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Sample records for cascade laser-based faraday

  1. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Based 3D Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LongWave Photonics proposes a terahertz quantum-cascade laser based swept-source optical coherence tomography (THz SS-OCT) system for single-sided, 3D,...

  2. Inverse energy cascade and emergence of large coherent vortices in turbulence driven by Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2013-05-10

    We report the generation of large coherent vortices via inverse energy cascade in Faraday wave driven turbulence. The motion of floaters in the Faraday waves is three dimensional, but its horizontal velocity fluctuations show unexpected similarity with two-dimensional turbulence. The inverse cascade is detected by measuring frequency spectra of the Lagrangian velocity, and it is confirmed by computing the third moment of the horizontal velocity fluctuations. This is observed in deep water in a broad range of wavelengths and vertical accelerations. The results broaden the scope of recent findings on Faraday waves in thin layers [A. von Kameke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 074502 (2011)].

  3. Contributed Review: Quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J. S., E-mail: jingsong-li@ahu.edu.cn; Yu, B. [Key Laboratory of Opto-Electronic Information Acquisition and Manipulation of Ministry of Education, Anhui University, Hefei (China); Fischer, H. [Department of Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Chen, W. [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l’Atmosphére, Université du Littoral Côte d’Opale, Dunkerque (France); Yalin, A. P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1374 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade.

  4. Quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic sulfuryl fluoride sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minini, Kariza Mayra Silva; Bueno, Sâmylla Cristina Espécie; da Silva, Marcelo Gomes; Sthel, Marcelo Silva; Vargas, Helion; Angster, Judit; Miklós, András

    2017-02-01

    Although sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) is an efficient fumigant that does not react with the surface of indoor materials and does not reduce the stratospheric ozone shield, there are some concerns about its use. It is a toxic gas that attacks the central nervous system, and its global warming potential (GWP) value is 4780 for 100 years' time. Therefore, it is a clear necessity of implementing detection methods for tracing such a molecule. In this work a sensitive photoacoustic setup was built to detect SO2F2 at concentrations of parts per billion by volume (ppbv). The symmetric S-O stretching mode was excited by a continuous-wave quantum cascade laser with radiation wavenumber ranging from 1275.7 to 1269.3 cm-1. The photoacoustic signal was generated by modulating the laser wavenumber at the first longitudinal mode of the photoacoustic cell with amplitude depth of 5 × 10-3 cm-1. The detection of a minimum SO2F2 concentration of 20 ppbv was achieved.

  5. Real-time quantum cascade laser-based infrared microspectroscopy in-vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger-Lui, N.; Haase, K.; Pucci, A.; Schönhals, A.; Petrich, W.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared microscopy can be performed to observe dynamic processes on a microscopic scale. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy-based microscopes are bound to limitations regarding time resolution, which hampers their potential for imaging fast moving systems. In this manuscript we present a quantum cascade laser-based infrared microscope which overcomes these limitations and readily achieves standard video frame rates. The capabilities of our setup are demonstrated by observing dynamical processes at their specific time scales: fermentation, slow moving Amoeba Proteus and fast moving Caenorhabditis elegans. Mid-infrared sampling rates between 30 min and 20 ms are demonstrated.

  6. Quantum cascade laser-based spectrometer for high sensitive measurements of trace gases in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Tang; Wenqing Liu; Ruifeng Kan; Yujun Zhang; Dong Chen; Shuai Zhang; Jun Ruan

    2012-01-01

    A quantum cascade (QC) laser-based spectrometer is developed to measure trace gases in air.The proposed spectrometer is tested for N2O,and the results presented in this letter.This system takes advantage of recent technology in QC lasers by utilizing intra-pulse scan spectroscopy,which allows high sensitive measurement.Without calibration gases,the gas concentration can be calculated with scan integration and the corresponding values from the HITRAN04 database.By analyzing the Allan variance,a detection limit of 2 ppb is obtained.Continuous measurement of N2O sampled from ambient air shows the applicability of the proposed system for the field measurements of gases of environmental concern.

