emergency department between 01.12.2009 - 31.12.2010 were included in the study. Patients were evaluated from the patient cards retrospectively. Categorical data summarized as number and percentage, numerical measurements summarized as mean and standard deviation. SPSS 17.0 package program was used for statistical analysis of data. The statistical significance level of all tests was p <0.05. Results: Of the 5870 judicial cases, 63.78 % were male and 36.22 % were female. Mean age of patients were 33.75 ± 12.4 years. Traffic accident (27.3 %, intoxication (24.3 % and to be beaten (17.6 % were the first three judicial events. Traffic accidents were seen in males between 26-33 ages mostly and intoxications were seen in females between 18-25 ages commonly. The most reason of injuries were limb injuries with 2404 cases. 73.3 % of patients were discharged and 26.3 % of patients were hospitalized. 0.3% of forensic cases (19 patients died in the emergency department, 0.1% (4 patients died before hospital admission. Death was mostly seen as traffic accidents and fall from height. When forensic reports were evaluated, 28.8 % of males and 11.3 % of females were not resolved with simple medical intervention. Only 3336 (56.8% forensic reports of all forensic cases were stated in a life-threatening situation. 21.1 % of the patients with a life-threatening situation of the current was life-threatening. Conclusion: Forensic cases are most commonly seen in young adult males and ages between 26-33. The frequency of diagnoses in male and female patients are different. Forensic cases require hospitalization rate as high as 26.3%, although the

  18. Community-based enterprises and the commons: The case of San Juan Nuevo Parangaricutiro, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandra Orozco-Quintero; Iain Davidson-Hunt

    2009-01-01

    Commons scholarship has tended to focus on the administration and use of commons by individuals and households and less so on collective enterprises that extract, transform and market what they harvest from the commons. In this paper, we consider Nuevo San Juan, a Mexican case that is well known in the community forestry and commons literature. In San Juan, indigenous community members who hold the rights for the commons are also the members of the enterprise that transforms and markets goods...

  19. Balancing power among academic and community partners: the case of El Proyecto Bienestar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Julie

    2008-06-01

    Balancing power among academic and community partners, addressing community-identified needs, and strengthening community capacity are ethical values unique to community-based participatory research (CBPR). Negotiation of these values in one CBPR environmental justice project was evaluated to advance the environmental and occupational health of a Hispanic agricultural community in central Washington State. Data were collected through document review and participant observation. Applied conversation and discourse analysis were used to interpret the data. Within the organization, farmworkers primarily served an advisory role. Facilitation style influenced how participants negotiated environmental justice. Research goals were advanced in the project, but no direct actions were taken to improve farmworker health. Implementing CBPR's ethical values requires a willingness to confront institutional and interpersonal challenges, and offers a vision of research that builds knowledge and strengthens communities.

  20. Multilevel governance in community-based environmental management: a case study comparison from Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Sattler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyze four case studies from Latin America using the concept of multilevel governance to assess at what vertical and horizontal levels and in what roles various state, market, and civil society actors interact for successful community-based environmental management (CBEM. In particular, we address the problem of how a conflict over natural resources with high negative impacts on the livelihoods of the respective communities could be overcome by a governance change that resulted in a multilevel governance arrangement for CBEM. The analysis involves a mixed-methods approach that combines a variety of empirical methods in social research such as field visits, personal interviews, participant observations, and stakeholder workshops. To visualize results, we introduce two schemes to present the composition of the governance structures for cross-case comparison. The first scheme plots the different actors into an arrangement that shows their associations with different societal spheres and at which territorial scales they are primarily involved. The second scheme differentiates these actors based on their complementing governance roles. Active roles are attributed to actors who implement activities on the ground, whereas passive roles are assigned to actors who provide specific resources such as knowledge, funding, legislative framework, or others. All cases involved governance actors from more than one societal sphere who operate on at least three different territorial levels (local to international and in distinct roles. Results show that multilevel governance can strengthen CBEM in different ways. First, the success of CBEM is an outcome of the sum of horizontal and vertical interactions of all involved actors, and there is no most appropriate single level of social organization at which a problem can best be addressed. Only the cooperation of actors from different societal spheres within and across levels ensures accessibility to needed

  1. Probing community nurses' professional basis: a situational case study in diabetic foot ulcer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaarup, Clara; Pape-Haugaard, Louise; Jensen, Merete Hartun; Laursen, Anders Christian; Bermark, Susan; Hejlesen, Ole Kristian

    2017-03-01

    Complicated and long-lasting wound care of diabetic foot ulcers are moving from specialists in wound care at hospitals towards community nurses without specialist diabetic foot ulcer wound care knowledge. The aim of the study is to elucidate community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. A situational case study design was adopted in an archetypical Danish community nursing setting. Experience is a crucial component in the community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. Peer-to-peer training is the prevailing way to learn about diabetic foot ulcer, however, this contributes to the risk of low evidence-based practice. Finally, a frequent behaviour among the community nurses is to consult colleagues before treating the diabetic foot ulcers.

  2. On robust analysis of paycheck: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Uherek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many statistical tests are constructed to check the validity of normal distribution. Here we propose a case study on analysis of paycheck where we employ the RT class of tests for normality firstly introduced in Střelec, Stehlík (2008. In particular such a study can be of interest for pension funds theoreticians and practitioners, which study the transitions of pension systems from one social security state to the another one. Our study illustrates some possible distributional deviations of salary residuals on a real data.

  3. The keys to governance and stakeholder engagement: the southeast michigan beacon community case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jardins, Terrisca R

    2014-01-01

    Community-based health information exchanges (HIEs) and efforts to consolidate and house data are growing, given the advent of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) under the Affordable Care Act and other similar population health focused initiatives. The Southeast Michigan Beacon Community (SEMBC) can be looked to as one case study that offers lessons learned, insights on challenges faced and accompanying workarounds related to governance and stakeholder engagement. The SEMBC case study employs an established Data Warehouse Governance Framework to identify and explain the necessary governance and stakeholder engagement components, particularly as they relate to community-wide data sharing and data warehouses or repositories. Perhaps the biggest lesson learned through the SEMBC experience is that community-based work is hard. It requires a great deal of community leadership, collaboration and resources. SEMBC found that organizational structure and guiding principles needed to be continually revisited and nurtured in order to build the relationships and trust needed among stakeholder organizations. SEMBC also found that risks and risk mitigation tactics presented challenges and opportunities at the outset and through the duration of the three year pilot period. Other communities across the country embarking on similar efforts need to consider realistic expectations about community data sharing infrastructures and the accompanying and necessary governance and stakeholder engagement fundamentals.

  4. Generating a Social Movement Online Community through an Online Discourse: The Case of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Olaug S; Grue, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Online communities, created and sustained by people sharing and discussing texts on the internet, play an increasingly important role in social health movements. In this essay, we explore a collective mobilization in miniature through an in-depth analysis of two satiric texts from an online community for people with myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). By blending a sociological analysis with a rhetorical exploration of these texts, our aim is to grasp the discursive generation of a social movement online community set up by sufferers themselves to negotiate and contest the dominating biomedical perception of their condition.

  5. Active Community-Based Case Finding for Tuberculosis With Limited Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Bindu; Kittel, Guenter; Bolokon, Ignatius; Duke, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Papua New Guinea is one of the 14 highest-burden countries for tuberculosis (TB) infection, but few community-based studies exist. We evaluated a low-cost method of active community case finding in Kabwum and Wasu in Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea. Over 3 months we visited 26 villages and screened adults and children for symptoms and signs of TB. Sputum samples were examined using smear microscopy. A total of 1700 people had chronic symptoms, of which 267 were suspicious for TB on further examination. Sputum from 230 symptomatic adults yielded 97 samples that were positive for acid-fast bacilli. In addition, 15 cases of extrapulmonary TB in adults and 17 cases of TB in children were identified. One hundred and thirty people were identified with active TB disease among the source population of approximately 17 000, giving an estimated prevalence of 765 per 100 000. One hundred and six (82%) cases were not previously diagnosed. The cost per case identified was US$146. It is feasible to conduct active community-based case finding and treatment initiation for TB with limited resources and in remote areas, and in Papua New Guinea the yield was high. Active case finding and follow-up of treatment in villages is needed to address the hidden burden of TB in Papua New Guinea and other high-burden Asia Pacific countries. PMID:28033717

  6. Mobile instant messaging for rural community health workers: a case from Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimmer, Christoph; Mhango, Susan; Mzumara, Alfred; Mbvundula, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Mobile instant messaging (MIM) tools, such as WhatsApp, have transformed global communication practice. In the field of global health, MIM is an increasingly used, but little understood, phenomenon. It remains unclear how MIM can be used by rural community health workers (CHWs) and their facilitators, and what are the associated benefits and constraints. To address this gap, WhatsApp groups were implemented and researched in a rural setting in Malawi. The multi-site case study research triangulated interviews and focus groups of CHWs and facilitators with the thematic qualitative analysis of the actual conversations on WhatsApp. A survey with open questions and the quantitative analysis of WhatsApp conversations were used as supplementary triangulation sources. The use of MIM was differentiated according to instrumental (e.g. mobilising health resources) and participatory purposes (e.g. the enactment of emphatic ties). The identified benefits were centred on the enhanced ease and quality of communication of a geographically distributed health workforce, and the heightened connectedness of a professionally isolated health workforce. Alongside minor technical and connectivity issues, the main challenge for the CHWs was to negotiate divergent expectations regarding the social versus the instrumental use of the space. Despite some challenges and constraints, the implementation of WhatsApp was received positively by the CHWs and it was found to be a useful tool to support distributed rural health work.

  7. Educational Hospital Units of Valencia community: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina PORTOLÉS SOLER

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The functioning and organization of an educational hospital unit of Valencia is described, through observation, field diary and documental analysis (during February to May 2016. Also, it is designed and implemented an educational project through the story The zebra Camila for students of early childhood education hospitalized in the Pediatric Oncology Service. In the project LOMCE objectives are followed, in addition to the Hospital Pedagogy objectives themselves; 12 educational units are proposed, covering all curricular areas of early childhood education, with a variety of activities and resources that can be adapted to the different educational needs of students who are included. Teachers, the kind of students, the areas of activity, methodology and teaching resources are very diverse and are based on health services.

  8. Framing community forestry challenges with a broader lens: case studies from the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, Reem; McGrath, David G; Kozak, Robert A; Innes, John L

    2011-09-01

    Community forestry initiatives have been shown to reduce rural poverty while promoting the conservation and sustainable use of forests. However, a number of challenges face communities wanting to initiate or maintain formal, community-based forest management. Through a grounded theory approach, this paper uses three case studies of community forest management models in the eastern Amazon to create a framework showing challenges faced by communities at different phases of formal management. The framework shows that, in the development phase, four root problems (land ownership, knowledge acquisition, community organization, and adequate capital) need to be addressed to obtain legal management permission. With this permission in hand, further challenges to operationalization are presented (deterring illegal loggers, maintaining infrastructure, obtaining necessary managerial skills and accessing markets). The interrelatedness of these challenges emphasizes that all challenges need to be addressed in a holistic manner for communities to maintain a profitable and self-sufficient operation. This contradicts current development approaches that only address part of this framework. The framework proposed here can be used as a starting point for community forestry initiatives in other regions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hair analysis as evidence in forensic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, M R; Fey, P; Sachs, H

    1993-12-01

    Because hair analysis can be used for the determination of drug use months after drug consumption, hair analysis data can often act as important and even decisive evidence in the courtroom. More recently developed GC/MS methods offer excellent sensitivity and can make the distinction between chronic heroin and codeine use, which was not possible earlier with radioimmunoassay techniques. From more than a thousand hair analyses, the morphine/codeine ratios necessary to determine heroin use were set at 5:1 for low morphine concentrations (< 1 ng/mg hair) and 2:1 for concentrations above 1 ng/mg hair. The distinction can be further focused with the additional analysis of the metabolite monoacetylmorphine (MAM). As can be seen from several case examples, hair analysis cannot pinpoint an exact date of opiate use, but it can be used to validate or invalidate a subject's statement concerning his/her drug consumption. Interpretations should always be made cautiously. Ranges, means and medians are also listed for amphetamine, cocaine and cannabis and work is under way to draw similar safety guidelines for these drugs.

  10. Promoting community socio-ecological sustainability through technology: A case study from Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Claudio; Eames, Chris

    2017-12-01

    The importance of community learning in effecting social change towards ecological sustainability has been recognised for some time. More recently, the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) tools to promote socio-ecological sustainability has been shown to have potential in community education for sustainable development (ESD). The effective design and use of technology for community learning implies an understanding of a range of cross-dimensional factors including: socio-cultural characteristics and needs of the target audience; considerations of available and culturally responsive types of technology; and non-formal pedagogical ESD strategies for community empowerment. In addition, both technology itself and social communities are dynamically evolving and complex entities. This article presents a case study which evaluated the potential of ICT for promoting ecological literacy and action competence amongst community members in southern Chile. The case study addressed the ecological deterioration of a lake, which is having deep social, economic, recreational and cultural implications locally. The authors' research involved developing a theoretical framework for the design, implementation and use of ICT for community learning for sustainability. The framework was based on key ideas from ESD, ICT and community education, and was underpinned by a systems thinking approach to account for the dynamism and complexity of such settings. Activity theory provided a frame to address overarching socio-cultural elements when using technology as a mediating tool for community learning. The authors' findings suggest that the use of an ICT tool, such as a website, can enhance ecological literacy in relation to a local socio-ecological issue.

  11. Practice Change in Community Pharmacy: A Case Study of Multiple Stakeholders' Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shara Elrod

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To obtain a multi-stakeholder perspective of community pharmacy practice change. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Community pharmacy in rural Mississippi. Participants: Fourteen key stakeholders of the patient care practice including pharmacists (n=4, support staff (n=2, collaborating providers (n=4, patients (n=3, and a payer (n=1. Intervention: Semi-structured interviews and participant-observation techniques were used. Main outcome measures: Description of the community pharmacy's practice and business model and identification of practice change facilitators. Results: Change facilitators for this practice included: a positive reputation in the community, forming solid relationships with providers, and convenience of patient services. Communication in and outside of the practice, adequate reimbursement, and resource allocation were identified as challenges. Conclusions: This case study is a multi-stakeholder examination of community pharmacy practice change and readers are provided with a real-world example of a community pharmacy's successful establishment of a patient care practice.   Type: Case Study

  12. Personal, musical and social benefits of singing in a community ensemble: Three case studies in Melbourne (Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia has a diverse, multilayered society that reflects its rich musical life. There are many community choirs formed by various cultural and linguistically diverse groups. This article is part of an ongoing project, Well-being and ageing: community, diversity and the arts (since 2008, undertaken by Deakin University and Monash University, that explores the cultural diversity within Australian society and how active music engagement fosters well-being. The singing groups selected for this discussion are the Skylarkers, the Bosnian Behar Choir, and the Coro Furlan. The Skylarkers and the Bosnian Behar Choir are mixed groups who respectively perform popular music from their generation and celebrate their culture through music. The Coro Furlan is an Italian male choir who understand themselves as custodians of their heritage. In these interpretative, qualitative case studies semi-structured interviews were undertaken and analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. In this approach there is an exploration of participants’ understanding of their lived experiences. The analysis of the combined data identified musical and social benefits that contribute to participants’ sense of individual well-being. Musical benefits occurred through sharing, learning and singing together. Social benefits included opportunities to build friendships, overcome isolation and gain a sense of validation. Many found that singing enhanced their health and happiness. Active music making in community choirs and music ensembles continues to be an effective way to support individuals, build community, and share culture and heritage.

  13. The Impact of Culture On Smart Community Technology: The Case of 13 Wikipedia Instances

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    Zinayida Petrushyna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Smart communities provide technologies for monitoring social behaviors inside communities. The technologies that support knowledge building should consider the cultural background of community members. The studies of the influence of the culture on knowledge building is limited. Just a few works consider digital traces of individuals that they explain using cultural values and beliefs. In this work, we analyze 13 Wikipedia instances where users with different cultural background build knowledge in different ways. We compare edits of users. Using social network analysis we build and analyze co- authorship networks and watch the networks evolution. We explain the differences we have found using Hofstede dimensions and Schwartz cultural values and discuss implications for the design of smart community technologies. Our findings provide insights in requirements for technologies used for smart communities in different cultures.

  14. Corporate America and community health: exploring the business case for investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Nicolaas P; Baase, Catherine; Noyce, Jerry; Stevens, Denise E

    2015-05-01

    The principal aim of this project was to learn from corporate executives about the most important components of a business case for employer leadership in improving community health. We used dialogue sessions to gain insight into this issue. The strongest elements included metrics and measurement, return on investment, communications, shared values, shared vision, shared definitions, and leadership. Important barriers included lack of understanding, lack of clear strategy, complexity of the problem, trust, lack of resources and leadership, policies and regulations, and leadership philosophy. Substantial variability was observed in the degree of understanding of the relationship between corporate health and community health. The business case for intentional and strategic corporate investment in community health occurs along a continuum has a set of clearly defined elements that address why investment may make sense, but also asks questions about the "what-to-do" and the "how-to-do-it."

  15. A Comprehensive HIV Stigma-reduction and Wellness-enhancement Community Intervention: A Case Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    French, H.; Greeff, M.; Watson, M.J.; Doak, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a comprehensive HIV stigma-reduction and wellness-enhancement community intervention that focused on people living with HIV (PLWH), as well as people living close to them (PLC) from six designated groups. A holistic multiple case study design was used in urban and

  16. Community Arts Programs: Cohesion and Difference Case Studies. Henry Street Settlement and El Museo del Barrio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiebert-Gruen, Cathleen

    2009-01-01

    A comparative case study of two cultural institutions, Henry Street Settlement and El Museo del Barrio, founded almost eighty years apart, were involved in social justice causes and community arts. Although both of these institutions participated in the political activism of their time, they also demonstrated an important adaptability. They were…

  17. Private sector community forestry partnerships in the Eastern Cape – Lambazi case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sisitka, L

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This Umzimkulu case study forms part of a broader investigation into community – private sector forestry partnerships in the Eastern Cape. This provincial study in turn, contributes to one of the three major research themes of a wider national...

  18. Relationship Depth in Community Food Security: Lessons from a Case Study of the Campus Kitchens Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelheber, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an instrumental case study of one branch of the nationally networked food recovery and redistribution program, the Campus Kitchens Project (CKP). Inquiry is focused on developing a better understanding of the relationship between this CKP branch and its community partners, as well as recognizing the potential for CKP branches…

  19. Responses to Islam in the Classroom: A Case of Muslim Girls from Minority Communities of Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Natasha Hakimali

    2016-01-01

    Coinciding with the rise of "Islamophobia" in the United States is a small but growing set of educational scholarship around the curricular impact of and response to Islamophobia. The qualitative case study discussed in this manuscript aims to contribute to this conversation by investigating how Muslim girls from minority communities of…

  20. Behavioural Comorbidity in Tanzanian Children with Epilepsy: A Community-Based Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Kathryn; Rogathe, Jane; Hunter, Ewan; Burton, Matthew; Swai, Mark; Todd, Jim; Neville, Brian; Walker, Richard; Newton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of and risk factors for behavioural disorders in children with epilepsy from a rural district of Tanzania by conducting a community-based case-control study. Method: One hundred and twelve children aged 6 to 14 years (55 males, 57 females; median age 12y) with active epilepsy (at least two…

  1. Community Organisations, Misiones and Integration of Barrios of Caracas: The Case of the CAMEBA Upgrading Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ayala Alemán (Alonzo)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe paper is an attempt to analyse the likely effects of compensatory social programmes such as Misiones Bolivarianas on community organisations in barrios and their participation in the planning and implementation of barrio upgrading projects, based on the case of the CAMEBA project in

  2. Case Studies of School Community and Climate: Success Narratives of Schools in Challenging Circumstances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Darlene Ciuffetelli; Grenville, Heather; Flessa, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a Canadian qualitative case study project funded by the Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario. The paper describes success stories of students and communities affected by poverty from a diverse sample of eleven elementary schools throughout the province of Ontario. Over the period of one school year (2007-2008) and…

  3. Older adults' and case managers' initial impressions of community-based telehealth kiosks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Karen L; Lingler, Jennifer H; Mecca, Laurel Person; Garlock, Laurie A; Schulz, Richard; Dick, Andrew W; Olshansky, Ellen

    2010-10-01

    Community-based (multi-user) telehealth interventions may be beneficial for older adults, but there is little research regarding such interventions. As a first step in feasibility assessment, we used a qualitative descriptive approach to examine the acceptability and perceived value of community-based telehealth kiosks with regard to current health self-management practices of community-dwelling older adults. Participants included residents (n = 6) and community agency case managers (n = 3) of a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development-subsidized senior apartment building. Both positive impressions from and concerns of each group are presented. Findings helped guide plans for future telehealth kiosk implementation and training. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Erythema nodosum an analysis of 100 cases

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    Khatri M

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of 100 cases of erythema nodosum (EN is presented. Likely causative factors were : focal streptococcal infection in 56, oral contraceptives in 4, tuberculosis in 3, kerion (due to Trichophyton mentagrophytes in 2, pregnancy in 2, Behcet′s disease in 2 and amoebiasis in 1 patient. A definite cause could not be elicited in 30 patients. Clinical features were almost similar to previously reported studies, except unilateral distribution in 3 patients. An unusual association of subcutaneous emphysema of the chest with recurrent episode of EN was observed in 1 female patient. Forty-one patients with moderate and severe presentation, treated with indomethacin, showed quicker resolution of the lesions.

  5. Shifting the burden or expanding access to care? Assessing malaria trends following scale-up of community health worker malaria case management and reactive case detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, David A; Winters, Anna; Cheelo, Sanford; Hamainza, Busiku; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Miller, John M; Bridges, Daniel J

    2017-11-02

    Malaria is a significant burden to health systems and is responsible for a large proportion of outpatient cases at health facilities in endemic regions. The scale-up of community management of malaria and reactive case detection likely affect both malaria cases and outpatient attendance at health facilities. Using health management information data from 2012 to 2013 this article examines health trends before and after the training of volunteer community health workers to test and treat malaria cases in Southern Province, Zambia. An estimated 50% increase in monthly reported malaria infections was found when community health workers were involved with malaria testing and treating in the community (incidence rate ratio 1.52, p < 0.001). Furthermore, an estimated 6% decrease in outpatient attendance at the health facility was found when community health workers were involved with malaria testing and treating in the community. These results suggest a large public health benefit to both community case management of malaria and reactive case detection. First, the capacity of the malaria surveillance system to identify malaria infections was increased by nearly one-third. Second, the outpatient attendance at health facilities was modestly decreased. Expanding the capacity of the malaria surveillance programme through systems such as community case management and reactive case detection is an important step toward malaria elimination.

  6. CORSSA: The Community Online Resource for Statistical Seismicity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Andrew J.; Wiemer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Statistical seismology is the application of rigorous statistical methods to earthquake science with the goal of improving our knowledge of how the earth works. Within statistical seismology there is a strong emphasis on the analysis of seismicity data in order to improve our scientific understanding of earthquakes and to improve the evaluation and testing of earthquake forecasts, earthquake early warning, and seismic hazards assessments. Given the societal importance of these applications, statistical seismology must be done well. Unfortunately, a lack of educational resources and available software tools make it difficult for students and new practitioners to learn about this discipline. The goal of the Community Online Resource for Statistical Seismicity Analysis (CORSSA) is to promote excellence in statistical seismology by providing the knowledge and resources necessary to understand and implement the best practices, so that the reader can apply these methods to their own research. This introduction describes the motivation for and vision of CORRSA. It also describes its structure and contents.

  7. Multi-criteria selection of UPPT subsystems by a social community: The 'Beovoz' case study

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    Vuković Dubravka R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper considers the issue of multi-criteria selection of urban public passenger transport (UPPT subsystems by a social community, where possible solutions are as follows: (1 implementation of a new one, (2 replacement of the existing with a new one, (3 keeping the existing UPPT subsystem. In order to reach the specific solution for this issue, a new algorithm is proposed, which is heuristic, three phased and relatively simple. The aim of the algorithm is to choose the UPPT subsystem between possible options in the specific traffic corridor. To test the algorithm, the 'Beovoz' case study was made, which includes the analysis of six options of the UPPT subsystem (four of which with railway technology, from which stood out the following alternatives2: bus and railway. The conclusion is that the railway can be used in a modern city, however only for high-volume traffic corridors. The bus subsystem can be used in corridors with lower volume and those that supplement the railway.

  8. Community-based enterprises and the commons: The case of San Juan Nuevo Parangaricutiro, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Orozco-Quintero

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Commons scholarship has tended to focus on the administration and use of commons by individuals and households and less so on collective enterprises that extract, transform and market what they harvest from the commons. In this paper, we consider Nuevo San Juan, a Mexican case that is well known in the community forestry and commons literature. In San Juan, indigenous community members who hold the rights for the commons are also the members of the enterprise that transforms and markets goods from the commons. We argue that such a strategy is one way to confront internal and external pressures on a commons. We draw upon the transcripts of 40 interviews undertaken during 2006 which are analyzed using a framework developed from the social, community-based and indigenous enterprise literature. Our goal was to utilize this framework to analyze the San Juan Forest Enterprise and understand its emergence and formation as a long-standing community-based enterprise that intersects with a commons, and thereby identify factors that increase chances of success for community enterprises. We found that by starting from the community-based and indigenous enterprise literature and using that literature to engage with thinking on commons, it was possible to consider the enterprise from the perspective of a regulatory framework rather than from the poles of dependency and modernization theories in which much commons work has been based. Enterprise and commons intersect when both are guided by core cultural values and the enterprise can become a new site for the creation of social and cultural cohesion. We also found that there were a number of necessary conditions for commons-based community-enterprises to retain internal and external legitimacy, namely: (1 leadership representative of the broad social mission rooted in the customary institutions, values and norms of the community; (2 accountability of enterprise leaders to the memberships they represent; and (3

  9. Engaging diverse communities participating in clinical trials: case examples from across Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doumbo Ogobara

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the advent of increasing international collaborative research involving participants drawn from populations with diverse cultural backgrounds, community engagement becomes very critical for the smooth conduction of the research. The African Malaria Network Trust (AMANET is a pan-African non-governmental organization that sponsors and technically supports malaria vaccine trials in various African countries. Case description AMANET sponsored phase Ib or IIb clinical trials of several malaria vaccine candidates in various Africa countries. In Burkina Faso, Mali and Tanzania trials of the merozoite surface protein 3 -- in its Long Synthetic Peptide configuration (MSP3 LSP -- were conducted. In Mali, the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1 was tested, while a hybrid of glutamate rich protein (GLURP and MSP3 (GMZ2 was tested in Gabon. AMANET recognizes the importance of engaging with the communities from which trial participants are drawn, hence community engagement was given priority in all project activities conducted in the various countries. Discussion and evaluation Existing local social systems were used to engage the communities from which clinical trial participants were drawn. This article focuses on community engagement activities employed at various AMANET-supported clinical trial sites in different countries, highlighting subtle differences in the approaches used. The paper also gives some general pros and cons of community engagement. Conclusions Community engagement enables two-way sharing of accurate information and ideas between researchers and researched communities, which helps to create an environment conducive to smooth research activities with enhanced sense of research ownership by the communities.

  10. Analysis and meta-analysis of single-case designs: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadish, William R

    2014-04-01

    The last 10 years have seen great progress in the analysis and meta-analysis of single-case designs (SCDs). This special issue includes five articles that provide an overview of current work on that topic, including standardized mean difference statistics, multilevel models, Bayesian statistics, and generalized additive models. Each article analyzes a common example across articles and presents syntax or macros for how to do them. These articles are followed by commentaries from single-case design researchers and journal editors. This introduction briefly describes each article and then discusses several issues that must be addressed before we can know what analyses will eventually be best to use in SCD research. These issues include modeling trend, modeling error covariances, computing standardized effect size estimates, assessing statistical power, incorporating more accurate models of outcome distributions, exploring whether Bayesian statistics can improve estimation given the small samples common in SCDs, and the need for annotated syntax and graphical user interfaces that make complex statistics accessible to SCD researchers. The article then discusses reasons why SCD researchers are likely to incorporate statistical analyses into their research more often in the future, including changing expectations and contingencies regarding SCD research from outside SCD communities, changes and diversity within SCD communities, corrections of erroneous beliefs about the relationship between SCD research and statistics, and demonstrations of how statistics can help SCD researchers better meet their goals. Copyright © 2013 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mining Data from Weibo to WeChat: A Comparative Case Study of MOOC Communities on Social Media in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    This article starts with an overview on China's MOOC phenomenon and social media, and then reports a comparative, multiple case study on three selected MOOC communities that have emerged on social media in China. These representative MOOC communities included: (a) MOOC Academy, the largest MOOC community in China, (b) Zhejiang University of…

  12. Addressing the social determinants of health: a case study from the Mitanin (community health worker) programme in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sulakshana; Schneider, Helen

    2014-09-01

    The Mitanin Programme, a government community health worker (CHW) programme, was started in Chhattisgarh State of India in 2002. The CHWs (Mitanins) have consistently adopted roles that go beyond health programme-specific interventions to embrace community mobilization and action on local priorities. The aim of this research was to document how and why the Mitanins have been able to act on the social determinants of health, describing the catalysts and processes involved and the enabling programmatic and organizational factors. A qualitative comparative case study of successful action by Mitanin was conducted in two 'blocks', purposefully selected as positive exemplars in two districts of Chhattisgarh. One case focused on malnutrition and the other on gender-based violence. Data collection involved 17 in-depth interviews and 10 group interviews with the full range of stakeholders in both blocks, including community members and programme team. Thematic analysis was done using a broad conceptual framework that was further refined. Action on social determinants involved raising awareness on rights, mobilizing women's collectives, revitalizing local political structures and social action targeting both the community and government service providers. Through these processes, the Mitanins developed identities as agents of change and advocates for the community, both with respect to local cultural and gender norms and in ensuring accountability of service providers. The factors underpinning successful action on social determinants were identified as the significance of the original intent and vision of the programme, and how this was carried through into all aspects of programme design, the role of the Mitanins and their identification with village women, ongoing training and support, and the relative autonomy of the programme. Although the results are not narrowly generalizable and do not necessarily represent the situation of the Mitanin Programme as a whole, the

  13. The Del Rio project: a case for community-campus partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrow, B; Meyers, P L

    2000-01-01

    Interdisciplinary teams of graduate health professions students and faculty were provided with experiential learning opportunities while assisting a small rural community address critical health-related issues. To establish an effective partnership with community leaders and area residents to assist in determining the feasibility of a new primary care clinic and to remediate a water borne disease threat. To create interdisciplinary clinical learning experiences and to develop future longitudinal learning opportunities, emphasizing primary prevention. To create a community-campus partnership with control originating in and sustained by the community. An interdisciplinary team of health professions students and faculty worked with community leaders and residents to develop leadership skills, enhance infrastructure and coordinate efforts to address health concerns. A health marketing analysis and a series of year-long environmental assessments of surface and ground water were completed. The community was assisted with reaching consensus for future actions, emphasizing local control, enhanced county-based ownership, and sustainability of intervention efforts. The Del Rio and East Tennessee State University partnership was instrumental in accomplishing its short-term objectives with the remediation of two major health issues. The more important long-term objectives of enhancing citizen leadership skills and developing a more action-oriented community infrastructure were also met. Using an experiential learning model, students practiced community organization skills, conflict resolution and problem-solving strategies. The campus-community partnership illustrated the advantages of experiential, multidisciplinary education and accentuated the positive aspects of collaborative planning and action. The partnership continues to provide expanded learning opportunities for students and contributes to the empowerment and self-sufficiency of the community. The ripple effects of

  14. Seasonal and Spatial Changes of Microorganism Communities in Constructed Wetlands: A Community Level Physiological Profiling Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Chazarenc

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In constructed wetlands, microorganisms associated with plants are assumed to play a major role. A one-year survey was conducted in five vertical flow constructed wetland systems that had been operating from 2 months to 8 years in small French villages (100–500 People Equivalent to provide a better understanding of microbiological activity. The objective of our study was to highlight the most important factor generating variability between microorganisms communities compared to treatment performances. Results of community level physiological profiling using Biolog Ecoplates were analyzed using principal component analysis. The greatest microbial activity was observed in the oldest wetland during summer. Profiles of fed and rest bed were differentiated by the nature of the main carbon source metabolized. Whereas carbohydrates and carboxylic acids appeared to be better assimilated with fed beds, it seemed that phosphate compounds as well as amines allowed better growth in the plates inoculated with samples of rest beds. In all fed beds, the most important parameters affecting the diversity were the season and the age of the wetlands. There were only slight profile differences between surface and subsurface samples and between the first and second stage samples.

  15. Analysis of Content Shared in Online Cancer Communities: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eenbergen, Mies C; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; Krahmer, Emiel; Verberne, Suzan; Mols, Floortje

    2018-04-03

    The content that cancer patients and their relatives (ie, posters) share in online cancer communities has been researched in various ways. In the past decade, researchers have used automated analysis methods in addition to manual coding methods. Patients, providers, researchers, and health care professionals can learn from experienced patients, provided that their experience is findable. The aim of this study was to systematically review all relevant literature that analyzes user-generated content shared within online cancer communities. We reviewed the quality of available research and the kind of content that posters share with each other on the internet. A computerized literature search was performed via PubMed (MEDLINE), PsycINFO (5 and 4 stars), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ScienceDirect. The last search was conducted in July 2017. Papers were selected if they included the following terms: (cancer patient) and (support group or health communities) and (online or internet). We selected 27 papers and then subjected them to a 14-item quality checklist independently scored by 2 investigators. The methodological quality of the selected studies varied: 16 were of high quality and 11 were of adequate quality. Of those 27 studies, 15 were manually coded, 7 automated, and 5 used a combination of methods. The best results can be seen in the papers that combined both analytical methods. The number of analyzed posts ranged from 200 to 1,500,000; the number of analyzed posters ranged from 75 to 90,000. The studies analyzing large numbers of posts mainly related to breast cancer, whereas those analyzing small numbers were related to other types of cancers. A total of 12 studies involved some or entirely automatic analysis of the user-generated content. All the authors referred to two main content categories: informational support and emotional support. In all, 15 studies reported only on the content, 6 studies explicitly reported on content and social

  16. Modeling accessibility of community facilities using GIS: case study of Depok City, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herika Muhamad Taki

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving community accessibility based on transport connectivity helps to address equity issues. Geographical information systems (GIS provide useful techniques for capturing, maintaining and analyzing spatial data to defining community issues. The objective of this study is to model accessibility of community facilities using GIS based on private car, bus and train in the city area of Depok, Indonesia. The study modeling the accessibility of community facilities using Geographical information systems (GIS. A geodatabase of community facilities that includes the location of the mall, schools, hospital, mosque, and lake and also supporting data such as street and road network, the number of population, density and land use. The geodatabase covers defining community facilities and modeling accessibility by car, by bus, and by train and analyzing the social pattern. The results obtained from the spatial pattern of accessibility based on the different modes of transportation using the method of network analysis and buffering operations underlines the existence of different patterns. Car transport mode is a commonly accessible mode of community-related to land use interpretation and social issues. The conclusion is that there are differences in the spatial models at the city level in terms of the use of transportation accessibility

  17. Digital Communication and a Concern with the Community: A Case Study in a Cooperative Credit Araguaina, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumeninng Abrantes Santos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to address the attributes of Digital Communication used by a cooperative of Credit to meet the seventh cooperative principle of Concern for Community. The same occurred in a credit union in the city of Araguaina Tocantins, with the aim of identifying the digital communication developed by the cooperative. The article begins with a literature review on the emergence of cooperative, then the conceptualization of the credit union and its history in Brazil, then the cooperative principles and their evolution, conceptualizations of concern for the community, digital communication, social marketing and the presentation and analysis of results. The methodology was based on the case study, which according to Yin (2001 it is important because it is the reality studied. The research showed that the performance of the cooperative is geared entirely to their members and do not have a lot of focus related to social actions, but it promotes actions to attract members and to promote community development through digital media. Another important result of the research was that the principle addressed is one of the goals of the cooperative that aims to meet the interests, promote the welfare of members and the entire community where the cooperative operates.

  18. The Analysis of a Murder, a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinan, Frank J.; Szczepankiewicz, Steven H.; Carnaham, Melinda; Colvin, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of a Murder case study can be used in general chemistry or nonscience major chemistry courses to teach data handling and analysis in a non-laboratory context. This case study will help students to respond more enthusiastically and with more interest to a set of material placed before them related to a real case rather than…

  19. Interventions to increase tuberculosis case detection at primary healthcare or community-level services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhimbira, Francis A; Cuevas, Luis E; Dacombe, Russell; Mkopi, Abdallah; Sinclair, David

    2017-11-28

    screening, using house-to-house visits, sometimes combined with printed information about going to clinic, may increase tuberculosis case detection (RR 1.24, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.79; 4 trials, 6,458,591 participants in 297 clusters, low-certainty evidence); and probably increases case detection in areas with tuberculosis prevalence of 5% or more (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.10 to 2.09; 3 trials, 155,918 participants, moderate-certainty evidence; prespecified stratified analysis). These interventions may lower the early default (prior to starting treatment) or default during treatment (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.96; 3 trials, 849 participants, low-certainty evidence). However, this intervention may have may have little or no effect on treatment success (RR 1.07, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.15; 3 trials, 849 participants, low-certainty evidence), and we do not know if there is an effect on treatment failure or mortality. One study investigated long-term prevalence in the community, but with no clear effect due to imprecision and differences in care between the two groups (RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.65 to 2.00; 1 trial, 556,836 participants, very low-certainty evidence).Four studies examined health promotion activities to encourage people to attend for screening, including mass media strategies and more locally organized activities. There was some increase, but this could have been related to temporal trends, with no corresponding increase in case notifications, and no evidence of an effect on long-term tuberculosis prevalence. Two studies examined the effects of two to six nurse practitioner educational sessions in tuberculosis diagnosis, with no clear effect on tuberculosis cases detected. One trial compared mobile clinics every five days with house-to-house screening every six months, and showed an increase in tuberculosis cases.There was also insufficient evidence to determine if sustained improvements in case detection impact on long-term tuberculosis prevalence; this was evaluated in one study, which

  20. Importance of woodlots to local communities, small scale entrepreneurs and indigenous forest conservation – A case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ham, C

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available forestry, South Africa The Importance of Woodlots to Local Communities, Small-scale Entrepreneurs and Indigenous Forest Conservation A case study Cori Ham ii The Importance of Woodlots to Local Communities, Small Scale Entrepreneurs... by the financial support of the UK Department for International Development and the European Commission iii Citation: Ham, C. 2000. The importance of woodlots to local communities, small scale entrepreneurs and indigenous forest conservation– A case study...

  1. Analysis of two cases with bronchopulmonary neurofibromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Ting

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neurogenic tumor of lung is very rare. Only few cases have been reported in the literature. We present here two cases of bronchopulmonary neurofibromatosis in two adults. In both cases, attempts at imaging failed to diagnose the case, and it was the histological study that ensured the diagnosis of neurofibromatosis. Biopsy specimens showed bundles of spindle-shaped cells mixed with collagen, and on immunohistochemistry some cells were positive for S-100 protein.

