WorldWideScience

Sample records for cascade laser-based faraday

  1. Ultrasensitive detection of nitric oxide at 5.33 μm by using external cavity quantum cascade laser-based Faraday rotation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, Rafał; Doty, James H.; Curl, Robert F.; Tittel, Frank K.; Wysocki, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    A transportable prototype Faraday rotation spectroscopic system based on a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser has been developed for ultrasensitive detection of nitric oxide (NO). A broadly tunable laser source allows targeting the optimum Q3/2(3/2) molecular transition at 1875.81 cm−1 of the NO fundamental band. For an active optical path of 44 cm and 1-s lock-in time constant minimum NO detection limits (1σ) of 4.3 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) and 0.38 ppbv are obtained by using a thermoelectrically cooled mercury–cadmium–telluride photodetector and liquid nitrogen-cooled indium–antimonide photodetector, respectively. Laboratory performance evaluation and results of continuous, unattended monitoring of atmospheric NO concentration levels are reported. PMID:19625625

  2. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Based 3D Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LongWave Photonics proposes a terahertz quantum-cascade laser based swept-source optical coherence tomography (THz SS-OCT) system for single-sided, 3D,...

  3. Upgrade of far-infrared laser-based Faraday rotation measurement on MST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the far-infrared (FIR) laser (λ0=432 μm) Faraday rotation measurement system on MST has been upgraded. The dc flowing-gas discharge CO2 pump laser is replaced by a rf-excited, sealed CO2 laser at 9.27 μm (GEM select 100, Coherent Inc., Santa Clara, CA), which is subdivided equally into three parts to simultaneously pump three FIR cavities. The total infrared pump power is approximately 80 W on the 9R(20) line required to pump the formic acid molecule. Each FIR cavity produces ∼12 mW, sufficient for 11 simultaneous chord interferometry-polarimetry operations. Three key issues [(1) conservation of circularly polarized wave, (2) colinearity of two probe waves, and (3) stability of intermediate frequencies between lasers] affecting the Faraday rotation measurement have been resolved experimentally.

  4. Widely tunable quantum cascade laser-based terahertz source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylov, Andriy A; Light, Alexander R; Waldman, Jerry; Erickson, Neal; Qian, Xifeng

    2014-07-10

    A compact, tunable, ultranarrowband terahertz source, Δν∼1  MHz, is demonstrated by upconversion of a 2.324 THz, free-running quantum cascade laser with a THz Schottky-diode-balanced mixer using a swept, synthesized microwave source to drive the nonlinearity. Continuously tunable radiation of 1 μW power is demonstrated in two frequency regions: ν(Laser) ± 0 to 50 GHz and ν(Laser) ± 70 to 115 GHz. The sideband spectra were characterized with a Fourier-transform spectrometer, and the radiation was tuned through CO, HDO, and D2O rotational transitions. PMID:25090067

  5. Contributed Review: Quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J. S., E-mail: jingsong-li@ahu.edu.cn; Yu, B. [Key Laboratory of Opto-Electronic Information Acquisition and Manipulation of Ministry of Education, Anhui University, Hefei (China); Fischer, H. [Department of Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Chen, W. [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l’Atmosphére, Université du Littoral Côte d’Opale, Dunkerque (France); Yalin, A. P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1374 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade.

  6. Contributed review: quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J S; Yu, B; Fischer, H; Chen, W; Yalin, A P

    2015-03-01

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade. PMID:25832204

  7. Contributed Review: Quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade

  8. Contributed Review: Quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J. S.; Yu, B.; Fischer, H.; Chen, W.; Yalin, A. P.

    2015-03-01

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade.

  9. Quantum cascade laser-based hyperspectral imaging of biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Niels; Egl, Alexander; Engel, Maria; Gretz, Norbert; Haase, Katharina; Herpich, Iris; Kränzlin, Bettina; Neudecker, Sabine; Pucci, Annemarie; Schönhals, Arthur; Vogt, Jochen; Petrich, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopy of analyte-specific molecular vibrations in tissue thin sections has opened up a path toward histopathology without the need for tissue staining. However, biomedical vibrational imaging has not yet advanced from academic research to routine histopathology due to long acquisition times for the microscopic hyperspectral images and/or cost and availability of the necessary equipment. Here we show that the combination of a fast-tuning quantum cascade laser with a microbolometer array detector allows for a rapid image acquisition and bares the potential for substantial cost reduction. A 3.1 x 2.8 mm2 unstained thin section of mouse jejunum has been imaged in the 9.2 to 9.7 μm wavelength range (spectral resolution ~1 cm(-1)) within 5 min with diffraction limited spatial resolution. The comparison of this hyperspectral imaging approach with standard Fourier transform infrared imaging or mapping of the identical sample shows a reduction in acquisition time per wavenumber interval and image area by more than one or three orders of magnitude, respectively. PMID:24967840

  10. Open-path, quantum cascade-laser-based sensor for high-resolution atmospheric ammonia measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, D. J.; Sun, K; L. Tao; M. A. KHAN; Zondlo, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact, open-path, quantum cascade-laser-based atmospheric ammonia sensor operating at 9.06 μm for high-sensitivity, high temporal resolution, ground-based measurements. Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) is a gas-phase precursor to fine particulate matter, with implications for air quality and climate change. Currently, NH3 sensing challenges have led to a lack of widespread in situ measurements. Our open-path sensor configuration minimizes sampling artifacts assoc...

  11. Sensitive CH4 detection applying quantum cascade laser based optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, N; Macherius, U; Wiese, M; Zimmermann, H; Röpcke, J; van Helden, J H

    2016-03-21

    We report on sensitive detection of atmospheric methane employing quantum cascade laser based optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OF-CEAS). An instrument has been built utilizing a continuous-wave distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) with a V-shaped cavity, a common arrangement that reduces feedback to the laser from non-resonant reflections. The spectrometer has a noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 3.6 × 10-9 cm-1 Hz-1/2 for a spectral scan of CH4 at 7.39 μm. From an Allan-Werle analysis a detection limit of 39 parts per trillion of CH4 at atmospheric pressure within 50 s acquisition time was found. PMID:27136874

  12. Quantum cascade laser-based spectrometer for high sensitive measurements of trace gases in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Tang; Wenqing Liu; Ruifeng Kan; Yujun Zhang; Dong Chen; Shuai Zhang; Jun Ruan

    2012-01-01

    A quantum cascade (QC) laser-based spectrometer is developed to measure trace gases in air.The proposed spectrometer is tested for N2O,and the results presented in this letter.This system takes advantage of recent technology in QC lasers by utilizing intra-pulse scan spectroscopy,which allows high sensitive measurement.Without calibration gases,the gas concentration can be calculated with scan integration and the corresponding values from the HITRAN04 database.By analyzing the Allan variance,a detection limit of 2 ppb is obtained.Continuous measurement of N2O sampled from ambient air shows the applicability of the proposed system for the field measurements of gases of environmental concern.

  13. A quantum cascade laser-based water vapor isotope analyzer for environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field-deployable mid-infrared quantum cascade laser-based spectrometer was designed and developed for measurements of H216O and H218O at 7.12 μm. H216O and H218O absorption features at 1390.52 cm−1 and 1389.91 cm−1, respectively, accessible within current tuning range of the laser, were targeted. The target lines were carefully selected to assure similar absorption levels and similar temperature sensitivities of the line strength due to comparable lower state energies. A real-time spectral fitting algorithm was implemented for isotopic concentration retrieval. Detection limits for H216O and H218O of 2.2 ppm and 7.0 ppb, respectively, were achieved at a dew point of 14 °C (volume mixing ratio of 15 766 ppm) in 1 s integration time, which resulted in a δ18O isotopic ratio measurement precision of 0.25‰. The ultimate minimum detection limits obtained after 160 s integration time for H216O and H218O, and δ18O measurements were 0.6 ppm, 1.7 ppb, and 0.05‰, respectively

  14. A quantum cascade laser-based water vapor isotope analyzer for environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. E.; Tsai, T.; Wysocki, G., E-mail: gwysocki@princeton.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Michel, A. P. M. [Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Wang, L.; Baeck, M. L.; Smith, J. A. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    A field-deployable mid-infrared quantum cascade laser-based spectrometer was designed and developed for measurements of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O at 7.12 μm. H{sub 2}{sup 16}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O absorption features at 1390.52 cm{sup −1} and 1389.91 cm{sup −1}, respectively, accessible within current tuning range of the laser, were targeted. The target lines were carefully selected to assure similar absorption levels and similar temperature sensitivities of the line strength due to comparable lower state energies. A real-time spectral fitting algorithm was implemented for isotopic concentration retrieval. Detection limits for H{sub 2}{sup 16}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O of 2.2 ppm and 7.0 ppb, respectively, were achieved at a dew point of 14 °C (volume mixing ratio of 15 766 ppm) in 1 s integration time, which resulted in a δ{sup 18}O isotopic ratio measurement precision of 0.25‰. The ultimate minimum detection limits obtained after 160 s integration time for H{sub 2}{sup 16}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O, and δ{sup 18}O measurements were 0.6 ppm, 1.7 ppb, and 0.05‰, respectively.

  15. A quantum cascade laser-based water vapor isotope analyzer for environmental monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W E; Michel, A P M; Wang, L; Tsai, T; Baeck, M L; Smith, J A; Wysocki, G

    2014-09-01

    A field-deployable mid-infrared quantum cascade laser-based spectrometer was designed and developed for measurements of H2(16)O and H2(18)O at 7.12 μm. H2(16)O and H2(18)O absorption features at 1390.52 cm(-1) and 1389.91 cm(-1), respectively, accessible within current tuning range of the laser, were targeted. The target lines were carefully selected to assure similar absorption levels and similar temperature sensitivities of the line strength due to comparable lower state energies. A real-time spectral fitting algorithm was implemented for isotopic concentration retrieval. Detection limits for H2(16)O and H2(18)O of 2.2 ppm and 7.0 ppb, respectively, were achieved at a dew point of 14 °C (volume mixing ratio of 15,766 ppm) in 1 s integration time, which resulted in a δ(18)O isotopic ratio measurement precision of 0.25‰. The ultimate minimum detection limits obtained after 160 s integration time for H2(16)O and H2(18)O, and δ(18)O measurements were 0.6 ppm, 1.7 ppb, and 0.05‰, respectively. PMID:25273703

  16. Open-path, quantum cascade laser-based sensor for high resolution atmospheric ammonia measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Miller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a compact, open-path, quantum cascade laser-based atmospheric ammonia sensor operating at 9.06 μm for high sensitivity, high temporal resolution, ground-based measurements. Atmospheric ammonia (NH3 is a gas-phase precursor to fine particulate matter, with implications for air quality and climate change. Currently, NH3 sensing challenges have led to a lack of widespread in-situ measurements. Our open-path sensor configuration avoids sampling artifacts associated with NH3 surface adsorption onto inlet tubing and reduced pressure sampling cells, as well as condensed-phase partitioning ambiguities. Multi-harmonic wavelength modulation spectroscopy allows for selective and sensitive detection of atmospheric-pressure broadened absorption features. An in-line ethylene reference cell provides real-time calibration (±20% accuracy and normalization for instrument drift under rapidly changing field conditions. The sensor has a sensitivity and minimum detection limit of 0.15 ppbv NH3 at 10 Hz, a mass of ~ 5 kg and consumes ~ 50 W of electrical power. In-situ field performance of this open-path NH3 sensor is demonstrated, with 10 Hz time resolution and a large dynamic response for in-situ NH3 measurements. This sensor provides the capabilities for improved in-situ gas phase NH3 sensing relevant for emission source characterization and flux measurements.

  17. Tunable dual-wavelength fiber laser based on an MMI filter in a cascaded Sagnac loop interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A widely tunable dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on a cascaded Sagnac loop interferometer incorporating a multimode interference filter is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. The mode selection is implemented by using the cascaded Sagnac loop interferometer with two segments of polarization maintaining fibers, and the wavelength tuning was achieved by using the refractive index characteristic of multimode interference effects. The tunable dual-wavelength fiber laser has a wavelength tuning of about 40 nm with a signal-to-noise ratio of more than 50 dB. (paper)

  18. Real time detection of exhaled human breath using quantum cascade laser based sensor technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittel, Frank K.; Lewicki, Rafal; Dong, Lei; Liu, Kun; Risby, Terence H.; Solga, Steven; Schwartz, Tim

    2012-02-01

    The development and performance of a cw, TE-cooled DFB quantum cascade laser based sensor for quantitative measurements of ammonia (NH3) and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations present in exhaled breath will be reported. Human breath contains ~ 500 different chemical species, usually at ultra low concentration levels, which can serve as biomarkers for the identification and monitoring of human diseases or wellness states. By monitoring NH3 concentration levels in exhaled breath a fast, non-invasive diagnostic method for treatment of patients with liver and kidney disorders, is feasible. The NH3 concentration measurements were performed with a 2f wavelength modulation quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) technique, which is suitable for real time breath measurements, due to the fast gas exchange inside a compact QEPAS gas cell. A Hamamatsu air-cooled high heat load (HHL) packaged CW DFB-QCL is operated at 17.5°C, targeting the optimum interference free NH3 absorption line at 967.35 cm-1 (λ~10.34 μm), with ~ 20 mW of optical power. The sensor architecture includes a reference cell, filled with a 2000 ppmv NH3 :N2 mixture at 130 Torr, which is used for absorption line-locking. A minimum detection limit (1σ) for the line locked NH3 sensor is ~ 6 ppbv (with a 1σ 1 sec time resolution of the control electronics). This NH3 sensor was installed in late 2010 and is being clinically tested at St. Luke's Hospital in Bethlehem, PA.

  19. A modular architecture for multi-channel external cavity quantum cascade laser-based chemical sensors: a systems approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Stahl, Robert D.; Cannon, Bret D.; Schiffern, John T.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-04-01

    A multi-channel laser-based chemical sensor platform is presented, in which a modular architecture allows the exchange of complete sensor channels without disruption to overall operation. Each sensor channel contains custom optical and electronics packages, which can be selected to access laser wavelengths, interaction path lengths and modulation techniques optimal for a given application or mission. Although intended primarily to accommodate mid-infrared (MIR) external cavity quantum cascade lasers (ECQCLs)and astigmatic Herriott cells, channels using visible or near infrared (NIR) lasers or other gas cell architectures can also be used, making this a truly versatile platform. Analog and digital resources have been carefully chosen to facilitate small footprint, rapid spectral scanning, ow-noise signal recovery, failsafe autonomous operation, and in-situ chemometric data analysis, storage and transmission. Results from the demonstration of a two-channel version of this platform are also presented.

  20. Broadly continuously tunable slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers based on a continuum-to-continuum active region design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bo; Zeng, Yong Quan; Liang, Guozhen; Tao, Jin; Hu, Xiao Nan; Rodriguez, Etienne; Wang, Qi Jie

    2015-09-01

    We report our progress in the development of broadly tunable single-mode slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers based on a continuum-to-continuum active region design. The electroluminescence spectrum of the continuum-to-continuum active region design has a full width at half maximum of 440 cm-1 at center wavelength ˜10 μm at room temperature (300 K). Devices using the optimized slot waveguide structure and the continuum-to-continuum design can be tuned continuously with a lasing emission over 42 cm-1, from 9.74 to 10.16 μm, at room temperature by using only current tuning scheme, together with a side mode suppression ratio of above 15 dB within the whole tuning range.

  1. Broadly continuously tunable slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers based on a continuum-to-continuum active region design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Bo; Zeng, Yong Quan; Liang, Guozhen; Hu, Xiao Nan; Rodriguez, Etienne [OPTIMUS, Centre for OptoElectronics and Biophotonics, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Border X Block, Level 6, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Tao, Jin [OPTIMUS, Centre for OptoElectronics and Biophotonics, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Border X Block, Level 6, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); CDPT, Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Wang, Qi Jie, E-mail: qjwang@ntu.edu.sg [OPTIMUS, Centre for OptoElectronics and Biophotonics, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CDPT, Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2015-09-14

    We report our progress in the development of broadly tunable single-mode slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers based on a continuum-to-continuum active region design. The electroluminescence spectrum of the continuum-to-continuum active region design has a full width at half maximum of 440 cm{sup −1} at center wavelength ∼10 μm at room temperature (300 K). Devices using the optimized slot waveguide structure and the continuum-to-continuum design can be tuned continuously with a lasing emission over 42 cm{sup −1}, from 9.74 to 10.16 μm, at room temperature by using only current tuning scheme, together with a side mode suppression ratio of above 15 dB within the whole tuning range.

  2. Broadly continuously tunable slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers based on a continuum-to-continuum active region design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report our progress in the development of broadly tunable single-mode slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers based on a continuum-to-continuum active region design. The electroluminescence spectrum of the continuum-to-continuum active region design has a full width at half maximum of 440 cm−1 at center wavelength ∼10 μm at room temperature (300 K). Devices using the optimized slot waveguide structure and the continuum-to-continuum design can be tuned continuously with a lasing emission over 42 cm−1, from 9.74 to 10.16 μm, at room temperature by using only current tuning scheme, together with a side mode suppression ratio of above 15 dB within the whole tuning range

  3. A quantum cascade laser based on an n-i-p-i superlattice

    OpenAIRE

    Faist, Jérôme; Müller, Antoine; Beck, Mattias; Hofstetter, Daniel; Blaser, Stéphane; Oesterle, Ursula; Ilegems, Marc

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a quantum cascade laser with a novel injection concept. Periodic insertion of silicon- and beryllium-doped layers are used to control locally the internal electric field in the active region. This concept is demonstrated experimentally using an active region based on a periodic superlattice.

  4. A Sulfur Hexafluoride Sensor Using Quantum Cascade and CO2 Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helion Vargas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase in greenhouse gas emissions is a serious environmental problem and has stimulated the scientific community to pay attention to the need for detection and monitoring of gases released into the atmosphere. In this regard, the development of sensitive and selective gas sensors has been the subject of several research programs. An important greenhouse gas is sulphur hexafluoride, an almost non-reactive gas widely employed in industrial processes worldwide. Indeed it is estimated that it has a radiative forcing of 0.52 W/m2. This work compares two photoacoustic spectrometers, one coupled to a CO2 laser and another one coupled to a Quantum Cascade (QC laser, for the detection of SF6. The laser photoacoustic spectrometers described in this work have been developed for gas detection at small concentrations. Detection limits of 20 ppbv for CO2 laser and 50 ppbv for quantum cascade laser were obtained.

  5. A high carrier injection terahertz quantum cascade laser based on indirectly pumped scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Terahertz quantum cascade laser with a rather high injection coupling strength based on an indirectly pumped scheme is designed and experimentally implemented. To effectively suppress leakage current, the chosen quantum cascade module of the device is based on a five-well GaAs/Al0.25Ga0.75As structure. The device lases up to 151 K with a lasing frequency of 2.67 THz. This study shows that the effect of higher energy states in carrier transport and the long-range tunnel coupling between states that belong to non-neighbouring modules have to be considered in quantum design of structures with a narrow injector barrier. Moreover, the effect of interface roughness scattering between the lasing states on threshold current is crucial

  6. A high carrier injection terahertz quantum cascade laser based on indirectly pumped scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavipour, S. G., E-mail: sgrazavi@uwaterloo.ca; Xu, C.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Ban, D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, Ontario N2L3G1 (Canada); Dupont, E.; Laframboise, S. R. [National Research Council, Blg. M-50, 1200 Montreal Rd., Ottawa, Ontario K1A0R6 (Canada); Chan, C. W. I.; Hu, Q. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-01-27

    A Terahertz quantum cascade laser with a rather high injection coupling strength based on an indirectly pumped scheme is designed and experimentally implemented. To effectively suppress leakage current, the chosen quantum cascade module of the device is based on a five-well GaAs/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As structure. The device lases up to 151 K with a lasing frequency of 2.67 THz. This study shows that the effect of higher energy states in carrier transport and the long-range tunnel coupling between states that belong to non-neighbouring modules have to be considered in quantum design of structures with a narrow injector barrier. Moreover, the effect of interface roughness scattering between the lasing states on threshold current is crucial.

  7. A Sulfur Hexafluoride Sensor Using Quantum Cascade and CO2 Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Mila; Sthel, Marcelo; Lima, Guilherme; da Silva, Marcelo; Schramm, Delson; Miklós, András; Vargas, Helion

    2010-01-01

    The increase in greenhouse gas emissions is a serious environmental problem and has stimulated the scientific community to pay attention to the need for detection and monitoring of gases released into the atmosphere. In this regard, the development of sensitive and selective gas sensors has been the subject of several research programs. An important greenhouse gas is sulphur hexafluoride, an almost non-reactive gas widely employed in industrial processes worldwide. Indeed it is estimated that it has a radiative forcing of 0.52 W/m2. This work compares two photoacoustic spectrometers, one coupled to a CO2 laser and another one coupled to a Quantum Cascade (QC) laser, for the detection of SF6. The laser photoacoustic spectrometers described in this work have been developed for gas detection at small concentrations. Detection limits of 20 ppbv for CO2 laser and 50 ppbv for quantum cascade laser were obtained. PMID:22163412

  8. Electrically tunable terahertz quantum cascade lasers based on a two-sections interdigitated distributed feedback cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turčinková, Dana; Scalari, Giacomo; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Amanti, Maria Ines [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Univ. Paris Diderot, Lab. Matererk iaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, F-75205 Paris (France)

    2015-03-30

    The continuous electrical tuning of a single-mode terahertz quantum cascade laser operating at a frequency of 3 THz is demonstrated. The devices are based on a two-section interdigitated third-order distributed feedback cavity. The lasers can be tuned of about 4 GHz at a constant optical output power of 0.7 mW with a good far-field pattern.

  9. Electrically tunable terahertz quantum cascade lasers based on a two-sections interdigitated distributed feedback cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuous electrical tuning of a single-mode terahertz quantum cascade laser operating at a frequency of 3 THz is demonstrated. The devices are based on a two-section interdigitated third-order distributed feedback cavity. The lasers can be tuned of about 4 GHz at a constant optical output power of 0.7 mW with a good far-field pattern

  10. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Trace Vapor Detection and Molecular Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Almon Fisher; Paul Pellegrino; John Bender; Ellen Holthoff

    2010-01-01

    We report on the development of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-scale photoacoustic sensor for the detection of trace gases. A mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL) was used to determine detection limits for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate. The source was continuously tunable from 1015 cm-1 to 1240 cm-1, allowing for the collection of photoacoustic vibrational spectra for these gases. Exceptional agreement between the measured photoacoustic spectra and the infr...

  11. High duty cycle operation of quantum cascade lasers based on graded superlattice active regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High duty cycle operation of quantum cascade superlattice lasers with graded superlattice active regions is investigated with the goal of achieving high average optical power. The optical output power increases with pulse width and decreases with heat sink temperature. This behavior is explained on the basis of the laser core temperature oscillations during the pulsed, high duty cycle operation. Between 175 and 325 K heat sink temperature, optimum duty cycles vary from 10% to 1% and average power levels vary from 50 to 1 mW for various lasers used in this study. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  12. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Sensor for Trace Detection of Formaldehyde Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mario Lugarà

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a photoacoustic sensor for the detection of formaldehyde (CH2O using a thermoelectrically cooled distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating in pulsed mode at 5.6 mm. A resonant photoacoustic cell, equipped with four electret microphones, is excited in its first longitudinal mode at 1,380 Hz. The absorption line at 1,778.9 cm-1 is selected for CH2O detection. A detection limit of 150 parts per billion in volume in nitrogen is achieved using a 10 seconds time constant and 4 mW laser power. Measurements in ambient air will require water vapour filters.

  13. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Sensor for Trace Detection of Formaldehyde Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Pietro Mario Lugarà; Gaetano Scamarcio; Vincenzo Spagnolo; Cinzia Di Franco; Angela Elia

    2009-01-01

    We report on the development of a photoacoustic sensor for the detection of formaldehyde (CH2O) using a thermoelectrically cooled distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating in pulsed mode at 5.6 mm. A resonant photoacoustic cell, equipped with four electret microphones, is excited in its first longitudinal mode at 1,380 Hz. The absorption line at 1,778.9 cm-1 is selected for CH2O detection. A detection limit of 150 parts per billion in volume in nitrogen is achieved using a 10 secon...

  14. Monitoring Hydrogen Sulfide Using a Quantum Cascade Laser Based Trace Gas Sensing System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ling-Fang; SHARPLES Thomas-Roben

    2011-01-01

    @@ We present the detection of hydrogen sulfide (HS) in a quantum cascade laser (QCL) based gas sensing system employing direct laser absorption spectroscopy.The sensitivity is obtained to be 3.61 × 10 cm Hz and the HS broadening coefficient in N is analyzed by fitting to the plot of the Lorentzian half width at the half maximum as a function of N pressure is 0.1124±0.0031 cm.atm.A simulation based on data from the HITRAN database shows broad agreement with the experimentally obtained spectrum.

  15. Quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic sensor for environmental pollution monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We will report here on the design and realization of an optoacoustic sensor for trace gas detection. The sensor consist of a commercial quantum cascade laser and a resonant photoacoustic cell. Two different cell configuration have been investigated: a standard H-cell and an innovative T-cell. We will describe the results obtained in the detection of different gases, such as nitric oxide, which plays an important role in environmental pollution and in medical diagnostics, and formaldehyde, a gas of great interest for indoor and outdoor air pollution.

  16. Multi-wavelength surface emitting quantum cascade laser based on equivalent phase shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J. C., E-mail: zhangjinchuan@semi.ac.cn; Liu, F. Q., E-mail: fqliu@semi.ac.cn; Yao, D. Y.; Wang, L. J.; Yan, F. L.; Liu, J. Q.; Wang, Z. G. [Institute of Semiconductors, Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100083, People’s Republic of China and Beijing Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Semiconductor Materials and Devices, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-01-21

    A novel surface emitting distributed feedback quantum cascade laser emitting around λ ∼ 4.6 μm is demonstrated by employing an equivalent phase shift (EPS) of quarter-wave (λ/4). The EPS is fabricated through extending one sampling period by 50% in the center of a sampled Bragg grating. Single-lobed far-field radiation pattern with a low divergence angle of about 0.6° × 16.8° is obtained. Selective single-mode lasing with a mean side mode suppression ratio above 20 dB and wavelength coverage range of 72 nm is achieved simultaneously on a single wafer only by changing the sampling period.

  17. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Trace Vapor Detection and Molecular Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almon Fisher

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS-scale photoacoustic sensor for the detection of trace gases. A mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL was used to determine detection limits for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate. The source was continuously tunable from 1015 cm-1 to 1240 cm-1, allowing for the collection of photoacoustic vibrational spectra for these gases. Exceptional agreement between the measured photoacoustic spectra and the infrared spectra for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate was observed. Partial least-squares (PLS regression was used to develop an algorithm for classification of these compounds based solely on photoacoustic spectra.

  18. Multi-wavelength surface emitting quantum cascade laser based on equivalent phase shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel surface emitting distributed feedback quantum cascade laser emitting around λ ∼ 4.6 μm is demonstrated by employing an equivalent phase shift (EPS) of quarter-wave (λ/4). The EPS is fabricated through extending one sampling period by 50% in the center of a sampled Bragg grating. Single-lobed far-field radiation pattern with a low divergence angle of about 0.6° × 16.8° is obtained. Selective single-mode lasing with a mean side mode suppression ratio above 20 dB and wavelength coverage range of 72 nm is achieved simultaneously on a single wafer only by changing the sampling period

  19. 186 K Operation of Terahertz Quantum-Cascade Lasers Based on a Diagonal Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sushil; Hu, Qing; Reno, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Resonant-phonon terahertz quantum-cascade lasers operating up to a heat-sink temperature of 186 K are demonstrated. This record temperature performance is achieved based on a diagonal design, with the objective to increase the upper-state lifetime and therefore the gain at elevated temperatures. The increased diagonality also lowers the operating current densities by limiting the flow of parasitic leakage current. Quantitatively, the diagonality is characterized by a radiative oscillator strength that is smaller by a factor of two from the least of any previously published designs. At the lasing frequency of 3.9 THz, 63 mW of peak optical power was measured at 5 K, and approximately 5 mW could still be detected at 180 K.

  20. Terahertz quantum cascade lasers based on quaternary AlInGaAs barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terahertz quantum cascade lasers incorporating lattice-matched quaternary AlInGaAs barriers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on InP substrate are reported. Four quantum well active region devices exhibited lasing at 3.8 THz with threshold current densities as low as 74 A/cm2 at 10 K. From optical characterization and a doping study of the active region, an upper state lifetime of 8 ps, as well as a long transport time across the active region of 68 ps and a ratio of free carrier loss to gain cross sections of 4.6%, is reported. A maximum operating temperature of 130 K was achieved for a device with a conduction band discontinuity of 0.14 eV

  1. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Sensor for Trace Detection of Formaldehyde Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Angela; Di Franco, Cinzia; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Scamarcio, Gaetano

    2009-01-01

    We report on the development of a photoacoustic sensor for the detection of formaldehyde (CH2O) using a thermoelectrically cooled distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating in pulsed mode at 5.6 μm. A resonant photoacoustic cell, equipped with four electret microphones, is excited in its first longitudinal mode at 1,380 Hz. The absorption line at 1,778.9 cm−1 is selected for CH2O detection. A detection limit of 150 parts per billion in volume in nitrogen is achieved using a 10 seconds time constant and 4 mW laser power. Measurements in ambient air will require water vapour filters. PMID:22574040

  2. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Trace Vapor Detection and Molecular Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthoff, Ellen; Bender, John; Pellegrino, Paul; Fisher, Almon

    2010-01-01

    We report on the development of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-scale photoacoustic sensor for the detection of trace gases. A mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL) was used to determine detection limits for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate. The source was continuously tunable from 1015 cm−1 to 1240 cm−1, allowing for the collection of photoacoustic vibrational spectra for these gases. Exceptional agreement between the measured photoacoustic spectra and the infrared spectra for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate was observed. Partial least-squares (PLS) regression was used to develop an algorithm for classification of these compounds based solely on photoacoustic spectra. PMID:22294910

  3. Pulsed quantum cascade laser based hypertemporal real-time headspace measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyson, Toby K; Rittman, Dylan R; Spence, Thomas G; Calzada, Maria E; Kallapur, Abhijit G; Petersen, Ian R; Paul Kirkbride, K; Moore, David S; Harb, Charles C

    2014-05-01

    Optical cavity enhancement is a highly desirable process to make sensitive direct-absorption spectroscopic measurements of unknown substances, such as explosives, illicit material, or other species of interest. This paper reports advancements in the development of real-time cavity ringdown spectroscopy over a wide-bandwidth, with the aim to make headspace measurements of molecules at trace levels. We report results of two pulsed quantum cascade systems operating between (1200 to 1320)cm(-1) and (1316 to 1613)cm(-1) that measure the headspace of nitromethane, acetonitrile, acetone, and nitroglycerin, where the spectra are obtained in less than four seconds and contain at least 150,000 spectral wavelength datapoints. PMID:24921754

  4. A quantum cascade laser based room temperature spectrometer for sensitive detection of ammonia and ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, J.; Jäger, W.; Tulip, J.

    2008-02-01

    We investigated the use of a pulsed, distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade (QC) laser centered at 970 cm -1 in combination with an astigmatic Herriot cell with 150 m path length for the detection of ammonia and ethylene. This spectrometer utilizes the intra-pulse method, where a linear frequency down-chirp, that is induced when a top-hat current pulse is applied to the laser, is used for sweeping across the absorption line. This provides a real time display of the spectral fingerprint of molecular gases, which can be a few wave numbers wide. A 200 ns long pulse was used for these measurements which resulted in a spectral window of ~1.74 cm -1. A room temperature mercury-cadmium-telluride detector was used, resulting in a completely cryogen free spectrometer. We demonstrated detection limits of ~3 ppb for ammonia and ~5 ppb for ethylene with less than 10 s averaging time.

  5. Monitoring Hydrogen Sulfide Using a Quantum Cascade Laser Based Trace Gas Sensing System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in a quantum cascade laser (QCL) based gas sensing system employing direct laser absorption spectroscopy. The sensitivity is obtained to be 3.61 × 10−6 cm−1 Hz−1/2 and the H2S broadening coefficient in N2 is analyzed by fitting to the plot of the Lorentzian half width at the half maximum as a function of N2 pressure is 0.1124 ± 0.0031 cm−1·atm−1. A simulation based on data from the HITRAN database shows broad agreement with the experimentally obtained spectrum. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  6. Monolithically, widely tunable quantum cascade lasers based on a heterogeneous active region design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenjia; Bandyopadhyay, Neelanjan; Wu, Donghai; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2016-06-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have become important laser sources for accessing the mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral range, achieving watt-level continuous wave operation in a compact package at room temperature. However, up to now, wavelength tuning, which is desirable for most applications, has relied on external cavity feedback or exhibited a limited monolithic tuning range. Here we demonstrate a widely tunable QCL source over the 6.2 to 9.1 μm wavelength range with a single emitting aperture by integrating an eight-laser sampled grating distributed feedback laser array with an on-chip beam combiner. The laser gain medium is based on a five-core heterogeneous QCL wafer. A compact tunable laser system was built to drive the individual lasers within the array and produce any desired wavelength within the available spectral range. A rapid, broadband spectral measurement (520 cm‑1) of methane using the tunable laser source shows excellent agreement to a measurement made using a standard low-speed infrared spectrometer. This monolithic, widely tunable laser technology is compact, with no moving parts, and will open new opportunities for MIR spectroscopy and chemical sensing.

  7. Multipurpose terahertz quantum cascade laser based system for industrial, environmental and meteorological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taslakov, M; Simeonov, V; Bergh, H van den [EPFL/ENAC, Laboratory of Air and Soil Pollution, Bat Ch, Station 6, CH 1015, Lausanne (Switzerland)], E-mail: marian.taslakov@epfl.ch

    2008-05-01

    A portable system, based on a pulsed quantum cascade laser (QCL) is developed. The QCL operates at near to ambient temperature in a pulsed mode with relatively long pulse duration in the range of 200 - 500 ns. The system design is flexible, allowing its use for a number of open path or cell-internal applications. Due to the so called fingerprint spectral region, high haze and turbulence immunity and low beam divergence, this system can be used in various applications. The first group includes environmental monitoring of a number of trace gases as CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, CO, O{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, hydrocarbons and many others. The meteorological applications include measuring the average humidity and temperature. Industrial surveillance control is another important application. Remote measurement of some physical parameters, as temperature or pressure, as well as for interferometric measurements are also possible. Space resolved study of air turbulence even in fog is another promising application. Security, speed control, open path data transfer and remote readout of information are but a few other real applications of our QCL based portable system.

  8. pH titration monitored by quantum cascade laser-based vibrational circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüther, Anja; Pfeifer, Marcel; Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A; Lüdeke, Steffen

    2014-04-10

    Vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of aqueous solutions of proline were recorded in the course of titrations from basic to acidic pH using a spectrometer equipped with a quantum cascade laser (QCL) as an infrared light source in the spectral range from 1320 to 1220 cm(-1). The pH-dependent spectra were analyzed by singular value decomposition and global fitting of a two-pK Henderson-Hasselbalch model. The analysis delivered relative fractions of the three different protonation species. Their agreement with the relative fractions obtained from performing the same analysis on pH-dependent Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and QCL-IR spectra validates the quantitative results from QCL-VCD. Global fitting of the pH-dependent VCD spectra of L-proline allowed for extraction of pure spectra corresponding to anionic, zwitterionic, and cationic L-proline. From a static experiment, only pure spectra of the zwitterion would be accessible in a straightforward way. A comparison to VCD spectra calculated for all three species led to assignment of vibrational modes that are characteristic for the respective protonation states. The study demonstrates the applicability of QCL-VCD both for quantitative evaluation and for qualitative interpretation of dynamic processes in aqueous solutions. PMID:24655319

  9. Multipurpose terahertz quantum cascade laser based system for industrial, environmental and meteorological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A portable system, based on a pulsed quantum cascade laser (QCL) is developed. The QCL operates at near to ambient temperature in a pulsed mode with relatively long pulse duration in the range of 200 - 500 ns. The system design is flexible, allowing its use for a number of open path or cell-internal applications. Due to the so called fingerprint spectral region, high haze and turbulence immunity and low beam divergence, this system can be used in various applications. The first group includes environmental monitoring of a number of trace gases as CH4, NH3, CO, O3, CO2, HNO3, hydrocarbons and many others. The meteorological applications include measuring the average humidity and temperature. Industrial surveillance control is another important application. Remote measurement of some physical parameters, as temperature or pressure, as well as for interferometric measurements are also possible. Space resolved study of air turbulence even in fog is another promising application. Security, speed control, open path data transfer and remote readout of information are but a few other real applications of our QCL based portable system

  10. Quantum cascade laser-based sensors for the detection of exhaled carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakmanesh, Nahid; Cristescu, Simona M.; Ghorbanzadeh, Atamalek; Harren, Frans J. M.; Mandon, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important biomarker as it originates in the human body from the heme (component of hemoglobin) degradation. Tunable laser absorption spectroscopy in the mid-infrared wavelength region is used for sensitive trace gas sensing of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO). Based on a quantum cascade laser emitting at 4.61 µm, two different spectroscopic methods are investigated: off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) and wavelength modulation 2f/1f spectroscopy (WMS). The optical sensors integrate a slow feedback system to correct for wavelength drifts improving their stability over days. Both approaches demonstrate a high reproducibility and sensitivity during online measurements of exhaled human breath. Considering the detection limit to be the equal to the standard deviation of the background fluctuations, the noise-equivalent detection limit for both OA-ICOS and WMS is 7 ppbv (1-s averaging time), leading to a noise-equivalent absorption sensitivity of 3.1 × 10-7 cm-1 Hz-1/2, which is sufficient for measurements of exhaled CO (eCO). Collection and measurements of eCO samples were investigated, and different exhalation flow rates and breath-holding time were explored, to provide a reliable sampling method for future medical investigations.

  11. Development of a Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Detector for Ammonia and Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; McManus, J. Barry; Shorter, Joanne H.; Herndon, Scott C.; Jimenez, Rodrigo

    2005-12-31

    We have developed a compact, robust, atmospheric trace gas detector based on mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using pulsed quantum cascade (QC) lasers. The spectrometer is suitable for airborne measurements of ammonia, nitric acid, formaldehyde, formic acid, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and other gases that have line-resolved absorption spectra in the mid-infrared spectral region. The QC laser light source operates near room temperature with thermal electric cooling instead of liquid nitrogen which has been previously required for semiconductor lasers in the mid-infrared spectral region. The QC lasers have sufficient output power so that thermal electric cooled detectors may be used in many applications with lower precision requirements. The instrument developed in this program has been used in several field campaigns from both the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory and from the NOAA WP3 aircraft. The Phase II program has resulted in more than 10 archival publications describing the technology and its applications. Over 12 instruments based on this design have been sold to research groups in Europe and the United States making the program both a commercial as well as a technological success. Anticipated Benefits The development of a sensitive, cryogen-free, mid-infrared absorption method for atmospheric trace gas detection will have wide benefits for atmospheric and environmental research and broader potential commercial applications in areas such as medical diagnostic and industrial process monitoring of gaseous compounds. Examples include air pollution monitoring, breath analysis, combustion exhaust diagnostics, and plasma diagnostics for semi-conductor fabrication. The substitution of near-room temperature QC lasers for cryogenic lead salt TDLs and the resulting simplifications in instrument design and operation will greatly expand the range of applications.

  12. Exhaled breath profiling using broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopy in healthy children and children with asthma and cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mastrigt, E; Reyes-Reyes, A; Brand, K; Bhattacharya, N; Urbach, H P; Stubbs, A P; de Jongste, J C; Pijnenburg, M W

    2016-01-01

    Exhaled breath analysis is a potential non-invasive tool for diagnosing and monitoring airway diseases. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and electrochemical sensor arrays are the main techniques to detect volatile organic compounds (VOC) in exhaled breath. We developed a broadband quantum cascade laser spectroscopy technique for VOC detection and identification. The objective of this study was to assess the repeatability of exhaled breath profiling with broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopy and to explore the clinical applicability by comparing exhaled breath samples from healthy children with those from children with asthma or cystic fibrosis (CF). Healthy children and children with stable asthma or stable CF, aged 6-18 years, were included. Two to four exhaled breath samples were collected in Tedlar bags and analyzed by quantum cascade laser spectroscopy to detect VOCs with an absorption profile in the wavenumber region between 832 and 1262.55 cm(-1). We included 35 healthy children, 39 children with asthma and 15 with CF. Exhaled breath VOC profiles showed poor repeatability (Spearman's rho  =  0.36 to 0.46) and agreement of the complete profiles. However, we were able to discriminate healthy children from children with stable asthma or stable CF and identified VOCs that were responsible for this discrimination. Broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopy detected differences in VOC profiles in exhaled breath samples between healthy children and children with asthma or CF. The combination of a relatively easy and fast method and the possibility of molecule identification makes broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopy attractive to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic potential of volatiles in exhaled breath. PMID:27058305

  13. Rapid identification of goblet cells in unstained colon thin sections by means of quantum cascade laser-based infrared microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger-Lui, N; Gretz, N; Haase, K; Kränzlin, B; Neudecker, S; Pucci, A; Regenscheit, A; Schönhals, A; Petrich, W

    2015-04-01

    Changes in the volume covered by mucin-secreting goblet cell regions within colon thin sections may serve as a means to differentiate between ulcerative colitis and infectious colitis. Here we show that rapid, quantum cascade laser-based mid-infrared microspectroscopy might be able to contribute to the differential diagnosis of colitis ulcerosa, an inflammatory bowel disease. Infrared hyperspectral images of mouse colon thin sections were obtained within 7.5 minutes per section with a pixel size of 3.65 × 3.65 μm(2) and a field of view of 2.8 × 3.1 mm(2). The spectra were processed by training a random decision forest classifier on the basis of k-means clustering on one thin section. The trained algorithm was then applied to 5 further thin sections for a blinded validation and it was able to identify goblet cells in all sections. The rapid identification of goblet cells within these unstained, paraffinized thin sections of colon tissue was enabled by the high content of glycopeptides within the goblet cells as revealed by the pronounced spectral signatures in the 7.6 μm-8.6 μm and the 9.2 μm-9.7 μm wavelength ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum. More so, the simple calculation of the ratio between the absorbance values at 9.29 μm and 8.47 μm provides the potential to further shorten the time for measurement and analysis of a thin section down to well below 1 minute. PMID:25649324

  14. Switchable multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser based on cascaded polarization maintaining fiber Bragg gratings in a Sagnac loop interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Suchun; Xu, Ou; Lu, Shaohua; Ning, Tigang; Jian, Shuisheng

    2008-12-01

    A switchable multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber (EDF) ring laser based on cascaded polarization maintaining fiber Bragg gratings (PMFBGs) in a Sagnac loop interferometer as the wavelength-selective filter at room temperature is proposed. Due to the polarization hole burning (PHB) enhanced by the PMFBGs, stable single-, dual-, three- and four-wavelength lasing operations can be obtained. The laser can be switched among the stable single-, dual-, three- and four-wavelength lasing operations by adjusting the polarization controllers (PCs). The optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) is over 50 dB.

  15. Study of methods for lowering the lasing frequency of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser based on two quantum wells

    OpenAIRE

    Ushakov, D.V.; Sadofyev, Yu. G.; N. Samal

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms for achieving lower terahertz range frequencies in quantum cascade structures with two quantum wells based on GaAs/AlGaAs compounds are proposed. The first mechanism is based on the introduction of composite quantum wells consisting of a narrow (~2 nm) quantum well with a low potential barrier, being within the main wide quantum well. The second mechanism is based on barriers with unequal heights, arranged in front of and behind the composite quantum well. Optimized qu...

  16. Analysis of surface emitting distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser based on a surface-plasmon waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of a surface emitting distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB QCL) based on a surface-plasmon waveguide is presented. The second-order grating realized by the sole patterning of the top metal provides strong feedback. The analysis is based on a coupled-mode theory derived from exact Floquet-Bloch solutions of the infinite periodic structure. The surface outcoupling efficiency and threshold gain for the optimized device design are 43% and 12 cm -1, respectively, which represent great improve ments on the conventional dielectric waveguide based DFB QCL with typical values of 17.5% and 20 cm-1.

  17. Material growth and device fabrication of terahertz quantum-cascade laser based on bound-to-continuum structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The terahertz quantum-cascade laser (THz QCL) based on bound-to-continuum structure is demonstrated. The X-ray diffraction measurement of the material shows a high crystalline quality of the active region. A THz QCL device was fabricated with semi-insulating surface-plasmon waveguide. The test device is lasing at about 3 THz and operating up to 60 K. It shows a single frequency property under different drive currents and temperatures. At 9 K, the maximum output power is greater than 2 mW with a threshold current density of 159 A/cm2. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  18. Analysis of surface emitting distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser based on a surface-plasmon waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Wanhong; Lu Quanyong; Liu Junqi; Zhang Wei; Jiang Yuchao; Li Lu; Wang Lijun; Liu Fengqi; Wang Zhanguo, E-mail: jqliu@semi.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-11-15

    An analysis of a surface emitting distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB QCL) based on a surface-plasmon waveguide is presented. The second-order grating realized by the sole patterning of the top metal provides strong feedback. The analysis is based on a coupled-mode theory derived from exact Floquet-Bloch solutions of the infinite periodic structure. The surface outcoupling efficiency and threshold gain for the optimized device design are 43% and 12 cm {sup -1}, respectively, which represent great improve ments on the conventional dielectric waveguide based DFB QCL with typical values of 17.5% and 20 cm{sup -1}.

  19. Compact quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor system for detection of carbon disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waclawek, Johannes P; Moser, Harald; Lendl, Bernhard

    2016-03-21

    A compact gas sensor system based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) employing a continuous wave (CW) distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL) operating at 4.59 µm was developed for detection of carbon disulfide (CS2) in air at trace concentration. The influence of water vapor on monitored QEPAS signal was investigated to enable compensation of this dependence by independent moisture sensing. A 1 σ limit of detection of 28 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) for a 1 s lock-in amplifier time constant was obtained for the CS2 line centered at 2178.69 cm-1 when the gas sample was moisturized with 2.3 vol% H2O. The work reports the suitability of the system for monitoring CS2 with high selectivity and sensitivity, as well as low sample gas volume requirements and fast sensor response for applications such as workplace air and process monitoring at industry. PMID:27136846

  20. A Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Optical Sensor for Continuous Monitoring of Environmental Methane in Dunkirk (France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabih Maamary

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A room-temperature continuous-wave (CW quantum cascade laser (QCL-based methane (CH4 sensor operating in the mid-infrared near 8 μm was developed for continuous measurement of CH4 concentrations in ambient air. The well-isolated absorption line (7F2,4 ← 8F1,2 of the ν4 fundamental band of CH4 located at 1255.0004 cm−1 was used for optical measurement of CH4 concentration by direct absorption in a White-type multipass cell with an effective path-length of 175 m. A 1σ (SNR = 1 detection limit of 33.3 ppb in 218 s was achieved with a measurement precision of 1.13%. The developed sensor was deployed in a campaign of measurements of time series CH4 concentration on a site near a suburban traffic road in Dunkirk (France from 9th to 22nd January 2013. An episode of high CH4 concentration of up to ~3 ppm has been observed and analyzed with the help of meteorological parameters combined with back trajectory calculation using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model of NOAA.