  7. Open-path, quantum cascade laser-based sensor for high resolution atmospheric ammonia measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Miller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a compact, open-path, quantum cascade laser-based atmospheric ammonia sensor operating at 9.06 μm for high sensitivity, high temporal resolution, ground-based measurements. Atmospheric ammonia (NH3 is a gas-phase precursor to fine particulate matter, with implications for air quality and climate change. Currently, NH3 sensing challenges have led to a lack of widespread in-situ measurements. Our open-path sensor configuration avoids sampling artifacts associated with NH3 surface adsorption onto inlet tubing and reduced pressure sampling cells, as well as condensed-phase partitioning ambiguities. Multi-harmonic wavelength modulation spectroscopy allows for selective and sensitive detection of atmospheric-pressure broadened absorption features. An in-line ethylene reference cell provides real-time calibration (±20% accuracy and normalization for instrument drift under rapidly changing field conditions. The sensor has a sensitivity and minimum detection limit of 0.15 ppbv NH3 at 10 Hz, a mass of ~ 5 kg and consumes ~ 50 W of electrical power. In-situ field performance of this open-path NH3 sensor is demonstrated, with 10 Hz time resolution and a large dynamic response for in-situ NH3 measurements. This sensor provides the capabilities for improved in-situ gas phase NH3 sensing relevant for emission source characterization and flux measurements.

  8. A Sulfur Hexafluoride Sensor Using Quantum Cascade and CO2 Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helion Vargas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase in greenhouse gas emissions is a serious environmental problem and has stimulated the scientific community to pay attention to the need for detection and monitoring of gases released into the atmosphere. In this regard, the development of sensitive and selective gas sensors has been the subject of several research programs. An important greenhouse gas is sulphur hexafluoride, an almost non-reactive gas widely employed in industrial processes worldwide. Indeed it is estimated that it has a radiative forcing of 0.52 W/m2. This work compares two photoacoustic spectrometers, one coupled to a CO2 laser and another one coupled to a Quantum Cascade (QC laser, for the detection of SF6. The laser photoacoustic spectrometers described in this work have been developed for gas detection at small concentrations. Detection limits of 20 ppbv for CO2 laser and 50 ppbv for quantum cascade laser were obtained.

  9. A high carrier injection terahertz quantum cascade laser based on indirectly pumped scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavipour, S. G., E-mail: sgrazavi@uwaterloo.ca; Xu, C.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Ban, D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, Ontario N2L3G1 (Canada); Dupont, E.; Laframboise, S. R. [National Research Council, Blg. M-50, 1200 Montreal Rd., Ottawa, Ontario K1A0R6 (Canada); Chan, C. W. I.; Hu, Q. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-01-27

    A Terahertz quantum cascade laser with a rather high injection coupling strength based on an indirectly pumped scheme is designed and experimentally implemented. To effectively suppress leakage current, the chosen quantum cascade module of the device is based on a five-well GaAs/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As structure. The device lases up to 151 K with a lasing frequency of 2.67 THz. This study shows that the effect of higher energy states in carrier transport and the long-range tunnel coupling between states that belong to non-neighbouring modules have to be considered in quantum design of structures with a narrow injector barrier. Moreover, the effect of interface roughness scattering between the lasing states on threshold current is crucial.

  10. Electrically tunable terahertz quantum cascade lasers based on a two-sections interdigitated distributed feedback cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turčinková, Dana; Scalari, Giacomo; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Amanti, Maria Ines [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Univ. Paris Diderot, Lab. Matererk iaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, F-75205 Paris (France)

    2015-03-30

    The continuous electrical tuning of a single-mode terahertz quantum cascade laser operating at a frequency of 3 THz is demonstrated. The devices are based on a two-section interdigitated third-order distributed feedback cavity. The lasers can be tuned of about 4 GHz at a constant optical output power of 0.7 mW with a good far-field pattern.

  11. Monitoring Hydrogen Sulfide Using a Quantum Cascade Laser Based Trace Gas Sensing System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ling-Fang; SHARPLES Thomas-Roben

    2011-01-01

    @@ We present the detection of hydrogen sulfide (HS) in a quantum cascade laser (QCL) based gas sensing system employing direct laser absorption spectroscopy.The sensitivity is obtained to be 3.61 × 10 cm Hz and the HS broadening coefficient in N is analyzed by fitting to the plot of the Lorentzian half width at the half maximum as a function of N pressure is 0.1124±0.0031 cm.atm.A simulation based on data from the HITRAN database shows broad agreement with the experimentally obtained spectrum.

  12. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Sensor for Trace Detection of Formaldehyde Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mario Lugarà

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a photoacoustic sensor for the detection of formaldehyde (CH2O using a thermoelectrically cooled distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating in pulsed mode at 5.6 mm. A resonant photoacoustic cell, equipped with four electret microphones, is excited in its first longitudinal mode at 1,380 Hz. The absorption line at 1,778.9 cm-1 is selected for CH2O detection. A detection limit of 150 parts per billion in volume in nitrogen is achieved using a 10 seconds time constant and 4 mW laser power. Measurements in ambient air will require water vapour filters.