  2. Bacterial community analysis of contaminant soils from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M.H.; Chapon, V.; Berthomieu, C.; Piette, L.; Le Marrec, C.; Coppin, F.; Fevrier, L.; Martin-Garin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Shortly after the Chernobyl accident in 1986, vegetation, contaminated soil and other radioactive debris were buried in situ in trenches. The aims of this work are to analyse the structure of bacterial communities evolving in this environment since 20 years, and to evaluate the potential role of microorganisms in radionuclide migration in soils. Therefore, soil samples exhibiting contrasted radionuclides content were collected in and around the trench number 22. Bacterial communities were examined using a genetic fingerprinting method that allowed a comparative profiling of the samples (DGGE), with universal and group-specific PCR primers. Our results indicate that Chernobyl soil samples host a wide diversity of Bacteria, with stable patterns for Firmicutes and Actinobacteria and more variable for Proteobacteria. A collection of 650 aerobic and anaerobic culturable isolates was also constructed. A phylogenetic analysis of 250 heterotrophic aerobic isolates revealed that 5 phyla are represented: Beta-, Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and spore-forming Firmicutes, which is largely dominant. These collection will be screened for the presence of radionuclide-accumulating species in order to estimate the potential influence of microorganisms in radionuclides migration in soils

  3. A Comparative Analysis of Community Wind Power DevelopmentModels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Wind, Tom; Juhl, Dan; Grace, Robert; West, Peter

    2005-05-20

    For years, farmers in the United States have looked with envy on their European counterparts ability to profitably farm the wind through ownership of distributed, utility-scale wind projects. Only within the past few years, however, has farmer- or community-owned windpower development become a reality in the United States. The primary hurdle to this type of development in the United States has been devising and implementing suitable business and legal structures that enable such projects to take advantage of tax-based federal incentives for windpower. This article discusses the limitations of such incentives in supporting farmer- or community-owned wind projects, describes four ownership structures that potentially overcome such limitations, and finally conducts comparative financial analysis on those four structures, using as an example a hypothetical 1.5 MW farmer-owned project located in the state of Oregon. We find that material differences in the competitiveness of each structure do exist, but that choosing the best structure for a given project will largely depend on the conditions at hand; e.g., the ability of the farmer(s) to utilize tax credits, preference for individual versus cooperative ownership, and the state and utility service territory in which the project will be located.

  4. Exploring New Firm Creation Out of Brand Communities: The Case of LEGO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hienerth, Christoph; Lettl, Christopher; Biskjaer, Michael Mose

    2011-01-01

    In the field of new product development, brand communities have attracted a great deal of attention from both academics and practitioners as a means of facilitating consumer-producer co-creation processes. In this paper, we extend the line of research on brand communities to the field...... of entrepreneurship studies by examining the conditions under which new firms emerge out of these social networks. Our empirical setting is the global LEGO brand community. As a well-known pioneering firm that is constantly experimenting with new ways of collaborating with its fan and customer base, LEGO recently...... invited lead users to start up new companies under its brand name. In this study, we use an explorative multiple case study design to identify patterns in this new firm creation process. Our findings show that each party derives specific returns in this entrepreneurial process: The LEGO company benefits...

  5. Tobacco Control Policy Adoption Dynamics: A Case Study of Missouri Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Kevin D; Chadwick, Ginny; Cowan, Stanley R; Kinkade, Emily

    2018-03-12

    Tobacco control policies reduce the health and economic burden caused by tobacco. With over half of the United States communities lacking adequate protective policies, an examination of policy adoption factors can provide insights to facilitate policy adoption. A case study approach examines the rate of adoption, prominent media frames, policy leaders' perceptions and coalition activities for smokefree and Tobacco 21 policies adopted in Missouri. Findings show compared to smokefree policy, Tobacco 21 requires a considerably shorter timeframe and fewer resources for adoption. Tobacco 21 coalitions target a small group of stakeholders compared to smokefree coalitions' emphasis on broad community engagement. Both policies are formally opposed, but elected officials perceive less political risk supporting Tobacco 21. As a new tobacco control policy tool, Tobacco 21 has relative advantage that should be considered by community health advocates.

  6. Leadership style in the deaf community: an exploratory case study of a university president.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm-Larew, Deborah; Stanford, Jevetta; Greene, Robert; Heacox, Christopher; Hodge, Warren

    2008-01-01

    A qualitative mini-case study of I. King Jordan and his leadership style explores the influence of a transformational leader on Gallaudet University and the Deaf community. The study features a template-style semistructured interview with Jordan regarding his perceptions of leadership and his personal insights. The study highlights the attributes of transformational leadership and encourages further research into leadership as a tool for change in the Deaf community and the disability rights movement. This exploration of the leadership style of Gallaudet's first Deaf president is especially timely; the study was conducted between Jordan's retirement announcement and the Gallaudet Board of Trustees' decision to rescind an offer to his announced successor to become the university's next president. That tumultuous transition accentuated the disconnect between Jordan's transformational, charismatic leadership style, which affected generations of the Deaf community, and his followers' dissatisfaction with his management and successor planning.

  7. Epistemic communities in global health and the development of child survival policy: a case study of iCCM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalglish, Sarah L; George, Asha; Shearer, Jessica C; Bennett, Sara

    2015-12-01

    Nearly all African countries have recently implemented some form of integrated community case management of childhood illness (iCCM), a strategy aimed at reducing child mortality by providing curative care for common yet fatal childhood illnesses. This case study describes the evolution of iCCM at the global level using the theory of epistemic communities first outlined by Haas, which explains how international policy coordination on technical issues takes place via transnational expert networks. We draw from in-depth interviews with global policy-makers (n = 25), a document review (n = 72) and co-authorship network analysis of scientific articles on iCCM. We find that members of the iCCM epistemic community were mainly mid- to upper-level technical officers working in the headquarters of large norm-setting bodies, implementing partners, funders and academic/research groups in global health. Already linked by pre-existing relationships, the epistemic community was consolidated as conflicts were overcome through structural changes in the network (including or excluding some members), changes in the state of technology or scientific evidence, shifting funding considerations, and the development of consensus through argument, legitimation and other means. Next, the epistemic community positioned iCCM as a preferred solution via three causal dynamics outlined by Haas: (1) responding to decision-makers' uncertainty about how to reduce child mortality after previous policies proved insufficient, (2) using sophisticated analytic tools to link the problem of child mortality to iCCM as a solution and (3) gaining buy-in from major norm-setting bodies and financial and institutional support from large implementing agencies. Applying the epistemic communities framework to the iCCM case study reveals the strengths and weaknesses of a focused policy enterprise with highly specialized and homogenous disciplinary origins, allowing for efficient sharing of complex, high

  8. GeoChips for Analysis of Microbial Functional Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-09-30

    Functional gene arrays (FGA) are microarrays that contain probes for genes encoding proteins or enzymes involved in functions of interest and allow for the study of thousands of genes at one time. The most comprehensive FGA to date is the GeoChip, which contains ~;;24,000 probes for ~;;10,000 genes involved in the geochemical cycling of C, N, P, and S, as well as genes involved in metal resistance and reduction and contaminant degradation. This chapter details the methods necessary for GeoChip analysis. Methods covered include preparation of DNA (whole community genome amplification and labeling), array setup (prehybridization steps), hybridization (sample and hybridization buffers), and post hybridization steps (slide washing and array scanning).

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial communities in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, J P; Herwig, R P

    1996-11-01

    For the phylogenetic analysis of microbial communities present in environmental samples microbial DNA can be extracted from the sample, 16S rDNA can be amplified with suitable primers and the PCR, and clonal libraries can be constructed. We report a protocol that can be used for efficient cell lysis and recovery of DNA from marine sediments. Key steps in this procedure include the use of a bead mill homogenizer for matrix disruption and uniform cell lysis and then purification of the released DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis. For sediments collected from two sites in Puget Sound, over 96% of the cells present were lysed. Our method yields high-molecular-weight DNA that is suitable for molecular studies, including amplification of 16S rRNA genes. The DNA yield was 47 micrograms per g (dry weight) for sediments collected from creosote-contaminated Eagle Harbor, Wash. Primers were selected for the PCR amplification of (eu)bacterial 16S rDNA that contained linkers with unique 8-base restriction sites for directional cloning. Examination of 22 16S rDNA clones showed that the surficial sediments in Eagle Harbor contained a phylogenetically diverse population of organisms from the Bacteria domain (G. J. Olsen, C. R. Woese, and R. Overbeek, J. Bacteriol. 176:1-6, 1994) with members of six major lineages represented: alpha, delta, and gamma Proteobacteria; the gram-positive high G+C content subdivision; clostridia and related organisms; and planctomyces and related organisms. None of the clones were identical to any representatives in the Ribosomal Database Project small subunit RNA database. The analysis of clonal representives in the first report using molecular techniques to determine the phylogenetic composition of the (eu)bacterial community present in coastal marine sediments.

  10. A case of an immunocompetent young man obtaining community-acquired disseminated Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinna; Cao, Jie; Wu, Yueqing; Wan, Nansheng; Pan, Li; Chen, Yuanbao

    2014-01-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare but severe pyogenic or granulomatous disease and caused by Nocardia that mainly infects immunocompromised patients. We report here a case of an immunocompetent 24-year-old male student with community-acquired pneumonia with asymptomatic disseminated cerebral abscess by Brasiliensis nocardiosis. The patient was fully recovered after receiving optimized antimicrobial therapy without relapse. This case suggests the health professionals such as the physicians of pulmonary, infection, neurology department and et al should always think about unusual cause of community acquired pneumonia, even in immunocompetent patients and when having pulmonary nocardiosis we should do a radiological neurological work up, even with the absence of neurological finding or symptom. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Case for Staff Development in the California Community College System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrakas, Lefteris

    Using Kurt Lewin's concept of "a dynamic balance of forces", the direction and strength of change tendencies related to staff development in California community colleges were identified through force-analysis. The forces of heritage/tradition, awareness, money, organizational climate, time, reward system, and formal system were examined for their…

  12. A Case of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Young Woong; Jung, In Young; Ahn, Mi Young; Jeon, Yong Duk; Ann, Hea Won; Ahn, Jin Young; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Young; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2017-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an aerobic Gram-negative coccobacillus that causes nosocomial pneumonia in patients on mechanical ventilation or previously treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Nevertheless, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by A. baumannii, especially multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains, is rare. We experienced the first case of CAP caused by MDR A. baumannii in Korea in a 78-year-old man. This case shows that MDR A. baumannii can cause CAP in Korea. Copyright © 2017 by The Korean Society of Infectious Diseases and Korean Society for Chemotherapy.

  13. Community participation in bank of garbage: Explorative case study in Banyumas regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Fitria Widiyanto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Waste bank is an activity that people do to reduce waste. The waste management activity through the establishment of a garbage bank becomes a very useful breakthrough, because people could save the waste which is exchangeable into money. The objective of this research is to know the inhibiting factors and the impetus for the community (targets to participate in waste bank, covering behavior, knowledge, understanding, and community motivation. This research is an exploratory research with qualitative approach implemented in Banyumas district. Data collection is done through in-depth interviews using purposive sampling. Data were analyzed using interactive analysis. The results indicate that the presence of active waste banks in the community, as well as motivated by other community members. The development of the existing garbage bank in the society is unstable that there is a need to be support from various parties so that the garbage bank continues to progress and develop. Community knowledge of waste bank activities, including collection, transportation, community participation, prices or economic value of waste and recycling activities. Factors that encourage participation in waste banks, among others are motivation and environmental conscious behavior.

  14. The readiness of farmer communities in biogas development (A case study: Wiyurejo Village, Malang Regency Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinanti, D.; Erlina, D. F.; Meidiana, C.

    2017-06-01

    Wiyurejo Village has the potential for biogas development with ±75% of breeders wanting to build biogas but do not have enough vacant land. Biogas is a renewable energy source which requires the involvement of the community and public awareness in its implementation. The purpose of this research is to know the readiness of breeders for the development of biogas with limited land availability for the development of biodigester in Wiyurejo Village, Malang Regency, Indonesia. Based on the analysis, the value of the stage of readiness of farmers community in Wiyurejo Village is 2.20, which means that from nine stages of community readiness, the stage of community readiness of Wiyurejo Village is in stage three, namely vague awareness. Vague awareness means most people feel that there is a local concern, but there is no motivation to do anything about it (Plested, Edwards, & Jumper-Thurman, 2006). The value of the dimension that gives the lowest contribution and is below the average value of the community readiness is community knowledge on the issue.

  15. Urban Studies, Students, and Communities: An Ideal Partnership A Case Study of Urban Studies Service Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Cherrington

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the implementation and results of a service learning based Urban Studies program course, the student expectations at the beginning of the course, and the student feedback at the end of the course. Through detailed explanation and examples of the live community needs, in multiple communities, addressed in this course and the resulting student projects, this article presents the case for service learning as a vibrant, efficient, and effective pedagogy for use within Urban Studies programs. Specifically, this article explores service learning pedagogy as, perhaps, a uniquely effective and satisfying tool that enhances the educative process for students and communities alike. Additionally, this article explores the enhanced project effectiveness and external outreach realized by partnering not only with communities, but also with multiple institutions of higher education, simultaneously, in order to achieve project(s success. This article also includes, and explores, the results of the pre and post course student experience surveys, as well as community feedback, and presents comparative data in which multiple curriculum formats, including lecture and workshops, are weighed against service learning curriculum prepared and presented in the course examined in this article. KEYWORDSService Learning, Higher Education, Urban Studies, Outreach

  16. [Pancreatic trauma: analysis of 29 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, S R; Duarte Júnior, E; Speranzini, M B

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between complications and the kind of pancreatic lesion and surgery performed. KIND OF STUDY: Retrospective. The patients were operated on at the Pronto Socorro--Mandaqui Hospital Complex, from January 1987 to January 1990. The authors analyzed 29 patients victims of penetrating or blunt abdominal trauma who were operated on in that period. 27 of them were male. 20 (69%) were shotgun victims; 5 (17.2%) were victims of cold steels; and 4 (13.8%) were victims of blunt trauma. In pancreatic head lesions (5 cases), hemostasis and drainage were performed in three cases; duodenopancreatectomy in one case; and suture in one case. In traumas to the pancreatic body (13 cases), six pancreatectomies, five drainages, and two sutures were performed. In traumas to the pancreatic tail (11 cases), six pancreatectomies, four sutures and one drainage were performed. Complications occurred in all patients with pancreatic head lesions, in eight patients with trauma to the pancreatic body, and in five patients trauma to the pancreatic tail. The most frequent complications were intracavitary abscesses (seven cases), and pancreatic fistulae (five cases). Morbidity rate was 72.4% and mortality rate was 17.2%. The authors conclude that indication of pancreatectomy in ductal lesions should be done, exception being made to cases of pancreatic head trauma, for which a suture or simple drainage can be used in superficial lesions. In doubt, an expert surgeon may be called.

  17. [Prophylaxis of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Outbreaks with Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine. Prospects Analysis for Russian Military Community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchev, I A; Klochkov, O I; Sinopalnikov, A I

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia and other diseases caused by pneumococci still remain the main factors of high morbidity and mortality rates throughout the world. Pneumococci as the leading pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), acute otitis media and sinusitis also cause a number of other serious systemic disorders including invasive infections with high mortality in spite of the antimicrobial resistance status and adequate antimicrobials choice. Pneumococcal infections are responsible for 5-35% or more of community-acquired pneumonias. The burden of pneumonia (up to 100-200 per thousand) is recorded among military recruits in training centers. Since the specific environment of the soldiers could be carrected, their health protection requires medical surveillance. For these reasons, polysaccharide and more immunogenic conjugated pneumococcal vaccines were developed. There is now an urgent need to understand whether such vaccines are effective in military conscripts. Controversy about the effectiveness and value of the polysaccharide (PPV-23) vaccine as a CAP morbidity restriction measure still persists. There were implemented plenty of metaanalyses of pneumococcal vaccines in adults. Some of them showed that the vaccine was effective against bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in 'low risk' healthy adults and elders. There have been a number of poor quality observational studies in Russia where 'all pneumonia cases' were considered as an endpoint. It remains controversial whether these observational studies provide adequate evidence to justify the use of the polysaccharide vaccine in the groups of healthy young men for whom it is being advocated. In our analysis we found weak evidence supporting pneumococcal vaccination with PPV-23 for this group. Nevertheless, favorable tendency was found to immunize. It is the reason for a trail to find pharmacoepidemiological support for vaccination by novel conjugated vaccines with better immunogenicity.

  18. The Case for Stage-Specific Frailty Interventions Spanning Community Aging to Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Mei Sian; Tay, Laura; Ismail, Noor Hafizah; Tan, Chay Hoon; Yew, Suzanne; Yeo, Audrey; Ye, Ruijing; Leung, Bernard; Ding, Yew Yoong

    2015-11-01

    To explore factors associated with frailty across the continuum of healthy aging to cognitive impairment (mild cognitive impairment [MCI], mild and moderate Alzheimer disease [AD]). Cross-sectional study. Senior activity centers and the outpatient memory clinic of a tertiary hospital. Community-dwelling and functionally independent adults aged 50 years and older and older adults attending the memory clinic with MCI, and mild and moderate AD diagnoses. We recruited 299 participants comprising 200 cognitively healthy individuals, 16 with MCI, 68 with mild AD, and 15 with moderate AD. We collected measures of comorbidities, cognitive and functional performance, physical activity level, and anthropometric and nutritional status. Frailty was defined using Buchmann criteria, and sarcopenic obesity (SO) was defined using the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia criteria and the revised National Cholesterol and Education Panel-obesity definition of waist circumference. Multiple logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with frailty as a whole group and separately based on cognitive subgroups. There were 16.7% of patients who met frailty criteria. Frailty prevalence was lowest in the well elderly (3.5%) and subsequently followed a U-shaped prevalence from MCI to mild and moderate AD, respectively. Specific univariate differences were noted in age, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, depressive symptoms, social differences, and functional scores. Multivariable logistic regression showed age, cognitive status, and SO to be significantly associated with frailty status. Subgroup analysis showed only SO to be significant (odds ratio [OR] 15.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.63-148.42) in well elderly and only cognition to be associated with frailty (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.80-0.99) among the cognitively impaired. Our findings lend initial support to the case for stage-specific interventions for physical frailty with the focus on SO in healthy community

  19. Clinicopathological features of pilomatricoma cases: Analysis of 21 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Ghartimagar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pilomatricoma is a slow-growing, asymptomatic tumour originating from outer sheath cells of hair follicle. In this study, we describe the clinical presentation and histopathological features of pilomatricoma. Materials and Methods: This was a hospital based retrospective study carried out in all patients who were diagnosed as pilomatricoma over a period of January 2001 to December 2013. The study was done in department of pathology, Manipal Teaching Hospital, Nepal. Results: A total of 21 cases of pilomatricoma were reported with age range of 9-53 years (mean age 23.7 and male female ratio of 1:1.1. The most common site of occurrence was neck and preauricular region. The size of the tumour ranged from 0.3 to 4.7cm with a mean of 1.2cm. Multiple occurrences were seen in 3 patients and ossifying pilomarticoma was seen in 4 cases. Conclusion: Pilomatricoma is a benign skin neoplasm of hair follicle matrix cells. Calcification is a common finding while dystrophic ossification also can occur in the tumour. Histopathology gives the definite diagnosis as fine needle aspiration cytology and clinical impression may be misleading. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v4i7.10293 Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2014 Vol. 4, 530-533

  20. Community College Student Mental Health: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Daniel Seth; Davison, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study explores community college student mental health by comparing the responses of California community college and traditional university students on the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II (ACHA-NCHA II). Using MANOVA, we compared community college and traditional university students, examining…

  1. Risk factors for human brucellosis in agro-pastoralist communities of south western Uganda: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiimwe, Benon B; Kansiime, Catherine; Rwego, Innocent B

    2015-09-04

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of veterinary, public health and economic significance in most developing countries. The disease can result in permanent and disabling sequelae and considerable medical expenses in addition to loss of income due to loss of working hours. A case-control study was conducted in Nyabushozi, Kiruhura district, Uganda, so as to determine the risk factors for transmission of brucellosis to humans in these communities. We conducted a matched case-control study among participants in a previous study who were positive by the standard Serum Agglutination Test with titres ≥1:160. Controls were two neighbors for each case, matched by sex and age. A structured interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect data on potential risk factors for brucellosis. Categorical variables were presented as proportions and their associations determined by Chi-square test. Bivariate analysis was performed to explore associations between the disease and the risk factors of brucellosis. Conditional logistic regression models were fitted to estimate independent associations between the disease and the risk factors using Odds Ratios and 95% confidence intervals. A total of 45 cases and 90 controls were interviewed. Of the 45 cases, 21 (46.7%) were male while 44/90 (48.9%) of the controls were female. The most significant risk factors for infection being an agro-pastoralist (P = 0.05), consumption of raw cow ghee (P = 0.03) and consumption of unpasteurized milk (P = 0.02). The greatest risk factors for acquiring brucellosis in the study area were being an agro-pastoralist, consumption of raw cow ghee and consumption of unboiled milk. We recommend dissemination of health education packages regarding risks and prevention measures for brucellosis in these communities.

  2. Costing commodity and human resource needs for integrated community case management in thie differing community health strategies of Ethiopia, Kenya and Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefdt, Rory; Ribaira, Eric; Diallo, Khassoum

    2014-10-01

    To ensure correct and appropriate funding is available, there is a need to estimate resource needs for improved planning and implementation of integrated Community Case Management (iCCM). To compare and estimate costs for commodity and human resource needs for iCCM, based on treatment coverage rates, bottlenecks and national targets in Ethiopia, Kenya and Zambia from 2014 to 2016. Resource needs were estimated using Ministry of Health (MoH) targets fronm 2014 to 2016 for implementation of case management of pneumonia, diarrhea and malaria through iCCM based on epidemiological, demographic, economic, intervention coverage and other health system parameters. Bottleneck analysis adjusted cost estimates against system barriers. Ethiopia, Kenya and Zambia were chosen to compare differences in iCCM costs in different programmatic implementation landscapes. Coverage treatment rates through iCCM are lowest in Ethiopia, followed by Kenya and Zambia, but Ethiopia had the greatest increases between 2009 and 2012. Deployment of health extension workers (HEWs) in Ethiopia is more advanced compared to Kenya and Zambia, which have fewer equivalent cadres (called commu- nity health workers (CHWs)) covering a smaller proportion of the population. Between 2014 and 2016, the propor- tion of treatments through iCCM compared to health centres are set to increase from 30% to 81% in Ethiopia, 1% to 18% in Kenya and 3% to 22% in Zambia. The total estimated cost of iCCM for these three years are USD 75,531,376 for Ethiopia, USD 19,839,780 for Kenya and USD 33,667,742 for Zambia. Projected per capita expen- diture for 2016 is USD 0.28 for Ethiopia, USD 0.20 in Kenya and USD 0.98 in Zambia. Commodity costs for pneumonia and diarrhea were a small fraction of the total iCCM budget for all three countries (less than 3%), while around 80% of the costs related to human resources. Analysis of coverage, demography and epidemiology data improves estimates of fimding requirements for iCCM. Bottleneck

  3. Utilization of an interorganizational network analysis to evaluate the development of community capacity among a community-academic partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Heather R; Ramirez, Albert; Drake, Kelly N; Beaudoin, Christopher E; Garney, Whitney R; Wendel, Monica L; Outley, Corliss; Burdine, James N; Player, Harold D

    2014-01-01

    Following a community health assessment the Brazos Valley Health Partnership (BVHP) organized to address fragmentation of services and local health needs. This regional partnership employs the fundamental principles of community-based participatory research, fostering an equitable partnership with the aim of building community capacity to address local health issues. This article describes changes in relationships as a result of capacity building efforts in a community-academic partnership. Growth in network structure among organizations is hypothesized to be indicative of less fragmentation of services for residents and increased capacity of the BVHP to collectively address local health issues. Each of the participant organizations responded to a series of questions regarding its relationships with other organizations. Each organization was asked about information sharing, joint planning, resource sharing, and formal agreements with other organizations. The network survey has been administered 3 times between 2004 and 2009. Network density increased for sharing information and jointly planning events. Growth in the complexity of relationships was reported for sharing tangible resources and formal agreements. The average number of ties between organizations as well as the strength of relationships increased. This study provides evidence that the community capacity building efforts within these communities have contributed to beneficial changes in interorganizational relationships. Results from this analysis are useful for understanding how a community partnership's efforts to address access to care can strengthen a community's capacity for future action. Increased collaboration also leads to new assets, resources, and the transfer of knowledge and skills.

  4. Factors Associated With Weight Change in Online Weight Management Communities: A Case Study in the LoseIt Reddit Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Gisele Lobo; Cunha, Tiago Oliveira; Bicalho, Paulo Viana; Ribeiro, Antonio; Couto Silva, Ana Paula; Meira, Wagner; Beleigoli, Alline Maria Rezende

    2017-01-16

    Recent research has shown that of the 72% of American Internet users who have looked for health information online, 22% have searched for help to lose or control weight. This demand for information has given rise to many online weight management communities, where users support one another throughout their weight loss process. Whether and how user engagement in online communities relates to weight change is not totally understood. We investigated the activity behavior and analyze the semantic content of the messages of active users in LoseIt (r/loseit), a weight management community of the online social network Reddit. We then explored whether these features are associated with weight loss in this online social network. A data collection tool was used to collect English posts, comments, and other public metadata of active users (ie, users with at least one post or comment) on LoseIt from August 2010 to November 2014. Analyses of frequency and intensity of user interaction in the community were performed together with a semantic analysis of the messages, done by a latent Dirichlet allocation method. The association between weight loss and online user activity patterns, the semantics of the messages, and real-world variables was found by a linear regression model using 30-day weight change as the dependent variable. We collected posts and comments of 107,886 unique users. Among these, 101,003 (93.62%) wrote at least one comment and 38,981 (36.13%) wrote at least one post. Median percentage of days online was 3.81 (IQR 9.51). The 10 most-discussed semantic topics on posts were related to healthy food, clothing, calorie counting, workouts, looks, habits, support, and unhealthy food. In the subset of 754 users who had gender, age, and 30-day weight change data available, women were predominant and 92.9% (701/754) lost weight. Female gender, body mass index (BMI) at baseline, high levels of online activity, the number of upvotes received per post, and topics discussed

  5. Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Kit, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Art in context of community is the theme of this newsletter. The theme is introduced in an editorial "Community-Enlarging the Definition" (Kit Grauer). Related articles include: (1) "The Children's Bridge is not Destroyed: Heart in the Middle of the World" (Emil Robert Tanay); (2) "Making Bridges: The Sock Doll…

  6. The Impact of Green Open Space on Community Attachment—A Case Study of Three Communities in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuemei Zhu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With the development of urbanization in China, the quality of urban life and community attachment have attracted increasing attention of the governments and society. Existing research on community attachment has mainly examined how individual characteristics affect community attachment, such as their length of residence and socioeconomic status. However, some scholars have become interested in exploring the effects of green open space on community attachment. This research examined whether the distribution of green open space in communities had significant effects on community attachment, and both the impact and path were also investigated. Through a questionnaire survey, relevant data in three communities of Beijing were collected. The impact of green open space layout on community attachment was evaluated by using hierarchical regression, and the impact path was examined by using a structural equation model. The results showed that green open space in a community had significant effects on the community attachment, with centralized green open space layout having a greater effect than that of dispersed green open space. Moreover, the more complex the shape of green open space is, the greater the impact is. The degree of satisfaction with the green open space had direct effects on the community attachment. The accessibility and perceived area of green open space could indirectly have an impact on the community attachment by affecting the degree of satisfaction with the green open space. Nevertheless, residents’ perceived importance of green open space could affect the community attachment directly and indirectly, as it affects the degree of satisfaction.

  7. Spatial distribution and deployment of community-based distributors implementing integrated community case management (iCCM): Geographic information system (GIS) mapping study in three South Sudan states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Abigail; Dale, Martin; Olivi, Elena; Miller, Jane

    2014-12-01

    In late 2012 and in conjunction with South Sudan's Ministry of Health - National Malaria Control Program, PSI (Population Services International) conducted a comprehensive mapping exercise to assess geographical coverage of its integrated community case management (iCCM) program and consider scope for expansion. The operational research was designed to provide evidence and support for low-cost mapping and monitoring systems, demonstrating the use of technology to enhance the quality of programming and to allow for the improved allocation of resources through appropriate and need-based deployment of community-based distributors (CBDs). The survey took place over the course of three months and program staff gathered GPS (global positioning system) data, along with demographic data, for over 1200 CBDs and 111 CBD supervisors operating in six counties in South Sudan. Data was collated, cleaned and quality assured, input into an Excel database, and subsequently uploaded to geographic information system (GIS) for spatial analysis and map production. The mapping results showed that over three-quarters of CBDs were deployed within a five kilometer radius of a health facility or another CBD, contrary to program planning and design. Other characteristics of the CBD and CBD supervisor profiles (age, gender, literacy) were more closely matched with other regional programs. The results of this mapping exercise provided a valuable insight into the contradictions found between a program "deployment plan" and the realities observed during field implementation. It also highlighted an important need for program implementers and national-level strategy makers to consider the natural and community-driven diffusion of CBDs, and take into consideration the strength of the local health facilities when developing a deployment plan.

  8. Community-acquired bacteremia and acute cholecystitis due to Enterobacter cloacae: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isasti Guillermo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Enterobacter cloacae is responsible for 65-75% of all Enterobacter infections, bacteremia being the most common syndrome. The majority of infections are nosocomially acquired and in patients with predisposing factors. Case presentation We present a case of E. cloacae bacteremia secondary to acute cholecystitis in a 60-year-old man with recent diagnosis of cholelithiasis. The diagnosis was established with abdominal echography and positive blood and biliary cultures. The patient was managed successfully with cholecystectomy and antibiotic therapy. Conclusion The peculiarity of our case is the development of community-acquired bacteremia due to E. cloacae with a clear infectious focus, as a single agent isolated in several blood cultures, in a patient without severe underlying diseases, prior antimicrobial use or previous hospital admission. Although the majority of Enterobacter spp. infections are nosocomially acquired, primary bacteremia being the most common syndrome, these pathogens may also be responsible for community-acquired cases. Patients without predisposing factors may also be affected.

  9. Necrotizing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Maharaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cavities are not typically associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. CAP due to P. aeruginosa is rare and even less commonly causes necrotizing pneumonia. We report a case of P. aeruginosa CAP that progressed to necrotizing pneumonia and was eventually fatal. Procalcitonin (PCT has been well investigated in guiding antibiotic therapy (especially CAP in adults. In this case, PCT at presentation and sequentially was negative. We discuss this caveat and present hypotheses as to the sensitivity and specificity of PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in these patients. To better characterize P. aeruginosa CAP, we undertook a review of cases indexed in PubMed from 2001 to 2016 (n=9. The data reveal that risk factors for P. aeruginosa CAP include smoking, alcohol use, obstructive lung disease, sinusitis, and hot tub use. The route of infection for P. aeruginosa CAP remains unknown. One of the most interesting findings on reviewing cases was that P. aeruginosa CAP involves the right upper lobe in the vast majority. We suggest that when physicians in the community see patients with distinctly upper lobe necrotizing or cavitary pneumonia, they should consider P. aeruginosa in their differential diagnosis. Further studies are needed to clarify route of infection, role of PCT and CRP, and optimal therapy including drug and duration.

  10. Poisoning and suicide by cyanide jewelry cleaner in the US Hmong community: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlich, Fiona M; Alsop, Judith Ann; Anderson, Deborah L; Geller, Richard J; Kalugdan, Theresa Thao; Roberts, David J; Thomas, Lindsey C

    2012-02-01

    Over 200 000 persons of Hmong ethnicity live in the United States. The majority of this Southeast Asian ethnic group live in California, Minnesota and Wisconsin. Tradition plays a strong role in the Hmong population, and difficulty in assimilation into "Western ways" has been reported to result in depression and suicide attempts. Some products sold at Southeast Asian ethnic markets are well-known within the Hmong community to be lethal but are essentially unknown to the outside community. We describe eight cases in which cyanide-containing products were ingested by Hmong patients. Seven cases were suicide attempts involving the ingestion of a locally-purchased substance intended for cleaning metal, coins, or jewelry. One case involved the fatal ingestion of a cyanide-containing "herbal" cure. In the majority of the cases, cyanide was not initially suspected, and treatment was delayed due to lack of information regarding the product ingested. In the two patients who survived, the cyanide antidote kit (sodium nitrite, amyl nitrite, and sodium thiosulfate) was administered early. Clinicians should be aware that unusual and potentially lethal products are easily available at ethnic markets. Cyanide toxicity should be suspected, and empiric antidote therapy initiated early, in patients of Hmong or Southeast Asian descent who present with sudden and unexplained cardiovascular collapse and metabolic acidosis, especially in the setting of a suspected suicidal ingestion.

  11. Enhancing engagement with community sector organisations working in sustainable waste management: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dururu, John; Anderson, Craig; Bates, Margaret; Montasser, Waleed; Tudor, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Voluntary and community sector organisations are increasingly being viewed as key agents of change in the shifts towards the concepts of resource efficiency and circular economy, at the community level. Using a meta-analysis and questionnaire surveys across three towns in the East Midlands of England, namely Northampton, Milton Keynes and Luton, this study aimed to understand public engagement with these organisations. The findings suggest that these organisations play a significant and wide-spread role, not only with regard to sustainable environmental management, but also a social role in community development and regeneration. The surveys indicated that there were generally high levels of awareness of the organisations and strong engagement with them. Clothes were the items most donated. Key reasons for engagement included the financial value offered and the perception that it helped the environment. However, potential limitations in future public engagement were also determined and recommendations for addressing these suggested. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. The Ambivalence of Community: A Critical Analysis of Rural Education's Oldest Trope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The concept of community has been central to the discourse of rural education for generations. At the same time, community has been and continues to be a deeply problematic concept. I begin this analysis with Raymond Williams's characterization of the idea of community as a uniquely positive concept, arguing that this framing is, as Williams…

  13. An organizational culture gap analysis in 6 New Zealand community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Shane L; Carswell, Peter; Harrison, Jeff

    2011-09-01

    The barriers to moving forward and meeting the expectations of policy makers and professional pharmacy bodies appear to relate to the organizational culture of community pharmacy. Despite the importance of cultural change for business transformation, organizational culture has largely gone unnoticed in community pharmacy practice research. To perform an organizational culture gap analysis in 6 New Zealand community pharmacies. Mean scores from a cultural rating survey (n=47) were calculated for 8 cultural clusters and mapped onto a typical and a beneficial pattern match (ladder diagram) for each case site. These ladder diagrams provide an understanding of the gap between the 2 ratings based on the gradient of the lines joining cultural clusters-the rungs of the ladder. Software can be used to generate a Pearson correlation describing the strength of the relationship between the typical and beneficial ratings. Eight cultural clusters were mapped: "leadership and staff management"; "valuing each other and the team"; "free-thinking, fun and, open to challenge"; "trusted behavior"; "customer relations"; "focus on external integration"; "provision of systematic advice"; and the "embracing of innovation." Analysis suggested a high level of correlation between the means of the typical and beneficial ratings. Although the variance between average ratings might be quite small, the relative difference can still be meaningful to participants in the cultural setting. The diagrams suggest a requirement for external integration, the provision of systematic advice, and the embracing of innovation to become more typical in most pharmacies. Trusted behavior is the most typical and most beneficial cultural dimension in most pharmacies, whereas valuing each other and the team is the least beneficial. Gaps in organizational culture have been identified through the use of a rating survey. The dimensions of focus on external integration, providing systematic advice, and embracing

  14. Performance Evaluation of Community Health Workers: Case Study in the Amazon of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgard, Christopher; Naraine, Renuka; Paucar Villacorta, Diego Mauricio

    2018-03-26

    A shortage in human resources for health is a growing crisis that has led to an inability to provide adequate health services to impoverished populations. By "task-shifting", health systems can delegate certain activities, such as health promotion and referral, to trained community members to help fill the human resource gap. An effective community health agent program can improve maternal and child health and overall effectiveness of rural health systems. Such a program is most effective when the community health agents receive supervision and evaluation of their performance. There is a shortage of literature that provides instruction and example on how to conduct a performance evaluation in the developing world to improve maternal and child health outcomes. The current study provides a case study of a performance evaluation in the Amazon region of Peru and how the findings can be used to make program adjustments. A set of instruments to measure the performance of CHWs was adapted from the literature and then implemented in the field. The instruments were used to measure the quality of home visits by the CHWs, their knowledge of the health topics, and structural activities. Three communities with an active CHW program in Loreto, Peru were chosen to receive the evaluation. All CHWs in the communities were evaluated. The scores from the evaluation were compared internally to identify strengths and weaknesses of the program and within the population of CHWs. The evaluation was completed on 52 home visits and 27 CHWs in three communities. The CHWs were found to be most effective at creating good relationships with caregivers and delivering health messages, and least effective at interacting with the child during the home visit and using material to deliver health messages. The evaluation instruments were well suited for the CHW program that utilizes home visits to teach about child health and development.

  15. Management of children’s acute diarrhea by community pharmacies in five towns of Ethiopia: simulated client case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abegaz TM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tadesse Melaku Abegaz,1 Sewunet Admasu Belachew,1 Tamrat Befekadu Abebe,1 Begashaw Melaku Gebresilassie,1 Fitsum Sebsibe Teni,2 Habtamu Gebremeskel Woldie3 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Gondar University, Gondar, 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Social Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, 3Department of Hospital Pharmacy, Debremarkos Teaching and Referral Hospital, Debremarkos, Ethiopia Background: Acute diarrhea is the major cause of child morbidity and mortality in low-income nations. It is the second most common cause of death among children <5 years of age globally. The indispensable role of community pharmacists is clearly observed in the prevention and treatment of diarrhea. However, there is a paucity of data on how community pharmacies manage acute childhood diarrhea cases in Ethiopia. This study aimed to evaluate the experience of community pharmacies in the management of acute diarrhea in northern Ethiopia.Methods: A simulated case-based cross-sectional study was conducted in community pharmacies from five towns of northern Ethiopia between April 2015 and September 2015. Convenience sampling technique was used to select sample towns. A structured questionnaire was organized to collect the information. Descriptive statistics, chi-squared test, one-way analysis of variance, and binary logistic regression were performed to describe, infer, and test for association between the variables. SPSS for Windows Version 21 was used to enter and analyze the data. A 95% confidence interval and P-value of 0.05 were set to test the level of significance.Results: Approximately 113 community pharmacies were visited to collect the required data from five towns. Majority (78, 69% of them were located away from hospitals and health care areas. Nine components of history taking were presented for dispensers. Regarding the patient history, “age” was frequently taken, (90

  16. Effect of phenylurea herbicides on soil microbial communities estimated by analysis of 16S rRNA gene fingerprints and community-level physiological profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Fantroussi, S; Verschuere, L; Verstraete, W; Top, E M

    1999-03-01

    The effect of three phenyl urea herbicides (diuron, linuron, and chlorotoluron) on soil microbial communities was studied by using soil samples with a 10-year history of treatment. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used for the analysis of 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNA). The degree of similarity between the 16S rDNA profiles of the communities was quantified by numerically analysing the DGGE band patterns. Similarity dendrograms showed that the microbial community structures of the herbicide-treated and nontreated soils were significantly different. Moreover, the bacterial diversity seemed to decrease in soils treated with urea herbicides, and sequence determination of several DGGE fragments showed that the most affected species in the soils treated with diuron and linuron belonged to an uncultivated bacterial group. As well as the 16S rDNA fingerprints, the substrate utilization patterns of the microbial communities were compared. Principal-component analysis performed on BIOLOG data showed that the functional abilities of the soil microbial communities were altered by the application of the herbicides. In addition, enrichment cultures of the different soils in medium with the urea herbicides as the sole carbon and nitrogen source showed that there was no difference between treated and nontreated soil in the rate of transformation of diuron and chlorotoluron but that there was a strong difference in the case of linuron. In the enrichment cultures with linuron-treated soil, linuron disappeared completely after 1 week whereas no significant transformation was observed in cultures inoculated with nontreated soil even after 4 weeks. In conclusion, this study showed that both the structure and metabolic potential of soil microbial communities were clearly affected by a long-term application of urea herbicides.