  1. Broadband Gain and Loss Characterisation of Quantum Cascade Laser based on Quantum Wells and Dashes using Synchrotron Infrared Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We use the high-brilliance infrared beam of a synchrotron light source (Swiss Light Source SLS) to investigate broadband transmission spectra (0.08 - 1eV) of quantum cascade (QC) structures with single-mode waveguides at the diffraction limit. The nature of intersubband transitions, which interact only with light polarised along the growth direction, is exploited to decouple waveguide and coupling losses from true intersubband effects, giving access to key parameters of laser devices, such as spectral gain and loss. We present an overview of our characterisation method of QC devices and show recent results obtained for broadband multi-section QC laser devices, emitting around 5 and 8 μm, respectively. We measure gain over more than ∼350 cm-1 at roll-over conditions, which however would only be achieved with an imaginary infinitively long device having zero mirror losses. In addition, we discuss the prospect of improving QC laser performance by embedded quantum dashes. In current devices, nonetheless of strong electroluminescence, we only see broadband losses monotonically increasing with current. (author)

  2. Quantum cascade laser based monitoring of CF2 radical concentration as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielectric etching plasma processes for modern interlevel dielectrics become more and more complex by the introduction of new ultra low-k dielectrics. One challenge is the minimization of sidewall damage, while etching ultra low-k porous SiCOH by fluorocarbon plasmas. The optimization of this process requires a deeper understanding of the concentration of the CF2 radical, which acts as precursor in the polymerization of the etch sample surfaces. In an industrial dielectric etching plasma reactor, the CF2 radical was measured in situ using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) around 1106.2 cm−1. We measured Doppler-resolved ro-vibrational absorption lines and determined absolute densities using transitions in the ν3 fundamental band of CF2 with the aid of an improved simulation of the line strengths. We found that the CF2 radical concentration during the etching plasma process directly correlates to the layer structure of the etched wafer. Hence, this correlation can serve as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes. Applying QCL based absorption spectroscopy opens up the way for advanced process monitoring and etching controlling in semiconductor manufacturing

  3. A Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Optical Sensor for Continuous Monitoring of Environmental Methane in Dunkirk (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maamary, Rabih; Cui, Xiaojuan; Fertein, Eric; Augustin, Patrick; Fourmentin, Marc; Dewaele, Dorothée; Cazier, Fabrice; Guinet, Laurence; Chen, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    A room-temperature continuous-wave (CW) quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based methane (CH4) sensor operating in the mid-infrared near 8 μm was developed for continuous measurement of CH4 concentrations in ambient air. The well-isolated absorption line (7F2,4 ← 8F1,2) of the ν4 fundamental band of CH4 located at 1255.0004 cm−1 was used for optical measurement of CH4 concentration by direct absorption in a White-type multipass cell with an effective path-length of 175 m. A 1σ (SNR = 1) detection limit of 33.3 ppb in 218 s was achieved with a measurement precision of 1.13%. The developed sensor was deployed in a campaign of measurements of time series CH4 concentration on a site near a suburban traffic road in Dunkirk (France) from 9 to 22 January 2013. An episode of high CH4 concentration of up to ~3 ppm has been observed and analyzed with the help of meteorological parameters combined with back trajectory calculation using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model of NOAA. PMID:26867196

  4. A Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Optical Sensor for Continuous Monitoring of Environmental Methane in Dunkirk (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maamary, Rabih; Cui, Xiaojuan; Fertein, Eric; Augustin, Patrick; Fourmentin, Marc; Dewaele, Dorothée; Cazier, Fabrice; Guinet, Laurence; Chen, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    A room-temperature continuous-wave (CW) quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based methane (CH4) sensor operating in the mid-infrared near 8 μm was developed for continuous measurement of CH4 concentrations in ambient air. The well-isolated absorption line (7F2,4 ← 8F1,2) of the ν4 fundamental band of CH4 located at 1255.0004 cm(-1) was used for optical measurement of CH4 concentration by direct absorption in a White-type multipass cell with an effective path-length of 175 m. A 1σ (SNR = 1) detection limit of 33.3 ppb in 218 s was achieved with a measurement precision of 1.13%. The developed sensor was deployed in a campaign of measurements of time series CH4 concentration on a site near a suburban traffic road in Dunkirk (France) from 9th to 22nd January 2013. An episode of high CH4 concentration of up to ~3 ppm has been observed and analyzed with the help of meteorological parameters combined with back trajectory calculation using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model of NOAA. PMID:26867196

  5. Real-time measurements of atmospheric CO using a continuous-wave room temperature quantum cascade laser based spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingsong; Parchatka, Uwe; Königstedt, Rainer; Fischer, Horst

    2012-03-26

    A compact, mobile mid-infrared laser spectrometer based on a thermoelectrically (TE) cooled continuous-wave room temperature quantum cascade laser and TE-cooled detectors has been newly developed to demonstrate the applicability of high sensitivity and high precision measurements of atmospheric CO. Performance of the instrument was examined with periodic measurements of reference sample and ambient air at 1 Hz sampling rate and a 1-hourly calibration cycle. The typical precision evaluated from replicate measurements of reference sample over the course of 66-h is 1.41 ppbv. With the utilization of wavelet filtering to improve the spectral SNR and minimize the dispersion of concentration values, a better precision of 0.88 ppbv and a lower detection limit of ~0.4 ppbv with sub-second averaging time have been achieved without reducing the fast temporal response. Allan variance analysis indicates a CO measurement precision of ~0.28 ppbv for optimal integration time of approximate 50 s. The absolute accuracy is limited by the calibration gas standard. This completely thermoelectrically cooled system shows the capability of long-term, unattended and continuous operation at room temperature without complicated cryogenic cooling. PMID:22453438

  6. Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Laser Based Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy for Biogenic Nitric Oxide Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhirkin, Yury A.; Kosterev, Anatoliy A.; Roller, Chad; Curl, Robert F.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2004-04-01

    Tunable-laser absorption spectroscopy in the mid-IR spectral region is a sensitive analytical technique for trace-gas quantification. The detection of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled breath is of particular interest in the diagnosis of lower-airway inflammation associated with a number of lung diseases and illnesses. A gas analyzer based on a continuous-wave mid-IR quantum cascade laser operating at ~5.2 µm and on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) has been developed to measure NO concentrations in human breath. A compact sample cell, 5.3 cm in length and with a volume of less than 80 cm3, that is suitable for on-line and off-line measurements during a single breath cycle, has been designed and tested. A noise-equivalent (signal-to-noise ratio of 1) sensitivity of 10 parts in 10 9 by volume (ppbv) of NO was achieved. The combination of ICOS with wavelength modulation resulted in a 2-ppbv noise-equivalent sensitivity. The total data acquisition and averaging time was 15 s in both cases. The feasibility of detecting NO in expired human breath as a potential noninvasive medical diagnostic tool is discussed.

  7. Atmospheric ammonia measurements in Houston, TX using an external-cavity quantum cascade laser-based sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the current understanding of the dynamics of ammonia (NH3 in a major industrial and urban area, intensive measurements of atmospheric NH3 were conducted in Houston during two sampling periods (12 February 2010–1 March 2010 and 5 August 2010–25 September 2010. The measurements were performed with a 10.4-μm external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL-based sensor employing conventional photo-acoustic spectroscopy. The mixing ratio of NH3 ranged from 0.1 to 8.7 ppb with a mean of 2.4 ± 1.2 ppb in winter and ranged from 0.2 to 27.1 ppb with a mean of 3.1 ± 2.9 ppb in summer. The larger levels in summer probably are due to higher ambient temperature. A notable morning increase and a mid-day decrease were observed in the diurnal profile of NH3 mixing ratios. Motor vehicles were found to be major contributors to the elevated levels during morning rush hours in winter. However, changes in vehicular catalytic converter performance and other local or regional emission sources from different wind directions governed the behavior of NH3 during morning rush hours in summer. There was a large amount of variability, particularly in summer, with several episodes of elevated NH3 mixing ratios that could be linked to industrial facilities. A considerable discrepancy in NH3 mixing ratios existed between weekdays and weekends. This study suggests that NH3 mixing ratios in Houston occasionally exceeded previous modeling predictions when sporadic and substantial enhancements occurred, potentially causing profound effects on particulate matter formation and local air quality.

  8. Atmospheric ammonia measurements in Houston, TX using an external-cavity quantum cascade laser-based sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the current understanding of the dynamics of ammonia (NH3 in a major industrial and urban area, intensive measurements of atmospheric NH3 were conducted in Houston during two sampling periods (12 February 2010–1 March 2010 and 5 August 2010–25 September 2010. The measurements were performed with a 10.4-μm external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL-based sensor employing conventional photo-acoustic spectroscopy. The mixing ratio of NH3 ranged from 0.1 to 8.7 ppb with a mean of 2.4 ± 1.2 ppb in winter and ranged from 0.2 to 27.1 ppb with a mean of 3.1 ± 2.9 ppb in summer. The larger levels in summer probably are due to higher ambient temperature. A notable morning increase and a mid-day decrease were observed in the diurnal profile of NH3 mixing ratios. Motor vehicles were found to be major contributors to the elevated levels during morning rush hours in winter. However, changes in vehicular catalytic converter performance and other local or regional emission sources from different wind directions governed the behavior of NH3 during morning rush hours in summer. There was a large amount of variability, particularly in summer, with several episodes of elevated NH3 mixing ratios that could be linked to industrial facilities. A considerable discrepancy in NH3 mixing ratios existed between weekdays and weekends. This study suggests that NH3 mixing ratios in Houston occasionally exceeded previous modeling predictions when sporadic and substantial enhancements occurred, potentially causing profound effects on particulate matter formation and local air quality.

  9. Long Path Quantum Cascade Laser Based Sensor for Environment Sensing/Ambient Detection of CH4 and N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, P. C.; Sydoryk, I.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.

    2013-12-01

    Methane (CH4) and Nitrous Oxide (N2O) are long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere with significant global warming effects. These gases also are known to be produced in a number of anthropogenic settings such as manure management systems, which releases substantial GHGs and is mandated by the EPA to provide continuous monitoring. In addition, natural gas leaks in urban areas is another source of strong spatially inhomogeneous methane emissions Most open path methods for quantitative detection of trace gases utilize either Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTIR) or near-IR differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Although, FTIR is suitable for ambient air monitoring measurement of more abundant gases such as CO2 and H20 etc., the lack of spectral resolution makes the retrieval of weaker absorbing features such as N20 more difficult. On the other hand, conventional DOAS systems can be large and impractical. As an alternative, we illustrate a robust portable quantum cascade laser (QCL) approach for simultaneous detection of CH4 and N2O. In particular, gas spectra were recorded by ultrafast pulse intensity (thermal) chirp tuning over the 1299 - 1300cm-1 spectral window. Etalon measurements insure stable tuning was obtained. To deal with multiple species, a LSQ spectral fitting approach was used which accounted for both the overlapping trace gases , background water vapor as well as detector drift and calibration. In summary, ambient concentrations of CH4 with and N2O with accuracy < 1% was obtained on the order of 5ms using optical paths of 500 m path length. In addition, unattended long term operation was demonstrated and validations using other sensors when possible were shown to be consistent. The system accuracy is limited by systemic errors, which are still being explored.

  10. Novel quantum-cascade laser based spectrometer for high precision isotopic ratio measurements of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Continuous and in-situ monitoring of the isotope content of atmospheric carbon dioxide is of prime interest in the biosphere-atmosphere exchange research. We present the design and laboratory results of a compact mid-IR spectrometer developed for such purposes using a pulsed quantum cascade laser (QCL) from Alpes Lasers operating at 4.3 μm. Employing thermoelectrically cooled (TEC) components for both the IR laser light source and detector, the instrument can operate in a complete cryogenic-free mode that greatly facilitates field applications. Furthermore, the carefully selected spectral range in the ν3 ro-vibrational band of CO2 allows for simultaneous concentration measurements of the three main stable carbon dioxide isotopologues (16O12C16O, 16O13C16O and 18O12C16O) in ambient air. The isotopic ratio measurement is performed using differential absorption spectroscopy. A dual multipass-cell arrangement is used to analyze the difference between the sample spectra and the simultaneously acquired reference spectra. This approach significantly improves the spectrometer performance due to the cancellation of correlated noise components specific to this method. The instrument precision has been evaluated using the Allan variance technique. The 13CO2/12CO2 ratio has a 1 s standard deviation of 0.6 o/oo, while the variance minimum at 430 s corresponds to a minimum σAllan of 0.04 o/oo. This clearly demonstrates the feasibility of high precision in-situ isotope ratio measurements by the above mentioned optical technique. Additional efforts for the development of an adequate calibration method and the integration of optimized TEC detectors, which are expected to give even better performance, are currently undertaken. (author)

  11. Atmospheric ammonia measurements in Houston, TX using an external cavity-quantum cascade laser-based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, L.; Lewicki, R.; Griffin, R. J.; Flynn, J. H.; Lefer, B. L.; Tittel, F. K.

    2010-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. It has many anthropogenic (e.g., agricultural crops and mineral fertilizers) and natural sources (e.g., animals, oceans, and vegetation) in the environment. In certain areas, industrial and motor vehicle activities also can contribute to increases in atmospheric NH3 levels. From a perspective of environmental concern, NH3 is a precursor of particulate matter (PM) because it can lead to production of ammonium salts (e.g., (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3) through chemical reactions with sulfuric and nitric acid. As a result, the abundance of NH3 in the atmosphere has a great impact on aerosol nucleation and composition. Despite this, NH3 is not regulated. It is crucial, however, to improve our understanding of the dynamics of NH3 in an industrial and urban area such as Greater Houston where atmospheric NH3 data are limited. In this study, a 10.4 µm external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL)-based sensor was developed and utilized. To monitor atmospheric NH3 at trace gas concentration levels, an amplitude modulated photo-acoustic spectroscopy (AM-PAS) technique was employed. The minimum detection limit obtained from the sensor is ~1.5 ppb for a 5-second data acquisition time. After averaging data over 300 seconds a sub-ppb NH3 concentration level can be achieved. The NH3 sensor has been deployed on the roof of a ~60-meter-high building (North Moody Tower) located on the University of Houston campus since November 2009. Several episodes of high NH3 concentrations were observed. For example, the sensor recorded a significant and lasting increase in NH3 concentrations (~21 ppb) on August 14, 2010, when a major accident occurred during the same time period on the Gulf Freeway (I-45) in Houston only 2 miles from the sampling site. The elevated concentration levels are assumed to be associated with NH3 generation from a chemical fire resulting from the collision involving two 18-wheelers, one carrying fertilizer

  12. Long-term Operation of an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser-based Trace-gas Sensor for Building Air Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.

    2013-11-03

    We analyze the long-term performance and stability of a trace-gas sensor based on an external cavity quantum cascade laser using data collected over a one-year period in a building air monitoring application.

  13. A quantum cascade laser-based mid-IR frequency metrology system with ultra-narrow linewidth and $1\\times 10^{-13}$-level absolute frequency stability

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Michael G; Chen, Qun-Feng; Ernsting, Ingo; Schiller, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a powerful tool for high-resolution mid-IR spectroscopy and frequency metrology with quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). We have implemented frequency stabilization of a QCL to an ultra-low expansion (ULE) reference cavity, via upconversion to the near-IR spectral range, at a level of $1\\times10^{-13}$. The absolute frequency of the QCL is measured relative to a hydrogen maser, with instability $<1\\times10^{-13}$ and inaccuracy $5\\times10^{-13}$, using a frequency comb phase-stabilized to an independent ultrastable laser. The QCL linewidth is determined to be 60 Hz, dominated by fiber noise. Active suppression of fiber noise could result in sub-10 Hz linewidth.

  14. Open-path quantum cascade laser-based system for simultaneous remote sensing of methane, nitrous oxide, and water vapor using chirped-pulse differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Paulo; Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Methane and Nitrous Oxide are long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere with significant global warming effects. We report on application of chirped-pulsed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) to simultaneous measurements of these trace gases in both open-path fence-line and backscatter systems. The intra-pulse thermal frequency chip in a QCL can be time resolved and calibrated to allow for high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy over the spectral window of the chip, which for a DFB-QCL can be reach ~2cm-1 for a 500 nsec pulse. The spectral line-shape of the output from these lasers are highly stable from pulse to pulse over long period of time (> 1 day), and the system does not require frequent calibrations.

  15. Enhancing the sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser-based cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy using RF current perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfred, Katherine M; Kirkbride, James M R; Ciaffoni, Luca; Peverall, Robert; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2014-12-15

    The sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), often limited by cavity mode structure and diffraction losses, was enhanced by applying a broadband RF noise to the laser current. A pump-probe measurement demonstrated that the addition of bandwidth-limited white noise effectively increased the laser linewidth, thereby reducing mode structure associated with CEAS. The broadband noise source offers a more sensitive, more robust alternative to applying single-frequency noise to the laser. Analysis of CEAS measurements of a CO(2) absorption feature at 1890  cm(-1) averaged over 100 ms yielded a minimum detectable absorption of 5.5×10(-3)  Hz(-1/2) in the presence of broadband RF perturbation, nearly a tenfold improvement over the unperturbed regime. The short acquisition time makes this technique suitable for breath applications requiring breath-by-breath gas concentration information. PMID:25503003

  16. Quantum cascade laser based monitoring of CF{sub 2} radical concentration as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hübner, M.; Lang, N.; Röpcke, J.; Helden, J. H. van, E-mail: jean-pierre.vanhelden@inp-greifswald.de [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), Felix-Hausdorff Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Zimmermann, S.; Schulz, S. E. [Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems, Technologie-Campus 3, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Buchholtz, W. [GLOBALFOUNDRIES Dresden Module One LLC and Co. KG, Wilschdorfer Landstr. 101, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-19

    Dielectric etching plasma processes for modern interlevel dielectrics become more and more complex by the introduction of new ultra low-k dielectrics. One challenge is the minimization of sidewall damage, while etching ultra low-k porous SiCOH by fluorocarbon plasmas. The optimization of this process requires a deeper understanding of the concentration of the CF{sub 2} radical, which acts as precursor in the polymerization of the etch sample surfaces. In an industrial dielectric etching plasma reactor, the CF{sub 2} radical was measured in situ using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) around 1106.2 cm{sup −1}. We measured Doppler-resolved ro-vibrational absorption lines and determined absolute densities using transitions in the ν{sub 3} fundamental band of CF{sub 2} with the aid of an improved simulation of the line strengths. We found that the CF{sub 2} radical concentration during the etching plasma process directly correlates to the layer structure of the etched wafer. Hence, this correlation can serve as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes. Applying QCL based absorption spectroscopy opens up the way for advanced process monitoring and etching controlling in semiconductor manufacturing.

  17. Reagent-free monitoring of multiple clinically relevant parameters in human blood plasma using a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser based sensor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Markus; Sumalowitsch, Tamara; Genner, Andreas; Posch, Andreas E; Herwig, Christoph; Drolz, Andreas; Fuhrmann, Valentin; Perkmann, Thomas; Lendl, Bernhard

    2013-07-21

    We present a semi-automated point-of-care (POC) sensor approach for the simultaneous and reagent-free determination of clinically relevant parameters in blood plasma. The portable sensor system performed direct mid-infrared (MIR) transmission measurements of blood plasma samples using a broadly tunable external-cavity quantum cascade laser source with high spectral power density. This enabled the use of a flow cell with a long path length (165 μm) which resulted in high signal-to-noise ratios and a rugged system, insensitive to clogging. Multivariate calibration models were built using well established Partial-Least-Squares (PLS) regression analysis. Selection of spectral pre-processing procedures was optimized by an automated evaluation algorithm. Several analytes, including glucose, lactate, triglycerides, cholesterol, total protein as well as albumin, were successfully quantified in routinely taken blood plasma samples from 67 critically ill patients. Although relying on a spectral range from 1030 cm(-1) to 1230 cm(-1), which is optimal for glucose and lactate but rather unusual for protein analysis, it was possible to selectively determine the albumin and total protein concentrations with sufficient accuracy for POC application. PMID:23678484

  18. Short-lived species detection of nitrous acid by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectroscopic detection of short-lived gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) at 1254.85 cm−1 was realized by off-beam coupled quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) in conjunction with an external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL). High sensitivity monitoring of HONO was performed within a very small gas-sample volume (of ∼40 mm3) allowing a significant reduction (of about 4 orders of magnitude) of air sampling residence time which is highly desired for accurate quantification of chemically reactive short-lived species. Calibration of the developed QEPAS-based HONO sensor was carried out by means of lab-generated HONO samples whose concentrations were determined by direct absorption spectroscopy involving a ∼109.5 m multipass cell and a distributed feedback QCL. A minimum detection limit (MDL) of 66 ppbv (1 σ) HONO was achieved at 70 mbar using a laser output power of 50 mW and 1 s integration time, which corresponded to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 3.6 × 10−8 cm−1 W/Hz1/2. This MDL was down to 7 ppbv at the optimal integration time of 150 s. The corresponding 1σ minimum detected absorption coefficient is ∼1.1 × 10−7 cm−1 (MDL ∼ 3 ppbv) in 1 s and ∼1.1 × 10−8 cm−1 (MDL ∼ 330 pptv) in 150 s, respectively, with 1 W laser power

  19. Short-lived species detection of nitrous acid by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Hongming [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l' Atmosphère, Université du Littoral Côte d' Opale, 189A, Av. Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Laboratory of Atmospheric Physico-Chemistry, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1125, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Maamary, Rabih; Fertein, Eric; Chen, Weidong, E-mail: chen@univ-littoral.fr [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l' Atmosphère, Université du Littoral Côte d' Opale, 189A, Av. Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Gao, Xiaoming [Laboratory of Atmospheric Physico-Chemistry, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1125, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sigrist, Markus W. [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, HPT H4.1, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-09

    Spectroscopic detection of short-lived gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) at 1254.85 cm{sup −1} was realized by off-beam coupled quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) in conjunction with an external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL). High sensitivity monitoring of HONO was performed within a very small gas-sample volume (of ∼40 mm{sup 3}) allowing a significant reduction (of about 4 orders of magnitude) of air sampling residence time which is highly desired for accurate quantification of chemically reactive short-lived species. Calibration of the developed QEPAS-based HONO sensor was carried out by means of lab-generated HONO samples whose concentrations were determined by direct absorption spectroscopy involving a ∼109.5 m multipass cell and a distributed feedback QCL. A minimum detection limit (MDL) of 66 ppbv (1 σ) HONO was achieved at 70 mbar using a laser output power of 50 mW and 1 s integration time, which corresponded to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 3.6 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. This MDL was down to 7 ppbv at the optimal integration time of 150 s. The corresponding 1σ minimum detected absorption coefficient is ∼1.1 × 10{sup −7 }cm{sup −1} (MDL ∼ 3 ppbv) in 1 s and ∼1.1 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1} (MDL ∼ 330 pptv) in 150 s, respectively, with 1 W laser power.

  20. Bosonic Cascade Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Liew, T. C. H.; Glazov, M. M.; Kavokin, K. V.; Shelykh, I. A.; Kaliteevski, M A; Kavokin, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a concept of a quantum cascade laser based on transitions of bosonic quasiparticles (excitons and exciton-polaritons) in a parabolic potential trap in a semiconductor microcavity. This laser would emit terahertz radiation due to bosonic stimulation of excitonic transitions. Dynamics of a bosonic cascade is strongly different from the dynamics of a conventional fermionic cascade laser. We show that populations of excitonic ladders are parity-dependent and quantized if the laser oper...

  1. The Faraday effect revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Nenciu, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series revisiting the (effect of) Faraday rotation. We formulate and prove the thermodynamic limit for the transverse electric conductivity of Bloch electrons, as well as for the Verdet constant. The main mathematical tool is a regularized magnetic and geometric...

  2. FARADAY'S MAGNETIC UNIVERSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The question of construction of electrodynamics in the framework of the metric theory of gravitation is discussed. It is shown that the energy-momentum tensor of the electromagnetic field creates a space in which Faraday's law of induction is true. In such a space the scalar curvature vanishes identically, although space contains matter in the form of an electromagnetic field. It is proposed to call such space Faraday's magnetic universe as historically Faraday first established experimentally that "empty space is a magnet." We consider the metric of the expanding universe and metrics that describe the local gravitational field in the Newtonian theory. It was established that the field equations in spaces containing matter only in the form of an electromagnetic field in these metrics are reduced to hyperbolic equations describing the propagation of waves at the speed of light. However, in the field containing matter, the field equations are the equations of parabolic type, which describe diffusion or probability waves of Schrödinger quantum theory type. It is assumed that the potentials of the two metrics are connected, as with the potentials of the electromagnetic field, and the potentials of the Yang-Mills theory. Hence, the total output for all interactions law establishing the primacy of the gravitational field as the fundamental interaction, generating other interactions

  3. Faraday instability and Faraday patterns in a superfluid Fermi gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rong-An; Li, Hao-Cai; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2011-06-01

    With the consideration of the coupling between the transverse width and the longitudinal density, the parametric excitations related to Faraday waves in a cigar-shaped superfluid Fermi gas are studied. A Mathieu equation is obtained, and it is demonstrated firstly that the excited actual 3D Faraday pattern is the combination of the longitudinal Faraday density wave and the corresponding transverse width fluctuation in the longitudinal direction. The Faraday instability growth index and the kinematic equations of the Faraday density wave and the width fluctuation along the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC)-Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) crossover are also given for the first time. It is found that the 3D Faraday pattern presents quite different behaviours (such as the excitations and the motions) when the system crosses from the BEC side to the BCS side. The coupling not only plays an important role in the parametric excitation, but also determines the dominant wavelength of the spatial structure. Along the crossover, the coupling effects are more significant in the BCS side. The final numerical investigation verifies these results and gives a detailed study of the parametric excitations (i.e. Faraday instability) and the 3D pattern formation.

  4. Faraday instability and Faraday patterns in a superfluid Fermi gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Rongan; Xue Jukui [Key Laboratory of Atomic Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 (China); Li Haocai, E-mail: tangra79@163.com, E-mail: xuejk@nwnu.edu.cn [High School Attached to Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2011-06-14

    With the consideration of the coupling between the transverse width and the longitudinal density, the parametric excitations related to Faraday waves in a cigar-shaped superfluid Fermi gas are studied. A Mathieu equation is obtained, and it is demonstrated firstly that the excited actual 3D Faraday pattern is the combination of the longitudinal Faraday density wave and the corresponding transverse width fluctuation in the longitudinal direction. The Faraday instability growth index and the kinematic equations of the Faraday density wave and the width fluctuation along the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC)-Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) crossover are also given for the first time. It is found that the 3D Faraday pattern presents quite different behaviours (such as the excitations and the motions) when the system crosses from the BEC side to the BCS side. The coupling not only plays an important role in the parametric excitation, but also determines the dominant wavelength of the spatial structure. Along the crossover, the coupling effects are more significant in the BCS side. The final numerical investigation verifies these results and gives a detailed study of the parametric excitations (i.e. Faraday instability) and the 3D pattern formation.

  5. Internal Subharmonic Resonance in Faraday Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-Long; CHEN Yi-Huang; WEI Rong-Jue

    2000-01-01

    The classical Faraday experiment is a tractable problem in nonlinear physics, and its rich spectrum of nonlinear phenomena has made it a prototype in studying nonlinear wave dynamics in general. Here we report the ob servation of a new type of subharmonic resonances which occurs at some smaller fractional frequencies, such as ν/3, ν/4, and ν/6, where ν is the forcing frequency. As a result of these resonances, the lower-order surface-wave modes whose eigenfrequencies are close to the fractional frequencies participate into the wave motions. Our theory involving quadratically nonlinear mode couplings shows that an already excited mode itself can act as a parametric source on the lower-order primary modes, thus leading to the cascading subharmonic resonances.

  6. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid. 3 figs

  7. Long-wavelength (λ ≈ 16 µm), room-temperature, single-frequency quantum-cascade lasers based on a bound-to-continuum transition

    OpenAIRE

    Rochat, Michel; Hofstetter, Daniel; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme

    2008-01-01

    Room-temperature operation of long-wavelength, Fabry–Perot and single-mode quantum-cascade lasers at λ ≈ 16 µm is reported. Multimode emission with pulsed peak power up to 400 mW at –40 °C and 220 mW at 30 °C is demonstrated. Single-mode emission up to 60 mW peak power has been achieved at 30 °C.

  8. Active Faraday optical frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We propose the mechanism of active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate active Faraday optical frequency standards based on 852 nm narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standards is determined by the cesium 6 $^{2}S_{1/2}$ $F$ = 4 to 6 $^{2}P_{3/2}$ $F'$ = 4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 996(26) Hz, which is 5.3 $\\times$ 10$^{3}$ times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852 nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 $\\upmu$W. The active Faraday optical frequency standards reported here have advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for...

  9. Quantum cascade laser-based mid-IR frequency metrology system with ultra-narrow linewidth and 1  ×  10⁻¹³-level frequency instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Michael G; Magoulakis, Evangelos; Chen, Qun-Feng; Ernsting, Ingo; Schiller, Stephan

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrate a powerful tool for high-resolution mid-IR spectroscopy and frequency metrology with quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). We have implemented frequency stabilization of a QCL to an ultra-low expansion (ULE) reference cavity, via upconversion to the near-IR spectral range, at a level of 1×10(-13). The absolute frequency of the QCL is measured relative to a hydrogen maser, with instability <1×10(-13) and inaccuracy 5×10(-13), using a frequency comb phase stabilized to an independent ultra-stable laser. The QCL linewidth is determined to be 60 Hz, dominated by fiber noise. Active suppression of fiber noise could result in sub-10 Hz linewidth. PMID:26393721

  10. Michael Faraday and the modern world

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Brian

    1991-01-01

    Michael Faraday and the Modern World is an account of Faraday's life and work together with a brief explantion of how much of what we now take for granted in daily life has been developed from his discoveries.

  11. High power operation of λ ∼ 5.2–11 μm strain balanced quantum cascade lasers based on the same material composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique based on composite quantum wells for design and growth of strain balanced Al0.63In0.37As/Ga0.35In0.65As/Ga0.47In0.53As quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), emitting in 5.2–11 μm wavelength range, is reported. The strained Al0.63In0.37As provides good electron confinement at all wavelengths, and strain balancing can be achieved through composite wells of Ga0.35In0.65As/Ga0.47In0.53As for different wavelength. The use of these fixed composition materials can avoid the need for frequent calibration of a MBE reactor to grow active regions with different strain levels for different wavelengths. Experimental results for QCLs emitting at 5.2, 6.7, 8.2, 9.1, and 11 μm exhibit good wall plug efficiencies and power across the whole wavelength range. It is shown that the emission wavelength can be predictably changed using the same design template. These lasers are also compatible with a heterogeneous broadband active region, consisting of multiple QCL cores, which can be produced in a single growth run.

  12. Building a better Faraday cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    MartinAlfven; Wright, David; skocpol; Rounce, Graham; Richfield, Jon; W, Nick; wheelsonfire

    2015-11-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news article “Are Faraday cages less effective than previously thought?” (15 September, http://ow.ly/SfklO), about a study that indicated, based on mathematical modelling, that conducting wire-mesh cages may not be as good at excluding electromagnetic radiation as is commonly assumed.

  13. Faraday's first dynamo: A retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Glenn S.

    2013-12-01

    In the early 1830s, Michael Faraday performed his seminal experimental research on electromagnetic induction, in which he created the first electric dynamo—a machine for continuously converting rotational mechanical energy into electrical energy. His machine was a conducting disc, rotating between the poles of a permanent magnet, with the voltage/current obtained from brushes contacting the disc. In his first dynamo, the magnetic field was asymmetric with respect to the axis of the disc. This is to be contrasted with some of his later symmetric designs, which are the ones almost invariably discussed in textbooks on electromagnetism. In this paper, a theoretical analysis is developed for Faraday's first dynamo. From this analysis, the eddy currents in the disc and the open-circuit voltage for arbitrary positioning of the brushes are determined. The approximate analysis is verified by comparing theoretical results with measurements made on an experimental recreation of the dynamo. Quantitative results from the analysis are used to elucidate Faraday's qualitative observations, from which he learned so much about electromagnetic induction. For the asymmetric design, the eddy currents in the disc dissipate energy that makes the dynamo inefficient, prohibiting its use as a practical generator of electric power. Faraday's experiments with his first dynamo provided valuable insight into electromagnetic induction, and this insight was quickly used by others to design practical generators.

  14. Streaming patterns in Faraday waves

    CERN Document Server

    Périnet, Nicolas; Urra, Héctor; Mujica, Nicolás; Gordillo, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Waves patterns in the Faraday instability have been studied for decades. Besides the rich dynamics that can be observed on the waves at the interface, Faraday waves hide beneath them an elusive range of flow patterns --or streaming patterns-- which have not been studied in detail until now. The streaming patterns are responsible for a net circulation in the flow which are reminiscent of convection cells. In this article, we analyse these streaming flows by conducting experiments in a Faraday-wave setup. To visualize the flows, tracers are used to generate both trajectory maps and to probe the streaming velocity field via Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). We identify three types of patterns and experimentally show that identical Faraday waves can mask streaming patterns that are qualitatively very different. Next we propose a three-dimensional model that explains streaming flows in quasi-inviscid fluids. We show that the streaming inside the fluid arises from a complex coupling between the bulk and the boundar...

  15. A Mobile Phone Faraday Cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, M. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physical phenomenon where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can. The background of the physics behind this is…

  16. A Note on Faraday Paradoxes

    CERN Document Server

    Auchmann, Bernhard; Russenschuck, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    The validity of the flux rule to determine the electromotive force in a cycle, epsilon = -d Phi/dt, has been the subject of a large amount of controversy since the beginning of electrical technology. Although most authors reach correct conclusions for a class of problems called Faraday paradoxes, the arguments that are used vary and often rely on ad-hoc physical reasoning. A didactic and insightful treatment should be based solely on Maxwell's equations, the constitutive laws, and a detailed study of the mathematics involved.

  17. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Based 3D Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Constellation program has a need to non-destructively test (NDT) non-metallic materials (foams, Shuttle Tile, Avcoat, etc) for defects such as...

  18. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrodynamical instabilities are usually studied either in bounded regions or free to grow in space. In this article we review the experimental results of an intermediate situation, in which an instability develops in deformable domains. The Faraday instability, which consists in the formation of surface waves on a liquid experiencing a vertical forcing, is triggered in floating liquid lenses playing the role of deformable domains. Faraday waves deform the lenses from the initial circular shape and the mutual adaptation of instability patterns with the lens boundary is observed. Two archetypes of behaviour have been found. In the first archetype a stable elongated shape is reached, the wave vector being parallel to the direction of elongation. In the second archetype the waves exceed the response of the lens border and no equilibrium shape is reached. The lens stretches and eventually breaks into fragments that have a complex dynamics. The difference between the two archetypes is explained by the competition between the radiation pressure the waves exert on the lens border and its response due to surface tension.

  19. Quantum dot cascade laser

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo, Ning; Liu, Feng Qi; Zhang, Jin Chuan; Wang, Li Jun; Liu, Jun Qi; Zhai, Shen Qiang; Wang, Zhan Guo

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated an unambiguous quantum dot cascade laser based on InGaAs/GaAs/InAs/InAlAs heterostructure by making use of self-assembled quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanow growth mode and two-step strain compensation active region design. The prototype generates stimulated emission at λ ~ 6.15 μm and a broad electroluminescence band with full width at half maximum over 3 μm. The characteristic temperature for the threshold current density within the temperature range of 82 to 162 K is up...

  20. Faraday instability on a network

    CERN Document Server

    Delon, G; Vandewalle, N; Dorbolo, S; Caps, H

    2009-01-01

    Faraday waves are generated at the air/liquid interface inside an array of square cells. As the free surface inside each cell is destabilizing due to the oscillations, the shape of the free surface is drastically changing. Depending on the value of the frequency $f$ of oscillations, different patterns are observed inside each cell. For well defined $f$ values, neighboring cells are observed to interact and a general organization is noticed. In such a situation, initially disordered structures lead to a general pattern covering the entire liquid pool and a spatial order appears all over the cell array. This abstract is related to a fluid dynamics video for the gallery of fluid motion 2009.

  1. Faraday wave lattice as an elastic metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Domino, L; Patinet, Sylvain; Eddi, A

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials enable the emergence of novel physical properties due to the existence of an underlying sub-wavelength structure. Here, we use the Faraday instability to shape the fluid-air interface with a regular pattern. This pattern undergoes an oscillating secondary instability and exhibits spontaneous vibrations that are analogous to transverse elastic waves. By locally forcing these waves, we fully characterize their dispersion relation and show that a Faraday pattern presents an effective shear elasticity. We propose a physical mechanism combining surface tension with the Faraday structured interface that quantitatively predicts the elastic wave phase speed, revealing that the liquid interface behaves as an elastic metamaterial.

  2. Emission spectra of terahertz quantum cascade laser

    OpenAIRE

    Antonov, A V; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Ikonnikov, A. V.; Maremyanin, K. V.; Lastovkin, A. A.; Morozov, S. V.; Ushakov, D.V.; Sadofyev, Yu. G.; N. Samal

    2009-01-01

    We calculated energy levels, wave functions, and energies of radiative transitions in terahertz quantum cascade lasers based on GaAs/Al0.15Ga0.85As heterostructures. Current-voltage characteristics and current dependences of laser radiation intensity were measured, and the maximum operating temperatures reaching 85 K were determined. Radiation spectra of quantum cascade lasers were measured for different temperatures, and the effect of intensity “pumping” from lowfrequency mode...

  3. Faraday waves in elongated superfluid fermionic clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Capuzzi, P.; Vignolo, P.

    2008-01-01

    We use hydrodynamic equations to study the formation of Faraday waves in a superfluid Fermi gas at zero temperature confined in a strongly elongated cigar-shaped trap. First, we treat the role of the radial density profile in the limit of an infinite cylindrical geometry and analytically evaluate the wavelength of the Faraday pattern. The effect of the axial confinement is fully taken into account in the numerical solution of hydrodynamic equations and shows that the infinite cylinder geometr...

  4. The Faraday induction law in relativity theory

    OpenAIRE

    Kholmetskii, Alexander L; Missevitch, Oleg V.

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the transformation properties of Faraday law in an empty space and its relationship with Maxwell equations. In our analysis we express the Faraday law via the four-potential of electromagnetic field and the field of four-velocity, defined on a circuit under its deforming motion. The obtained equations show one more facet of the physical meaning of electromagnetic potentials, where the motional and transformer parts of the flux rule are incorporated into a common phenomenon, reflect...

  5. Faraday waves under time-reversed excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions. PMID:23496716

  6. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system--spectrally dependent losses--achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  7. Infrared laser-based monitoring of the silane dissociation during deposition of silicon thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The silane dissociation efficiency, or depletion fraction, is an important plasma parameter by means of which the film growth rate and the amorphous-to-microcrystalline silicon transition regime can be monitored in situ. In this letter we implement a homebuilt quantum cascade laser-based absorption spectrometer to measure the silane dissociation efficiency in an industrial plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. This infrared laser-based diagnostic technique is compact, sensitive, and nonintrusive. Its resolution is good enough to resolve Doppler-broadened rotovibrational absorption lines of silane. The latter feature various absorption strengths, thereby enabling depletion measurements over a wide range of process conditions.

  8. Faraday waves in elongated superfluid fermionic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuzzi, P.; Vignolo, P.

    2008-10-01

    We use hydrodynamic equations to study the formation of Faraday waves in a superfluid Fermi gas at zero temperature confined in a strongly elongated cigar-shaped trap. First, we treat the role of the radial density profile in the limit of an infinite cylindrical geometry and analytically evaluate the wavelength of the Faraday pattern. The effect of the axial confinement is fully taken into account in the numerical solution of hydrodynamic equations, and shows that the infinite cylinder geometry provides a very good description of the phenomena.

  9. Fiber optic, Faraday rotation current sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeser, L. R.; Day, G. W.

    The Second Megagauss Conference in 1979 reported experiments using the Faraday magneto-optic effect in a glass rod to measure large electric current pulses or magnetic fields. Since then we have seen the development of single-mode optical fibers carrying polarized light in a closed loop around a current load. A fiber optic Faraday rotation sensor will integrate the flux, instead of sampling it at a discrete point, to get a measurement independent of the current distribution. Early Faraday rotation experiments using optical fibers to measure currents dealt with problems such as fiber birefringence and difficulties in launching light into the tiny fiber cores. We have built on those experiments, working to reduce the effects of shocks and obtaining higher bandwidths, absolute calibration, and computerized recording and data analysis, to develop the Faraday rotation sensors into a routine current diagnostic. For large current pulses we find reduced sensitivity to electromagnetic interference and other backgrounds than for Rogowski loops; often the fiber optic sensors are useful where conductive probes cannot be used at all. The fiber optic sensors and some practical matters involved in fielding them are described.

  10. Scaling behavior of coarsening Faraday heaps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerner, van H.J.; Weele, van der J.P.; Meer, van der R.M.; Hoef, van der M.A.

    2015-01-01

    When a layer of sand is vertically shaken, the surface spontaneously breaks up in a landscape of small conical “Faraday heaps,” which merge into larger ones on an ever increasing time scale. We propose a model for the heap dynamics and show analytically that the mean lifetime of the transient state

  11. The Minus Sign in Faraday's Law Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Colm; Hurley, Donal

    2013-01-01

    By introducing the mathematical concept of orientation, the significance of the minus sign in Faraday's law may be made clear to students with some knowledge of vector calculus. For many students, however, the traditional approach of treating the law as a relationship between positive scalars and of relying on Lenz's law to provide the information…

  12. Laser-based capillary polarimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, K; Hankins, J; Bornhop, D J

    1999-01-01

    A laser-based capillary polarimeter has been configured to allow for the detection of optically active molecules in capillary tubes with a characteristic inner diameter of 250 microm and a 39-nL (10(-9)) sample volume. The simple optical configuration consists of a HeNe laser, polarizing optic, fused-silica capillary, and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera in communication with a laser beam analyzer. The capillary scale polarimeter is based on the interaction between a polarized laser beam and a capillary tube, which results in a 360 degree fan of scattered light. This array of scattered light contains a set of interference fringe, which respond in a reproducible manner to changes in solute optical activity. The polarimetric utility of the instrument will be demonstrated by the analysis of two optically active solutes, R-mandelic acid and D-glucose, in addition to the nonoptically active control, glycerol. The polarimetric response of the system is quantifiable with detection limits facilitating 1.7 x 10(-3) M or 68 x 10(-12) nmol (7 psi 10(-9) g) sensitivity. PMID:11315158

  13. Probing Coronal Mass Ejections with Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Fischer, P. D.; Kooi, J. E.; Buffo, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are one of the most important solar phenomena in affecting conditions on Earth. There is not a consensus as to the physical mechanisms responsible for ejecting CME material from the solar atmosphere. Measurements that specify basic physical properties close to the Sun, when the CME is still evolving, should be useful in determining the correct theoretical model. One of the best observational techniques is that of Faraday rotation, a rotation in the plane of polarization of radio waves when propagating through a magnetized medium like the corona. The importance of Faraday rotation in determining the structure and evolutionary history of CMEs was discussed in Liu et al (ApJ 665, 1439, 2007). In this paper, we report Faraday rotation observations of ``constellations'' of background extragalactic radio sources near the Sun on three days in August, 2012, with the intention of observing a source occulted by a CME. Observations were made with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. We made polarization measurements at 6 frequencies between 1.31 and 1.94 GHz. On August 2, 2012, a CME clearly visible on the LASCO C3 coronagraph occulted a radio source from our sample, 0843+1547. Preliminary data analysis shows a Faraday rotation transient for 0843+1547 which appears to be associated with the CME. The Faraday rotation measure changes from nearly 0 before CME passage, to a value of about -12 radians/square-meter before declining after CME passage. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of models for CME structure, as well as the status of our observations of other sources on August 2, and on other days. This work was supported at the University of Iowa by grant ATM09-56901.

  14. The interrelation between the Faraday effect and the inverse Faraday effect in a magnetic medium and the terahertz inverse Faraday effect in single molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokman, I. D.; Shvetsov, A. V.

    2009-11-01

    The interrelation between the Faraday and the inverse Faraday effects when the magneto-dipole interaction of a sample with an electromagnetic wave is essential has been phenomenologically investigated. This investigation was carried out in the spirit of well-known Pitaevsky’s approach. The terahertz inverse Faraday effect in single molecule magnets has been theoretically studied, the conditions favorable for observing this effect have been formulated.

  15. Quantum dot cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated an unambiguous quantum dot cascade laser based on InGaAs/GaAs/InAs/InAlAs heterostructure by making use of self-assembled quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanow growth mode and two-step strain compensation active region design. The prototype generates stimulated emission at λ ~ 6.15 μm and a broad electroluminescence band with full width at half maximum over 3 μm. The characteristic temperature for the threshold current density within the temperature range of 82 to 162 K is up to 400 K. Moreover, our materials show the strong perpendicular mid-infrared response at about 1,900 cm-1. These results are very promising for extending the present laser concept to terahertz quantum cascade laser, which would lead to room temperature operation. PACS 42.55.Px; 78.55.Cr; 78.67.Hc PMID:24666965

  16. On intracluster Faraday rotation. II - Statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, J. M.; Dennison, B.

    1982-01-01

    The comparison of a reliable sample of radio source Faraday rotation measurements seen through rich clusters of galaxies, with sources seen through the outer parts of clusters and therefore having little intracluster Faraday rotation, indicates that the distribution of rotation in the former population is broadened, but only at the 80% level of statistical confidence. Employing a physical model for the intracluster medium in which the square root of magnetic field strength/turbulent cell per gas core radius number ratio equals approximately 0.07 microgauss, a Monte Carlo simulation is able to reproduce the observed broadening. An upper-limit analysis figure of less than 0.20 microgauss for the field strength/turbulent cell ratio, combined with lower limits on field strength imposed by limitations on the Compton-scattered flux, shows that intracluster magnetic fields must be tangled on scales greater than about 20 kpc.

  17. In-vacuum Faraday isolation remote tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Antonucci, F; Aoudia, S; Arun, K G; Astone, P; Ballardin, G; Barone, F; Barsuglia, M; Bauer, Th S; Beker, M G; Bigotta, S; Birindelli, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Blom, M; Boccara, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bosi, L; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brillet, A; Brisson; Budzynski, R; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buskulic, D; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Campagna, E; Canuel, B; Carbognani, F; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cesarini, E; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chincarini, A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Corda, C; Corsi, A; Coulon, J-P; Cuoco, E; D'Antonio, S; Dari, A; Dattilo, V; Davier, M; Day, R; De Rosa, R; del Prete, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Dietz, A; Drago, M; Fafone, V; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J-D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Freise, A; Gammaitoni, L; Garufi, F; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Giazotto, A; Gouaty, R; Granata, M; Greverie, C; Guidi, G M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hild, S; Huet, D; Jaranowski, P; Kowalska, I; Królak, A; La Penna, P; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, T G F; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Losurdo, G; Mackowski, J M; Majorana, E; Man, N; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Masserot, A; Michel, C; Milano, L; Minenkov, Y; Mohan, M; Moreau, J; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Mosca, S; Moscatelli, V; Mours, B; Neri, I; Nocera, F; Pagliaroli, G; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Paoletti, F; Pardi, S; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Persichetti, G; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Poggiani, R; Prato, M; Prodi, G A; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Rabaste, O; Rabeling, D S; Rapagnani, P; Re, V; Regimbau, T; Ricci, F; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Romano, R; Rosińska, D; Ruggi, P; Sassolas, B; Sentenac, D; Sturani, R; Swinkels, B; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Trummer, J; Vajentei, G; van den Brand, J F J; van der Putten, S; Vavoulidis, M; Vedovato, G; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinet, J-Y; Vocca, H; Was, M; Yvert, M

    2010-09-01

    In-vacuum Faraday isolators (FIs) are used in gravitational wave interferometers to prevent the disturbance caused by light reflected back to the input port from the interferometer itself. The efficiency of the optical isolation is becoming more critical with the increase of laser input power. An in-vacuum FI, used in a gravitational wave experiment (Virgo), has a 20 mm clear aperture and is illuminated by an almost 20 W incoming beam, having a diameter of about 5 mm. When going in vacuum at 10(-6) mbar, a degradation of the isolation exceeding 10 dB was observed. A remotely controlled system using a motorized lambda=2 waveplate inserted between the first polarizer and the Faraday rotator has proven its capability to restore the optical isolation to a value close to the one set up in air. PMID:20842804

  18. Dual Modulation Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy of HO2

    CERN Document Server

    Brumfield, Brian; Ju, Yiguang; Wysocki, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The technique of dual modulation Faraday rotation spectroscopy has been applied for near shot-noise limited detection of HO2 at the exit of an atmospheric pressure flow reactor. This was achieved by combining direct current modulation at 51 kHz of an external cavity quantum cascade laser system with 610 Hz modulation of the magnetic field generated by a Helmholtz coil. The DM-FRS measurement had a 1.8 times better signal-to-noise ratio than an AC-FRS measurement acquired under identical flow reactor conditions. Harmonic detection of the FRS signal also eliminated the substantial DC-offset associated with electromagnetic intereference pick-up from the Helmholtz coils that is observed in the AC-FRS spectrum. A noise equivalent angle of 4x10^(-9) rad Hz^(-1/2) was observed for the DM-FRS measurement, and this corresponds to a 3 sigma detection limit of 0.2 ppmv Hz^(-1/2).

  19. Faraday Rotation and L Band Oceanographic Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Spaceborne radiometric measurements of the L band brightness temperature over the oceans make it possible to estimate sea surface salinity. However, Faraday rotation in the ionosphere disturbs the signals and must be corrected. Two different ways of assessing the disturbance directly from the...... radiometric measurements, and hence enabling a correction for the effect, are being discussed. Also, a method, which aims at circumventing the problem by using the first Stokes parameter in the salinity retrieval, is being discussed....