  13. Terahertz dual-wavelength quantum cascade laser based on GaN active region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, B.; Rostami, A.; Baghban, H.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper a novel terahertz (THz) quantum cascade laser (QCL) based on GaN/AlGaN quantum wells has been proposed, which emits at two widely separated wavelengths 33 and 52 μm simultaneously in a single active region. The large LO-phonon energy (˜90 meV), the ultrafast resonant phonon depopulation of the lower radiative levels, suppression of the electrons that escape to the continuum states and selective carrier injection and extraction all together lead to a considerable enhancement in the operating temperature of the structure. All calculations have been done at a temperature of 265 K. Moreover, similar behavior of the output optical powers is another remarkable feature, which makes both wavelengths useful for special applications.

  14. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Trace Vapor Detection and Molecular Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almon Fisher

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS-scale photoacoustic sensor for the detection of trace gases. A mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL was used to determine detection limits for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate. The source was continuously tunable from 1015 cm-1 to 1240 cm-1, allowing for the collection of photoacoustic vibrational spectra for these gases. Exceptional agreement between the measured photoacoustic spectra and the infrared spectra for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate was observed. Partial least-squares (PLS regression was used to develop an algorithm for classification of these compounds based solely on photoacoustic spectra.

  15. Quantum cascade laser-based sensors for the detection of exhaled carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakmanesh, Nahid; Cristescu, Simona M.; Ghorbanzadeh, Atamalek; Harren, Frans J. M.; Mandon, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important biomarker as it originates in the human body from the heme (component of hemoglobin) degradation. Tunable laser absorption spectroscopy in the mid-infrared wavelength region is used for sensitive trace gas sensing of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO). Based on a quantum cascade laser emitting at 4.61 µm, two different spectroscopic methods are investigated: off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) and wavelength modulation 2f/1f spectroscopy (WMS). The optical sensors integrate a slow feedback system to correct for wavelength drifts improving their stability over days. Both approaches demonstrate a high reproducibility and sensitivity during online measurements of exhaled human breath. Considering the detection limit to be the equal to the standard deviation of the background fluctuations, the noise-equivalent detection limit for both OA-ICOS and WMS is 7 ppbv (1-s averaging time), leading to a noise-equivalent absorption sensitivity of 3.1 × 10-7 cm-1 Hz-1/2, which is sufficient for measurements of exhaled CO (eCO). Collection and measurements of eCO samples were investigated, and different exhalation flow rates and breath-holding time were explored, to provide a reliable sampling method for future medical investigations.

  16. Development of a Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Detector for Ammonia and Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; McManus, J. Barry; Shorter, Joanne H.; Herndon, Scott C.; Jimenez, Rodrigo

    2005-12-31

    We have developed a compact, robust, atmospheric trace gas detector based on mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using pulsed quantum cascade (QC) lasers. The spectrometer is suitable for airborne measurements of ammonia, nitric acid, formaldehyde, formic acid, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and other gases that have line-resolved absorption spectra in the mid-infrared spectral region. The QC laser light source operates near room temperature with thermal electric cooling instead of liquid nitrogen which has been previously required for semiconductor lasers in the mid-infrared spectral region. The QC lasers have sufficient output power so that thermal electric cooled detectors may be used in many applications with lower precision requirements. The instrument developed in this program has been used in several field campaigns from both the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory and from the NOAA WP3 aircraft. The Phase II program has resulted in more than 10 archival publications describing the technology and its applications. Over 12 instruments based on this design have been sold to research groups in Europe and the United States making the program both a commercial as well as a technological success. Anticipated Benefits The development of a sensitive, cryogen-free, mid-infrared absorption method for atmospheric trace gas detection will have wide benefits for atmospheric and environmental research and broader potential commercial applications in areas such as medical diagnostic and industrial process monitoring of gaseous compounds. Examples include air pollution monitoring, breath analysis, combustion exhaust diagnostics, and plasma diagnostics for semi-conductor fabrication. The substitution of near-room temperature QC lasers for cryogenic lead salt TDLs and the resulting simplifications in instrument design and operation will greatly expand the range of applications.