  17. Impervious Surfaces Alter Soil Bacterial Communities in Urban Areas: A Case Study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yinhong; Dou, Xiaolin; Li, Juanyong; Li, Feng

    2018-01-01

    The rapid expansion of urbanization has caused land cover change, especially the increasing area of impervious surfaces. Such alterations have significant effects on the soil ecosystem by impeding the exchange of gasses, water, and materials between soil and the atmosphere. It is unclear whether impervious surfaces have any effects on soil bacterial diversity and community composition. In the present study, we conducted an investigation of bacterial communities across five typical land cover types, including impervious surfaces (concrete), permeable pavement (bricks with round holes), shrub coverage ( Buxus megistophylla Levl. ), lawns ( Festuca elata Keng ex E. Alexeev ), and roadside trees ( Sophora japonica Linn. ) in Beijing, to explore the response of bacteria to impervious surfaces. The soil bacterial communities were addressed by high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. We found that Proteobacteria , Actinobacteria , Acidobacteria , Bacteroidetes , Chloroflexi , and Firmicutes were the predominant phyla in urban soils. Soil from impervious surfaces presented a lower bacterial diversity, and differed greatly from other types of land cover. Soil bacterial diversity was predominantly affected by Zn, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and soil moisture content (SMC). The composition of the bacterial community was similar under shrub coverage, roadside trees, and lawns, but different from beneath impervious surfaces and permeable pavement. Variance partitioning analysis showed that edaphic properties contributed to 12% of the bacterial community variation, heavy metal pollution explained 3.6% of the variation, and interaction between the two explained 33% of the variance. Together, our data indicate that impervious surfaces induced changes in bacterial community composition and decrease of bacterial diversity. Interactions between edaphic properties and heavy metals were here found to change the composition of the bacterial community and diversity

  18. Impervious Surfaces Alter Soil Bacterial Communities in Urban Areas: A Case Study in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhong Hu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid expansion of urbanization has caused land cover change, especially the increasing area of impervious surfaces. Such alterations have significant effects on the soil ecosystem by impeding the exchange of gasses, water, and materials between soil and the atmosphere. It is unclear whether impervious surfaces have any effects on soil bacterial diversity and community composition. In the present study, we conducted an investigation of bacterial communities across five typical land cover types, including impervious surfaces (concrete, permeable pavement (bricks with round holes, shrub coverage (Buxus megistophylla Levl., lawns (Festuca elata Keng ex E. Alexeev, and roadside trees (Sophora japonica Linn. in Beijing, to explore the response of bacteria to impervious surfaces. The soil bacterial communities were addressed by high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. We found that Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes were the predominant phyla in urban soils. Soil from impervious surfaces presented a lower bacterial diversity, and differed greatly from other types of land cover. Soil bacterial diversity was predominantly affected by Zn, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, and soil moisture content (SMC. The composition of the bacterial community was similar under shrub coverage, roadside trees, and lawns, but different from beneath impervious surfaces and permeable pavement. Variance partitioning analysis showed that edaphic properties contributed to 12% of the bacterial community variation, heavy metal pollution explained 3.6% of the variation, and interaction between the two explained 33% of the variance. Together, our data indicate that impervious surfaces induced changes in bacterial community composition and decrease of bacterial diversity. Interactions between edaphic properties and heavy metals were here found to change the composition of the bacterial community and

  19. An Integrative Psychotherapy Approach to Foster Community Engagement and Rehabilitation in Schizophrenia: A Case Study Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Marina; Whitesel, Frankie; Lysaker, Paul H

    2016-02-01

    This case study illustrates the use of a long-term integrative psychotherapy approach with a middle- aged man with chronic schizophrenia and a mood disorder. The case of "Holst" describes a man with a history of insecure attachment and trauma who later went on to contract a serious chronic illness, precipitating the onset of psychotic symptoms, depression, and chronic suicidal ideation, resulting in multiple hospitalizations. Combining metacognition-oriented therapy with elements of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychiatric rehabilitation, this approach fostered significantly improved community functioning and attainment of personal goals over time. Through the journey of therapy, the patient also developed a more coherent narrative about his life, established a stable sense of self, and became an active agent in the world. This case illustration demonstrates that these three different approaches can be used in a sequential and complementary fashion to foster recovery in the midst of serious physical and mental illness. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Community-Acquired MRSA Pyomyositis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Douglas P. Olson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is responsible for a broad range of infections. We report the case of a 46-year-old gentleman with a history of untreated, uncomplicated Hepatitis C who presented with a 2-month history of back pain and was found to have abscesses in his psoas and right paraspinal muscles with subsequent lumbar spine osteomyelitis. Despite drainage and appropriate antibiotic management the patient's clinical condition deteriorated and he developed new upper extremity weakness and sensory deficits on physical exam. Repeat imaging showed new, severe compression of the spinal cord and cauda equina from C1 to the sacrum by a spinal epidural abscess. After surgical intervention and continued medical therapy, the patient recovered completely. This case illustrates a case of CA-MRSA pyomyositis that progressed to lumbar osteomyelitis and a spinal epidural abscess extending the entire length of the spinal canal.

  1. Jury Selection in Child Sex Abuse Trials: A Case Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J.; Adams, Desiree D.; Brodsky, Stanley L.

    2009-01-01

    Child sex abuse cases have been the target of considerable psycho-legal research. The present paper offers an analysis of psychological constructs for jury selection in child sex abuse cases from the defense perspective. The authors specifically delineate general and case-specific jury selection variables. General variables include…

  2. Infectious spondylodiscitis - a case series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garkowski, Adam; Zajkowska, Agata; Czupryna, Piotr; Lebkowski, Wojciech; Letmanowski, Michał; Gołębicki, Paweł; Moniuszko, Anna; Ustymowicz, Andrzej; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to describe the clinical and laboratory features as well as diagnostic difficulties in the case series of spondylodiscitis. We retrospectively reviewed 11 cases of spondylodiscitis. The diagnosis of spondylodiscitis was based on clinical, radiological and microbiological evidence and by the response to antimicrobial therapy. There were 7 men and 4 women, and the age ranged from 21 to 74 years. Risk factors of spondylodiscitis were observed in 7 patients. The approximate time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was from 2 to 7 months (median 45 days). Back pain was the most common symptom. The most frequent location of spondylodiscitis was lumbar spine. Pathogens were isolated in 6 cases and were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus (4 cases), Staphylococcus warneri (1 case) and Escherichia coli (1 case). After therapy, all patients had rapid regression of symptoms and no permanent neurological impairments and recurrence of infection were observed. Diagnosis of spondylodiscitis is frequently delayed. This disease should be taken into consideration in differential diagnosis in patients with root syndromes accompanied by back pain and usually fever as well as increased values of CRP and ESR. Copyright © 2014 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  3. Building up STEM education professional learning community in school setting: Case of Khon Kaen Wittayayon School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thana, Aduldej; Siripun, Kulpatsorn; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    The STEM education is new issue of teaching and learning in school setting. Building up STEM education professional learning community may provide some suggestions for further collaborative work of STEM Education from grounded up. This paper aimed to clarify the building up STEM education learning community in Khon Kaen Wittayayon (KKW) School setting. Participants included Khon Kaen University researchers, Khon Kaen Wittayayon School administrators and teachers. Methodology regarded interpretative paradigm. The tools of interpretation included participant observation, interview and document analysis. Data was analyzed to categories of condition for building up STEM education professional learning community. The findings revealed that the actions of developing STEM learning activities and research showed some issues of KKW STEM community of inquiry and improvement. The paper will discuss what and how the community learns about sharing vision of STEM Education, supportive physical and social conditions of KKW, sharing activities of STEM, and good things from some key STEM teachers' ambition. The paper may has implication of supporting STEM education in Thailand school setting.

  4. Enhancing the Analysis of Rural Community Resilience: Evidence from Community land Ownership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerratt, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Resilience, and specifically the resilience of (rural) communities, is an increasingly-ubiquitous concept, particularly in the contexts of resistance to shocks, climate change, and environmental disasters. The dominant discourse concerning (community) resilience centres around bounce-back from external shocks. In this paper, I argue that it is…

  5. Communities as neighborhood guardians: A spatio-temporal analysis of community policing in Nairobi's suburbs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mburu, L; Helbich, M

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of citizens to participate in neighborhood-watch activities and report signs of trouble is important for safeguarding communities against crime. Community policing is a key policing strategy for utilizing the capability of residents to solve local crime-related problems. However,

  6. Participation is possible: A case report of integration into a community performing arts program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Emily; Dusing, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Typically developing children frequently participate in community recreation activities that enhance their social/emotional and physical development. The inclusion of children with developmental disabilities in these activities continues to be a challenge. This case report investigated the feasibility of including a child with Down syndrome in a community performing arts program. The participant is an 11-year-old female with Down syndrome and mild cognitive impairment. The participant was enrolled in a 14-week performing arts session that included a combination of acting, voice, and dance instruction. She participated in the program with the support of a one-on-one assistant who was a physical therapy student. The assistant facilitated learning the choreography, appropriate socialization, and positioning on the stage. Peer helpers were used to allow for greater independence toward the end of the session and for the final performance. The participant completed the final performance without the one-on-one assistant. The participant's mother completed the PedsQL before and after the performance, and the participant's scaled scores increased in all subsets except for emotional function and the total scales score increased from 51 to 57. With appropriate modifications and the right child/program fit, children with developmental disabilities such as Down syndrome can successfully be included in community programs. Physical therapists can assist families and community programs to make developmentally appropriate modifications to enhance participation.

  7. Teaching Case: Analysis of an Electronic Voting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nik; Toohey, Danny

    2014-01-01

    This teaching case discusses the analysis of an electronic voting system. The development of the case was motivated by research into information security and management, but as it includes procedural aspects, organizational structure and personnel, it is a suitable basis for all aspects of systems analysis, planning and design tasks. The material…

  8. Analysis of Multidimensional Poverty: Theory and Case Studies ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Analysis of Multidimensional Poverty: Theory and Case Studies. Couverture du livre Analysis of Multidimensional Poverty: Theory and Case Studies. Auteur(s):. Louis-Marie Asselin. Maison(s) d'édition: Springer, CRDI. 18 août 2009. ISBN : 9781441909053. 228 pages. e-ISBN : 9781552504604. Téléchargez le PDF.

  9. A Case Study of Community Involvement Influence on Policy Decisions: Victories of a Community-Based Participatory Research Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith M. Williams

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Buffalo Lupus Project was a community-university partnership that investigated associations between exposure to a local waste site and high rates of lupus and other autoimmune diseases. The partnership’s major accomplishment was successful advocacy for containment and clean-up of the site. As a result of community education, the remediation plan suggested by the community was adopted. Additionally, when a local childhood lead poisoning testing program was canceled, community members signed a letter to legislators urging them to replace the funding, which was restored within one week. This demonstrated how coordinated community-based capacity-building efforts can influence health policy.

  10. Average case analysis of the MST-heuristic for the power assignment problem: special cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, Maurits; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hurink, Johann L.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.; Knottenbelt, W.; Wolter, K.; Busic, A.; Gribaudo, M.; Reinecke, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present an average case analysis of the minimum spanning tree heuristic for the power assignment problem. The worst-case approximation ratio of this heuristic is 2. We have the following results: (a) In the one-dimensional case, with uniform [0, 1]-distributed distances, the expected

  11. Determinants of falls in community-dwelling elderly: hierarchical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Thais Alves; Coqueiro, Raildo da Silva; Fernandes, Marcos Henrique; de Jesus, Cleber Souza

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the fall-related factors in community-dwelling elderly. Epidemiologic cross-sectional population-based household study with hierarchical interrelationships among the potential risk factors. The sample was made up of noninstitutionalized individuals over age 60, who were resident of a city in Brazil's Northeast Region. The dependent variable was fall occurrence in the last 12 months; independent variables were sociodemographic, behavioral, health, and functional status factors. Multivariate hierarchical Poisson regression analysis was used based on a proposed theoretic model. Three hundred and sixteen (89.0%) elderly participated of the survey, average age 74.2 years; the majority was female, with limited literacy and had low-medium family income. The fall prevalence was of 25.8%; occurrence was related to depression symptoms (PR = 1.55) and balance limitation (PR = 1.56). The high fall prevalence among elderly necessitates the identification of fall-related factors for action planning prevention programs with this group. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Designing healthy communities: A walkability analysis of LEED-ND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana A. Zuniga-Teran

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Prevailing city design in many countries has created sedentary societies that depend on automobile use. Consequently, architects, urban designers, and land planners have developed new urban design theories, which have been incorporated into the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND certification system. The LEED-ND includes design elements that improve human well-being by facilitating walking and biking, a concept known as walkability. Despite these positive developments, relevant research findings from other fields of study have not been fully integrated into the LEED-ND. According to Zuniga-Teran (2015, relevant walkability research findings from multiple disciplines were organized into a walkability framework (WF that organizes design elements related to physical activity into nine categories, namely, connectivity, land use, density, traffic safety, surveillance, parking, experience, greenspace, and community. In this study, we analyze walkability in the LEED-ND through the lens of the nine WF categories. Through quantitative and qualitative analyses, we identify gaps and strengths in the LEED-ND and propose potential enhancements to this certification system that reflects what is known about enhancing walkability more comprehensively through neighborhood design analysis. This work seeks to facilitate the translation of research into practice, which can ultimately lead to more active and healthier societies.

  13. Community acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in a young athlete man: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahdar, Hossein Ali; Kazemian, Hossein; Bimanand, Lida; Zahedani, Shahram Shahraki; Feyisa, Seifu Gizaw; Taki, Elahe; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Karami-Zarandi, Morteza

    2018-04-10

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly known as nosocomial infection agent but rarely previously healthy peoples infected by P. aeruginosa. Here we report community acquired pneumonia in a 27 years old athleteman. 15 published P. aeruginosa CAP case reports are reviewed.1 53.3% of patients was female and 46.67% was male. The mean age was 44 years old (SD: ±13.54). In 8 report it is mentioned that the patient was smoker. Fatality rate was 46.6% and death rate was not significantly different between selected antibiotic regimen, sex and smoking in patient's outcome. Chest strike can be a risk factor for P. aeruginosa CAP in athlete people. Our reported patient treated by ciprofloxacin 400 mg per day and healed without any Secondary complication. Fast and timelymanner diagnosis and treatment is critical in Community acquired P. aeruginosapneumonia outcome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Socio economic community mapping around Dumai Timur (case study: Tanjung Palas Village)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilham, Ami; Putra, M. Umar Maya

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to analyze the socio economic community mapping around Dumai Timur Sub District with a case study: Tanjung Palas Village. The problem in this research is to analyze community needs and potential contained there. The data used are primary data that have been obtained to do data entry based on the guidance from the actors concerned, there is a transfer in the form of qualitative data into quantitative measurement techniques reference instrument of socio economic mapping activities. From the results of this study indicate that the necessary empowerment of social management in which short-term policy for the addition of water discharge, training on the concept of raising entrepreneurial innovation. For the long term necessary to make a business innovation and sustainability development pattern with operational assistance in the form of seeds, the manufacture of cages and chicken feed.

  15. Case fatality ratio and mortality rate trends of community-onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tom, S; Galbraith, J C; Valiquette, L

    2014-01-01

    Lethal outcomes can be expressed as a case fatality ratio (CFR) or as a mortality rate per 100 000 population per year (MR). Population surveillance for community-onset methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (MRSA) Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia was conducted in Canada, Australia......, Sweden and Denmark to evaluate 30-day CFR and MR trends between 2000 and 2008. The CFR was 20.3% (MSSA 20.2%, MRSA 22.3%) and MR was 3.4 (MSSA 3.1, MRSA 0.3) per 100 000 per year. Although MSSA CFR was stable the MSSA MR increased; MRSA CFR decreased while its MR remained low during the study. Community......-onset S. aureus bacteraemia, particularly MSSA, is associated with major disease burden. This study highlights complementary information provided by evaluating both CFR and MR....

  16. An analysis of 1018 cases of ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chu Wan; Suh, Jeong Soo; Lee, Kwan Seh; Kim, Ki Hwan; Im, Chung Gie; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung; Choo, Dong Woon

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasound is an especially helpful diagnostic tool in assessing various diseases in various organs as well as differentiating cystic masses from solid ones, with ease safety, reproducibility, and high accuracy. Authors analyzed total 1018 cases of ultrasonography that were studied in last seven months from March. 15. 1979 to October. 31. 1979, at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1. Among the 1018 cases, 421 cases were male and 597 cases of female. The age distribution was from several months to 83 years, and 88% of all cases were in 20 to 69 years of age. 2. Sites of scanning; Liver, G.B. and biliary systems 376, thyroid 185, kidney 192, pelvis 121, abdomen 70, pancreas 48, eyeball 14, and other 12. 3. Hepatobiliary system 376; Normal 174, hepatomegaly 12, hepatoma 7, metastases 6, abscess 6, cirrhosis 2, hepatic cyst 1, hemangioma 1, agenesis of left lobe 1. 4. G.B. stones 106, cholecystitis 35, biliary tree dilatation 13, enlarged G.B. 7, C.B.D. stone 5, cystic duct stone 4, C.B.D. cancer 6, G.B. cancer 1, choledochal cyst 1, non-visualized G.B. 8. 5. Thyroid, 185; Nodule 147 -- solid 56, cystic 70, complex 21, Diffuse enlargement 29, normal scan 7, unidentified 2. 6. Pancreas, 48; Normal 17, pancreastitis 4, pancreatic cancer 22, pseudocyst 4, unidentified 1. 7. Abdomen 77 (excluding liver, G.B. and pancreas); Normal scan 31, solid tumor 14 - lymphoma group 12, mesenchyma origin 2, multiple lymph node enlargement 13, aortic aneurysm 4, retroperitoneal mass 2, subphrenic abscess 2, abdominal wall abscess 2, unknown solid mass 4, not contributory 4. 8. Kidney, 194, Normal scan 44, size and markings for biopsy 75, hydronephrosis 21, renal cyst 8, polycystic disease 8, solid renal tumor 10, renal stone 7, agenesis or hypoplasia 2, contracted kidney, both 7, enlarge kidney due to lymphoma and compensatory hyperplasia 5, renal tbc 2, perirenal abscess 1, perirenal hematoma 1, movable kidney 1, bladder tumor

  17. An analysis of 1018 cases of ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chu Wan; Suh, Jeong Soo; Lee, Kwan Seh; Kim, Ki Hwan; Im, Chung Gie; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung; Choo, Dong Woon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-12-15

    Ultrasound is an especially helpful diagnostic tool in assessing various diseases in various organs as well as differentiating cystic masses from solid ones, with ease safety, reproducibility, and high accuracy. Authors analyzed total 1018 cases of ultrasonography that were studied in last seven months from March. 15. 1979 to October. 31. 1979, at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1. Among the 1018 cases, 421 cases were male and 597 cases of female. The age distribution was from several months to 83 years, and 88% of all cases were in 20 to 69 years of age. 2. Sites of scanning; Liver, G.B. and biliary systems 376, thyroid 185, kidney 192, pelvis 121, abdomen 70, pancreas 48, eyeball 14, and other 12. 3. Hepatobiliary system 376; Normal 174, hepatomegaly 12, hepatoma 7, metastases 6, abscess 6, cirrhosis 2, hepatic cyst 1, hemangioma 1, agenesis of left lobe 1. 4. G.B. stones 106, cholecystitis 35, biliary tree dilatation 13, enlarged G.B. 7, C.B.D. stone 5, cystic duct stone 4, C.B.D. cancer 6, G.B. cancer 1, choledochal cyst 1, non-visualized G.B. 8. 5. Thyroid, 185; Nodule 147 -- solid 56, cystic 70, complex 21, Diffuse enlargement 29, normal scan 7, unidentified 2. 6. Pancreas, 48; Normal 17, pancreastitis 4, pancreatic cancer 22, pseudocyst 4, unidentified 1. 7. Abdomen 77 (excluding liver, G.B. and pancreas); Normal scan 31, solid tumor 14 - lymphoma group 12, mesenchyma origin 2, multiple lymph node enlargement 13, aortic aneurysm 4, retroperitoneal mass 2, subphrenic abscess 2, abdominal wall abscess 2, unknown solid mass 4, not contributory 4. 8. Kidney, 194, Normal scan 44, size and markings for biopsy 75, hydronephrosis 21, renal cyst 8, polycystic disease 8, solid renal tumor 10, renal stone 7, agenesis or hypoplasia 2, contracted kidney, both 7, enlarge kidney due to lymphoma and compensatory hyperplasia 5, renal tbc 2, perirenal abscess 1, perirenal hematoma 1, movable kidney 1, bladder tumor

  18. Predicate Argument Structure Analysis for Use Case Description Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hironori; Nakamura, Taiga; Yamaguchi, Takahira

    In a large software system development project, many documents are prepared and updated frequently. In such a situation, support is needed for looking through these documents easily to identify inconsistencies and to maintain traceability. In this research, we focus on the requirements documents such as use cases and consider how to create models from the use case descriptions in unformatted text. In the model construction, we propose a few semantic constraints based on the features of the use cases and use them for a predicate argument structure analysis to assign semantic labels to actors and actions. With this approach, we show that we can assign semantic labels without enhancing any existing general lexical resources such as case frame dictionaries and design a less language-dependent model construction architecture. By using the constructed model, we consider a system for quality analysis of the use cases and automated test case generation to keep the traceability between document sets. We evaluated the reuse of the existing use cases and generated test case steps automatically with the proposed prototype system from real-world use cases in the development of a system using a packaged application. Based on the evaluation, we show how to construct models with high precision from English and Japanese use case data. Also, we could generate good test cases for about 90% of the real use cases through the manual improvement of the descriptions based on the feedback from the quality analysis system.

  19. Soviet Jewish Community Strategies, Concerning Memory Perpetuation (Erection of Memorials to Jews-Fascism Victims Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Tcherkasski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article, case studying the memorials erection, shows the process of Jews, victims of Nazism memory perpetuation by the Jewish Community within the Soviet Republics in postwar, what difficulties the Jewish Communities and groups of initiators faced, trying to prove the Jewish identity of the graves and gain adoption of Jewish symbols on memorials and memorial signs to fascism victims.

  20. Working Together and Making a Difference: Virginia Western Community College and Goodwill Industries of the Valleys Partnership Case Study Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Bill

    2015-01-01

    "Working Together and Making A Difference: Virginia Western Community College and Goodwill Industries of the Valleys Partnership Case Study Report" is a report aimed at informing community college and workforce leaders of best practices for launching and expanding partnerships to serve students more effectively. Co-published by AspenWSI…

  1. Influence of face-to-face meetings on virtual community activity: the case of Learning Network for Learning Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgos, Daniel; Hummel, Hans; Tattersall, Colin; Brouns, Francis; Kurvers, Hub; Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Burgos, D., Hummel, H., Tattersall, C., Brouns, F., Kurvers, H., & Koper, R. (2006). Influence of face-to-face meetings on virtual community activity: the case of Learning Network for Learning Design. Proceedings of IADIS International Conference Web Based Communities 2006. February, 16-18,2006, San

  2. Autonomy and hierarchy in two slave communities: the cases of George (Alabama, United States, 1847 and Lino (Vassouras, Brazil, 1871

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Pereira de Carvalho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks argue that the search for autonomy among slaves necessarily created hierarchies within the community where they were inserted. Through two cases compared, George in U.S. and Lino in Brazil, seeks to show that a notion of slave community was built by the social actors who were part of it

  3. Success or failure of critical steps in community case management of malaria with rapid diagnostic tests: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruizendaal, Esmée; Dierickx, Susan; Peeters Grietens, Koen; Schallig, Henk D. F. H.; Pagnoni, Franco; Mens, Petra F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Malaria still causes high morbidity and mortality around the world, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. Community case management of malaria (CCMm) by community health workers (CHWs) is one of the strategies to combat the disease by increasing access to malaria treatment. Currently, the World

  4. Clinical analysis of 44 lung abscess cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruga, Hironori; Hanada, Shigeo; Takaya, Hisashi; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Morokawa, Nasa; Kishi, Kazuma

    2012-01-01

    Lung abscess is frequently caused by anaerobes that are difficult to diagnose by sputum examination. To evaluate diagnostic methods and bacteriology of lung abscesses, we retrospectively studied 44 consecutive lung abscess cases (37 men; 7 women; median age, 60 years) admitted and treated at our hospital from 2001 to 2010. The most frequent underlying disease was periodontitis (n=20, 45.5%). The diagnostic rate of causative pathogens by ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration (n=2), computed tomography (CT)-guided fine-needle aspiration (n=19), sputum examination (n=37), and bronchoscopy (n=10) was 100, 68.4, 16.2, and 10%, respectively. In total, 43 causative pathogens were identified in 18 cases (40.9%), of which 12 (67%) had polymicrobial infections. Furthermore, anaerobes and bacterial species belonging to the Streptococcus anginosus group accounted for 55.8 and 14% of the 43 identified pathogens, and both were identified by examination of CT-guided fine-needle aspiration fluid in all cases, except for one patient. Every case was successfully treated with antibiotics. Anaerobes and species of the S. anginosus group are common causes of lung abscess, and CT-guided fine-needle aspiration is a useful diagnostic tool for identifying these causative agents. (author)

  5. Analysis of 61 cases of vertebral osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzakis, M J; Rao, S; Wilkins, J; Moore, T M; Harvey, P J

    1991-03-01

    Sixty-one cases of bacterial vertebral osteomyelitis from July 1969 to July 1979 were analyzed. The ages of the 49 men and 12 women ranged from 21 to 66 years. The portal of entry was hematogenous in 58 cases, gunshot wounds in two cases, and and adjacent retroperitoneal abscess in one case. Biopsy was performed in 60 patients. There were 15 complications related to the disease. Gram-negative rods were the predominant bacteria isolated. Blood culture was positive in 13 of the 26 (50%) patients tested. Eleven of the 13 (85%) organisms isolated from the blood cultures correlated with organisms recovered from biopsy specimens. Eleven of the patients had more than one disk level involved. Of the 61 patients, 29 went on to spontaneous fusion, 17 were lost to follow-up study, 11 failed to fuse, three had surgical fusion, and one patient died. Recommendations for diagnosis included the collection of blood cultures and radionuclide bone scans. Management recommendations included systemic antibiotics for at least three weeks and immobilization with either bed rest or spinal orthoses. Surgery was indicated if an abscess was present, neurologic complications occurred, instability became a factor, or the medical treatment failed.

  6. Kaizen implementation: A best case analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokozawa, Kodo; Steenhuis, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    This study add insights to the concept on kaizen and its implementation process based upon an in-depth case study at OMN, a Japanese manufacturer in the Netherlands which has successfully adopted kaizen concepts. It was found that employee discipline and personal-initiatives are the two critical

  7. Analysis of Marketing and Customer Satisfaction in Base Housing Communities of the Monterey Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    SUBTITLE Analysis of Marketing and Customer Satisfaction in Base Housing Communities of the Monterey Bay Area 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S...MARKETING AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IN BASE HOUSING COMMUNITIES OF THE MONTEREY BAY AREA Andrea B. Hernandez, Civilian, United States Navy... CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IN BASE HOUSING COMMUNITIES OF THE MONTEREY BAY AREA ABSTRACT An analysis of the base housing organization Clark/Pinnacle

  8. Building Resilient Communities through Empowering Women with Information and Communication Technologies: A Pakistan Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Khan Khalafzai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary world, a revolution in digital technologies has changed our way of life—for better. The role of women is expanding in socio-economic, political and physical spaces; hence their empowerment will contribute toward resilience and capacity building that contributes to sustainability and disaster risk reduction in the long run. In developing nations, especially in rural regions, women empowered with information and communication technologies can enhance their capacity to cope in diverse situations. This paper addresses the vital role of information and communication technologies intervention and resilient communities with the help of a case study carried out in Pakistan.

  9. A case of newborn with community acquired pneumonia caused by Cupriavidus pauculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Banu; Dilli, Dilek; Zenciroğlu, Ayşegül; Okumuş, Nurullah; Ozkan, Sengül; Tanır, Gönül

    2012-01-01

    Cupriavidus pauculus is a gram-negative, aerobic, non-spore forming, non-fermentative motile bacillus. The bacillus can be isolated from water, bottled mineral water, and water from ultrafiltration systems in hospital setting. C. pauculus rarely causes human infections, however it may be an infectious agent especially in immunocompromised individuals. In this report, we present the first case of community acquired pneumonia caused by C. pauculus in a previously healthy newborn who was hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit on postnatal day 16 because of respiratory distress.

  10. Developing a comprehensive framework of community integration for people with acquired brain injury: a conceptual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Nusratnaaz M; Kersten, Paula; Siegert, Richard J; Theadom, Alice

    2018-03-06

    Despite increasing emphasis on the importance of community integration as an outcome for acquired brain injury (ABI), there is still no consensus on the definition of community integration. The aim of this study was to complete a concept analysis of community integration in people with ABI. The method of concept clarification was used to guide concept analysis of community integration based on a literature review. Articles were included if they explored community integration in people with ABI. Data extraction was performed by the initial coding of (1) the definition of community integration used in the articles, (2) attributes of community integration recognized in the articles' findings, and (3) the process of community integration. This information was synthesized to develop a model of community integration. Thirty-three articles were identified that met the inclusion criteria. The construct of community integration was found to be a non-linear process reflecting recovery over time, sequential goals, and transitions. Community integration was found to encompass six components including: independence, sense of belonging, adjustment, having a place to live, involved in a meaningful occupational activity, and being socially connected into the community. Antecedents to community integration included individual, injury-related, environmental, and societal factors. The findings of this concept analysis suggest that the concept of community integration is more diverse than previously recognized. New measures and rehabilitation plans capturing all attributes of community integration are needed in clinical practice. Implications for rehabilitation Understanding of perceptions and lived experiences of people with acquired brain injury through this analysis provides basis to ensure rehabilitation meets patients' needs. This model highlights the need for clinicians to be aware and assess the role of antecedents as well as the attributes of community integration itself to

  11. Assessment of data quality and reporting systems for underserved populations: the case of integrated community case management programs in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyangara, Florence M; Hai, Tajrina; Zalisk, Kirsten; Ozor, Lynda; Ufere, Joy; Isiguzo, Chinwoke; Abubakar, Ibrahim Ndaliman

    2018-02-13

    Decision makers are searching for reliable data and best practices to support the implementation and scale-up of the integrated community case management (iCCM) programs in underserved areas to reduce under-five mortality in low-income countries. This study assesses data quality and reporting systems of the World Health Organization supported Rapid Access Expansion program implementing iCCM in Abia and Niger States, Nigeria. This cross-sectional study used data from 16 primary health facilities in both states. Data were collected through review of registers and monthly summary reports of 140 community-oriented resource persons (CORPs), assessments of the five dimensions of the data reporting systems and 46 key informant interviews with stakeholders. Data quality was assessed by availability, completeness and consistency. Each component of the reporting system was assessed on a 3-point scale (weak, satisfactory and strong). Results show that both the structure, functions and capabilities, as well as data collection and reporting tools dimensions of the reporting system were strong, scoring (2.80, 2.73) for Abia and (2.88, 2.75) for Niger, respectively. Data management processes and links with national reporting system components scored low 2 s, indicating fair strength. Data availability, completeness and consistency were found to be good, an indication of adequate training and supervision of CORPs and community health extension workers. Indicator definitions and reporting guidelines were the weakest dimension of the system due to lack of data reporting guidelines in both states. In conclusion, the results indicate satisfactory data reporting systems and good quality data during early implementation of iCCM programs in the two states. Hence, countries planning to adopt and implement iCCM programs should first develop structures, establish national standardized tools for collecting and reporting data, provide for adequate training and supervision of community

  12. Capgras syndrome: analysis of nine cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T L; Liu, C Y; Yang, Y Y

    1999-08-01

    Three hundred and sixty-four patients, 158 males and 206 females, were admitted to an acute psychiatric ward between November 1994 and October 1995, and only 9 patients (2 males and 7 females) fulfilled the clinical criteria for Capgras syndrome. The crude prevalence of Capgras syndrome in the acute psychiatric ward was 2.5% (1.3% for men and 3.4% for women), which is not uncommon. Medical records and laboratory examinations, including brain images and electroencephalographic examinations (EEG), were reviewed in the nine patients with Capgras syndrome. Four cases were proven to have apparently abnormal anatomical lesions on EEG, brain computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or single photon emission computed tomography (99mTc-HMPAO) examinations and five cases were associated with major physical illness. These findings support that organic factors could be important in the pathogenesis of Capgras syndrome.

  13. Implementing a virtual community of practice for family physician training: a mixed-methods case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen; Jones, Sandra C; Caton, Tim; Iverson, Don; Bennett, Sue; Robinson, Laura

    2014-03-12

    GP training in Australia can be professionally isolating, with trainees spread across large geographic areas, leading to problems with rural workforce retention. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs) may provide a way of improving knowledge sharing and thus reducing professional isolation. The goal of our study was to review the usefulness of a 7-step framework for implementing a VCoP for general practitioner (GP) training and then evaluated the usefulness of the resulting VCoP in facilitating knowledge sharing and reducing professional isolation. The case was set in an Australian general practice training region involving 55 first-term trainees (GPT1s), from January to July 2012. ConnectGPR was a secure, online community site that included standard community options such as discussion forums, blogs, newsletter broadcasts, webchats, and photo sharing. A mixed-methods case study methodology was used. Results are presented and interpreted for each step of the VCoP 7-step framework and then in terms of the outcomes of knowledge sharing and overcoming isolation. Step 1, Facilitation: Regular, personal facilitation by a group of GP trainers with a co-ordinating facilitator was an important factor in the success of ConnectGPR. Step 2, Champion and Support: Leadership and stakeholder engagement were vital. Further benefits are possible if the site is recognized as contributing to training time. Step 3, Clear Goals: Clear goals of facilitating knowledge sharing and improving connectedness helped to keep the site discussions focused. Step 4, A Broad Church: The ConnectGPR community was too narrow, focusing only on first-term trainees (GPT1s). Ideally there should be more involvement of senior trainees, trainers, and specialists. Step 5, A Supportive Environment: Facilitators maintained community standards and encouraged participation. Step 6, Measurement Benchmarking and Feedback: Site activity was primarily driven by centrally generated newsletter feedback. Viewing

  14. Complicated Community-Acquired Staphylococcus Endocarditis and Multiple Lung Abscesses: Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa A. Garbati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Isolated tricuspid valve endocarditis in the absence of risk factors in the community setting is very rare and can be easily missed in patients with hitherto normal valves. Case Presentation. We present a case of a 49 year old gentleman who presented with generalized body aches, fever, and jaundice and was initial diagnosed as hepatitis. He subsequently developed recurrent episodes of panic attacks and shortness of breath and later multiple skin abscesses. Further investigations excluded pulmonary embolism but revealed multiple abscesses in the body including the lungs. Blood cultures and culture from abscesses grew S. aureus. An initial transthoracic echocardiogram was normal. A transesophageal echocardiogram subsequently confirmed endocarditis on a normal natural tricuspid valve and multiple lung abscesses. He was successfully treated with appropriate antibiotics. Conclusion. We discuss the pathogenesis of this patient's presentation highlight the need for assessment and proper evaluation of patients with unexplained bacteremia.

  15. Complicated community-acquired Staphylococcus endocarditis and multiple lung abscesses: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbati, Musa A; Tleyjeh, Imad M; Abba, Abdullah A

    2011-01-01

    Background. Isolated tricuspid valve endocarditis in the absence of risk factors in the community setting is very rare and can be easily missed in patients with hitherto normal valves. Case Presentation. We present a case of a 49 year old gentleman who presented with generalized body aches, fever, and jaundice and was initial diagnosed as hepatitis. He subsequently developed recurrent episodes of panic attacks and shortness of breath and later multiple skin abscesses. Further investigations excluded pulmonary embolism but revealed multiple abscesses in the body including the lungs. Blood cultures and culture from abscesses grew S. aureus. An initial transthoracic echocardiogram was normal. A transesophageal echocardiogram subsequently confirmed endocarditis on a normal natural tricuspid valve and multiple lung abscesses. He was successfully treated with appropriate antibiotics. Conclusion. We discuss the pathogenesis of this patient's presentation highlight the need for assessment and proper evaluation of patients with unexplained bacteremia.

  16. Network approach for local and community governance of energy: The case of Oxfordshire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parag, Yael; Hamilton, Jo; White, Vicki; Hogan, Bernie

    2013-01-01

    One of the many barriers to the incorporation of local and community actors in emerging energy governance structures and policy delivery mechanisms is the lack of thorough understanding of how they work in practice, and how best to support and develop effective local energy governance. Taking a meso-level perspective and a network approach to governance, this paper sheds some new light on this issue, by focusing on the relation, channels of communication and interactions between low carbon community groups (LCCGs) and other actors. Based on data gathered from LCCGs in Oxfordshire, UK, via network survey and interviews the research maps the relations in terms of the exchanges of information and financial support, and presents a relation-based structure of local energy governance. Analysis reveals the intensity of energy related information exchanges that is taking place at the county level and highlights the centrality of intermediary organization in facilitating information flow. The analysis also identifies actors that are not very dominant in their amount of exchanges, but fill ‘weak-tie’ functions between otherwise disconnected LCCGs or other actors in the network. As an analytical tool the analysis could be useful for various state and non-state actors that want to better understand and support – financially and otherwise – actors that enable energy related local action. - Highlights: • We used social network analysis to examine local and community governance of energy. • We examined information and financial support flow within the network. • Analysis highlights central and peripheral actors in the local governance structure. • The findings highlight the central role intermediary organizations have in local governance structures

  17. Building the Community Online Resource for Statistical Seismicity Analysis (CORSSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, A. J.; Wiemer, S.; Zechar, J. D.; Hardebeck, J. L.; Naylor, M.; Zhuang, J.; Steacy, S.; Corssa Executive Committee

    2010-12-01

    Statistical seismology is critical to the understanding of seismicity, the testing of proposed earthquake prediction and forecasting methods, and the assessment of seismic hazard. Unfortunately, despite its importance to seismology - especially to those aspects with great impact on public policy - statistical seismology is mostly ignored in the education of seismologists, and there is no central repository for the existing open-source software tools. To remedy these deficiencies, and with the broader goal to enhance the quality of statistical seismology research, we have begun building the Community Online Resource for Statistical Seismicity Analysis (CORSSA). CORSSA is a web-based educational platform that is authoritative, up-to-date, prominent, and user-friendly. We anticipate that the users of CORSSA will range from beginning graduate students to experienced researchers. More than 20 scientists from around the world met for a week in Zurich in May 2010 to kick-start the creation of CORSSA: the format and initial table of contents were defined; a governing structure was organized; and workshop participants began drafting articles. CORSSA materials are organized with respect to six themes, each containing between four and eight articles. The CORSSA web page, www.corssa.org, officially unveiled on September 6, 2010, debuts with an initial set of approximately 10 to 15 articles available online for viewing and commenting with additional articles to be added over the coming months. Each article will be peer-reviewed and will present a balanced discussion, including illustrative examples and code snippets. Topics in the initial set of articles will include: introductions to both CORSSA and statistical seismology, basic statistical tests and their role in seismology; understanding seismicity catalogs and their problems; basic techniques for modeling seismicity; and methods for testing earthquake predictability hypotheses. A special article will compare and review

  18. Leadership, Social Capital and Coastal Community Resource Governance: the Case of the Destructive Seaweed Harvest in West Bali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Carol

    This paper concerns resource governance in a remote Balinese coastal community, which faces severe environmental challenges due to overexploitation and habitat destruction. It explores some of the issues raised in 'social capital' debates regarding leadership and public participation toward sustainable natural resource governance. Given the strength of Balinese customary law and the high degree of participation required in the ritual-social domain, Bali represents a model context for examining these issues. Through a case study of destructive resource exploitation and evolving rules-in-use, this paper analyses the ambiguous role of 'bonding' social capital and the complexities of negotiating collective action on environmental problems where conflicting interests and dense social ties make local action difficult. The paper finds that a more complex appreciation of vertical (authority) and horizontal (solidarity) relationships between leaders and ordinary villagers is required, and that a more nuanced institutional bricolage and exploratory scenario approach to analysis of evolving rules in use would enhance associated policy interventions.