  20. A Simple Model for Faraday Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Bechhoefer, John; Johnson, Brad

    1996-01-01

    We show that the linear-stability analysis of the birth of Faraday waves on the surface of a fluid is simplified considerably when the fluid container is driven by a triangle waveform rather than by a sine wave. The calculation is simple enough to use in an undergraduate course on fluid dynamics or nonlinear dynamics. It is also an attractive starting point for a nonlinear analysis.

  1. Faraday Pilot-Waves: Generation and Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano-Rios, Carlos; Milewski, Paul; Nachbin, André; Bush, John

    2015-11-01

    We examine the dynamics of drops bouncing on a fluid bath subjected to vertical vibration. We solve a system of linear PDEs to compute the surface wave generation and propagation. Waves are triggered at each bounce, giving rise to the Faraday pilot-wave field. The model captures several of the behaviors observed in the laboratory, including transitions between a variety of bouncing and walking states, the Doppler effect, and droplet-droplet interactions. Thanks to the NSF.

  2. MUSIC for Faraday rotation measure synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrecut, M.

    2013-03-01

    Faraday rotation measure (RM) synthesis requires the recovery of the Faraday dispersion function (FDF) from measurements restricted to limited wavelength ranges, which is an ill-conditioned deconvolution problem. Here, we propose a novel deconvolution method based on an extension of the MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm. The complexity and speed of the method is determined by the eigen-decomposition of the covariance matrix of the observed polarizations. We show numerically that for high to moderate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) cases the RM-MUSIC method is able to recover the Faraday depth values of closely spaced pairs of thin RM components, even in situations where the peak response of the FDF is outside of the RM range between the two input RM components. This result is particularly important because the standard deconvolution approach based on RM-CLEAN fails systematically in such situations, due to its greedy mechanism used to extract the RM components. For low S/N situations, both the RM-MUSIC and RM-CLEAN methods provide similar results.

  3. Design of the Faraday Cups in Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, A F D

    2005-01-01

    This paper details the work done on the design of the Faraday cups for the Diamond injector. Faraday cups are a basic charge capture device which can be used as reference points for current measurement calibration. Diamond has Faraday cups in positions covering the complete energy range of the injector from the electron gun to the booster synchrotron extraction. Specifically there are cups at 90 keV, 4 MeV, 100 MeV and 3 GeV. An initial design decision was made to make the designs passive to increase reliability and reduce complexity. The 90 keV and 4 MeV cups were modified from an existing design using analytical formulae and MathCAD, while the high energy 100 MeV and 3 GeV designs were done using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and MatLAB. The EGSnrc led designs achieved a theoretical electron capture of around 99%, allowing them to be used with reasonable certainty as calibration references. Due to the modest 5Hz repetition rate, power loading of the structures is minimal and active cooling is not required for...

  4. Midplane Faraday Rotation: A densitometer for BPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The density in a high field, high density tokamak such as BPX can be determined by measuring the Faraday rotation of a 10.6 μm laser directed tangent to the toroidal field. If there is a horizontal array of such beams, then ne(R) can be readily obtained with a simple Abel version about the center line of the tokamak. For BPX operated at full field and density, the rotation angle would be quite large -- about 75 degrees per pass. A layout in which a single laser beam is fanned out in the horizontal midplane of the tokamak, with a set of retroreflectors on the far side of the vacuum vessel, would provide good spatial resolution, depending only upon the number of reflectors. With this proposed layout, only one window would be needed. Because the rotation angle is never more than 1 ''fringe,'' the data is always good, and it is also a continuous measurement in time. Faraday rotation is dependent only upon the plasma itself, and thus is not sensitive to vibration of the optical components. Simulations of the expected results show that BPX would be well served even at low densities by a Midplane Faraday Rotation densitometer of ∼64 channels. Both TFTR and PBX-M would be suitable test beds for the BPX system

  5. Accurate Jones Matrix of the Practical Faraday Rotator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王林斗; 祝昇翔; 李玉峰; 邢文烈; 魏景芝

    2003-01-01

    The Jones matrix of practical Faraday rotators is often used in the engineering calculation of non-reciprocal optical field. Nevertheless, only the approximate Jones matrix of practical Faraday rotators has been presented by now. Based on the theory of polarized light, this paper presents the accurate Jones matrix of practical Faraday rotators. In addition, an experiment has been carried out to verify the validity of the accurate Jones matrix. This matrix accurately describes the optical characteristics of practical Faraday rotators, including rotation, loss and depolarization of the polarized light. The accurate Jones matrix can be used to obtain the accurate results for the practical Faraday rotator to transform the polarized light, which paves the way for the accurate analysis and calculation of practical Faraday rotators in relevant engineering applications.

  6. Faraday Induction and the Current Carriers in a Circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, it is pointed out that Faraday induction can be treated from an untraditional, particle-based point of view. The electromagnetic fields of Faraday induction can be calculated explicitly from approximate point-charge fields derived from the Li\\'enard-Wiechert expressions or from the Darwin Lagrangian. Thus the electric fields of electrostatics, the magnetic fields of magnetostatics, and the electric fields of Faraday induction can all be regarded as arising from charged partic...

  7. Electroluminescence of quantum-dash-based quantum cascade laser structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed two mid-infrared quantum cascade structures based on InAs quantum dashes. The dashes were embedded either in AlInGaAs lattice-matched to InP or in tensile-strained AlInAs. The devices emit between 7 and 11 μm and are a step forward in the development of quantum cascade lasers based on 3-D confined active regions.

  8. Rethinking Faraday's law for teaching motional electromotive force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study shows physicists' discussions on the meaning of Faraday's law where situations involving extended conductors or moving contact points are particularly troublesome. We raise questions to test students' difficulties in applying Faraday's law in motional electromotive force phenomena. We suggest the benefit of analysing these phenomena when teaching Faraday's law in introductory physics courses at university. We are not implying that Faraday's law should be revised, but we do want to set the stage for careful rethinking regarding the meaning and application of each term of the law as it appears in traditional introductory courses. (paper)

  9. Competing Turing and Faraday instabilities in longitudinally modulated passive resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Copie, Francois; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Trillo, Stefano; Mussot, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the interplay of Turing and Faraday (modulational) instabilities in a bistable passive nonlinear resonator. The Faraday branch is induced via parametric resonance owing to a periodic modulation of the resonator dispersion. We show that the bistable switching dynamics is dramatically affected by the competition between the two instability mechanisms, which dictates two completely novel scenarios. At low detunings from resonance switching occurs between the stable stationary lower branch and the Faraday-unstable upper branch, whereas at high detunings we observe the crossover between the Turing and Faraday periodic structures. The results are well explained in terms of the universal Lugiato-Lefever model.

  10. Competing Turing and Faraday Instabilities in Longitudinally Modulated Passive Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copie, François; Conforti, Matteo; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Mussot, Arnaud; Trillo, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally investigate the interplay of Turing (modulational) and Faraday (parametric) instabilities in a bistable passive nonlinear resonator. The Faraday branch is induced via parametric resonance owing to a periodic modulation of the resonator dispersion. We show that the bistable switching dynamics is dramatically affected by the competition between the two instability mechanisms, which dictates two completely novel scenarios. At low detunings from resonance, switching occurs between the stable stationary lower branch and the Faraday-unstable upper branch, whereas at high detunings we observe the crossover between the Turing and Faraday periodic structures. The results are well explained in terms of the universal Lugiato-Lefever model.

  11. Learning Cascading

    CERN Document Server

    Covert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for software developers, system architects and analysts, big data project managers, and data scientists who wish to deploy big data solutions using the Cascading framework. You must have a basic understanding of the big data paradigm and should be familiar with Java development techniques.

  12. Internal magnetic field measurements by laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. Q.; Jie, Y. X.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Zou, Z. Y.; Qian, J. P.; Li, W. M.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Zhang, S. B.; Lan, T.; Wang, S. X.; Hanada, K.; Wei, X. C.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-channel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique has been implemented for fully diagnosing the internal magnetic field in the EAST tokamak. Double-pass, horizontal, radially-viewing chords access the plasma via an equatorial port. The laser source consists of three CW formic acid (HCOOH) FIR lasers at nominal wavelength 432.5 μm which are optically pumped by independent infrared CO2 lasers. Output power is more than 30 mW of per cavity. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors, can with withstand baking temperature up to 350°C and discharge duration more than 1000 s, are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output for plasma control, have been developed for the POINT system. Reliability of both polarimetric and interferometric measurement are obtained in 22 s long pulse H mode discharge and 8 s NBI H mode discharge, indicating the POINT system works for any heating scheme on EAST so far. The electron line-integrated density resolution of POINT is less than 1 × 1016 m-2 (validation POINT data. Realtime EFIT with Faraday angle and density phase shift constraints will be implemented in the plasma control system in the future.

  13. Faraday rotation in clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraday rotation in the clusters of galaxies are estimated systematically from the rotation measures of radio sources in or behind the clusters of galaxies. A cross-correlation of the Abell catalogue of rich clusters of galaxies with the catalogue of linear polarization of radio sources resulted in the identification of 10 clusters of galaxies. The average value of the rotation measures in the clusters of galaxies is about 20 rad m-2 and correspond to the well ordered magnetic field with the value of 2 x 10-7 gauss, if the electron densities is 10-4 cm-3. (author)

  14. Broadband Faraday isolator for gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Parfenov, V A

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the concept and performance of a highly effective broadband Faraday isolator. This device is based on Nd:Fe:B permanent magnets and can be used in interferometric gravitational wave detectors in which lasers oscillating in the visible or near infrared region are used. The degree of optical isolation of 30 dB, provided by the device, is achieved when operating with laser beams of up to 2 mm, and up to 25 dB when the aperture of the magneto-optic element (10 mm) is completely filled.

  15. Recent VLA Observations of Coronal Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, P. D.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Proposed mechanisms for coronal heating and acceleration of the fast solar wind, such as Joule heating by coronal currents or dissipation of Alfvén waves, depend on the magnetic field structure and plasma characteristics of the corona within heliocentric distances of 5 solar radii. Faraday rotation observations can provide unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. We report on sensitive full-polarization observations of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 solar radii. The observations were made with the VLA in August of 2011. We performed these observations at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz), permitting measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. While the measured Faraday rotation was lower than our a priori expectations, we can understand the magnitude of the observed Faraday rotation in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. For coronal remote sensing, an advantage of using extended extragalactic radio sources such as 3C228 is that such observations provide multiple lines of sight through the corona. Our data provide two lines of sight (separated by 46″, 33,000 km in the corona), one to a northern hotspot and the other to a southern hotspot with fractional polarizations of 14% and 8% respectively. We detected three periods over the eight-hour observing session during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation between these two closely spaced lines of sight. These measurements yield an estimate of 2 - 4 GA for coronal currents. We did not directly detect rotation measure fluctuations. Our data impose upper limits on rotation measure fluctuations caused by coronal waves. The observed upper limits were 3.3 and 6.4 rad/m2 and are comparable to and not inconsistent with some models for Alfvén wave heating. This research was supported at the University of Iowa by grants ATM09

  16. Inverse Faraday Effect driven by Radiation Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Liseykina, T V; Macchi, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of extremely intense ($>10^{23}~\\mbox{W cm}^{-2}$), circularly polarized laser pulses with thick targets, theory and simulations show that a major fraction of the laser energy is converted into incoherent radiation because of collective electron motion during the "hole boring" dynamics. The effective dissipation due to radiative losses allows the absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum, which in turn leads to the generation of an axial magnetic field of tens of gigagauss value. This peculiar "inverse Faraday effect" is demonstrated in three-dimensional simulations including radiation friction.

  17. Acoustic Faraday rotation in Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Donghao; Shi, Junren

    We investigate the phonon problems in Weyl semimetals, from which both the phonon Berry curvature and the phonon Damping could be obtained. We show that even without a magnetic field, the degenerate transverse acoustic modes could also be split due to the adiabatic curvature. In three dimensional case, acoustic Faraday rotation shows up. And furthermore, since the attenuation procedure could distinguish the polarized mode, single circularly polarized acoustic wave could be realized. We study the mechanism in the novel time reversal symmetry broken Weyl semimetal. New effects rise because of the linear dispersion, which give enlightenment in the measurement of this new kind of three-dimensional material.

  18. Rethinking Faraday's Law for Teaching Motional Electromotive Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuza, Kristina; Guisasola, Jenaro; Michelini, Marisa; Santi, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    This study shows physicists' discussions on the meaning of Faraday's law where situations involving extended conductors or moving contact points are particularly troublesome. We raise questions to test students' difficulties in applying Faraday's law in motional electromotive force phenomena. We suggest the benefit of analysing these phenomena…

  19. Expenditure Cascades

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Prevailing economic models of consumer behavior completely ignore the well-documented link between context and evaluation. We propose and test a theory that explicitly incorporates this link. Changes in one group's spending shift the frame of reference that defines consumption standards for others just below them on the income scale, giving rise to expenditure cascades. Our model, a descendant of James Duesenberry's relative income hypothesis, predicts the observed ways in which individual sa...

  20. Faraday Rotation Observations of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, S.; Spangler, S. R.

    1998-05-01

    Faraday rotation measures the path integral of the product of electron density and line of sight component of the magnetic field from the observer to a source of linearly polarized radio emission. For our observations, the line of sight passes through the solar corona. These observations were made with the NRAO Very Large Array at frequencies of 1465 and 1635 MHz. Observations at two frequencies can confirm the lambda (2) dependence of position angle rotation characteristic of Faraday rotation. We observed the extended radio source 0036+030 (4C+03.01) on March 28, 1997, when the source was 8.6 Rsun from the center of the Sun. Nearly continuous observations were made over an 11 hour period. Our observations measure an average rotation measure (RM) of about +7 radians/m(2) attributable to the corona. The RM showed slow variations during the observing session, with a total change of about 3 radians/m(2) . This variation is attributed to large scale gradients and static plasma structures in the corona, and is the same for two source components separated by 30 arcseconds (22000 km). We have also detected RM variations on time scales of 15 minutes to one hour, which may be coronal Alfven waves. We measure an rms variation of 0.57 radians/m(2) for such fluctuations, which is comparable to previous reports.

  1. Correcting ionospheric Faraday rotation for ASKAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Shane; Gaensler, Bryan; Landecker, Tom L.; Willis, Tony

    2012-10-01

    Next-generation polarisation surveys, such as the POSSUM survey on ASKAP, aim to measure weak, statistical, cosmological effects associated with weak magnetic fields, and so will require unprecedented accuracy and stability for measuring polarisation vectors and their Faraday rotation measures (RMs). Ionospheric Faraday rotation (IFR) corrupts polarization observations and cannot be ignored at mid to low frequencies. In aperture-synthesis polarimetry IFR rotates individual visibilities and leads to a loss of coherence and accuracy of polarization angle determination. Through the POSSUM survey science team we have been involved in developing detailed ionospheric prediction software (POSSUM memos #10a,b) that will be used to correct the observed visibilities on ASKAP before imaging to obtain sufficiently accurate polarization and RM data. To provide a stringent test of this software, we propose a continuous 24 hr observing block using the 1.1-3.1 GHz band to monitor the variations caused by the time-variable ionosphere in the polarization angle and RM of a strongly polarized calibrator source, PKS B1903-802. We request a total of 96 hrs (4 x 24 hrs) to monitor the changes in the ionosphere every 3 to 6 months until BETA/ASKAP-12 is taking reliable polarization data.

  2. Observation of Phillips' spectrum in Faraday waves

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of the Phillips' spectrum of gravity surface waves driven by a horizontally moving wave maker interacting with Faraday waves. We measure the temporal fluctuations of the surface wave amplitude at a given location and we show that, for a wide range of forcing parameters, they display a power-law spectrum that greatly differs from the one predicted by the WT theory but coincides with Phillips' spectrum for gravity waves. We compute the probability density function of the local surface height increments, which show that they change strongly across time scales. The structure functions of these increments are shown to display power-laws as a function of the time lag, with exponents that are not linear with the order of the structure function, thus showing that the wave field is intermittent. We argue that the origin of this scale-invariant intermittent spectrum is the Faraday wave pattern breakup due to its advection by the propagating gravity waves, which can be related directly to the P...

  3. Preinjector for Linac 1, Faraday cage

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The 50 MeV Linac 1 started up in 1958 as injector to the 26 GeV PS, with a 520 kV Cockcroft-Walton generator as its preinjector, housed in a vast Faraday cage, visible here. When the Cockcroft-Walton broke down in 1973, it was replaced by a much smaller SAMES generator, of the kind used for electrostatic separators. From 1980 on, Linac 2 took over as injector for the 800 MeV Booster, and Linac 1 continued as injector for LEAR. In 1984, the electrostatic preinjector (i.e. the Faraday cage with its contents, SAMES generator and all) was replaced by a 520 keV RFQ. At the lower left corner we see the HV connectors to the SAMES generator, at the right edge part of the opened electronics-platform. Jean-Luc Vallet sees to it that all parts are properly grounded. See also 7403073X, 7403074X, 7403081X, 7403083X.

  4. Searching for Faraday rotation in cosmic microwave background polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Granados, B.; Battaner, E.; Florido, E.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 9th-year foreground reduced data at 33, 41 and 61 GHz to derive a Faraday rotation at map and at angular power spectrum levels taking into account their observational errors. A processing mask provided by WMAP is used to avoid contamination from the disc of our Galaxy and local spurs. We have found a Faraday rotation component at both, map and power spectrum levels. The lack of correlation of the Faraday rotation with Galactic Faraday rotation, synchrotron and dust polarization from our Galaxy or with cosmic microwave background anisotropies or lensing suggests that it could be originated at reionization (ℓ ≲ 12). Even if the detected Faraday rotation signal is weak, the present study could contribute to establish magnetic fields strengths of B0 ˜ 10-8 G at reionization.

  5. A High Efficiency Architecture for Cascaded Raman Fiber Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Supradeepa, V R; Headley, Clifford E; Yan, Man F; Palsdottir, Bera; Jakobsen, Dan

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new high efficiency architecture for cascaded Raman fiber lasers based on a single pass cascaded amplifier configuration. Conversion is seeded at all intermediate Stokes wavelengths using a multi-wavelength seed source. A lower power Raman laser based on the conventional cascaded Raman resonator architecture provides a convenient seed source providing all the necessary wavelengths simultaneously. In this work we demonstrate a 1480nm laser pumped by an 1117nm Yb-doped fiber laser with maximum output power of 204W and conversion efficiency of 65% (quantum-limited efficiency is ~75%). We believe both the output power and conversion efficiency (relative to quantum-limited efficiency) are the highest reported for Raman fiber lasers.

  6. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2006-01-01

    the Fermi energy lies in a spectral gap, we rigorously prove theWidom-Streda formula. For free electrons, the transverse conductivity can be explicitly computed and coincides with the classical result. In the general case, using magnetic perturbation theory, the conductivity tensor is expanded in......This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. At zero temperature and zero frequency, if...... field Bloch functions and energies. No derivatives with respect to the quasimomentum appear and thereby all ambiguities are removed, in contrast to earlier work....

  7. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. For free electrons, the transverse...... conductivity can be explicitly computed and coincides with the classical result. In the general case, using magnetic perturbation theory, the conductivity tensor is expanded in powers of the strength of the magnetic field B. Then the linear term in B of this expansion is written down in terms of the zero...... magnetic field Green function and the zero field current operator. In the periodic case, the linear term in B of the conductivity tensor is expressed in terms of zero magnetic field Bloch functions and energies. No derivatives with respect to the quasimomentum appear and thereby all ambiguities are removed...

  8. The Faraday effect revisited General theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cornean, H D; Pedersen, T G

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. For free electrons, the transverse conductivity can be explicitly computed and coincides with the classical result. In the general case, using magnetic perturbation theory, the conductivity tensor is expanded in powers of the strength of the magnetic field $B$. Then the linear term in $B$ of this expansion is written down in terms of the zero magnetic field Green function and the zero field current operator. In the periodic case, the linear term in $B$ of the conductivity tensor is expressed in terms of zero magnetic field Bloch functions and energies. No derivatives with respect to the quasimomentum appear and thereby all ambiguities are removed, in contrast to earlier work.

  9. Media responsible for Faraday rotation: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, D.; Lonsdale, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent technological advances have led to a resurgence of interest in low frequency radio astronomy. Ionospheric distortion of cosmic radiation has, however, been a challenge for high fidelity and high sensitivity measurements at these long wavelengths. Several new and innovative low radio frequency interferometers are currently in varying stages of development, construction and commissioning across the globe. They will pursue a broad range of scientific objectives, and precise ionospheric calibration over the wide field-of-view of these new generation instruments will be a prerequisite for achieving these science goals. The task of calibration is made more difficult by the Faraday rotation (FR) of polarized flux as it passes through the magnetized plasma of the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the magnetosphere, and the heliosphere. To quantify these effects, we present a survey of the order of magnitude of FR associated with these media and their spatial and temporal variations.

  10. Scaling behavior of coarsening Faraday heaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gerner, Henk Jan; van der Weele, Ko; van der Meer, Devaraj; van der Hoef, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    When a layer of sand is vertically shaken, the surface spontaneously breaks up in a landscape of small conical "Faraday heaps," which merge into larger ones on an ever increasing time scale. We propose a model for the heap dynamics and show analytically that the mean lifetime of the transient state with N heaps scales as N(-2). When there is an abundance of sand, such that the vibrating plate always remains completely covered, this means that the average diameter of the heaps grows as t(1/2). Otherwise, when the sand is less plentiful and parts of the plate get depleted during the coarsening process, the average diameter of the heaps grows more slowly, namely as t(1/3). This result compares well with experimental observations. PMID:26565231

  11. Current measurement by Faraday effect on GEPOPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and calibration of an optical current sensor using BK7 glass is presented. The current sensor is based on the polarization rotation by Faraday effect. GEPOPU is a pulsed power generator, double transit time 120 ns, 1.5 Ohm impedance, coaxial geometry, where Z pinch experiment are performed. The measurements were performed at the Optics and Plasma Physics Laboratory of Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. The verdet constant for two different optical materials was obtained using He-Ne laser. The values obtained are within the experimental error bars of measurements published in the literature (less than 15% difference). Two different sensor geometries were tried. We present the preliminary results for one of the geometries. The values obtained for the current agree within the measurement error with those obtained by means of a Spice simulation of the generator. Signal traces obtained are completely noise free.

  12. Testing Ionospheric Faraday Rotation Corrections in CASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Moellenbrock, George

    2015-04-01

    The Earth’s ionosphere introduces direction- and time-dependent effects over a range of physical and temporal scales and so is a major source for unmodeled phase offsets for low frequency radioastronomical observations. Ionospheric effects are often the limiting factor to making sensitive radioastronomical measurements to probe the solar corona or coronal mass ejections at low frequencies (Array (VLA), did not previously have the capability to mitigate ionospheric effects. This algorithm uses GPS-based global ionosphere maps to mitigate the first and second order ionospheric effects (dispersion delay and Faraday rotation, respectively). We investigated several data centers as potential sources for global ionospheric models and chose the International Global Navigation Satellite System Service data product because data from other sources are generally too sparse to use without additional interpolation schemes. This implementation of ionospheric corrections in CASA has been tested on several sets of VLA observations and all of them showed a significant reduction of the dispersion delay. In order to rigorously test CASA’s ability to mitigate ionospheric Faraday rotation, we made VLA full-polarization observations of the standard VLA phase calibrators J0359+5057 and J0423+4150 in August 2014, using L band (1 - 2 GHz), S band (2 - 4 GHz), and C band (4 - 6 GHz) frequencies in the D array configuration. The observations were 4 hours in duration, beginning near local sunrise. In this paper, we give a general description of how these corrections are implemented as well as discussion of the code’s ability to mitigate the ionospheric effects present in these test observations over a range of times and elevation angles. This work was supported at the University of Iowa by grant ATM09-56901.

  13. Miniature modified Faraday cup for micro electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruya, Alan T.; Elmer, John W.; Palmer, Todd A.; Walton, Chris C.

    2008-05-27

    A micro beam Faraday cup assembly includes a refractory metal layer with an odd number of thin, radially positioned traces in this refractory metal layer. Some of the radially positioned traces are located at the edge of the micro modified Faraday cup body and some of the radially positioned traces are located in the central portion of the micro modified Faraday cup body. Each set of traces is connected to a separate data acquisition channel to form multiple independent diagnostic networks. The data obtained from the two diagnostic networks are combined and inputted into a computed tomography algorithm to reconstruct the beam shape, size, and power density distribution.

  14. Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy of Quantum-Dot Quantum Wells

    OpenAIRE

    Meier, Florian; Awschalom, David D.

    2004-01-01

    Time-resolved Faraday rotation studies of CdS/CdSe/CdS quantum-dot quantum wells have recently shown that the Faraday rotation angle exhibits several well-defined resonances as a function of probe energy close to the absorption edge. Here, we calculate the Faraday rotation angle from the eigenstates of the quantum-dot quantum well obtained with k.p theory. We show that the large number of narrow resonances with comparable spectral weight observed in experiment is not reproduced by the level s...

  15. Compact Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2009-04-01

    ): In this paper we present design considerations, thermal and optical modeling results, and device performance for a ruggedized, compact laser transmitter that utilizes a room temperature quantum cascade (QC) laser source. The QC laser transmitter is intended for portable mid-infrared (3-12 µm) spectroscopy applications, where the atmospheric transmission window is relatively free of water vapor interference and where the molecular rotational vibration absorption features can be used to detect and uniquely identify chemical compounds of interest. Initial QC laser-based sensor development efforts were constrained by the complications of cryogenic operation. However, improvements in both QC laser designs and fabrication processes have provided room-temperature devices that now enable significant miniaturization and integration potential for national security, environmental monitoring, atmospheric science, and industrial safety applications.

  16. External cavity quantum cascade laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we review the progress of the development of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) operated in an external cavity configuration. We concentrate on QCLs based on the bound-to-continuum design, since this design is especially suitable for broadband applications. Since they were first demonstrated, these laser-based tunable sources have improved in performance in terms of output power, duty cycle, operation temperature and tuneability. Nowadays they are an interesting alternative to FTIRs for some applications. They operate at room temperature, feature a high spectral resolution while being small in size. They were successfully used in different absorption spectroscopy techniques. Due to their vast potential for applications in industry, medicine, security and research, these sources enjoy increasing interest within the research community as well as in industry. (topical review)

  17. Guided flux motion and Faraday induction in hollow superconducting cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guided flux motion and Faraday induction effects were observed in two hollow cylinders of superconducting niobium in an effort to understand the origin of flux flow voltages in superconductors. Calculations are in excellent agreement with experimental results

  18. Commercialization plan laser-based decoating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    F2 Associates Inc. (F2) is a small, high-technology firm focused on developing and commercializing environmentally friendly laser ablation systems for industrial-rate removal of surface coatings from metals, concrete, and delicate substrates such as composites. F2 has a contract with the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to develop and test a laser-based technology for removing contaminated paint and other contaminants from concrete and metal surfaces. Task 4.1 in Phase 2 of the Statement of Work for this DOE contract requires that F2 ``document its plans for commercializing and marketing the stationary laser ablation system. This document shall include a discussion of prospects for commercial customers and partners and may require periodic update to reflect changing strategy. This document shall be submitted to the DOE for review.`` This report is being prepared and submitted in fulfillment of that requirement. This report describes the laser-based technology for cleaning and coatings removal, the types of laser-based systems that have been developed by F2 based on this technology, and the various markets that are emerging for this technology. F2`s commercialization and marketing plans are described, including how F2`s organization is structured to meet the needs of technology commercialization, F2`s strategy and marketing approach, and the necessary steps to receive certification for removing paint from aircraft and DOE certification for D and D applications. The future use of the equipment built for the DOE contract is also discussed.

  19. Commercialization plan laser-based decoating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F2 Associates Inc. (F2) is a small, high-technology firm focused on developing and commercializing environmentally friendly laser ablation systems for industrial-rate removal of surface coatings from metals, concrete, and delicate substrates such as composites. F2 has a contract with the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to develop and test a laser-based technology for removing contaminated paint and other contaminants from concrete and metal surfaces. Task 4.1 in Phase 2 of the Statement of Work for this DOE contract requires that F2 ''document its plans for commercializing and marketing the stationary laser ablation system. This document shall include a discussion of prospects for commercial customers and partners and may require periodic update to reflect changing strategy. This document shall be submitted to the DOE for review.'' This report is being prepared and submitted in fulfillment of that requirement. This report describes the laser-based technology for cleaning and coatings removal, the types of laser-based systems that have been developed by F2 based on this technology, and the various markets that are emerging for this technology. F2's commercialization and marketing plans are described, including how F2's organization is structured to meet the needs of technology commercialization, F2's strategy and marketing approach, and the necessary steps to receive certification for removing paint from aircraft and DOE certification for D and D applications. The future use of the equipment built for the DOE contract is also discussed

  20. Nanoscale Lasers Based on Carbon Peapods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shao-Long; SHEN Jian-Qi

    2006-01-01

    A scheme of nanoscale lasers based on the so-called carbon peapods is examined in detail.Since there is considerable cylindrical empty space in the middle of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT),it can serve as a laser resonant cavity that consists of two highly reflecting alignment "mirrors" separated by a distance.These mirrors refer to ordered arrays of C60 inside SWCNTs,which have photonic bandgap structures.Meanwhile,ideally single-mode lasers are supposed to be produced in the nanoscale resonant cavity.

  1. Linear diffusion into a Faraday cage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lin, Yau Tang; Merewether, Kimball O.; Chen, Kenneth C.

    2011-11-01

    Linear lightning diffusion into a Faraday cage is studied. An early-time integral valid for large ratios of enclosure size to enclosure thickness and small relative permeability ({mu}/{mu}{sub 0} {le} 10) is used for this study. Existing solutions for nearby lightning impulse responses of electrically thick-wall enclosures are refined and extended to calculate the nearby lightning magnetic field (H) and time-derivative magnetic field (HDOT) inside enclosures of varying thickness caused by a decaying exponential excitation. For a direct strike scenario, the early-time integral for a worst-case line source outside the enclosure caused by an impulse is simplified and numerically integrated to give the interior H and HDOT at the location closest to the source as well as a function of distance from the source. H and HDOT enclosure response functions for decaying exponentials are considered for an enclosure wall of any thickness. Simple formulas are derived to provide a description of enclosure interior H and HDOT as well. Direct strike voltage and current bounds for a single-turn optimally-coupled loop for all three waveforms are also given.

  2. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Quantum Cascade Lasers for Trace Gas Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Gaetano Scamarcio; Pietro Mario LugarÃ; Cinzia Di Franco; Angela Elia

    2006-01-01

    Various applications, such as pollution monitoring, toxic-gas detection, non invasive medical diagnostics and industrial process control, require sensitive and selective detection of gas traces with concentrations in the parts in 109 (ppb) and sub-ppb range. The recent development of quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) has given a new aspect to infrared laser-based trace gas sensors. In particular, single mode distributed feedback QCLs are attractive spectroscopic sources because of their excellent...

  3. Multicomponent gas analysis using broadband quantum cascade laser spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes Reyes, A.; Hou, Z.; Van Mastrigt, E.; Horsten, R.C.; J. C. De Jongste; Pijnenburg, M. W.; Urbach, H.P.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system covering the region between 850 and 1250 cm−1. Its robust multipass cavity ensures a constant interaction length over the entire spectral region. The device enables the detection and identification of numerous molecules present in a complex gas mixture without any pre-treatment in two minutes. We demonstrate that we can detect sub-ppmv concentration of acetone in presence of 2% of water at the same wavenumber region.

  4. Multicomponent gas analysis using broadband quantum cascade laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Reyes, A; Hou, Z; van Mastrigt, E; Horsten, R C; de Jongste, J C; Pijnenburg, M W; Urbach, H P; Bhattacharya, N

    2014-07-28

    We present a broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system covering the region between 850 and 1250 cm(-1). Its robust multipass cavity ensures a constant interaction length over the entire spectral region. The device enables the detection and identification of numerous molecules present in a complex gas mixture without any pre-treatment in two minutes. We demonstrate that we can detect sub-ppmv concentration of acetone in presence of 2% of water at the same wavenumber region. PMID:25089450

  5. Design of two-dimensional photonic crystal defect states for quantum cascade laser resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Kartik; Painter, Oskar

    2004-01-01

    Current quantum cascade lasers based upon conduction band electron transitions are predominantly TM (electrical field normal to the epitaxial direction) polarized. Here we present a study of localized defect modes, with the requisite TM polarization, in connected square and hexagonal lattice two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals for application as quantum cascade laser resonators. A simple group-theory based analysis is used to produce an approximate description of the resonant modes support...

  6. The contributions of Faraday and Maxwell to electrical science

    CERN Document Server

    Tricker, R A R

    1966-01-01

    The Contributions of Faraday and Maxwell to Electrical Science deals with the development of electromagnetic theory following the establishment of the basis for the first law of circulation relating to the magnetic fields generated by steady currents. This book is organized into two parts encompassing nine chapters that specifically treat the provision of the basis for the second law of circulation, the law that deals with the induction of currents, which was predominantly the work of British physicists, Michael Faraday and James Clerk Maxwell. Part I highlights their life, career, and contri

  7. MOEMS technology in laser based instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasers due to their high spatial coherence, low divergence and monochromaticity, can be used for precision metrology, trace measurement and remote diagnostics. At RRCAT several laser-based instruments have been developed to meet the requirements of the different stages of nuclear fuel cycle. The nuclear fuel cycle involves various stages right from uranium prospecting, to spent fuel inspection and reprocessing. At each stage of the fuel cycle instruments are required for monitoring different parameters with high sensitivity and accuracy. Several laser-based diagnostics and metrology systems have been developed for these applications which include laser uranium analyzer, optical dip-type probes for remote plutonium measurement, laser Scan guage for mixed carbide fuel metrology, fuel pellets inspection system, laser non-destructive testing systems for structural components of reactors, underwater inspection head for metrology of FBTR spent fuel bundles etc. One possible way of measurement or inspection in a high radiation environment would be to build the optical and mechanical front-end as a compact and miniaturized unit and connect it to the control arid data-acquisition electronics which sits far from the radiation field via a fiber optic cable. As the front end would contain only optical and mechanical components it would be easier to design a radiation hard system suitable for use in a hot cell environment. Miniaturization using Micro-Optical-Electronic-Mechanical-Systems (MOEMS) technology would further reduce the integrated dose received by the system and minimize the contaminated waste generated at end-of-life. These systems would be classified under the extrinsic fiber sensors category as the measurement is done by a MOEMS device external to the fiber and the fiber plays the roll' of carrying the control signals from the externally placed control unit to the MOEMS device and the measured parameter the other way round. This methodology of system design would

  8. Do Cascades Recur?

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Justin; Adamic, Lada A.; Kleinberg, Jon; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-01-01

    Cascades of information-sharing are a primary mechanism by which content reaches its audience on social media, and an active line of research has studied how such cascades, which form as content is reshared from person to person, develop and subside. In this paper, we perform a large-scale analysis of cascades on Facebook over significantly longer time scales, and find that a more complex picture emerges, in which many large cascades recur, exhibiting multiple bursts of popularity with period...

  9. Long wavelength quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is the extension of the concept of quantum cascade lasers towards longer wavelengths and the exploration of quantum cascade emission in the terahertz frequency regime. The first step is the realization of quantum cascade lasers based on GaAs/AlGaAs chirped superlattice active regions with photon energies above the longitudinal optical (LO-) phonon energy. These lasers push the long wavelength limit of GaAs-based quantum cascade lasers (previously at 13) to 23 micrometers. The 23-micrometer device is the first GaAs based quantum cascade laser with a metal surface plasmon waveguide. This waveguide scheme allows a reduction of the thickness of the epitaxially grown layer system and is therefore appropriate for long wavelength lasers. The measured threshold current densities reflect the differences in intersubband lifetimes and waveguide losses close to the LO-phonon energy. The major part of this thesis is devoted to the terahertz regime, i.e. the photon energy range below the LO-phonon energy. The intersubband scattering rate is no longer governed by LO-phonon emission from electrons at zero in-plane momentum, but disorder related scattering and electron-electron scattering come into play. Terahertz quantum cascade structures are designed, fabricated, and experimentally examined. Narrow linewidth (1.3 millielectronvolts) spontaneous emission is detected at a photon energy of 17.3 millielectronvolts (λ = 72 micrometers). To achieve population inversion the intersubband scattering rates have to be carefully engineered. Three strategies to manipulate the non-radiative rate are demonstrated: (1) Magnetic field quantization of the electronic motion reduces non-radiative scattering. Magneto-intersubband oscillations caused by inter-Landau-level transitions allow to determine the optical transition energy independently of the emission. (2) A reduction of the spatial overlap of initial and final subband by a barrier in an interwell transition causes a

  10. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Sensors for Hypersonic Flows (7274-050) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ground test facilities are used by NASA to simulate the conditions present during flight at hypersonic velocities, to test thermal protection materials for existing...

  11. A Quantum Cascade Laser-Based CO Sensor for Fire Warning Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maxion Technologies, Inc. (Maxion) proposes to develop and field test a Carbon Monoxide (CO)-sensor prototype for post fire cleanup and CO detection. The sensor...

  12. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Sensors for Hypersonic Flows (7275-020) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) proposes to design, build, test, and deliver to NASA a THz wavelength absorption sensor for continuous monitoring of atomic oxygen...

  13. A Sulfur Hexafluoride Sensor Using Quantum Cascade and CO2 Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Helion Vargas; Delson Schramm; Marcelo da Silva; Mila Rocha; Marcelo Sthel; Guilherme Lima; András Miklós

    2010-01-01

    The increase in greenhouse gas emissions is a serious environmental problem and has stimulated the scientific community to pay attention to the need for detection and monitoring of gases released into the atmosphere. In this regard, the development of sensitive and selective gas sensors has been the subject of several research programs. An important greenhouse gas is sulphur hexafluoride, an almost non-reactive gas widely employed in industrial processes worldwide. Indeed it is estimated that...

  14. A Quantum Cascade Laser-Based CO Sensor for Fire Warning Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maxion Technologies and Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) propose to jointly develop a compact, rugged, highly reliable, and autonomous sensor for in-situ monitoring of...

  15. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Local Oscillator for Terahertz Astronomy (7275-070) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Scientists at JPL measure radiation emitted in the far-infrared (or terahertz) region of the spectrum to study the history of the universe and the Earth's...

  16. Mapping Atmospheric Ammonia Emissions Using a Mobile Quantum Cascade Laser-based Open-path Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Miller, D. J.; Khan, M. A.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is a key precursor to atmospheric fine particulate matter, with strong implications for regional air quality and global climate change. Despite the importance of atmospheric ammonia, its spatial/temporal variation is poorly characterized, and the knowledge of its sources, sinks, and transport is severely limited. Existing measurements suggest that traffic exhaust may provide significant amounts of ammonia in urban areas, which cause greater impacts on particulate matter formation and urban air quality. To capture the spatial and temporal variation of ammonia emissions, a portable, low power sensor with high time resolution is necessary. We have developed a portable open-path ammonia sensor with a detection limit of 0.5 ppbv ammonia for 1 s measurements. The sensor has a power consumption of about 60 W and is capable of running on a car battery continuously for 24 hours. An additional laser has been coupled to the sensor to yield concurrent N2O and CO measurements as tracers for determining various sources. The overall sensor prototype fits on a 60 cm × 20 cm aluminum breadboard. Roadside measurements indicated NH3/CO emission ratios of 4.1±5.4 ppbv/ppmv from a fleet of 320 vehicles, which agree with existing on-ramp measurements. Urban measurements in the Baltimore and Washington, DC metropolitan areas have shown significant ammonia mixing ratios concurrent with carbon monoxide levels from the morning and evening rush hours. On-road measurements of our open-path sensor have also been performed continuously from the Midwest to Princeton, NJ including urban areas such as Pittsburgh, tunnels, and relatively clean conditions. The emission ratios of ammonia against CO and/or CO2 help identify the sources and amounts of both urban and agricultural ammonia emissions. Preliminary data from both spatial mapping, monitoring, and vehicle exhaust measurements suggest that urban ammonia emissions from fossil fuel combustion are significant and may provide an unrecognized source in the atmospheric ammonia budget. Ongoing efforts include spatial mapping of ammonia and other tracers in the New York City and Philadelphia metropolitan areas. Further comparison with TES satellite ammonia retrieval will help to put the measurements into a larger geographical and temporal context.

  17. The correspondence of Michael Faraday, v.2 1832-1840

    CERN Document Server

    James, F

    1993-01-01

    Volume 2 covers the 1830s, a period when Faraday pursued the consequences of his discovery of electromagnetic induction and revised entirely the theories of electrochemistry and the nature of electricity.His correspondents include scientists of the day as well as antiquaries, military men, artists and politicians.

  18. Faraday cup on board Japan's first interplanetary probe 'SAKIGAKE'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraday cup on board Japan's 1st interplanetary test probe 'SAKIGAKE' is described. The contents include the description of the principle of the measurement, structure of the sensor, accuracy of the measurement of bulk velocity, ion density and temperature of the solar wind plasma, data processing, and the thorough system of the experiment including telemetry allocation, status words and command system. (author)

  19. Interferometer using a 3 x 3 coupler and Faraday mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breguet, J; Gisin, N

    1995-06-15

    A new interferometric setup using a 3 x 3 coupler and two Faraday mirrors is presented. It has the advantages of being built only with passive components, of freedom from the polarization fading problem, and of operation with a LED. It is well suited for sensing time-dependent signals and does not depend on reciprocal or nonreciprocal constant perturbations. PMID:19862044

  20. Faraday's Investigation of Electromagnetic Induction. Experiment No. 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devons, Samuel

    This paper focuses on Michael Faraday's experimental research in electricity in the 1830's. Historical notes related to his work are included as well as experiments, his objectives, and illustrations of equipment for the experiments. Examples from his diary are given so that students can attempt to emulate his honest and systematic manner of…

  1. The correspondence of Michael Faraday, v.4 1849-1855

    CERN Document Server

    James, F

    2008-01-01

    This volume includes 70% of previously unpublished letters of Michael Farday spanning half of the 1850s and most of 1860. Topics include Faraday's work on regelation, the transmission of light through gold and his appointment by Emperor Napoleon III to be a Commander of the Legion of Honour.

  2. Correspondence of Michael Faraday, v.5 1855-1860

    CERN Document Server

    Faraday, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This volume includes 70% of previously unpublished letters of Michael Farday spanning half of the 1850s and most of 1860. Topics include Faraday's work on regelation, the transmission of light through gold and his appointment by Emperor Napoleon III to be a Commander of the Legion of Honour.

  3. Assessment of the Usability of the Workbench Faraday Cage Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten; Franek, Ondrej; Christensen, Søren K.; Pedersen, Gert Frølund; Ebert, Hans

    The workbench Faraday Cage method (WBFC) is a time efficient module pre-compliance test regarding radiated emission. This work investigates the method’s usability and credibility and concludes that for this particular case the WBFC perform a tolerable compliance test for frequencies below 360 MHz...

  4. Applications of cw quantum cascade laser near 8 μm in gas sensing research

    KAUST Repository

    Sajid, Muhammad Bilal

    2014-01-01

    Quantum cascade laser based sensors operating near 8 μm to detect H2O2, C2H2, CH4, N2O and H2O are discussed and demonstrated for applications in chemical kinetics, combustion and spectroscopic measurements.

  5. Earth-based observations of Faraday rotation in radio bursts from Jupiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New observations have been made of Faraday rotation in decameter-wavelength radio bursts from the planet Jupiter. Data obtained during six Io-B storms clearly indicate that an appreciable fraction (20 → 30%) of the observed Faraday rotation occurs in the Jovian magnetosphere. All of the Faraday rotation observed during a single Io-A storm can be accounted for by Earth's ionosphere. Measurements of the Faraday effect in Io-B emissions indicate that the source is in Jupiter's northern magnetic hemisphere. Observations of the Faraday effect in Io-C emissions are proposed to determine its location as well

  6. Simultaneous Quantification of OH and HO_2 in Dimethyl Ether Oxidation Using Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumfield, Brian; Yang, Xueliang; Lefkowitz, Joseph; Ju, Yiguang; Wysocki, Gerard

    2014-06-01

    OH and HO_2 are key radical species that control the autoignition and flame chemistry of fuels. Quantification of these radicals in the low-temperature oxidation of fuels is challenging due to their low concentrations. Strong spectral interference from more abundant non-radical species can further complicate accurate quantification of OH and HO_2. Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy (FRS), a laser-based diagnostic that exploits magneto-optical properties of paramagnetic radical species, can overcome these technical challenges to provide sensitive and selective in situ quantification of radicals. Previously we have been able to illustrate the strengths of FRS in quantification of HO_2 radicals in the low-temperature oxidation of dimethyl ether. Recently we have constructed a dual-wavelength FRS system capable of simultaneous in situ measurement of OH and HO_2. A DFB diode laser operating at 2.8 μm is used to target the Q(1.5e) and Q(1.5f) transitions in the fundamental vibrational band of the 2Π3/2 ground electronic state of OH. An EC-QCL operating at 7.1 μm is used to target a Q-branch spectral feature in the νb{2} vibrational band of HO_2. Concentrations of the target species are extracted from the measured spectra through fitting of an FRS spectral model. Based on preliminary retrievals, 3σ detection limits of estimated from the non-linear least-squares fitting results. In this talk I will discuss the application of dual-wavelength FRS for sensitive measurement of OH and HO_2 radicals generated by oxidation of dimethyl ether in a flow reactor over a 520 K - 1050 K temperature range. B. Brumfield et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 4, 872 (2013) B. Brumfield et al., ``Dual Modulation Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy of HO_2 in a Flow Reactor'' Accepted in Optics Letters (2014) N. Kurimoto et al., ``Quantitative Measurements of HO_2 / H_2O_2 and Intermediate Species in Low and Intermediate Temperature Oxidation of Dimethyl Ether'', Submitted to The 35th International

  7. Laser-based measuring equipment controlled by microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some laser-based measuring equipment controlled by microcomputer developed for industrial and scientific purposes are described. These equipments are intended for dial indicators verification, graduated rules measurement, and for very accurate measurement of the gravitational constant. (authors)

  8. CRADA Final Report, 2011S003, Faraday Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraday Technologies

    2012-12-12

    This Phase I SBIR program addressed the need for an improved manufacturing process for electropolishing niobium RF superconducting cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The ILC is a proposed particle accelerator that will be used to gain a deeper understanding of the forces of energy and matter by colliding beams of electrons and positrons at nearly the speed of light. The energy required for this to happen will be achieved through the use of advanced superconducting technology, specifically ~16,000 RF superconducting cavities operating at near absolute zero. The RF superconductor cavities will be fabricated from highly pure Nb, which has an extremely low surface resistance at 2 Kelvin when compared to other materials. To take full advantage of the superconducting properties of the Nb cavities, the inner surface must be a) polished to a microscale roughness < 0.1 µm with removal of at least 100 µm of material, and b) cleaned to be free of impurities that would degrade performance of the ILC. State-of-the-art polishing uses either chemical polishing or electropolishing, both of which require hydrofluoric acid to achieve breakdown of the strong passive film on the surface. In this Phase I program, Faraday worked with its collaborators at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) to demonstrate the feasibility of an electropolishing process for pure niobium, utilizing an environmentally benign alternative to chemical or electrochemical polishing electrolytes containing hydrofluoric acid. Faraday utilized a 31 wt% aqueous sulfuric acid solution (devoid of hydrofluoric acid) in conjunction with the FARADAYICSM Process, which uses pulse/pulse reverse fields for electropolishing, to demonstrate the ability to electropolish niobium to the desired surface finish. The anticipated benefits of the FARADAYICSM Electropolishing process will be a simpler, safer, and less expensive method capable of surface finishing high purity niobium cavities

  9. A New Faraday Screen For Tore Supra ICRH Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulliez, K.; Colas, L.; Argouarch, A.; Mendes, A.; Hamlyn-Harris, C.; Ekedahl, A.; Patterlini, J. C.

    2009-11-01

    In the framework of the Ion Cyclotron (IC) developments held in Cadarache, the design of a new Faraday Screen (FS) was initiated to replace the aging ones mounted on the 3 Tore Supra (TS) antennas. The new conceptual design proposed is steered by conclusive results of electrical simulation stressing the need to suppress the parallel RF currents flowing on the FS frame to reduce the RF sheaths. Two major modifications are implemented on a TS FS to reduce the j// circulation: apertures on the top and bottom closure walls of the antenna radiating box, and cantilevered FS bars (that is, bars not connected to the vertical central septum). This single connection point also eases the FS rod thermal expansion, resulting in less mechanical stresses. In addition, the cantilevered bar design avoids eddy current loops which reduces electromagnetically induced stresses during disruptions. If successful with plasma operation, this RF structure provides a promising new option to simplify the ITER IC Faraday screen design.

  10. Faraday Rotation Correction for Passive Microwave Remote Sensing from Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Faraday rotation (FR is one of the main error sources for passive microwave remote sensing from space especially in frequencies less than or equal to 10.7 GHz. In this paper, Faraday rotation correction for the vertical brightness temperature at L band and the third Stokes parameter brightness temperature at 10.7 GHz are discussed. Two approaches are studied to remove the influence of FR: correction by auxiliary data and correction by polarimetric mode. At 1.4 GHz, correction by polarimetric mode performs better than correction by auxiliary data. At 10.7 GHz, correction by auxiliary data is feasible while polarimetric mode correction becomes invalid. We propose a new method of using TEC data released by international GNSS service (IGS for correction. It has been proved that the residual correction errors are reduced. IGS data method greatly improves the correction accuracy.

  11. The effect of lipid monolayers on Faraday waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Stephen; Bookman, Lake; Shearer, Michael; Daniels, Karen

    2011-11-01

    Surface tension is known to affect the critical driving acceleration for Faraday waves and their spatial wavenumber at onset. We perform experiments in the subharmonic regime, on water whose free surface is contaminated with up to one monolayer of fluorescent NBD-PC lipid. A circular container of water is vibrated vertically at single frequencies ranging from 15 Hz to 70 Hz, and we measure the acceleration and wavenumber at the onset of Faraday waves. We observe that the critical acceleration is larger than predicted by recent models, if the effect of the contaminant is assumed to simply lower the surface tension. Critical wavenumbers are largely unaffected. We examine whether a non-uniform lipid distribution is responsible for these effects. This work is funded by NSF Grant # DMS-0968258.

  12. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Quantum Cascade Lasers for Trace Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Scamarcio

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Various applications, such as pollution monitoring, toxic-gas detection, noninvasive medical diagnostics and industrial process control, require sensitive and selectivedetection of gas traces with concentrations in the parts in 109 (ppb and sub-ppb range.The recent development of quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs has given a new aspect toinfrared laser-based trace gas sensors. In particular, single mode distributed feedback QCLsare attractive spectroscopic sources because of their excellent properties in terms of narrowlinewidth, average power and room temperature operation. In combination with these lasersources, photoacoustic spectroscopy offers the advantage of high sensitivity and selectivity,compact sensor platform, fast time-response and user friendly operation. This paper reportsrecent developments on quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for tracegas detection. In particular, different applications of a photoacoustic trace gas sensoremploying a longitudinal resonant cell with a detection limit on the order of hundred ppb ofozone and ammonia are discussed. We also report two QC laser-based photoacousticsensors for the detection of nitric oxide, for environmental pollution monitoring andmedical diagnostics, and hexamethyldisilazane, for applications in semiconductormanufacturing process.

  13. Observation of Faraday Waves in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Engels, P.; Atherton, C.; Hoefer, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Faraday waves in a cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate are created. It is shown that periodically modulating the transverse confinement, and thus the nonlinear interactions in the BEC, excites small amplitude longitudinal oscillations through a parametric resonance. It is also demonstrated that even without the presence of a continuous drive, an initial transverse breathing mode excitation of the condensate leads to spontaneous pattern formation in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the e...

  14. Development of movable faraday cup for precise charge measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high brightness electron beam is required for the 8-GeV linac in SACLA in order to generate an x-ray free electron laser. The high peak current beam is generated by bunch compressors, which shorten a bunch length up to several tens of femto-seconds. The precise charge measurement of the bunched beam is indispensable for estimation of the peak current, which is important to determine the characteristics of the x-ray free-electron laser, such as a FEL gain length. The longitudinal charge distribution of the bunched beam is measured by an rf deflector. Simultaneously, the total beam charge is measured by using a current transformer (CT), which is a non-destructive beam current monitor. By using both the distribution and total charge, we can estimate the peak current value. To calibrate the current monitor, we had installed a Faraday cup, which was designed to achieve a resolution of less than 1 pC. The geometry of a collector in the Faraday cup was determined by estimations of energy loss, charge loss and thermal analyses. The collector is designed to be retractable with an actuator, in order that the beam for the user experiment is supplied without intercepting beam transport. To reduce the charge loss due to secondary emission in the collector, a bias voltage can be applied between the collector and a vacuum chamber. In order to check the performance of the Faraday cup, the beam test was carried out. An absolute accuracy of beam charge measurement of the single bunch beam with a bunch length of 20 fs or less was achieved ±2% by using the Faraday cup. The CT was calibrated with sufficient accuracy. (author)

  15. Amplitude equations and pattern selection in Faraday waves

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Peilong; Vinals, Jorge

    1997-01-01

    A nonlinear theory of pattern selection in parametric surface waves (Faraday waves) is presented that is not restricted to small viscous dissipation. By using a multiple scale asymptotic expansion near threshold, a standing wave amplitude equation is derived from the governing equations. The amplitude equation is of gradient form, and the coefficients of the associated Lyapunov function are computed for regular patterns of various symmetries as a function of a viscous damping parameter gamma....

  16. Faraday cage angled-etching of nanostructures in bulk dielectrics

    OpenAIRE

    Latawiec, Pawel; Burek, Michael J.; Sohn, Young-Ik; Lončar, Marko

    2016-01-01

    For many emerging optoelectronic materials, heteroepitaxial growth techniques do not offer the same high material quality afforded by bulk, single-crystal growth. However, the need for optical, electrical, or mechanical isolation at the nanoscale level often necessitates the use of a dissimilar substrate, upon which the active device layer stands. Faraday cage angled-etching (FCAE) obviates the need for these planar, thin-film technologies by enabling in-situ device release and isolation thro...

  17. Gravitational Faraday Rotation of the Earth and Its Possible Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lin-Xia; SHAO Cheng-Gang; LUO Jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ It is shown that the rotation of the polarization plane of rays induced by a rotating body can be accumulated by means of a long baseline optical cavity. Theoretical analysis shows that the presently proposal experimental scheme is possible to test this gravitational Faraday rotation effect on the Earth, especially including how to effectively suppress the dominant part of the Sagnac effect due to the rotation of the Earth with a reasonable experimental configuration.

  18. Development of an external Faraday cup for beam current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In general, beam current measurements are very important for many kinds of experiments using highly energetic particle beams at accelerators, such as cyclotrons, linacs, etc. The Faraday cup is known to be one of the most popular beam current measurement tools. We developed an external Faraday cup to measure the beam current at a dedicated beam line for low-flux experiments installed at the MC-50 cyclotron of Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). It was designed for external beam current measurements and is composed of a vacuum chamber, an entrance window, a collimator, a electrostatic suppressor ring, and a cup. The window is made of 75-um-thick Kapton film, and the diameter of the collimator is 10 mm or 20 mm. The ring and the cup has 5-cm inner diameters, and the thickness of the bottom of the cup is 2 cm, which is enough to absorb the total proton energy up to 45 MeV. Using this external Faraday cup, we measured the beam current from the cyclotron, and we compared measured flux to the results from film dosimetry using GAF films.

  19. Faraday rotation data analysis with least-squares elliptical fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of analyzing Faraday rotation data from pulsed magnetic field measurements is described. The method uses direct least-squares elliptical fitting to measured data. The least-squares fit conic parameters are used to rotate, translate, and rescale the measured data. Interpretation of the transformed data provides improved accuracy and time-resolution characteristics compared with many existing methods of analyzing Faraday rotation data. The method is especially useful when linear birefringence is present at the input or output of the sensing medium, or when the relative angle of the polarizers used in analysis is not aligned with precision; under these circumstances the method is shown to return the analytically correct input signal. The method may be pertinent to other applications where analysis of Lissajous figures is required, such as the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) diagnostics. The entire algorithm is fully automated and requires no user interaction. An example of algorithm execution is shown, using data from a fiber-based Faraday rotation sensor on a capacitive discharge experiment.

  20. Faraday rotation data analysis with least-squares elliptical fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Adam D.; McHale, G. Brent; Goerz, David A.; Speer, Ron D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A method of analyzing Faraday rotation data from pulsed magnetic field measurements is described. The method uses direct least-squares elliptical fitting to measured data. The least-squares fit conic parameters are used to rotate, translate, and rescale the measured data. Interpretation of the transformed data provides improved accuracy and time-resolution characteristics compared with many existing methods of analyzing Faraday rotation data. The method is especially useful when linear birefringence is present at the input or output of the sensing medium, or when the relative angle of the polarizers used in analysis is not aligned with precision; under these circumstances the method is shown to return the analytically correct input signal. The method may be pertinent to other applications where analysis of Lissajous figures is required, such as the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) diagnostics. The entire algorithm is fully automated and requires no user interaction. An example of algorithm execution is shown, using data from a fiber-based Faraday rotation sensor on a capacitive discharge experiment.

  1. Toward instructional design principles: Inducing Faraday's law with contrasting cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Eric; Wieman, Carl E.

    2016-06-01

    Although physics education research (PER) has improved instructional practices, there are not agreed upon principles for designing effective instructional materials. Here, we illustrate how close comparison of instructional materials could support the development of such principles. Specifically, in discussion sections of a large, introductory physics course, a pair of studies compare two instructional strategies for teaching a physics concept: having students (i) explain a set of contrasting cases or (ii) apply and build on previously learned concepts. We compare these strategies for the teaching of Faraday's law, showing that explaining a set of related contrasting cases not only improves student performance on Faraday's law questions over building on a previously learned concept (i.e., Lorentz force), but also prepares students to better learn subsequent topics, such as Lenz's law. These differences persist to the final exam. We argue that early exposure to contrasting cases better focuses student attention on a key feature related to both concepts: change in magnetic flux. Importantly, the benefits of contrasting cases for both learning and enjoyment are enhanced for students who did not first attend a Faraday's law lecture, consistent with previous research suggesting that being told a solution can circumvent the benefits of its discovery. These studies illustrate an experimental approach for understanding how the structure of activities affects learning and performance outcomes, a first step toward design principles for effective instructional materials.

  2. Cascade quantum teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Nan-run; GONG Li-hua; LIU Ye

    2006-01-01

    In this letter a cascade quantum teleportation scheme is proposed. The proposed scheme needs less local quantum operations than those of quantum multi-teleportation. A quantum teleportation scheme based on entanglement swapping is presented and compared with the cascade quantum teleportation scheme. Those two schemes can effectively teleport quantum information and extend the distance of quantum communication.

  3. Quantum Faraday Effect in Double-Dot Aharonov-Bohm Ring

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Kicheon

    2011-01-01

    We investigate Faraday's law of induction manifested in the quantum state of Aharonov-Bohm loops. In particular, we propose a flux-switching experiment for a double-dot AB ring to verify the phase shift induced by Faraday's law. We show that the induced {\\em Faraday phase} is geometric and nontopological. Our study demonstrates that the relation between the local phases of a ring at different fluxes is not arbitrary but is instead determined by Faraday's inductive law, which is in strong cont...

  4. Comparison of algorithms for determination of rotation measure and Faraday structure. I. 1100–1400 MHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, X. H.; Akahori, Takuya; Anderson, C. S.; Farnes, J. S.; O’Sullivan, S. P. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Rudnick, L.; O’Brien, T. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Bell, M. R. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bray, J. D.; Scaife, A. M. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Ideguchi, S.; Kumazaki, K. [University of Nagoya, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Stepanov, R. [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, Korolyov str. 1, 614061 Perm (Russian Federation); Stil, J.; Wolleben, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary AB T2 N 1N4 (Canada); Takahashi, K. [University of Kumamoto, 2–39-1, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Weeren, R. J. van, E-mail: x.sun@physics.usyd.edu.au, E-mail: larry@umn.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Faraday rotation measures (RMs) and more general Faraday structures are key parameters for studying cosmic magnetism and are also sensitive probes of faint ionized thermal gas. A definition of which derived quantities are required for various scientific studies is needed, as well as addressing the challenges in determining Faraday structures. A wide variety of algorithms has been proposed to reconstruct these structures. In preparation for the Polarization Sky Survey of the Universe's Magnetism (POSSUM) to be conducted with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder and the ongoing Galactic Arecibo L-band Feeds Array Continuum Transit Survey (GALFACTS), we run a Faraday structure determination data challenge to benchmark the currently available algorithms, including Faraday synthesis (previously called RM synthesis in the literature), wavelet, compressive sampling, and QU-fitting. The input models include sources with one Faraday thin component, two Faraday thin components, and one Faraday thick component. The frequency set is similar to POSSUM/GALFACTS with a 300 MHz bandwidth from 1.1 to 1.4 GHz. We define three figures of merit motivated by the underlying science: (1) an average RM weighted by polarized intensity, RM{sub wtd}, (2) the separation Δϕ of two Faraday components, and (3) the reduced chi-squared χ{sub r}{sup 2}. Based on the current test data with a signal-to-noise ratio of about 32, we find the following. (1) When only one Faraday thin component is present, most methods perform as expected, with occasional failures where two components are incorrectly found. (2) For two Faraday thin components, QU-fitting routines perform the best, with errors close to the theoretical ones for RM{sub wtd} but with significantly higher errors for Δϕ. All other methods, including standard Faraday synthesis, frequently identify only one component when Δϕ is below or near the width of the Faraday point-spread function. (3) No methods as currently

  5. Comparison of Algorithms for Determination of Rotation Measure and Faraday Structure. I. 1100-1400 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X. H.; Rudnick, L.; Akahori, Takuya; Anderson, C. S.; Bell, M. R.; Bray, J. D.; Farnes, J. S.; Ideguchi, S.; Kumazaki, K.; O'Brien, T.; O'Sullivan, S. P.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Stepanov, R.; Stil, J.; Takahashi, K.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wolleben, M.

    2015-02-01

    Faraday rotation measures (RMs) and more general Faraday structures are key parameters for studying cosmic magnetism and are also sensitive probes of faint ionized thermal gas. A definition of which derived quantities are required for various scientific studies is needed, as well as addressing the challenges in determining Faraday structures. A wide variety of algorithms has been proposed to reconstruct these structures. In preparation for the Polarization Sky Survey of the Universe's Magnetism (POSSUM) to be conducted with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder and the ongoing Galactic Arecibo L-band Feeds Array Continuum Transit Survey (GALFACTS), we run a Faraday structure determination data challenge to benchmark the currently available algorithms, including Faraday synthesis (previously called RM synthesis in the literature), wavelet, compressive sampling, and QU-fitting. The input models include sources with one Faraday thin component, two Faraday thin components, and one Faraday thick component. The frequency set is similar to POSSUM/GALFACTS with a 300 MHz bandwidth from 1.1 to 1.4 GHz. We define three figures of merit motivated by the underlying science: (1) an average RM weighted by polarized intensity, R{{M}wtd}, (2) the separation Δφ of two Faraday components, and (3) the reduced chi-squared χ r2. Based on the current test data with a signal-to-noise ratio of about 32, we find the following. (1) When only one Faraday thin component is present, most methods perform as expected, with occasional failures where two components are incorrectly found. (2) For two Faraday thin components, QU-fitting routines perform the best, with errors close to the theoretical ones for R{{M}wtd} but with significantly higher errors for Δφ . All other methods, including standard Faraday synthesis, frequently identify only one component when Δφ is below or near the width of the Faraday point-spread function. (3) No methods as currently implemented work well for

  6. Comparison of algorithms for determination of rotation measure and Faraday structure. I. 1100–1400 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraday rotation measures (RMs) and more general Faraday structures are key parameters for studying cosmic magnetism and are also sensitive probes of faint ionized thermal gas. A definition of which derived quantities are required for various scientific studies is needed, as well as addressing the challenges in determining Faraday structures. A wide variety of algorithms has been proposed to reconstruct these structures. In preparation for the Polarization Sky Survey of the Universe's Magnetism (POSSUM) to be conducted with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder and the ongoing Galactic Arecibo L-band Feeds Array Continuum Transit Survey (GALFACTS), we run a Faraday structure determination data challenge to benchmark the currently available algorithms, including Faraday synthesis (previously called RM synthesis in the literature), wavelet, compressive sampling, and QU-fitting. The input models include sources with one Faraday thin component, two Faraday thin components, and one Faraday thick component. The frequency set is similar to POSSUM/GALFACTS with a 300 MHz bandwidth from 1.1 to 1.4 GHz. We define three figures of merit motivated by the underlying science: (1) an average RM weighted by polarized intensity, RMwtd, (2) the separation Δϕ of two Faraday components, and (3) the reduced chi-squared χr2. Based on the current test data with a signal-to-noise ratio of about 32, we find the following. (1) When only one Faraday thin component is present, most methods perform as expected, with occasional failures where two components are incorrectly found. (2) For two Faraday thin components, QU-fitting routines perform the best, with errors close to the theoretical ones for RMwtd but with significantly higher errors for Δϕ. All other methods, including standard Faraday synthesis, frequently identify only one component when Δϕ is below or near the width of the Faraday point-spread function. (3) No methods as currently implemented work well for

  7. Theory and Simulation of Magnetohydrodynamic Dynamos and Faraday Rotation for Plasmas of General Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kiwan

    2013-03-01

    Many astrophysical phenomena depend on the underlying dynamics of magnetic fields. The observations of accretion disks and their jets, stellar coronae, and the solar corona are all best explained by models where magnetic fields play a central role. Understanding these phenomena requires studying the basic physics of magnetic field generation, magnetic energy transfer into radiating particles, angular momentum transport, and the observational implications of these processes. Each of these topics comprises a large enterprise of research. However, more practically speaking, the nonlinearity in large scale dynamo is known to be determined by magnetic helicity(>), the topological linked number of knotted magnetic field. Magnetic helicity, which is also observed in solar physics, has become an important tool for observational and theoretical study. The first part of my work addresses one aspect of the observational implications of magnetic fields, namely Faraday rotation. It is shown that plasma composition affects the interpretation of Faraday rotation measurements of the field, and in turn how this can be used to help constrain unknown plasma composition. The results are applied to observations of astrophysical jets. The thesis then focuses on the evolution of magnetic fields. In particular, the dynamo amplification of large scale magnetic fields is studied with an emphasis on the basic physics using both numerical simulations and analytic methods. In particular, without differential rotation, a two and three scale mean field (large scale value + fluctuation scales) dynamo theory and statistical methods are introduced. The results are compared to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the Pencil code, which utilizes high order finite difference methods. Simulations in which the energy is initially driven into the system in the form of helical kinetic energy (via kinetic helicity) or helical magnetic energy (via magnetic helicity) reveal the exponential growth of seed

  8. Collision cascade temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of a projectile with a solid has been considered in detail. It has been found that any collision cascade generated by a projectile can be characterized by the average kinetic energy of cascade atoms that represents an 'instantaneous temperature' of the cascade during its very short lifetime (10-12 s). We refer to this value as the 'dynamic temperature' in order to emphasize the fact that cascade atoms are in a dynamic equilibrium and have a definite energy distribution. The dynamic temperature defines the electron distribution in the cascade area and, hence, the ionization probability of sputtered atoms. The energy distribution of cascade atoms and, as a consequence, the dynamic temperature can be found experimentally by measuring the energy distribution of sputtered atoms. The calculated dynamic temperature has been found to be in good agreement with the experimental data on ion formation in the case of cesium and oxygen ion sputtering of silicon. Based on the developed model we suggest an experimental technique for a radical improvement of the existing cascade sputtering models

  9. Faraday rotator based on TSAG crystal with orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Ryo; Snetkov, Ilya; Starobor, Aleksey; Mironov, Evgeniy; Palashov, Oleg

    2016-07-11

    A Faraday isolator (FI) for high-power lasers with kilowatt-level average power and 1-µm wavelength was demonstrated using a terbium scandium aluminum garnet (TSAG) with its crystal axis aligned in the direction. Furthermore, no compensation scheme for thermally induced depolarization in a magnetic field was used. An isolation ratio of 35.4 dB (depolarization ratio γ of 2.9 × 10-4) was experimentally observed at a maximum laser power of 1470 W. This result for room-temperature FIs is the best reported, and provides a simple, practical solution for achieving optical isolation in high-power laser systems. PMID:27410823

  10. Observation of Faraday Waves in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Peter; Atherton, Collin; Hoefer, Mark

    2007-06-01

    Faraday waves in a cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate are created. It is shown that periodically modulating the transverse confinement, and thus the nonlinear interactions in the BEC, excites small amplitude longitudinal oscillations through a parametric resonance. It is also demonstrated that even without the presence of a continuous drive, an initial transverse breathing mode excitation of the condensate leads to spontaneous pattern formation in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the effects of strongly driving the transverse breathing mode with large amplitude are investigated. In this case, impact-oscillator behavior and intriguing nonlinear dynamics, including the gradual emergence of multiple longitudinal modes, are observed.

  11. Faraday Instability in a Surface-Frozen Liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Patrick; Soprunyuk, Viktor; Embs, Jan; Wagner, Christian; Deutsch, Moshe; Kumar, Satish

    2005-01-01

    Faraday surface instability measurements of the critical acceleration, a_c, and wavenumber, k_c, for standing surface waves on a tetracosanol (C_24H_50) melt exhibit abrupt changes at T_s=54degC above the bulk freezing temperature. The measured variations of a_c and k_c vs. temperature and driving frequency are accounted for quantitatively by a hydrodynamic model, revealing a change from a free-slip surface flow, generic for a free liquid surface (T>T_s), to a surface-pinned, no-slip flow, ch...

  12. Quantum noise for Faraday light–matter interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasliyev, D.V.; Hammerer, K.; Korolev, N.;

    2012-01-01

    In light–matter interfaces based on the Faraday effect, quite a number of quantum information protocols have been successfully demonstrated. In order to further increase the performance and fidelities achieved in these protocols, a deeper understanding of the relevant noise and decoherence...... effective equations of motion for collective atomic spins and the forward-propagating light modes to the full atomic level structure. We illustrate and apply our results to the case of a quantum memory protocol. Our results can be applied to any alkali atoms, and the general approach taken in this paper can...... be applied to light–matter interfaces and quantum memories based on different mechanisms....

  13. Confirmation of a Faraday Rotation Measure Anomaly in Cygnus

    CERN Document Server

    Whiting, Catherine A; Ingleby, Laura D; Haffner, L Matthew

    2008-01-01

    We confirm the reality of a reversal of the sign of the Faraday Rotation Measure in the Galactic plane in Cygnus (Lazio et al, 1990), possibly associated with the Cygnus OB1 association. The rotation measure changes by several hundred rad/m$^2$ over an angular scale of $2-5^{\\circ}$. We show that a simple model of an expanding plasma shell with an enhanced density and magnetic field, consistent with observations of H$\\alpha$ emission in this part of sky, and physically associated with a superbubble of the Cygnus OB1 association, can account for the magnitude and angular scale of this feature.

  14. New cylindrical gravitational soliton waves and gravitational Faraday rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Tomizawa, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    In terms of gravitational solitons, we study gravitational non-linear effects of gravitational solitary waves such as Faraday rotation. Applying the Pomeransky's procedure for inverse scattering method, which has been recently used for constructing stationary black hole solutions in five dimensions to a cylindrical spacetime in four dimensions, we construct a new cylindrically symmetric soliton solution. This is the first example to be applied to the cylindrically symmetric case. In particular, we clarify the difference from the Tomimatsu's single soliton solution, which was constructed by the Belinsky-Zakharov's procedure.

  15. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, the same cloud can be imaged up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This paves the way towards quantum state engineering using feedback control of ultracold atoms.

  16. Preinjector for Linac 1, inside the Faraday cage

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    For a description of the Linac 1 preinjector, please see first 7403070X. Here, the view is towards the upper level of the Faraday cage. Far to the right, a technician is peering through the service door. The huge box-shaped cubicle is the electronics platform, at 520 kV potential during operation. The "bull eye" at the left back sits at the top end of the accelerating column (see 7403081X) and houses the ion source with its electronics (see 7403083X). The SAMES generator, providing the 520 kV HV (7403074) sits on the floor and is not visible here.

  17. The Correspondence of Michael Faraday Pt 6 1860-1867

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, James

    2012-01-01

    Michael Faraday (1791-1867) was one of the most important men of science in nineteenth century Britain. His discoveries of electro-magnetic rotations (1821) and electro-magnetic induction (1831) laid the foundations of the modern electrical industry. His discovery of the magneto-optical effect and diamagnetism (1845) led him to formulate the field theory of electro-magnetism, which forms one of the cornerstones of modern physics.These and a whole host of other fundamental discoveries in physics and chemistry, together with his lecturing at the Royal Institution, his work for the state (includi

  18. Informational Cascades : A Mirage?

    OpenAIRE

    Spiwoks, Markus; Bizer, Kilian; Hein, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Experimental research found contradictory results regarding the occurrence of informational cascades. Whereas Anderson and Holt (1997) confirmed the model of Banerjee (1992), and Bikhchandani et al. (1992) through lab tests, Huck and Oechssler (2000) came to contradictory results on crucial issues. This article presents experimental evidence supporting further doubts concerning "Bayesian" informational cascades: Just under two thirds of all decisions are characterized by an excessive orientat...

  19. Cascade Lake: A Novel

    OpenAIRE

    Pack, Camille Marian

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-two-year-old Macy Oman narrates the book in retrospect from Cascade, Oregon, where she is visiting her mother. Macy's father moved with her to Portland shortly after the accidental death of her brother, Nick, seven years before the narration begins. Macy's mother stayed behind in Cascade. Thematically the work centers on the emotional repercussions of these losses. Macy's, and her older lover Jason's, involvement with Nick's death is unknown to everyone. Her guilt and her mother's perc...

  20. A Left-Hand Rule for Faraday's Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salu, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    A left-hand rule for Faraday's law is presented here. This rule provides a simple and quick way of finding directional relationships between variables of Faraday's law without using Lenz's rule.

  1. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T; Huang, Yong; Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie, Yubing; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location (±5 μm) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing. PMID:20814088

  2. Diode-laser-based lidars: the next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujkovic-Cvijin, Pajo; Cooper, David E.; Van der Laan, Jan E.; Warren, Russell E.

    1999-10-01

    The work on the development of compact diode laser-based lidar systems at SRI International is reviewed. Two systems, a pseudorandom modulation lidar, and a mobile remote sensor for natural gas pipeline leak detection are described in detail, and experimental results are presented. Methods to enhance signal detection by digital filtering are also reviewed.

  3. Faraday rotation imaging microscope with microsecond pulse magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have fabricated a high-performance Faraday rotation (FR) imaging microscope that uses a microsecond pulse magnet comprising an insulated gated bipolar transistor and a 2 μF capacitor. Our microscope produced images with greater stability and sensitivity than those of previous microscopes that used millisecond pulse magnet; these improvements are likely due to high repetition rate and negligible Joule heating effects. The mechanical vibrations in the magnet coil caused by the pulsed current were significantly reduced. The present FR microscope constructed an averaged image from 1000 FR images within 10 min under 1.7 T. Applications of the FR microscope to discriminating three benzene derivatives in micro-capillaries and oscillation-free imaging of spherical polystyrene and polymethyl methacrylate microparticles demonstrated its high performance. - Highlights: • A microsecond pulse magnet with high repetition rate of 10 Hz was fabricated. • Faraday rotation (FR) imaging microscope with the μs magnet was constructed. • Benzene derivatives in microcapillaries were distinguished with the FR microscope. • FR images of single polymer microspheres of 20 μm were correctly acquired. • Observed FR angles agreed quantitatively with those expected from Verdet constants

  4. Faraday rotation imaging microscope with microsecond pulse magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwa, Masayori, E-mail: msuwa@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Tsukahara, Satoshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Watarai, Hitoshi, E-mail: watarai@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute for NanoScience Design, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-11-01

    We have fabricated a high-performance Faraday rotation (FR) imaging microscope that uses a microsecond pulse magnet comprising an insulated gated bipolar transistor and a 2 μF capacitor. Our microscope produced images with greater stability and sensitivity than those of previous microscopes that used millisecond pulse magnet; these improvements are likely due to high repetition rate and negligible Joule heating effects. The mechanical vibrations in the magnet coil caused by the pulsed current were significantly reduced. The present FR microscope constructed an averaged image from 1000 FR images within 10 min under 1.7 T. Applications of the FR microscope to discriminating three benzene derivatives in micro-capillaries and oscillation-free imaging of spherical polystyrene and polymethyl methacrylate microparticles demonstrated its high performance. - Highlights: • A microsecond pulse magnet with high repetition rate of 10 Hz was fabricated. • Faraday rotation (FR) imaging microscope with the μs magnet was constructed. • Benzene derivatives in microcapillaries were distinguished with the FR microscope. • FR images of single polymer microspheres of 20 μm were correctly acquired. • Observed FR angles agreed quantitatively with those expected from Verdet constants.

  5. Protection characteristics of a Faraday cage compromised by lightning burnthrough.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Bystrom, Edward; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Montoya, Sandra L.; Merewether, Kimball O.; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Martinez, Leonard E.; Jojola, John M.

    2012-01-01

    A lightning flash consists of multiple, high-amplitude but short duration return strokes. Between the return strokes is a lower amplitude, continuing current which flows for longer duration. If the walls of a Faraday cage are made of thin enough metal, the continuing current can melt a hole through the metal in a process called burnthrough. A subsequent return stroke can couple energy through this newly-formed hole. This LDRD is a study of the protection provided by a Faraday cage when it has been compromised by burnthrough. We initially repeated some previous experiments and expanded on them in terms of scope and diagnostics to form a knowledge baseline of the coupling phenomena. We then used a combination of experiment, analysis and numerical modeling to study four coupling mechanisms: indirect electric field coupling, indirect magnetic field coupling, conduction through plasma and breakdown through the hole. We discovered voltages higher than those encountered in the previous set of experiments (on the order of several hundreds of volts).

  6. Faraday Rotation Observations of Magnetic Fields in galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, T E

    2004-01-01

    The presence of magnetic fields in the intracluster medium in clusters of galaxies has been revealed through several different observational techniques. These fields may be dynamically important in clusters as they will provide additional pressure support to the intracluster medium as well as inhibit transport mechanisms such as thermal conduction. Here, we review the current observational state of Faraday rotation measure studies of the cluster fields. The fields are generally found to be a few to 10 microG in non-cooling core clusters and ordered on scales of 10-20 kpc. Studies of sources at large impact parameters show that the magnetic fields extend from cluster cores to radii of at least 500 kpc. In central regions of cooling core systems the field strengths are often somewhat higher (10-40 microG) and appear to be ordered on smaller scales of a few to 10 kpc. We also review some of the recent work on interpreting Faraday rotation measure observations through theory and numerical simulations. These techn...

  7. Continuous Emission Monitoring of Tetrafluoromethane Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Geiser

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in quantum cascade lasers have enabled the development of new sensors for in-situ applications that have so far only been possible with extractive systems. In this work, a sensor is presented using a unique Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy approach to measure tetrafluoromethane, a strong greenhouse gas. The sensor was characterized in a laboratory environment indicating a long-term detection limit of 20 ppb·m and a short-term value of well below 10 ppb·m. To demonstrate the feasibility of the sensor in a real-world environment, it was installed at an Alcoa aluminum smelter. A co-located Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer allowed direct comparison measurements of both systems. General agreement between the two methods was observed, leading to the conclusion that the developed in-situ quantum cascade laser based sensor has the potential to continuously measure tetrafluoromethane at aluminum smelters.

  8. Site-resolved imaging of single atoms with a Faraday quantum gas microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Ryuta; Kato, Kohei; Kuno, Takuma; Sakura, Yuto; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    We successfully demonstrate a quantum gas microscopy using the Faraday effect which has an inherently non-destructive nature. The observed Faraday rotation angle reaches 3.0(2) degrees for a single atom. We reveal the non-destructive feature of this Faraday imaging method by comparing the detuning dependence of the Faraday signal strength with that of the photon scattering rate. We determine the atom distribution with deconvolution analysis. We also demonstrate the absorption and the dark field Faraday imaging, and reveal the different shapes of the point spread functions for these methods, which are fully explained by theoretical analysis. Our result is an important first step towards an ultimate quantum non-demolition site-resolved imaging and furthermore opens up the possibilities for quantum feedback control of a quantum many-body system with a single-site resolution.

  9. The Lower Vistula Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireneusz Ankiersztejn

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the development and modifications of the Lower Vistula Cascade concept in order to meet changing requirements for utilisation of the river for power generation and navigation purposes. In the years 1957–1993 the Lower Vistula Cascade concept was modified in order to achieve the maximum power generation capacity (an example was the high efficiency of the hydropower station at the Włocławek Barrage, built in 1970 as the first and so far the only barrage of the proposed cascade. In the 1990s the potential economic benefits of the Vistula River management were re-evaluated in favour of natural and landscape merits, and another multi-variant modification of the Lower Vistula Cascade concept was carried out applying the principles of sustainable development and environmental protection. The analysis of the cascade variants considered in 1999 led to the conclusion that there is no justification for the project implementation, with the exception of the barrage located downstream of Włocławek (Nieszawa-Ciechocinek, the construction of which is essential for the Włocławek Barrage safety.

  10. Cascade Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schlenker, Cody W.

    2011-09-27

    We demonstrate planar organic solar cells consisting of a series of complementary donor materials with cascading exciton energies, incorporated in the following structure: glass/indium-tin-oxide/donor cascade/C 60/bathocuproine/Al. Using a tetracene layer grown in a descending energy cascade on 5,6-diphenyl-tetracene and capped with 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyl- tetracene, where the accessibility of the π-system in each material is expected to influence the rate of parasitic carrier leakage and charge recombination at the donor/acceptor interface, we observe an increase in open circuit voltage (Voc) of approximately 40% (corresponding to a change of +200 mV) compared to that of a single tetracene donor. Little change is observed in other parameters such as fill factor and short circuit current density (FF = 0.50 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.55 ± 0.23 mA/cm2) compared to those of the control tetracene-C60 solar cells (FF = 0.54 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.86 ± 0.23 mA/cm2). We demonstrate that this cascade architecture is effective in reducing losses due to polaron pair recombination at donor-acceptor interfaces, while enhancing spectral coverage, resulting in a substantial increase in the power conversion efficiency for cascade organic photovoltaic cells compared to tetracene and pentacene based devices with a single donor layer. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. A density matrix model of transport and radiation in quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transport model for quantum cascade lasers based on density matrix formalism that incorporates the laser optical field is confronted with experiment. For a typical mid-infrared laser, very good agreement is found for both the current-voltage and current-optical power characteristics. Forcing thermal distribution with a unique temperature in all subbands was found to lead to an overestimate of electron heating in the injector. The model can then be used further to optimize and design new structures.

  12. Fabrication of Faraday Cup Array for the Measurement of 2-Dimensional Proton Beam Profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has an advantage of easy-to-use and possible to visually check, immediately; on the other hand, the measurement range is very limited. Another method is using the CCD camera-scintillator device such as p43 phosphor screen or chromox. A variety of faraday cup detectors have been recently introduced. The faraday cup is one of the powerful and popular tools for the measurement of beam current. By using several faraday cups in array geometry, it is possible to observe current distribution. In this study, we developed an external faraday cup array for the measure the beam current and profile at a KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) beam utilization facility. To measure the beam profile, before fabrication of faraday cup array, we use gafchromic film. By making the faraday cup array we were able to reduce the consumption of Gafchromic film and a more accurate diagnosis of the proton beam is possible. The use of faraday cup array, experiment using the proton beam is more reliable and confident

  13. Fabrication of Faraday Cup Array for the Measurement of 2-Dimensional Proton Beam Profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Bom Sok; Kim, Kyeryung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    It has an advantage of easy-to-use and possible to visually check, immediately; on the other hand, the measurement range is very limited. Another method is using the CCD camera-scintillator device such as p43 phosphor screen or chromox. A variety of faraday cup detectors have been recently introduced. The faraday cup is one of the powerful and popular tools for the measurement of beam current. By using several faraday cups in array geometry, it is possible to observe current distribution. In this study, we developed an external faraday cup array for the measure the beam current and profile at a KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) beam utilization facility. To measure the beam profile, before fabrication of faraday cup array, we use gafchromic film. By making the faraday cup array we were able to reduce the consumption of Gafchromic film and a more accurate diagnosis of the proton beam is possible. The use of faraday cup array, experiment using the proton beam is more reliable and confident.

  14. Electrostatic capacitance and Faraday cage behavior of carbon nanotube forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding of the electrostatic properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is essential to enable their integration in microelectronic and micromechanical devices. In this study, we sought to understand how the hierarchical geometry and morphology of CNT forests determines their capacitance. First, we find that at small gaps, solid micropillars have greater capacitance, yet at larger gaps the capacitance of the CNT forests is greater. The surface area of the CNT forest accessible to the electrostatic field was extracted by analysis of the measured capacitance, and, by relating the capacitance to the average density of CNTs in the forest, we find that the penetration depth of the electrostatic field is on the order of several microns. Therefore, CNT forests can behave as a miniature Faraday cage. The unique electrostatic properties of CNT forests could therefore enable their use as long-range proximity sensors and as shielding elements for miniature electronic devices

  15. Advances in Optical Fiber-Based Faraday Rotation Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A D; McHale, G B; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    In the past two years, we have used optical fiber-based Faraday Rotation Diagnostics (FRDs) to measure pulsed currents on several dozen capacitively driven and explosively driven pulsed power experiments. We have made simplifications to the necessary hardware for quadrature-encoded polarization analysis, including development of an all-fiber analysis scheme. We have developed a numerical model that is useful for predicting and quantifying deviations from the ideal diagnostic response. We have developed a method of analyzing quadrature-encoded FRD data that is simple to perform and offers numerous advantages over several existing methods. When comparison has been possible, we have seen good agreement with our FRDs and other current sensors.

  16. Advances in Optical Fiber-Based Faraday Rotation Diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past two years, we have used optical fiber-based Faraday Rotation Diagnostics (FRDs) to measure pulsed currents on several dozen capacitively driven and explosively driven pulsed power experiments. We have made simplifications to the necessary hardware for quadrature-encoded polarization analysis, including development of an all-fiber analysis scheme. We have developed a numerical model that is useful for predicting and quantifying deviations from the ideal diagnostic response. We have developed a method of analyzing quadrature-encoded FRD data that is simple to perform and offers numerous advantages over several existing methods. When comparison has been possible, we have seen good agreement with our FRDs and other current sensors

  17. Multifrequency transverse Faraday effect in single magneto-dielectric microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Maksymov, Ivan S

    2014-01-01

    We propose using a single magneto-dielectric microsphere as a device for enhancing the transverse Faraday effect at multiple wavelengths at the same time. Although the diameter of the sphere can be $<1$ $\\mu$m, the numerically predicted strength of its magneto-optical (MO) response can be an order of magnitude stronger than in MO devices based on thick magnetic plates. The MO response of a microsphere is also comparable with that of subwavelength magneto-dielectric gratings which, however, operate at a single wavelength and occupy a large area. In contrast to gratings and thick plates, the compact size of the microsphere and its capability to support spin-wave excitations make it suitable for applications in nanophotonics, imaging systems, and magnonics.

  18. Faraday rotation imaging microscope with microsecond pulse magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Masayori; Tsukahara, Satoshi; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    We have fabricated a high-performance Faraday rotation (FR) imaging microscope that uses a microsecond pulse magnet comprising an insulated gated bipolar transistor and a 2 μF capacitor. Our microscope produced images with greater stability and sensitivity than those of previous microscopes that used millisecond pulse magnet; these improvements are likely due to high repetition rate and negligible Joule heating effects. The mechanical vibrations in the magnet coil caused by the pulsed current were significantly reduced. The present FR microscope constructed an averaged image from 1000 FR images within 10 min under 1.7 T. Applications of the FR microscope to discriminating three benzene derivatives in micro-capillaries and oscillation-free imaging of spherical polystyrene and polymethyl methacrylate microparticles demonstrated its high performance.

  19. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L.; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  20. Evolution of pulsarmagnetism by virtue of a Faraday dynamo mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evidence that radio-pulsars are slowed-down and Roentgen - pulsars accelerated predominantly by magnetic torques is now very strong. Angular momentum is transferred away from the neutron star to the velocity-of-light cylinder or from the Alfven - cylinder down to the neutron star by means of a magnetic spring the physical origin of which is an appropriate current flowing along the magnetic field lines. As this current must be closed at the neutron star's surface and no Hall-Field can be built-up a Faraday dynamo mechanism is set up. It is pointed out that this mechanism could switch -off a radio pulsar or turn-on a Roentgen pulsar. Many disconcerting pulsar observations could thus be explained, if radio pulsars can be reactivated in the galactic plane by means of accretion of matter in dense clouds and if Roentgenpulsars must first create a sufficiently strong magnetic field to function as a regularly pulsed emitter. (Author)

  1. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L.; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F. [Danish National Research Foundation Center for Quantum Optics, Institut for Fysik og Astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, Ny Munkegade 120, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2013-08-15

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  2. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds

  3. Dynamics of the Faraday Instability in a Small Cylinder

    CERN Document Server

    Batson, William; Narayanan, Ranga

    2013-01-01

    Vertical oscillation of a fluid interface above a critical amplitude excites the Faraday instability, typically manifesting itself as a standing wave pattern. Fundamentally, the phenomenon is an example of parametric resonance. At high frequencies, the wavelength is small and the pattern selection process is highly nonlinear. We excite the instability with low frequencies, where the wavelength is large, and the form is highly influenced by the container geometry. In this regime, the cell modes are easily excited on an individual basis and the observed waves resemble the forms predicted from linear theory. In our video we highlight basic spatial and temporal dynamics of this regime. This fluid dynamics video is submitted to the APS DFD Gallery of Fluid Motion 2013, part of the 66th Annual Meeting of the American Physical Societys Division of Fluid Dynamics (24-26 November, Pittsburgh, PA, USA).

  4. Laser-based ultraviolet absorption detection in capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-based UV absorption in capillary electrophoresis is demonstrated. The use of vacuum photodiodes and an all-electronic noise canceller provides adequate baseline stability despite the large inherent intensity noise in UV lasers. A 4-fold improvement in the detection limit is achieved in comparison to that of commercial instruments. The main advantage here is the better optical coupling with small capillary tubes, maximizing the available optical pathlength for absorption

  5. Beam shaping for laser-based adaptive optics in astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Béchet, Clémentine; Guesalaga, Andrés; Neichel, Benoit; Fesquet, Vincent; González-Núñez, Héctor; Zúñiga, Sebastián; Escarate, Pedro; Guzman, Dani

    2014-01-01

    The availability and performance of laser-based adaptive optics (AO) systems are strongly dependent on the power and quality of the laser beam before being projected to the sky. Frequent and time-consuming alignment procedures are usually required in the laser systems with free-space optics to optimize the beam. Despite these procedures, significant distortions of the laser beam have been observed during the first two years of operation of the Gemini South multi-conjugate adaptive optics syst...

  6. Transient spectral dependence of photoinduced magneto-optical Faraday effect in CdTe quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The time-resolved photo-induced magneto-optical response of water soluble cadmium telluride (CdTe colloidal quantum dots (QDs is studied in the spectral range across the first exciton (1S3/21Se transition at room temperature without external magnetic field. Spectral dependence of the Faraday ellipticity reaches an extremum near the first exciton transition energy, while the Faraday rotation shows a sign reversal, which indicates that the spectral dependence of photo-induced Faraday effect evolves from a diamagnetic to a paramagnetic behavior during the exciton spin relaxation process in CdTe QDs.

  7. Enhanced transmission and giant Faraday effect in magnetic metal–dielectric photonic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their large electrical conductivity, stand-alone metallic films are highly reflective at microwave (MW) frequencies. For this reason, it is nearly impossible to observe Faraday rotation in ferromagnetic metal layers, even in films just tens of nanometres thick. Here, we show using numerical simulations that a stack of cobalt nano-layers interlaced between dielectric layers can become highly transmissive and display a large Faraday rotation in a finite frequency band. A 45° Faraday rotation commonly used in MW isolators can be achieved with ferromagnetic metallic layers as thin as tens of nanometres. (paper)

  8. Enhanced Transmission and Giant Faraday Effect in Magnetic Metal-Dielectric Photonic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Kyle; Bodyfelt, Joshua D; Vitebskiy, Ilya; Chabanov, Andrey A

    2012-01-01

    Due to their large electric conductivity, stand-alone metallic films are highly reflective at microwave frequencies. For this reason, it is nearly impossible to observe Faraday rotation in ferromagnetic metal layers, even in films just tens of nanometers thick. Here, we show using numerical simulations that a stack of cobalt nano-layers interlaced between dielectric layers can become highly transmissive and display a large Faraday rotation in a finite frequency band. A 45-degree Faraday rotation can be achieved with metallic ferromagnetic layers as thin as tens of nanometers.

  9. CSS - Cascading Style Sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Martinelli, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Curso "CSS - Cascading Style Sheets" sobre programación web con CSS para el "Máster doble competencia en ciencias informáticas y ciencias sociales" ("Master double competence in computer science and social science"). Proyecto TEMPUS JEP – 26235-2005

  10. HIE-ISOLDE Faraday cups tested with ion beams at TRIUMF

    CERN Document Server

    Cantero, E D

    2014-01-01

    The future HIE-ISOLDE Faraday cups for both the intercryomodule regions and the HEBTs have been tested using 34S+7, 4He+, 23Na+6 and 20Ne+5 beams from the ISAC-II accelerator at TRIUMF. Their performance has been characterized together with the Faraday cups from REX-ISOLDE and those from ISAC-II. The measurements were done at E/A = 1.5, 2.85 and 5.5 MeV/u, with beam intensities in the range of 100 pA to 4 nA. The performance of these Faraday cups has been compared under the same beam conditions for different bias voltages up to -350 V. Within the experimental uncertainties, most of them coming from fluctuations in beam intensity, all devices showed similar results. Biasing the Faraday cup repeller ring to voltages of at least -60 V, the escape of secondary electrons was suppressed.

  11. Moire-Schlieren, time-differential interferometry, and enhanced sensitivity of Faraday rotation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes the Moire-Schlieren method and shows how it can be applied to time-differential holographic interferometry. He then describes Faraday rotation measurements being made on ZT-40M. (Auth.)

  12. Broadband Radio Polarimetry and Faraday Rotation of 563 Extragalactic Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, C S; Feain, I J; Franzen, T M O

    2015-01-01

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 \\& 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We have used rotation measure synthesis to identify Faraday complex polarized sources --- i.e. objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behaviour indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday simple polarized sources (i.e. sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12\\% of polarized sources at $\\sim1'$ resolution, but demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations...

  13. New conceptual antenna with spiral structure and back Faraday shield for FWCD (fast wave current drive)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new conceptual antenna, which we call as a spiral antenna, is proposed as a traveling wave antenna for fast wave current drive in tokamaks. The features of the spiral antenna are a sharp Nz spectrum, easy impedance matching, Nz controllable and good coupling. A back Faraday shield is proposed for improving the cooling design of Faraday shield and better antenna-plasma coupling. A helical support which is a compact and wide band support is proposed as a kind of quarter wave length stub supports. The RF properties of the spiral antenna and the back Faraday shield have been investigated by using mock-up antennas. The VSWR of spiral antenna is low at the wide frequency band from 15 MHz to 201 MHz. The back Faraday shield is effective for suppressing the RF toroidal electric field between adjacent currents straps. (author)

  14. Geometric Phase Of The Faraday Rotation Of Electromagnetic Waves In Magnetized Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian Liu and Hong Qin

    2011-11-07

    The geometric phase of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied theoretically. The variation of the propagation direction of circularly polarized waves results in a geometric phase, which also contributes to the Faraday rotation, in addition to the standard dynamical phase. The origin and properties of the geometric phase is investigated. The in uence of the geometric phase to plasma diagnostics using Faraday rotation is also discussed as an application of the theory.

  15. FARADAY PLASMA CURRENT SENSOR WITH COMPENSATION FOR RECIPROCAL BIREFRINGENCE INDUCED BY MECHANICALPERTURBATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. O. Barmenkov

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A Faraday fiber-optic current sensor was employed to measure the tokamak plasma current. In order todecrease the influence of mechanical perturbations on the sensor sensitivity, a two-pass optical scheme witha variable Faraday mirror at the fiber end is proposed. A decrease, by two orders of magnitude, in theinfluence of the linear birefringence produced by an external piezoceramic fiber modulator was experimentallyobserved.