  19. Asymptomatic and Submicroscopic Carriage of Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria in Household and Community Members of Clinical Cases in Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornace, Kimberly M; Nuin, Nor Afizah; Betson, Martha; Grigg, Matthew J; William, Timothy; Anstey, Nicholas M; Yeo, Tsin W; Cox, Jonathan; Ying, Lau Tiek; Drakeley, Chris J

    2016-03-01

    Although asymptomatic carriage of human malaria species has been widely reported, the extent of asymptomatic, submicroscopic Plasmodium knowlesi parasitemia is unknown. In this study, samples were obtained from individuals residing in households or villages of symptomatic malaria cases with the aim of detecting submicroscopic P. knowlesi in this population. Four published molecular assays were used to confirm the presence of P. knowlesi. Latent class analysis revealed that the estimated proportion of asymptomatic individuals was 6.9% (95% confidence interval, 5.6%-8.4%). This study confirms the presence of a substantial number of asymptomatic monoinfections across all age groups; further work is needed to estimate prevalence in the wider community. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  20. Sharing best practices through online communities of practice: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Peter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The USAID-funded Capacity Project established the Global Alliance for Pre-Service Education (GAPS to provide an online forum to discuss issues related to teaching and acquiring competence in family planning, with a focus on developing countries' health related training institutions. The success of the Global Alliance for Nursing and Midwifery's ongoing web-based community of practice (CoP provided a strong example of the successful use of this medium to reach many participants in a range of settings. Case description GAPS functioned as a moderated set of forums that were analyzed by a small group of experts in family planning and pre-service education from three organizations. The cost of the program included the effort provided by the moderators and the time to administer responses and conduct the analysis. Discussion and evaluation Family planning is still considered a minor topic in health related training institutions. Rather than focusing solely on family planning competencies, GAPS members suggested a focus on several professional competencies (e.g. communication, leadership, cultural sensitivity, teamwork and problem solving that would enhance the resulting health care graduate's ability to operate in a complex health environment. Resources to support competency-based education in the academic setting must be sufficient and appropriately distributed. Where clinical competencies are incorporated into pre-service education, responsible faculty and preceptors must be clinically proficient. The interdisciplinary GAPS memberships allowed for a comparison and contrast of competencies, opportunities, promising practices, documents, lessons learned and key teaching strategies. Conclusions Online CoPs are a useful interface for connecting developing country experiences. From CoPs, we may uncover challenges and opportunities that are faced in the absorption of key public health competencies required for decreasing maternal

  1. Evaluation of Integrated Community Case Management in Eight Districts of Central Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Mubiru

    Full Text Available Evidence is limited on whether Integrated Community Case Management (iCCM improves treatment coverage of the top causes of childhood mortality (acute respiratory illnesses (ARI, diarrhoea and malaria. The coverage impact of iCCM in Central Uganda was evaluated.Between July 2010 and December 2012 a pre-post quasi-experimental study in eight districts with iCCM was conducted; 3 districts without iCCM served as controls. A two-stage household cluster survey at baseline (n = 1036 and 1042 and end line (n = 3890 and 3844 was done in the intervention and comparison groups respectively. Changes in treatment coverage and timeliness were assessed using difference in differences analysis (DID. Mortality impact was modelled using the Lives Saved Tool.5,586 Village Health Team members delivered 1,907,746 treatments to children under age five. Use of oral rehydration solution (ORS and zinc treatment of diarrhoea increased in the intervention area, while there was a decrease in the comparison area (DID = 22.9, p = 0.001. Due to national stock-outs of amoxicillin, there was a decrease in antibiotic treatment for ARI in both areas; however, the decrease was significantly greater in the comparison area (DID = 5.18; p<0.001. There was a greater increase in Artemisinin Combination Therapy treatment for fever in the intervention areas than in the comparison area but this was not significant (DID = 1.57, p = 0.105. In the intervention area, timeliness of treatments for fever and ARI increased significantly higher in the intervention area than in the comparison area (DID = 2.12, p = 0.029 and 7.95, p<0.001, respectively. An estimated 106 lives were saved in the intervention area while 611 lives were lost in the comparison area.iCCM significantly increased treatment coverage for diarrhoea and fever, mitigated the effect of national stock outs of amoxicillin on ARI treatment, improved timeliness of treatments for fever and ARI and saved lives.

  2. Evaluation of Integrated Community Case Management in Eight Districts of Central Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubiru, Denis; Byabasheija, Robert; Bwanika, John Baptist; Meier, Joslyn Edelstein; Magumba, Godfrey; Kaggwa, Flavia Mpanga; Abusu, Jackson Ojera; Opio, Alex Chono; Lodda, Charles Clarke; Patel, Jaanki; Diaz, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evidence is limited on whether Integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) improves treatment coverage of the top causes of childhood mortality (acute respiratory illnesses (ARI), diarrhoea and malaria). The coverage impact of iCCM in Central Uganda was evaluated. Methods Between July 2010 and December 2012 a pre-post quasi-experimental study in eight districts with iCCM was conducted; 3 districts without iCCM served as controls. A two-stage household cluster survey at baseline (n = 1036 and 1042) and end line (n = 3890 and 3844) was done in the intervention and comparison groups respectively. Changes in treatment coverage and timeliness were assessed using difference in differences analysis (DID). Mortality impact was modelled using the Lives Saved Tool. Findings 5,586 Village Health Team members delivered 1,907,746 treatments to children under age five. Use of oral rehydration solution (ORS) and zinc treatment of diarrhoea increased in the intervention area, while there was a decrease in the comparison area (DID = 22.9, p = 0.001). Due to national stock-outs of amoxicillin, there was a decrease in antibiotic treatment for ARI in both areas; however, the decrease was significantly greater in the comparison area (DID = 5.18; p<0.001). There was a greater increase in Artemisinin Combination Therapy treatment for fever in the intervention areas than in the comparison area but this was not significant (DID = 1.57, p = 0.105). In the intervention area, timeliness of treatments for fever and ARI increased significantly higher in the intervention area than in the comparison area (DID = 2.12, p = 0.029 and 7.95, p<0.001, respectively). An estimated 106 lives were saved in the intervention area while 611 lives were lost in the comparison area. Conclusion iCCM significantly increased treatment coverage for diarrhoea and fever, mitigated the effect of national stock outs of amoxicillin on ARI treatment, improved timeliness of treatments for fever and ARI and saved

  3. Specific issues, exact locations: case study of a community mapping project to improve safety in a disadvantaged community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qummouh, Rana; Rose, Vanessa; Hall, Pat

    2012-12-01

    Safety is a health issue and a significant concern in disadvantaged communities. This paper describes an example of community-initiated action to address perceptions of fear and safety in a suburb in south-west Sydney which led to the development of a local, community-driven research project. As a first step in developing community capacity to take action on issues of safety, a joint resident-agency group implemented a community safety mapping project to identify the extent of safety issues in the community and their exact geographical location. Two aerial maps of the suburb, measuring one metre by two metres, were placed on display at different locations for four months. Residents used coloured stickers to identify specific issues and exact locations where crime and safety were a concern. Residents identified 294 specific safety issues in the suburb, 41.9% (n=123) associated with public infrastructure, such as poor lighting and pathways, and 31.9% (n=94) associated with drug-related issues such as drug activity and discarded syringes. Good health promotion practice reflects community need. In a very practical sense, this project responded to community calls for action by mapping resident knowledge on specific safety issues and exact locations and presenting these maps to local decision makers for further action.

  4. Conflicted Communities, Contested Campuses: A Cross-Case Comparison of Community Engagement at Two African Universities in Conflict Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ane Turner

    2017-01-01

    Higher education institutions around the world are sites of contestation. Armed groups have targeted universities in efforts to divert valuable resources, destabilize communities, and suppress dissent. Moreover, conflict has engendered poor relations with community members that should be characterized by collaboration between the institution and…

  5. Molecular Analysis Research at Community College of Philadelphia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-21

    YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. Community College of Philadelphia Community College of Philadelphia 1700 Spring Garden Street Philadelphia, PA 19130...inflammation and sepsis, leading to the development of novel therapeutics aimed at blunting the cytokine storm responsible for acute sepsis. Our recent...development of therapeutics to downregulate inflammatory pathways in the goal of preventing sepsis. It has been established that the MAP kinase pathway (and

  6. Health worker perceptions of integrating mobile phones into community case management of malaria in Saraya, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanas, Demetri A; Ndiaye, Youssoupha; MacFarlane, Matthew; Manga, Isaac; Siddiqui, Ammar; Velez, Olivia; Kanter, Andrew S; Nichols, Kim; Hennig, Nils

    2015-05-01

    Although community case management of malaria increases access to life-saving care in isolated settings, it contends with many logistical challenges. Mobile phone health information technology may present an opportunity to address a number of these barriers. Using the wireless adaptation of the technology acceptance model, this study assessed availability, ease of use, usefulness, and job relevance of mobile phones by health workers in Saraya, Senegal. This study conducted seven key informant interviews with government health workers, and three focus groups and 76 surveys with lay health workers. Principal findings included that mobile phones are already widely available and used, and that participants valued using phones to address training, stock management, programme reporting, and transportation challenges. By documenting widespread use of mobile phones and health worker perceptions of their most useful applications, this paper provides a framework for their integration into the community case management of malaria programme in Saraya, Senegal. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Fuzzy analysis of community detection in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dawei; Xie, Fuding; Zhang, Yong; Dong, Fangyan; Hirota, Kaoru

    2010-11-01

    A snowball algorithm is proposed to find community structures in complex networks by introducing the definition of community core and some quantitative conditions. A community core is first constructed, and then its neighbors, satisfying the quantitative conditions, will be tied to this core until no node can be added. Subsequently, one by one, all communities in the network are obtained by repeating this process. The use of the local information in the proposed algorithm directly leads to the reduction of complexity. The algorithm runs in O(n+m) time for a general network and O(n) for a sparse network, where n is the number of vertices and m is the number of edges in a network. The algorithm fast produces the desired results when applied to search for communities in a benchmark and five classical real-world networks, which are widely used to test algorithms of community detection in the complex network. Furthermore, unlike existing methods, neither global modularity nor local modularity is utilized in the proposal. By converting the considered problem into a graph, the proposed algorithm can also be applied to solve other cluster problems in data mining.

  8. Qualitative case study data analysis: an example from practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Catherine; Murphy, Kathy; Shaw, David; Casey, Dympna

    2015-05-01

    To illustrate an approach to data analysis in qualitative case study methodology. There is often little detail in case study research about how data were analysed. However, it is important that comprehensive analysis procedures are used because there are often large sets of data from multiple sources of evidence. Furthermore, the ability to describe in detail how the analysis was conducted ensures rigour in reporting qualitative research. The research example used is a multiple case study that explored the role of the clinical skills laboratory in preparing students for the real world of practice. Data analysis was conducted using a framework guided by the four stages of analysis outlined by Morse ( 1994 ): comprehending, synthesising, theorising and recontextualising. The specific strategies for analysis in these stages centred on the work of Miles and Huberman ( 1994 ), which has been successfully used in case study research. The data were managed using NVivo software. Literature examining qualitative data analysis was reviewed and strategies illustrated by the case study example provided. Discussion Each stage of the analysis framework is described with illustration from the research example for the purpose of highlighting the benefits of a systematic approach to handling large data sets from multiple sources. By providing an example of how each stage of the analysis was conducted, it is hoped that researchers will be able to consider the benefits of such an approach to their own case study analysis. This paper illustrates specific strategies that can be employed when conducting data analysis in case study research and other qualitative research designs.

  9. Diagnostic challenges of early Lyme disease: Lessons from a community case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzwalder Alison

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne infection in North America, is increasingly reported. When the characteristic rash, erythema migrans, is not recognized and treated, delayed manifestations of disseminated infection may occur. The accuracy of diagnosis and treatment of early Lyme disease in the community is unknown. Methods A retrospective, consecutive case series of 165 patients presenting for possible early Lyme disease between August 1, 2002 and August 1, 2007 to a community-based Lyme referral practice in Maryland. All patients had acute symptoms of less than or equal to 12 weeks duration. Patients were categorized according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria and data were collected on presenting history, physical findings, laboratory serology, prior diagnoses and prior treatments. Results The majority (61% of patients in this case series were diagnosed with early Lyme disease. Of those diagnosed with early Lyme disease, 13% did not present with erythema migrans; of those not presenting with a rash, 54% had been previously misdiagnosed. Among those with a rash, the diagnosis of erythema migrans was initially missed in 23% of patients whose rash was subsequently confirmed. Of all patients previously misdiagnosed, 41% had received initial antibiotics likely to be ineffective against Lyme disease. Conclusion For community physicians practicing in high-risk geographic areas, the diagnosis of Lyme disease remains a challenge. Failure to recognize erythema migrans or alternatively, viral-like presentations without a rash, can lead to missed or delayed diagnosis of Lyme disease, ineffective antibiotic treatment, and the potential for late manifestations.

  10. Local government alcohol policy development: case studies in three New Zealand communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, Brett; Kypri, Kypros; Room, Robin; Langley, John

    2013-01-01

    Aims Local alcohol policies can be effective in reducing alcohol-related harm. The aim of this study was to examine local government responses to alcohol-related problems and identify factors influencing their development and adoption of alcohol policy. Designsettings and participants Case studies were used to examine local government responses to alcohol problems in three New Zealand communities: a rural town, a provincial city and a metropolitan city. Newspaper reports, local government documents and key informant interviews were used to collect data which were analysed using two conceptual frameworks: Kingdon's Streams model and the Stakeholder model of policy development. Measurements Key informant narratives were categorized according to the concepts of the Streams and Stakeholder models. Findings Kingdon's theoretical concepts associated with increased likelihood of policy change seemed to apply in the rural and metropolitan communities. The political environment in the provincial city, however, was not favourable to the adoption of alcohol restrictions. The Stakeholder model highlighted differences between the communities in terms of power over agenda-setting and conflict between politicians and bureaucrats over policy solutions to alcohol-related harm. These differences were reflected in the ratio of policies considered versus adopted in each location. Decisions on local alcohol policies lie ultimately with local politicians, although the policies that can be adopted by local government are restricted by central government legislation. Conclusions The adoption of policies and strategies to reduce alcohol-related harm may be better facilitated by an agenda-setting process where no ‘gate-keepers’ determine what is included into the agenda, and community mobilization efforts to create competitive local government elections around alcohol issues. Policy adoption would also be facilitated by more enabling central government legislation. PMID:23130762

  11. Traditional climate knowledge: a case study in a peasant community of Tlaxcala, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Romero, Alexis D; Moreno-Calles, Ana I; Casas, Alejandro; Castillo, Alicia; Camou-Guerrero, Andrés

    2016-08-18

    Traditional climate knowledge is a comprehensive system of insights, experiences and practices used by peasant communities to deal with the uncertainties of climate conditions affecting their livelihood. This knowledge is today as relevant in the Mesoamerican and Andean regions as it is in Europe and Asia. Our research sought to analyze the traditional knowledge about the weather and climate in a rural village of the state of Tlaxcala, Mexico, and its importance in decision-making in agriculture. Through 30 interviews and participant observation in the community during 2013, information was gathered about traditional climate and weather indicators and prediction tools, as well as rituals and agronomic and agroforestry strategies. This information allowed for the reconstruction of the community's agro-festive calendar. Data analysis was carried out with the help of the qualitative analysis software Atlas.ti (version 7). The socio-ecological importance of traditional knowledge about the climate lies in its ability to forecast local weather conditions and recognize climate variations, so vital to the food security of rural families. Knowledge about climate predictors is exchanged and passed on from generation to generation, contributing to the preservation and promotion of biodiversity. By observing the behavior of 16 animals and 12 plant species (both domestic and wild) as well as seven astronomical indicators, villagers are able to predict rain, dry weather and frosts. However, the continuity of this traditional knowledge in the community under study is now compromised by the little interest in agriculture characteristic of the younger generations, the ensuing abandonment of the countryside, the widespread economic crisis and the disappearance of animal and plant species. Traditional climate knowledge includes the understanding of weather events and weather changes at different time scales (hours, days, weeks, and seasons). The ability to interpret weather events

  12. Analysis of microbial community composition in a lab-scale membrane distillation bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q; Shuwen, G; Zhang, J; Fane, A G; Kjelleberg, S; Rice, S A; McDougald, D

    2015-04-01

    Membrane distillation bioreactors (MDBR) have potential for industrial applications where wastewater is hot or waste heat is available, but the role of micro-organisms in MDBRs has never been determined, and thus was the purpose of this study. Microbial communities were characterized by bacterial and archaeal 16S and eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene tag-encoded pyrosequencing of DNA obtained from sludge. Taxonomy-independent analysis revealed that bacterial communities had a relatively low richness and diversity, and community composition strongly correlated with conductivity, total nitrogen and bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Taxonomy-dependent analysis revealed that Rubrobacter and Caldalkalibacillus were abundant members of the bacterial community, but no archaea were detected. Eukaryotic communities had a relatively high richness and diversity, and both changes in community composition and abundance of the dominant genus, Candida, correlated with bound EPS. Thermophilic MDBR communities were comprised of a low diversity bacterial community and a highly diverse eukaryotic community with no archea detected. Communities exhibited low resilience to changes in operational parameters. Specifically, retenatate nutrient composition and concentration was strongly correlated with the dominant species. This study provides an understanding of microbial community diversity in an MDBR, which is fundamental to the optimization of reactor performance. © 2015 The Authors published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Impact analysis and community development needs at the salt site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, S.; Boryczka, M.; Hines, B.

    1984-01-01

    The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) has developed a socioeconomic program for a nuclear waste repository constructed in salt. The program is comprised of three elements: impact assessment, impact mitigation, and impact monitoring. The first element, impact assessment, is the focus of ONWI's current activities. Socioeconomic data has been collected for seven salt sites in Texas, Utah, Mississippi and Louisiana. Demographic, economic, community service, governmental and social structure information has been assembled into data base reports for each site area. These socioeconomic reports will be the basis for analyzing community-related impacts. Socioeconomic effects are currently being evaluated for the environmental assessment document required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The approach to evaluating socioeconomic impacts for the environmental assessment impact includes developing the data base necessary for evaluation; assessing impacts of baseline population projected by the states; assessing project-related impacts through the use of an inmigration model and responding to socioeconomic issues raised in public meetings and hearings. The siting, construction, and operation of nuclear repositories will involve an extended period of time and an increased workforce, which can result in some impacts similar to those of other large development projects. The communities affected by a repository site will face increased demands for housing, community services (transportation, sewer and water, schools, etc.) and land, as well as a desire to maintain the community's ''character''. The management of this expansion and other related community impacts should be structured to meet community needs and goals. The management process should include the formation of an impact management comment, a public participation program, and a technical assistance program

  14. ESP Teaching and Needs Analysis. Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nădrag Lavinia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the characteristics of the English language for Specific Purposes (ESP, the difficulties and challenges faced when teaching English as a foreign language, and the importance of Needs Analysis in learning a foreign language. For this purpose, we applied a questionnaire to a group of intermediate level (B1 students, majoring in Tourism. The needs analysis revealed the approaches and activities that should be applied in different types of lessons, thus giving the students the opportunity to improve their English skills and find out what they lack and need when studying English for their future professional careers. The results outlined the need for concrete activities and strategies, with the focus on communicative skills, based on learner-centered approaches and activities, real-life situations by using authentic materials that are efficient for the students’ better integration into the Tourism labor market.

  15. ICT in Teaching: An analysis of cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Elisabet Almiron

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Although increasingly, with ever more emphasis and frequency, the benefits of incorporating Information Technology and Communications (ICT in teaching are touted, the reality is far from what is stated. In this paper the aim has been to investigate teachers’ conceptions of ICT and how they apply them in the classroom. To this end, discourse analysis (DA was performed on the opinions of three Natural Science teachers about the importance they assign to ICT, and the new challenges of education in today's society. The analysis results show that, although the discourse emphasizes the need for ICT in school, the reality is that teachers find it hard to implement them in the classroom.

  16. Cost and cost-effectiveness analysis of a community mobilisation intervention to reduce intimate partner violence in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels-Igbokwe, Christine; Abramsky, Tanya; Devries, Karen; Michau, Lori; Musuya, Tina; Watts, Charlotte

    2016-02-29

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) poses a major public health concern. To date there are few rigorous economic evaluations of interventions aimed at preventing IPV in low-income settings. This study provides a cost and cost effectiveness analysis of SASA!, a community mobilisation intervention to change social norms and prevent IPV. An economic evaluation alongside a cluster randomised controlled trial. Both financial and economic costs were collected retrospectively from the provider's perspective to generate total and unit cost estimates over four years of intervention programming. Univariate sensitivity analysis is conducted to estimate the impact of uncertainty in cost and outcome measures on results. The total cost of developing the SASA! Activist Kit is estimated as US$138,598. Total intervention costs over four years are estimated as US$553,252. The annual cost of supporting 351 activists to conduct SASA! activities was approximately US$389 per activist and the average cost per person reached in intervention communities was US$21 over the full course of the intervention, or US$5 annually. The primary trial outcome was past year experience of physical IPV with an estimated 1201 cases averted (90% CI: 97-2307 cases averted). The estimated cost per case of past year IPV averted was US$460. This study provides the first economic evaluation of a community mobilisation intervention aimed at preventing IPV. SASA! unit costs compare favourably with gender transformative interventions and support services for survivors of IPV. ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT00790959.

  17. Machine Learning Methods for Production Cases Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrova, Nataliya V.; Mokrov, Alexander M.; Safonova, Alexandra V.; Vishnyakov, Igor V.

    2018-03-01

    Approach to analysis of events occurring during the production process were proposed. Described machine learning system is able to solve classification tasks related to production control and hazard identification at an early stage. Descriptors of the internal production network data were used for training and testing of applied models. k-Nearest Neighbors and Random forest methods were used to illustrate and analyze proposed solution. The quality of the developed classifiers was estimated using standard statistical metrics, such as precision, recall and accuracy.

  18. A Framework for Analysis of Case Studies of Reading Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Joanne F.; Kelcey, Ben; Rosaen, Cheryl; Phelps, Geoffrey; Vereb, Anita

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development and study of a framework to provide direction and guidance for practicing teachers in using a web-based case studies program for professional development in early reading; the program is called Case Studies Reading Lessons (CSRL). The framework directs and guides teachers' analysis of reading instruction by…

  19. Leadership Analysis in K-12 Case Study: "Divided Loyalties"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    This report mainly aims to provide a critical and in-depth analysis of the K-12 Case, "Divided Loyalty" by Holy and Tartar (2004). The case recounts how the manifestation of inadequate leadership skills in a school setting could affect negatively the performance of students.

  20. Microcredit–nutrition education link: A case study analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The qualitative analysis was based on case studies of 12 women considered by their peers to be 'successful' ENAM participants, and six case studies of women considered to be 'less successful' ENAM participants. The qualitative methodology complimented knowledge gained through quantitative investigations as ...

  1. Community characteristics that attract physicians in Japan: a cross-sectional analysis of community demographic and economic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyokawa Satoshi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many countries, there is a surplus of physicians in some communities and a shortage in others. Population size is known to be correlated with the number of physicians in a community, and is conventionally considered to represent the power of communities to attract physicians. However, associations between other demographic/economic variables and the number of physicians in a community have not been fully evaluated. This study seeks other parameters that correlate with the physician population and show which characteristics of a community determine its "attractiveness" to physicians. Methods Associations between the number of physicians and selected demographic/economic/life-related variables of all of Japan's 3132 municipalities were examined. In order to exclude the confounding effect of community size, correlations between the physician-to-population ratio and other variable-to-population ratios or variable-to-area ratios were evaluated with simple correlation and multiple regression analyses. The equity of physician distribution against each variable was evaluated by the orenz curve and Gini index. Results Among the 21 variables selected, the service industry workers-to-population ratio (0.543, commercial land price (0.527, sales of goods per person (0.472, and daytime population density (0.451 were better correlated with the physician-to-population ratio than was population density (0.409. Multiple regression analysis showed that the service industry worker-to-population ratio, the daytime population density, and the elderly rate were each independently correlated with the physician-to-population ratio (standardized regression coefficient 0.393, 0.355, 0.089 respectively; each p Conclusion Daytime population and service industry population in a municipality are better parameters of community attractiveness to physicians than population. Because attractiveness is supposed to consist of medical demand and the amenities

  2. Bone Health in Patients with Epilepsy: A Community-based Pilot Nested Case-control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Shweta; Kaushal, Sandeep; Arora, Shalini; Singh, Gagandeep

    2017-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) adversely affect bone health and there are reports describing association of alternations of bone and mineral metabolism in epileptic patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate the bone profile (bone mineral parameters and bone mineral density [BMD]) of patients with epilepsy and compare them to their age-, gender-, and socioeconomic status-matched healthy controls in a community. This was a nested case-control study conducted in fifty individuals, which included 25 cases (age above 18 years and on AEDs for at least 3 years) for which 25 controls were selected from the same community. Bone mineral parameters (serum calcium, proteins, phosphorous, alkaline phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and Vitamin D) and BMD were measured. There was significant hypocalcemia ( P = 0.003), hypoproteinemia ( P = 0.014), hyperparathyroidism ( P = 0.048), and increased levels of serum alkaline phosphatase ( P = 0.019) in cases as compared to controls. The difference was insignificant in the serum levels of Vitamin D and phosphorous among both the groups. Vitamin D was significantly low in female patients as compared to males ( P = 0.043). There was no significant difference in BMD at the lumbar spine and femur neck among both the groups. Mean duration of epilepsy was longest in patients with osteoporosis (23.6 years), and increasing duration of epilepsy was associated with reduction in age- and sex-corrected total BMD mean Z-score anteroposterior spine. There was negative correlation between cumulative drug load and T-score of patients with epilepsy. Patients on long-term AED treatment have altered bone profile as evident from biochemical parameters and reduced BMD. There is a need for more extensive research and that too on a larger sample size.

  3. Community mental health teams for older people: variations in case mix and service receipt (I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Sue; Wilberforce, Mark; Brand, Christian; Abendstern, Michele; Crook, Anthony; Jasper, Rowan; Stewart, Karen; Challis, David

    2015-06-01

    The study sought to identify the characteristics of community-dwelling older people supported by community mental health teams (CMHTs) in England and, in particular, to determine whether there is a common threshold for CMHT entry and/or a core client group. Data were collected about a random sample of 15 CMHTs' caseloads, including information about their sociodemographic characteristics, physical health, dependence, mental health, risks and service receipt. The sample was divided into 16 subgroups of people with similar needs for care (case types), and differences between teams were explored. Information was obtained for 1396 patients. Just under half had a functional mental health problem, slightly over a third an organic disorder, seven per cent both, and nine per cent no diagnosis. Considerable variation was found in teams' caseloads, and there was no evidence of a common caseload threshold. Two of the commonest case types represented people with functional diagnoses who were independent in activities of daily living (ADL) and had no/low levels of challenging behaviour. Another representing people with organic/mixed diagnoses, ADL dependence, challenging behaviour and at least one medium risk was also fairly common. The two case types that represented patients with the most complex needs accounted for more than a quarter of some teams' caseloads but less than a tenth of others. It is wrong to assume that CMHTs all have similar caseloads. Commissioners must ensure that the network of services provided can meet the needs of all eligible patients, whilst more research is required on who such teams should target. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Community violence and urban childhood asthma: a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternthal, M J; Jun, H-J; Earls, F; Wright, R J

    2010-12-01

    We examined the association between community violence exposure and childhood asthma risk in a multilevel, multimethod, longitudinal study controlling for individual- and neighbourhood-level confounders and pathway variables. Analyses included 2,071 children aged 0-9 yrs at enrolment from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Multilevel logistic regression models estimated the likelihood of asthma, controlling for individual-level (child's age, sex, race/ethnicity, maternal asthma, socioeconomic status and family violence in the home) and neighbourhood-level confounders (concentrated disadvantage, collective efficacy and social disorder), and pathway variables (maternal smoking, breastfeeding). In adjusted analyses, medium (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.17-2.19) and high levels (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.12-2.18) of community violence were associated with increased asthma risk, relative to low levels. The increased asthma risk remained for African Americans when models included community violence and all other individual-level covariates, but attenuated to borderline nonsignificance when further adjusting for collective efficacy. Community violence is associated with asthma risk when controlling for individual- and neighborhood-level confounders. Neither community violence, nor the other individual-level factors, fully accounted for the excess asthma burden among African Americans. These data suggest that public health interventions outside the biomedical model may be needed to reduce asthma in disadvantaged populations.

  5. Perspective for Aquaponic Systems: "Omic" Technologies for Microbial Community Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguia-Fragozo, Perla; Alatorre-Jacome, Oscar; Rico-Garcia, Enrique; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Cruz-Hernandez, Andres; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V; Garcia-Trejo, Juan F; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G

    2015-01-01

    Aquaponics is the combined production of aquaculture and hydroponics, connected by a water recirculation system. In this productive system, the microbial community is responsible for carrying out the nutrient dynamics between the components. The nutrimental transformations mainly consist in the transformation of chemical species from toxic compounds into available nutrients. In this particular field, the microbial research, the "Omic" technologies will allow a broader scope of studies about a current microbial profile inside aquaponics community, even in those species that currently are unculturable. This approach can also be useful to understand complex interactions of living components in the system. Until now, the analog studies were made to set up the microbial characterization on recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS). However, microbial community composition of aquaponics is still unknown. "Omic" technologies like metagenomic can help to reveal taxonomic diversity. The perspectives are also to begin the first attempts to sketch the functional diversity inside aquaponic systems and its ecological relationships. The knowledge of the emergent properties inside the microbial community, as well as the understanding of the biosynthesis pathways, can derive in future biotechnological applications. Thus, the aim of this review is to show potential applications of current "Omic" tools to characterize the microbial community in aquaponic systems.

  6. Criteria and indicators for the assessment of community forestry outcomes: a comparative analysis from Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelbaum, Sara

    2014-01-01

    In Canada, there are few structured evaluations of community forestry despite more than twenty years of practice. This article presents a criteria and indicator framework, designed to elicit descriptive information about the types of socio-economic results being achieved by community forests in the Canadian context. The criteria and indicators framework draws on themes proposed by other researchers both in the field of community forestry and related areas. The framework is oriented around three concepts described as amongst the underlying objectives of community forestry, namely participatory governance, local economic benefits and multiple forest use. This article also presents the results of a field-based application of the criteria and indicators framework, comparing four case studies in three Canadian provinces. All four are community forests with direct tenure rights to manage and benefit from forestry activities. Results reveal that in terms of governance, the case studies adhere to two different models, which we name 'interest group' vs. 'local government'. Stronger participatory dimensions are evident in two case studies. In the area of local economic benefits, the four case studies perform similarly, with some of the strongest benefits being in employment creation, especially for those case studies that offer non-timber activities such as recreation and education. Two of four cases have clearly adopted a multiple-use approach to management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A critical discussion of the Community Readiness Model using a case study of childhood obesity prevention in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesten, Joanna May; Griffiths, Paula Louise; Cameron, Noel

    2015-05-01

    Recent reforms to the public health system in England aim to generate co-ordinated action between local authorities, healthcare systems and communities to target local health priorities. To support this effort, researchers must contribute and evaluate appropriate strategies for designing interventions tailored to community-specific needs. One strategy is to apply the Community Readiness Model (CRM), which uses key informant interviews to assess a community's readiness to address local issues. This article presents a critical discussion of the CRM developed from a case study of obesity prevention in pre-adolescent girls within a community in the United Kingdom. Data were collected between February and November 2011. We offer lessons learnt and recommendations relating to (i) modifications to the interview guide; (ii) key informant identification; (iii) conducting interviews to theoretical saturation; (iv) using key informants to define their community; (v) key informant's ability to respond on behalf of the community; (vi) using a qualitative model with a quantitative scoring system; and (vii) the optimum application of transcript scoring. In conclusion, the CRM can help researchers, health professionals and local authorities identify the priorities of a community. It is recommended that users of the model be careful to identify and recruit suitable key informants with the help of the community under study, select an appropriate 'community' and utilise the qualitative findings to strengthen the interpretation of the readiness score. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Situation analysis of community pharmacy owners in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallit, Souheil; Zeenny, Rony M; Sili, Georges; Salameh, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the current community pharmacists' interventions and job satisfaction, secondary to the alteration in the financial rewards. A cross-sectional study was carried out, using a proportionate random sample of Lebanese community pharmacy owners from all districts of Lebanon. Out of 1618 distributed questionnaires, 1465 (90.5%) were collected back from pharmacy owners. Our study results showed that the monthly sales and profit decreased significantly in the last decade as well as the number of loyal customers (psituation was better 10 years ago compared to nowadays. Most Lebanese community pharmacists are not financially satisfied; their financial situation deteriorated in the last decade. The ministry of Health along with the Order of Pharmacists in Lebanon should cooperate together to resolve this problem since they are two entities responsible for the patient's health.

  9. Odontogenic tumors: analysis of 706 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Kerr, D A; Courtney, R M

    1978-10-01

    From a total of 54,534 oral biopsy specimens, 706 (1.3%) odontogenic tumors were retrieved and reviewed. Odontomas comprised more than 65% of the odontogenic tumors, ameloblastomas about 10%, and the remaining six categories of odontogenic tumors accounted for approximately 25% of the lesions. The distribution by age, sex, and location of these tumors generally supported the data from other previously reported cases. A possible variant of the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor was described, and instances of two granular cell ameloblastic fibromas were reported. The myxomas as a group were characterized histologically more by residual bony trabeculae than by the presence of odontogenic rests. Because the clinical, histological, and behavioral features of the ameloblastic fibroma and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma were similar, these lesions were considered to be essentially the same. From limited follow-up information, the ameloblastoma was the only lesion that recurred. With the exception of one ameloblastoma found in the lung, no malignant odontogenic tumors were encountered.

  10. Antisynthetase syndrome: Analysis of 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamarrón-de Lucas, Ester; Gómez Carrera, Luis; Bonilla, Gema; Petit, Dessiree; Mangas, Alberto; Álvarez-Sala, Rodolfo

    2017-02-23

    Antisynthetase syndrome (ASS) is characterised by a series of clinical manifestations such as myositis, fever, mechanic's hands and diffuse interstitial lung disease (ILD), all associated with positivity to antisynthetase antibodies. The presence of ILD will be that, to a great extent it will mark the response to treatment and prognosis. Eleven cases of patients with ASS and pulmonary involvement in monitoring at a Pulmonary monographic consult in a third level hospital consult are described. Nine patients presented positivity to anti-Jo antibody and 2 to anti-PL12. Four patients' HRCT pattern showed NSIP, four UIP, one COP and 2 ground-glass opacity. A percentage of 73 were accompanied by bronchiectasis and bronchiolectasis and 27% honeycombing. Functional exploration was mainly affected by DLCO with up to 45% of the positive walking test. Corticodependence is highlighted, often requiring immunosuppressive treatment both chronically and in exacerbations. All patients maintain good prognosis so far. Patients with interstitial lung disease should have at least a determination of antisynthetase antibodies in order to identify this disease, better prognosis than other interstitial diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Flumazenil and seizures: analysis of 43 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, W H

    1992-01-01

    Flumazenil is a new drug indicated for the reversal of the sedative effects of benzodiazepines mediated at the benzodiazepine-receptor site. Worldwide sources to date have disclosed 43 cases of seizures related, at least temporally, to the intravenous administration of flumazenil. There was no apparent relationship between the dose of flumazenil and the development of seizures, which occurred at doses ranging from 0.2 to 10.0 mg. The seizures were not considered to be a toxic effect of flumazenil, but many of them probably were due to an unmasking of the anticonvulsant effect of the previously used benzodiazepine or to a severe benzodiazepine-withdrawal syndrome. Eighteen (42%) of the patients had ingested overdoses of cyclic antidepressants, which were considered responsible for the seizures. In addition to patients with concurrent cyclic antidepressant poisoning, high-risk populations include patients who have been treated with benzodiazepines for a seizure disorder or an acute convulsive episode, patients with concurrent major sedative-hypnotic drug withdrawal, patients who have recently been treated with repeated doses of parenteral benzodiazepines, and overdose patients with myoclonic jerking or seizure activity before flumazenil administration. To minimize the likelihood of a seizure, it is recommended that flumazenil not be administered to patients who have used benzodiazepines for the treatment of seizure disorders or to patients who have ingested drugs (eg, cyclic antidepressants, cocaine, lithium, methylxanthines, isoniazid, propoxyphene, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, buproprion HCl, and cyclosporine) that place them at risk for the development of seizures.

  12. Are human values and community participation key to climate adaptation? The case of community forest organisations in British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    Furness, Ella; Nelson, Harry

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a multidisciplinary framework composed of a range of determinants of adaptive capacity to climate change found in economic, sociological, political, geographical and psychological literature. The framework is then used to carry out a survey of community managed forest organisations to measure their adaptive capacity and establish the characteristics that enable their adaptation. The research finds that adaptive organisations spend a substantial amount of time on community ...