  16. Effect of the Quadrupole Moment of a Rotating Massive Object on the Gravitational Faraday Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈贻汉; 邵常贵

    2002-01-01

    We study the rotation of the polarization plane for a ray of electromagnetic radiation propagating in the grav-itoelectromagnetic field caused by a rotating massive object with the quadrupole moment. The effect of thequadrupole moment on the gravitational Faraday rotation is investigated. It is found that the gravitational Fara-day effect of the quadrupole moment is negligible for Kerr black holes, but this effect is important for rapidlyrotating neutron stars.

  17. Study on simulation and experiment of array micro Faraday cup ion detector for FAIMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An array micro Faraday cup ion detector for FAIMS (High-field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry) was introduced, with which the size of the FAIMS system was reduced. With simple structure, good stability, low noise, large measurements range, this detector can work under the condition of atmospheric pressure. The array micro Faraday cup was composed of gate electrode, sensitive electrode and shielding electrode. The sensitive electrode was made of tens of crossing silicon columns with diameter of 200 μm. It was fabricated through typical MEMS technology, which was compatible completely with plane FAIMS. It was shown from FLUENT simulation result that the resistance to gas motion was low and the flow field distribution was helpful for full absorption of the ion in this array design. Through electricity simulation, the method to reduce interference on the detection signal of the micro Faraday cup was given out. Connecting with KEITHLEY 237 ampere meter, the noise level of the array micro Faraday cup was lower than 0.5 pA. The output signal of the acetone sample measured by experiment was about 210 pA. Through contrast experiment, the design parameter of the micro Faraday cup was obtained primarily. This array micro Faraday cup can meet the requirements of the FAIMS system.

  18. Comparison of algorithms for determination of rotation measure and Faraday structure I. 1100 - 1400 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, X H; Akahori, Takuya; Anderson, C S; Bell, M R; Bray, J D; Farnes, J S; Ideguchi, S; Kumazaki, K; O'Brien, T; O'Sullivan, S P; Scaife, A M M; Stepanov, R; Stil, J; Takahashi, K; van Weeren, R J; Wolleben, M

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) We run a Faraday structure determination data challenge to benchmark the currently available algorithms including Faraday synthesis (previously called RM synthesis in the literature), wavelet, compressive sampling and $QU$-fitting. The frequency set is similar to POSSUM/GALFACTS with a 300 MHz bandwidth from 1.1 to 1.4 GHz. We define three figures of merit motivated by the underlying science: a) an average RM weighted by polarized intensity, RMwtd, b) the separation $\\Delta\\phi$ of two Faraday components and c) the reduced chi-squared. Based on the current test data of signal to noise ratio of about 32, we find that: (1) When only one Faraday thin component is present, most methods perform as expected, with occasional failures where two components are incorrectly found; (2) For two Faraday thin components, QU-fitting routines perform the best, with errors close to the theoretical ones for RMwtd, but with significantly higher errors for $\\Delta\\phi$. All other methods including standard Faraday synt...

  19. Material and electromagnetic properties of Faraday shields for ion cyclotron heating antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Faraday shields for ion cyclotron antennas must transmit magnetic waves and adsorb little rf power. To investigate these properties, we have constructed 27 Faraday shields in many configurations, including chevrons, tubes, straps, concentric rings, various layered shields, conventionally leafed straps, and replicas of the Faraday shields for ASDEX, the Joint European Torus (JET), TEXTOR, and Alcator-C. We have measured the magnetic flux and observed loading at various operating resistances by using dielectric sheets or magnetic-coupled loads. Each Faraday shield effects a net change in the characteristic inductance of the antenna, resulting in a reduction of wave coupling. However, the load experienced by the antenna is not always reduced because the Faraday shield itself acts as a load. We differentiate between these effects experimentally. The net result of the study is that the Faraday shields now in use cost up to a factor of 50% of coupling. This, of course, reduces the power handling capability by 50% as well. However, configurations exist that are easily cooled and result in a reduction of less than 5% in loading

  20. Information cascade on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisakado, Masato; Mori, Shintaro

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model by considering three different kinds of networks: a random graph, the Barabási-Albert (BA) model, and a fitness model. A voting model represents the way in which public perceptions are conveyed to voters. Our voting model is constructed by using two types of voters-herders and independents-and two candidates. Independents conduct voting based on their fundamental values; on the other hand, herders base their voting on the number of previous votes. Hence, herders vote for the majority candidates and obtain information relating to previous votes from their networks. We discuss the difference between the phases on which the networks depend. Two kinds of phase transitions, an information cascade transition and a super-normal transition, were identified. The first of these is a transition between a state in which most voters make the correct choices and a state in which most of them are wrong. The second is a transition of convergence speed. The information cascade transition prevails when herder effects are stronger than the super-normal transition. In the BA and fitness models, the critical point of the information cascade transition is the same as that of the random network model. However, the critical point of the super-normal transition disappears when these two models are used. In conclusion, the influence of networks is shown to only affect the convergence speed and not the information cascade transition. We are therefore able to conclude that the influence of hubs on voters' perceptions is limited.

  1. Superconducting cascade electron refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarasa-Gómez, M.; Giazotto, F. [NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Di Marco, A.; Hekking, F. W. J. [LPMMC, CNRS and Université Joseph Fourier, 38042 Grenoble (France); Winkelmann, C. B.; Courtois, H. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, 38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut Néel, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2014-05-12

    The design and operation of an electronic cooler based on a combination of superconducting tunnel junctions is described. The cascade extraction of hot-quasiparticles, which stems from the energy gaps of two different superconductors, allows for a normal metal to be cooled down to about 100 mK starting from a bath temperature of 0.5 K. We discuss the practical implementation, potential performance, and limitations of such a device.

  2. Quantum Cascade Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Baumann, Esther; Graf, Marcel; Yang, Quankui; Manz, Christian; Köhler, Klaus; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.; Linfield, Edmund; Davies, Alexander G.; Fedoryshyn, Yuriy; Jackel, Heinz; Fischer, Milan; Faist, Jérôme; Hofstetter, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives an overview on the design, fabrication, and characterization of quantum cascade detectors. They are tailorable infrared photodetectors based on intersubband transitions in semiconductor quantum wells that do not require an external bias voltage due to their asymmetric conduction band profile. They thus profit from favorable noise behavior, reduced thermal load, and simpler readout circuits. This was demonstrated at wavelengths from the near infrared at 2 μm to THz radiation a...

  3. Cascade ICF power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The double-cone-shaped Cascade reaction chamber rotates at 50 rpm to keep a blanket of ceramic granules in place against the wall as they slide from the poles to the exit slots at the equator. The 1 m-thick blanket consists of layers of carbon, beryllium oxide, and lithium aluminate granules about 1 mm in diameter. The x rays and debris are stopped in the carbon granules; the neutrons are multiplied and moderated in the BeO and breed tritium in the LiAlO2. The chamber wall is made up of SiO tiles held in compression by a network of composite SiC/Al tendons. Cascade operates at a 5 Hz pulse rate with 300 MJ in each pulse. The temperature in the blanket reaches 1600 K on the inner surface and 1350 K at the outer edge. The granules are automatically thrown into three separate vacuum heat exchangers where they give up their energy to high pressure helium. The helium is used in a Brayton cycle to obtain a thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of 55%. Studies have been done on neutron activation, debris recovery, vaporization and recondensation of blanket material, tritium control and recovery, fire safety, and cost. These studies indicate that Cascade appears to be a promising ICF reactor candidate from all standpoints. At the 1000 MWe size, electricity could be made for about the same cost as in a future fission reactor

  4. Cascading to the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Heckman, Jonathan J; Verlinde, Herman; Wijnholt, Martijn

    2008-01-01

    The MSSM can arise as an orientifold of a pyramid-like quiver in the context of intersecting D-branes. Here we consider quiver realizations of the MSSM which can emerge at the bottom of a duality cascade. We classify all possible minimal ways this can be done by allowing only one extra node. It turns out that this requires extending the geometry of the pyramid to an octahedron. The MSSM at the bottom of the cascade arises in one of two possible ways, with the extra node disappearing either via Higgsing or confinement. Remarkably, the quiver of the Higgsing scenario turns out to be nothing but the quiver version of the left-right symmetric extension of the MSSM. In the minimal confining scenario the duality cascade can proceed if and only if there is exactly one up/down Higgs pair. Moreover, the symmetries of the octahedron naturally admit an automorphism of the quiver which solves a version of the mu problem precisely when there are an odd number of generations.

  5. Rapid analysis of steels using laser-based techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the data obtained by this study, we conclude that laser-based techniques can be used to provide at least semi-quantitative information about the elemental composition of molten steel. Of the two techniques investigated here, the Sample-Only method appears preferable to the LIBS (laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy) method because of its superior analytical performance. In addition, the Sample-Only method would probably be easier to incorporate into a steel plant environment. However, before either technique can be applied to steel monitoring, additional research is needed

  6. A laser based reusable microjet injector for transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-hee; Yoh, Jack J.

    2010-05-01

    A laser based needle-free liquid drug injection device has been developed. A laser beam is focused inside the liquid contained in the rubber chamber of microscale. The focused laser beam causes explosive bubble growth, and the sudden volume increase in a sealed chamber drives a microjet of liquid drug through the micronozzle. The exit diameter of a nozzle is 125 μm and the injected microjet reaches an average velocity of 264 m/s. This device adds the time-varying feature of microjet to the current state of liquid injection for drug delivery.

  7. Holmium fiber laser based on the heavily doped active fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have made and studied a set of the fiber lasers based on Ho-doped fiber with high concentration of the active ions. For the first time the spectral efficiency in a range of 2.02 – 2.15 μm was determined. The highest output power of 4.2 W was detected at 2.1 μm with the efficiency slope of 34%. This value of the efficiency is highest for pure holmium-doped silica fibers

  8. Design and Implementation of a Laser-Based Ammonia Breath Sensor for Medical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Owen, Kyle

    2012-06-01

    Laser-based sensors can be used as non-invasive monitoring tools to measure parts per billion (ppb) levels of trace gases. Ammonia sensors are useful for applications in environmental pollutant monitoring, atmospheric and combustion kinetic studies, and medical diagnostics. This sensor was specifically designed to measure ammonia in exhaled breath to be used as a medical diagnostic and monitoring tool, however, it can also be extended for use in other applications. Although ammonia is a naturally occurring species in exhaled breath, abnormally elevated levels can be an indication of adverse medical conditions. Laser-based breath diagnostics have many benefits since they are cost effective, non-invasive, painless, real time monitors. They have the potential to improve the quality of medical care by replacing currently used blood tests and providing immediate feedback to physicians. This sensor utilizes a Quantum Cascade Laser and Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with second harmonic normalized by first harmonic detection in a 76 m multi-pass absorption cell to measure ppb levels of ammonia with improved sensitivity over previous sensors. Initial measurements to determine the ammonia absorption line parameters were performed using direct absorption spectroscopy. This is the first experimental study of the ammonia absorption line transitions near 1103.46 cm1 with absorption spectroscopy. The linestrengths were measured with uncertainties less than 10%. The collisional broadening coefficients for each of the ammonia lines with nitrogen, oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide were also measured, many of which had uncertainties less than 5%. The sensor was characterized to show a detectability limit of 10 ppb with an uncertainty of less than 5% at typical breath ammonia levels. Initial breath test results showed that some of the patients with chronic kidney disease had elevated ammonia levels while others had ammonia levels in the same range as expected for healthy

  9. CMB Faraday rotation as seen through the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    De, Soma; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2013-01-01

    Faraday Rotation (FR) of CMB polarization, as measured through mode-coupling correlations of E and B modes, can be a promising probe of a stochastic primordial magnetic field (PMF). While the existence of a PMF is still hypothetical, there will certainly be a contribution to CMB FR from the magnetic field of the Milky Way. We use existing estimates of the Milky Way rotation measure (RM) to forecast its detectability with upcoming and future CMB experiments. We find that the galactic RM will not be seen in polarization measurements by Planck, but that it will need to be accounted for by CMB experiments capable of detecting the weak lensing contribution to the B-mode. We then discuss prospects for constraining the PMF in the presence of FR due to the galaxy under various assumptions that include partial de-lensing and partial subtraction of the galactic FR. We find that a realistic future sub-orbital experiment, covering a patch of the sky near the galactic poles, can detect a scale-invariant PMF of 0.1 nano-Ga...

  10. Probing the Rosette Nebula Stellar Bubble with Faraday Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Savage, Allison H; Fischer, Patrick D

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of Faraday rotation measurements of 23 background radio sources whose lines of sight pass through or close to the Rosette Nebula. The Rosette Nebula is an excellent candidate for studies of super bubbles associated with young star clusters. We made linear polarization measurements with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at frequencies of 4.4GHz, 4.9GHz, and 7.7GHz. We are able to establish a background rotation measure in this part of the sky due to the Galaxy of +147 rad m^-2. Sources whose lines of sight pass through the nebula have an excess rotation measure of 50-750 rad m^-2, which we attribute to the plasma shell of the Rosette Nebula. We consider two simple plasma shell models and how they reproduce the magnitude and sign of the rotation measure, and its dependence on distance from the center of the nebula. These two models represent different modes of interaction of the Rosette Nebula star cluster with the surrounding interstellar medium. Both can reproduce the magnitude ...

  11. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the (88)Sr (5s(2))(1)S0 - (5s5p)(1)P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization. PMID:27418112

  12. Probing the central parsecs of AGN using Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, R. T.; Taylor, G. B.

    2002-05-01

    A broad frequency range and low instrumental polarization makes the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) an ideal instrument for studying polarimetry at sub-milliarcsecond resolution. To take advantage of these unique capabilities we have conducted a multi-frequency polarization survey of 40 radio-loud AGN (Quasars, BL Lacs, and radio galaxies). Our aim is to use Faraday Rotation Measures (RMs) as a probe of the central 1-50 parsecs of these objects. The RM is produced by the line of sight magnetic field weighted by the electron density. Using the electron density established through spectral line diagnostics a magnetic field strength and topology can be estimated within a few parsecs of the central engines of these AGN. The observations for the survey are complete, and we present the first results for 8 quasars, 5 BL Lacs, and 4 radio galaxies. The magnitudes for the RMs range from several thousand rad m-2 in the quasars and radio galaxies to a few hundred rad m-2 in the BL Lac objects. These values are in agreement with the basic ideas of the unified model for AGN. We also observe variations in the RM on small spatial (Mexico Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professiorate through NSF grant HRD-0086701.

  13. Na-Faraday rotation filtering: the optimal point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Wilhelm; Löw, Robert; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    Narrow-band optical filtering is required in many spectroscopy applications to suppress unwanted background light. One example is quantum communication where the fidelity is often limited by the performance of the optical filters. This limitation can be circumvented by utilizing the GHz-wide features of a Doppler broadened atomic gas. The anomalous dispersion of atomic vapours enables spectral filtering. These, so-called, Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters (FADOFs) can be by far better than any commercial filter in terms of bandwidth, transition edge and peak transmission. We present a theoretical and experimental study on the transmission properties of a sodium vapour based FADOF with the aim to find the best combination of optical rotation and intrinsic loss. The relevant parameters, such as magnetic field, temperature, the related optical depth, and polarization state are discussed. The non-trivial interplay of these quantities defines the net performance of the filter. We determine analytically the optimal working conditions, such as transmission and the signal to background ratio and validate the results experimentally. We find a single global optimum for one specific optical path length of the filter. This can now be applied to spectroscopy, guide star applications, or sensing. PMID:25298251

  14. Photoswitchable Faraday effect in EuS-Au nanosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Akira; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Fushimi, Koji; Hasegawa, Yasuchika [Division of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, North-13 West-8, Kita-ku, 060-8628, Sapporo (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Effective photoswitchable europium sulfide nanocrystals with gold nanoparticles using dithiol (DDT: 1,10-decanedithiol) joint molecules, EuS-Au nanosystems, are demonstrated. The TEM image indicates the formation of EuS-Au nanosystems composed of cube-shaped EuS nanocrystals and spherical Au nanoparticles. Under visible-light irradiation, a drastic change of absorption band of EuS-Au nanosystems at around 600 nm was observed. The Faraday effects of EuS-Au nanosystems were estimated using magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurements. The effective change of the MCD spectra of EuS-Au nanosystems under visible-light irradiation was successfully observed at around 670 nm for the first time. The effective reversible changes in MCD spectra with the alternative irradiation cycles of visible light (>440 nm) and dark are also presented. The decrease rate of rotation angle at 670 nm of EuS-Au nanosystems is larger than that of absorbance. These results indicate that the effective change of MCD spectra of EuS-Au nanosystems would be dominated not only by a drastic change of absorption band related to enhanced LSPR of Au nanoparticles but also by specific interaction between EuS and Au in nanosystem under irradiation. Illustration of photoswitch and TEM image of EuS-Au nanosystems. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Relation of magnetism and electricity beyond Faraday-Maxwell electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkin, M. I.; Orlova, N. B.

    2014-11-01

    A comparison has been performed between the Landau-Dzyaloshinskii-Astrov magnetoelectric effects and the electromagnetic effects caused by the electromagnetic Faraday induction and Maxwell displacement currents. The requirement for the spontaneous violation of symmetry relative to space inversion and time reversion is formulated as the condition for the existence of magnetoelectric effects. An analysis is performed of some results obtained by E.A. Turov both personally and in association with colleagues, which made a significant contribution to the development of the science of magnetoelectricity. These results include the development of the scheme of a simplified symmetry analysis for describing collinear spin structures; the use of this scheme for the invariant expansion of thermodynamic potentials for the magnetic materials with different types of magnetic ordering; the formulation of the microscopic model of magnetoelectricity with the use of the relation between spins and electroactive optical phonons; the study of the phenomena of the enhancement of magnetoelectric effects upon the magnetic resonance; the analysis of the opportunities of electrodipole excitation and of the detection of different signals of magnetic resonance; and the study of the manifestations of magnetoelectric effects in magnetoacoustics and optics.

  16. A Sensitive Faraday Rotation Setup Using Triple Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Phelps, Gretchen; Broering, Mark; Korsch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of polarized targets in scattering experiments has become a common practice in many major accelerator laboratories. Noble gases are especially suitable for such applications, since they can be easily hyper-polarized using spin exchange or metastable pumping techniques. Polarized helium-3 is a very popular target because it often serves as an effective polarized neutron due to its simple nuclear structure. A favorite cell material to generate and store polarized helium-3 is GE-180, a relatively dense aluminosilicate glass. In this paper, we present a Faraday rotation method, using a new triple modulation technique, where the measurement of the Verdet constants of SF57 flint glass, pyrex glass, and air were tested. The sensitivity obtained shows that this technique may be implemented in future cell wall characterization and thickness measurements. We also discuss the first ever extraction of the Verdet constant of GE-180 glass for four wavelength values of 632 nm, 773 nm, 1500 nm, and 1547 nm, w...

  17. Design of two-dimensional photonic crystal defect states for quantum cascade laser resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Srinivasan, K; Srinivasan, Kartik; Painter, Oskar

    2004-01-01

    Current quantum cascade lasers based upon conduction band electron transitions are predominantly TM (electrical field normal to the epitaxial direction) polarized. Here we present a study of localized defect modes, with the requisite TM polarization, in connected square and hexagonal lattice two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals for application as quantum cascade laser resonators. A simple group-theory based analysis is used to produce an approximate description of the resonant modes supported by defects situated at different high symmetry points within the host photonic lattice. The results of this analysis are compared with 2D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations, showing a close correspondence between the two analyses, and potential applications of the analysis in quantum cascade laser design are considered.

  18. Laser based diagnostics - from cultural heritage to human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanberg, S.

    2008-09-01

    An overview of applied laser-based diagnostics as pursued at the Division of Atomic Physics, Lund University, is given. The fields of application range from environmental monitoring including cultural heritage assessment, to biomedical applications. General aspects of laser-based methods are non-intrusiveness, high spectral- and spatial resolution, and data production in real-time. Different applications are frequently generically very similar irrespective of the particular context, which, however, decides the spatial and temporal scales as well as the size of the optics employed. Thus, volcanic plume mapping by lidar, and optical mammography are two manifestations of the same principle, as is fluorescence imaging of a human bronchus by an endoscope, and the scanning of a cathedral using a fluorescence lidar system. Recent applications include remote laser-induced break-down spectroscopy (LIBS) and gas monitoring in scattering media (GASMAS). In particular, a powerful method for diagnostics of human sinus cavities was developed, where free oxygen and water molecules are monitored simultaneously.

  19. Displacement cascades in polyatomic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkin, D.M.; Coulter, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Using a continuous-slowing-down, random amorphous material model, we have studied displacement cascades in a number of diatomic materials. This paper reviews a number of previous results that elucidate the effects of atomic mass, recoil energy, displacement energy, capture energy and material stoichiometry on the numbers of displacements in a cascade. The displacement cascade reveals a complex structure that is dependent on the type of irradiation and the material properties. Conclusions related to damage analysis for fusion reactors are given.

  20. Sub-parts-per-billion level detection of NO2 using room-temperature quantum cascade lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Pushkarsky, Michael; Tsekoun, Alexei; Dunayevskiy, Ilya G.; Go, Rowel; C. Kumar N. Patel

    2006-01-01

    We report the sub-parts-per-billion-level detection of NO2 using tunable laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy where the laser radiation is obtained from a room-temperature continuous-wave high-power quantum cascade laser operating in an external grating cavity configuration. The continuously tunable external grating cavity quantum cascade laser produces maximum single-frequency output of ≈300 mW tunable over ≈350 nm centered at 6.25 μm. We demonstrate minimum detection level of ≈0.5 parts p...

  1. High-power continuous-wave mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers based on strain-balanced heterostructures (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razeghi, M.; Evans, A.; Slivken, S.; Yu, J. S.; Zheng, J. G.; Dravid, V. P.

    2005-07-01

    Limiting factors for short-wavelength QCL designs are discussed, and a model is described to predict the short-wavelength limit for strain-balanced QCL structures. High performance is predicted at wavelengths as short as 3.0mm based on a conduction band offset of 0.9 eV in the GaInAs/AlInAs materials. Recent work is presented on the growth of strained materials using gas-source molecular beam epitaxy to investigate the model predictions. Advanced material characterization, including HR-STEM, high-resolution x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, atomic force microscopy, and wafer-scale uniformity and repeatability are demonstrated for strain-balanced QCL structures. Laser testing results are presented for QCLs operating at ~4.8mm, and lastly, predictions for further performance improvement at short wavelengths are discussed.

  2. Tunable multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on an in-line Mach Zehnder interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tunable multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on an in-line Mach Zehnder interferometer is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The in-line Mach Zehnder interferometer is realized by using cascaded long-period fiber gratings. The long-period fiber gratings can couple the guided core mode to several cladding modes. If two identical long-period fiber gratings are concatenated, an interference pattern can be generated, which results from an interaction of the core and the cladding modes in the second long-period fiber grating. Therefore, a simple multichannel filter based on an in-line Mach Zehnder interferometer can be realized. The wavelength spacing of the proposed multichannel filter is controlled by the number of long-period fiber gratings. We apply the proposed multichannel fiber to the generation of a multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber laser with a tunability on the order of the wavelength spacing. An erbium-doped fiber amplifier is implemented as a gain medium. The gain competition of erbium ions is suppressed by soaking the erbium-doped fiber in liquid nitrogen. The power fluctuation of the proposed multiwavelength fiber laser is measured to be less than 0.5 dB. A high-quality multiwavelength output with a high extinction ratio of more than 40 dB is achieved. The wavelength spacing of the proposed multiwavelength fiber laser is controlled by increasing the number of long-period fiber gratings. The wavelength spacing is changed from 0.8 nm to 1.6 nm discretely.

  3. Laser based in-situ and standoff detection of chemical warfare agents and explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2009-09-01

    Laser based detection of gaseous, liquid and solid residues and trace amounts has been developed ever since lasers were invented. However, the lack of availability of reasonably high power tunable lasers in the spectral regions where the relevant targets can be interrogated as well as appropriate techniques for high sensitivity, high selectivity detection has hampered the practical exploitation of techniques for the detection of targets important for homeland security and defense applications. Furthermore, emphasis has been on selectivity without particular attention being paid to the impact of interfering species on the quality of detection. Having high sensitivity is necessary but not a sufficient condition. High sensitivity assures a high probability of detection of the target species. However, it is only recently that the sensor community has come to recognize that any measure of probability of detection must be associated with a probability of false alarm, if it is to have any value as a measure of performance. This is especially true when one attempts to compare performance characteristics of different sensors based on different physical principles. In this paper, I will provide a methodology for characterizing the performance of sensors utilizing optical absorption measurement techniques. However, the underlying principles are equally application to all other sensors. While most of the current progress in high sensitivity, high selectivity detection of CWAs, TICs and explosives involve identifying and quantifying the target species in-situ, there is an urgent need for standoff detection of explosives from safe distances. I will describe our results on CO2 and quantum cascade laser (QCL) based photoacoustic sensors for the detection of CWAs, TICs and explosives as well the very new results on stand-off detection of explosives at distances up to 150 meters. The latter results are critically important for assuring safety of military personnel in battlefield

  4. Weakly nonlinear analysis of impulsively-forced Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catllá, Anne; Porter, Jeff; Silber, Mary

    2005-11-01

    Parametrically-excited surface waves, forced by a repeating sequence of delta-function impulses, are considered within the framework of the Zhang-Viñals model [W. Zhang and J. Viñals, J. Fluid Mech. 336, 301 (1997)]. With impulsive forcing, the linear stability analysis can be carried out exactly and leads to an implicit equation for the neutral stability curves. As noted previously [J. Bechhoefer and B. Johnson, Am. J. Phys. 64, 1482 (1996)], in the simplest case of N=2 equally-spaced impulses per period (which alternate up and down) there are only subharmonic modes of instability. The familiar situation of alternating subharmonic and harmonic resonance tongues emerges only if an asymmetry in the spacing between the impulses is introduced. We extend the linear analysis for N=2 impulses per period to the weakly nonlinear regime, where we determine the leading order nonlinear saturation of one-dimensional standing waves as a function of forcing strength. Specifically, an analytic expression for the cubic Landau coefficient in the bifurcation equation is derived as a function of the dimensionless spacing between the two impulses and the fluid parameters that appear in the Zhang-Viñals model. As the capillary parameter is varied, one finds a parameter regime of wave amplitude suppression, which is due to a familiar 1:2 spatiotemporal resonance between the subharmonic mode of instability and a damped harmonic mode. This resonance occurs for impulsive forcing even when harmonic resonance tongues are absent from the neutral stability curves. The strength of this resonance feature can be tuned by varying the spacing between the impulses. This finding is interpreted in terms of a recent symmetry-based analysis of multifrequency forced Faraday waves [J. Porter, C. M. Topaz, and M. Silber, Phys. Lett. 93, 034502 (2004); C. M. Topaz, J. Porter, and M. Silber, Phys. Rev. E 70, 066206 (2004)]. PMID:16383732

  5. Assessment of beryllium Faraday screens of the JET ICRF antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JET ICRF antennas, equipped with beryllium (Be) Faraday screens (FS), can be operated in such a way that the RF specific effects on the plasma boundary, by the impurity influx originating at the screens, are reduced to a negligible level. In dipole phasing, k parallel = 7 m-1, the influx is for all purposes negligible. In monopole phasing (kparallel = 0 m-1) the beryllium influx does not exceed ΦFSBe = 1 x 1019 atoms·MW-1·s-1 and the corresponding δZeff/PRF is -1. The observed dependences of ΦFSBe (in monopole phasing) on plasma density, antenna voltage, antenna phasing, and the angle between FS elements and the magnetic field in the boundary, B-vector(a) = B-vectorθ(a) + B-vectorT(a), confirm that the release mechanism is sputtering by ions accelerated in the RF enhanced Bohm-Debye sheaths forming at the front face of the FS. When the angle between FS and B-vector(a) is approx. 22 deg. C, the fraction of the RF power radiated by the antenna, dissipated at the screen, can reach 40%. At high antenna voltage, arcing across the FS can occur. With dipole phasing the heating efficiency is not degraded, even with the large angle, and all the power coupled by the antenna is absorbed at the resonance position near the plasma centre. The open screen design did not introduce any disadvantages. The experience from JET operation at powers of up to 22 MW shows that, if the necessary conditions are met, i.e. if RF rectification is minimized, antennas are phased as dipoles and material with low sputtering coefficients at energies of 0.5-1 keV is used, then the influx from the FS is, for all practical purposes, eliminated. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  6. Laser-Based Hot-Melt Bonding of Thermosetting GFRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, P.; Pillach, B.; Frick, T.; Schmidt, M.

    In the future the use of tailored multi-material components will increase because of lightweight constructions. However for an optimal integration of different materials suitable joining techniques are necessary. This paper presents results of joining thermosetting composites to thermoplastics by means of laser-based hot-melt bonding. First the joining process of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) to thermoplastics is analyzed with regard to appropriate material selection of the thermoplastic joining partner. Then experiments are performed to join two thermosetting GFRP composites using a thermoplastic interlayer. All joined specimens are characterized by tensile shear tests whereby the influences of the used peel ply and the thermoplastic joining partner on the tensile shear strength are analyzed. Finally climate tests are performed to investigate the long-term durability of the joint connections.

  7. Laser based remote diameter measurement in radioactive area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-contact laser based instrument for fuel pellet diameter measurement from outside the glass walled glove box has been developed at LPTD, BARC. Its optical design allows separation of 1 meter between its two measuring units thus suitable for 1 meter wide glove box. The instrument is based on beam scanning principle and calculates the diameter by measuring object shadow pulse width. A micro controller based circuit has been designed along with high speed counters for diameter calculation and display purpose. This stand alone instrument has been tested for diameter range of interest from 4.12mm to 4.23 mm and gives an accuracy of ± 4 μm. (author)

  8. LASER-BASED PROFILE MONITOR FOR ELECTRON BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High performance TeV energy electron / positron colliders (LC) are the first machines to require online, non-invasive beam size monitors for micron and sub-micron for beam phase space optimization. Typical beam densities in the LC are well beyond the threshold density for single pulse melting and vaporization of any material, making conventional wire scanners ineffective. Using a finely focused, diffraction limited high power laser, it is possible to devise a sampling profile monitor that, in operation, resembles a wire scanner. Very high resolution laser-based profile monitors have been developed and tested, first at FFTB (SLAC) and later at SLC and ATF. The monitor has broad applicability and we review here the technology, application and status of ongoing research programs

  9. Faraday laser using 1.2 km fiber as an extended cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaogang; Pan, Duo; Chen, Mo; Zhu, Chuanwen; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a Faraday laser using a 1.2 km fiber as an extended cavity, which provides optical feedback and obtains small free spectrum range (FSR) of 83 kHz, and have succeeded in limiting the laser frequency to a crossover transition {5}2{S}1/2,F=2\\to {5}2{P}3/2,F\\prime =1,3 of the natural 87Rb at 780 nm. The Faraday laser is based on a Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) with an ultra-narrow bandwidth and the long fiber extended cavity of 1.2 km. The peak transmission assigned to the crossover transition F=2\\to F\\prime =1,3 in the FADOF is 20.5% with an ultra-narrow bandwidth of 29.1 MHz. The Allan deviation of the Faraday laser is around 6.0× {10}-11 in 0.06 to 1 s sampling time. Laser frequency is always kept in the center of the transmitted peak assigned to F=2\\to F\\prime =1,3. The Faraday laser realized here can provide light exactly resonant with an atomic transition used for atom–photon interaction experiments and is insensitive to diode temperature and injection current fluctuations.

  10. Position control of desiccation cracks by memory effect and Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yousuke; Takeshi, Ooshida; Nakahara, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation of desiccation cracks on a layer of a calcium carbonate paste is studied experimentally. This paste is known to exhibit a memory effect, which means that a short-time application of horizontal vibration to the fresh paste predetermines the direction of the cracks that are formed after the paste is dried. While the position of the cracks (as opposed to their direction) is still stochastic in the case of horizontal vibration, the present work reports that their positioning is also controllable, at least to some extent, by applying vertical vibration to the paste and imprinting the pattern of Faraday waves, thus breaking the translational symmetry of the system. The experiments show that the cracks tend to appear in the node zones of the Faraday waves: in the case of stripe-patterned Faraday waves, the cracks are formed twice more frequently in the node zones than in the anti-node zones, presumably due to the localized horizontal motion. As a result of this preference of the cracks to the node zones, the memory of the square lattice pattern of Faraday waves makes the cracks run in the oblique direction differing by 45 degrees from the intuitive lattice direction of the Faraday waves. PMID:23306446

  11. Applications of laser based measurements to combustion related fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingmann, J.

    1998-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with laser based techniques for the measurement of fluid dynamical properties and their application to combusting flow fields or flow fields related to combustion. As an introduction, the theory of turbulent flow and combustion is shortly presented. An overview of laser based measuring techniques is given. Next, seven papers are included. The main topic of papers 1 and 2 is the measurements of swirling pipe flows with sudden axi-symmetric expansions. These flow fields are related to the flow fields of gas turbine combustors. Measurements and computations using commercial software are compared. Papers 3 and 7 deal with a laser Doppler anemometry based method for the measurement of the turbulent dissipation rate and its application to an axi-symmetric free jet, respectively. The measurements rely on two-point measurements with high spatial resolution. Also three-component one-point measurements are used to obtain the triple velocity correlations. Together these measurements are sufficient to present the energy balance, if pressure effects are neglected. Papers 4, 5 and 6 are concerned with the turbulent flame speed under premixed conditions. Papers 4 and 5 present flame speed measurements from a stationary burner using methane and Danish natural gas. Particle image velocimetry and one- and two-point Laser Doppler anemometry is used to measure flame speed and turbulent quantities, including integral length scales. Paper 7 presents measurements of flame speed and turbulence parameters in a spark ignition engine. Here heat release analyses from pressure measurements are combined with one- and two-point laser Doppler anemometry to analyze influence of turbulence on flame propagation 50 refs, 25 figs

  12. Spectroscopic detection of biological NO with a quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, L.; Kosterev, A. A.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Gmachl, C.; Capasso, F.; Sivco, D. L.; Baillargeon, J. N.; Hutchinson, A. L.; Cho, A. Y.; Urban, W.

    2001-01-01

    Two configurations of a continuous wave quantum cascade distributed feedback laser-based gas sensor for the detection of NO at a parts per billion (ppb) concentration level, typical of biomedical applications, have been investigated. The laser was operated at liquid nitrogen temperature near lambda = 5.2 microns. In the first configuration, a 100 m optical path length multi-pass cell was employed to enhance the NO absorption. In the second configuration, a technique based on cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (CES) was utilized, with an effective path length of 670 m. Both sensors enabled simultaneous analysis of NO and CO2 concentrations in exhaled air. The minimum detectable NO concentration was found to be 3 ppb with a multi-pass cell and 16 ppb when using CES. The two techniques are compared, and potential future developments are discussed.

  13. Cascade Error Projection Learning Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, T. A.; Stubberud, A. R.; Daud, T.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed mathematical analysis is presented for a new learning algorithm termed cascade error projection (CEP) and a general learning frame work. This frame work can be used to obtain the cascade correlation learning algorithm by choosing a particular set of parameters.

  14. Faraday and Cotton-Mouton Effects of Helium at $\\lambda = 1064$ nm

    CERN Document Server

    Cadène, Agathe; Berceau, Paul; Fouché, Mathilde; Battesti, Remy; Rizzo, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of the Faraday and the Cotton-Mouton effects of helium gas at $\\lambda =~1064$\\,nm. Our apparatus is based on an up-to-date resonant optical cavity coupled to longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields. This cavity increases the signal to be measured by more than a factor of 270\\,000 compared to the one acquired after a single path of light in the magnetic field region. We have reached a precision of a few percent both for Faraday effect and Cotton-Mouton effect. Our measurements give for the first time the experimental value of the Faraday effect at $\\lambda$=\\,1064\\,nm. This value is compatible with the theoretical prediction. Concerning Cotton-Mouton effect, our measurement is the second reported experimental value at this wavelength, and the first to agree at better than 1$\\sigma$ with theoretical predictions.

  15. Statistical Techniques for Detecting the Intergalactic Magnetic Field from Large Samples of Extragalactic Faraday Rotation Data

    CERN Document Server

    Akahori, Takuya; Ryu, Dongsu

    2014-01-01

    Rotation measure (RM) grids of extragalactic radio sources have been widely used for studying cosmic magnetism. But their potential for exploring the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in filaments of galaxies is unclear, since other Faraday-rotation media such as the radio source itself, intervening galaxies, and the interstellar medium of our Galaxy are all significant contributors. We study statistical techniques for discriminating the Faraday rotation of filaments from other sources of Faraday rotation in future large-scale surveys of radio polarization. We consider a 30 degree times 30 degree field-of-view toward the south Galactic pole, while varying the number of sources detected in both present and future observations. We select sources located at high redshifts and toward which depolarization and optical absorption systems are not observed, so as to reduce the RM contributions from the sources and intervening galaxies. It is found that a high-pass filter can satisfactorily reduce the RM contribution...

  16. Faraday rotation influence factors in tellurite-based glass and fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuling; Wang, Hui; Wang, Qingwei; Chen, Qiuping

    2015-09-01

    The Faraday rotation influence factors in tellurite-based glass and fibers were studied by experiments and simulations. TeO2-ZnO-Na2O-BaO glass family was fabricated and characterized in terms of the thermal and magneto-optical properties. Two core-cladding pairs for two fibers were selected from fabricated glasses. The Verdet constants of the glasses and fibers were measured at different wavelengths using a homemade optical bench, and the Verdet constant of fiber was close to that of the bulk glass. The influence from external factors (wavelength, laser power and magnetic field) and internal factors (thermal expansion coefficient difference, refractive index and Verdet constant of core and cladding) on Faraday rotation in fibers was investigated and discussed, and the purpose of this study is to improve the Faraday rotation in tellurite fibers for MO device applications both from internal material property match and external parameter configuration in measurement.

  17. Charge-exchanged beam measurement by using a grid-biased Faraday cup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for neutral beam measurement by using a Faraday cup is proposed in this paper. The method enables us to detect neutral beams by controlling secondary electrons by using a biasing grid in front of the Faraday cup. A procedure is also proposed for in situ determination of the secondary electron emission coefficient of the Faraday cup. Experimental results show that appropriate emission coefficients are determined for helium beams with energies of 2-10 keV. The neutral flux charge-exchanged from a helium ion beam passing through a helium gas is also measured. Saturation of the neutral flux is observed above the pressure expected from the solution of a rate equation. The method is promising for neutral beam measurement, especially for small current-neutral beams. (author)

  18. Michael Faraday on the Learning of Science and Attitudes of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Elspeth

    The paper makes use of Michael Faraday's ideas about learning, in particular his thoughts about attitudes to the unknowns of science and the development of an attitude which improves scientific decision-making. An invented scenario involving nursery school children demonstrates some attitudes displayed there. Discussion of the scenario and variation in possible outcomes suggests that Faraday's views are relevant to scientific learning in general. The main thesis of the paper is that it is central to learning in science to acknowledge that there is an inner struggle involved in facing unknowns, and that empathy with the fears and expectations of learners is an essential quality if genuinely scientific thought is to develop. It is suggested, following Faraday, that understanding our own feelings while we teach is a pre-requisite to enabling such empathy and that only then will we be in a position to evaluate accurately whether or not our pupils are thinking scientifically.

  19. Giant Faraday rotation of high-order plasmonic modes in graphene-covered nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzmin, Dmitry A; Shavrov, Vladimir G; Temnov, Vasily V

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic Faraday rotation in nanowires manifests itself in the rotation of the spatial intensity distribution of high-order surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes around the nanowire axis. Here we predict theoretically the giant Faraday rotation for SPP propagating on graphene-coated magneto-optically active nanowires. Upon the reversal of the external magnetic field pointing along the nanowire axis some high-order plasmonic modes may be rotated by up to ~ 100 degrees on scale of about 500 nm at mid-infrared frequencies. Tuning carrier concentration in graphene by chemical doping or gate voltage allows for controlling SPP-properties and notably the rotation angle of high-order azimuthal modes. Our results open the door to novel plasmonic applications ranging from nanowire-based Faraday isolators to the magnetic control in quantum-optical applications.

  20. Faraday rotation influence factors in tellurite-based glass and fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiuling; Wang, Qingwei [Henan University of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Wang, Hui; Chen, Qiuping [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Turin (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The Faraday rotation influence factors in tellurite-based glass and fibers were studied by experiments and simulations. TeO{sub 2}-ZnO-Na{sub 2}O-BaO glass family was fabricated and characterized in terms of the thermal and magneto-optical properties. Two core-cladding pairs for two fibers were selected from fabricated glasses. The Verdet constants of the glasses and fibers were measured at different wavelengths using a homemade optical bench, and the Verdet constant of fiber was close to that of the bulk glass. The influence from external factors (wavelength, laser power and magnetic field) and internal factors (thermal expansion coefficient difference, refractive index and Verdet constant of core and cladding) on Faraday rotation in fibers was investigated and discussed, and the purpose of this study is to improve the Faraday rotation in tellurite fibers for MO device applications both from internal material property match and external parameter configuration in measurement. (orig.)

  1. Faraday rotation influence factors in tellurite-based glass and fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Faraday rotation influence factors in tellurite-based glass and fibers were studied by experiments and simulations. TeO2-ZnO-Na2O-BaO glass family was fabricated and characterized in terms of the thermal and magneto-optical properties. Two core-cladding pairs for two fibers were selected from fabricated glasses. The Verdet constants of the glasses and fibers were measured at different wavelengths using a homemade optical bench, and the Verdet constant of fiber was close to that of the bulk glass. The influence from external factors (wavelength, laser power and magnetic field) and internal factors (thermal expansion coefficient difference, refractive index and Verdet constant of core and cladding) on Faraday rotation in fibers was investigated and discussed, and the purpose of this study is to improve the Faraday rotation in tellurite fibers for MO device applications both from internal material property match and external parameter configuration in measurement. (orig.)

  2. Faraday and resonant waves in binary collisionally-inhomogeneous Bose-Einstein condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Sudharsan, J B; Raportaru, Mihaela Carina; Nicolin, Alexandru I; Balaz, Antun

    2016-01-01

    We study Faraday and resonant waves in two-component quasi-one-dimensional (cigar-shaped) collisionally inhomogeneous Bose-Einstein condensates subject to periodic modulation of the radial confinement. We show by means of extensive numerical simulations that, as the system exhibits stronger spatially-localised binary collisions (whose scattering length is taken for convenience to be of Gaussian form), the system becomes effectively a linear one. In other words, as the scattering length approaches a delta-function, we observe that the two nonlinear configurations typical for binary cigar-shaped condensates, namely the segregated and the symbiotic one, turn into two overlapping Gaussian wave functions typical for linear systems, and that the instability onset times of the Faraday and resonant waves become longer. Moreover, our numerical simulations show that the spatial period of the excited waves (either resonant or Faraday ones) decreases as the inhomogeneity becomes stronger. Our results also demonstrate tha...

  3. Features of collisionless turbulence in the intracluster medium from simulated Faraday Rotation maps

    CERN Document Server

    Nakwacki, M S; Santos-Lima, R; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Falceta-Gonçalves, D A

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the intracluster medium (ICM) in galaxy clusters suggest for the presence of turbulence and the magnetic fields existence has been proved through observations of Faraday Rotation and synchrotron emission. The ICM is also known to be filled by a rarefied weakly collisional plasma. In this work we study the possible signatures left on Faraday Rotation maps by collisionless instabilities. For this purpose we use a numerical approach to investigate the dynamics of the turbulence in collisionless plasmas based on an magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) formalism taking into account different levels of pressure anisotropy. We consider models covering the sub/super-Alfv\\'enic and trans/supersonic regimes, one of them representing the fiducial conditions corresponding to the ICM. From the simulated models we compute Faraday Rotation maps and analyze several statistical indicators in order to characterize the magnetic field structure and compare the results obtained with the collisionless model to those obtaine...

  4. Basic research for development of the beam profile monitor based on a Faraday cup array system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mook-Kwang

    2015-10-01

    The basic design used to develop a beam profile monitor based on a Faraday cup array (FCA), which has the advantages of high robustness, reliability, and long-term stability, along with the ability to measure the ion current over a wide dynamic range, was developed. The total system is divided into three parts: i.e., a faraday cup, measuring electronics, and a display program part. The FCA was considered to consist of a collimator, suppressor, insulator frame, and 64 (8 × 8 array) tiny Faraday cups (FC). An electronic circuit using a multiplexer was applied to effectively address many signal lines and the printed circuit board (PCB) was designed to be divided into three parts, i.e., an electrode PCB (ELEC PCB), capacitance PCB (CAP PCB), and control PCB (CON PCB).

  5. Giant Faraday Rotation of High-Order Plasmonic Modes in Graphene-Covered Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Dmitry A; Bychkov, Igor V; Shavrov, Vladimir G; Temnov, Vasily V

    2016-07-13

    Plasmonic Faraday rotation in nanowires manifests itself in the rotation of the spatial intensity distribution of high-order surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes around the nanowire axis. Here we predict theoretically the giant Faraday rotation for SPPs propagating on graphene-coated magneto-optically active nanowires. Upon the reversal of the external magnetic field pointing along the nanowire axis some high-order plasmonic modes may be rotated by up to ∼100° on the length scale of about 500 nm at mid-infrared frequencies. Tuning the carrier concentration in graphene by chemical doping or gate voltage allows for controlling SPP-properties and notably the rotation angle of high-order azimuthal modes. Our results open the door to novel plasmonic applications ranging from nanowire-based Faraday isolators to the magnetic control in quantum-optical applications. PMID:27348746

  6. Cascade Distillation System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargushingh, Miriam; Shull, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support System (LSS) Project is chartered with de-veloping advanced life support systems that will ena-ble NASA human exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The goal of AES is to increase the affordabil-ity of long-duration life support missions, and to re-duce the risk associated with integrating and infusing new enabling technologies required to ensure mission success. Because of the robust nature of distillation systems, the AES LSS Project is pursuing develop-ment of the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) as part of its technology portfolio. Currently, the system is being developed into a flight forward Generation 2.0 design.

  7. Interband cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurgaftman, I.; Weih, R.; Kamp, M.; Meyer, J. R.; Canedy, C. L.; Kim, C. S.; Kim, M.; Bewley, W. W.; Merritt, C. D.; Abell, J.; Höfling, S.

    2015-04-01

    We review the current status of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the midwave infrared (IR). The ICL may be considered the hybrid of a conventional diode laser that generates photons via electron-hole recombination, and an intersubband-based quantum cascade laser (QCL) that stacks multiple stages for enhanced current efficiency. Following a brief historical overview, we discuss theoretical aspects of the active region and core designs, growth by molecular beam epitaxy, and the processing of broad-area, narrow-ridge, and distributed feedback (DFB) devices. We then review the experimental performance of pulsed broad area ICLs, as well as the continuous-wave (cw) characteristics of narrow ridges having good beam quality and DFBs producing output in a single spectral mode. Because the threshold drive powers are far lower than those of QCLs throughout the λ = 3-6 µm spectral band, ICLs are increasingly viewed as the laser of choice for mid-IR laser spectroscopy applications that do not require high output power but need to be hand-portable and/or battery operated. Demonstrated ICL performance characteristics to date include threshold current densities as low as 106 A cm-2 at room temperature (RT), cw threshold drive powers as low as 29 mW at RT, maximum cw operating temperatures as high as 118 °C, maximum cw output powers exceeding 400 mW at RT, maximum cw wallplug efficiencies as high as 18% at RT, maximum cw single-mode output powers as high as 55 mW at RT, and single-mode output at λ = 5.2 µm with a cw drive power of only 138 mW at RT.