  13. Community-based case-control study of childhood stroke risk associated with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christine K; Sidney, Stephen; Fullerton, Heather J

    2015-02-01

    A better understanding of the stroke risk factors in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) could inform stroke prevention strategies. We analyzed pediatric stroke associated with CHD in a large community-based case-control study. From 2.5 million children (aged hemorrhagic strokes and randomly selected age- and facility-matched stroke-free controls (3 per case). We determined exposure to CHD (diagnosed before stroke) and used conditional logistic regression to analyze stroke risk factors. CHD was identified in 15 of 412 cases (4%) versus 7 of 1236 controls (0.6%). Cases of childhood stroke (occurring between ages 29 days to 20 years) with CHD had 19-fold (odds ratio, 19; 95% confidence interval 4.2-83) increased stroke risk compared to controls. History of CHD surgery was associated with >30-fold (odds ratio, 31; confidence interval 4-241) increased risk of stroke in children with CHD when compared with controls. After excluding perioperative strokes, the history of CHD surgery still increased the childhood stroke risk (odds ratio, 13; confidence interval 1.5-114). The majority of children with stroke and CHD were outpatients at the time of stroke, and almost half the cases who underwent cardiac surgery had their stroke >5 years after the most recent procedure. An estimated 7% of ischemic and 2% of hemorrhagic childhood strokes in the population were attributable to CHD. CHD is an important childhood stroke risk factor. Children who undergo CHD surgery remain at elevated risk outside the perioperative period and would benefit from optimized long-term stroke prevention strategies. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. An analysis of a low-energy, low-water use community in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez Alcocer, Jose Luis

    This study investigated how to determine a potential scenario to reduce energy, water and transportation use in Mexico City by implementing low-energy, low-water use communities. The proposed mixed-use community has multi-family apartments and a small grocery store. The research included the analysis of: case studies, energy simulation, and hand calculations for water, transportation and cost analysis. The previous case studies reviewed include: communities in Mexico City, Mexico, Austin, Texas, Phoenix, Arizona, New York City, New York and San Diego, California in terms of successful low-energy, low-water use projects. The analysis and comparison of these centers showed that the Multifamiliar Miguel Aleman is an excellent candidate to be examined for Mexico City. This technical potential study evaluated energy conserving measures such as low-energy appliances and efficient lighting that could be applied to the apartments in Mexico City to reduce energy-use. The use of the simulations and manual calculations showed that the application of the mixed-use concept was successful in reducing the energy and water use and the corresponding carbon footprint. Finally, this technical potential study showed taking people out of their cars as a result of the presence of the on-site grocery store, small recreation center and park on the ground floor also reduced their overall transportation energy-use. The improvement of the whole community (i.e., apartments plus grocery store) using energy-efficient measures provided a reduction of 70 percent of energy from the base-case. In addition a 69 percent reduction in water-use was achieved by using water-saving fixtures and greywater reuse technologies for the complex. The combination of high-efficiency automobiles and the presence of the on-site grocery store, small recreation center and park potentially reduced the transportation energy-use by 65 percent. The analysis showed an energy cost reduction of 82 percent reduction for

  15. What Attracts People to Visit Community Open Spaces? A Case Study of the Overseas Chinese Town Community in Shenzhen, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyong Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A well-designed open space that encourages outdoor activity and social communication is a community asset that could potentially contribute to the health of local residents and social harmony of the community. Numerous factors may influence the use of each single space and may result in a variety of visitors. Compared with previous studies that focused on accessibility, this study highlights the relationship between the utilization and characteristics of community open spaces in China. The Overseas Chinese Town community in Shenzhen is regarded as an example. The association between the number of visitors and space characteristics is examined with multivariate regression models. Results show that large areas with accessible lawns, well-maintained footpaths, seats, commercial facilities, and water landscapes are important characteristics that could increase the use of community open spaces. However, adding green vegetation, sculptures, and landscape accessories in open spaces has limited effects on increasing the outdoor activities of residents. Thus, to increase the use of community open spaces, landscape designers should focus more on creating user-oriented spaces with facilities that encourage active use than on improving ornamental vegetation and accessories.

  16. What Attracts People to Visit Community Open Spaces? A Case Study of the Overseas Chinese Town Community in Shenzhen, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiyong; Liu, Tao; Xie, Xiaohuan; Marušić, Barbara Goličnik

    2016-01-01

    A well-designed open space that encourages outdoor activity and social communication is a community asset that could potentially contribute to the health of local residents and social harmony of the community. Numerous factors may influence the use of each single space and may result in a variety of visitors. Compared with previous studies that focused on accessibility, this study highlights the relationship between the utilization and characteristics of community open spaces in China. The Overseas Chinese Town community in Shenzhen is regarded as an example. The association between the number of visitors and space characteristics is examined with multivariate regression models. Results show that large areas with accessible lawns, well-maintained footpaths, seats, commercial facilities, and water landscapes are important characteristics that could increase the use of community open spaces. However, adding green vegetation, sculptures, and landscape accessories in open spaces has limited effects on increasing the outdoor activities of residents. Thus, to increase the use of community open spaces, landscape designers should focus more on creating user-oriented spaces with facilities that encourage active use than on improving ornamental vegetation and accessories. PMID:27367713

  17. Pyrosequencing analysis of source water switch and sulfate-induced bacterial community transformation in simulated drinking water distribution pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Shi, Baoyou; Zhang, Weiyu; Cui, Jing; Guo, Jianbo; Wang, Dongsheng; Wu, Nan; Liu, Xinyuan

    2017-12-01

    Inter-basin water transfer and source water switching will be increasingly launched due to significant population increase and the shortage of the local water resources in cities around the world. Source water switch may cause physiochemical and microbiological de-stabilization of pipe material, biofilms, and loose deposits in drinking water distribution system (DWDS). Great sulfate alteration during source water switch had been deemed as the main cause of a red water case that occurred in a northern China city. To ascertain the relationship between water quality changing and bacterial communities of biofilms in DWDS and possible bacteria risk in a red water case, water quality changing experiments in simulated DWDSs were conducted for approximately 2 years. Twenty-five corrosion scale samples and eight water samples collected from pipe harvest sites or during experimental periods were analyzed for their bacterial community composition by 454-pyrosequencing technology. Taxonomy results together with redundancy analysis (RDA) or canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis all indicated that bacterial community of samples with groundwater (GW) or surface water (SW) supply history and their variations under high sulfate water were rather different owing to different water source histories and the original pipe scale characteristics. Potential opportunistic pathogens: Burkholderia, Escherichia-Shigella, Mycobacterium, Serratia, Ralstonia, Novosphingobium, Flavobacterium, Sphingomonas, and Sphingopyxis were observed in scale or water samples.

  18. Rock stability analysis – A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahmili A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of the stability of the mineral-bearing structure ST2 at 560 m of depth in the east zone of Bou-azzer mine disturbs the advance of the exploitation. The geological and structural study based on field observations and the analysis of core drilling shows the presence of altered and fractured diorite surmounted by cobalt mineralization. Based on the empirical methods of Barton (Q-system and Bieniawski (RMR the bed rock is classified as poor quality. The analytical study made it possible to dimension supporting by bow-pieces and bolting. The existence of several types of discontinuities (fault, diaclases and joints has made the realization of numerical simulation by the finite elements method very difficult. These discontinuities create a network of natural fractures which cut out the blocks in various forms likely to be detached or slip into the excavation, thus encouraging the infiltration of water creating pressure on the massif. The classical studies show their limits in practice for installation of supporting because they must take into account the characteristics of discontinuities. Hence a structural analysis of the massif is essential. The cracking survey of ST2 at 560 m of depth in the east zone of Bou-azzer mine at 560m of depth, and their processing by the DIPS software, showed the existence of three main families of discontinuity NW-SE with a dip of 75SW, NS subverticale and NE-SW with a dip of 57NW, and two families of minor joints NW-SE and NE-SW with successive dips of 40SW and 75SE. The analysis of fracturing surveys allowed us to evaluate the risks of falling blocks and the families of discontinuity responsible for them, and to limit the zones presenting a risk of slip and the families responsible for them. The importance of this study is of knowing how and where to put supporting to be opposed to the risk of fall and tilting of the blocks, caused by the network of discontinuities of the massif.

  19. Use-Misuse Case Driven Analysis of Positive Train Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartong, Mark; Goel, Rajni; Wijesekera, Duminda

    Forensic analysis helps identify the causes of crimes and accidents. Determination of cause, however, requires detailed knowledge of a system's design and operational characteristics. This paper advocates that "use cases," which specify operational interactions and requirements, and "misuse cases," which specify potential misuse or abuse scenarios, can be used to analyze and link forensic evidence and create postincident reconstructions. Use-misuse case analysis techniques involving non-probabilistic and probabilistic methods are described and applied to Positive Train Control (PTC) Systems — a network-based automated system that controls the movements of passenger and freight trains.

  20. Using evaluability assessment to assess local community development health programmes: a Scottish case-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Belford

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of the potential effectiveness of a programme’s objectives (health or otherwise is important in demonstrating how programmes work. However, evaluations are expensive and can focus on unrealistic outcomes not grounded in strong theory, especially where there is pressure to show effectiveness. The aim of this research was to demonstrate that the evaluability assessment (a cost-effective pre-evaluation tool that primarily gives quick, constructive feedback can be used to help develop programme and outcome objectives to improve programmes while they run and to assist in producing more effective evaluations. This was done using the example of a community development programme aiming to improve health and reduce health inequalities in its target population. Methods The setting was Glasgow, Scotland, UK and focused on the Health Issues in the Community programme. Data were collected from documents and nine individual stakeholder interviews. Thematic analysis and a realist approach were used to analyse both datasets and, in conjunction with a workshop with stakeholders, produce a logic model of the programme theory and related evaluation options to explore further. Results Five main themes emerged from the analysis: History; Framework; Structure and Delivery of the Course; Theory of Action; and Barriers to Delivery and Successful Outcomes. These themes aided in drafting the logic model which revealed they key programme activities (e.g. facilitating group learning and 23 potential outcomes. The majority of these outcomes (16 were deemed to be short-term outcomes (more easily measured within the timeframe of an individual being involved in the programme e.g. increased self-esteem or awareness of individual/community health. The remaining 6 outcomes were deemed longer-term and included outcomes such as increased social capital and individual mental health and wellbeing. Conclusions We have shown that the evaluability

  1. PUBLIC DEBT SUSTAINABILITY ANALYSIS: EU CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botoc Claudiu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The global crisis has caused a serious fiscal deterioration that leaves the world economy with serious challenges. In many developed markets as well as in a few emerging markets (Emerging markets public finances have already become, or are at least at risk of becoming, unsustainable. Commonly, public debt sustainability is defined as a sovereign's ability to service debt without large adjustments to public revenue and/or expenditure and without ever-increasing public-debt-to-GDP ratios. Hence, this definition refers to both a country's ability and willingness to repay its debt. We also have to add the fact that there isn`t an universal accepted definition of fiscal or debt sustainability. In light of the growing public debt, the issue of debt sustainability has increasingly attracted attention. In this paper we analyse public debt sustainability scenario in EU economies. At least half of the EU countries will have to implement stringent fiscal consolidation programmes over the next few years in order to prevent already high public-debt-to-GDP ratios from a further significant rise, also the case of Romania. However, drastic fiscal policy adjustment may be not feasible in the short term and hence public debt is likely to grow further. In some scenarios the public-debt-to-GDP ratio is predicted to soar to 133% in 2020, from just over 100% in 2010. By contrast, nearly all EM countries, including major economies, appear to be well positioned to stabilise or even outgrow their current debt ratios without drastic fiscal adjustment. Institutional improvements may help European countries to maintain fiscal credibility. In light of the future fiscal challenges, many European governments may introduce new or more effective national debt limits, similar to those put in place in the past with good results by some Emerging markets. Such institutional reforms could help to insulate fiscal policies from political pressure and to anchor financial market

  2. Use of combinatorial pharmacogenomic testing in two cases from community psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fields ES

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Eve S Fields,1 Raymond A Lorenz,2 Joel G Winner2 1Northwest Center for Community Mental Health, Reston, VA, USA; 2Assurex Health, Mason, OH, USA Abstract: This report describes two cases in which pharmacogenomic testing was utilized to guide medication selection for difficult to treat patients. The first patient is a 29-year old male with bipolar disorder who had severe akathisia due to his long acting injectable antipsychotic. The second patient is a 59-year old female with major depressive disorder who was not ­responding to her medication. In both cases, a proprietary combinatorial pharmacogenomic test was used to inform medication changes and improve patient outcomes. The first patient was switched to a long acting injectable that was not affected by his genetic profile and his adverse effects abated. The second patient had her medications discontinued due to the results of the genetic testing and more intense psychotherapy initiated. While pharmacogenomic testing may be ­helpful in cases such as these presented here, it should never serve as a proxy for a comprehensive biopsychosocial approach. The pharmacogenomic information may be selectively added to this comprehensive approach to support medication treatment. Keywords: pharmacogenomics, adverse effects, risperidone, nortriptyline, paliperidone

  3. Benefit-Cost Analysis of Integrated Paratransit Systems : Volume 4. Issues in Community Acceptance and IP Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    The report describes various factors which influence community acceptance of integrated paratransit (IP) systems. In order to fully explore past events in those communities which have already accepted IP, a case study approach has been used. Seven we...

  4. Fire as a galvanizing and fragmenting influence on communities: the case of the Rodeo-Chediski fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew S. Carroll; Patricia J. Cohn; David N. Seesholtz; Lorie L. Higgins

    2005-01-01

    Large wildfires that burn through the "forest-residential intermix" are complex events with a variety of social impacts. This study looks at three northern Arizona community clusters directly affected by the 2002 Rodeo-Chediski fire. Our analysis suggests that the fire event led to both the emergence of cohesion and conflict in the study area. Community...

  5. [Forensic Analysis of 20 Dead Cases Related to Heroin Abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W Q; Li, L H; Li, Z; Hong, S J

    2016-08-01

    To perform retrospective analysis on 20 dead cases related to heroin abuse, and to provide references for the forensic assessment of correlative cases. Among 20 dead cases related to heroin abuse, general situation, using method of drug, cause of death and result of forensic examination were analyzed by statistical analysis for summarizing the cause of death and pathologic changes. The dead were mostly young adults, with more male than female. The results of histopathological examinations showed non-specific pathological changes. There were four leading causes of death, including acute poisoning of heroin abuse or leakage (13 cases, 65%), concurrent diseases caused by heroin abuse (3 cases, 15%), inspiratory asphyxia caused by taking heroin (2 cases, 10%), and heroin withdrawal syndrome (2 cases, 10%). The forensic identification on dead related to heroin abuse must base on the comprehensive autopsy, and combine with the qualitative and quantitative analysis of heroin and its metabolites in death and the case information, as well as the scene investigation. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  6. Analysis Of Economic Benefits Of Rural Communities\\' Participation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 18% and palm oil 2% respectively. It is recommended that farmers should be seriously engaged in agroforestry practices to enjoy output and profit maximization effects. Keywords: Economic benefit, communities\\' participation, Agro forestry. Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences Vol. 4 (2) 2006: pp. 13-23 ...

  7. Analysis of bacterial and fungal community structure in replant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High quality DNA is the basis of analyzing bacterial and fungal community structure in replant strawberry rhizosphere soil with the method of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). DNA of soil microorganisms was extracted from the rhizosphere soil of strawberries planted in different replanted years (0, two, ...

  8. Defining Campus Violence: A Phenomenological Analysis of Community Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Matthew J.; Caldwell, Rebecca J.; Goldman, Emily Grey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive an empirically based understanding of campus violence. Grounded in a communication paradigm offered by sociolinguistic scholars, we adopted a phenomenological approach for conducting and analyzing 23 interviews from campus community stakeholders, including students, staff, faculty, administrators, and…

  9. Functional diversity in plant communities: Theory and analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant functional diversity in community has become a key point in ecology studies recently. The development of species functional diversity was reviewed in the present work. Based on the former original research papers and reviews, we discussed the concept and connotation and put forward a new definition of functional ...

  10. Phylogeographic analysis of paternal lineages in NE Portuguese Jewish communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueiro, Inês; Manco, Licínio; Gomes, Verónica; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor

    2010-03-01

    The establishment of Jewish communities in the territory of contemporary Portugal is archaeologically documented since the 3rd century CE, but their settlement in Trás-os-Montes (NE Portugal) has not been proved before the 12th century. The Decree of Expulsion followed by the establishment of the Inquisition, both around the beginning of the 16th century, accounted for a significant exodus, as well as the establishment of crypto-Jewish communities. Previous Y chromosome studies have shown that different Jewish communities share a common origin in the Near East, although they can be quite heterogeneous as a consequence of genetic drift and different levels of admixture with their respective host populations. To characterize the genetic composition of the Portuguese Jewish communities from Trás-os-Montes, we have examined 57 unrelated Jewish males, with a high-resolution Y-chromosome typing strategy, comprising 16 STRs and 23 SNPs. A high lineage diversity was found, at both haplotype and haplogroup levels (98.74 and 82.83%, respectively), demonstrating the absence of either strong drift or founder effects. A deeper and more detailed investigation is required to clarify how these communities avoided the expected inbreeding caused by over four centuries of religious repression. Concerning haplogroup lineages, we detected some admixture with the Western European non-Jewish populations (R1b1b2-M269, approximately 28%), along with a strong ancestral component reflecting their origin in the Middle East [J1(xJ1a-M267), approximately 12%; J2-M172, approximately 25%; T-M70, approximately 16%] and in consequence Trás-os-Montes Jews were found to be more closely related with other Jewish groups, rather than with the Portuguese non-Jewish population.

  11. Strategic Management Analysis: Case of Erzeni LTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba KRUJA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades Albania had shifted from a closed, communist economy to an open market where private sector has increased its influence, especially in production and trade sector. Today it can be studied and found the leaders of each sector by analyzing the position that these private companies have in the market.Erzeni LTD is a company operating in the market for more than 17 years. The company‘s first operations were production and trade of home, office and school furniture, operations which later on were expanded in new product such as inside and armored doors. Erzeni LTD, known also as the leader in wood/MDF based products, arranges its sale in three different directions: 1. Sales in Albanian free market, 2. Sales through fixed long-term contracts, 3. Export sales. In this paper it will be analyzed the past, present and future of Erzeni LTD, by developing an implementable strategy that would improve the future position of the company not only as an operator in the Albanian market but also abroad. In order to develop the company`s strategies, the SWOT-TOWS analysis will be conducted in which it will be identified the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats that the company is facing.

  12. Combining Community Engagement and Scientific Approaches in Next-Generation Monitor Siting: The Case of the Imperial County Community Air Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Wong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution continues to be a global public health threat, and the expanding availability of small, low-cost air sensors has led to increased interest in both personal and crowd-sourced air monitoring. However, to date, few low-cost air monitoring networks have been developed with the scientific rigor or continuity needed to conduct public health surveillance and inform policy. In Imperial County, California, near the U.S./Mexico border, we used a collaborative, community-engaged process to develop a community air monitoring network that attains the scientific rigor required for research, while also achieving community priorities. By engaging community residents in the project design, monitor siting processes, data dissemination, and other key activities, the resulting air monitoring network data are relevant, trusted, understandable, and used by community residents. Integration of spatial analysis and air monitoring best practices into the network development process ensures that the data are reliable and appropriate for use in research activities. This combined approach results in a community air monitoring network that is better able to inform community residents, support research activities, guide public policy, and improve public health. Here we detail the monitor siting process and outline the advantages and challenges of this approach.

  13. The Community College and a Rising Global Imaginary: An Analysis of Practical Reasoning, 1950-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, David F.; Palmadessa, Allison L.

    2015-01-01

    Through an analysis of 245 issues of the "Community College Journal" published between 1950 and 2013, we show how three discourses--international understanding and geopolitics, economic competitiveness, and global citizenship--informed practical reasoning about a rising global imaginary and its implications for the community college. By…

  14. The effects of community environmental factors on obesity among Korean adults: a multilevel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-He Yoon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study explored multidimensional factors related to obesity by dividing them into individual and environmental factors, and performed multilevel analysis to investigate community environmental effects. METHODS: Data from the 2011 and 2012 Community Health Surveys were used for the analysis. Community-level variables, constructed from various regional statistics, were included in the model as environmental factors. Respondents with body mass index (BMI≥25 were defined as obese, and a multilevel logistic regression analysis was conducted to analyze individual and environmental factors related to obesity. Moreover, a stratified analysis was conducted to compare factors related to obesity between men and women. RESULTS: Of 337,136 samples, 82,887 (24.6% were obese, with BMI≥25. Sociodemographic characteristics at the individual level were mostly significantly related to obesity; however, while there were more obese men subjects among those with high socioeconomic status, there were more obese women among those with low socioeconomic status. There were fewer obese respondents among those who regularly walked and more obese respondents among those who reported short sleep duration or were highly stressed. At the community level, people living in areas with high socioeconomic status, high satisfaction with safety and public transportation, and high accessibility to sports facilities in their community had lower obesity risks. CONCLUSIONS: Community-level environmental factors affected obesity, especially perceived community environment, more significant than physical environment. Thus, it is necessary to develop effective obesity prevention and management strategies by considering potential community environmental factors that affect obesity.

  15. The Development of Professional Learning Communities and Their Teacher Leaders: An Activity Systems Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Julianne C.; Christensen, Andrea; Kackar-Cam, Hayal Z.; Fulmer, Sara M.; Trucano, Meg

    2018-01-01

    Professional learning communities can be effective vehicles for teacher learning and instructional improvement, partly because they help change professional culture. However, little is known about "how" these changes occur. We used activity systems analysis to investigate the development of professional learning communities and their…

  16. Retention of female volunteer community health workers in Dhaka urban slums: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Khurshid; Tasneem, Sakiba; Oliveras, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Volunteer community health workers (CHWs) are one approach to addressing the health workforce shortage in developing countries. BRAC, a large NGO in Bangladesh, is a pioneer in using female volunteer CHWs as core workers in its successful health programmes. After 25 years of implementing the CHW model in rural areas, BRAC is now using CHWs in urban slums of Dhaka through Manoshi, a community-based maternal and child health project. However, high dropout rates among CHWs in the slums suggested a need to better understand factors associated with their retention, and consequently recommend strategies for increasing their retention. This mixed-method study included a case-control design to assess factors relating to the retention of volunteer CHWs, and focus group discussions (FGDs) to explore solutions to problems. In total, 542 current and 146 dropout CHWs participated in the survey. Six FGDs were held with groups of current and groups of dropout CHWs. Financial incentives were the main factor linked to CHW retention. CHWs who joined with the expectation of income were almost twice as likely to remain as CHWs. This finding was reinforced by the inverse association between wealth quintile of the CHWs and retention; the poorest CHWs were significantly more likely to stay in the programme than the richest. However, social prestige, community approval and household responsibilities were important non-financial factors associated with CHW retention. Restructuring and expansion of existing financial incentives to better compensate CHWs were recommended by CHWs to improve their retention. Factors found to be important in this study are similar to those from earlier studies in rural areas. While the data indicate that financial incentives are the most commonly discussed factor regarding CHW retention in urban slums, the results also suggest other avenues that could be strengthened to improve their retention.

  17. Building a Mien-American house: A case study in school-community relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Lorie A.

    2000-10-01

    Researchers and policymakers agree that schools and parents must work together if they are to provide the sustenance, services, and support which children need to be successful in our increasingly complex society. (Clark, 1983; Comer, 1980, 1996; Clinton, 1995; Epstein, 1995, 1996). Unfortunately, the social and academic success of language minority students is often adversely affected by the alienation of parents from school culture and by the "deficit" view which teachers hold of language minority parents' academic and parenting skills (Boggs, 1985; Delgado-Gaitan, 1990; Heath, 1983; Lareau, 1987, 1989; Philips, 1983). This case study describes the attempts of one school site to build academic and social bridges between immigrant families from a Southeast Asian Hill Tribe, the Iu Mien, and a mainstream elementary school. This effort is facilitated by a constructivist approach to curriculum in which parents, teachers, and children create an intercultural space---a school community garden---as a context in which academic dialogue can occur. Various strategies which enable inter-cultural learning are described, including the use of students as ethnographers, of parents as expert teachers, and of teachers as cultural brokers. The study also considers the cultural conflicts and understandings which occurred when American teachers and Mien parents built a Mien field-house together: a structure which became symbolic of their blended lives. Through both a descriptive narration and interviews with various participants, the study analyzes (a) community-based curriculum development, led by practitioner reformers, as a way to enable language minority students to be academically successful within their own life worlds, as well as (b) the political and bureaucratic forces which make community-based reforms difficult to sustain. This study employs qualitative research strategies within an action-research context in which the author plays the dual role of practitioner reformer

  18. Social impacts of community renewable energy projects: findings from a woodfuel case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Jennifer C.; Simmons, Eunice A.; Convery, Ian; Weatherall, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    There is much current interest in the potential of community-based renewable energy projects to contribute to transition towards low carbon energy systems. As well as displacing fossil fuel consumption by increasing renewable energy generation, projects are expected to have a range of social impacts which may result in additional positive sustainability outcomes. These include potential to increase: acceptance of renewable energy developments; awareness of renewable and sustainable energy technologies and issues; uptake of low carbon technologies; and sustainable/pro-environmental behaviours. To date however, there has been little investigation of whether and how these impacts occur. This paper presents results from qualitative research investigating the social impacts of a community woodfuel project as experienced by project participants and other local stakeholders. Findings show projects can raise awareness of renewable energy technologies and increase uptake of renewables. Overall the case study project successfully changed the local social context for development of woodfuel heating, reducing risk for all involved in the future development of this sector, particularly in the immediate locality. There was some evidence of increased engagement with wider sustainability issues but this was limited to direct participants, suggesting local projects need to be supported by wider systemic change to maximise impacts. - Highlights: ► We assessed the social impacts of a community woodfuel project. ► The project increased awareness and uptake of woodfuel heating. ► Impacts were achieved as a result of the locally-specific approach. ► Local projects can seed cultural change promoting transition to a low carbon society.

  19. Establishing community-based integrated care for elderly patients through interprofessional teamwork: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asakawa T

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomohiro Asakawa,1 Hidenobu Kawabata,1 Kengo Kisa,2 Takayoshi Terashita,3 Manabu Murakami,4 Junji Otaki1 1Department of Medical Education and General Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 2Kutchan-Kosei General Hospital, Kutchan, Hokkaido, 3Graduate School of Radiological Technology Gunma Prefectural College of Health Sciences, Kamioki-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 4International Relations Office, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan Background: Working in multidisciplinary teams is indispensable for ensuring high-quality care for elderly people in Japan’s rapidly aging society. However, health professionals often experience difficulty collaborating in practice because of their different educational backgrounds, ideas, and the roles of each profession. In this qualitative descriptive study, we reveal how to build interdisciplinary collaboration in multidisciplinary teams. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 26 medical professionals, including physicians, nurses, public health nurses, medical social workers, and clerical personnel. Each participant worked as a team member of community-based integrated care. The central topic of the interviews was what the participants needed to establish collaboration during the care of elderly residents. Each interview lasted for about 60 minutes. All the interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and subjected to content analysis. Results: The analysis yielded the following three categories concerning the necessary elements of building collaboration: 1 two types of meeting configuration; 2 building good communication; and 3 effective leadership. The two meetings described in the first category – “community care meetings” and “individual care meetings” – were aimed at bringing together the disciplines and discussing individual cases, respectively. Building good communication referred to the activities

  20. Community referral in home management of malaria in western Uganda: A case series study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nsungwa-Sabiiti Jesca

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Home Based Management of fever (HBM was introduced as a national policy in Uganda to increase access to prompt presumptive treatment of malaria. Pre-packed Chloroquine/Fansidar combination is distributed free of charge to febrile children Methods A case-series study was performed during 20 weeks in a West-Ugandan sub-county with an under-five population of 3,600. Community drug distributors (DDs were visited fortnightly and recording forms collected. Referred children were located and primary caretaker interviewed in the household. Referral health facility records were studied for those stating having completed referral. Results Overall referral rate was 8% (117/1454. Fever was the main reason for mothers to seek DD care and for DDs to refer. Twenty-six of the 28 (93% "urgent referrals" accessed referral care but 8 (31% delayed >24 hours. Waiting for antimalarial drugs to finish caused most delays. Of 32 possible pneumonias only 16 (50% were urgently referred; most delayed ≥ 2 days before accessing referral care. Conclusion The HBM has high referral compliance and extends primary health care to the communities by maintaining linkages with formal health services. Referral non-completion was not a major issue but failure to recognise pneumonia symptoms and delays in referral care access for respiratory illnesses may pose hazards for children with acute respiratory infections. Extending HBM to also include pneumonia may increase prompt and effective care of the sick child in sub-Saharan Africa.

  1. VOICES AGAINST EXTREMISM: A CASE STUDY OF A COMMUNITY-BASED CVE COUNTER-NARRATIVE CAMPAIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan Macnair

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a case study of the recently conceived and ongoing counter-extremism campaign, Voices Against Extremism, a campaign designed and implemented by university students from Vancouver, Canada. Through a multifaceted approach that includes extensive use of social media, academic research, and grassroots community activities and involvement, Voices Against Extremism operates under the mission statement of countering and preventing violent extremism and radicalization through the humanization of minority groups and through the education and engagement of the silent majority. This article examines the effectiveness of this campaign as a proactive counter-radicalization strategy by outlining its specific components and activities. Based on the results of this campaign, suggestions are then offered regarding specific counter-extremism and counter-radicalizations policies that may be adopted by law enforcement, policymakers – or any other organizations concerned with countering and preventing radicalization and violent extremism – with a specific focus on the potential benefits of proactive and long-term social and community engagement.

  2. Remote community-based public health nursing during a disaster: an ethnographic case study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mari; Atogami, Fumi; Nakamura, Yasuka; Kusaka, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Toyoko

    2014-08-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake that occurred on March 11, 2011 generated a tsunami that directly struck Japan. Public health nurses (PHNs) played important roles in this disaster response and community recovery. This research identified a PHN's experience in an affected area. An ethnographic case study approach was used to obtain in-depth information regarding the experiences of one PHN, using semi-structured interviews, participant observation, and statistical documents. Six themes were identified and explored, including that the PHN undertook overwhelming responsibilities to protect the local residents, made several autonomous decisions, and had a strong sense of mission. These were based on the relationship-building that occurred with the local residents due to the geographical characteristics and her own preparations. The findings encourage PHNs to participate in simulations of disasters in preparation for major catastrophes and establish good collaborative efforts with residents by being a part of the community. Copyright © 2014 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Study on the Wind Environment of the Architecture Communities: Traditional Typical Min Nan Human Settlements’ Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Miao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the modern urban planning, which can be done in short period in terms of the spatial qualified design, the traditional tribe needs longer period in terms of the villagers’ sense of community. The selection of location, planning, and construction reveals the wisdom of the former people’s use of the resourceful life experience. First, the paper employs PHOENICS to simulate the wind environments of two most representative patterns of rural settlements in the southern area of Southern Fujian, China. This was made to compare the different conditions caused by settlements of various architectural groups. Second, the engineering and construction aspects of settlements—such as the width of roads and building structures—will be further analyzed and examined as case study in attempt to discover the favorable environmental factors for generating winds as well as the construction dimension of the settlement, such as the road width and the architectural design. Finally, the paper tends to conclude with an energy conservation strategy applied to the construction of modern communities which has low density and small group buildings.

  4. Improving financial performance by modeling and analysis of radiology procedure scheduling at a large community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lingbo; Li, Jingshan; Gisler, Paula

    2011-06-01

    Radiology tests, such as MRI, CT-scan, X-ray and ultrasound, are cost intensive and insurance pre-approvals are necessary to get reimbursement. In some cases, tests may be denied for payments by insurance companies due to lack of pre-approvals, inaccurate or missing necessary information. This can lead to substantial revenue losses for the hospital. In this paper, we present a simulation study of a centralized scheduling process for outpatient radiology tests at a large community hospital (Central Baptist Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky). Based on analysis of the central scheduling process, a simulation model of information flow in the process has been developed. Using such a model, the root causes of financial losses associated with errors and omissions in this process were identified and analyzed, and their impacts were quantified. In addition, "what-if" analysis was conducted to identify potential process improvement strategies in the form of recommendations to the hospital leadership. Such a model provides a quantitative tool for continuous improvement and process control in radiology outpatient test scheduling process to reduce financial losses associated with process error. This method of analysis is also applicable to other departments in the hospital.

  5. Feasibility Study of Case-Finding for Breast Cancer by Community Health Workers in Rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Touhidul Imran; Love, Richard Reed; Chowdhury, Mohammad Touhidul Imran; Artif, Abu Saeem; Ahsan, Hasib; Mamun, Anwarul; Khanam, Tahmina; Woods, James; Salim, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Mortality from breast cancer is high in low- and middle-income countries, in part because most patients have advanced stage disease when first diagnosed. Case-finding may be one approach to changing this situation. We conducted a pilot study to explore the feasibility of population-based case finding for breast cancer by community health workers (CHWs) using different data collection methods and approaches to management of women found to have breast abnormalities. After training 8 CHWs in breast problem recognition, manual paper data collection and operation of a cell-phone software platform for reporting demographic, history and physical finding information, these CHWs visited 3150 women >age 18 and over they could find--from 2356 households in 8 villages in rural Bangladesh. By 4 random assignments of villages, data were collected manually (Group 1), or with the cell-phone program alone (Group 2) or with management algorithms (Groups 3 and 4), and women adjudged to have a serious breast problem were shown a motivational video (Group 3), or navigated/accompanied to a breast problem center for evaluation (Group 4). Only three visited women refused evaluation. The manual data acquisition group (1) had missing data in 80% of cases, and took an average of 5 minutes longer to acquire, versus no missing data in the cell phone-reporting groups (2,3 and 4). One woman was identified with stage III breast cancer, and was appropriately treated. Among very poor rural Bangladeshi women, there was very limited reluctance to undergo breast evaluation. The estimated rarity of clinical breast cancer is supported by these population-based findings. The feasibility and efficient use of mobile technology in this setting is supported. Successor studies may most appropriately be trials focusing on improving the suggested benefits of motivation and navigation, on increasing the numbers of cases found, and on stage of disease at diagnosis as the primary endpoint.

  6. The roles and needs of community health workers in developing countries: an exploratory case study in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khalala, G

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available they encounter in their job and the perception on where the services can be improved and if they think technology can assist in improving the challenges. The results from the case study are analysed and collated in Section 3; the results are then discussed... cellphone coverage) f) Health Workers reporting process/routine Based on how the Community Health Workers described their day-to-day activities of gathering household data, the following data collection protocol emerges:  Community Health...

  7. Understanding interactions in virtual HIV communities: a social network analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingyuan; Wang, Xiaohui; Peng, Tai-Quan; Chen, Liang

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the driving mechanism of building interaction ties among the people living with HIV/AIDS in one of the largest virtual HIV communities in China using social network analysis. Specifically, we explained the probability of forming interaction ties with homophily and popularity characteristics. The exponential random graph modeling results showed that members in this community tend to form homophilous ties in terms of shared location and interests. Moreover, we found a tendency away from popularity effect. This suggests that in this community, resources and information were not disproportionally received by a few of members, which could be beneficial to the overall community.

  8. Bite mark analysis in forensic routine case work

    OpenAIRE

    Lessig, R.; Weber, M.; Wenzel, V.

    2006-01-01

    The individuality of the human dentition frequently allows the Forensic Odonto-Stomatologist (FOS) to reach a strong opinion of association in cases of identification and bite mark analy-sis. Such analysis can often be useful during the investigation of violent crimes, especially those involving sexual assault. Bites from animals are rarely the object of bite mark analysis. The teeth of animals leave patterned injuries that appear quite different from those created by human teeth. This is esp...

  9. The Importance of Audience and Agency for Representation: A Case Study of an Urban Youth Media Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmaraman, Linda

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Urban youths' agency to represent their realities through media has been largely unexplored in the youth development literature. In this qualitative case study of an after-school youth media program in the Bay Area, expressions of youth agency and the role of audiences are explored during the process of producing videos for public consumption. METHODOLOGY: As participant observer of 14 ethnically diverse youth participants aged between 15 and 18 years over 18 months, I documented (a) the kind of agencies participants engaged in and (b) the impact of live and imagined future audiences on youths' creative processes. Analyses of field notes, semi-structured interviews, and media projects were conducted using thematic analysis to inductively generate emerging categories. FINDINGS: Themes included an agentive sense of self-efficacy, commitment, and responsibility, as well as perceived contributions to local audiences and an emerging collective identity. The youth demonstrated their increased sense of a social or civic duty to realistically represent youth of color to familiar and unfamiliar audiences. IMPLICATIONS: This case study demonstrated how one youth media organization fostered agency through youth authorship, production, distribution, and local community dialogue. By documenting the impact of audiences from conception to public reception, this study provides valuable insight into the agentive process of publicly "performing" a commitment to complete a social change video project. CONTRIBUTION: This chapter underscores the value of performance within youth development programs and the critical component of audiences as one form of authentic assessment in order to foster individual and collective agency.

  10. A novel community driven software for functional enrichment analysis of extracellular vesicles data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathan, Mohashin; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Chisanga, David; Alessandro, Riccardo; Ang, Ching-Seng; Askenase, Philip; Batagov, Arsen O.; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Camussi, Giovanni; Clayton, Aled; Collino, Federica; Di Vizio, Dolores; Falcon-Perez, Juan Manuel; Fonseca, Pedro; Fonseka, Pamali; Fontana, Simona; Gho, Yong Song; Hendrix, An; Hoen, Esther Nolte-’t; Iraci, Nunzio; Kastaniegaard, Kenneth; Kislinger, Thomas; Kowal, Joanna; Kurochkin, Igor V.; Leonardi, Tommaso; Liang, Yaxuan; Llorente, Alicia; Lunavat, Taral R.; Maji, Sayantan; Monteleone, Francesca; Øverbye, Anders; Panaretakis, Theocharis; Patel, Tushar; Peinado, Héctor; Pluchino, Stefano; Principe, Simona; Ronquist, Goran; Royo, Felix; Sahoo, Susmita; Spinelli, Cristiana; Stensballe, Allan; Théry, Clotilde; van Herwijnen, Martijn J.C.; Wauben, Marca; Welton, Joanne L.; Zhao, Kening; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bioinformatics tools are imperative for the in depth analysis of heterogeneous high-throughput data. Most of the software tools are developed by specific laboratories or groups or companies wherein they are designed to perform the required analysis for the group. However, such software tools may fail to capture “what the community needs in a tool”. Here, we describe a novel community-driven approach to build a comprehensive functional enrichment analysis tool. Using the existing FunRich tool as a template, we invited researchers to request additional features and/or changes. Remarkably, with the enthusiastic participation of the community, we were able to implement 90% of the requested features. FunRich enables plugin for extracellular vesicles wherein users can download and analyse data from Vesiclepedia database. By involving researchers early through community needs software development, we believe that comprehensive analysis tools can be developed in various scientific disciplines. PMID:28717418

  11. Perceived community environmental influences on eating behaviors: A Photovoice analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belon, Ana Paula; Nieuwendyk, Laura M; Vallianatos, Helen; Nykiforuk, Candace I J

    2016-12-01

    People's perceptions of local food environments influence their abilities to eat healthily. PhotoVoice participants from four communities in Alberta, Canada took pictures of barriers and opportunities for healthy eating and shared their stories in one-on-one semi-structured interviews. Using a socioecological framework, emergent themes were organized by type and size of environment. Findings show that, while availability and access to food outlets influence healthy eating practices, these factors may be eclipsed by other non-physical environmental considerations, such as food regulations and socio-cultural preferences. This study identifies a set of meta-themes that summarize and illustrate the interrelationships between environmental attributes, people's perceptions, and eating behaviors: a) availability and accessibility are interrelated and only part of the healthy eating equation; b) local food is synonymous with healthy eating; c) local food places for healthy eating help define community identity; d) communal dining (commensality) does not necessarily mean healthy eating; e) rewarding an achievement or celebrating special occasions with highly processed foods is socially accepted; f) food costs seemed to be driving forces in food decisions; g) macro-environmental influences are latent in food decisions. Recognizing the interrelationship among multiple environmental factors may help efforts to design effective community-based interventions and address knowledge gaps on how sociocultural, economic, and political environments intersect with physical worlds. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Case Study: Cincinnati, Covington, and Newport. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  13. A Case for Community-Run Pre-Schools and Daycare Centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Rosamunde

    This booklet advocates and describes the establishment of community run preschool and day care centers. The type described is based on the Laborie Community Education Centre in Saint Lucia, West Indies. Chapter 1 advocates establishing small, local institutions that are community managed, community owned, concerned with quality, and sustainable.…

  14. Business Students' Learning with Online Discussion Forums: The Case of a Virtual Classroom Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jake

    2010-01-01

    This study examined what learning is and how learning was facilitated in a virtual classroom community using online discussion forums. Results demonstrated that learning in such a community was the active participation by the members of the community in the process of meaning construction. The construction of meaning in such a community was…

  15. Empowering Students through Service-Learning in a Community Psychology Course: A Case in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; Ng, Eddie; Chan, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    This article chronicles a service-learning (SL) subject on community psychology in Hong Kong (n = 26) and elaborates on how students experience concepts, frameworks, and values in community psychology and put them into practice at servicelearning settings. Upon acquiring basic concepts in community psychology, including sense of community,…

  16. A case study of the South Puget Intertribal Planning Agency's comprehensive cancer control planning and community mobilization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nass, Carrie; Simmons, John; Bowen, Deborah; Guthrie, Teresa

    2008-04-01

    The high rates of cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives are of growing concern. In response to high cancer rates, national, state, and tribal organizations have worked to assess knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and screening practices related to cancer in American Indian and Alaska Native communities and to increase awareness and use of cancer screening. The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is one such effort. NCCCP's comprehensive cancer control (CCC) planning process provides a new approach to planning and implementing cancer control programs. The CCC process and components for American Indians and Alaska Natives are not yet fully understood because this is a fairly new approach for these communities. Therefore, the purpose of our case study was to describe the CCC process and its outcomes and successes as applied to these communities and to identify key components and lessons learned from the South Puget Intertribal Planning Agency's (SPIPA's) CCC planning and community mobilization process. We used interviews, document reviews, and observations to collect data on SPIPA's CCC planning and community mobilization process. We identified the key components of SPIPA's CCC as funding and hiring key staff, partnering with outside organizations, developing a project management plan and a core planning team, creating community cancer orientations, conducting community cancer surveys, developing a community advisory committee, ongoing training and engaging of the community advisory committee, and supporting the leadership of the communities involved. The CCC planning process is a practicable model, even for groups with little experience or few resources. The principles identified in this case study can be applied to the cancer control planning process for other tribes.

  17. FUTISTREFFIT : Participatory Action Research: analysis and evaluation of football as a community youth development tool

    OpenAIRE

    Wesseh, Cucu

    2012-01-01

    Wesseh Cucu. Thesis: Futistreffit – analysis and evaluation. Language: English. Content: 53 pages, 2 appendices. Degree: Bachelor of Social Services. Focus: Community Development. Institution: Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Järvenpää The aim of this research is to examine football as a positive youth development tool for Learning-Integration. It focuses on community youth work and uses action research as the prime method of analysis and evaluation. The subject of researc...

  18. Community-School Relations. Current Policies of Parental Involvement and Community Participation. Cases in Brazil and Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Maria Eulina Pessoa de; Jeria, Jorge

    Current educational policy in Latin America has been aiming to include community participation in a wider spectrum as part of decentralization reform. Much of the rhetoric of these policies seems to originate from neo-liberal policies of State modernization carried out under the auspices of international organizations. Based on a critical review…

  19. Community Knowledge Sharing and Co-Production of Water Services: Two Cases of Community Aqueduct Associations in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Llano-Arias

    2015-06-01

    These new forms of citizenship based on claims of sovereignty over natural, common goods are gradually transforming Colombian democratic space. The article draws on debates around active citizenship, deepening democracy, and participatory communication approaches to explain the aims of community organisations and the mechanisms by which they are self-organising and managing water at the local level.

  20. Evaluating community investments in the mining sector using multi-criteria decision analysis to integrate SIA with business planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Gaining senior management's commitment to long-term social development projects, which are characterised by uncertainty and complexity, is made easier if projects are shown to benefit the site's strategic goals. However, even though the business case for community investment may have been accepted at a general level, as a strategy for competitive differentiation, risk mitigation and a desire to deliver - and to be seen to deliver - a 'net benefit' to affected communities, mining operations are still faced with implementation challenges. Case study research on mining companies, including interviews with social investment decision-makers, has assisted in developing the Social Investment Decision Analysis Tool (SIDAT), a decision model for evaluating social projects in order to create value for both the company and the community. Multi-criteria decision analysis techniques integrating business planning processes with social impact assessment have proved useful in assisting mining companies think beyond the traditional drivers (i.e. seeking access to required lands and peaceful relations with neighbours), to broader issues of how they can meet their business goals and contribute to sustainable development in the regions in which they operate

  1. Towards eliminating malaria in high endemic countries: the roles of community health workers and related cadres and their challenges in integrated community case management for malaria: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunguya, Bruno F; Mlunde, Linda B; Ayer, Rakesh; Jimba, Masamine

    2017-01-03

    Human resource for health crisis has impaired global efforts against malaria in highly endemic countries. To address this, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended scaling-up of community health workers (CHWs) and related cadres owing to their documented success in malaria and other disease prevention and management. Evidence is inconsistent on the roles and challenges they encounter in malaria interventions. This systematic review aims to summarize evidence on roles and challenges of CHWs and related cadres in integrated community case management for malaria (iCCM). This systematic review retrieved evidence from PubMed, CINAHL, ISI Web of Knowledge, and WHO regional databases. Terms extracted from the Boolean phrase used for PubMed were also used in other databases. The review included studies with Randomized Control Trial, Quasi-experimental, Pre-post interventional, Longitudinal and cohort, Cross-sectional, Case study, and Secondary data analysis. Because of heterogeneity, only narrative synthesis was conducted for this review. A total of 66 articles were eligible for analysis out of 1380 studies retrieved. CHWs and related cadre roles in malaria interventions included: malaria case management, prevention including health surveillance and health promotion specific to malaria. Despite their documented success, CHWs and related cadres succumb to health system challenges. These are poor and unsustainable finance for iCCM, workforce related challenges, lack of and unsustainable supply of medicines and diagnostics, lack of information and research, service delivery and leadership challenges. Community health workers and related cadres had important preventive, case management and promotive roles in malaria interventions. To enable their effective integration into the health systems, the identified challenges should be addressed. They include: introducing sustainable financing on iCCM programmes, tailoring their training to address the identified gaps

  2. AN ANALYSIS OF PHARMACY SERVICES BY PHARMACIST IN COMMUNITY PHARMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Up to now there are more than 60 schools of pharmacy with a variety of accreditation level in lndonesia. Previous study found that the standard of pharmaceutical services at various service facilities (hospitals, primary health care and community pharmacy can not be fully implemented because of the limited competency of pharmacist. This study was conducted to identify the qualification of pharmacist who delivers services in community pharmacy in compliance with the Indonesian Health Law No. 36 of 2009. As mandated in the Health Law No. 36 of 2009, the government is obliged to establish minimum requirements that must be possessed. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in 2010 at 2 community pharmacies in each of 3 cities, i.e. Bandung, DI Yogyakarta and Surabaya. Other than ten pharmacists delivering services in community pharmacies, there were pharmacists as informants from 4 institutions in each city selected, i.e. six pharmacists from two Schools of Pharmacy, three pharmacists from three Regional Indonesian Pharmacists Association,six pharmacists from three District Health Offices and three Provincial Health Offices. Primary data collection through in-depth interviews and observation as well as secondary data collection concerning standard operating procedures, monitoring documentation and academic curricula has been used. Descriptive data were analysed qualitatively Results: The findings indicate that pharmacists' qualification to deliver services in a community pharmacy in accordance with the Government Regulation No. 51 of 2009, Standards of Pharmacy Services in Community Pharmacy and Good Pharmaceutical Practices (GPP was varied. Most pharmacists have already understood their roles in pharmacy service, but to practice it in accordance with the standards or guidelines they are still having problems. It is also acknowledged by pharmacists in other institutions, including School of Pharmacy, Regional

  3. [Thallium poisoning a clinical analysis of 5 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J; Wei, J; Li, S

    1998-08-01

    To sumarize the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of thallium poisoning by analysis of clinical cases. Five cases of thallium poisoning were reported. The clinical manifestations, quantitative-analysed thallium level, methods and effect of treatment, and prognosis were analysed. Three of the 5 cases were acute, and the other two chronic. Four of them had a history of poison contact. The clinical features included alopicia (4 cases), transverse white stripes in the nails (Mee's stripes, 2) polyneuropathy, cranial nerve and central nervous system impairments (5), and abdominal pain and other digestion disturbances (3). All of the 5 cases were treated with antidotes and other methods to increase thallium excretion. One case died of lung infection 3 days after diagnosis. The serum and urine thallium levels of the 4 survivors decreased to normal after treatment (3 recovered, one had neurologic sequelae). It is not difficult to diagnose thallium poisoning by definite poison contact history, classical manifestation, and serum or urine thallium quantitative analysis. Attention should be paid to those patients with indefinite exposure to thallium. For those suspected cases, it is necessary to measure the thallium level in blood and urine in order to verify the diagnosis.

  4. Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis mimicking gallbladder carcinoma: An analysis of 42 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi-Lei; Cheng, Nan-Sheng; Zhang, Shui-Jun; Ma, Wen-Jie; Shrestha, Anuj; Li, Fu-Yu; Xu, Fei-Long; Zhao, Long-Shuan

    2015-11-28

    To review and evaluate the diagnostic dilemma of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) clinically. From July 2008 to June 2014, a total of 142 cases of pathologically diagnosed XGC were reviewed at our hospital, among which 42 were misdiagnosed as gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) based on preoperative radiographs and/or intra-operative findings. The clinical characteristics, preoperative imaging, intra-operative findings, frozen section (FS) analysis and surgical procedure data of these patients were collected and analyzed. The most common clinical syndrome in these 42 patients was chronic cholecystitis, followed by acute cholecystitis. Seven (17%) cases presented with mild jaundice without choledocholithiasis. Thirty-five (83%) cases presented with heterogeneous enhancement within thickened gallbladder walls on imaging, and 29 (69%) cases presented with abnormal enhancement in hepatic parenchyma neighboring the gallbladder, which indicated hepatic infiltration. Intra-operatively, adhesions to adjacent organs were observed in 40 (95.2%) cases, including the duodenum, colon and stomach. Thirty cases underwent FS analysis and the remainder did not. The accuracy rate of FS was 93%, and that of surgeon's macroscopic diagnosis was 50%. Six cases were misidentified as GBC by surgeon's macroscopic examination and underwent aggressive surgical treatment. No statistical difference was encountered in the incidence of postoperative complications between total cholecystectomy and subtotal cholecystectomy groups (21% vs 20%, P > 0.05). Neither clinical manifestations and laboratory tests nor radiological methods provide a practical and effective standard in the differential diagnosis between XGC and GBC.

  5. Newcomer Integration in Online Knowledge Building Communities: Automated Dialogue Analysis in Integrative vs. Non-Integrative Blogger Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Nistor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Online knowledge building communities (OKBC reunite participants engaged in collaborative discourse. OKBCs can be made „smart“ by adding tools that predict how likely an OKBC is to integrate newcomers in existing dialogues and socio-cognitive structures. Starting from Bakhtin’s dialogical approach and polyphony theory, and building on the concept of inter- animation of voices, this study explores the relationship between newcomer integration and dialogue quality in OKBCs. The automated analysis tool “Important Moments” was employed to compare two dialogues, from an integrative and from a non-integrative blog-based OKBC. In the former, the concepts, lexical chains and inter-animation moments occurred more frequently than in the latter. Also, newcomer comments were linked to less lexical chains in the integrative community than in the non-integrative OKBC. These findings suggest close relationships between dialogue quality and newcomer integration, which can be used for designing smart OKBCs.

  6. Covariation in community- and individual-based community capacity and health behavior: a multilevel analysis of populations in Seoul, South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo

    2012-01-01

    Community capacity is defined as the degree to which the human, physical, and potential resources of a neighborhood are organized based on mutual solidarity among the residents. The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationship between community capacity and health behaviors in Seoul, South Korea. Multilevel models controlling for socioeconomic variables were used to measure the association between community capacity and health behaviors in 25 districts and 404 subdistricts (n = 14 228). Community capacity was determined to be significant at the more local community level, as it was a significant variable in the subdistrict analysis for explaining health behaviors such as smoking, drinking, and exercising. Community capacity exists not only at the individual level but also at the community level. High community capacity further enhanced the positive effects of individual capacity on health behavior and further weakened the negative effects.

  7. A Multi-Science Data Analysis Platform and the GeneROOT Use Case

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Rademakers, Fons

    2017-01-01

    This talk will cover two areas of current research in the context of knowledge sharing between CERN openlab and the life science communities. The first area covers the development and prototyping of a multi-science data analysis platform build up around CERN developed technologies like, Zenodo, REANA and CVMFS. When finished this platform will support a complete data analysis life-cycle from data discovery, to data access, to data processing to end-user data analysis. The second area covers a specific use case, where HEP specific software like ROOT is used to store and process genomics data sequences. There are a number of handcrafted genomics data formats being used, like FASTQ, SAM, BAM, CRAM, etc. They range from pure ASCII to compressed binary formats. We will compare the features of these formats with the generic capabilities of ROOT’s TTree containers. Also we will show performance numbers of typical analysis scenarios.

  8. Analysis of the sustainability of tourism: a study in indigenous communities of Roraima state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane do Nascimento Brandao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This survey was conducted in three indigenous communities in the state of Roraima. They found in tourism a way of achieving local sustainable development. This activity can bring positive and negative consequences, so the aim of this study is to analyze the social, cultural, economic and environmental impacts of tourism in indigenous communities. We used the quantitative method with questionnaires. The units of analysis were the indigenous inhabitants of the surveyed communities. The survey sample consisted of 210 valid responses. In the data analysis, we used descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis. The study found that tourism can bring economic, social, cultural and environmental benefits for communities. Must develop actions that aim to transform existing initiatives in destinations of excellence in Indigenous tourism.

  9. A method for analyzing the business case for provider participation in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and similar federally funded, provider-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L; Song, Paula H; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-09-01

    The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the efforts of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to increase enrollment in clinical trials. Currently, there is little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. In this article, the authors present a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation, a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Key components of the business case included CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The authors recognized the value of incidental benefits as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation; however, currently, this component is not calculated. The current results indicated that providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers' understanding of the financial implications of participation. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  10. Soil quality and bacterial community structure: a case study from the mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita-Maeso, Manuel; Miralles*, Isabel; Soriano**, Miguel; Ortega, Raúl; García-Salcedo, José Antonio; Sánchez-Marañon, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial communities play a central role in innumerable processes and functions of soils such as decomposition of organic residues, nutrient cycling, aggregation, and formation of humic substances. We investigated the relationships between bacterial communities, soil profiles, and quality parameters in eight benchmark soils of the Mediterranean calcareous mountain sampled on a local scale. The diversity and composition of prokaryotic community was assessed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing of DNA from samples of topsoil (10 x 10 x 0.2 m). The bacterial profile content resulted in the identification of groups belonging to 16 phyla and 75 genera. Two-dimensional models using multidimensional scaling (Stress 71%), and principal component analysis (Variance > 60%) showed a decrease in the abundance of acidobacteria Gp4 and Gp3 while actinobacteria flourished with increasing soil profile development (from Leptosol to Luvisol). This can be attributed to inherent changes in soil quality along pedogenesis such as pH (8.3 to 7.8), organic C (20.0 to 45.2 Mg ha-1), macropososity (0.11 to 0.32 cm3 cm-3), and water stable aggregates (365.8 to 963.4 Mg ha-1). Actinobacteria genera like Aciditerrimonas, Nocardioides, and Solirubrobacter also displayed positive correlations (r > 0.90) with the content of clay and free Ferric forms. Other factors like Re-carbonation, loss of organic matter, and soil compaction probably caused by land use and management, led to a decline in the Chao1 richness and Shannon diversity indices (3625 and 6.3) with respect to native soils (7852 and 7.4). Likewise, Firmicutes and Gemmatimonadetes were tripled and the genera of Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes decreased. Our data indicate that bacterial community structure depends largely on the soil quality status, both inherent and managed and suggest the bacterial group composition also follows the course of soil genesis. (*) Financial support by Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship (FP7

  11. Costs of implementing integrated community case management (iCCM) in six African countries: implications for sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviaud, Emmanuelle; Besada, Donnela; Leon, Natalie; Rohde, Sarah; Sanders, David; Oliphant, Nicholas; Doherty, Tanya

    2017-06-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa still reports the highest rates of under-five mortality. Low cost, high impact interventions exist, however poor access remains a challenge. Integrated community case management (iCCM) was introduced to improve access to essential services for children 2-59 months through diagnosis, treatment and referral services by community health workers for malaria, pneumonia and diarrhea. This paper presents the results of an economic analysis of iCCM implementation in regions supported by UNICEF in six countries and assesses country-level scale-up implications. The paper focuses on costs to provider (health system and donors) to inform planning and budgeting, and does not cover cost-effectiveness. The analysis combines annualised set-up costs and 1 year implementation costs to calculate incremental economic and financial costs per treatment from a provider perspective. Affordability is assessed by calculating the per capita financial cost of the program as a percentage of the public health expenditure per capita. Time and financial implications of a 30% increase in utilization were modeled. Country scale-up is modeled for all children under 5 in rural areas. Utilization of iCCM services varied from 0.05 treatment/y/under-five in Ethiopia to over 1 in Niger. There were between 10 and 603 treatments/community health worker (CHW)/y. Consultation cost represented between 93% and 22% of economic costs per treatment influenced by the level of utilization. Weighted economic cost per treatment ranged from US$ 13 (2015 USD) in Ghana to US$ 2 in Malawi. CHWs spent from 1 to 9 hours a week on iCCM. A 30% increase in utilization would add up to 2 hours a week, but reduce cost per treatment (by 20% in countries with low utilization). Country scale up would amount to under US$ 0.8 per capita total population (US$ 0.06-US$0.74), between 0.5% and 2% of public health expenditure per capita but 8% in Niger. iCCM addresses unmet needs and impacts on under 5 mortality. An

  12. Linkage analysis of alcohol dependence symptoms in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, Narelle K; Agrawal, Arpana; Whitfield, John B; Morley, Katherine I; Gordon, Scott D; Lind, Penelope A; Pergadia, Michele L; Montgomery, Grant W; Madden, Pamela A F; Todd, Richard D; Heath, Andrew C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2010-01-01

    We have previously identified suggestive linkage for alcohol consumption in a community-based sample of Australian adults. In this companion paper, we explore the strength of genetic linkage signals for alcohol dependence symptoms. An alcohol dependence symptom score, based on DSM-IIIR and DSM-IV criteria, was examined. Twins and their nontwin siblings (1,654 males, 2,518 females), aged 21 to 81 years, were interviewed, with 803 individuals interviewed on 2 occasions, approximately 10 years apart. Linkage analyses were conducted on datasets compiled to maximize data collected at either the younger or the older age. In addition, linkage was compared between full samples and truncated samples that excluded the lightest drinkers (approximately 10% of the sample). Suggestive peaks on chromosome 5p (LODs >2.2) were found in a region previously identified in alcohol linkage studies using clinical populations. Linkage signal strength was found to vary between full and truncated samples and when samples differed only on the collection age for a sample subset. The results support the finding that large community samples can be informative in the study of alcohol-related traits.

  13. Analysis of stomach bacterial communities in Australian feral horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, Benoit; de la Fuente, Gabriel; O'Neill, Sean; Wright, André-Denis G; Al Jassim, Rafat

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the community structure of bacteria that populate the stomach of the Brumby, a breed of feral horses from the Australian outback. Using a 16S rRNA gene clone library, we identified 155 clones that were assigned to 26 OTUs based on a 99.0 % sequence identity cutoff. Two OTUs represented 73.5 % of clones, while 18 OTUs were each assigned only a single clone. Four major bacterial types were identified in the Brumby stomach: Lactobacillaceae, Streptococcaceae, Veillonellaceae and Pasteurellaceae. The first three groups, which represented 98.1 % of the Brumby stomach library clones, belonged to the bacterial phylum Firmicutes. We found that 49.7 % of clones were related to bacterial species previously identified in the equine hindgut, and that 44.5 % of clones were related to symbiotic bacterial species identified in the mouth or throat of either horses or other mammals. Our results indicated that the composition of mutualistic bacterial communities of feral horses was consistent with other studies on domestic horses. In addition to bacterial sequences, we also identified four plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, which may help in further characterizing the type of vegetation consumed by Brumby horses in their natural environment.

  14. The business case for provider participation in clinical trials research: an application to the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Paula H; Reiter, Kristin L; Weiner, Bryan J; Minasian, Lori; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2013-01-01

    Provider-based research networks (PBRNs) make clinical trials available in community-based practice settings, where most people receive their care, but provider participation requires both financial and in-kind contributions. The aim of this study was to explore whether providers believe there is a business case for participating in PBRNs and what factors contribute to the business case. We use a multiple case study methodology approach to examine the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program, a long-standing federally funded PBRN. Interviews with 41 key informants across five sites, selected on the basis of organizational maturity, were conducted using a semistructured interview guide. We analyzed interview transcripts using an iterative, deductive process to identify themes and subthemes in the data. We found that a business case for provider participation in PBRNs may exist if both direct and indirect financial benefits are identified and included in the analysis and if the time horizon is long enough to allow those benefits to be realized. We identified specific direct and indirect financial benefits that were perceived as important contributors to the business case and the perceived length of time required for a positive return to accrue. As the lack of a business case may result in provider reluctance to participate in PBRNs, knowledge of the benefits we identified may be crucial to encouraging and sustaining participation, thereby preserving patient access to innovative community-based treatments. The results are also relevant to federally funded PBRNs outside of oncology or to providers considering participation in any clinical trials research.

  15. Collaborative leadership and the implementation of community-based fall prevention initiatives: a multiple case study of public health practice within community groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle-Reid, Maureen; Dykeman, Cathy; Ploeg, Jenny; Kelly Stradiotto, Caralyn; Andrews, Angela; Bonomo, Susan; Orr-Shaw, Sarah; Salker, Niyati

    2017-02-16

    Falls among community-dwelling older adults are a serious public health concern. While evidence-based fall prevention strategies are available, their effective implementation requires broad cross-sector coordination that is beyond the capacity of any single institution or organization. Community groups comprised of diverse stakeholders that include public health, care providers from the public and private sectors and citizen volunteers are working to deliver locally-based fall prevention. These groups are examples of collective impact and are important venues for public health professionals (PHPs) to deliver their mandate to work collaboratively towards achieving improved health outcomes. This study explores the process of community-based group work directed towards fall prevention, and it focuses particular attention on the collaborative leadership practices of PHPs, in order to advance understanding of the competencies required for collective impact. Four community groups, located in Ontario, Canada, were studied using an exploratory, retrospective, multiple case study design. The criteria for inclusion were presence of a PHP, a diverse membership and the completion of an initiative that fit within the scope of the World Health Organization Fall Prevention Model. Data were collected using interviews (n = 26), focus groups (n = 4), and documents. Cross-case synthesis was conducted by a collaborative team of researchers. The community groups differed by membership, the role of the PHP and the type of fall prevention initiatives. Seven practice themes emerged: (1) tailoring to address context; (2) making connections; (3) enabling communication; (4) shaping a vision; (5) skill-building to mobilize and take action; (6) orchestrating people and projects; and (7) contributing information and experience. The value of recognized leadership competencies was underscored and the vital role of institutional supports was highlighted. To align stakeholders working

  16. Capacity and readiness of civil society organisations to implement community case management of malaria in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marita, Enock; Oule, Jared; Mungai, Margaret; Thiam, Sylla; Ilako, Festus

    2016-01-01

    Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) contribute to achieving development goals through advocacy, social mobilisation and provision of health services. CSO programming is a key component of Global Fund (GF) grants; however, CSOs face technical and governance capacity challenges in grant utilisation leading to missed opportunities for improving health at community level. Amref Health Africa was appointed Principal Recipient of a GF grant aimed at scaling up community case management of malaria through CSOs as sub-recipients in western Kenya. To identify potential risks and strengthen grant management, Amref Health Africa and the Ministry of Health conducted a capacity needs assessment to determine the capacity of CSOs to effectively utilise grants. 26 selected CSOs participated in this study. Document reviews and on-site assessments and observations were conducted using structured tool. The five main assessment areas were: governance and risk management; strategic and operational planning; monitoring and evaluation; programme management; and financial management. Overall performance was grouped into four categories: 3.0-2.5 (excellent), 2.0-2.4 (good), 1.5-1.9 (fair), and 1.0-1.4 (poor). Data were collected and analysed using Excel software. Twenty five out of 26 CSOs were legally compliant. 14(54%) CSOs were categorized as good; 7(27%) as excellent; 3(12%) as poor and 2(8%) as fair. Most CSOs had good programme management capacity but monitoring and evaluation presented the most capacity gaps. More than 75% of the CSOs were rated as excellent or good. A capacity building plan, programme risk management plan and oversight mechanisms were important for successful grant implementation.

  17. Estimating Fluoride Exposure in Rural Communities: A Case Study in Western Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Janessa M.; Daniell, William; James, Frank; Milgrom, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Efforts to achieve national objectives for fluoridation, such as Healthy People 2010, and water quality monitoring regulations focus on public water systems and generally overlook the 15% of U.S. households with private wells. Mandated testing of public water systems and new building sites on San Juan Island, Washington revealed naturally occurring fluoride levels up to several times the EPA Maximum Contaminant Level. This study evaluated fluoride concentrations in private wells and estimated the prevalence of dental fluorosis among children to inform local stakeholders. Methods Primary school children were examined by a dentist for dental fluorosis, parents were surveyed about fluoride exposures, and household drinking water samples were collected to measure and map fluoride concentrations. De-identified data were analyzed using chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests. Results 18.8% of examined children exhibited mild dental fluorosis, a prevalence similar to national averages. Fluoride concentrations in drinking water were 0.08 to 1.30 mg/L, below levels for health concerns, and generally (94%) below levels recommended for caries prevention. Supplemental sources of fluoride (e.g. tablets) did not account for observed fluorosis. Conclusions Results provided community stakeholders with valuable information to support decision-making regarding fluoride levels in drinking water. Previously available information suggested potential for excessive fluoride exposure, however, these study results indicated low fluoride levels were more common. The approach used in this case study suggests a simple method of assessing the scope of fluoridation needs in communities where private water sources are common, allowing for better informed decision-making with regard to future fluoridation efforts. PMID:20617156

  18. High-Resolution Melt Analysis for Rapid Comparison of Bacterial Community Compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmsø, Mathis Hjort; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Bælum, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    -resolution melt (HRM) analysis is the study of the melt behavior of specific PCR products. Here we describe a novel high-throughput approach in which we used HRM analysis targeting the 16S rRNA gene to rapidly screen multiple complex samples for differences in bacterial community composition. We hypothesized......In the study of bacterial community composition, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing is today among the preferred methods of analysis. The cost of nucleotide sequence analysis, including requisite computational and bioinformatic steps, however, takes up a large part of many research budgets. High...... that HRM analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes from a soil ecosystem could be used as a screening tool to identify changes in bacterial community structure. This hypothesis was tested using a soil microcosm setup exposed to a total of six treatments representing different combinations of pesticide...

  19. Community-Based Coastal Resource Management (CB-CRM: a Case Study f Mariveles, Bataan, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Lou L. Mungcal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper addressed the issue of sustainable coastal resource management through a successful Community-Based Coastal Resource Management (CB-CRM Program in the Municipality of Mariveles, province of Bataan in the Philippines. The paper investigated how governance and institutional and legislative framework, and the concept of sustainable development complemented each other to promote good local eco-governance in the management and protection of finite local marine resources. Specifically, it analyzed how the local fisherfolk community of Mariveles utilized efficiently their finite marine resources in the context of eco-governance. It also investigated how the cooperative efforts of various stakeholders: peoples’ organizations (POs, local government unit (LGU, and a non-government organization (NGO in Mariveles, Bataan affected their coastal resources against environmental degradation and exploitation. This paper would benefit POs, LGUs, and NGOs in their quest for sustainable management and conservation of their limited coastal resources. This paper yielded the following findings. First, POs and NGOs engage when NGOs can strengthen the POs’ capacity building through the transfer of skills and technology, when NGOs can enhance the POs’ indigenous knowledge, and when NGOs are more knowledgeable of formal venues of LGU participation. Second, LGUs, NGOs and POs engage when POs and NGOs can complement each other to strengthen their capacity building, and when NGOs can help implement environmental programs that are beneficial to the POs. Third, NGOs and POs engage when POs are threatened by elite power, and when NGOs want their environmental issues on LGU’s legislative agenda. Finally, NGOs and POs engage when they see possible LGU cooperation. Participant observation through focus group discussion (FGD and key informants’ interview of different stakeholders was a primary source of information in formulating the aforementioned conclusions

  20. How is perceived community cohesion and membership in community groups associated with children’s dietary adequacy in disadvantaged communities? A case of the Indian Sundarbans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debjani Barman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membership in community groups and a sense of community cohesion may facilitate collective action in mobilizing resources towards better health outcomes. This paper explores the relationship of these factors, along with individual level socio-economic variables, to dietary adequacy among children below 6 years of age, a proximate determinant of child malnutrition. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey in Patharpratima block of the Sundarbans in West Bengal, India, using a two-stage, 30 cluster random sampling design. In 1200 sampled households, we used a structured questionnaire to interview mothers of children below 6 years of age on their child’s nutritional intake. We also interviewed household heads to assess perceived community cohesion using a nine item scale, membership in any community self-help organization, and other socio-economic determinants. We used a logistic regression model to assess their association with a minimum acceptable diet among children between 6 months to 6 years. Results Only 9.33 % children between 6 and 71 months of age received a minimum acceptable diet. With each increase in the perceived community cohesion score (scale 0-9, a child is 1.31 times more likely to have minimum acceptable diet (95 % CI 1.14, 1.50. The odds of minimum acceptable diet were also higher among children whose mothers had primary education (2.09, 95 % CI 1.03, 2.94 as compared to illiterate mothers and in households with surplus food resources (2.72, 95 % CI 1.32, 5.58 as compared to those without surplus or deficit. In contrast, registering at an Anganwadi (government early child development centre (odds ratio 1.34 95 % CI 0.69, 2.60 and community membership (odds ratio 0.93, 95 % CI 0.59, 1.46 were not associated with minimum acceptable diet. Conclusion The results are consistent with what is known about the importance of maternal education and access to food resources in ensuring that children

  1. Costs of a community-based glaucoma detection programme: analysis of the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Laura T; Waisbourd, Michael; Hark, Lisa; Sembhi, Harjeet; Lee, Paul; Crews, John E; Saaddine, Jinan B; Steele, Deon; Katz, L Jay

    2018-02-01

    Glaucoma is the foremost cause of irreversible blindness, and more than 50% of cases remain undiagnosed. Our objective was to report the costs of a glaucoma detection programme operationalised through Philadelphia community centres. The analysis was performed using a healthcare system perspective in 2013 US dollars. Costs of examination and educational workshops were captured. Measures were total programme costs, cost/case of glaucoma detected and cost/case of any ocular disease detected (including glaucoma). Diagnoses are reported at the individual level (therefore representing a diagnosis made in one or both eyes). Staff time was captured during site visits to 15 of 43 sites and included time to deliver examinations and workshops, supervision, training and travel. Staff time was converted to costs by applying wage and fringe benefit costs from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Non-staff costs (equipment and mileage) were collected using study logs. Participants with previously diagnosed glaucoma were excluded. 1649 participants were examined. Mean total per-participant examination time was 56 min (SD 4). Mean total examination cost/participant was $139. The cost/case of glaucoma newly identified (open-angle glaucoma, angle-closure glaucoma, glaucoma suspect, or primary angle closure) was $420 and cost/case for any ocular disease identified was $273. Glaucoma examinations delivered through this programme provided significant health benefit to hard-to-reach communities. On a per-person basis, examinations were fairly low cost, though opportunities exist to improve efficiency. Findings serve as an important benchmark for planning future community-based glaucoma examination programmes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Cluster analysis of typhoid cases in Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarudin Safian

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever is still a major public health problem globally as well as in Malaysia. This study was done to identify the spatial epidemiology of typhoid fever in the Kota Bharu District of Malaysia as a first step to developing more advanced analysis of the whole country. The main characteristic of the epidemiological pattern that interested us was whether typhoid cases occurred in clusters or whether they were evenly distributed throughout the area. We also wanted to know at what spatial distances they were clustered. All confirmed typhoid cases that were reported to the Kota Bharu District Health Department from the year 2001 to June of 2005 were taken as the samples. From the home address of the cases, the location of the house was traced and a coordinate was taken using handheld GPS devices. Spatial statistical analysis was done to determine the distribution of typhoid cases, whether clustered, random or dispersed. The spatial statistical analysis was done using CrimeStat III software to determine whether typhoid cases occur in clusters, and later on to determine at what distances it clustered. From 736 cases involved in the study there was significant clustering for cases occurring in the years 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2005. There was no significant clustering in year 2004. Typhoid clustering also occurred strongly for distances up to 6 km. This study shows that typhoid cases occur in clusters, and this method could be applicable to describe spatial epidemiology for a specific area. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 175-82Keywords: typhoid, clustering, spatial epidemiology, GIS

  3. Creating a low carbon tourism community by public cognition, intention and behaviour change analysisa case study of a heritage site (Tianshan Tianchi, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wenjie

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to explore the establishment of a low-carbon tourism community by public cognition, intention, and behaviour change analysis in a case study of a heritage site, China. Low carbon tourism advocates a way of travel with low energy consumption, low pollution and low CO2 emissions during personal activities. Behaviour change is not only influenced by internal individual aspects including a person’s awareness, attitudes, and capacity to change, but is also driven by external social aspects including the culture and environments in which a person lives. In this paper, questionnaire surveys and field interviews were used to obtain basic information, and with reference to TPB, studied and analyzed the characteristics of cognition, intention and behaviour change practice by low carbon tourism community economy participants. With the help of SPSS analysis software, we found that a person’s educational level or occupation might affect cognition of low carbon tourism, and motives for participating in low carbon tourism could reflect the public’s perception of its emotional value, cognitive value and functional value. Most respondents knew about low carbon tourism; however, when putting it into practice, habitual behaviour was the main barrier for tourists while the residents were passive and followed the needs and choices of the tourists. Therefore, a comprehensive low carbon tourism community system was proposed not only for addressing the aspects of awareness, intention, and practice from individual behavior, but also for covering policy, infrastructure, institution systems and mechanisms at the community level.

  4. Creating a low carbon tourism community by public cognition, intention and behaviour change analysisa case study of a heritage site (Tianshan Tianchi, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xiaolei; Yang, Zhaoping; Wall, Geoffrey; Wang, Fang

    2017-06-01

    This study attempts to explore the establishment of a low-carbon tourism community by public cognition, intention, and behaviour change analysis in a case study of a heritage site, China. Low carbon tourism advocates a way of travel with low energy consumption, low pollution and low CO2 emissions during personal activities. Behaviour change is not only influenced by internal individual aspects including a person's awareness, attitudes, and capacity to change, but is also driven by external social aspects including the culture and environments in which a person lives. In this paper, questionnaire surveys and field interviews were used to obtain basic information, and with reference to TPB, studied and analyzed the characteristics of cognition, intention and behaviour change practice by low carbon tourism community economy participants. With the help of SPSS analysis software, we found that a person's educational level or occupation might affect cognition of low carbon tourism, and motives for participating in low carbon tourism could reflect the public's perception of its emotional value, cognitive value and functional value. Most respondents knew about low carbon tourism; however, when putting it into practice, habitual behaviour was the main barrier for tourists while the residents were passive and followed the needs and choices of the tourists. Therefore, a comprehensive low carbon tourism community system was proposed not only for addressing the aspects of awareness, intention, and practice from individual behavior, but also for covering policy, infrastructure, institution systems and mechanisms at the community level.

  5. Risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia among adults in Kenya: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthumbi, Esther; Lowe, Brett S; Muyodi, Cyprian; Getambu, Esther; Gleeson, Fergus; Scott, J Anthony G

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among adults worldwide; however, the risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia in Africa are not well characterized. The authors recruited 281 cases of community-acquired pneumonia and 1202 hospital controls among patients aged ≥15 years who attended Kilifi District Hospital/Coast Provincial General Hospital in Kenya between 1994 and 6. Cases were admissions with an acute illness with ≥2 respiratory signs and evidence of consolidation on a chest radiograph. Controls were patients without signs of pneumonia, frequency matched by age, sex and hospital. Risk factors related to socio-demographic factors, drug use, clinical history, contact patterns and exposures to indoor air pollution were investigated by questionnaire, anthropometric measurements and laboratory assays. Associations were evaluated using a hierarchical logistic regression model. Pneumonia was associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.06, 95% CI 1.44-3.08), anemia (OR 1.91, 1.31-2.74), splenomegaly (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.14-3.41), recent history of pneumonia (OR 4.65, 95% CI 1.66-12.5), history of pneumonia >2 years previously (OR 17.13, 95% CI 5.01-60.26), coryza in the 2 weeks preceding hospitalization (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.44-3.03), current smoking (2.19, 95% CI 1.39-3.70), use of khat (OR 3.44, 95% CI 1.72-7.15), use of snuff (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.35-5.49) and contact with several animal species. Presence of a Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) scar was associated with protection (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.32-0.82). The risk factors varied significantly by sex. Pneumonia in Kenyan adults was associated with global risk factors, such as HIV and smoking, but also with specific local factors like drug use and contact with animals. Intervention strategies should account for sex-specific differences in risk factors.

  6. Analysis of community tsunami evacuation time: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunarto, Y.; Sari, A. M.

    2018-02-01

    Tsunami in Indonesia is defined as local tsunami due to its occurrences which are within a distance of 200 km from the epicenter of the earthquake. A local tsunami can be caused by an earthquake, landslide, or volcanic eruption. Tsunami arrival time in Indonesia is generally between 10-60 minutes. As the estimated time of the tsunami waves to reach the coast is 30 minutes after the earthquake, the community should go to the vertical or horizontal evacuation in less than 30 minutes. In an evacuation, the city frequently does the evacuation after obtaining official directions from the authorities. Otherwise, they perform an independent evacuation without correct instructions from the authorities. Both of these ways have several strengths and limitations. This study analyzes these methods regarding time as well as the number of people expected to be saved.

  7. Case study: Promoting community resilience with local values – Greenland's Paamiut Asasara

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berliner, Peter; Larsen, Line Natascha; de Casas Soberón, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The chapter describes the programme Paamiut Asasara. The programme mobilised the local community from locally defined values and promoted shared community resilience as well as individual and family resilience....

  8. Revising the Community of Inquiry Framework for the Analysis of One-to-One Online Learning Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbom, Stefan; Jansson, Malin; Hulkko, Annelie

    2016-01-01

    In online learning research, the theoretical community of inquiry framework has been used extensively to analyze processes of inquiry among learners and instructors within a community. This paper examines a special case of community of inquiry consisting of only one learner and one instructor. Together they engage in an online coaching discourse…

  9. Numerical analysis of rapid drawdown: Applications in real cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo E. Alonso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, rapid drawdown scenarios were analyzed by means of numerical examples as well as modeling of real cases with in situ measurements. The aim of the study was to evaluate different approaches available for calculating pore water pressure distributions during and after a drawdown. To do that, a single slope subjected to a drawdown was first analyzed under different calculation alternatives, and numerical results were discussed. Simple methods, such as undrained analysis and pure flow analysis, implicitly assuming a rigid soil skeleton, lead to significant errors in pore water pressure distributions when compared with coupled flow-deformation analysis. A similar analysis was performed for the upstream slope of the Glen Shira Dam, Scotland, and numerical results were compared with field measurements during a controlled drawdown. Field records indicate that classical undrained calculations are conservative but unrealistic. Then, a recent case of a major landslide triggered by a rapid drawdown in a reservoir was interpreted. A key aspect of the case was the correct characterization of permeability of a representative soil profile. This was achieved by combining laboratory test results and a back analysis of pore water pressure time records during a period of reservoir water level fluctuations. The results highlight the difficulty of predicting whether the pore water pressure is overestimated or underestimated when using simplified approaches, and it is concluded that predicting the pore water pressure distribution in a slope after a rapid drawdown requires a coupled flow-deformation analysis in saturated and unsaturated porous media.