  8. Interband cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the current status of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the midwave infrared (IR). The ICL may be considered the hybrid of a conventional diode laser that generates photons via electron–hole recombination, and an intersubband-based quantum cascade laser (QCL) that stacks multiple stages for enhanced current efficiency. Following a brief historical overview, we discuss theoretical aspects of the active region and core designs, growth by molecular beam epitaxy, and the processing of broad-area, narrow-ridge, and distributed feedback (DFB) devices. We then review the experimental performance of pulsed broad area ICLs, as well as the continuous-wave (cw) characteristics of narrow ridges having good beam quality and DFBs producing output in a single spectral mode. Because the threshold drive powers are far lower than those of QCLs throughout the λ = 3–6 µm spectral band, ICLs are increasingly viewed as the laser of choice for mid-IR laser spectroscopy applications that do not require high output power but need to be hand-portable and/or battery operated. Demonstrated ICL performance characteristics to date include threshold current densities as low as 106 A cm−2 at room temperature (RT), cw threshold drive powers as low as 29 mW at RT, maximum cw operating temperatures as high as 118 °C, maximum cw output powers exceeding 400 mW at RT, maximum cw wallplug efficiencies as high as 18% at RT, maximum cw single-mode output powers as high as 55 mW at RT, and single-mode output at λ = 5.2 µm with a cw drive power of only 138 mW at RT. (topical review)

  9. Analysis of nitrogen ion beam produced in dense plasma focus device using Faraday cup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nanosecond response Faraday cup was fabricated and employed to characterize pulsed ion beam of a 2.2 kJ Mather type dense plasma focus device. The Faraday cup operating in bias ion collector mode was used to determine the energy spectrum and flux of fast nitrogen ion beam along the electrode axis (0 deg) of the device. It has been possible to register the ion energy up to a lower kinetic energy threshold of ∼ 7 keV which is a value much lower than that obtained in any previous works. The correlation of the ion beam intensity with filling gas pressure is also reported. (author)

  10. Polarization-independent optical circulator for high accuracy Faraday depolarization lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Tatsuo; Noguchi, Kazuo; Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    A high precision, polarization-independent optical circulator was developed for high accuracy Faraday depolarization lidar. Glan laser prisms and other novel optics were utilized in the circulator optics, resulting in a high extinction ratio of polarization of >30 dB. High accuracy is needed to detect a small rotation angle in the polarization plane of the propagating beam. It is generated by the Faraday effect due to the lightning discharge. The developed circulator delivered high performance of insertion loss and isolation as laser transmitter and echo receiver in the inline lidar optics. PMID:22410893

  11. Orthotropic conductivity reconstruction with virtual-resistive network and Faraday's law

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Min-Gi

    2015-06-01

    We obtain the existence and the uniqueness at the same time in the reconstruction of orthotropic conductivity in two-space dimensions by using two sets of internal current densities and boundary conductivity. The curl-free equation of Faraday\\'s law is taken instead of the elliptic equation in a divergence form that is typically used in electrical impedance tomography. A reconstruction method based on layered bricks-type virtual-resistive network is developed to reconstruct orthotropic conductivity with up to 40% multiplicative noise.

  12. Enhanced Faraday rotation by crystals of core-shell magnetoplasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varytis, P.; Pantazopoulos, P. A.; Stefanou, N.

    2016-06-01

    Collective hybridized plasmon modes, which enable strong magnetooptical coupling and consequent enhanced Faraday effect in three-dimensional periodic assemblies of magnetic dielectric nanoparticles coated with a noble-metal shell, are studied by means of rigorous full electrodynamic calculations using an extension of the layer-multiple-scattering method, in conjunction with the effective-medium approximation. A thorough analysis of relevant photonic dispersion diagrams and transmission spectra provides a consistent explanation of the underlying physical mechanisms to a degree that goes beyond existing interpretation. It is shown that properly designed structures of such composite magnetoplasmonic nanoparticles offer a versatile platform for engineering increased and broadband Faraday rotation.

  13. Electromagnetic fields in 3-D for various cavity antennas and Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell's Equations are solved for vectors E and H for various cavities of interest. The results are shown to be in agreement with existing theory for the fundamental resonance of a long ridge wave guide. This analysis has been applied to the testing cavity antenna for D-III. The method can include the addition of an arbitrarily-shaped Faraday shield. We have explored the electromagnetic effects of Faraday shield by measurement and computation. This correlation of theory and experiments is then used to predict power limits of an antenna by voltage- and current-limitations

  14. Patterns beyond Faraday waves: observation of parametric crossover from Faraday instabilities to the formation of vortex lattices in open dual fluid strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlin, Kjell; Berggren, Karl Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    Faraday first characterised the behaviour of a fluid in a container subjected to vertical periodic oscillations. His study pertaining to hydrodynamic instability, the ‘Faraday instability’, has catalysed a myriad of experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies shedding light on the mechanisms responsible for the transition of a system at rest to a new state of well-ordered vibrational patterns at fixed frequencies. Here we study dual strata in a shallow vessel containing distilled water and high-viscosity lubrication oil on top of it. At elevated driving power, beyond the Faraday instability, the top stratum is found to ‘freeze’ into a rigid pattern with maxima and minima. At the same time there is a dynamic crossover into a new state in the form of a lattice of recirculating vortices in the lower layer containing the water. Instrumentation and the physics behind are analysed in a phenomenological way together with a basic heuristic modelling of the wave field. The study, which is based on relatively low-budget equipment, stems from related art projects that have evolved over the years. The study is of value within basic research as well as in education, especially as more advanced collective project work in e.g. engineering physics, where it invites further studies of pattern formation, the emergence of vortex lattices and complexity.

  15. Dental hard tissue characterization using laser-based ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, David W.; Massey, Ward L.

    2003-07-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. One critical need is the detection of tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated to help re-mineralize the tooth. Currently employed x-ray imaging is limited in its ability to visualize interfaces and incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration. To this end, non-destructive and non-contact in vitro measurements on extracted human molars using laser-based ultrasonics are presented. Broadband ultrasonic waves are excited in the extracted sections by using a pulsed carbon-dioxide (CO2) laser operating in a region of high optical absorption in the dental hard tissues. Optical interferometric detection of the ultrasonic wave surface displacements in accomplished with a path-stabilized Michelson-type interferometer. Results for bulk and surface in-vitro characterization of caries are presented on extracted molars with pre-existing caries.

  16. Beam shaping for laser-based adaptive optics in astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Béchet, Clémentine; Neichel, Benoit; Fesquet, Vincent; González-Núñez, Héctor; Zúñiga, Sebastián; Escarate, Pedro; Guzman, Dani

    2014-01-01

    The availability and performance of laser-based adaptive optics (AO) systems are strongly dependent on the power and quality of the laser beam before being projected to the sky. Frequent and time-consuming alignment procedures are usually required in the laser systems with free-space optics to optimize the beam. Despite these procedures, significant distortions of the laser beam have been observed during the first two years of operation of the Gemini South multi-conjugate adaptive optics system (GeMS). A beam shaping concept with two deformable mirrors is investigated in order to provide automated optimization of the laser quality for astronomical AO. This study aims at demonstrating the correction of quasi-static aberrations of the laser, in both amplitude and phase, testing a prototype of this two-deformable mirror concept on GeMS. The paper presents the results of the preparatory study before the experimental phase. An algorithm to control amplitude and phase correction, based on phase retrieval techniques...

  17. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsin, Tse-Ming [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  18. Laser-based micro/nanoengineering for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, E.; Ranella, A.; Farsari, M.; Fotakis, C.

    2009-09-01

    Controlling the interactions of light with matter is crucial for the success and scalability for materials processing applications at micro and nano-scales. The use of ultrafast pulsed lasers (i.e. lasers emitting pulses of duration shorter than 10 -12 s) for the micro/nano engineering of biomaterials or materials relevant to biological applications opens up several exciting possibilities in this respect. These possibilities rely on several attractive features of ultrafast laser-matter interaction processes which allow nanoscale spatial resolution, non-thermal and non-destructive engineering to take place. This article presents a review of novel laser-based techniques for the printing and micro- and nano- scale surface modification of materials for biological applications. Emphasis is placed on techniques appropriate for biochip and tissue engineering applications, for which there is an increasing demand over the last years. Besides presenting recent advances achieved by these techniques, this work also delineates existing limitations and highlights emerging possibilities and future prospects in this field.

  19. Distributed-feedback Terahertz Quantum-cascade Lasers with Laterally Corrugated Metal Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin S.; Kumar, Sushil; Hu, Qing; Reno, John L.

    2005-01-01

    We report the demonstration of distributed-feedback terahertz quantum-cascade lasers based on a first-order grating fabricated via a lateral corrugation in a double-sided metal ridge waveguide. The phase of the facet reflection was precisely set by lithographically defined facets by dry etching. Single-mode emission was observed at low to moderate injection currents, although multimode emission was observed far beyond threshold owing to spatial hole burning. Finite-element simulations were used to calculate the modal and threshold characteristics for these devices, with results in good agreement with experiments.

  20. A phonon scattering assisted injection and extraction based terahertz quantum cascade laser

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, E; Fathololoumi, S; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Aers, G.; Laframboise, S. R.; Lindskog, M; Wacker, A.; Ban, D.; Liu, H. C.

    2012-01-01

    A novel lasing scheme for terahertz quantum cascade lasers, based on consecutive phonon-photon-phonon emissions per module, is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The charge transport of the proposed structure is modeled using a rate equation formalism. An optimization code based on a genetic algorithm was developed to find a four-well design in the $\\mathrm{GaAs/Al_{0.25}Ga_{0.75}As}$ material system that maximizes the product of population inversion and oscillator strength at 150 K. T...

  1. A hybrid plasmonic waveguide terahertz quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degl' Innocenti, Riccardo, E-mail: rd448@cam.ac.uk; Shah, Yash D.; Wallis, Robert; Klimont, Adam; Ren, Yuan; Jessop, David S.; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-23

    We present the realization of a quantum cascade laser emitting at around 2.85 THz, based on a hybrid plasmonic waveguide with a low refractive index dielectric cladding. This hybrid waveguide design allows the performance of a double-metal waveguide to be retained, while improving the emission far-field. A set of lasers based on the same active region material were fabricated with different metal layer thicknesses. A detailed characterization of the performance of these lasers revealed that there is an optimal trade-off that yields the best far-field emission and the maximum temperature of operation. By exploiting the pure plasmonic mode of these waveguides, the standard operation conditions of a double-metal quantum cascade laser were retrieved, such that the maximum operating temperature of these devices is not affected by the process. These results pave the way to realizing a class of integrated devices working in the terahertz range which could be further exploited to fabricate terahertz on-chip circuitry.

  2. A hybrid plasmonic waveguide terahertz quantum cascade laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the realization of a quantum cascade laser emitting at around 2.85 THz, based on a hybrid plasmonic waveguide with a low refractive index dielectric cladding. This hybrid waveguide design allows the performance of a double-metal waveguide to be retained, while improving the emission far-field. A set of lasers based on the same active region material were fabricated with different metal layer thicknesses. A detailed characterization of the performance of these lasers revealed that there is an optimal trade-off that yields the best far-field emission and the maximum temperature of operation. By exploiting the pure plasmonic mode of these waveguides, the standard operation conditions of a double-metal quantum cascade laser were retrieved, such that the maximum operating temperature of these devices is not affected by the process. These results pave the way to realizing a class of integrated devices working in the terahertz range which could be further exploited to fabricate terahertz on-chip circuitry

  3. A Bright Spark: Open Teaching of Science Using Faraday's Lectures on Candles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mark; Groger, Martin; Schutler, Kirsten; Mosler, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    As well as being a founding father of modern chemistry and physics Michael Faraday was also a skilled lecturer, able to explain scientific principles and ideas simply and concisely to nonscientific audiences. However science didactics today emphasizes the use of open and student-centered methods of teaching in which students find and develop…

  4. Faraday waves in quasi-one-dimensional superfluid Fermi-Bose mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Ögren, Magnus; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2013-01-01

    The generation of Faraday waves in superfluid Fermi-Bose mixtures in elongated traps is investigated. The generation of waves is achieved by periodically changing a parameter of the system in time. Two types of modulations of parameters are considered: a variation of the fermion-boson scattering...

  5. Faraday effect and Bessel beams in a magneto-optic medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacyan, S; Jauregui, R [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 20-364, Mexico DF 01000 (Mexico)

    2008-01-14

    We present a detailed theoretical study of Bessel beams propagating parallel to a magnetic field in a magneto-optic medium. Exact solutions of the Maxwell equations are presented from which the Faraday effect follows. The mechanical properties of light and some possible effects on the medium are also analysed.

  6. Faraday effect and Bessel beams in a magneto-optic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a detailed theoretical study of Bessel beams propagating parallel to a magnetic field in a magneto-optic medium. Exact solutions of the Maxwell equations are presented from which the Faraday effect follows. The mechanical properties of light and some possible effects on the medium are also analysed

  7. Modulation and suppression of weak Cotton-Mouton effect by Faraday rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Yu. A.; Chrzanowski, J.

    2011-06-01

    Polarization of electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasma is studied in conditions, when Cotton-Mouton effect is weak enough as compared with Faraday one. Evolution of polarization state is described by new mathematical approach, namely, by angular variables technique (AVT) which describes evolution of the angular parameters of polarization ellipse in magnetized plasma. The method of consequent approximations is applied, which uses the ratio ( Ω ⊥/ Ω 3) of Cotton-Mouton and Faraday terms, as a small parameter of a problem and allows obtaining simple analytical expressions for azimuthal and ellipticity angles in frame of the first and second approximations. The phenomenon of ellipticity modulation and suppression by Faraday rotation is revealed, which consists in ellipticity decreasing for stronger Faraday rotation, what makes polarization closer to linear one. Numerical illustration of the phenomenon are presented. It is shown that account of the second-order terms of the method of consequent approximation provides an accuracy better than 1% even in conditions, when small parameter Ω ⊥/ Ω 3 achieves the value 1/4.

  8. Stray-field-induced Faraday contributions in wide-field Kerr microscopy and -magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markó, D.; Soldatov, I. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, PO 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Materials Science, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Tekielak, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Bialystok, Lipowa 41, Bialystok 15-424 Poland (Poland); Schäfer, R., E-mail: r.schaefer@ifw-dresden.de [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, PO 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Materials Science, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The magnetic domain contrast in wide-field Kerr microscopy on bulk specimens can be substantially distorted by non-linear, field-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective lens that are caused by stray-field components emerging from the specimen. These Faraday contributions, which were detected by Kerr-magnetometry on grain-oriented iron–silicon steel samples, are thoroughly elaborated and characterized. They express themselves as a field-dependent gray-scale offset to the domain contrast and in highly distorted surface magnetization curves if optically measured in a wide field Kerr microscope. An experimental method to avoid such distortions is suggested. In the course of these studies, a low-permeability part in the surface magnetization loop of slightly misoriented (110)-surfaces in iron–silicon sheets was discovered that is attributed to demagnetization effects in direction perpendicular to the sheet surface. - Highlights: • Magnetizing a finite sample in a Kerr microscope leads to sample-generated stray-fields. • They cause non-linear, field- and position-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective. • This leads to a modulation of the Kerr contrast and to distorted MOKE loops. • A method to compensate these Faraday rotations is presented.

  9. Faraday rotation of plasmas in the vicinity of a Schwarzschild black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, Felipe; Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy; Mahajan, Swadesh

    2015-11-01

    The propagation of an electromagnetic wave in a multi-specie plasmas (ion-electron and ion-electron-positron), embedded in the gravitational field of a Schwarzschild black hole, is investigated with particular emphasis on studying the Faraday rotation (rotation of the phase angle of the right and left-handed components of wave). In order to appropriately deal with the strong gravitational field (affecting the plasma in the proximity of the black hole horizon), we employ Rindler coordinates in the 3 +1 decomposition of general relativity. The rather complex dispersion relation for high-frequency electromagnetic waves reveals the dependence of Faraday rotation on the number density of different constituents of the multi-specie plasma, the background magnetic field, and the mass of the black hole. Amongst other things, the expression for the Faraday rotation allows us to determine the black hole mass if the number density and magnetic field strength are estimated, and the rotation of the phase angle is measured. It is also shown how Faraday rotation could be harnessed to infer black hole features in a more complete theory that pertains, for example, to Kerr black holes. Different astrophysical implications are pointed out. Felipe Asenjo thanks CONICyT for funding No. 79130002.

  10. Measurement of Faraday rotation in twisted optical fiber using rotating polarization and analog phase detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated phase modulation of rotating linearly polarized light by current-induced Faraday rotation in a single mode optical fiber and used the technique to measure the current in ZT-40M, a Reversed-Field Pinch. We have also demonstrated the practicality of using twisted sensing fiber to overcome the problems associated with linear birefringence

  11. Exploring Faraday's Law of Electrolysis Using Zinc-Air Batteries with Current Regulative Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Paku, Miei

    2007-01-01

    Current regulative diodes (CRDs) are applied to develop new educational experiments on Faraday's law by using a zinc-air battery (PR2330) and a resistor to discharge it. The results concluded that the combination of zinc-air batteries and the CRD array is simpler, less expensive, and quantitative and gives accurate data.

  12. Conditions for the Validity of Faraday's Law of Induction and Their Experimental Confirmation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Ramos, A.; Menendez, J. R.; Pique, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper, as its main didactic objective, shows the conditions needed for the validity of Faraday's law of induction. Inadequate comprehension of these conditions has given rise to several paradoxes about the issue; some are analysed and solved in this paper in the light of the theoretical deduction of the induction law. Furthermore, an…

  13. A New Method for Analyzing Near-Field Faraday Probe Data in Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for analyzing near-field Faraday probe data obtained from Hall thrusters. Traditional methods spawned from far-field Faraday probe analysis rely on assumptions that are not applicable to near-field Faraday probe data. In particular, arbitrary choices for the point of origin and limits of integration have made interpretation of the results difficult. The new method, called iterative pathfinding, uses the evolution of the near-field plume with distance to provide feedback for determining the location of the point of origin. Although still susceptible to the choice of integration limits, this method presents a systematic approach to determining the origin point for calculating the divergence angle. The iterative pathfinding method is applied to near-field Faraday probe data taken in a previous study from the NASA-300M and NASA-457Mv2 Hall thrusters. Since these two thrusters use centrally mounted cathodes the current density associated with the cathode plume is removed before applying iterative pathfinding. A procedure is presented for removing the cathode plume. The results of the analysis are compared to far-field probe analysis results. This paper ends with checks on the validity of the new method and discussions on the implications of the results.

  14. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  15. Ultrarelativistic cascades and strangeness production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahana, D.E. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kahana, S.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    1998-08-24

    A two-phase cascade code, LUCIFER II, developed for the treatment of ultra high energy-ion-ion collisions is applied to the production of strangeness at SPS energies {radical}(s)=17-20. This simulation is able to simultaneously describe both hard processes such as Drell-Yan and slower, soft processes such as the production of light mesons by separating the dynamics into two steps, a fast cascade involving only the nucleons in the original colliding relativistic ions followed, after an appropriate delay, by a normal multiscattering of the resulting excited baryons and mesons produced virtually in the first step. No energy loss can take place in the short time interval over which the first cascade takes place. The chief result is a reconciliation of the important Drell-Yan measurements with the apparent success of standard cascades to describe the nucleon stopping and meson production in heavy-ion experiments at the CERN SPS. (orig.) 26 refs.

  16. Ultrarelativistic cascades and strangeness production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-phase cascade code, LUCIFER II, developed for the treatment of ultra high energy-ion-ion collisions is applied to the production of strangeness at SPS energies √(s)=17-20. This simulation is able to simultaneously describe both hard processes such as Drell-Yan and slower, soft processes such as the production of light mesons by separating the dynamics into two steps, a fast cascade involving only the nucleons in the original colliding relativistic ions followed, after an appropriate delay, by a normal multiscattering of the resulting excited baryons and mesons produced virtually in the first step. No energy loss can take place in the short time interval over which the first cascade takes place. The chief result is a reconciliation of the important Drell-Yan measurements with the apparent success of standard cascades to describe the nucleon stopping and meson production in heavy-ion experiments at the CERN SPS. (orig.)

  17. Ultrarelativistic cascades and strangeness production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahana, D.E. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Physics Dept.; Kahana, S.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    1998-02-01

    A two phase cascade, LUCIFER II, developed for the treatment of ultra high energy Ion-Ion collisions is applied to the production of strangeness at SPS energies. This simulation is able to simultaneously describe both hard processes such as Drell-Yan and slower, soft processes such as the production of light mesons by separating the dynamics into two steps, a fast cascade involving only the nucleons in the original colliding relativistic ions followed, after an appropriate delay, by a normal multiscattering of the resulting excited baryons and mesons produced virtually in the first step. No energy loss can take place in the short time interval over which the first cascade takes place. The chief result is a reconciliation of the important Drell-Yan measurements with the apparent success of standard cascades to describe the nucleon stopping and meson production in heavy ion experiments at the CERN SPS.

  18. Interband Cascade Photovoltaic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui Q. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Santos, Michael B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Johnson, Matthew B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2014-09-24

    In this project, we are performing basic and applied research to systematically investigate our newly proposed interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) cells [1]. These cells follow from the great success of infrared IC lasers [2-3] that pioneered the use of quantum-engineered IC structures. This quantum-engineered approach will enable PV cells to efficiently convert infrared radiation from the sun or other heat source, to electricity. Such cells will have important applications for more efficient use of solar energy, waste-heat recovery, and power beaming in combination with mid-infrared lasers. The objectives of our investigations are to: achieve extensive understanding of the fundamental aspects of the proposed PV structures, develop the necessary knowledge for making such IC PV cells, and demonstrate prototype working PV cells. This research will focus on IC PV structures and their segments for utilizing infrared radiation with wavelengths from 2 to 5 μm, a range well suited for emission by heat sources (1,000-2,000 K) that are widely available from combustion systems. The long-term goal of this project is to push PV technology to longer wavelengths, allowing for relatively low-temperature thermal sources. Our investigations address material quality, electrical and optical properties, and their interplay for the different regions of an IC PV structure. The tasks involve: design, modeling and optimization of IC PV structures, molecular beam epitaxial growth of PV structures and relevant segments, material characterization, prototype device fabrication and testing. At the end of this program, we expect to generate new cutting-edge knowledge in the design and understanding of quantum-engineered semiconductor structures, and demonstrate the concepts for IC PV devices with high conversion efficiencies.

  19. Laser-based analytical monitoring in nuclear-fuel processing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1978-09-01

    The use of laser-based analytical methods in nuclear-fuel processing plants is considered. The species and locations for accountability, process control, and effluent control measurements in the Coprocessing, Thorex, and reference Purex fuel processing operations are identified and the conventional analytical methods used for these measurements are summarized. The laser analytical methods based upon Raman, absorption, fluorescence, and nonlinear spectroscopy are reviewed and evaluated for their use in fuel processing plants. After a comparison of the capabilities of the laser-based and conventional analytical methods, the promising areas of application of the laser-based methods in fuel processing plants are identified.

  20. Laser-based analytical monitoring in nuclear-fuel processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of laser-based analytical methods in nuclear-fuel processing plants is considered. The species and locations for accountability, process control, and effluent control measurements in the Coprocessing, Thorex, and reference Purex fuel processing operations are identified and the conventional analytical methods used for these measurements are summarized. The laser analytical methods based upon Raman, absorption, fluorescence, and nonlinear spectroscopy are reviewed and evaluated for their use in fuel processing plants. After a comparison of the capabilities of the laser-based and conventional analytical methods, the promising areas of application of the laser-based methods in fuel processing plants are identified

  1. A Cascading Failure Model by Quantifying Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Junjian; Mei, Shengwei

    2013-01-01

    Cascading failures triggered by trivial initial events are encountered in many complex systems. It is the interaction and coupling between components of the system that causes cascading failures. We propose a simple model to simulate cascading failure by using the matrix that determines how components interact with each other. A careful comparison is made between the original cascades and the simulated cascades by the proposed model. It is seen that the model can capture general features of t...

  2. Constraining atmospheric ammonia emissions through new observations with an open-path, laser-based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kang

    As the third most abundant nitrogen species in the atmosphere, ammonia (NH3) is a key component of the global nitrogen cycle. Since the industrial revolution, humans have more than doubled the emissions of NH3 to the atmosphere by industrial nitrogen fixation, revolutionizing agricultural practices, and burning fossil fuels. NH3 is a major precursor to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), which has adverse impacts on air quality and human health. The direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcings currently constitute the largest uncertainties for future climate change predictions. Gas and particle phase NH3 eventually deposits back to the Earth's surface as reactive nitrogen, leading to the exceedance of ecosystem critical loads and perturbation of ecosystem productivity. Large uncertainties still remain in estimating the magnitude and spatiotemporal patterns of NH3 emissions from all sources and over a range of scales. These uncertainties in emissions also propagate to the deposition of reactive nitrogen. To improve our understanding of NH3 emissions, observational constraints are needed from local to global scales. The first part of this thesis is to provide quality-controlled, reliable NH3 measurements in the field using an open-path, quantum cascade laser-based NH3 sensor. As the second and third part of my research, NH3 emissions were quantified from a cattle feedlot using eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements, and the similarities between NH3 turbulent fluxes and those of other scalars (temperature, water vapor, and CO2) were investigated. The fourth part involves applying a mobile laboratory equipped with the open-path NH3 sensor and other important chemical/meteorological measurements to quantify fleet-integrated NH3 emissions from on-road vehicles. In the fifth part, the on-road measurements were extended to multiple major urban areas in both the US and China in the context of five observation campaigns. The results significantly improved current urban NH3

  3. A Laser-Based Diagnostic Suite for Hypersonic Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a suite of laser-based diagnostics for the study of reactive and non-reactive hypersonic flows....

  4. A Faraday rotation search for magnetic fields in quasar damped Ly alpha absorption systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Abraham L.; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a Faraday rotation survey of 61 radio-bright QSOs conducted at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA). The Galactic contribution to the Faraday rotation is estimated and subtracted to determine the extragalactic rotation measure (RRM) for each source. Eleven of these QSOs are known to exhibit damped Ly alpha absorption. The rate of incidence of significant Faraday rotation of these 11 sources is compared to the remaining 50 and is found to be higher at the 99.8% confidence level. However, as this is based upon only two detections of Faraday rotation in the damped Ly alpha sample, the result is only tentative. If the two detections in the damped Ly alpha sample are dug to the absorbing systems, then the inferred rotation measure induced by these systems is roughly 250 rad/sq m. The two detections were for the two lowest redshift absorbers in the sample. We find that a rotation measure of 250 rad/sq m would have gone undetected for any other absorber in the damped Ly alpha sample due to the 1/(1 + 2) squared dilution of the observed RRM with redshift. Thus the data are consistent with, but do not prove, the hypothesis that Faraday rotation is a generic property of damped Ly alpha absorbers. We do not confirm the suggestion that the amplitude of RRMs increases with redshift. Rather, the data are consistent with no redshift evolution. We find that the uncertainty in the estimation of the Galactic rotation measure (GRM) is a more serious problem than previously realized for extra-galactic Faraday rotation studies of QSO absorbers. A careful analysis of current methods for estimating GRM indicate that it can be determined to an accuracy of about 15 - 20 rad/sq m. Previous studies underestimated this uncertainty by more than a factor of 2. Due to this uncertainty, rotation measures such as we suspect are associated with damped Ly alpha absorption systems can only be detected at redshifts less than z approximately

  5. Laser based observation of space debris: Taking benefits from the fundamental wave

    OpenAIRE

    Völker, Uwe; Friederich, Fabian; Buske, Ivo; Hampf, Daniel; Riede, Wolfgang; Giesen, Adolf

    2013-01-01

    After the successful experimental demonstration of the prior published concept on laser-based monitoring of space debris in early 2012, we will present further technological and conceptual advancements of this position sensing scheme. The laser based measurement of LEO space debris positions in general offers the potential of a very high accuracy on the order of 10 meters in 3D, which in turn is the input for orbit processing of objects which are seemingly on collisional course. We argue t...

  6. Rescuing Ecosystems from Extinction Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasrabudhe, Sagar; Motter, Adilson

    2010-03-01

    Food web perturbations stemming from climate change, overexploitation, invasive species, and natural disasters often cause an initial loss of species that results in a cascade of secondary extinctions. Using a predictive modeling framework, here we will present a systematic network-based approach to reduce the number of secondary extinctions. We will show that the extinction of one species can often be compensated by the concurrent removal of a second specific species, which is a counter-intuitive effect not previously tested in complex food webs. These compensatory perturbations frequently involve long-range interactions that are not a priori evident from local predator-prey relationships. Strikingly, in numerous cases even the early removal of a species that would eventually be extinct by the cascade is found to significantly reduce the number of cascading extinctions. Other nondestructive interventions based on partial removals and growth suppression and/or mortality increase are shown to sometimes prevent all secondary extinctions.

  7. Calibrating High-Precision Faraday Rotation Measurements for LOFAR and the Next Generation of Low-Frequency Radio Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Sotomayor-Beltran, C; Hessels, J W T; de Bruyn, G; Noutsos, A; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Birzan, L; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brouw, W N; Brueggen, M; Ciardi, B; de Gasperin, F; Dettmar, R -J; van Duin, A; Duscha, S; Eisloeffel, J; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Griessmeier, J; Grit, T; Gunst, A W; Hassall, T E; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Keane, E; Kohler, J; Kramer, M; Kondratiev, V I; Koopmans, L V E; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Maat, P; Macario, G; Markoff, S; McKean, J P; Mulcahy, D D; Munk, H; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pilia, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Roettgering, H; Serylak, M; Sluman, J; Stappers, B W; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Vermeulen, R; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wijnholds, S J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P; 10.1051/0004-6361/201220728

    2013-01-01

    Faraday rotation measurements using the current and next generation of low-frequency radio telescopes will provide a powerful probe of astronomical magnetic fields. However, achieving the full potential of these measurements requires accurate removal of the time-variable ionospheric Faraday rotation contribution. We present ionFR, a code that calculates the amount of ionospheric Faraday rotation for a specific epoch, geographic location, and line-of-sight. ionFR uses a number of publicly available, GPS-derived total electron content maps and the most recent release of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field. We describe applications of this code for the calibration of radio polarimetric observations, and demonstrate the high accuracy of its modeled ionospheric Faraday rotations using LOFAR pulsar observations. These show that we can accurately determine some of the highest-precision pulsar rotation measures ever achieved. Precision rotation measures can be used to monitor rotation measure variations - e...

  8. Nanowire terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum cascade lasers made of nanowire axial heterostructures are proposed. The dissipative quantum dynamics of their carriers is theoretically investigated using non-equilibrium Green functions. Their transport and gain properties are calculated for varying nanowire thickness, from the classical-wire regime to the quantum-wire regime. Our calculation shows that the lateral quantum confinement provided by the nanowires allows an increase of the maximum operation temperature and a strong reduction of the current density threshold compared to conventional terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

  9. Closing remarks on Faraday Discussion 107: Interactions of acoustic waves with thin films and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    The papers in this Faraday Discussion represent the state-of-the-art in using acoustic devices to measure the properties of thin films and interfaces. Sauerbrey first showed that the mass sensitivity of a quartz crystal could be used to measure the thickness of vacuum-deposited metals. Since then, significant progress has been made in understanding other interaction mechanisms between acoustic devices and contacting media. Bruckenstein and Shay and Kanazawa and Gordon showed that quartz resonators could be operated in a fluid to measure surface mass accumulation and fluid properties. The increased understanding of interactions between acoustic devices and contacting media has allowed new information to be obtained about thin films and interfaces. These closing remarks will summarize the current state of using acoustic techniques to probe thin films and interfaces, describe the progress reported in this Faraday Discussion, and outline some remaining problems. Progress includes new measurement techniques, novel devices, new applications, and improved modeling and data analysis.

  10. Transfer matrix approach for the Kerr and Faraday rotation in layered nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Széchenyi, Gábor; Vigh, Máté; Kormányos, Andor; Cserti, József

    2016-09-21

    To study the optical rotation of the polarization of light incident on multilayer systems consisting of atomically thin conductors and dielectric multilayers we present a general method based on transfer matrices. The transfer matrix of the atomically thin conducting layer is obtained using the Maxwell equations. We derive expressions for the Kerr (Faraday) rotation angle and for the ellipticity of the reflected (transmitted) light as a function of the incident angle and polarization of the light. The method is demonstrated by calculating the Kerr (Faraday) angle for bilayer graphene in the quantum anomalous Hall state placed on the top of dielectric multilayers. The optical conductivity of the bilayer graphene is calculated in the framework of a four-band model. PMID:27420800

  11. Interaction between Faraday rotation and Cotton-Mouton effects in polarimetry modeling for NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of electromagnetic wave polarization is modeled for propagation in the major radial direction in the National Spherical Torus Experiment with retroreflection from the center stack of the vacuum vessel. This modeling illustrates that the Cotton-Mouton effect-elliptization due to the magnetic field perpendicular to the propagation direction-is shown to be strongly weighted to the high-field region of the plasma. An interaction between the Faraday rotation and Cotton-Mouton effects is also clearly identified. Elliptization occurs when the wave polarization direction is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the local transverse magnetic field. Since Faraday rotation modifies the polarization direction during propagation, it must also affect the resultant elliptization. The Cotton-Mouton effect also intrinsically results in rotation of the polarization direction, but this effect is less significant in the plasma conditions modeled. The interaction increases at longer wavelength and complicates interpretation of polarimetry measurements.

  12. Use of Faraday probing to estimate current distribution in wire array z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the formation and dynamics of plasma in wire array z-pinch experiments, measurements of the distribution of current throughout the array are required. We present details of two Faraday probing diagnostics aimed at exploring the magnetic fields and hence distribution of current in an array. An imaging Faraday system utilizes a short laser pulse to make estimates of the current distribution in the precursor column formed on axis before implosion. In a second system, a rod of high Verdet constant glass is placed close to the wires of an array and the polarization of a cw laser passing through the rod is monitored to examine the variance of current with time

  13. Faraday-Active Fabry-Perot Resonator: Transmission, Reflection, and Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptuga, Anatoliy; Morozhenko, Vasyl; Pipa, Viktor; Venger, Evgen; Kostiuk, Theodor

    2011-01-01

    The propagation of light within a semiconductor Faraday-active Fabry-Perot resonator (FAFR) is investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that an external magnetic field radically changes the angular and spectral characteristics of transmission, reflection and emissivity of the resonator not only for polarized, but also for unpolarized light. Suppression of interference patterns and phase inversion of the interference extrema were observed in both monochromatic and polychromatic light. The investigations were carried out for the plane-parallel plates of n-InAs in the spectral range of free charge carrier absorption. The results can be used to create new controllable optical and spectroscopic devices for investigation of Faraday-active material properties and for control of parameters of plane-parallel layers and structures.

  14. Faraday, Maxwell, and the electromagnetic field how two men revolutionized physics

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    The story of two brilliant nineteenth-century scientists who discovered the electromagnetic field, laying the groundwork for the amazing technological and theoretical breakthroughs of the twentieth century Two of the boldest and most creative scientists of all time were Michael Faraday (1791-1867) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879). This is the story of how these two men - separated in age by forty years - discovered the existence of the electromagnetic field and devised a radically new theory which overturned the strictly mechanical view of the world that had prevailed since Newton's time. The authors, veteran science writers with special expertise in physics and engineering, have created a lively narrative that interweaves rich biographical detail from each man's life with clear explanations of their scientific accomplishments. Faraday was an autodidact, who overcame class prejudice and a lack of mathematical training to become renowned for his acute powers of experimental observation, technological skil...

  15. Terahertz spectroscopy on Faraday and Kerr rotations in a quantum anomalous Hall state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ken N; Takahashi, Youtarou; Mogi, Masataka; Yoshimi, Ryutaro; Tsukazaki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kei S; Ogawa, Naoki; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Electrodynamic responses from three-dimensional topological insulators are characterized by the universal magnetoelectric term constituent of the Lagrangian formalism. The quantized magnetoelectric coupling, which is generally referred to as topological magnetoelectric effect, has been predicted to induce exotic phenomena including the universal low-energy magneto-optical effects. Here we report the experimental indication of the topological magnetoelectric effect, which is exemplified by magneto-optical Faraday and Kerr rotations in the quantum anomalous Hall states of magnetic topological insulator surfaces by terahertz magneto-optics. The universal relation composed of the observed Faraday and Kerr rotation angles but not of any material parameters (for example, dielectric constant and magnetic susceptibility) well exhibits the trajectory towards the fine structure constant in the quantized limit. PMID:27436710

  16. Numerical simulation of Faraday waves oscillated by two-frequency forcing

    CERN Document Server

    Takagi, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    We perform a numerical simulation of Faraday waves forced with two-frequency oscillations using a level-set method with Lagrangian-particle corrections (particle level-set method). After validating the simulation with the linear stability analysis, we show that square, hexagonal and rhomboidal patterns are reproduced in agreement with the laboratory experiments [Arbell and Fineberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 654 (2000) and Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 756 (2000)]. We also show that the particle level-set's high degree of conservation of volume is necessary in the simulations. The numerical results of the rhomboidal states are compared with weakly nonlinear analysis. Difficulty in simulating other patterns of the two-frequency forced Faraday waves is discussed.

  17. Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography: Japanese SKA Cosmic Magnetism Science

    CERN Document Server

    Akahori, Takuya; Ichaki, Kiyotomo; Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Kudoh, Takahiro; Kudoh, Yuki; Machida, Mami; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takizawa, Motokazu

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields play essential roles in various astronomical objects. Radio astronomy has revealed that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our Universe. However, the real origin and evolution of magnetic fields is poorly proven. In order to advance our knowledge of cosmic magnetism in coming decades, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) should have supreme sensitivity than ever before, which provides numerous observation points in the cosmic space. Furthermore, the SKA should be designed to facilitate wideband polarimetry so as to allow us to examine sightline structures of magnetic fields by means of depolarization and Faraday Tomography. The SKA will be able to drive cosmic magnetism of the interstellar medium, the Milky Way, galaxies, AGN, galaxy clusters, and potentially the cosmic web which may preserve information of the primeval Universe. The Japan SKA Consortium (SKA-JP) Magnetism Science Working Group (SWG) proposes the project "Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography"...

  18. InGaAs spin light emitting diodes measured in the Faraday and oblique Hanle geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansell, R.; Laloë, J.-B.; Holmes, S. N.; Petrou, A.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Barnes, C. H. W.

    2016-04-01

    InGaAs quantum well light emitting diodes (LED) with spin-injecting, epitaxial Fe contacts were fabricated using an in situ wafer transfer process where the semiconductor wafer was transferred under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions to a metals growth chamber to achieve a high quality interface between the two materials. The spin LED devices were measured optically with applied magnetic fields in either the Faraday or the oblique Hanle geometries in two experimental set-ups. Optical polarizations efficiencies of 4.5% in the Faraday geometry and 1.5% in the Hanle geometry are shown to be equivalent. The polarization efficiency of the electroluminescence is seen to decay as the temperature increases although the spin lifetime remains constant due to the influence of the D’yakonov–Perel’ spin scattering mechanism in the quantum well.

  19. Chain-induced effects in the Faraday instability on ferrofluids in a horizontal magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Mekhonoshin, V. V.; Lange, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    The linear stability analysis of the Faraday instability on a viscous ferrofluid in a horizontal magnetic field is performed. Strong dipole-dipole interactions lead to the formation of chains elongated in the field direction. The formation of chains results in a qualitative new behaviour of the ferrofluid. This new behaviour is characterized by a neutral stability curve similar to that observed earlier for Maxwell viscoelastic liquids and causes a significant weakening of the energy dissipati...

  20. Faraday Cup - it is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    A Faraday Cup is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams. An electrically isolated metallic electrode intercepts the beam and captures all its charges. These charges are integrated using an current sensitive amplifier. When the beam impinges onto the electrode surface low energy electrons are liberated. In order to prevent these electrons from escaping the cup and thus falsifying the measurement, a repeller electrode with negative potential pushes the electrons back onto the electrode.

  1. A little help for a better understanding and application of Faraday's law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this letter, we examine Faraday's law of induction, analysing the electromotive force generated by a Lorentz force and the one generated by an electric field due to a changing magnetic field. We obtain the result in a didactically simple and appealing way. The final formula is derived considering explicitly the dependence of the magnetic field on the space coordinates, which is often neglected in standard textbooks. (letters and comments)

  2. Solid State Ionics: from Michael Faraday to green energy—the European dimension

    OpenAIRE

    Klaus Funke

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Ionics has its roots essentially in Europe. First foundations were laid by Michael Faraday who discovered the solid electrolytes Ag2S and PbF2 and coined terms such as cation and anion, electrode and electrolyte. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, the main lines of development toward Solid State Ionics, pursued in Europe, concerned the linear laws of transport, structural analysis, disorder and entropy and the electrochemical storage and conversion of energy. Fundamental contri...

  3. Long-range Coulomb-like mode interaction in a coaxial waveguide filled with Faraday material

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninov, I I

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear mode coupling in a coaxial waveguide filled with Faraday material has been considered. The picture of mode interaction is shown to resemble Coulomb interaction of charges: higher modes with nonzero angular momentum interact like effective charges via exchange of zero angular momentum quanta of the fundamental mode. Thus, at large distances this interaction becomes the dominant mechanism of mode coupling. The developed model may be used in designing coaxial photonic crystal fibers with strong tailored mode interaction.

  4. Interaction of Cotton-Mouton and Faraday effect under different initial polarization state of incident beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowski, J.; Kravtsov, Yu. A.

    2010-12-01

    The evolution of polarization along the ray in homogeneous plasma is analyzed in situation when Faraday and Cotton-Mouton effects are not small and comparable with each other. On the basis of the quasi-isotropic approximation of geometrical optics method authors find the numerical solution for azimuthal and ellipticity angles of polarization ellipse and analyze how the initial state of the incident beam affects obtained results. Numerical modeling is performed for plasma parameters comparable with those acceptable for the ITER project.

  5. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Based on a Potassium Faraday Dispersive Filter for Daytime Temperature Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Abo Makoto; Le Hoai Phong Pham; Aruga Kouki; Nagasawa Chikao; Shibata Yasukuni

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new high-spectral-resolution lidar technique is proposed for measuring the profiles of atmospheric temperature in daytime. Based on the theory of high resolution Rayleigh scattering, the feasibility and advantages of using potassium (K) Faraday dispersive optical filters as blocking filters for measuring atmospheric temperature are demonstrated with a numerical simulation. It was found that temperature profiles could be measured within 1K error for the height of 9 km with a 5...

  6. An analytical stability theory for Faraday waves and the observation of the harmonic surface response

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, H. W.; Wittmer, H; Wagner, C.; Albers, J; Knorr, K.

    1996-01-01

    We present an analytical stability theory for the onset of the Faraday instability, applying over a wide frequency range between shallow water gravity and deep water capillary waves. For sufficiently thin fluid layers the surface is predicted to occur in harmonic rather than subharmonic resonance with the forcing. An experimental confirmation of this result is given. PACS: 47.20.Ma, 47.20.Gv, 47.15.Cb

  7. Measurement of ionospheric Faraday rotation in simulated and real spaceborne SAR data

    OpenAIRE

    Jehle, M; Rüegg, M; Zuberbühler, L; Small, D; Meier, E

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the atmosphere on a frequencymodulated electromagnetic wave traversing the ionosphere is becoming increasingly important for recent and upcoming lowfrequency and wide-bandwidth spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. The ionized ionosphere induces Faraday rotation (FR) at these frequencies that affects radar polarimetry and causes signal path delays resulting in a reduced range resolution. The work at hand introduces a simulation model of SAR signals...

  8. Ultrafast geometric manipulation of electron spin and detection of the geometric phase via Faraday rotation spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Li Xue Qian; Cen, L X; Zheng, H Z; Yan, Y J; Li, Xin-Qi; Hu, Cheng-Yong; Cen, Li-Xiang; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Yan, YiJing

    2002-01-01

    Time-resolved Faraday rotation spectroscopy is currently exploited as a powerful technique to probe spin dynamics in semiconductors. We propose here an all-optical approach to geometrically manipulate electron spin and to detect the geometric phase by this type of extremely sensitive experiment. The global nature of the geometric phase can make the quantum manipulation more stable, which may find interesting application in quantum devices.

  9. A calorimeter-Faraday cup to measure energy content of ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calorimeter-Faraday cup to measure energy content of ion beams is described. It uses an HP quartz thermometer having a 10-40C sensitivity; contact potential problems, arising when working with thermocouples, are so avoided. Calibration has been performed with a resistive filament and with an electron beam. The apparatus is profitable if the measured ion beams are constant in time. The measured sensitivity was 10-40C/10-5W. (author)

  10. Current sensing in magnetic fusion experiments by Faraday rotation in single-mode optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We find that sensors exploiting the Faraday effect in single-mode optical fibers are practical means of measuring large currents in the MFE environment. Work still needs to be done to overcome the effects of linear birefringence. We have seen distortion caused by dynamic stress-induced birefringence and shown the importance of physically eliminating it because of the difficulty of treating it analytically

  11. Faraday synthesis study and polarized properties of PSR J1745-2900 at 7 mm

    CERN Document Server

    Kravchenko, E V; Yusef-Zadeh, F; Kovalev, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    We present results of interferometric polarization observations of the recently discovered magnetar J1745-2900 in the vicinity of the Galactic center. The observations were made with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) on 21 February 2014 in the range 40-48 GHz. The full polarization mode and A configuration of the array were used. The average total and linearly polarized flux density of the pulsar amounts to 2.3$\\pm$0.31 mJy/beam and 1.5$\\pm$0.2 mJy/beam, respectively. Analysis shows a rotation measure (RM) of (-67$\\pm$3)x10$^3$ rad/m$^2$, which is in a good agreement with previous measurements at longer wavelengths. These high frequency observations are sensitive to RM values of up to ~2x10$^7$ rad/m$^2$. However, application of the Faraday synthesis technique did not reveal other significant RM components in the pulsar emission. This supports an external nature of a single thin Faraday-rotating screen which should be located close to the Galactic center. The Faraday corrected intrinsic electric vecto...

  12. Faraday effect of bismuth iron garnet thin film prepared by mist CVD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastable bismuth iron garnet (BIG, an abbreviation of Bi3Fe5O12), one kind of garnet-type ferrites, is known to manifest very large Faraday rotation as well as low optical absorption in the visible to infrared region. We report on successful synthesis of thin film composed of single-phase BIG epitaxially grown on single-crystalline gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd3Ga5O12, GGG) substrate by using mist chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, which is an emerging technique for preparation of thin films. The crystal structure, surface morphology, and magnetic, optical and magneto-optical properties of the resultant thin films have been explored. The BIG thin film has a relatively flat surface free from roughness compared to those prepared by other vapor deposition methods. Saturation magnetization is about 1620 G at room temperature, which is close to that expected from the ideal magnetic structure of BIG. The maximum value of Faraday rotation angle reaches 54.3 deg/μm at a wavelength of 424 nm. This value is rather large when compared with those reported for BIG thin films prepared by other techniques. The wavelength dependence of Faraday rotation angle is analyzed well in terms of the crystal electric field (CEF) level schema. Our result suggests that the mist CVD method is a simple and effective technique to synthesize BIG thin film with excellent magneto-optical properties. (author)

  13. Giant Faraday effect due to Pauli exclusion principle in 3D topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Hari P; Leuenberger, Michael N

    2014-02-26

    Experiments using ARPES, which is based on the photoelectric effect, show that the surface states in 3D topological insulators (TI) are helical. Here we consider Weyl interface fermions due to band inversion in narrow-bandgap semiconductors, such as Pb1-xSnxTe. The positive and negative energy solutions can be identified by means of opposite helicity in terms of the spin helicity operator in 3D TI as ĥ(TI) = (1/ |p|_ |) β (σ|_ x p|_ ) · z^, where β is a Dirac matrix and z^ points perpendicular to the interface. Using the 3D Dirac equation and bandstructure calculations we show that the transitions between positive and negative energy solutions, giving rise to electron-hole pairs, obey strict optical selection rules. In order to demonstrate the consequences of these selection rules, we consider the Faraday effect due to the Pauli exclusion principle in a pump-probe setup using a 3D TI double interface of a PbTe/Pb₀.₃₁Sn₀.₆₉Te/PbTe heterostructure. For that we calculate the optical conductivity tensor of this heterostructure, which we use to solve Maxwell's equations. The Faraday rotation angle exhibits oscillations as a function of probe wavelength and thickness of the heterostructure. The maxima in the Faraday rotation angle are of the order of mrds. PMID:24501191

  14. The UK High Power RF Faraday Partnership Industrial, Academia, and Public Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Power Radio Frequency (HPRF) Faraday Partnership is a UK technology forum for all users, designers, developers and researchers of RF and microwave devices and systems. High power RF and microwave engineering are key enabling technologies in a wide range of industrial sectors. Formed in October 2001 and funded initially by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, the purpose of the HPRF Faraday Partnership is the development of a vibrant research, development and manufacturing base capable of exploiting opportunities in high power radio-frequency engineering. The partnership includes the key UK industrial companies, research laboratories and university research groups. The number of partners is constantly growing and already numbers over thirty. The partnership provides the enabling technology for future high power RF systems and their power supplies through its research programme. It is training people for the sector through PhD studentships and employment as Research Associates. It is planned to develop a Masters Training program. Support and involvement in research for companies in the supply chain is provided through a Partnership Office, a web site and through a range of government funded research schemes. The HPRF Faraday Partnership is seeking to establish more long term international research and development collaborations

  15. Vito Volterra and his commemoration for the centenary of Faraday's discovery of electromagnetic induction

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a memoir of 1931 written by Vito Volterra on the Italian physicists of the nineteenth century and the researches these scientists made after the discoveries of Michael Faraday on electromagnetism. Here, the memoir entitled "I fisici italiani e le ricerche di Faraday" is translated from Italian. It was written to commemorate the centenary of Faraday's discovery of the electromagnetic induction. Besides being a remarkable article on the history of science, it was also, in a certain extent, a political paper. In fact, in 1931, the same year of the publication of this article, Mussolini imposed a mandatory oath of loyalty to Italian academies. Volterra was one of the very few professors who refused to take this oath of loyalty. Because of the political situation in Italy, Volterra wanted to end his paper sending a message to the scientists of the world, telling that the feeling of admiration and gratitude that in Italy the scientists had towards "the great thinker and British experimentalist" w...