  10. A Qualitative Analysis of Pesantren Educational Management: School Culture and Leadership of a Professional Learning Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyimas Mu'azzomi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore supportive and shared leadership structures at one Indonesian Islamic boarding school (Pesantren as a function of school culture policies and procedures in a professional learning community in the disctrict. A qualitative study was conducted at one Pesantren located in Jambi, an Indonesian province in west part of Sumatra island. We interviewed three administrators and five teachers to get in-depth information about the purpose of this paper. The interview transcriptions were translated, coded, divided into themes, and elaborated in the findings of the paper. The findings of study conclude that Pesantren leaders in the perspective of the participants must provide supportive and shared leadership structures for teachers in order to create positive cultures and effective a professional learning community for the development of the Pesantren. Leaders of the Pesantren must directly cooperate with teaching staff to provide policies and procedures for teachers in the leadership structure to directly impact school improvement through professional learning community collaborative attempts. This study was conducted based on the school culture and professional learning communities literature by exploring existent policies and practices in schools as unique cases. This study is significant to the community as specific cases informing educational leaders especially in Islamic education on mechanisms that may be leveraged to ensure successful implementation of policies and procedures on the leadership and school culture of a professional learning community literature.

  11. Validation test case generation based on safety analysis ontology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Chin-Feng; Wang, Wen-Shing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Current practice in validation test case generation for nuclear system is mainly ad hoc. ► This study designs a systematic approach to generate validation test cases from a Safety Analysis Report. ► It is based on a domain-specific ontology. ► Test coverage criteria have been defined and satisfied. ► A computerized toolset has been implemented to assist the proposed approach. - Abstract: Validation tests in the current nuclear industry practice are typically performed in an ad hoc fashion. This study presents a systematic and objective method of generating validation test cases from a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). A domain-specific ontology was designed and used to mark up a SAR; relevant information was then extracted from the marked-up document for use in automatically generating validation test cases that satisfy the proposed test coverage criteria; namely, single parameter coverage, use case coverage, abnormal condition coverage, and scenario coverage. The novelty of this technique is its systematic rather than ad hoc test case generation from a SAR to achieve high test coverage.

  12. An Analysis of Earth Science Data Analytics Use Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Chung-Lin; Kempler, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the number and volume, and sources, of globally available Earth science data measurements and datasets have afforded Earth scientists and applications researchers unprecedented opportunities to study our Earth in ever more sophisticated ways. In fact, the NASA Earth Observing System Data Information System (EOSDIS) archives have doubled from 2007 to 2014, to 9.1 PB (Ramapriyan, 2009; and https:earthdata.nasa.govaboutsystem-- performance). In addition, other US agency, international programs, field experiments, ground stations, and citizen scientists provide a plethora of additional sources for studying Earth. Co--analyzing huge amounts of heterogeneous data to glean out unobvious information is a daunting task. Earth science data analytics (ESDA) is the process of examining large amounts of data of a variety of types to uncover hidden patterns, unknown correlations and other useful information. It can include Data Preparation, Data Reduction, and Data Analysis. Through work associated with the Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Federation, a collection of Earth science data analytics use cases have been collected and analyzed for the purpose of extracting the types of Earth science data analytics employed, and requirements for data analytics tools and techniques yet to be implemented, based on use case needs. ESIP generated use case template, ESDA use cases, use case types, and preliminary use case analysis (this is a work in progress) will be presented.

  13. Leading Change: A Case Study of Leadership Practices from the Development of the Niagara County Community College Culinary Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caton, Jazmin; Mistriner, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the lessons learned from the development of a project that set out to revitalize an economically depressed area with an innovative approach to workforce development through partnerships. The focus was to utilize the development of the Niagara County Community College Culinary Institute as an example…

  14. Implementation of a Community-Based Family-Centered Program in Portugal: A Multiple Case Study Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira de Melo, Ana; Alarcao, Madalena

    2012-01-01

    Family-centered, community-based programs are particularly suited to support families with at-risk children or maltreated children and achieve family preservation or reunification. In these child protection and child welfare cases, assessment is of great importance to inform decision making. But the implementation of services to support the…

  15. Case Management for Students at Risk of Dropping Out: Implementation and Interim Impact Findings from the Communities in Schools Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrin, William; Parise, Leigh M.; Cerna, Oscar; Haider, Zeest; Somers, Marie-Andrée

    2015-01-01

    Too many students drop out and never earn their high school diploma. For students at risk of dropping out, academic, social, and other supports may help. "Communities In Schools" seeks to organize and provide these supports to at-risk students in the nation's poorest-performing schools, including through "case-managed"…

  16. Are pathogenic leptospira species agents of community-acquired pneumonia? case reports of leptospirosis presenting as pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Gasem; H. Farida (Helmia); A. Ahmed (Ahmed); J.A. Severin (Juliëtte); A. Suryanto (Agus); B. Isbandrio; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); R.A. Hartskeerl (Rudy); P.J. Van Den Broek (Peterhans J.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe report four Indonesian cases meeting the clinical and radiological criteria for community-acquired pneumonia and other findings suggestive of leptospirosis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses of serum and urine samples and serology confirmed the diagnosis of leptospirosis in each.

  17. A Triple Helix Strategy for Promoting SME Development: The Case of a Dried Banana Community Enterprise in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwawutto, Sauwapa; Smitinont, Thitapha; Charoenanong, Numtip; Yokakul, Nattaka; Chatratana, Sonchai; Zawdie, Girma

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the university-industry-government relationship as a mechanism for enhancing the efficiency and competitiveness of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The case of a community enterprise producing dried banana products in the north of Thailand is used to demonstrate the significance of the Triple Helix model for business…

  18. Are Pathogenic Leptospira Species Agents of Community-Acquired Pneumonia? Case Reports of Leptospirosis Presenting as Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasem, M. Hussein; Farida, Helmia; Ahmed, Ahmed; Severin, Juliţte A.; Suryanto, Agus; Isbandrio, Bambang; Verbrugh, Henri A.; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; van den Broek, Peterhans J.

    2016-01-01

    We report four Indonesian cases meeting the clinical and radiological criteria for community-acquired pneumonia and other findings suggestive of leptospirosis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses of serum and urine samples and serology confirmed the diagnosis of leptospirosis in each. Results of qPCR

  19. Use of integrated dual disorder treatment via assertive community treatment versus clinical case management for persons with co-occurring disorders and antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisman, Linda K; Mueser, Kim T; Covell, Nancy H; Lin, Hsiu-Ju; Crocker, Anne; Drake, Robert E; Essock, Susan M

    2009-11-01

    We conducted secondary analyses of data from a randomized trial testing the effectiveness of Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) in delivery of integrated dual disorder treatment (IDDT) to explore the impact of IDDT delivered through ACT teams compared with standard clinical case management for dually-disordered persons with and without antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). This analysis included 36 individuals with ASPD and 88 individuals without ASPD. Participants with ASPD assigned to ACT showed a significantly greater reduction in alcohol use and were less likely to go to jail than those in standard clinical case management, whereas participants without ASPD did not differ between the 2 case management approaches. There were no significant differences for other substance use or criminal justice outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that persons with co-occurring serious mental illness, substance use disorders, and ASPD may benefit from delivery of IDDT through ACT teams.

  20. Design and participant enrollment of a randomized controlled trial evaluating effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a community based case management intervention for patients suffering from COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sabrina Storgaard; Pedersen, Kjeld Møller; Weinreich, Ulla Møller

    2015-01-01

    patients were randomized into two groups: the case-managed group and the usual-care group. Participant characteristics were obtained at baseline, and measures on effectiveness and costs were obtained through questionnaires and registries within a 12-month follow-up period. In the forthcoming analysis......Background: Case management interventions are recommended to improve quality of care and reduce costs in chronic care, but further evidence on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is needed. The objective of this study is the reporting of the design and participant enrollment of a randomized...... controlled trial, conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a community-based case management model for patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). With a focus on support for self-care and care coordination, the intervention was hypothesized to result...

  1. Designing Program Roadmaps to Catalyze Community Formation: A Case Study of the Long-Term Stewardship Science and Technology Roadmapword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Brent; Hanson, Duane; Matthern, Gretchen

    2003-01-01

    A number of broad perspective technology roadmaps have been developed in the last few years as tools for coordinating nation-wide research in targeted areas. These roadmaps share a common characteristic of coalescing the associated stakeholder groups into a special-interest community that is willing to work cooperatively in achieving the roadmap goals. These communities are key to roadmap implementation as they provide the collaborative energy necessary to obtain the political support and funding required for identified science and technology development efforts. This paper discusses the relationship between roadmaps and special-interest communities, using the recently drafted Department of Energy's Long-Term Stewardship Science and Technology Roadmap as a case study. Specific aspects this roadmap's design facilitated the development of a long-term stewardship community while specific realities during roadmap development impacted the realization of the design

  2. Designing Program Roadmaps to Catalyze Community Formation: A Case Study of the Long-Term Stewardship Science and Technology Roadmapword

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Brent; Hanson, Duane; Matthern, Gretchen

    2003-02-27

    A number of broad perspective technology roadmaps have been developed in the last few years as tools for coordinating nation-wide research in targeted areas. These roadmaps share a common characteristic of coalescing the associated stakeholder groups into a special-interest community that is willing to work cooperatively in achieving the roadmap goals. These communities are key to roadmap implementation as they provide the collaborative energy necessary to obtain the political support and funding required for identified science and technology development efforts. This paper discusses the relationship between roadmaps and special-interest communities, using the recently drafted Department of Energy's Long-Term Stewardship Science and Technology Roadmap as a case study. Specific aspects this roadmap's design facilitated the development of a long-term stewardship community while specific realities during roadmap development impacted the realization of the design.

  3. Policy Analysis of Surgical Utilization at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-09

    Utilization 12 anterior /posterior cruciate ligament (ACL/PCL) reconstruction surgery may take 2-3 hours and a cataract surgery may only take 10-20 minutes...equipment, or secondary services like an ICU or physical therapy . Larger, more in depth cases could be performed at Gateway, thus allowing for an...Fort Campbell’s Post Office is on the Kentucky side which, ultimately, provides the post with a Kentucky mailing address. The physical facility of BACH

  4. Assessing Opinions in Community Leadership Networks to Address Health Inequalities: A Case Study from Project IMPACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, M. P.; Ramanadhan, S.; Viswanath, K.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel approach that those engaged in promoting social change in health can use to analyze community power, mobilize it and enhance community capacity to reduce health inequalities. We used community reconnaissance methods to select and interview 33 participants from six leadership sectors in "Milltown", the New…

  5. Water Management and Supply in a Mining Community – A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since mining activities require a lot of water and also increase population of host communities as a result of influx of workers, water resources in mining communities must be efficiently managed. This paper considered the various factors affecting water supply and its distribution in the Tarkwa area, a mining community, ...

  6. Examining the Development of a Teacher Learning Community: The Case of a Video Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Es, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Learning communities have become a widespread model for teacher development. However, simply bringing teachers together does not ensure community development. This study offers a framework for the development of a teacher learning community in a video club. Qualitative coding of video data resulted in characterizing the evolution of the video club…

  7. Surgical treatment of hyperparathyroidism : with an analysis of 267 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A. Bruining (Hajo)

    1971-01-01

    textabstractIt is generally accepted that for autonomous hyperparathyroidism, whether primary or tertiary, surgery is still the only suitable method of treatment available. Analysis of a series of cases treated in t his way over the past twenty years has shown that there are certain problems

  8. The implementation of customer profitability analysis: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raaij, E.M.; Vernooij, M.J.A.; Vernooij, Maarten J.A.; van Triest, S.P.

    2003-01-01

    By using customer profitability analysis (CPA), firms can determine the profit contribution of customer segments and/or individual customers. This article presents an approach for the implementation of CPA. The implementation process is illustrated using a case study of a firm producing and selling

  9. Simplified Worst-Case Analysis of Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    Statistical method avoids excessive computer time. Technique involves simplified Monte Carlo simulation of system with randomly chosen parameters and comparison of tolerance extremes of several of worst-case situations found. Resulting combination of tolerance extremes then used in detailed analysis - one that makes use of full complex nonlinear model capable of accurate simulations.

  10. Average-case analysis of incremental topological ordering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajwani, Deepak; Friedrich, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Many applications like pointer analysis and incremental compilation require maintaining a topological ordering of the nodes of a directed acyclic graph (DAG) under dynamic updates. All known algorithms for this problem are either only analyzed for worst-case insertion sequences or only evaluated...

  11. Participation, Poverty and Public Policies: 3P Challenging Community Environmental Psychology (The Case of the Communal Councils in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Wiesenfeld

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Participation, poverty and public policy are three relevant topics for the state, society and academy, particularly for environmental and community social psychology. Meanings and ways of addressing these topics by the above mentioned sector have varied across time and places. Recent impact of new governance models, such as participative democracy, has provoked changes in public policy modes of influence, as a strategy for poverty reduction. Such changes’ orientations coincide with those of environmental community psychology, social constructionist theoretical perspective and qualitative methodology. In Venezuela, only Latin American country where participation has been given a constitutional and legal status, it is important to study participation’s meanings and its implications in public management as a strategy for poverty reduction. Communal councils constitute the main community participatory structure, which integrates poor sectors and vehicles their requirements together with governmental entities. Conscious as we are of existing gaps between discourses and actions, the present research analyses official discourses on participation, through the Venezuelan Constitution and the Organic Communal Councils Law, and compares them with participatory meanings and experiences provided by communal councils’ members and other community stakeholders’ narratives. Results show differences between official and community perspectives on participation in communal councils, as well as discrepancies within communities: they also point out to the difficulties of state induced participation, as is the venezuelan case, for its protagonists’ limitations for transcending projects and exerting power outside community boundaries.

  12. Analysis Of Gunshot Injuries In A Semi-Urban Community In Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gunshot injuries are taking a worrisome dimension in all parts of Nigeria with associated significant morbidity mortality. Most cases of gun shot injuries in our community prefer to be managed by traditional healers rather than medical doctors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the pattern and outcome of ...

  13. ESIP Federation: A Case Study on Enabling Collaboration Infrastructure to Support Earth Science Informatics Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, E.; Meyer, C. B.; Benedict, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    toolbox of collaborative development resources including Amazon Web Services to quickly spin-up the testbed instance and a GitHub account for maintaining testbed project code enabling reuse. Recently, the Foundation supported development of the ESIP Commons (http://commons.esipfed.org), a Drupal-based knowledge repository for non-traditional publications to preserve community products and outcomes like white papers, posters and proceedings. The ESIP Commons adds additional structured metadata, provides attribution to contributors and allows those unfamiliar with ESIP a straightforward way to find information. The success of ESIP Federation activities is difficult to measure. The ESIP Commons is a step toward quantifying sponsor return on investment and is one dataset used in network map analysis of the ESIP community network, another success metric. Over the last 15 years, ESIP has continually grown and attracted experts in the Earth science data and informatics field becoming a primary locus of research and development on the application and evolution of Earth science data standards and conventions. As funding agencies push toward a more collaborative approach, the lessons learned from ESIP and the collaboration services themselves are a crucial component of supporting science research.

  14. Applied behavior analysis: understanding and changing behavior in the community-a representative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, Paul D

    2009-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis, a psychological discipline, has been characterized as the science of behavior change (Chance, 2006). Research in applied behavior analysis has been published for approximately 40 years since the initial publication of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis in 1968. The field now encompasses a wide range of human behavior. Although much of the published research centers on problem behaviors that occur in schools and among people with disabilities, a substantial body of knowledge has emerged in community settings. This article provides a review of the behavioral community research published in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis as representative of this work, including research in the areas of home and family, health, safety, community involvement and the environment, recreation and sports, crime and delinquency, and organizations. In the interest of space, research in schools and with people with disabilities has been excluded from this review.

  15. External rhinoplasty: a critical analysis of 500 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2003-06-01

    The study presents a comprehensive statistical analysis of a series of 500 consecutive rhinoplasties of which 380 (76 per cent) were primary and 120 (24 per cent) were secondary cases. All cases were operated upon using the external rhinoplasty technique; simultaneous septal surgery was performed in 350 (70 per cent) of the cases. Deformities of the upper two-thirds of the nose that occurred significantly more in the secondary cases included; dorsal saddling, dorsal irregularities, valve collapse, open roof and pollybeak deformities. In the lower third of the nose; secondary cases showed significantly higher incidences of depressed tip, tip over-rotation, tip asymmetry, retracted columella, and alar notching. Suturing techniques were used significantly more in primary cases, while in secondary cases grafting techniques were used significantly more. The complications encountered intra-operatively included; septal flap tears (2.8 per cent) and alar cartilage injury (1.8 per cent), while post-operative complications included; nasal trauma (one per cent), epistaxis (two per cent), infection (2.4 per cent), prolonged oedema (17 per cent), and nasal obstruction (0.8 per cent). The overall patient satisfaction rate was 95.6 per cent and the transcolumellar scar was found to be unacceptable in only 0.8 per cent of the patients.

  16. Quality and safety of integrated community case management of malaria using rapid diagnostic tests and pneumonia by community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Davidson H; Brooks, Erin Twohig; Semrau, Katherine; Pilingana, Portipher; MacLeod, William B; Siazeele, Kazungu; Sabin, Lora L; Thea, Donald M; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo

    2012-03-01

    To assess the quality and safety of having community health workers (CHWs) in rural Zambia use rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and provide integrated management of malaria and pneumonia. In the context of a cluster-randomized controlled trial of two models for community-based management of malaria and/or non-severe pneumonia in children under 5 years old, CHWs in the intervention arm were trained to use RDTs, follow a simple algorithm for classification and treat malaria with artemether-lumefantrine (AL) and pneumonia with amoxicillin. CHW records were reviewed to assess the ability of the CHWs to appropriately classify and treat malaria and pneumonia, and account for supplies. Patients were also followed up to assess treatment safety. During the 12-month study, the CHWs evaluated 1017 children with fever and/or fast/difficult breathing and performed 975 RDTs. Malaria and/or pneumonia were appropriately classified 94-100% of the time. Treatment based on disease classification was correct in 94-100% of episodes. Supply management was excellent with over 98% of RDTs, amoxicillin, and AL properly accounted for. The use of RDTs, amoxicillin, and AL was associated with few minor adverse events. Most febrile children (90%) with negative RDT results recovered after being treated with an antipyretic alone. Volunteer CHWs in rural Zambia are capable of providing integrated management of malaria and pneumonia to children safely and at high quality.

  17. Bioethics, culture and infanticide in Brazilian indigenous communities: the Zuruahá case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, Saulo Ferreira; Garrafa, Volnei; Cornelli, Gabriele; Tardivo, Carla; Carvalho, Samuel José de

    2010-05-01

    This article analyzes the practice of infanticide in indigenous communities in Brazil. Taking as a reference point a specific case involving two children of the Zuruahá people, it takes a broader look at the issue and discusses how infanticide is understood among other indigenous peoples. A debate focusing specifically on this topic that took place during a public hearing held in the Brazilian National Congress in December 2005 has also been taken into consideration in this discussion. In view of the positions adopted as a result of the hearing, this paper seeks to identify the ethical problems and moral dilemmas relating to the subject, by putting them into context and analyzing them in the light of respect for cultural pluralism. Seeking to contribute to the debate, the authors analyze the possibilities for intervention in the traditional practices of infanticide, while rejecting those positions that are not anchored in an attitude of profound respect for other people's cultures or that do not create conditions for dialogue between individuals or groups with different moralities.

  18. Case analysis online: a strategic management case model for the health industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne; Bearden, Eithne

    2004-01-01

    Despite the plethora of methods and tools available to support strategic management, the challenge for health executives in the next century will relate to their ability to access and interpret data from multiple and intricate communication networks. Integrated digital networks and satellite systems will expand the scope and ease of sharing information between business divisions, and networked systems will facilitate the use of virtual case discussions across universities. While the internet is frequently used to support clinical decisions in the healthcare industry, few executives rely upon the internetfor strategic analysis. Although electronic technologies can easily synthesize data from multiple information channels, research as well as technical issues may deter their application in strategic analysis. As digital models transform access to information, online models may become increasingly relevant in designing strategic solutions. While there are various pedagogical models available to support the strategic management process, this framework was designed to enhance strategic analysis through the application of technology and electronic research. A strategic analysis framework, which incorporated internet research and case analysis in a strategic managementcourse, is described alongwith design and application issues that emerged during the case analysis process.

  19. Case study of microarthropod communities to assess soil quality in different managed vineyards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnarli, E.; Goggioli, D.; Tarchi, F.; Guidi, S.; Nannelli, R.; Vignozzi, N.; Valboa, G.; Lottero, M. R.; Corino, L.; Simoni, S.

    2015-07-01

    Land use influences the abundance and diversity of soil arthropods. The evaluation of the impact of different management strategies on soil quality is increasingly sought, and the determination of community structures of edaphic fauna can represent an efficient tool. In the area of Langhe (Piedmont, Italy), eight vineyards characterized for physical and chemical properties (soil texture, soil pH, total organic carbon, total nitrogen, calcium carbonate) were selected. We evaluated the effect of two types of crop management, organic and integrated pest management (IPM), on abundance and biodiversity of microarthropods living at the soil surface. Soil sampling was carried out in winter 2011 and spring 2012. All specimens were counted and determined up to the order level. The biodiversity analysis was performed using ecological indexes (taxa richness, dominance, Shannon-Wiener, Buzas and Gibson's evenness, Margalef, equitability, Berger-Parker), and the biological soil quality was assessed with the BSQ-ar index. The mesofauna abundance was affected by both the type of management and sampling time. On the whole, a higher abundance was in organic vineyards (N = 1981) than in IPM ones (N = 1062). The analysis performed by ecological indexes showed quite a high level of biodiversity in this environment, particularly in May 2012. Furthermore, the BSQ-ar values registered were similar to those obtained in preserved soils.

  20. Networking between community health programs: a case study outlining the effectiveness, barriers and enablers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grills Nathan J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In India, since the 1990s, there has been a burgeoning of NGOs involved in providing primary health care. This has resulted in a complex NGO-Government interface which is difficult for lone NGOs to navigate. The Uttarakhand Cluster, India, links such small community health programs together to build NGO capacity, increase visibility and better link to the government schemes and the formal healthcare system. This research, undertaken between 1998 and 2011, aims to examine barriers and facilitators to such linking, or clustering, and the effectiveness of this clustering approach. Methods Interviews, indicator surveys and participant observation were used to document the process and explore the enablers, the barriers and the effectiveness of networks improving community health. Results The analysis revealed that when activating, framing, mobilising and synthesizing the Uttarakhand Cluster, key brokers and network players were important in bridging between organisations. The ties (or relationships that held the cluster together included homophily around common faith, common friendships and geographical location and common mission. Self interest whereby members sought funds, visibility, credibility, increased capacity and access to trainings was also a commonly identified motivating factor for networking. Barriers to network synthesizing included lack of funding, poor communication, limited time and lack of human resources. Risk aversion and mistrust remained significant barriers to overcome for such a network. Conclusions In conclusion, specific enabling factors allowed the clustering approach to be effective at increasing access to resources, creating collaborative opportunities and increasing visibility, credibility and confidence of the cluster members. These findings add to knowledge regarding social network formation and collaboration, and such knowledge will assist in the conceptualisation, formation and success of

  1. Game Theoretical Analysis on Cooperation Stability and Incentive Effectiveness in Community Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kaida; Wang, Rui; Liu, Yi; Qian, Depei; Zhang, Han; Cai, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Community networks, the distinguishing feature of which is membership admittance, appear on P2P networks, social networks, and conventional Web networks. Joining the network costs money, time or network bandwidth, but the individuals get access to special resources owned by the community in return. The prosperity and stability of the community are determined by both the policy of admittance and the attraction of the privileges gained by joining. However, some misbehaving users can get the dedicated resources with some illicit and low-cost approaches, which introduce instability into the community, a phenomenon that will destroy the membership policy. In this paper, we analyze on the stability using game theory on such a phenomenon. We propose a game-theoretical model of stability analysis in community networks and provide conditions for a stable community. We then extend the model to analyze the effectiveness of different incentive policies, which could be used when the community cannot maintain its members in certain situations. Then we verify those models through a simulation. Finally, we discuss several ways to promote community network's stability by adjusting the network's properties and give some proposal on the designs of these types of networks from the points of game theory and stability.

  2. Game Theoretical Analysis on Cooperation Stability and Incentive Effectiveness in Community Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaida Song

    Full Text Available Community networks, the distinguishing feature of which is membership admittance, appear on P2P networks, social networks, and conventional Web networks. Joining the network costs money, time or network bandwidth, but the individuals get access to special resources owned by the community in return. The prosperity and stability of the community are determined by both the policy of admittance and the attraction of the privileges gained by joining. However, some misbehaving users can get the dedicated resources with some illicit and low-cost approaches, which introduce instability into the community, a phenomenon that will destroy the membership policy. In this paper, we analyze on the stability using game theory on such a phenomenon. We propose a game-theoretical model of stability analysis in community networks and provide conditions for a stable community. We then extend the model to analyze the effectiveness of different incentive policies, which could be used when the community cannot maintain its members in certain situations. Then we verify those models through a simulation. Finally, we discuss several ways to promote community network's stability by adjusting the network's properties and give some proposal on the designs of these types of networks from the points of game theory and stability.

  3. Static analysis of worst-case stack cache behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Alexander; Brandner, Florian; Schoeberl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing a stack cache in a real-time system can aid predictability by avoiding interference that heap memory traffic causes on the data cache. While loads and stores are guaranteed cache hits, explicit operations are responsible for managing the stack cache. The behavior of these operations can......-graph, the worst-case bounds can be efficiently yet precisely determined. Our evaluation using the MiBench benchmark suite shows that only 37% and 21% of potential stack cache operations actually store to and load from memory, respectively. Analysis times are modest, on average running between 0.46s and 1.30s per...... be analyzed statically. We present algorithms that derive worst-case bounds on the latency-inducing operations of the stack cache. Their results can be used by a static WCET tool. By breaking the analysis down into subproblems that solve intra-procedural data-flow analysis and path searches on the call...

  4. Community involvement in obstetric emergency management in rural areas: a case of Rukungiri district, Western Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogwang, Simon; Najjemba, Robinah; Tumwesigye, Nazarius Mbona; Orach, Christopher Garimoi

    2012-03-29

    Maternal mortality is a major public health problem worldwide especially in low income countries. Most causes of maternal deaths are due to direct obstetric complications. Maternal mortality ratio remains high in Rukungiri district, western Uganda estimated at 475 per 100,000 live births. The objectives were to identify types of community involvement and examine factors influencing the level of community involvement in the management of obstetric emergencies. We conducted a descriptive study during 2nd to 28th February 2009 in rural Rukungiri district, western Uganda. A total of 448 heads of households, randomly selected from 6/11 (54.5%) of sub-counties, 21/42 (50.0%) parishes and 32/212 (15.1%) villages (clusters), were interviewed. Data were analysed using STATA version 10.0. Community pre-emergency support interventions available included community awareness creation (sensitization) while interventions undertaken when emergency had occurred included transportation and referring women to health facility. Community support programmes towards health care (obstetric emergencies) included establishment of community savings and credit schemes, and insurance schemes. The factors associated with community involvement in obstetric emergency management were community members being employed (AOR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.02 - 3.54) and rating the quality of maternal health care as good (AOR = 2.22, 95% CI: 1.19 - 4.14). Types of community involvement in obstetric emergency management include practices and support programmes. Community involvement in obstetric emergency management is influenced by employment status and perceived quality of health care services. Policies to promote community networks and resource mobilization strategies for health care should be implemented. There is need for promotion of community support initiatives including health insurance schemes and self help associations; further community sensitization by empowered community based resource persons rather

  5. Analysis of Lullabic Songs in Traditional African Communities: Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Nwa eri-gi ,. If the baby refuses to eat,. Erie - m . I'll eat. The song describes the plight of babysitters who eat only after everybody, including the baby, has eaten and probably gone to sleep. It is a plea expressing the desire for their basic necessities to be met. Overtly speaking. Analysis of Lullabic Songs in Traditional African ...

  6. Independent Evaluation of the integrated Community Case Management of Childhood Illness Strategy in Malawi Using a National Evaluation Platform Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouzou, Agbessi; Kanyuka, Mercy; Hazel, Elizabeth; Heidkamp, Rebecca; Marsh, Andrew; Mleme, Tiope; Munthali, Spy; Park, Lois; Banda, Benjamin; Moulton, Lawrence H; Black, Robert E; Hill, Kenneth; Perin, Jamie; Victora, Cesar G; Bryce, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the impact of integrated community case management of childhood illness (iCCM) on careseeking for childhood illness and child mortality in Malawi, using a National Evaluation Platform dose-response design with 27 districts as units of analysis. "Dose" variables included density of iCCM providers, drug availability, and supervision, measured through a cross-sectional cellular telephone survey of all iCCM-trained providers. "Response" variables were changes between 2010 and 2014 in careseeking and mortality in children aged 2-59 months, measured through household surveys. iCCM implementation strength was not associated with changes in careseeking or mortality. There were fewer than one iCCM-ready provider per 1,000 under-five children per district. About 70% of sick children were taken outside the home for care in both 2010 and 2014. Careseeking from iCCM providers increased over time from about 2% to 10%; careseeking from other providers fell by a similar amount. Likely contributors to the failure to find impact include low density of iCCM providers, geographic targeting of iCCM to "hard-to-reach" areas although women did not identify distance from a provider as a barrier to health care, and displacement of facility careseeking by iCCM careseeking. This suggests that targeting iCCM solely based on geographic barriers may need to be reconsidered. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  7. Development of the community midwifery education initiative and its influence on women's health and empowerment in Afghanistan: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speakman, Elizabeth M; Shafi, Ahmad; Sondorp, Egbert; Atta, Nooria; Howard, Natasha

    2014-09-15

    Political transition in Afghanistan enabled reconstruction of the destroyed health system. Maternal health was prioritised due to political will and historically high mortality. However, severe shortages of skilled birth attendants--particularly in rural areas--hampered safe motherhood initiatives. The Community Midwifery Education (CME) programme began training rural midwives in 2002, scaling-up nationally in 2005. This case study analyses CME development and implementation to help determine successes and challenges. Data were collected through documentary review and key informant interviews. Content analysis was informed by Walt and Gilson's policy triangle framework. The CME programme has contributed to consistently positive indicators, including up to a 1273/100,000 reduction in maternal mortality ratios, up to a 28% increase in skilled deliveries, and a six-fold increase in qualified midwives since 2002. Begun as a small pilot, CME has gained support of international donors, the Afghan government, and civil society. CME is considered by stakeholders to be a positive model for promoting women's education, employment, and health. However, its future is threatened by insecurity, corruption, lack of regulation, and funding uncertainties. Strategic planning and resource mobilisation are required for it to achieve its potential of transforming maternal healthcare in Afghanistan.

  8. [A Retrospective Analysis of 88 Solved Intentional Homicide Cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jia-quan; Liu, Jian-feng

    2016-04-01

    To summarize the key points, difficulties and relevant practical experiences for analyzing the scene of solved intentional homicide cases. The data of 88 solved intentional homicide cases in a county from 2004 to 2013 were collected and the retrospective analysis was performed. The number of local female victims obviously higher than non-local female victims and the number of non-local suspects is obviously higher than local suspects. The number of Male suspects showed higher compared with the female. Most of them were temporary workers, unemployment or farmers with less education backgrounds. The main causes of victims' death were mechanical injury or asphyxia. The murders were acquaintances in most intentional homicide cases. The motive of the stranger murders was commonly money. The murder behavior types of homicide cases were related with people, money and sexual assault. Camouflage and guilty behavior showed the most significance. The accurate identification of suspects is one of the most important task in forensic investigation and reflects the importance of the criminal scene analysis for intentional homicide cases. It also provides the direction of future research.

  9. [Analysis of Forensic Characteristics about 23 Family Homicide Cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X; Dong, X D

    2016-08-01

    To provide references for forensic analysis of family homicides cases by analyzing the situations of scene, injuries and individual which were related to the family homicide cases in a county. The data of 23 family homicide cases from 2004 to 2013 were collected. The basic situation of individual involved, the relationship between dead and suspect, the cause of death, the motive, the location, time and tools of the crime and the behavior of the suspect after crime etc. were analyzed. The characteristics of the 23 family homicides cases showed that couple relationship was the most common relationship; passion killing was the most common motive; local materials were mostly used as the tools for committing crimes; most crimes were committed in residences; most time of crime was night. The analysis of family homicide cases should be based on the scene investigation, the examination of the body and combined with the investigation of the situation. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  10. Translating an early childhood obesity prevention program for local community implementation: a case study of the Melbourne InFANT Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Laws

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is a growing interest in the field of research translation, there are few published examples of public health interventions that have been effectively scaled up and implemented in the community. This paper provides a case study of the community-wide implementation of the Melbourne Infant, Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT, an obesity prevention program for parents with infants aged 3–18 months. The study explored key factors influencing the translation of the Program into routine practice and the respective role of policy makers, researchers and implementers. Methods Case studies were conducted of five of the eight prevention areas in Victoria, Australia who implemented the Program. Cases were selected on the basis of having implemented the Program for 6 months or more. Data were collected from January to June 2015 and included 18 individual interviews, one focus group and observation of two meetings. A total of 28 individuals, including research staff (n = 4, policy makers (n = 2 and implementers (n = 22, contributed to the data collected. Thematic analysis was conducted using cross case comparisons and key themes were verified through member checking. Results Key facilitators of implementation included availability of a pre-packaged evidence based program addressing a community need, along with support and training provided by research staff to local implementers. Partnerships between researchers and policy makers facilitated initial program adoption, while local partnerships supported community implementation. Community partnerships were facilitated by local coordinators through alignment of program goals with existing policies and services. Workforce capacity for program delivery and administration was a challenge, largely overcome by embedding the Program into existing roles. Adapting the Program to fit local circumstance was critical for feasible and sustainable delivery, however

  11. The Educational Community and the School: A Case Study, by Means of the Combination of Different Techniques, of a Public Secondary School in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta Giacobbe

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Research projects in which qualitative and quantitative techniques are combined entail the difficulty of an integral interpretation of the results, due to the particular characteristics of these two approaches. In this article the methodology applied in a case study carried out in an educational institution is described. The study was especially directed towards discovering the particular elements of teacher training which can hinder a constructive teaching practice, ascertaining the role that each of the educational actors performs in the construction of their school, and identifying the characteristics of the educational community that shape the performance of the institution. The study involved the collection, processing and analysis of materials relating to students, teachers, parents and administrators. Each group is addressed methodologically in a different way. Low levels of school performance and difficulties in the integration of the educational community were found. Some proposals for rectifying them are presented here.

  12. The Importance of Audience and Agency for Representation: A Case Study of an Urban Youth Media Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmaraman, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Urban youths' agency to represent their realities through media has been largely unexplored in the youth development literature. In this qualitative case study of an after-school youth media program in the Bay Area, expressions of youth agency and the role of audiences are explored during the process of producing videos for public consumption. Methodology As participant observer of 14 ethnically diverse youth participants aged between 15 and 18 years over 18 months, I documented (a) the kind of agencies participants engaged in and (b) the impact of live and imagined future audiences on youths' creative processes. Analyses of field notes, semi-structured interviews, and media projects were conducted using thematic analysis to inductively generate emerging categories. Findings Themes included an agentive sense of self-efficacy, commitment, and responsibility, as well as perceived contributions to local audiences and an emerging collective identity. The youth demonstrated their increased sense of a social or civic duty to realistically represent youth of color to familiar and unfamiliar audiences. Implications This case study demonstrated how one youth media organization fostered agency through youth authorship, production, distribution, and local community dialogue. By documenting the impact of audiences from conception to public reception, this study provides valuable insight into the agentive process of publicly “performing” a commitment to complete a social change video project. Contribution This chapter underscores the value of performance within youth development programs and the critical component of audiences as one form of authentic assessment in order to foster individual and collective agency. PMID:20671812

  13. Spatial analysis of colorectal cancer cases in Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Neoh, Hui-Min; Rahim, Syed Sharizman Syed Abdul; Azhar, Zahir Izuan; Hassan, Mohd Rohaizat; Safian, Nazarudin; Jamal, Rahman

    2014-01-01

    In Malaysia, data from the Malaysian Health Ministry showed colorectal cancer (CRC) to be the second most common type of cancer in 2007-2009, after breast cancer. The same was apparent after looking at males and females cases separately. In the present study, the Geographic Information System (GIS) was employed to describe the distribution of CRC cases in Kuala Lumpur (KL), Malaysia, according to socio-demographic factors (age, gender, ethnicity and district). This retrospective review concerned data for patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer in the years 1995 to 2011 collected from the Wilayah Persekutuan Health Office, taken from the cancer notification form (NCR-2), and patient medical records from the Surgical Department, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC). A total of 146 cases were analyzed. All the data collected were analysed using ArcGIS version 10.0 and SPSS version 19.0. Patients aged 60 to 69 years accounted for the highest proportion of cases (34.2%) and males slightly predominated 76 (52.1%), Chinese had the highest number of registered cases at 108 (74.0%) and staging revealed most cases in the 3rd and 4th stages. Kernel density analysis showed more cases are concentrated up in the northern area of Petaling and Kuala Lumpur subdistricts. Spatial global pattern analysis by average nearest neighbour resulted in nearest neighbour ratio of 0.75, with Z-score of -5.59, p value of population and improvement of healthcare facilities to provide better treatment for CRC patients.

  14. The Duration of Civil Cases. A Survival Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas Pérez, Carmen; Peñaloza Figueroa, Juan Luis

    2007-01-01

    Duration estimates about the duration of judicial cases are usually initiated by eliminating all those observations in which at least one of the two relevant dates (beginning or ending of the procedure) are unknown. This method tends to produce a bias in the estimations. Thus, in this paper we make an application of Survival Analysis to assess the duration of civil cases in Argentina (Capital Federal and Santa Fe). We use Kaplan-Meier Product Limit Method to estimate survival functions (i.e d...

  15. RisaAligner software for aligning fluorescence data between Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer chips: Application to soil microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Elisabeth; Fabrègue, Olivier; Scorretti, Riccardo; Reboulet, Jérémy; Simonet, Pascal; Dawson, Lorna; Demanèche, Sandrine

    2015-12-01

    Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA) is a high-resolution and highly reproducible fingerprinting technique for discriminating between microbial communities. The community profiles can be visualized using the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer. Comparison between fingerprints relies upon precise estimation of all amplified DNA fragment lengths; however, size standard computation can vary between gel runs. For complex samples such as soil microbial communities, discrimination by fragment size is not always sufficient. In such cases, the comparison of whole fluorescence data as a function of time (electrophoregrams) is more appropriate. When electrophoregrams [fluorescence = f (time)] are used, and more than one chip is involved, electrophoregram comparisons are challenging due to experimental variations between chips and the lack of correction by the Agilent software in such situations. Here we present RisaAligner software for analyzing and comparing electrophoregrams from Agilent chips using a nonlinear ladder-alignment algorithm. We demonstrate the robustness and substantial improvement of data analysis by analyzing soil microbial profiles obtained with Agilent DNA 1000 and High Sensitivity chips.

  16. Tacit knowledge of public health nurses in identifying community health problems and need for new services: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka-Maeda, Kyoko; Murashima, Sachiyo; Asahara, Kiyomi

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the tacit knowledge of public health nurses in identifying community health problems and developing relevant new projects. Previous research only roughly showed those skills for creating new community health services, such as lobbying. Nine Japanese public health nurses who had created new projects in their municipalities were selected by theoretical sampling and interviewed in 2002-2003. Yin's Case Study Method, especially the multiple-case study design, was used. All 9 public health nurses used similar approaches in identifying community health problems and the need for creating new services, even though their experiences differed and the kinds of projects varied. They identified the difficulties of clients, recognized clients who had the same problems, elucidated the limitations of existing services, and forecasted outcomes from the neglect of the clients' problems. Then they succeeded in creating a new project by examining individual health problems in the context of their community's characteristics, societal factors, and using existing policies to support their clients. This is the first study to explore the skills of public health nurses and their intention to use such skills in creating new projects as well as the exact process. They could identify community health problems that will be the basis for developing new services to provide care for individual clients. This is different from the traditional community assessment approach that requires the collection of a huge amount of information to clarify community health problems. The tacit knowledge of public health nurses will help to create needs-oriented new services more smoothly.

  17. Hydrocephalus is a rare outcome in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a retrospective analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) continues to have a high mortality rate and often results in severe sequelae among survivors. Lately, an increased effort has been focused on describing the neurological complications of meningitis including hydrocephalus. To aid in this field of research we set out to ascertain the risk and outcome of hydrocephalus in patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) in North Denmark Region. Methods We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study of CABM cases above 14 years of age. Cases diagnosed during a 13-year period, 1998 through 2010, were identified in a laboratory register and data were acquired through patient records. Cases not confirmed by culture met other strict inclusion criteria. The diagnosis of hydrocephalus relied upon the radiologists’ reports on cranial imaging. Outcome was graded according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at discharge from the primary admission. Long-term sequelae were based upon any subsequent hospital contacts until the end of 2011. Results Hydrocephalus was diagnosed in five of 165 episodes (3%) and all were classified as communicating. Only 120 patients had cranial imaging done and in this group the rate was 4.2%. In three cases hydrocephalus was present at admission, while two cases were diagnosed on days 44 and 99, respectively, due to altered mental status. The aetiology was either Eschericia coli (n = 2) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 3). Case fatality was 60% among cases with hydrocephalus and 17% among other cases. Case fatality was similar irrespective of whether patients had a cranial CT or not. Conclusions Hydrocephalus was diagnosed in 3% of adolescent and adult cases with CABM and had a high case fatality rate in spite of specialised medical care and neurosurgical interventions. Our findings are comparable with a recent Dutch national prospective study. PMID:23855442

  18. Applying information network analysis to fire-prone landscapes: implications for community resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derric B. Jacobs

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Resilient communities promote trust, have well-developed networks, and can adapt to change. For rural communities in fire-prone landscapes, current resilience strategies may prove insufficient in light of increasing wildfire risks due to climate change. It is argued that, given the complexity of climate change, adaptations are best addressed at local levels where specific social, cultural, political, and economic conditions are matched with local risks and opportunities. Despite the importance of social networks as key attributes of community resilience, research using social network analysis on coupled human and natural systems is scarce. Furthermore, the extent to which local communities in fire-prone areas understand climate change risks, accept the likelihood of potential changes, and have the capacity to develop collaborative mitigation strategies is underexamined, yet these factors are imperative to community resiliency. We apply a social network framework to examine information networks that affect perceptions of wildfire and climate change in Central Oregon. Data were collected using a mailed questionnaire. Analysis focused on the residents' information networks that are used to gain awareness of governmental activities and measures of community social capital. A two-mode network analysis was used to uncover information exchanges. Results suggest that the general public develops perceptions about climate change based on complex social and cultural systems rather than as patrons of scientific inquiry and understanding. It appears that perceptions about climate change itself may not be the limiting factor in these communities' adaptive capacity, but rather how they perceive local risks. We provide a novel methodological approach in understanding rural community adaptation and resilience in fire-prone landscapes and offer a framework for future studies.

  19. Community-Acquired Serratia Marcescens Spinal Epidural Abscess in a Patient Without Risk Factors: Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Parkins

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens has rarely been reported as an agent of invasive disease in patients presenting from the community. Furthermore, S marcescens is frequently opportunistic, affecting individuals with serious medical comorbidities including immune suppression and diabetes. A case of a community-acquired S marcescens spontaneous lumbar epidural abscess presenting as cauda equina syndrome is reported in a previously well 36-year-old man with no identifiable risk factors. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of invasive S marcescens causing disease in a patient with no medical comorbidities.

  20. Analysis of Factors Associated With Rhytidectomy Malpractice Litigation Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandinov, Aron; Mutchnick, Sean; Nangia, Vaibhuv; Svider, Peter F; Zuliani, Giancarlo F; Shkoukani, Mahdi A; Carron, Michael A

    2017-07-01

    This study investigates the financial burden of medical malpractice litigation associated with rhytidectomies, as well as factors that contribute to litigation and poor defendant outcomes, which can help guide physician practices. To comprehensively evaluate rhytidectomy malpractice litigation. Jury verdict and settlement reports related to rhytidectomy malpractice litigations were obtained using the Westlaw Next database. Use of medical malpractice in conjunction with several terms for rhytidectomy, to account for the various procedure names associated with the procedure, yielded 155 court cases. Duplicate and nonrelevant cases were removed, and 89 cases were included in the analysis and reviewed for outcomes, defendant specialty, payments, and other allegations raised in proceedings. Data were collected from November 21, 2015, to December 25, 2015. Data analysis took place from December 25, 2015, to January 20, 2016. A total of 89 cases met our inclusion criteria. Most plaintiffs were female (81 of 88 with known sex [92%]), and patient age ranged from 40 to 76 years (median age, 56 years). Fifty-three (60%) were resolved in the defendant's favor, while the remaining 36 cases (40%) were resolved with either a settlement or a plaintiff verdict payment. The mean payment was $1.4 million. A greater proportion of cases involving plastic surgeon defendants were resolved with payment compared with cases involving defendants with ear, nose, and throat specialty (15 [36%] vs 4 [24%]). The most common allegations raised in litigation were intraoperative negligence (61 [69%]), poor cosmesis or disfigurement (57 [64%]), inadequate informed consent (30 [34%]), additional procedures required (14 [16%]), postoperative negligence (12 [14%]), and facial nerve injury (10 [11%]). Six cases (7%) involved alleged negligence surrounding a "lifestyle-lift" procedure, which tightens or oversews the superficial muscular aponeurosis system layer. In this study, although most cases of

  1. [Analysis of the efficiency of antimicrobial treatment for community-acquired pneumonia in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, O V; Ruina, O V; Kononova, S V; Konyshkina, T M

    To analyze actual drug consumption based on the defined daily dose (DDD analysis) and to analyze the utilization of drugs based on their proportion of the total defined daily doses (DU90% analysis) for the antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in clinical practice at a hospital in Russia. The investigation materials were the data of 117 case histories of male (51.3%) and female (48.7%) patients hospitalized with CAP at Nizhny Novgorod City Clinical Hospital Five in 2015. The investigation enrolled all the patients admitted to the hospital over the analyzed period. DDD analysis and DU90% analysis were used as study methods. DDD analysis and DU90% analysis of antimicrobial therapy for CAP were carried out at the hospital in clinical practice during a year. The annual number of defined daily doses (NDDD) for antimicrobial drugs, the number of defined daily doses per 100 bed-days (NDDD/100 bed-days), and a drug load (g) per 1000 CAP patients per day and per CAP patient per year were determined. The largest NDDD/year for CAP treatment with ceftriaxone was 376 g, or 43.43 NDDD/100 bed-days, which is much higher than that with other antimicrobial agents. The daily drug load of ceftriaxone per 1,000 CAP patients was 8.8 g, which exceeds that of moxifloxacin by 18.7 times, azithromycin and levofloxacin by 5 times, and ampicillin/sulbactam by 2.3 times. The daily drug load of ceftriaxone per CAP patient was 3.2 g, which exceeds that of of ampicillin/sulbactam by 2.3 times, levofloxacin and azithromycin by 5 times, and moxifloxacin by 19 times. It may be recommended that the proportion of cephalosporins as drugs that promote the rise of resistance in microbes and their production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases should be further limited, the proportion of penicillins be extended, and the administered ampicillin/sulbactam be added, for example, by amoxicillin/clavulanate. Penicillins contribute to the rise of resistance to a lesser degree, and the use

  2. Trait-based approaches in the analysis of stream fish communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Emmanuel; Angermeier, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Species traits are used to study the functional organization of fish communities for a range of reasons, from simply reducing data dimensionality to providing mechanistic explanations for observed variation in communities. Ecological and life history traits have been used to understand the basic ecology of fishes and predict (1) species and community responses to habitat and climate alteration, and (2) species extinction, species invasion, and community homogenization. Many approaches in this arena have been developed during the past three decades, but they often have not been integrated with related ecological concepts or subdisciplines, which has led to confusion in terminology. We review 102 studies of species traits and then summarize patterns in traits being used and questions being addressed with trait-based approaches. Overall, studies of fish–habitat relationships that apply habitat templates and hierarchical filters dominate our sample; the most frequently used traits are related to feeding. We define and show the relationships among key terms such as fundamental and realized niches; functional traits, performance, and fitness; tactic, trait-state, syndromes, and strategies; and guilds and functional groups. We propose accelerating research to (1) quantify trait plasticity, (2) identify traits useful for testing ecological hypotheses, (3) model habitat and biotic interactions in communities while explicitly accounting for phylogenetic relationships, (4) explore how traits control community assembly, and (5) document the importance of traits in fish– community responses to anthropogenic change and in delivering ecosystem services. Further synthesis of these topics is still needed to develop concepts, models, and principles that can unify the disparate approaches taken in trait-based analysis of fish communities, link fish community ecology to general community ecology, and inform sustainable management of ecosystems.

  3. Capacity factor analysis for evaluating water and sanitation infrastructure choices for developing communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouabid, Ali; Louis, Garrick E

    2015-09-15

    40% of the world's population lacks access to adequate supplies of water and sanitation services to sustain human health. In fact, more than 780 million people lack access to safe water supplies and about 2.5 billion people lack access to basic sanitation. Appropriate technology for water supply and sanitation (Watsan) systems is critical for sustained access to these services. Current approaches for the selection of Watsan technologies in developing communities have a high failure rate. It is estimated that 30%-60% of Watsan installed infrastructures in developing countries are not operating. Inappropriate technology is a common explanation for the high rate of failure of Watsan infrastructure, particularly in lower-income communities (Palaniappan et al., 2008). This paper presents the capacity factor analysis (CFA) model, for the assessment of a community's capacity to manage and sustain access to water supply and sanitation services. The CFA model is used for the assessment of a community's capacity to operate, and maintain a municipal sanitation service (MSS) such as, drinking water supply, wastewater and sewage treatment, and management of solid waste. The assessment of the community's capacity is based on seven capacity factors that have been identified as playing a key role in the sustainability of municipal sanitation services in developing communities (Louis, 2002). These capacity factors and their constituents are defined for each municipal sanitation service. Benchmarks and international standards for the constituents of the CFs are used to assess the capacity factors. The assessment of the community's capacity factors leads to determine the overall community capacity level (CCL) to manage a MSS. The CCL can then be used to assist the community in the selection of appropriate Watsan technologies for their MSS needs. The selection is done from Watsan technologies that require a capacity level to operate them that matches the assessed CCL of the

  4. URBAN DISPLACEMENT AND LOW-INCOME COMMUNITIES: THE CASE OF THE AMERICAN CITY FROM THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Knight

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available How can urban redevelopment benefit existing low-income communities? The history of urban redevelopment is one of disruption of poor communities. Renewal historically offered benefits to the place while pushing out the people. In some cases, displacement is intentional, in others it is unintentional. Often, it is the byproduct of the quest for profits. Regardless of motives, traditional communities, defined by cultural connections, are often disrupted. Disadvantaged neighborhoods include vacant units, which diminish the community and hold back investment. In the postwar period, American cities entered into a program of urban renewal. While this program cleared blight, it also drove displacement among the cities’ poorest and was particularly hard on minority populations clustered in downtown slums. The consequences of these decisions continue to play out today. Concentration of poverty is increasing and American cities are becoming more segregated. As neighborhoods improve, poorer residents are uprooted and forced into even more distressed conditions, elsewhere. This paper examines the history of events impacting urban communities. It further reviews the successes and failures of efforts to benefit low-income communities.

  5. Building Trust in Natural Resource Management Within Local Communities: A Case Study of the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Mae A.; Leahy, Jessica E.; Anderson, Dorothy H.; Jakes, Pamela J.

    2007-03-01

    Communities neighboring federally protected natural areas regularly weigh the costs and benefits of the administering agency’s programs and policies. While most agencies integrate public opinion into decision making, efforts to standardize and formalize public involvement have left many local communities feeling marginalized, spurring acrimony and opposition. A significant body of research has examined barriers to effective public participation as well as strategies for relationship building in planning processes; many of which point to trust as a key factor. Trust is especially tenuous in local communities. This paper explores perceptions of trust, expectations for management, as well as constraints to building trust. In-depth interviews were conducted with 21 community members and USDA Forest Service personnel at the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie in northeastern Illinois. The interviews revealed that trust is perceived as important to effective management. Distinct expectations for management outcomes and processes emerged, including the values, knowledge, and capacity demonstrated in management decisions and actions and opportunities provided for communication, collaboration, and cooperation within the agency-community relationship. The case study identified several constraints to building trust, including competing values, knowledge gaps, limited community engagement, and staff turnover.

  6. The influences of psychological sense of brand community on mobile game loyalty: a case study research

    OpenAIRE

    Duong, Kim

    2017-01-01

    This thesis contributes to Carlson et al.’s (2008) findings on a brand-based community and its psychological aspects. The research aimed to investigate the influences of psychological sense of brand community (PSBC) on mobile game loyalty. Particularly, it attempted to, first, look at sense of brand community from the social identity viewpoint, and second, explore the influence of PSBC on game loyalty as well as the role PSBC plays in the satisfaction–loyalty relationship. The relevant studie...

  7. Residents' Class Status and Social Political Attitude: Two Cases of Middle-Class Community in Beijing

    OpenAIRE

    Lipeng  ZHAO

    2016-01-01

    According to the data in two type of middle class community, this paper finds out that differences on residents' objective class status exist, so does subjective class status. The type of the community, occupation, and annual household income influences residents' subjective class status. This paper also compares people's social political attitude in two types of communities. People value some social political issues according to their subjective class status.

  8. The role of communities in sustainable land and forest management: The case of Nyanga, Zvimba and Guruve districts of Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Matsvange

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Forest benefit analysis is vital in ensuring sustainable community-based natural resources management. Forest depletion and degradation are key issues in rural Zimbabwe and strategies to enhance sustainable forest management are continually sought. This study was carried out to assess the impact of forests on communities from Nyanga, Guruve and Zvimba districts of Zimbabwe. It is based on a Big Lottery Fund project implemented by Progressio-UK and Environment Africa. Itfocuses on identifying replicable community forest and landmanagement strategies and the level of benefits accruing to the community. Analysis of change was based on the Income and Food Security and Forest benefits, which also constitutes the tools used during the research. The study confirms the high rate of deforestation and the increased realisation by communities to initiate practical measures aimed at protecting and sustaining forest and land resources from which they derive economic and social benefits. The results highlight the value of community structures (Farmer Field Schools and Environmental Action Groups as conduits for natural resource management. The interconnectivity among forests, agricultural systems and the integral role of people are recognised as key to climate change adaptation. Keywords: Forest benefits; sustainability,;livelihoods; farmer field schools

  9. [A retrospective analysis of 97 drunk driving cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiang-Wei; Chu, Yun; Zong, Xiong-Xin; Wang, Zi-Wei; Chu, Jian-Xin

    2013-04-01

    Based on a retrospective analysis of the drunk driving cases, to explore the drunk drivers' personnel composition, occurrence time and psychology. As a result of punishment of the drunk driving by criminal law for one year from May 1st, 2011 to April 30th, 2012, 91 drunk driving cases were statistically analyzed the easy-happening time of drunk driving, the drunk drivers' age, gender, occupational characteristics, domicile and psychological factors. In 97 drunk driving cases, 26-40 years old, non-local domiciled and non-professional male drivers were prone to drunk driving at night from 22:00 to 5:00. The behavior of drunk driving is relevant to time, age, genders and occupation. The psychological characteristics of most drivers are fluky, making-life-easy, competitive and peacockish.

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Cases with Community-Acquired Infective Endocarditis and Health Care-Associated Infective Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Kursun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study aimed to comparatively evaluate the cases with health care-associated infective endocarditis and the cases with community-acquired infective endocarditis. Material and Methods: Of the cases followed for infective endocarditis (IE, 21 (40 % had health care-associated infective endocarditis and 31 (60 % community-acquired infective endocarditis. Results: Comparing the cases with community acquired infective endocarditis and the cases with health care-associated infective endocarditis, it was determined that advanced age (58.0 +/- 15.1 years vs. 41.3+/- 14.4 years, P= 0.000, presence of chronic renal insufficiency (P= 0.001 and diabetes mellitus (P= 0.016 as concomitant diseases, being previously hospitalized (P= 0.0001, hemodialysis in terms of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions (P= 0.022, presence of central venous catheter (P= 0.022, and undergone intervention for gastrointestinal system (P= 0.060,as well as laboratory results including positive blood culture growth for S. aureus and Enterococcus (P= 0.037, and complications such as development of embolic event (P= 0.008, spondylodiscitis (P= 0.034 and stroke (P= 0.007 were statistically significantly more common in health care-associated infective endocarditis cases. Whilst mortality was higher in health care-associated infective endocarditis cases (28.6 %, it was determined that there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: Health care-associated infective endocarditis is a disease that is more common in the patients at advanced age, with concomitant disease and the history of exposing invasive procedures in the past for diagnostic and therapeutic purpose, and it is a disease with high morbidity and mortality that courses with serious complications [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(1.000: 91-97

  11. Environmental Equity through Negotiation: A Case Study on Urban Landfills and the Roma Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu-Mag, Ruxandra Mălina; Petrescu, Dacinia Crina; Oroian, Ioan Gheorghe; Safirescu, Ovidiu Călin; Bican-Brișan, Nicoleta

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses the necessity to bring environmental equity within the Pata Rât Roma community in Northwest Romania, relying on the answers to three questions: “Does environmental equity exist in Pata Rât?”, “How can it be attained?”, and “To what extent can it be brought to the targeted people?” It was shown how a trio of factors tailors the destiny of Roma inhabitants: being a minority, their ethnicity, and the fact they are living on and off what society rejects and dumps—a landfill. The framing of the environmental equity concerns within a vision considering negotiation as the most adequate means to attain it is a novel approach. Further on, the results of the study can fuel win-win solutions in environmental equity. The information abstracted from a set of indicators, assessed through an evaluation matrix, represents a beneficial platform for future bottom-up decisions concerning landfill residents. Three action options were analyzed: on-site living opportunities—that resulted to be preferred, off-site living opportunities, and “Do nothing”. The analysis provides qualitative evidence that the evaluation of environmental equity is largely subjective, because of its complexity and specificity related to geographical, historical, cultural characteristics, and political interests. PMID:27314371

  12. Community pharmacy-based case finding for COPD in urban and rural settings is feasible and effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Mariam; Saini, Bandana; Foster, Juliet M; Armour, Carol L

    2017-01-01

    Case finding of patients at risk of COPD by community pharmacists could identify a substantial number of people with undiagnosed COPD, but little is known about the feasibility and effectiveness of pharmacy-based COPD case finding using microspirometry. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of COPD case-finding service provided by community pharmacists, utilizing a combination of risk assessment questionnaire and microspirometry. A 6-month service was conducted in 21 community pharmacies in Australia. Pharmacists trained in COPD case finding, including lung function test (LFT), invited their patients aged ≥35 years with a history of smoking and/or respiratory symptoms to participate. High-risk patients were identified via a COPD risk assessment questionnaire (Initial Screening Questionnaire [ISQ]) and underwent LFT. Pharmacists referred patients with a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 )/forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV 6 ) ratio 3 indicating high COPD risk. Of the 157 patients who were able to complete LFT, 61 (39%) had an FEV 1 /FEV 6 ratio of 3) were at a significantly higher risk of an FEV 1 /FEV 6 ratio of <0.75, compared to patients with fewer COPD symptoms. A total of 15 (10%) patients were diagnosed with COPD by their GP. Another eight (5%) patients were diagnosed with other medical conditions and 87% of these were initiated on treatment. Although only half of all screened patients lived in regional areas, 93% of those diagnosed with COPD were from regional areas. A brief community pharmacy-based COPD case-finding service utilizing the ISQ, LFT and GP referral is feasible and may lead to identification and diagnosis of a substantial number of people with COPD. This might be an important strategy for reducing the burden of COPD, particularly for those living in rural locations.

  13. FACTORS AFFECTING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHERS’ PARTICIPATION IN ONLINE COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE: THE CASE OF WEBHEADS IN ACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali BOSTANCIOĞLU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An online community of practice (OCoP is a group of people, who are brought together by a shared interest and with the aim of deepening their understanding of an area of knowledge through regular interactions facilitated by computer mediated communication (CMC tools. An OCoP potentially provides teachers with those elements of effective professional development (PD, cited in the literature, such as; collaboration, opportunities for mentoring, and sustainability over time. In this sense, OCoPs can be considered as a viable alternative for teacher PD. If OCoPs are to become an alternative approach to teacher PD then it is important to understand what factors affect teachers’ participation in such communities. Therefore, through the case of Webheads in Action (WiA OCoP, this study aimed to identify what factors contribute towards creating successful OCoPs. Members’ interactions in WiA’s public group page were collated over a period of nine months and interviews with 24 members of the community (4 core, 9 active, 11 peripheral were used to gather the data. Two major themes emerged in relation to factors affecting members’ participation in this OCoP. The first one was identified as the creation of a sense of belonging to the community which was achieved through various means such as having an initiation process and fostering trust and an inclusive community environment through community norms. The second was dynamism inherent in the community which manifested itself as new topics that kept members interested and participating, and a flow of continuous member recruitment to the community. In conclusion, this study highlighted the importance of the socio-affective dimension for designing and sustaining OCoPs.

  14. How Are Fishing Patterns and Fishing Communities Responding to Climate Change? A Test Case from the Northwest Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, T.; Fuller, E.; Coleman, K.; Provost, M.; Pinsky, M. L.; St Martin, K.

    2016-02-01

    We know climate is changing and fish are moving in response to those changes. But we understand less about how harvesters are responding to these changes in fish distribution and the ramifications of those changes for fishing communities. Ecological and evolutionary theory suggests that organisms must move, adapt, or die in response to environmental changes, and a related frame may be relevant for human harvesters in the face of climate change. Furthermore, research suggests that there may be a portfolio effect: a wider diversity of catch may buffer harvesters from some effects of climate change. To get at these questions, we explored changes in fishing patterns among commercial fishing communities in the northeast US from 1997-2014 using NOAA-collected logbook data. We found that communities using more mobile gear (large trawl vessels) demonstrated a greater range of latitudinal shift than communities using any other gear. Latitudinal shift was also inversely related to species diversity of catch and port latitude in those communities: southern communities that caught few species shifted dramatically northward, and northern communities that caught many species did not demonstrate marked latitudinal shifts. Those communities that demonstrated larger latitudinal shifts also demonstrated smaller changes in catch composition than their more stationary counterparts. We also found that vessels are indeed leaving many, but not all, fisheries in this region. These results suggest that harvesters are moving, adapting, and leaving fisheries, and that there does appear to be a portfolio effect, with catch diversity mediating some of these responses. While these changes in fishing patterns cannot all be directly attributed to climate change per se, marine fishes in this region are shifting north rapidly, as is expected under climate change. This study provides a valuable test case for exploring the potential ramifications of climate change on coastal socio-ecological systems.

  15. FARO base case post-test analysis by COMETA code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annunziato, A.; Addabbo, C. [Joint Research Centre, Ispra (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    The paper analyzes the COMETA (Core Melt Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis) post test calculations of FARO Test L-11, the so-called Base Case Test. The FARO Facility, located at JRC Ispra, is used to simulate the consequences of Severe Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants under a variety of conditions. The COMETA Code has a 6 equations two phase flow field and a 3 phases corium field: the jet, the droplets and the fused-debris bed. The analysis shown that the code is able to pick-up all the major phenomena occurring during the fuel-coolant interaction pre-mixing phase.

  16. Survival analysis for customer satisfaction: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadiyat, M. A.; Wahyudi, R. D.; Sari, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Most customer satisfaction surveys are conducted periodically to track their dynamics. One of the goals of this survey was to evaluate the service design by recognizing the trend of satisfaction score. Many researchers recommended in redesigning the service when the satisfaction scores were decreasing, so that the service life cycle could be predicted qualitatively. However, these scores were usually set in Likert scale and had quantitative properties. Thus, they should also be analyzed in quantitative model so that the predicted service life cycle would be done by applying the survival analysis. This paper discussed a starting point for customer satisfaction survival analysis with a case study in healthcare service.

  17. Human resources in advanced environmental approaches - A case analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract A weak environmental culture in organizations and deficiencies in human resources are major barriers to the implementation of environmental action processes. However, very few studies have been published in this area. The objective of this study, therefore, is to conduct an exploratory case analysis and develop some proposals based on the conclusions arrived at. We have analyzed a total of 8 factories to ensure a sufficient number of sources of information. Some factors li...

  18. Studying the Complex Communities of Ants and Their Symbionts Using Ecological Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivens, Aniek B F; von Beeren, Christoph; Blüthgen, Nico; Kronauer, Daniel J C

    2016-01-01

    Ant colonies provide well-protected and resource-rich environments for a plethora of symbionts. Historically, most studies of ants and their symbionts have had a narrow taxonomic scope, often focusing on a single ant or symbiont species. Here we discuss the prospects of studying these assemblies in a community ecology context using the framework of ecological network analysis. We introduce three basic network metrics that we consider particularly relevant for improving our knowledge of ant-symbiont communities: interaction specificity, network modularity, and phylogenetic signal. We then discuss army ant symbionts as examples of large and primarily parasitic communities, and symbiotic sternorrhynchans as examples of generally smaller and primarily mutualistic communities in the context of these network analyses. We argue that this approach will provide new and complementary insights into the evolutionary and ecological dynamics between ants and their many associates, and will facilitate comparisons across different ant-symbiont assemblages as well as across different types of ecological networks.

  19. Factors Conditioning Community Utilization of Environmental Education in Tanzania: The Case of Uluguru Mountains, Morogoro Municipality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manase, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    In order for the community to bring meaningful and sustainable environmental conservation and change, it must take action in implementing environmental education values acquired from environmental learning programmes and organizations. This study therefore aimed at assessing factors conditioning community implementation of environmental education…

  20. Corporate Social Responsibility: Case Study of Community Expectations and the Administrative Systems, Niger Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogula, David

    2012-01-01

    Poor community-company relations in the Niger Delta have drawn attention to the practice of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the region. Since the 1960s, transnational oil corporations operating in the Niger Delta have adopted various CSR strategies, yet community-company relations remain adversarial. This article examines community…

  1. A Case Study of Rural Community Colleges' Transition to Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genandt, James D.

    2017-01-01

    The traditional role of workforce training by community colleges in support of regional economic development is insufficient to help rural areas survive in a global economy. Rural community colleges are uniquely positioned to provide enhanced economic development support through entrepreneurship and small business development programs. Using…

  2. Student-Created Musical as a Community of Practice: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Research on the improvement of learning shifted from a focus on the learner as individual to the concept of sociocultural learning in communities of learning, communities of practice or learning cultures during the 1990s. A similar shift in the focus of the development of a single construct of individual musical creativity to socially situated…

  3. Service-Learning and Emergent Communities of Practice: A Teacher Education Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschak, Jennifer Cutsforth; Letwinsky, Karim Medico

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the unexpected emergence of a community of practice in a middle level mathematics and science methods course. The authors describe how preservice teacher participation in a collaborative, project-based service-learning experience resulted in the formation of a community of practice characterized by teamwork, meaningful…

  4. Gaining Community Access in Cross-Cultural Research: A Case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article explores the value of community collaboration in cross-cultural research. Gaining community access and acceptance is one, of the most important components of every research undertaking. However, as a Ghanaian researcher in the Diaspora, there were many issues that I had to contend with, one of them ...

  5. Problems with Reporting and Evaluating Mining Industry Community Development Projects: A Case Study from Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Wangari

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Reporting on contributions to community development is one way gold mining companies communicate the expanse and depth of their commitment to social responsibility. These projects are intended to provide the mine-proximate communities with some of the wealth and other benefits generated by mine development in their locales. We raise questions about reporting and evaluation of community development projects undertaken by AngloGold Ashanti in the two communities of Nyakabale and Nyamalembo, near its Geita mining projects in the Lake Victoria goldfields of Tanzania. We use archival data and data obtained from field research conducted during different periods throughout 2005, 2007 and 2010 to compare what the company reports to have done with what is found on the ground. Our findings revealed that the corporate reporting is misleading, ambiguous, and omissive. Much of the effort labeled “community development” benefited the companies directly via infrastructure development, food supplies to the mine cafeteria, and worker health. We argue that, if Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR projects are to be the primary way local people directly benefit from mine development, the relationship between the value of those projects and the wealth taken from the location should be considered, community projects should be well defined and differentiated from company-oriented projects, and community representatives should participate in monitoring the success and impact of community development projects.

  6. Whither Utility and Duty? A Case for Virtue in Community College Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propheter, Geoffrey; Jez, Su Jin

    2012-01-01

    Recent improprieties by community college administrators have scarred the public trust. Efforts to secure against maladministration are firmly rooted in utilitarian and deontological ethics. In this article, the authors argue that these common approaches cannot remedy maladministration in the community college because utilitarianism and deontology…

  7. Benchmarking Alumni Relations in Community Colleges: Findings from a 2015 CASE Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradise, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The Benchmarking Alumni Relations in Community Colleges white paper features key data on alumni relations programs at community colleges across the United States. The paper compares results from 2015 and 2012 across such areas as the structure, operations and budget for alumni relations, alumni data collection and management, alumni communications…

  8. Exploring Online Community among Rural Medical Education Students: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Ryan Tyler

    2013-01-01

    There is a severe shortage of rural physicians in America. One reason physicians choose not to practice, or persist in practice, in rural areas is due to a lack of professional community, i.e., community of practice (CoP). Online, "virtual" CoPs, enabled by now common Internet communication technology can help give rural physicians the…

  9. Comparing Compositional Effects in Two Education Systems: The Case of the Belgian Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhier, Julien; Martin, Émilie

    2014-01-01

    The Belgian educational field includes separate educational systems reflecting the division of the country into linguistic communities. Even if the French-speaking and the Dutch-speaking communities keep sharing important similarities in terms of funding rules and structures, they present a huge gap between their respective pupils' achievement.…

  10. Community natural resource management: the case of woodlots in Northern Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebremedhin, B.; Pender, J.; Tesfay Belay, Girmay

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of community management of woodlots and investigates the determinants of collective action and its effectiveness in managing woodlots, based on a survey of 100 villages in Tigray, northern Ethiopia. Despite limited current benefits received by community members, the

  11. Rethinking the "Apprenticeship of Liberty": The Case for Academic Programs in Community Engagement in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butin, Dan W.

    2012-01-01

    This article articulates a model for the "engaged campus" through academic programs focused on community engagement, broadly construed. Such academic programs--usually coalesced in certificate programs, minors, and majors--provide a complementary vision for the deep institutionalization of civic and community engagement in the academy that can…

  12. Immortality of Prejudice in Striving Ubuntu: Case Studies of Community Managed Schools in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari, Mani Man Singh; Rajbhandari, Smriti

    2016-01-01

    The immortality of prejudice after the school management transfer has not been judged. This makes communities to take responsibility for schools further by compelling the government to mandate amendments of Community Managed Schools (CMS) Directives. The purpose was to explore the CMS enduring Ubuntu against immorality of prejudice, through…

  13. Community College Healthcare Students' Conceptions of Empathy: A Program-Wide Mixed Methods Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Kellee M.

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges play a vital role in the education of our Nations healthcare professions. In order to respond to the rising economic and social needs of the healthcare sector, community colleges are meeting the challenge by providing health professions skills and training programs to meet these shortages. These crucial programs are charged with…

  14. International Community-Based Service Learning: Two Comparative Case Studies of Benefits and Tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhurst, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The drives to internationalise the UK curriculum and psychology students' desires to work in communities are brought together in this paper. International community-based learning (ICBL) links with many psychology students' motivations to make contributions to others; with the potential to enhance students' learning and cultural sensitivities. The…

  15. Learning How to Teach Poverty: A Case for Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Laurie P.; Roll, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    Recreation students today need to be prepared to engage in the topic of poverty as a social justice issue affecting our communities, yet many instructors do not have the tools to effectively teach this complex topic. One way instructors might learn how to engage students with poverty is through an interdisciplinary community of practice (CoP).…

  16. Community pharmacy-based case finding for COPD in urban and rural settings is feasible and effective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathima M

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mariam Fathima,1 Bandana Saini,1,2 Juliet M Foster,1 Carol L Armour1,3 1Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, Sydney Medical School, 2Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, 3Central Sydney Area Health Service, Sydney, NSW, Australia Background and objective: Case finding of patients at risk of COPD by community pharmacists could identify a substantial number of people with undiagnosed COPD, but little is known about the feasibility and effectiveness of pharmacy-based COPD case finding using microspirometry. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of COPD case-finding service provided by community pharmacists, utilizing a combination of risk assessment questionnaire and microspirometry. Methods: A 6-month service was conducted in 21 community pharmacies in Australia. Pharmacists trained in COPD case finding, including lung function test (LFT, invited their patients aged ≥35 years with a history of smoking and/or respiratory symptoms to participate. High-risk patients were identified via a COPD risk assessment questionnaire (Initial Screening Questionnaire [ISQ] and underwent LFT. Pharmacists referred patients with a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1/forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV6 ratio <0.75 to their general practitioner (GP for further assessment and diagnosis. Results: In all, 91 of 167 (54% patients had an ISQ score >3 indicating high COPD risk. Of the 157 patients who were able to complete LFT, 61 (39% had an FEV1/FEV6 ratio of <0.75 and were referred to their GP. Patients with high ISQ symptoms scores (>3 were at a significantly higher risk of an FEV1/FEV6 ratio of <0.75, compared to patients with fewer COPD symptoms. A total of 15 (10% patients were diagnosed with COPD by their GP. Another eight (5% patients were diagnosed with other medical conditions and 87% of these were initiated on treatment. Although only half of all screened patients lived in regional areas, 93

  17. Spatial organization and drivers of the virtual water trade: a community-structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Odorico, Paolo; Carr, Joel; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    The trade of agricultural commodities can be associated with a virtual transfer of the local freshwater resources used for the production of these goods. Thus, trade of food products virtually transfers large amounts of water from areas of food production to far consumption regions, a process termed the ‘globalization of water’. We consider the (time-varying) community structure of the virtual water network for the years 1986–2008. The communities are groups of countries with dense internal connections, while the connections are sparser among different communities. Between 1986 and 2008, the ratio between virtual water flows within communities and the total global trade of virtual water has continuously increased, indicating the existence of well defined clusters of virtual water transfers. In some cases (e.g. Central and North America and Europe in recent years) the virtual water communities correspond to geographically coherent regions, suggesting the occurrence of an ongoing process of regionalization of water resources. However, most communities also include countries located on different ‘sides’ of the world. As such, geographic proximity only partly explains the community structure of virtual water trade. Similarly, the global distribution of people and wealth, whose effect on the virtual water trade is expressed through simple ‘gravity models’, is unable to explain the strength of virtual water communities observed in the past few decades. A gravity model based on the availability of and demand for virtual water in different countries has higher explanatory power, but the drivers of the virtual water fluxes are yet to be adequately identified. (letter)

  18. Analysis of case studies - mining, milling and discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwan, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    This analysis paper reviews case studies on mining and milling and on radioactive discharges. An outline is given of each of the case studies presented from the perspectives of the study background, the criteria followed in remediation, the decision making process, outcomes achieved, and an evaluation in relation to radiological criteria that are recommended internationally. Site remediation after mining and milling operations may be driven more by aesthetic and environmental concerns than radiological criteria, particularly in more populated areas. The cases illustrated that it is highly desirable that stakeholders, including the public, are involved in decision making at an early stage with agreement on remediation outcomes. In particular, the exposure pathways and dose assessment models employed should generally be agreed with or approved by the regulatory authority prior to remediation work. In the case of remediated properties at Grand Junction, Colorado, it appears the cleanup criteria employed were below or consistent with those applicable to practices, although the situation was one of intervention, and this raises a question as to the cost effectiveness of the cleanup. For some remediation projects there are long term ownership issues arising out of the need for extended public or state oversight of engineered structures or active water treatment facilities, but for these cases ownership issues did not arise for purely radiological reasons. (author)

  19. Idiopathic collapsing glomerulopathy: A clinicopathologic analysis of 30 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ahuja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG is a distinct clinicopathologic entity associated with various infections, medications and acute ischemia. There have been few scattered reports of CG from India. This study aimed at evaluating the clinicopathologic features of idiopathic CG in Indian patients with comparison between adult-onset and childhood CG. This study included all cases of idiopathic CG diagnosed over a period of 4 years (2006-2009. Appropriate clinical details and laboratory findings were retrieved. Renal biopsies were reviewed and detailed pathologic features assessed. Statistical analysis was performed to compare various features between adult-onset and childhood CG. Over these 4 years, 30 cases of idiopathic CG were diagnosed. Of these, 11 were children. Childhood CG cases had longer duration of symptoms and lower serum urea and creatinine levels compared with adult patients. In renal histology, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis was frequent in our cases. Pediatric cases of CG showed a higher proportion of segmental glomerulosclerosis. On clinical follow-up, nine of the 30 patients progressed to end-stage renal disease and these included two pediatric patients. Idiopathic CG is a significant cause of renal dysfunction in both pediatric and adult patients. Childhood and adult-onset CG differ in few clinicopathologic features. Early and accurate diagnosis of CG is imperative for appropriate management of these patients.

  20. Application of a tool of aid to the energy planning in isolated rural communities. Case of application Las Peladas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benítez Leyva, Lázaro Ventura; Jerez Pereira, Rubén; Pompa Chávez, Yanel; Tamayo Saborit, Michel; Rosa Andino, Alain de la

    2014-01-01

    This work refers the experience of a study of case realized in the rural community Las Peladas, located in the municipality Bartolome Maso Marquez, of the Granma province. In the same the application of a multi-objective mathematical model like computer tool of aid to the planning appears energetics, in agreement with the specific characteristics of the analyzed locality. The field study was based on the results of a participating survey, the observation and compilation of data that it made possible to obtain a characterization of the community and, this way, of delimiting the necessary parameters for the application of the tool. Five alternatives were evaluated: Aeolian energy, biomass, to pave, hydraulics and the connection to the national network. Of them, the model suggests, that the photovoltaic energy solar exerts the greater influence in the improvement of the integral sustainability of the capitals natural, physical, financial, human and social in the community. (author)