  16. Periodic reversal of magneto-optic Faraday rotation on uniaxial birefringence crystal with ultrathin magnetic films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Su

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental approach of inclined incidence magneto-optic Faraday effect observed in the polar plane is applied. Three samples containing ferromagnetic cobalt ultrathin films on a semiconductor zinc oxide (0001 single crystal substrate with in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropy are evaluated. Through the fine adjustment of crossed polarizers in the magneto-optic effect measurement completely recorded the detail optical and magneto-optical responses from the birefringent crystal substrate and the magnetic film, especially for the signal induced from the substrate with uniaxial optical axis. The angle dependency of interference phenomena periodically from the optical and magneto-optical responses is attributed to the birefringence even in the absence of a magnetic field. The new type of observation finds that the transmission Faraday intensity in the oblique incidence includes a combination of polarization rotations, which results from optical compensation from the substrate and magneto-optical Faraday effects from the film. The samples grown at different rates and examined by this method exhibit magnetic structure discriminations. This result can be applied in the advanced polarized-light technologies to enhance the spatial resolution of magnetic surfaces with microstructural information under various magnetic field direction.

  17. Characteristics for two kinds of cascading events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Sheng-Rong; Gu, Ai-Hua; Liu, Ai-Fen; Xu, Xiu-Lian; Wang, Jian; He, Da-Ren

    2011-04-01

    Avalanche or cascade failure is ubiquitous. We first classify the cascading phenomena into two categories: the cascading disasters which result in large-scale functional failures and the cascading events that do not lead to disasters. We elucidate that two important factors, the increasing amount of events and the acceleration of event frequency, can induce the crossover from the cascading phenomenon to the cascading disaster. Through a simplified sandpile model and a heuristic logistic map, we demonstrate that the dependence of the event number on the observation time behaves as a power-law and as an exponential for these two different cascading events, respectively. The analytic derivations are found to be consistent with several empirical observations. Our present findings contribute to the understanding of the transition between different cascading events, providing a basis for the further understanding of the transitions among more general critical events.

  18. Cascade Support Vector Machines with Dimensionality Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kramer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cascade support vector machines have been introduced as extension of classic support vector machines that allow a fast training on large data sets. In this work, we combine cascade support vector machines with dimensionality reduction based preprocessing. The cascade principle allows fast learning based on the division of the training set into subsets and the union of cascade learning results based on support vectors in each cascade level. The combination with dimensionality reduction as preprocessing results in a significant speedup, often without loss of classifier accuracies, while considering the high-dimensional pendants of the low-dimensional support vectors in each new cascade level. We analyze and compare various instantiations of dimensionality reduction preprocessing and cascade SVMs with principal component analysis, locally linear embedding, and isometric mapping. The experimental analysis on various artificial and real-world benchmark problems includes various cascade specific parameters like intermediate training set sizes and dimensionalities.

  19. Azobenzene-functionalized cascade molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archut, A.; Vogtle, F.; De Cola, L.;

    1998-01-01

    Cascade molecules bearing up to 32 azobenzene groups in the periphery have been prepared from poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. The dendritic azobenzene species show similar isomerization properties as the corresponding azobenzene monomers. The all-E azobenzene den...

  20. Applications of cascade multilevel inverters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭方正; 钱照明

    2003-01-01

    Cascade multilevel inverters have been developed for electric utility applications. A cascade M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 H-bridges in which each bridge's dc voltage is supported by its own de ca-pacitor. The new inverter can : ( 1 ) generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage while only switching one timeper fundamental cycle ; (2) dispense with multi-pulse inverters' transformers used in conventional utility in-terfaces and static var compensators; (3) enables direct parallel or series transformer-less connection to medium- and high-voltage power systems. In short, the cascade inverter is much more efficient and suitable for utility applications than traditional multi-pulse and pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters. The authors have experimentally demonstrated the superiority of the new inverter for power supply, (hybrid) electric vehicle (EV) motor drive, reactive power (var) and harmonic compensation. This paper summarizes the features,feasibility, and control schemes of the cascade inverter for utility applications including utility interface of renewable energy, voltage regulation, var compensation, and harmonic filtering in power systems. Analytical,simulated, and experimental results demonstrated the superiority of the new inverters.

  1. Applications of cascade multilevel inverters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭方正; 钱照明

    2003-01-01

    Cascade multilevel inverters have been developed for electric utility applications. A cascade M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 H-bridges in which each bridge's dc voltage is supported by its own dc capacitor. The new inverter can: (1) generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage while only switching one time per fundamental cycle; (2) dispense with multi-pulse inverters' transformers used in conventional utility interfaces and static var compensators; (3) enables direct parallel or series transformer-less connection to medium- and high-voltage power systems. In short, the cascade inverter is much more efficient and suitable for utility applications than traditional multi-pulse and pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters. The authors have experimentally demonstrated the superiority of the new inverter for power supply, (hybrid) electric vehicle (EV) motor drive, reactive power (var) and harmonic compensation. This paper summarizes the features, feasibility, and control schemes of the cascade inverter for utility applications including utility interface of renewable energy, voltage regulation, var compensation, and harmonic filtering in power systems. Analytical, simulated, and experimental results demonstrated the superiority of the new inverters.

  2. Multiplicity distributions in QCD cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiplicity distributions for hadrons and for jets are studied in QCD parton cascades. The colour dipole formalism is used and earlier results in the double log approximation are generalized to include terms which are suppressed by colour factors or factors of ln s. The result is a set of coupled differential equations, together with appropriate boundary conditions

  3. Strangeness Production and Ultrarelativistic Cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Kahana, D E

    1998-01-01

    A two phase cascade, LUCIFER II, developed for the treatment of ultra high energy ion-ion collisions is applied to the production of strangeness at SPS energies $\\sqrt{s}=17-20$. This simulation is able to simultaneously describe both hard processes such as Drell-Yan and slower, soft processes such as the production of light mesons, including strange mesons, by separating the dynamics into two steps, a fast cascade involving only nucleons in the original colliding relativistic ions followed, after an appropriate delay, by multiscattering of the resulting excited baryons and mesons produced virtually in the first step. No energy loss can take place in the short time interval over which the first cascade takes place. The chief result is a reconciliation of the important Drell-Yan measurements with the apparent success of standard cascades to describe the nucleon stopping and meson production in heavy ion experiments at the CERN SPS. A byproduct, obtained here in preliminary calculations, is a description of str...

  4. Intranuclear cascade models lack dynamic flow

    OpenAIRE

    Molitoris, Joseph J.; Stöcker, Horst; Gustafsson, Hans-Ake; Cugnon, Joseph; L'Hote, Denis

    2006-01-01

    We study the recent claim that the intranuclear cascade model exhibits collective sidewards flow. 4000 intranuclear cascade simulations of the reaction Nb(400 MeV/nucleon)+Nb are performed employing bound and unbound versions of the Cugnon cascade. We show that instability of the target and projectile nuclei in the unbound cascade produces substantial spurious sidewards flow angles, for spectators as well as for participants. Once the nuclear binding is included, the peak of the flow angle di...

  5. Account of cascade formation depth during sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cascade theory of sputtering is considered. It is suggested to take account of the fact that cascade in a solid forms at a certain depth. This results in decreasing a sputtered particle yield and in changing the form of angular distributions. Angular distributions of sputtered particles were calculated for plane and spherical potential barriers. It was demonstrated that account of cascade formation depth enabled to describe the experiment much better as compared to standard cascade theories. 9 refs.; 13 figs.; 2 tabs

  6. Analysis of boson cascade laser characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, K. A.; Kaliteevskaya, N. A.; Gubaidullin, A. R.; Kaliteevski, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The dependence of the level population on pumping in a boson cascade laser has been theoretically studied. Analytical expressions for the population of various cascade levels and the terahertz mode below and above the pumping threshold are obtained. Formulas for the pumping threshold and external quantum efficiency of the boson cascade laser are derived.

  7. 948 kHz repetition rate, picosecond pulse duration, all-PM 1.03 μm mode-locked fiber laser based on nonlinear polarization evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivinet, S.; Lecourt, J.-B.; Hernandez, Y.; Fotiadi, A.; Mégret, P.

    2014-05-01

    We present in this study a PM all-fiber laser oscillator passively mode-locked (ML) at 1.03 μm. The laser is based on Nonlinear Polarization Evolution (NPE) in polarization maintaining (PM) fibers. In order to obtain the mode-locking regime, a nonlinear reflective mirror including a fibered polarizer, a long fiber span and a fibered Faraday mirror (FM) is inserted in a Fabry-Perot laser cavity. In this work we explain the principles of operation of this original laser design that permits to generate ultrashort pulses at low repetition (lower that 1MHz) rate with a cavity length of 100 m of fiber. In this experiment, the measured pulse duration is about 6 ps. To our knowledge this is the first all-PM mode-locked laser based on the NPE with a cavity of 100m length fiber and a delivered pulse duration of few picosecondes. Furthermore, the different mode-locked regimes of the laser, i.e. multi-pulse, noise-like mode-locked and single pulse, are presented together with the ways of controlling the apparition of these regimes. When the single pulse mode-locking regime is achieved, the laser delivers linearly polarized pulses in a very stable way. Finally, this study includes numerical results which are obtained with the resolution of the NonLinear Schrodinger Equations (NLSE) with the Split-Step Fourier (SSF) algorithm. This modeling has led to the understanding of the different modes of operation of the laser. In particular, the influence of the peak power on the reflection of the nonlinear mirror and its operation are studied.

  8. Internuclear cascade in high energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental analysis of the process of cascading in the target fragmentation region (TFR) is performed on the basis of the available experimental methods and data and the existing phenomenological models. The effect is studied separately for the deuteron and for the heavy nuclei. The following subjects are discussed: the experimental evidence for the existence of cascading phenomenon in TFR, the effective cascade cross section, the fraction of cascade interactions, multiplicity of particles produced through cascading and their rapidity distributions, the dependence of cascading on energy and on the type of projectile as well as on the size of the nucleus, the comparison with the phenomenological models and with other proposed mechanisms of particle production in TFR. The possibility of determining the hadronization time (formation time) through the study of the cascading process in TFR is pointed out. (author). 90 refs

  9. Bankruptcy cascades in interbank markets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Tedeschi

    Full Text Available We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank's liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable.

  10. Injectorless quantum-cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 'injectorless' quantum-cascade (QC) laser is presented. The requirement of using injector regions to transport electrons from the lower laser level and other low-lying energy levels of one active region to the upper laser level of the next electron-downstream active region was eliminated by using an appropriately designed double-quantum-well 'chirped' superlattice active region. The major advantage of the 'injectorless' QC laser is the close packing of the active regions and the concomitant large optical confinement factor. Using a cascade of 75 consecutive active regions, designed for emission at λ=11.5μm, a pulsed peak output power of 270 mW is achieved at 7 K and approximately 10 mW at the maximum operating temperature of 195 K. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  11. Bankruptcy Cascades in Interbank Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Gabriele; Mazloumian, Amin; Gallegati, Mauro; Helbing, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank’s liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable. PMID:23300760

  12. Lens Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor); Lee, Alan Wei Min (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade (QC) devices are disclosed that can operate, e.g., in a range of about 1 THz to about 10 THz. In some embodiments, QC lasers are disclosed in which an optical element (e.g., a lens) is coupled to an output facet of the laser's active region to enhance coupling of the lasing radiation from the active region to an external environment. In other embodiments, terahertz amplifier and tunable terahertz QC lasers are disclosed.

  13. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  14. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  15. Advances in Diode-Laser-Based Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuler, Scott; Repasky, Kevin; Morley, Bruce; Moen, Drew; Weckwerth, Tammy; Hayman, Matt; Nehrir, Amin

    2016-06-01

    An advanced diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (WV-DIAL) has been developed. The next generation design was built on the success of previous diode-laser-based prototypes and enables accurate measurement of water vapor closer to the ground surface, in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions, and in daytime cloudy conditions up to cloud base. The lidar provides up to 1 min resolution, 150 m range resolved measurements of water vapor in a broad range of atmospheric conditions. A description of the instrument and results from its initial field test in 2014 are discussed.

  16. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  17. High power-efficiency terahertz quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Jun-Qi; Liu, Feng-Qi; Zhang, Jin-Chuan; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Zhuo, Ning; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Shu-Man; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate continuous-wave (CW) high power-efficiency terahertz quantum cascade laser based on semi-insulating surface-plasmon waveguide with epitaxial-side down (Epi-down) mounting process. The performance of the device is analyzed in detail. The laser emits at a frequency of ∼ 3.27 THz and has a maximum CW operating temperature of ∼ 70 K. The peak output powers are 177 mW in pulsed mode and 149 mW in CW mode at 10 K for 130-μm-wide Epi-down mounted lasers. The record wall-plug efficiencies in direct measurement are 2.26% and 2.05% in pulsed and CW mode, respectively. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014CB339803 and 2013CB632801), the Special-funded Program on National Key Scientific Instruments and Equipment Development, China (Grant No. 2011YQ13001802-04), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61376051).

  18. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY WITH THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY: FARADAY ROTATION TOWARD BRIGHT POLARIZED RADIO GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed 37 bright, polarized radio sources with the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) to present a novel analysis of their Faraday rotation properties. Each source was observed during the commissioning phase with two to four 100 MHz bands at frequencies ranging from 1 to 2 GHz. These observations demonstrate how the continuous frequency coverage of the ATA's log-periodic receiver can be applied to the study of Faraday rotation measures (RMs). We use RM synthesis to show that wide-bandwidth data can find multiple RM components toward a single source. Roughly a quarter of the sources studied have extra RM components with high confidence (brighter than ∼40 mJy), when observing with an RM resolution of roughly 100 rad m-2. These extra components contribute 10%-70% of the total polarized flux. This is the first time multiple RM components have been identified in a large sample of point sources. For our observing configuration, these extra RM components bias the measurement of the peak RM by 10-15 rad m-2; more generally, the peak RM cannot be determined more precisely than the RM beam size. Comparing our 1-2 GHz RM spectra to Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) polarimetric maps shows that both techniques can identify complicated Faraday structures in the sources. However, the RM values and fractional polarization are generally smaller at lower frequencies than in the higher frequency VLBA maps. With a few exceptions, the RMs from this work are consistent with that of earlier, narrow-bandwidth, all-sky surveys. This work also describes the polarimetry calibration procedure and that on-axis ATA observations of linear polarization can be calibrated to an accuracy of 0.2% of Stokes I. Future research directions include studying the time-dependent RM structure in active galactic nuclei and enabling accurate, wide-area RM surveys to test models of Galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields.

  19. Measurements of Faraday Rotation through the Solar Corona at 4.6 Solar Radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, P. D.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2013-07-01

    Identifying and understanding (1) the coronal heating mechanism and (2) the acceleration mechanism for the high-speed solar wind are two of the most important modern problems in solar physics. Many competing models of the high-speed solar wind depend on the solar magnetic field inside heliocentric distances of 5 solar radii. We report on sensitive VLA full-polarization observations made in August, 2011, at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz) of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 solar radii. Observations at 5.0 GHz (C-band frequencies) permit measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. These Faraday rotation observations provide unique information on the plasma density and magnetic field strength in this region of the corona. The measured Faraday rotation on this day was lower than our a priori expectations, but we have successfully modeled the measurement in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. Further, 3C228 provides two lines of sight (separated by 46”) that allow measurement of differential Faraday rotation. These data may provide constraints on the magnitude of coronal currents and, thus, on the role Joule heating plays in the corona. Fluctuations in the observed rotation measure may also place constraints on wave-turbulence models by constraining the magnitude of coronal Alfvén waves.

  20. Parsec-scale Faraday Rotation Measures from General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Active Galactic Nucleus Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Avery E.; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2010-12-01

    It is now possible to compare global three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) jet formation simulations directly to multi-wavelength polarized VLBI observations of the pc-scale structure of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets. Unlike the jet emission, which requires post hoc modeling of the nonthermal electrons, the Faraday rotation measures (RMs) depend primarily upon simulated quantities and thus provide a direct way to confront simulations with observations. We compute RM distributions of a three-dimensional global GRMHD jet formation simulation, extrapolated in a self-consistent manner to ~10 pc scales, and explore the dependence upon model and observational parameters, emphasizing the signatures of structures generic to the theory of MHD jets. With typical parameters, we find that it is possible to reproduce the observed magnitudes and many of the structures found in AGN jet RMs, including the presence of transverse RM gradients. In our simulations, the RMs are generated in the circum-jet material, hydrodynamically a smooth extension of the jet itself, containing ordered toroidally dominated magnetic fields. This results in a particular bilateral morphology that is unlikely to arise due to Faraday rotation in distant foreground clouds. However, critical to efforts to probe the Faraday screen will be resolving the transverse jet structure. Therefore, the RMs of radio cores may not be reliable indicators of the properties of the rotating medium. Finally, we are able to constrain the particle content of the jet, finding that at pc scales AGN jets are electromagnetically dominated, with roughly 2% of the comoving energy in nonthermal leptons and much less in baryons.

  1. Antennas, Faraday shields, and feedthroughs for ion cyclotron resonance heating in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antennas for ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) applications have been analyzed and optimized to extend the power limit per antenna by a factor of two to three. Loop variations (simple loop, long loop, cavity, resonant double loop (RDL), asymmetric RDL (ARDL), and U-slot) have been built and studied. High voltage in the antenna structure generally limits the power; the matched resonant loop minimizes the voltage at the feedpoint. The ARDL not only minimizes the voltage at the feedpoint but also has the lowest voltages of any of the antennas. The electrical characteristics of each antenna and measurements of magnetic field profiles and coupling are presented. Faraday shields are used to protect the antennas and to polarize the wave while transmitting power. Experiments on 27 Faraday shields show that typically used shields cut coupling in half and that simple designs can result in virtually no reductions. These optimium Faraday shields, in combination with the optimum antennas, can improve the rf launcher system power-handling capability by a factor of six. The benefits of matched antennas are realized only with a matched feedthrough. High-power, 50-Ω feedthroughs have been built, tested, and modeled. Prototypes have an insertion voltage standing wave ratio (IVSWR) less than 1.15 for frequencies less than 400 MHz. This was well correlated with a two-dimensional Poisson solver that computes the feedthrough's impedance as a function of frequency. Other models designed being built are predicted to have and IVSWR less than 1.03 for f<400 MHz. The feedthroughs have been tested to 80kV for 5 s and 610 A for 1 s with no problems. This is more than sufficient for 1- to 5-MW antennas

  2. Statistical techniques for detecting the intergalactic magnetic field from large samples of extragalactic Faraday rotation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotation measure (RM) grids of extragalactic radio sources have been widely used for studying cosmic magnetism. However, their potential for exploring the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in filaments of galaxies is unclear, since other Faraday-rotation media such as the radio source itself, intervening galaxies, and the interstellar medium of our Galaxy are all significant contributors. We study statistical techniques for discriminating the Faraday rotation of filaments from other sources of Faraday rotation in future large-scale surveys of radio polarization. We consider a 30° × 30° field of view toward the south Galactic pole, while varying the number of sources detected in both present and future observations. We select sources located at high redshifts and toward which depolarization and optical absorption systems are not observed so as to reduce the RM contributions from the sources and intervening galaxies. It is found that a high-pass filter can satisfactorily reduce the RM contribution from the Galaxy since the angular scale of this component toward high Galactic latitudes would be much larger than that expected for the IGMF. Present observations do not yet provide a sufficient source density to be able to estimate the RM of filaments. However, from the proposed approach with forthcoming surveys, we predict significant residuals of RM that should be ascribable to filaments. The predicted structure of the IGMF down to scales of 0.°1 should be observable with data from the Square Kilometre Array, if we achieve selections of sources toward which sightlines do not contain intervening galaxies and RM errors are less than a few rad m–2.

  3. Energy cascades in the upper ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ray Q.Lin; Scott Chubb

    2006-01-01

    Wave-wave interactions cause energy cascades. These are the most important processes in the upper ocean because they govern wave-growth and dissipation. Through indirect cascades, wave energy is transferred from higher frequencies to lower frequencies, leading to wave growth. In direct cascades, energy is transferred from lower frequencies to the higher frequencies, which causes waves to break, and dissipation of wave energy. However, the evolution and origin of energy cascade processes are still not fully understood. In particular, for example, results from a recent theory (Kalmykov, 1998) suggest that the class I wave-wave interactions (defined by situations involving 4-, 6-, 8-, etc, even numbers of resonantly interacting waves) cause indirect cascades, and Class II wave-wave interactions (involving, 5-, 7-, 9-, etc, .., odd numbers of waves) cause direct cascades. In contrast to this theory, our model results indicate the 4-wave interactions can cause significant transfer of wave energy through both direct and indirect cascades. In most situations, 4-wave interactions provide the major source of energy transfer for both direct cascades and indirect cascades, except when the wave steepness is larger than 0.28. Our model results agree well with wave measurements, obtained using field buoy data (for example, Lin and Lin, 2002). In particular, in these observations, asymmetrical wave-wave interactions were studied. They found that direct and indirect cascades both are mainly due to the 4-wave interactions when wave steepness is less than 0.3.

  4. Design and construction of a faraday cup for measuring small electron currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design of a device for measuring and integrating very small currents generated by the impact of a charged particle beam upon a Faraday cup. Part one considers the detector as such. The main component is a graphite bloc capable of stopping practically all the incident charges. Part two describes the associated electrode apparatus required to measure better than 10-13 ampere with a precision- of 1 per cent: Integration of such weak currents over periods of several hours, in the presence of a strong background current, is also discussed. (author)

  5. OPTICAL FIBRES AND FIBREOPTIC SENSORS: Spun microstructured optical fibresfor Faraday effect current sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorovsky, Yury K.; Starostin, Nikolay I.; Morshnev, Sergey K.; Gubin, Vladimir P.; Ryabko, Maksim V.; Sazonov, Aleksandr I.; Vorob'ev, Igor'L.

    2009-11-01

    We report a simple design of spun holey fibres and the first experimental study of the magneto-optical response of spun microstructured fibres with high built-in birefringence. Such fibres enable the Faraday-effect-induced phase shift to effectively accumulate in a magnetic field even at very small coiling diameters. For example, the magneto-optical sensitivity of a 5-mm-diameter fibre coil consisting of 100 turns is ~70% that of an ideal fibre, in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  6. Chain-induced effects in the Faraday instability on ferrofluids in a horizontal magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Mekhonoshin, V V; Lange, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    The linear stability analysis of the Faraday instability on a viscous ferrofluid in a horizontal magnetic field is performed. Strong dipole-dipole interactions lead to the formation of chains elongated in the field direction. The formation of chains results in a qualitative new behaviour of the ferrofluid. This new behaviour is characterized by a neutral stability curve similar to that observed earlier for Maxwell viscoelastic liquids and causes a significant weakening of the energy dissipation at high frequencies. In the case of a ferrofluid with chains in a horizontal magnetic field, the effective viscosity is anisotropic and depends on the field strength as well as on the wave frequency.

  7. Excited state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters based on indirect laser pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Longfei; Luo, Bin; Chen, Zhongjie; Zhong, Lei; Guo, Hong

    2014-02-15

    The direct pump method now used in excited state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters (ES-FADOFs) requires that the transition between the target and the ground state is an electric dipole allowed transition and that a laser that operates at the exact pump wavelength is available. This is not always satisfied in practice. An indirect laser pump method for ES-FADOF is proposed and experimentally realized. Compared with the commonly used direct pump method, this indirect pump method can reach the same performance using lasers at very different wavelengths. This method can greatly extend the wavelength range of FADOF and provide a novel scheme for ES-FADOF design. PMID:24562221

  8. Faraday rotation in the MOJAVE blazars: 3C 273 a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Hovatta, T.; Lister, M. L.; Aller, M. F.; H. D. Aller(Astronomy Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor); Homan, D. C.; Kovalev, Y.Y.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Savolainen, T.

    2011-01-01

    Radio polarimetric observations of Active Galactic Nuclei can reveal the magnetic field structure in the parsec-scale jets of these sources. We have observed the gamma-ray blazar 3C 273 as part of our multi-frequency survey with the Very Long Baseline Array to study Faraday rotation in a large sample of jets. Our observations re-confirm the transverse rotation measure gradient in 3C 273. For the first time the gradient is seen to cross zero which is further indication for a helical magnetic f...

  9. Faraday Rotation Measure Gradients from a Helical Magnetic Field in 3C 273

    OpenAIRE

    Zavala, R. T.; Taylor, G. B.

    2005-01-01

    Using high frequency (12-22 GHz) VLBA observations we confirm the existence of a Faraday rotation measure gradient of ~ 500 rad/m^2/mas transverse to the jet axis in the quasar 3C 273. The gradient is seen in two epochs spaced roughly six months apart. This stable transverse rotation measure gradient is expected if a helical magnetic field wraps around the jet. The overall order to the magnetic field in the inner projected 40 parsecs is consistent with a helical field. However, we find an une...

  10. Highly Sensitive Fiber-Optic Faraday-Effect Magnetic Field Sensor Based on Yttrium Iron Garnet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The principle and performance of a fiber-optic Faraday-effect magnetic-field sensor based on an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and two flux concentrations are described. A single polarization maintaining optical fiber links the sensor head to the source and detection system, in which the technique of phase shift cancellation is used to cancel the phase shift that accumulate in the optical fiber. Flux concentrators were exploited to enhance the YIG crystal magneto optic sensitivity .The sensor system exhibited a noise-equivalent field of 8 and a 3 dB bandwidth of ~10 MHz.

  11. Single-mode interband cascade laser sources for mid-infrared spectroscopic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, J.; von Edlinger, M.; Weih, R.; Becker, S.; Nähle, L.; Fischer, M.; Koeth, J.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2016-05-01

    Compared to the near infrared, many technologically and industrially relevant gas species have more than an order of magnitude higher absorption features in the mid-infrared (MIR) wavelength range. These species include for example important hydrocarbons (methane, acetylene), nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides. Tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) has proven to be a versatile tool for gas sensing applications with significant advantages compared to other techniques. These advantages include real time measurement, standoff detection and ruggedness of the sensor. We present interband cascade lasers (ICLs), which have evolved into important laser sources for the MIR spectral range from 3 to 7 μm. ICLs achieve high efficiency by cascading optically active zones whilst using interband transitions, so they combine common diode laser as well as quantum cascade laser based technologies. Our application grade singlemode distributed feedback devices operate continuous wave at room temperature and are offering several features especially useful for high performance TLAS applications like: side mode suppression ratio of > 30 dB, continuous tuning ranges up to 30 nm, low threshold power densities and low overall power consumption. The devices are typically integrated in a thermoelectrically cooled TO-style package, hermetically sealed using a cap with anti-reflection coated window. This low power consumption as well as the compact size and ruggedness of the fabricated laser sources makes them perfectly suited for battery powered portable solutions for in field spectroscopy applications.

  12. Magnetic-Field-Assisted Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Operating up to 225 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, A.; Fedorov, G.; Smirnov, D.; Kumar, S.; Williams, B. S.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in semiconductor bandgap engineering have resulted in the recent development of the terahertz quantum cascade laser1. These compact optoelectronic devices now operate in the frequency range 1.2-5 THz, although cryogenic cooling is still required2.3. Further progress towards the realization of devices operating at higher temperatures and emitting at longer wavelengths (sub-terahertz quantum cascade lasers) is difficult because it requires maintaining a population inversion between closely spaced electronic sub-bands (1 THz approx. equals 4 meV). Here, we demonstrate a magnetic-field-assisted quantum cascade laser based on the resonant-phonon design. By applying appropriate electrical bias and strong magnetic fields above 16 T, it is possible to achieve laser emission from a single device over a wide range of frequencies (0.68-3.33 THz). Owing to the suppression of inter-landau-level non-radiative scattering, the device shows magnetic field assisted laser action at 1 THz at temperatures up to 215 K, and 3 THz lasing up to 225 K.

  13. Measurements of the linewidth enhancement factor of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers by different optical feedback techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jumpertz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise knowledge of the linewidth enhancement factor of a semiconductor laser under actual operating conditions is of prime importance since this parameter dictates various phenomena such as linewidth broadening or optical nonlinearities enhancement. The above-threshold linewidth enhancement factor of a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser structure operated at 10∘C is determined experimentally using two different methods based on optical feedback. Both Fabry-Perot and distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers based on the same active area design are studied, the former by following the wavelength shift as a function of the feedback strength and the latter by self-mixing interferometry. The results are consistent and unveil a clear pump current dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor, with values ranging from 0.8 to about 3.

  14. Measurements of the linewidth enhancement factor of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers by different optical feedback techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise knowledge of the linewidth enhancement factor of a semiconductor laser under actual operating conditions is of prime importance since this parameter dictates various phenomena such as linewidth broadening or optical nonlinearities enhancement. The above-threshold linewidth enhancement factor of a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser structure operated at 10∘C is determined experimentally using two different methods based on optical feedback. Both Fabry-Perot and distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers based on the same active area design are studied, the former by following the wavelength shift as a function of the feedback strength and the latter by self-mixing interferometry. The results are consistent and unveil a clear pump current dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor, with values ranging from 0.8 to about 3

  15. Comparative analysis of quantum cascade laser modeling based on density matrices and non-equilibrium Green's functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindskog, M., E-mail: martin.lindskog@teorfys.lu.se; Wacker, A. [Mathematical Physics, Lund University, Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Wolf, J. M.; Liverini, V.; Faist, J. [ETH Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH-Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Trinite, V.; Maisons, G.; Carras, M. [III-V Lab, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Aidam, R.; Ostendorf, R. [Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    We study the operation of an 8.5 μm quantum cascade laser based on GaInAs/AlInAs lattice matched to InP using three different simulation models based on density matrix (DM) and non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formulations. The latter advanced scheme serves as a validation for the simpler DM schemes and, at the same time, provides additional insight, such as the temperatures of the sub-band carrier distributions. We find that for the particular quantum cascade laser studied here, the behavior is well described by simple quantum mechanical estimates based on Fermi's golden rule. As a consequence, the DM model, which includes second order currents, agrees well with the NEGF results. Both these simulations are in accordance with previously reported data and a second regrown device.

  16. Comparative analysis of quantum cascade laser modeling based on density matrices and non-equilibrium Green's functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the operation of an 8.5 μm quantum cascade laser based on GaInAs/AlInAs lattice matched to InP using three different simulation models based on density matrix (DM) and non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formulations. The latter advanced scheme serves as a validation for the simpler DM schemes and, at the same time, provides additional insight, such as the temperatures of the sub-band carrier distributions. We find that for the particular quantum cascade laser studied here, the behavior is well described by simple quantum mechanical estimates based on Fermi's golden rule. As a consequence, the DM model, which includes second order currents, agrees well with the NEGF results. Both these simulations are in accordance with previously reported data and a second regrown device.

  17. Measurements of the linewidth enhancement factor of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers by different optical feedback techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumpertz, L.; Michel, F.; Pawlus, R.; Elsässer, W.; Schires, K.; Carras, M.; Grillot, F.

    2016-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the linewidth enhancement factor of a semiconductor laser under actual operating conditions is of prime importance since this parameter dictates various phenomena such as linewidth broadening or optical nonlinearities enhancement. The above-threshold linewidth enhancement factor of a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser structure operated at 10∘C is determined experimentally using two different methods based on optical feedback. Both Fabry-Perot and distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers based on the same active area design are studied, the former by following the wavelength shift as a function of the feedback strength and the latter by self-mixing interferometry. The results are consistent and unveil a clear pump current dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor, with values ranging from 0.8 to about 3.

  18. Measurements of the linewidth enhancement factor of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers by different optical feedback techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumpertz, L., E-mail: louise.jumpertz@telecom-paristech.fr [Université Paris-Saclay, Télécom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI, 46 rue Barrault, F-75013 Paris (France); MirSense, 8 avenue de la Vauve, F-91120 Palaiseau (France); Michel, F.; Pawlus, R.; Elsässer, W. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstr. 7, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Schires, K. [Université Paris-Saclay, Télécom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI, 46 rue Barrault, F-75013 Paris (France); Carras, M. [MirSense, 8 avenue de la Vauve, F-91120 Palaiseau (France); Grillot, F. [Université Paris-Saclay, Télécom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI, 46 rue Barrault, F-75013 Paris (France); also with Center for High Technology Materials, University of New-Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Precise knowledge of the linewidth enhancement factor of a semiconductor laser under actual operating conditions is of prime importance since this parameter dictates various phenomena such as linewidth broadening or optical nonlinearities enhancement. The above-threshold linewidth enhancement factor of a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser structure operated at 10{sup ∘}C is determined experimentally using two different methods based on optical feedback. Both Fabry-Perot and distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers based on the same active area design are studied, the former by following the wavelength shift as a function of the feedback strength and the latter by self-mixing interferometry. The results are consistent and unveil a clear pump current dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor, with values ranging from 0.8 to about 3.

  19. Faraday rotation and ellipticity signals of mode-locked spins in InGaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the pump-probe Faraday rotation and ellipticity signals of electron spins in ensembles of singly charged (In,Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots. For degenerate pump and probe we observe that the Faraday rotation signal amplitude first grows with increasing the time separation between pump and probe before a decay is observed for large temporal separations. The temporal behavior of the ellipticity signal, on the other hand, is regular: its amplitude decays with the separation. By contrast, for detuned pump and probe the Faraday rotation and ellipticity signals both exhibit similar and conventional behavior. The comparison between calculations and experimental data allows us to provide insight into the spectral dependence of the electron spin precession frequencies and extract the electron g factor dependence on energy.

  20. A study of broadband Faraday rotation and polarization behaviour over 1.3--10 GHz in 36 discrete radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, C S; Feain, I J

    2016-01-01

    We present a broadband polarization analysis of 36 discrete polarized radio sources over a very broad, densely-sampled frequency band. Our sample was selected on the basis of polarization behaviour apparent in narrowband archival data at 1.4 GHz: half the sample show complicated frequency-dependent polarization behaviour (i.e. Faraday complexity) at these frequencies, while half show comparatively simple behaviour (i.e. they appear Faraday simple). We re-observed the sample using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) in full polarization, with 6 GHz of densely sampled frequency coverage spanning 1.3 to 10 GHz. We have devised a general polarization modelling technique that allows us to identify multiple polarized emission components in a source, and to characterize their properties. We detect Faraday complex behaviour in almost every source in our sample. Several sources exhibit particularly remarkable polarization behaviour. By comparing our new and archival data, we have identified temporal variabili...

  1. Micro-fabricated solid state dye lasers based on a photo-definable polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Daniel; Balslev, Søren; Gregersen, Misha Marie;

    2005-01-01

    We present a solid polymer dye laser based on a single-mode planar waveguide. The all-polymer device is self-contained in the photodefinable polymer SU-8 and may therefore easily be placed on any substrate and be integrated with polymer-based systems. We use as the active medium for the laser the...

  2. Seam gap bridging of laser based processes for the welding of aluminium sheets for industrial applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalderink, Bernard Johan; Pathiraj, B.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.

    2010-01-01

    Laser welding has a large potential for the production of tailor welded blanks in the automotive industry, due to the low heat input and deep penetration. However, due to the small laser spot and melt pool, laser-based welding processes in general have a low tolerance for seam gaps. In this paper, f

  3. A Comparison of Methods for Cascade Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Ruocheng

    2016-01-01

    Information cascades exist in a wide variety of platforms on Internet. A very important real-world problem is to identify which information cascades can go viral. A system addressing this problem can be used in a variety of applications including public health, marketing and counter-terrorism. As a cascade can be considered as compound of the social network and the time series. However, in related literature where methods for solving the cascade prediction problem were proposed, the experimental settings were often limited to only a single metric for a specific problem formulation. Moreover, little attention was paid to the run time of those methods. In this paper, we first formulate the cascade prediction problem as both classification and regression. Then we compare three categories of cascade prediction methods: centrality based, feature based and point process based. We carry out the comparison through evaluation of the methods by both accuracy metrics and run time. The results show that feature based met...

  4. Cascades on clique-based graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Hackett, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We present an analytical approach to determining the expected cascade size in a broad range of dynamical models on the class of highly-clustered random graphs introduced in [J. P. Gleeson, Phys. Rev. E 80, 036107 (2009)]. A condition for the existence of global cascades is also derived. Applications of this approach include analyses of percolation, and Watts's model. We show how our techniques can be used to study the effects of in-group bias in cascades on social networks.

  5. Lateral Modes in Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C. Dente

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We will examine the waveguide mode losses in ridge-guided quantum cascade lasers. Our analysis illustrates how the low-loss mode for broad-ridge quantum cascade lasers (QCLs can be a higher-order lateral waveguide mode that maximizes the feedback from the sloped ridge-wall regions. The results are in excellent agreement with the near- and far-field data taken on broad-ridge-guided quantum cascade lasers processed with sloped ridge walls.

  6. Disaster Mythology and Availability Cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Grow Sun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sociological research conducted in the aftermath of natural disasters has uncovered a number of “disaster myths” – widely shared misconceptions about typical post-disaster human behavior. This paper discusses the possibility that perpetuation of disaster mythology reflects an “availability cascade,” defined in prior scholarship as a “self-reinforcing process of collective belief formation by which an expressed perception triggers a chain reaction that gives the perception increasing plausibility through its rising availability in public discourse.” (Kuran and Sunstein 1999. Framing the spread of disaster mythology as an availability cascade suggests that certain tools may be useful in halting the myths’ continued perpetuation. These tools include changing the legal and social incentives of so-called “availability entrepreneurs” – those principally responsible for beginning and perpetuating the cascade, as well as insulating decision-makers from political pressures generated by the availability cascade. This paper evaluates the potential effectiveness of these and other solutions for countering disaster mythology. Las investigaciones sociológicas realizadas tras los desastres naturales han hecho evidentes una serie de “mitos del desastre”, conceptos erróneos ampliamente compartidos sobre el comportamiento humano típico tras un desastre. Este artículo analiza la posibilidad de que la perpetuación de los mitos del desastre refleje una “cascada de disponibilidad”, definida en estudios anteriores como un “proceso de auto-refuerzo de la formación de una creencia colectiva, a través del que una percepción expresada produce una reacción en cadena que hace que la percepción sea cada vez más verosímil, a través de una mayor presencia en el discurso público” (Kuran y Sunstein 1999. Enmarcar la propagación de los mitos del desastre como una cascada de disponibilidad sugiere que ciertas herramientas pueden ser

  7. Spray formation: an inverse cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Yue; Tryggvason, Gretar; zaleski, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of droplet formation in a gas-liquid mixing layer using direct numerical simulation. It is seen that two mechanisms compete to generate the droplets: fingering at the tip of the waves and hole formation in the thin liquid sheet. The three dimensional liquid structures are much shorter than the longitudinal wavelength of the instability at the first instant of their formation. As time evolves, the structures evolves to larger and larger scales, in a way similar to the inverse cascade of length scales in droplet impact and impact crown formation.

  8. Quantum Cascade Laser Frequency Combs

    OpenAIRE

    Faist, Jérôme; Villares, Gustavo; Scalari, Giacomo; Rösch, Markus; Bonzon, Christopher; Hugi, Andreas; Beck, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that broadband quantum cascade lasers can operate as frequency combs. As such, they operate under direct electrical pumping at both mid-infrared and THz frequencies, making them very attractive for dual-comb spectroscopy. Performance levels are continuously improving, with average powers over 100 mW and frequency coverage of 100 cm$^{-1}$ in the mid-infrared. In the THz range, 10 mW of average power and 600 GHz of frequency coverage are reported. As a result of th...

  9. DFB Quantum Cascade Laser Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Benjamin G.; Belkin, Mikhail A.; Pflügl, Christian; Diehl, Laurent; Zhang, Haifei; Audet, Ross M.; MacArthur, Jim B.; Bour, David P.; Corzine, Scott W.; Höfler, Gloria E.; Capasso, Federico

    2009-01-01

    DFB quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL) arrays operating between 8.7 and 9.4 mum are investigated for their performance characteristics-single-mode selection of the DFB grating, and variability in threshold, slope efficiency, and output power of different lasers in the array. Single-mode selection refers to the ability to choose a desired mode/frequency of laser emission with a DFB grating. We apply a theoretical framework developed for general DFB gratings to analyze DFB-QCL arrays. We calculate...

  10. Availability Cascades & the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In search of a new concept that will provide answers to as to how modern societies should not only make sense but also resolve the social and environmental problems linked with our modes of production and consumption, collaborative consumption and the sharing economy are increasingly attracting...... attention. This conceptual paper attempts to explain the emergent focus on the sharing economy and associated business and consumption models by applying cascade theory. Risks associated with this behavior will be especially examined with regard to the sustainability claim of collaborative consumption. With...

  11. WHISTLER TURBULENCE FORWARD CASCADE VERSUS INVERSE CASCADE: THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ouliang [Oracle Corporation, Redwood Shores, CA (United States); Gary, S. Peter [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO (United States); Wang, Joseph, E-mail: ouliang@usc.edu, E-mail: pgary@lanl.gov, E-mail: josephjw@usc.edu [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We present the results of the first fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma in which both forward cascades to shorter wavelengths, and inverse cascades to longer wavelengths are allowed to proceed. For the electron beta β {sub e} = 0.10 initial value considered here, the early-time rate of inverse cascade is very much smaller than the rate of forward cascade, so that at late times the fluctuation energy in the regime of the inverse cascade is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime. Similarly, the wavevector anisotropy in the inverse cascade regime is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime.

  12. A non-conventional isotope separation cascade without any mixing: net cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A component has different concentrations in the incoming flows at a confluent point in all existing isotope separations cascades for multi-component isotope separation and mixing is inevitable, which results in deterioration of separation performance of the separation cascade. However, realization of no-mixing at a confluent point is impossible with a conventional cascade. A non-conventional isotope separation cascade, net cascade, is found to be able to realize no mixings for all components at confluent points, and its concept is further developed here. No-mixing is fulfilled by requiring symmetrical separation of two specified key components at every stage, and the procedure of realizing no-mixing is presented in detail. Some properties of net cascade are investigated preliminarily, and the results demonstrated the no-mixing property is indeed realized. Net cascade is the only separation cascade that so far possesses the no-mixing property. (authors)

  13. Thermal and mechanical analysis of the Faraday shield for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antenna for the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is protected from the plasma environment by a Faraday shield, an array of gas-cooled metallic tubes. The plasma side of the tubes is armored with graphite tiles, which can be either brazed or mechanically attached to the tube. The Faraday shield has been analyzed using finite element codes to model thermal and mechanical responses to typical CIT heating and disruption loads. Four representative materials (Inconel 718, tantalum-10 tungsten, copper alloy C17510, and molybdenum alloy TZM) and several combinations of tube and armor thicknesses were used in the thermal analysis, which revealed that maximum allowable temperatures were not exceeded for any of the four materials considered. The two-dimensional thermal stress analysis indicated Von Mises stresses greater than twice the yield stress for a tube constructed of Inconel 718 (the original design material) for the brazed-graphite design. Analysis of stresses caused by plasma disruption (/rvec J/ /times/ /rvec B/) loads eliminated the copper and molybdenum alloys as candidate tube materials. Of the four materials considered, tantalum-10 tungsten performed the best for a brazed graphite design, showing acceptable thermal stresses (69% of yield) and disruption stresses (42% of yield). A preliminary thermal analysis of the mechanically attached graphite scheme predicts minimal thermal stresses in the tube. The survivability of the graphite tubes in this scheme is yet to be analyzed. 8 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs

  14. The birth of the electric machines: a commentary on Faraday (1832) 'Experimental researches in electricity'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2015-04-13

    The history of science is filled with examples of key discoveries and breakthroughs that have been published as landmark texts or journal papers, and to which one can trace the origins of whole disciplines. Such paradigm-shifting publications include Copernicus' De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (1543), Isaac Newton's Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1687) and Albert Einstein's papers on relativity (1905 and 1915). Michael Faraday's 1832 paper on electromagnetic induction sits proudly among these works and in a sense can be regarded as having an almost immediate effect in transforming our world in a very real sense more than any of the others listed. Here we review the status of the subject-the relationship between magnetism and electricity both before and after Faraday's paper and delve into the details of the key experiments he carried out at the Royal Institution outlining clearly how he discovered the process of electromagnetic induction, whereby an electric current could be induced to flow through a conductor that experiences a changing magnetic field. His ideas would not only enable Maxwell's later development of his theory of classical electromagnetism, but would directly lead to the development of the electric dynamo and electric motor, two technological advances that are the very foundations of the modern world. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750145

  15. Ultraviolet-visible optical isolators based on CeF3 Faraday rotator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first ultraviolet (UV) and visible optical isolators based on CeF3 are demonstrated. CeF3 possesses unique properties as Faraday rotator for the UV-visible wavelength region: a wide transparency range (wavelength of >300 nm) and an outstanding Verdet constant. In contrast, currently used terbium-gallium garnets and magneto-optical glasses possess a low transparency in the visible and a small Verdet constant in the UV, respectively. The optical isolator prototypes consist of a CeF3 rod, a single ring magnet, and a couple of beam splitters. The ring magnets have been designed to guarantee a homogeneous magnetic field; for it, numerical simulations have been carried out. The two prototypes are very compact and operate in the UV at 355 and in the visible at 405 nm, respectively. The performance of these devices indicates the high potential of CeF3 as a new UV-visible Faraday rotator, specially for shorter wavelengths where at present there are no optical isolators available

  16. Measurements of Coronal Faraday Rotation at 4.6 Solar Radii

    CERN Document Server

    Kooi, Jason E; Buffo, Jacob J; Spangler, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    Many competing models for the coronal heating and acceleration mechanisms of the high-speed solar wind depend on the solar magnetic field and plasma structure inside the corona within heliocentric distances of 5 R_sun. We report on sensitive VLA full-polarization observations made in August, 2011, at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz) of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 R_sun. Observations at 5.0 GHz permit measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. These Faraday rotation observations provide unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. The measured Faraday rotation on this day was lower than our a priori expectations, but we have successfully modeled the measurement in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. Our data on 3C228 provide two lines of sight (separated by 46'', 33,000 km in the corona). We detected three periods during which there a...

  17. Faraday instability of a two-layer liquid film with a free upper surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pototsky, Andrey; Bestehorn, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We study the linear stability of a laterally extended flat two-layer liquid film under the influence of external vertical vibration. The first liquid layer rests on a vibrating solid plate and is overlaid by a second layer of immiscible fluid with deformable upper surface. Surface waves, excited as the result of the Faraday instability, can be characterized by a time-dependent relative amplitude of the displacements of the liquid-liquid and the liquid-gas interfaces. The in-phase displacements are associated with a zigzag (barotropic) mode and the antiphase displacement corresponds to the varicose thinning mode. We numerically determine the stability threshold in the vibrated two-layer film and compute the dispersion relation together with the decay rates of the surface waves in the absence of vibration. The in-phase and the antiphase displacements are strongly coupled in the vibrated system. The interplay between the Faraday and the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the system with heavier fluid on top of a lighter fluid is analyzed.

  18. Implementation and automation of a Faraday experiment for the magneto-optical characterization of ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the design, assembly and automation of a Faraday experiment for use in characterization of the magneto-optical response of fluids and ferrofluids. The magneto-optical Faraday experiment was automated using programmable equipment, controlled through the IEEE-488 port via Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments executed from a graphical interface developed in LabVIEW software. To calibrate the system the Verdet constants of distilled water and isopropyl alcohol were measured, obtaining an error percentage less than 2% for both fluids. Subsequently we used the system for measuring the Verdet constant of a ferrofluid of iron oxide nanoparticles diluted in distilled water, which was synthesized and, before its dilution, characterized by scanning electron microscopy, room temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. We found that the Verdet constant of the diluted ferrofluid was smaller than that of distilled water, indicating opposite contributions of the effects of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic phases present in the ferrofluid to the magneto-optical effect. Details of the assembly, control of the experiment and development of the measurements are presented in this paper. (paper)

  19. Faraday Rotation Measure Synthesis of intermediate redshift quasars as a probe of intervening matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kwang Seong; Miniati, Francesco; Bernet, M L; Beck, Rainer; O'Sullivan, S P; Gaensler, B M

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that magnetized material along the line of sight to distant quasars is detectable in the polarization properties of the background sources, which appear to be correlated with the presence of intervening MgII absorption, which is itself thought to arise in outflowing material from star forming galaxies. In order to investigate this further, we have obtained high spectral resolution polarization measurements, with the VLA and ATCA, of a set of 49 unresolved quasars for which we have high quality optical spectra. These enable us to produce a Faraday Depth spectrum for each source, using Rotation Measure Synthesis. We characterize the complexity of the Faraday Depth spectrum using a number of parameters and show how these are related, or not, to the overall depolarization and to the presence of MgII absorption along the line of sight. Our new independent radio data confirms that interveners are strongly associated with depolarization and also, at lower significance, with the mean Rotation Measur...

  20. Characterization of magnetic field profiles at RFX-mod by Faraday rotation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriemma, Fulvio; Brombin, Matteo; Canton, Alessandra; Giudicotti, Leonardo; Innocente, Paolo; Zilli, Enrico

    2009-11-01

    A multichannel far-infrared (FIR, λ=118.8 μm) polarimeter has been recently upgraded and re-installed on RFX-mod to measure the Faraday rotation angle along five vertical chords. Polarimetric data, associated with electron density profile, allow the reconstruction of the poloidal magnetic field profile. In this work the setup of the diagnostic is presented and the first Faraday rotation measurements are analyzed. The measurements have been performed at plasma current above 1.2 MA and electron density between 2 and 6x10^19 m-3. The actual S/N ratio is slightly lower than the expected one, due to electromagnetic coupling of the detectors with the saddle coils close to the polarimeter position. Due to this limit, only average information in the flat-top phase of the discharge could be so far obtained. The experimental data have been compared with the result of the μ&p equilibrium model [1], showing a good agreement between experiment and model, whereas the main differences are in the external region of the plasma. A different parameterization of the μ=μ0 J.B/B^2 profile has been proposed to enhance the agreement between model and experiment. [0pt] [1] Ortolani and Snack, World Scientific (1993) Singapore

  1. Implementation and automation of a Faraday experiment for the magneto-optical characterization of ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez, A. A.; Urquijo, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the design, assembly and automation of a Faraday experiment for use in characterization of the magneto-optical response of fluids and ferrofluids. The magneto-optical Faraday experiment was automated using programmable equipment, controlled through the IEEE-488 port via Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments executed from a graphical interface developed in LabVIEW software. To calibrate the system the Verdet constants of distilled water and isopropyl alcohol were measured, obtaining an error percentage less than 2% for both fluids. Subsequently we used the system for measuring the Verdet constant of a ferrofluid of iron oxide nanoparticles diluted in distilled water, which was synthesized and, before its dilution, characterized by scanning electron microscopy, room temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. We found that the Verdet constant of the diluted ferrofluid was smaller than that of distilled water, indicating opposite contributions of the effects of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic phases present in the ferrofluid to the magneto-optical effect. Details of the assembly, control of the experiment and development of the measurements are presented in this paper.

  2. Faraday Rotation Measure Gradients from a Helical Magnetic Field in 3C273

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavala, Robert T.; /Naval Observ., Flagstaff; Taylor, G.B.; /NRAO, Socorro /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-06-06

    Using high frequency (12-22 GHz) VLBA observations we confirm the existence of a Faraday rotation measure gradient of {approx}500 rad m{sup -2} mas{sup -1} transverse to the jet axis in the quasar 3C273. The gradient is seen in two epochs spaced roughly six months apart. This stable transverse rotation measure gradient is expected if a helical magnetic field wraps around the jet. The overall order to the magnetic field in the inner projected 40 parsecs is consistent with a helical field. However, we find an unexpected increase in fractional polarization along the edges of the source, contrary to expectations. This high fractional polarization rules out internal Faraday rotation, but is not readily explained by a helical field. After correcting for the rotation measure, the intrinsic magnetic field direction in the jet of 3C273 changes from parallel to nearly perpendicular to the projected jet motion at two locations. If a helical magnetic field causes the observed rotation measure gradient then the synchrotron emitting electrons must be separate from the helical field region. The presence or absence of transverse rotation measure gradients in other sources is also discussed.

  3. Faraday Rotation Measure Gradients from a Helical Magnetic Field in 3C273

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using high frequency (12-22 GHz) VLBA observations we confirm the existence of a Faraday rotation measure gradient of ∼500 rad m-2 mas-1 transverse to the jet axis in the quasar 3C273. The gradient is seen in two epochs spaced roughly six months apart. This stable transverse rotation measure gradient is expected if a helical magnetic field wraps around the jet. The overall order to the magnetic field in the inner projected 40 parsecs is consistent with a helical field. However, we find an unexpected increase in fractional polarization along the edges of the source, contrary to expectations. This high fractional polarization rules out internal Faraday rotation, but is not readily explained by a helical field. After correcting for the rotation measure, the intrinsic magnetic field direction in the jet of 3C273 changes from parallel to nearly perpendicular to the projected jet motion at two locations. If a helical magnetic field causes the observed rotation measure gradient then the synchrotron emitting electrons must be separate from the helical field region. The presence or absence of transverse rotation measure gradients in other sources is also discussed

  4. Passive faraday mirror attack in practical two-way quantum key distribution system

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Liang, Lin-Mei; 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.062331

    2012-01-01

    The faraday mirror (FM) plays a very important role in maintaining the stability of two way plug-and-play quantum key distribution (QKD) system. However, the practical FM is imperfect, which will not only introduce additional quantum bit error rate (QBER) but also leave a loophole for Eve to spy the secret key. In this paper, we propose a passive faraday mirror attack in two way QKD system based on the imperfection of FM. Our analysis shows that, if the FM is imperfect, the dimension of Hilbert space spanned by the four states sent by Alice is three instead of two. Thus Eve can distinguish these states with a set of POVM operators belonging to three dimension space, which will reduce the QBER induced by her attack. Furthermore, a relationship between the degree of the imperfection of FM and the transmittance of the practical QKD system is obtained. The results show that, the probability that Eve loads her attack successfully depends on the degree of the imperfection of FM rapidly, but the QBER induced by Eve'...

  5. Passive Faraday-mirror attack in a practical two-way quantum-key-distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2011-06-01

    The Faraday mirror (FM) plays a very important role in maintaining the stability of two-way plug-and-play quantum key distribution (QKD) systems. However, the practical FM is imperfect, which will not only introduce an additional quantum bit error rate (QBER) but also leave a loophole for Eve to spy the secret key. In this paper we propose a passive Faraday mirror attack in two-way QKD system based on the imperfection of FM. Our analysis shows that if the FM is imperfect, the dimension of Hilbert space spanned by the four states sent by Alice is three instead of two. Thus Eve can distinguish these states with a set of Positive Operator Valued Measure (POVM) operators belonging to three-dimension space, which will reduce the QBER induced by her attack. Furthermore, a relationship between the degree of the imperfection of FM and the transmittance of the practical QKD system is obtained. The results show that the probability that Eve loads her attack successfully depends on the degree of the imperfection of FM rapidly, but the QBER induced by Eve’s attack changes slightly with the degree of the FM imperfection.

  6. Ultraviolet-visible optical isolators based on CeF{sub 3} Faraday rotator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Víllora, Encarnación G., E-mail: VILLORA.Garcia@nims.go.jp; Shimamura, Kiyoshi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Plaza, Gustavo R. [ETSI de Caminos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-06-21

    The first ultraviolet (UV) and visible optical isolators based on CeF{sub 3} are demonstrated. CeF{sub 3} possesses unique properties as Faraday rotator for the UV-visible wavelength region: a wide transparency range (wavelength of >300 nm) and an outstanding Verdet constant. In contrast, currently used terbium-gallium garnets and magneto-optical glasses possess a low transparency in the visible and a small Verdet constant in the UV, respectively. The optical isolator prototypes consist of a CeF{sub 3} rod, a single ring magnet, and a couple of beam splitters. The ring magnets have been designed to guarantee a homogeneous magnetic field; for it, numerical simulations have been carried out. The two prototypes are very compact and operate in the UV at 355 and in the visible at 405 nm, respectively. The performance of these devices indicates the high potential of CeF{sub 3} as a new UV-visible Faraday rotator, specially for shorter wavelengths where at present there are no optical isolators available.

  7. Improvements of characteristics of open cycle Faraday type MHD power generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MHD power generators are classified into two types: Faraday type and diagonal type (including Hall type). It is considered also in Faraday type generators that the characteristics can be improved further by selecting the aspect ratio appropriately, and employing cap electrodes which approach diagonal conducting side-wall type from parallel plate electrodes. First, the three-dimensional analysis using a new equivalent circuit is introduced, in which finite electrode division and working gas boundary layer are considered using the generalized Ohm's law, Maxwell's electromagnetic equations and others. The above described improvement of characteristics is investigated numerically fully applying this analyzing method. If the wall temperature is low, the increase in the aspect ratio of a generating duct cross-section considerably improves the characteristics because plasma non-uniformity decreases. If the cap electrodes having an optimum side-wall length are used, the output increases considerably because the load current is given and received through the side-wall electrodes. Efficiency is a little lower than the case using parallel plate electrodes. Therefore, if the aspect ratio is taken sufficiently large, and the cap electrodes with optimum side-wall electrode length are used, the generator characteristics are greatly improved since the above mentioned effects are multiplied. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  8. On the source of Faraday rotation in the jet of the radio galaxy 3C120

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, José L; Agudo, Iván; Marscher, Alan P; Jorstad, Svetlana G

    2011-01-01

    The source of Faraday rotation in the jet of the radio galaxy 3C120 is analyzed through Very Long Baseline Array observations carried out between 1999 and 2007 at 86, 43, 22, 15, 12, 8, 5, 2, and 1.7 GHz. Comparison of observations from 1999 to 2001 reveals uncorrelated changes in the linear polarization of the underlying jet emission and the Faraday rotation screen: while the rotation measure (RM) remains constant between approximately 2 and 5 mas from the core, the RM-corrected electric vector position angles (EVPAs) of two superluminal components are rotated by almost 90 degrees when compared to other components moving through similar jet locations. On the other hand, the innermost 2 mas experiences a significant change in RM -- including a sign reversal -- but without variations in the RM-corrected EVPAs. Similarly, observations in 2007 reveal a double sign reversal in RM along the jet, while the RM-corrected EVPAs remain perpendicular to the jet axis. Although the observed coherent structure and gradient...

  9. Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

    2011-03-01

    As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

  10. Single-Seed Cascades on Clustered Networks

    CERN Document Server

    McSweeney, John K

    2015-01-01

    We consider a dynamic network cascade process developed by Watts applied to a random networks with a specified amount of clustering, belonging to a class of random networks developed by Newman. We adapt existing tree-based methods to formulate an appropriate two-type branching process to describe the spread of a cascade started with a single active node, and obtain a fixed-point equation to implicitly express the extinction probability of such a cascade. In so doing, we also recover a special case of a formula of Hackett et al. giving conditions for certain extinction of the cascade.

  11. Dynamics and structure of energetic displacement cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes recent progress in the understanding of energetic displacement cascades and the primary state of damage in metals. On the theoretical side, the availability of supercomputers has greatly enhanced our ability to simulate cascades by molecular dynamics. Recent application of this simulation technique to Cu and Ni provides new insight into the dynamics of cascade processes. On the experimental side, new data on ion beam mixing and in situ electron microscopy studies of ion damage at low temperatures reveal the role of the thermodynamic properties of the material on cascade dynamics and structure. 38 refs., 9 figs

  12. Cascade decays of hollow ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiple-electron-emission process for atoms with one or more inner-shell vacancies is treated using the radiative- and Auger-electron-emission cascade model, in which inner-shell holes are assumed to decay by sequentially emitting radiations and/or Auger electrons. Such hollow ions are produced by synchrotron irradiation of atomic targets and in ion-surface interactions with multiple-electron transfers. The final charge-state distribution is determined by the Auger and radiative branching ratios at each stage of the decay sequence. At intermediate stages of cascade, hollow ions with more than one hole in different ionization stages are created. The Ne, Mg, and Fe14+ ions with the initial 1s, 2s, and 2p vacancies are considered in detail, and the core charge dependence of the maximum charge state is studied. The hollow Mg ion with double initial 1s holes is analyzed, and the result compared with that for the case of one 1s hole. The peak is shifted more than two units to a higher degree of ionization. The correlated shake-off and shake-up multiple-electron processes are not considered, but they are expected to cause further shifts

  13. Time evolution of cascade decay

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We study non-perturbatively the time evolution of cascade decay for generic fields $\\pi \\rightarrow \\phi_1\\phi_2\\rightarrow \\phi_2\\chi_1\\chi_2$ and obtain the time dependence of amplitudes and populations for the resonant and final states. We analyze in detail the different time scales and the manifestation of unitary time evolution in the dynamics of production and decay of resonant intermediate and final states. The probability of occupation (population) ``flows'' as a function of time from the initial to the final states. When the decay width of the parent particle $\\Gamma_\\pi$ is much larger than that of the intermediate resonant state $\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$ there is a ``bottleneck'' in the flow, the population of resonant states builds up to a maximum at $t^* = \\ln[\\Gamma_\\pi/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}]/(\\Gamma_\\pi-\\Gamma_{\\phi_1})$ nearly saturating unitarity and decays to the final state on the longer time scale $1/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$. As a consequence of the wide separation of time scales in this case the cascade decay ...

  14. Physics of interband cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurgaftman, I.; Bewley, W. W.; Merritt, C. D.; Canedy, C. L.; Kim, C. S.; Abell, J.; Meyer, J. R.; Kim, M.

    2012-01-01

    The interband cascade laser (ICL) is a unique device concept that combines the effective parallel connection of its multiple-quantum-well active regions, interband active transitions, and internal generation of electrons and holes at a semimetallic interface within each stage of the device. The internal generation of carriers becomes effective under bias, and the role of electrical injection is to replenish the carriers consumed by recombination processes. Major strides have been made toward fundamentally understanding the rich and intricate ICL physics, which has in turn led to dramatic improvements in the device performance. In this article, we review the physical principles of the ICL operation and designs of the active region, electron and hole injectors, and optical waveguide. The results for state-of- the-art ICLs spanning the 3-6 μm wavelength range are also briefly reviewed. The cw threshold input powers at room temperature are more than an order of magnitude lower than those for quantum cascade lasers throughout the mid-IR spectral range. This will lengthen battery lifetimes and greatly relax packaging and size/weight requirements for fielded sensing systems.

  15. Michael Faraday: o caminho da livraria à descoberta da indução eletromagnética Michael Faraday: the road from the bookstore to the discovery of electromagnetic induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Silva Dias

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudando o trabalho experimental sobre eletromagnetismo realizado por Michael Faraday no início do século XIX, encontramos vários elementos que poderiam ser utilizados no Ensino de Ciências. Um conhecimento histórico sobre o trabalho experimental desenvolvido por Faraday e que o levou à descoberta da indução eletromagnética pode transmitir aos estudantes uma concepção mais adequada do processo de desenvolvimento da Ciência. No entanto, isso só pode ser feito utilizando-se um estudo detalhado e bem fundamentado do processo histórico ocorrido, deixando de lado as simplificações e os mitos que costumam ser apresentados.The study of Michael Faraday's experimental research on electromagnetism developed in the early 19th century provides several components which could be used in Science Teaching. A historical knowledge of the experimental work that led Faraday to the discovery of electromagnetic induction may convey to students a more adequate process of the development of science. However, this can only be done by the use of a detailed and well grounded study of the historical process, leaving aside the naïve simplifications and the myths that are usually told.

  16. Nonlinearly Driven Second Harmonics of Alfven Cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent experiments on Alcator C-Mod, measurements of density fluctuations with Phase Contrast Imaging through the plasma core show a second harmonic of the basic Alfven Cascade (AC) signal. The present work describes the perturbation at the second harmonic as a nonlinear sideband produced by the Alfven Cascade eigenmode via quadratic terms in the MHD equations. (author)

  17. A NOTE ON VECTOR CASCADE ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-hui Chen; Jin-zhao Liu; Wen-sheng Zhang

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the relationship between accuracy of multivariate refinable vector and vector cascade algorithm. We show that, if the vector cascade algorithm (1.5) with isotropic dilation converges to a vector-valued function with regularity, then the initial function must satisfy the Strang-Fix conditions.

  18. Design concept of Hydro cascade control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a design concept of the comple hydro cascade scheme is presented with the design parameters of the main technical features. The cascade control system architecture is designed considering up-to-date communication and information technology. The control algorithm is based on Pond Level Control and Economic Load Allocation concepts.

  19. Fractal dimensionality of cascades of atomic displacements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cascades of opening displacements, formed during irradiation of solids are the most typical process of dissipation of the energy of incident particles and the generation of radiation defects. The aim of the present work is the examination of the energy dependence of the fractal dimensionality of the cascades of atomic displacements in the solid

  20. Cascading costs: An economic nitrogen cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William R. Moomaw; Melissa B. L. Birch

    2005-01-01

    The chemical nitrogen cycle is becoming better characterized in terms of fluxes and reservoirs on a variety of scales. Galloway has demonstrated that reactive nitrogen can cascade through multiple ecosystems causing environmental damage at each stage before being denitrifled to N2. We propose to construct a parallel economic nitrogen cascade (ENC) in which economic impacts of nitrogen fluxes can be estimated by the costs associated with each stage of the chemical cascade. Using economic data for the benefits of damage avoided and costs of mitigation in the Chesapeake Bay basin, we have constructed an economic nitrogen cascade for the region. Since a single tonne of nitrogen can cascade through the system, the costs also cascade.Therefore evaluating the benefits of mitigating a tonne of reactive nitrogen released needs to consider the damage avoided in all of the ecosystems through which that tonne would cascade.The analysis reveals that it is most cost effective to remove a tonne of nitrogen coming from combustion since it has the greatest impact on human health and creates cascading damage through the atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We will discuss the implications of this analysis for determining the most cost effective policy option for achieving environmental quality goals.

  1. Observation of two coupled Faraday waves in a vertically vibrating Hele-Shaw cell with one of them oscillating horizontally

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiaochen; Liao, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    A system of two-dimensional, two coupled Faraday interfacial waves is experimentally observed at the two interfaces of the three layers of fluids (air, pure ethanol and silicon oil) in a sealed Hele-Shaw cell with periodic vertical vibration. The upper and lower Faraday waves coexist: the upper vibrates vertically, but the crests of the lower one oscillate horizontally with unchanged wave height and a frequency equal to the half of the forcing one of the vertically vibrating basin, while the troughs of the lower one always stay in the same place (relative to the basin). Besides, they are strongly coupled: the wave height of the lower Faraday wave is either a linear function (in the case of a fixed forcing frequency) or a parabolic function (in the case of a fixed acceleration amplitude) of that of the upper, with the same wave length. In addition, the upper Faraday wave temporarily loses its smoothness at around $t=T/4$ and $t=3T/4$, where $T$ denotes the wave period, and thus has fundamental difference from ...

  2. Cascade Error Projection: An Efficient Hardware Learning Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    A new learning algorithm termed cascade error projection (CEP) is presented. CEP is an adaption of a constructive architecture from cascade correlation and the dynamical stepsize of A/D conversion from the cascade back propagation algorithm.

  3. Multiscales and cascade in isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ran, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    The central problem of fully developed turbulence is the energy cascading process. It has revisited all attempts at a full physical understanding or mathematical formulation. The main reason for this failure are related to the large hierarchy of scales involved, the highly nonlinear character inherent in the Navier-Stokes equations, and the spatial intermittency of the dynamically active regions. Richardson has described the interplay between large and small scales and the phenomena so described are known as the Richardson cascade. This local interplay also forms the basis of a theory by Kolmogorov. In this letter, we use the explicit map method to analyze the nonlinear dynamical behavior for cascade in isotropic turbulence. This deductive scale analysis is shown to provide the first visual evidence of the celebrated Richardson cascade, and reveals in particular its multiscale character. The results also indicate that the energy cascading process has remarkable similarities with the deterministic construction...

  4. Stochastic annealing simulation of cascades in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1996-04-01

    The stochastic annealing simulation code ALSOME is used to investigate quantitatively the differential production of mobile vacancy and SIA defects as a function of temperature for isolated 25 KeV cascades in copper generated by MD simulations. The ALSOME code and cascade annealing simulations are described. The annealing simulations indicate that the above Stage V, where the cascade vacancy clusters are unstable,m nearly 80% of the post-quench vacancies escape the cascade volume, while about half of the post-quench SIAs remain in clusters. The results are sensitive to the relative fractions of SIAs that occur in small, highly mobile clusters and large stable clusters, respectively, which may be dependent on the cascade energy.

  5. MAPK Cascades in Guard Cell Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuree; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwak, June M

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions. PMID:26904052

  6. Network reconstruction from infection cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Braunstein, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing propagation networks from observations is a fundamental inverse problem, and it's crucial to understand and control dynamics in complex systems. Here we show that it is possible to reconstruct the whole structure of an interaction network and to simultaneously infer the complete time course of activation spreading, relying just on single snapshots of a small number of activity cascades. The method, that we called Inverse Dynamics Network Reconstruction (IDNR), is shown to work successfully on several synthetic and real networks, inferring the networks and the sources of infection based on sparse observations, including single snapshots. IDNR is built on a Belief Propagation approximation, that has an impressive performance in a wide variety of topological structures. The method can be applied in absence of complete time-series data by providing a detailed modeling of the posterior distribution of trajectories conditioned to the observations. Furthermore, we show by experiments that the informat...

  7. Multifunctional Cascaded Metamaterials: Integrated Transmitarrays

    CERN Document Server

    Elsakka, Amr A; Faniayeu, Ihar A; Tcvetkova, Svetlana N; Tretyakov, Sergei A

    2016-01-01

    Control of electromagnetic waves using engineered materials is very important in a wide range of applications, therefore there is always a continuous need for new and more efficient solutions. Known natural and artificial materials and surfaces provide a particular functionality in the frequency range they operate but cast a "shadow" and produce reflections at other frequencies. Here, we introduce a concept of multifunctional engineered materials that possess different predetermined functionalities at different frequencies. Such response can be accomplished by cascading metasurfaces (thin composite layers) that are designed to perform a single operation at the desired frequency and are transparent elsewhere. Previously, out-of-band transparent metasurfaces for control over reflection and absorption were proposed. In this paper, to complete the full set of functionalities for wave control, we synthesize transmitarrays that tailor transmission in a desired way, being "invisible" beyond the operational band. The...

  8. High power quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the most recent state-of-art quantum cascade laser results at wavelengths around 4.8 and 10 μm. At 4.8 μm, a room temperature wall plug efficiency (WPE) of 22 and 15.5% are obtained in pulsed mode and continuous wave (cw) mode, respectively. Room temperature cw output power reaches 3.4 W. The same laser design is able to reach a WPE of 36% at 120 K in pulsed mode. At 10 μm, room temperature average power of 2.2 W and cw power of 0.62 W are obtained. We also explore lasers utilizing the photonic crystal distributed feedback mechanism, and we demonstrate up to 12 W peak power operation at three different wavelengths around 4.7 μm with a waveguide width of 100 μm and diffraction limited beam quality.

  9. Third Generation in Cascade Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Maxin, James A; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Sinha, Kuver; Walker, Joel W

    2014-01-01

    In supersymmetric models with gluinos around 1000-2000 GeV, new physics searches based on cascade decay products of the gluino are viable at the next run of the LHC. We investigate a scenario where the light stop is lighter than the gluino and both are lighter than all other squarks, and show that its signal can be established using multi b-jet, multi W and/or multi lepton final state topologies. We then utilize both boosted and conventional jet topologies in the final state in conjunction with di-tau production as a probe of the stau-neutralino co-annihilation region responsible for the model's dark matter content. This study is performed in the specific context of one such phenomenologically viable model named No-Scale F-SU(5).

  10. Cascades in interdependent flow networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Antonio; De Sanctis Lucentini, Pier Giorgio; Caldarelli, Guido; D'Agostino, Gregorio

    2016-06-01

    In this manuscript, we investigate the abrupt breakdown behavior of coupled distribution grids under load growth. This scenario mimics the ever-increasing customer demand and the foreseen introduction of energy hubs interconnecting the different energy vectors. We extend an analytical model of cascading behavior due to line overloads to the case of interdependent networks and find evidence of first order transitions due to the long-range nature of the flows. Our results indicate that the foreseen increase in the couplings between the grids has two competing effects: on the one hand, it increases the safety region where grids can operate without withstanding systemic failures; on the other hand, it increases the possibility of a joint systems' failure.

  11. Cascades in interdependent flow networks

    CERN Document Server

    Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; D'Agostino, Gregorio

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the abrupt breakdown behavior of coupled distribution grids under load growth. This scenario mimics the ever-increasing customer demand and the foreseen introduction of energy hubs interconnecting the different energy vectors. We extend an analytical model of cascading behavior due to line overloads to the case of interdependent networks and find evidence of first order transitions due to the long-range nature of the flows. Our results indicate that the foreseen increase in the couplings between the grids has two competing effects: on the one hand, it increases the safety region where grids can operate without withstanding systemic failures; on the other hand, it increases the possibility of a joint systems' failure.

  12. The Geant4 Bertini Cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, D. H.; Kelsey, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    One of the medium energy hadron–nucleus interaction models in the Geant4 simulation toolkit is based partly on the Bertini intranuclear cascade model. Since its initial appearance in the toolkit, this model has been largely re-written in order to extend its physics capabilities and to reduce its memory footprint. Physics improvements include extensions in applicable energy range and incident particle types, and improved hadron–nucleon cross-sections and angular distributions. Interfaces have also been developed which allow the model to be coupled with other Geant4 models at lower and higher energies. The inevitable speed reductions due to enhanced physics have been mitigated by memory and CPU efficiency improvements. Details of these improvements, along with selected comparisons of the model to data, are discussed.

  13. A Laser-based Ultrasonic Inspection System to Detect Micro Fatigue Cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-based ultrasonic techniques have been established as a viable non-contact alternative to piezoelectric transducers for generating and receiving ultrasound. Laser-based ultrasonic inspection system provides a number of advantages over the conventional generation by piezoelectric transducers, especially a non-contact generation and detection of ultrasonic waves, high spatial scanning resolution, controllable narrow-band and wide-band spectrum, absolute measurements of the moving distance, use of fiber optics, and an ability to operate on curved and rough surfaces and at hard-to-access locations like a nuclear power plant. Ochiai and Miura used the laser-based ultrasound to detect micro fatigue cracks for the inspection of a material degradation in nuclear power plants. This widely applicable laser-based ultrasonic inspection system is comparatively expensive and provides low signal-to-noise ratio to measure ultrasound by using the laser interferometer. Many studies have been carried out to improve the measuring efficiency of the laser interferometer. One of the widely used laser interferometer types to measure the ultrasound is the Confocal Fabry-Perot Interferometer(CFPI). The measurement gain of the CFPI is slightly and continually varied according to the small change of the cavity length and the fluctuations of the measuring laser beam frequency with time. If we continually adjust the voltage of a PZT which is fixed to one of the interferometer mirrors, the optimum working point of the CFPI can be fixed. Though a static stabilizer can fix the gain of the CFPI where the CW laser beam is targeted at one position, it can not be used when the CW laser beam is scanned like a scanning laser source(SLS) technique. A dynamic stabilizer can be used for the scanning ultrasonic inspection system. A robust dynamic stabilizer is needed for an application to the industrial inspection fields. Kromine showed that the SLS technique is effective to detect small fatigue cracks

  14. Laser propagation characteristics in laser-based alignment experiment at the KEKB injector linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new laser-based alignment system is under development at the KEKB injector linac. Towards the Super-KEKB project, the new system is strongly required for increasing the operation stability and enhancing the quality of electron and positron beams. The new laser optics for the generation of so-called Airy beam has been developed for the laser-based alignment system. The new system comprises a flat mirror with two apertures of different diameter and spherical mirror. By using this system, the 100-m-long laser propagating is tested, and its profile is measured. It is confirmed that the measured profile has a good agreement with the simulation result. We report the overview of the new alignment system, the preliminary test result, and the simulation result in detail. (author)

  15. Comparison of laser-based and monochromator-based thermodynamic temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we describe comparisons between a laser-based and a monochromator-based radiance responsivity calibration of a radiation thermometer. The spectral selection of the radiation thermometer is performed using a spectrally broad photopic-response filter which was selected to minimize effects of convolution differences due to the spectral width of the laser-and the monochromator-based sources. The photopic-response filter is physically thick, which should also reduce possible interference fringes which can be problematic in the laser-based calibrations. We compare the radiance responsivities obtained using the two approaches and also compare the blackbody temperatures determined using the detector/monochromator based and the gold-point based calibration methods

  16. Inverse cascades of angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most theoretical and computational studies of turbulence in Navier-Stokes fluids and/or guiding-centre plasmas have been carried out in the presence of spatially periodic boundary conditions. In view of the frequently reproduced result that two-dimensional and/or MHD decaying turbulence leads to structures comparable in length scae to a box dimension, it is natural to ask if periodic boundary conditions are an adequate representation of any physical situation. Here, we study, computationally, the decay of two-dimensional turbulence in a Navier-Stokes fluid or guiding-centre plasma in the presence of circular no-slip rigid walls. The method is wholly spectral, and relies on a Galerkin approximation by a set of functions that obey two boundary conditions at the wall radius (analogues of the Chandrasekhar-Reid functions). It is possible to explore Reynolds numbers up to the order of 1250, based on an RMS velocity and a box radius. It is found that decaying turbulence is altered significantly by the no-slip boundaries. First, strong boundary layers serve as sources of vorticity and enstrophy and enhance the early-time energy decay rate, for a given Reynolds number, well above the periodic boundary condition values. More importantly, angular momentum turns out to be an even more slowly decaying ideal invariant than energy, and to a considerable extent governs the dynamics of the decay. Angular momentum must be taken into account, for example, in order to achieve quantitative agreement with the prediction of maximum entropy, or 'most probable', states. These are predictions of conditions that are established after several eddy turnover times but before the energy has decayed away. Angular momentum will cascade to lower azimuthal mode numbers, even if absent there initially, and the angular momentum modal spectrum is eventually dominated by the lowest mode available. When no initial angular momentum is present, no behaviour that suggests the likelihood of inverse cascades

  17. Characterization of the Laser-Based Release of Micropallets from Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Georgina To’a; Wang, Yuli; Sims, Christopher E.; Bachman, Mark; Li, G.P.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    The micropallet array system uses a pulsed laser to release pallets tens of microns to hundreds of microns in size from a larger array, enabling selective isolation of single cells adherent to the pallets. In this study, the laser-based release of pallets was characterized with respect to pallet array and laser parameters. The threshold laser energy required for pallet release increased linearly with the area of the pallet in contact with the underlying glass substrate. The spacing of the pal...

  18. Development of a laser based inspection system for surface defect detection

    OpenAIRE

    Bhuian, Mohammed Belal Hossain

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project was to design and develop a laser based inspection system for the detection of surface defects and to assess its potentiality for high-speed online applications. The basic components of this inspection system are a laser diode module as illumination source, a random access CMOS camera as detector unit, and an XYZ translation stage. Algorithms were developed to analyze the data obtained from the scanning of different sample surfaces. The inspection system was base...

  19. Femtosecond laser based small incision lenticule extraction for moderate and high myopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Asp, Sven; Ivarsen, Anders;

    Femtosecond laser based small incision lenticule extraction for moderate and high myopia. Jesper Hjortdal, Sven Asp, Anders Ivarsen, Anders Vestergaard Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark Purpose: ReLEx® smile is a new keratorefractive procedure whereby a stromal lent....... Refractive predictability, safety and patient satisfaction at 3 months seems equal to ReLEx flex and FS-LASIK. Optimizing laser energy settings and surgeon experience is important to minimize initial inferior results....

  20. Laser-Based Trespassing Prediction in Restrictive Environments: A Linear Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Scaglia; Fernando Auat Cheein

    2012-01-01

    Stationary range laser sensors for intruder monitoring, restricted space violation detections and workspace determination are extensively used in risky environments. In this work we present a linear based approach for predicting the presence of moving agents before they trespass a laser-based restricted space. Our approach is based on the Taylor's series expansion of the detected objects' movements. The latter makes our proposal suitable for embedded applications. In the experimental results ...

  1. Status of Real-Time Laser Based Ion Engine Diagnostics at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The development status of laser based erosion diagnostics for ion engines at the NASA Glenn Research Center is discussed. The diagnostics are being developed to enhance component life-prediction capabilities. A direct measurement of the erosion product density using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is described. Erosion diagnostics based upon evaluation of the ion dynamics are also under development, and the basic approach is presented. The planned implementation of the diagnostics is discussed.

  2. Calibration and characterisation with a new laser-based magnetostriction measurement system

    OpenAIRE

    Rafferty, Aran; Bakir, S.; Brabazon, Dermot; Prescott, Tim

    2009-01-01

    A laser-based magnet measurement system has been developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of large cylindrical samples. The measurement system incorporates a solenoid capable of generating a maximum magnetic field intensity of 3000 Oe and a laser displacement sensor. For calibration and evaluation purposes, the positive magnetostrictions of two different types of giant magnetostrictive Tb–Dy–Fe-based materials were accessed with this system. A magnetostrictive strain of 622 ppm was ob...

  3. Laser-Based Pedestrian Tracking in Outdoor Environments by Multiple Mobile Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Masafumi Hashimoto; Kazuhiko Takahashi; Kei Kakimuma; Masataka Ozaki

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an outdoors laser-based pedestrian tracking system using a group of mobile robots located near each other. Each robot detects pedestrians from its own laser scan image using an occupancy-grid-based method, and the robot tracks the detected pedestrians via Kalman filtering and global-nearest-neighbor (GNN)-based data association. The tracking data is broadcast to multiple robots through intercommunication and is combined using the covariance intersection (CI) method. For pe...

  4. Laser-based methods for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds in biological matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, András; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2016-07-15

    Laser-based desorption and/or ionization methods play an important role in the field of the analysis of low molecular-weight compounds (LMWCs) because they allow direct analysis with high-throughput capabilities. In the recent years there were several new improvements in ionization methods with the emergence of novel atmospheric ion sources such as laser ablation electrospray ionization or laser diode thermal desorption and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and in sample preparation methods with the development of new matrix compounds for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Also, the combination of ion mobility separation with laser-based ionization methods starts to gain popularity with access to commercial systems. These developments have been driven mainly by the emergence of new application fields such as MS imaging and non-chromatographic analytical approaches for quantification. This review aims to present these new developments in laser-based methods for the analysis of low-molecular weight compounds by MS and several potential applications. PMID:27107904

  5. Synergetic interaction of Dark-Modes and Faraday Rotation for Enhanced Magneto-Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mazor, Y; Steinberg, Ben Z

    2016-01-01

    We examine the efficacy of Dark-mode plasmonics as a platform for enhanced magneto-optics. Dark-mode of a small particle consists of two co-existing equal-intensity and mutually opposing dipolar excitations. Each of these two opposing dipoles may even resonate intensely at or near the dark-mode frequency, but the net dipole moment of the system vanishes due to the mutual cancelation between the opposing dipoles. We show that application of external magnetic bias may alleviate the intense destructive interference. Furthermore, under external magnetic bias the opposing dark-resonances of a plasmonic particle shift in opposite directions and create a region of extremely sensitive Faraday rotation. We show that the magnetized dark resonance in Ag particle may provide 50 degrees rotation under magnetic fields of the order of 1-2 Tesla, exhibiting magneto-plasmonic activity that is nearly three orders of magnitude larger than that observed in conventional plasmonic particle.

  6. Collimation properties of a laser ion source measured using the multichannel Faraday cup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to increase the beam intensity of a laser ion source extracted from laser photoionized plasma, a pair of semispherical electrodes was set outside the conventional parallel plate electrodes, and the obtained intensity distributions were measured by scanning a multichannel Faraday cup. The vertical and horizontal widths of the ion beam at the position of the detector were reduced by the concentric electric field formed with these electrodes. The central ion beam intensity increased about 36 times compared with that in the case without the additional electric field. The ion trajectories as a function of the potential applied to the electrodes and the initial emergent position on the electrode were studied by simulations using SIMION 3D 7.0 software package. (author)

  7. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Based on a Potassium Faraday Dispersive Filter for Daytime Temperature Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, Makoto; Pham Le Hoai, Phong; Aruga, Kouki; Nagasawa, Chikao; Shibata, Yasukuni

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new high-spectral-resolution lidar technique is proposed for measuring the profiles of atmospheric temperature in daytime. Based on the theory of high resolution Rayleigh scattering, the feasibility and advantages of using potassium (K) Faraday dispersive optical filters as blocking filters for measuring atmospheric temperature are demonstrated with a numerical simulation. It was found that temperature profiles could be measured within 1K error for the height of 9 km with a 500 m range resolution in 60 min by using laser pulses with 1mJ/pulse and 1 kHz, and a 50 cm diameter telescope. Furthermore, we are developing compact pulsed laser system for temperature lidar transmitter.

  8. Design of lost fast-ion probe based on thin faraday films in Heliotron J

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lost fast-ion probe based on thin Faraday films (FLIP) is designed to measure fast-ion losses caused by fast-ion-driven MHD modes as well as magnetic field ripples in Heliotron J. The FLIP works as a magnetic spectrometer providing the energy and pitch angle of lost fast-ions. The installation location of FLIP is studied using Lorentz orbit code. Upper port of Heliotron J at the corner section is a primary target to install the FLIP, because not only co-going fast ions but also counter-going fast ions will be detected at this position. The FLIP will give the decisive information to study fast-ion losses in Heliotron J. (author)

  9. Primordial magnetism in the CMB: Exact treatment of Faraday rotation and WMAP7 bounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraday rotation induced B modes can provide a distinctive signature of primordial magnetic fields because of their characteristic frequency dependence and because they are only weakly damped on small scales, allowing them to dominate B modes from other sources. By numerically solving the full cosmic microwave background radiative transport equations, we study the B-mode power spectrum induced by stochastic magnetic fields that have significant power on scales smaller than the thickness of the last scattering surface. Constraints on the magnetic field energy density and inertial scale are derived from WMAP 7-year data, and are stronger than the big bang nucleosynthesis bound for a range of parameters. Observations of the cosmic microwave background polarization at smaller angular scales are crucial to provide tighter constraints or a detection.

  10. Evidence of the harmonic Faraday instability in ultrasonic atomization experiments with a deep, inviscid fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, A P; Guillen, A; Jones, N; Donnelly, T D; Bernoff, A J

    2011-11-01

    A popular method for generating micron-sized aerosols is to submerge ultrasonic (ω~MHz) piezoelectric oscillators in a water bath. The submerged oscillator atomizes the fluid, creating droplets with radii proportional to the wavelength of the standing wave at the fluid surface. Classical theory for the Faraday instability predicts a parametric instability driving a capillary wave at the subharmonic (ω/2) frequency. For many applications it is desirable to reduce the size of the droplets; however, using higher frequency oscillators becomes impractical beyond a few MHz. Observations are presented that demonstrate that smaller droplets may also be created by increasing the driving amplitude of the oscillator, and that this effect becomes more pronounced for large driving frequencies. It is shown that these observations are consistent with a transition from droplets associated with subharmonic (ω/2) capillary waves to harmonic (ω) capillary waves induced by larger driving frequencies and amplitudes, as predicted by a stability analysis of the capillary waves. PMID:22087897

  11. Slit disk for modified faraday cup diagnostic for determining power density of electron and ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruya, Alan T.; Elmer; John W.; Palmer, Todd A.

    2011-03-08

    A diagnostic system for characterization of an electron beam or an ion beam includes an electrical conducting disk of refractory material having a circumference, a center, and a Faraday cup assembly positioned to receive the electron beam or ion beam. At least one slit in the disk provides diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam. The at least one slit is located between the circumference and the center of the disk and includes a radial portion that is in radial alignment with the center and a portion that deviates from radial alignment with the center. The electron beam or ion beam is directed onto the disk and translated to the at least one slit wherein the electron beam or ion beam enters the at least one slit for providing diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam.

  12. Increasing the output of a Littman-type laser by use of an intracavity Faraday rotator

    CERN Document Server

    Merrill, R; Bergeson, S; Durfee, D S; Merrill, Rebecca; Olson, Rebecca; Bergeson, Scott; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2004-01-01

    We present a new method of external-cavity diode laser grating stabilization which combines the high output power of the Littrow design with the fixed output pointing of the Littman-Metcalf design. Our new approach utilizes a Faraday-effect optical isolator inside the external cavity. Experimental testing and a model which describes the tuning range and optimal tuning parameters of the laser are described. Preliminary testing of this design has resulted in a short-term linewidth of 360 kHz and a side-mode suppression of 37 dB. The laser tunes mode-hop free over 7 GHz and we predict that much larger tuning ranges are possible.

  13. Cs 728 nm excited state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter with indirect pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaogang; Chen, Mo; Liu, Zhongzheng; Zhu, Chuanwen; Liu, Zhiwen; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a Cs excited state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (ESFADOF) operating at 728 nm using a novel pump method, by which the pump beam and the probe beam in the ESFADOF realized here have no a common energy level. Using this method, the ESFADOF achieves a transmission of 2.39% with a bandwidth of 22.52 MHz, which can be applied to both laser frequency stabilization and future four-level active optical clocks. Under the 455 nm laser pump, in addition to 52D5/2, other states such as 72S1/2, 72P3/2, 62P3/2, 62P1/2 and 52D3/2 have also been populated effectively. Meanwhile, multiple wavelength filters exploiting atomic transitions to these states can be realized.

  14. Highlights from Faraday Discussion: Designing New Heterogeneous Catalysts, London, UK, April 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nico; Manyar, Haresh G; Roldan, Alberto

    2016-06-28

    The Faraday Discussion on the design of new heterogeneous catalysts took place from 4-6 April 2016 in London, United Kingdom. It brought together world leading scientists actively involved in the synthesis, characterisation, modelling and testing of solid catalysts, attracting more than one hundred delegates from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and experience levels - academic and industrial researchers, experimentalists and theoreticians, and students. The meeting was a reflection of how big of an impact the ability to control and design catalysts with specific properties for particular processes can potentially have on the chemical industry, environment, economy and society as a whole. In the following, we give an overview of the topics covered during this meeting and briefly highlight the content of each presentation. PMID:27307017

  15. Quasiequilibrium nonlinearities in Faraday and Kerr rotation from spin-polarized carriers in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua, Arjun; Venkataraman, V.

    2010-01-01

    Semiconductor Bloch equations (SBEs), which microscopically describe optical properties in terms of the dynamics of a Coulomb interacting, spin-unpolarized electron-hole plasma, can be solved in two limits: the coherent and the quasiequilibrium regimes. Recently, Nemec et al. [1] reported circularly polarized pump-probe absorption spectra in the quasiequilibrium regime for carrier spin-polarized bulk GaAs at room temperature, which lacked a suitable microscopic theoretical understanding. We have very recently explained their results by solving the spin-SBEs in the quasiequilibrium regime (spin-Bethe-Salpeter equation), and accounted for spin-dependent mechanisms of optical nonlinearity [2]. Here, we extend our theory to the microscopic calculation of Kerr and Faraday rotation in the quasiequilibrium regime, for which there are no experimental or theoretical results available.

  16. Primordial Magnetism in the CMB: Exact Treatment of Faraday Rotation and WMAP7 Bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Pogosian, Levon; Ng, Yi-Fung; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2011-01-01

    Faraday rotation induced B-modes can provide a distinctive signature of primordial magnetic fields because of their characteristic frequency dependence and because they are only weakly damped on small scales, allowing them to dominate B-modes from other sources. By numerically solving the full CMB radiative transport equations, we study the B-mode power spectrum induced by stochastic magnetic fields that have significant power on scales smaller than the thickness of the last scattering surface. Constraints on the magnetic field energy density and inertial scale are derived from WMAP 7-year data, and are stronger than the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) bound for a range of parameters. Observations of the CMB polarization at smaller angular scales are crucial to provide tighter constraints or a detection.

  17. Effect of imperfect Faraday mirrors on the security of a Faraday–Michelson quantum cryptography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The one-way Faraday–Michelson system is a very useful practical quantum cryptography system where Faraday mirrors (FMs) play an important role. In this paper we analyze the security of this system against imperfect FMs. We consider the security loophole caused by imperfect FMs in Alice’s and Bob’s security zones. Then we implement a passive FM attack in this system. By changing the values of the imperfection parameters of Alice’s FMs, we calculate the quantum bit error rate between Alice and Bob induced by Eve and the probability that Eve obtains outcomes successfully. It is shown that the imperfection of one of Alice’s two FMs makes the system sensitive to an attack. Finally we give a modified key rate as a function of the FM imperfections. The security analysis indicates that both Alice’s and Bob’s imperfect FMs can compromise the secure key. (paper)

  18. Sub-atom shot noise Faraday imaging of ultracold atom clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kristensen, Mick A; Pedersen, Poul L; Klempt, Carsten; Sherson, Jacob F; Arlt, Jan J; Hilliard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that a dispersive imaging technique based on the Faraday effect can measure the atom number in a large, ultracold atom cloud with a precision below the atom shot noise level. The minimally destructive character of the technique allows us to take multiple images of the same cloud, which enables sub-atom shot noise measurement precision of the atom number and allows for an in situ determination of the measurement precision. We have developed a noise model that quantitatively describes the noise contributions due to photon shot noise in the detected light and the noise associated with single atom loss. This model contains no free parameters and is calculated through an analysis of the fluctuations in the acquired images. For clouds containing $N \\sim 5 \\times 10^6$ atoms, we achieve a precision more than a factor of two below the atom shot noise level.

  19. Faraday rotation from magnesium II absorbers toward polarized background radio sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnes, J. S.; O' Sullivan, S. P.; Corrigan, M. E.; Gaensler, B. M., E-mail: jamie.farnes@sydney.edu.au [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-11-01

    Strong singly ionized magnesium (Mg II) absorption lines in quasar spectra typically serve as a proxy for intervening galaxies along the line of sight. Previous studies have found a correlation between the number of these Mg II absorbers and the Faraday rotation measure (RM) at ≈5 GHz. We cross-match a sample of 35,752 optically identified non-intrinsic Mg II absorption systems with 25,649 polarized background radio sources for which we have measurements of both the spectral index and RM at 1.4 GHz. We use the spectral index to split the resulting sample of 599 sources into flat-spectrum and steep-spectrum subsamples. We find that our flat-spectrum sample shows significant (∼3.5σ) evidence for a correlation between Mg II absorption and RM at 1.4 GHz, while our steep-spectrum sample shows no such correlation. We argue that such an effect cannot be explained by either luminosity or other observational effects, by evolution in another confounding variable, by wavelength-dependent polarization structure in an active galactic nucleus, by the Galactic foreground, by cosmological expansion, or by partial coverage models. We conclude that our data are most consistent with intervenors directly contributing to the Faraday rotation along the line of sight, and that the intervening systems must therefore have coherent magnetic fields of substantial strength ( B-bar =1.8±0.4 μG). Nevertheless, the weak nature of the correlation will require future high-resolution and broadband radio observations in order to place it on a much firmer statistical footing.

  20. Modelling of the plasma at the Faraday screen of an ICRH antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applicability of ICRH as a heating method for fusion plasmas crucially depends on the possibility of restricting unwanted impurity production connected with this method. One of the sources of impurities is the Faraday screen which protects the current-carrying antenna strap from the main plasma. A possible mechanism of impurity production is the sputtering of metal atoms from the screen by energetic plasma ions. These plasma ions may gain their energy as follows: The magnetic flux of the antenna creates a certain RF voltage across the gaps between adjacent strips of the Faraday screen. If no plasma were present at the screen, the electric field generating this voltage would extend across the whole gap. In the presence of a plasma, on the contrary, the electric field is essentially localized within a thin sheath in front of the strip with the lower voltage. The electric field in this case is therefore much larger and the time necessary to accelerate the ions across the sheath to the strip is much shorter than in the case where no plasma is present. Thus, ions within a plasma of sufficient density at the screen can gain energy of the order of the voltage across the gap between adjacent strips within a half period of the IC wave. This non-resonant mechanism of ion energy gain is studied with a numerical 1-D electrostatic particle code. Ion and electron orbits are followed in the self-consistent electric and prescribed magnetic fields. The voltage induced is taken into account as a time-varying boundary potential. The code is used to calculate particle and energy fluxes to the boundary as function of time, energy and incidence angle. From these fluxes the sputtering yield of target material can be determined. (orig.)