  17. Quantum cascade laser-based measurement of metal alkylamide density during atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslar, James E; Kimes, William A; Sperling, Brent A

    2012-03-01

    An in situ gas-phase diagnostic for the metal alkylamide compound tetrakis(ethylmethylamido) hafnium (TEMAH), Hf[N(C(2)H(5))(CH(3))](4), was demonstrated. This diagnostic is based on direct absorption measurement of TEMAH vapor using an external cavity quantum cascade laser emitting at 979 cm(-1), coinciding with the most intense TEMAH absorption in the mid-infrared spectral region, and employing 50 kHz amplitude modulation with synchronous detection. Measurements were performed in a single-pass configuration in a research-grade atomic layer deposition (ALD) chamber. To examine the detection limit of this technique for use as a TEMAH delivery monitor, this technique was demonstrated in the absence of any other deposition reactants or products, and to examine the selectivity of this technique in the presence of deposition products that potentially interfere with detection of TEMAH vapor, it was demonstrated during ALD of hafnium oxide using TEMAH and water. This technique successfully detected TEMAH at molecular densities present during simulated industrial ALD conditions. During hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, absorbance from gas-phase reaction products did not interfere with TEMAH measurements while absorption by reaction products deposited on the optical windows did interfere, although interfering absorption by deposited reaction products corresponded to only ≈4% of the total derived TEMAH density. With short measurement times and appropriate signal averaging, estimated TEMAH minimum detectable densities as low as ≈2 × 10(12) molecules/cm(3) could be obtained. While this technique was demonstrated specifically for TEMAH delivery and hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, it should be readily applicable to other metal alkylamide compounds and associated metal oxide and nitride deposition chemistries, assuming similar metal alkylamide molar absorptivity and molecular density in the measurement chamber.

  18. Rapid identification of goblet cells in unstained colon thin sections by means of quantum cascade laser-based infrared microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger-Lui, N; Gretz, N; Haase, K; Kränzlin, B; Neudecker, S; Pucci, A; Regenscheit, A; Schönhals, A; Petrich, W

    2015-04-07

    Changes in the volume covered by mucin-secreting goblet cell regions within colon thin sections may serve as a means to differentiate between ulcerative colitis and infectious colitis. Here we show that rapid, quantum cascade laser-based mid-infrared microspectroscopy might be able to contribute to the differential diagnosis of colitis ulcerosa, an inflammatory bowel disease. Infrared hyperspectral images of mouse colon thin sections were obtained within 7.5 minutes per section with a pixel size of 3.65 × 3.65 μm(2) and a field of view of 2.8 × 3.1 mm(2). The spectra were processed by training a random decision forest classifier on the basis of k-means clustering on one thin section. The trained algorithm was then applied to 5 further thin sections for a blinded validation and it was able to identify goblet cells in all sections. The rapid identification of goblet cells within these unstained, paraffinized thin sections of colon tissue was enabled by the high content of glycopeptides within the goblet cells as revealed by the pronounced spectral signatures in the 7.6 μm-8.6 μm and the 9.2 μm-9.7 μm wavelength ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum. More so, the simple calculation of the ratio between the absorbance values at 9.29 μm and 8.47 μm provides the potential to further shorten the time for measurement and analysis of a thin section down to well below 1 minute.

  19. Single-mode surface-emitting distributed feedback quantum-cascade lasers based on hybrid waveguide structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanhong Guo; Junqi Liu; Jianyan Chen; Lu Li; Lijun Wang; Fengqi Liu; Zhanguo Wang

    2011-01-01

    Surface-emitting distributed feedback quantum-cascade lasers operating at λ≈7.8 μm are demonstrated.The metal-covered second-order grating is shallow-etched into the surface of a thin InGaAs contact and cladding layer. This forms a hybrid waveguide and used to achieve relatively low waveguide losses and high coupling strengths. The devices exhibit stable single-mode operation from 90 to 130 K with a side mode suppression ratio above 20 dB. A slope efficiency of 194 mW/A is obtained at 90 K, which is twice higher than that of the Fabry-Perot counterpart.%@@ Surface-emitting distributed feedback quantum-cascade lasers operating at λ≈7.8 μm are demonstrated.The metal-covered second-order grating is shallow-etched into the surface of a thin InGaAs contact and cladding layer.This forms a hybrid waveguide and used to achieve relatively low waveguide losses and high coupling strengths.The devices exhibit stable single-mode operation from 90 to 130 K with a side mode suppression ratio above 20 dB.A slope efficiency of 194 mW/A is obtained at 90 K, which is twice higher than that of the Fabry-Perot counterpart.

  20. Quantum cascade laser based monitoring of CF2 radical concentration as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, M.; Lang, N.; Zimmermann, S.; Schulz, S. E.; Buchholtz, W.; Röpcke, J.; van Helden, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric etching plasma processes for modern interlevel dielectrics become more and more complex by the introduction of new ultra low-k dielectrics. One challenge is the minimization of sidewall damage, while etching ultra low-k porous SiCOH by fluorocarbon plasmas. The optimization of this process requires a deeper understanding of the concentration of the CF2 radical, which acts as precursor in the polymerization of the etch sample surfaces. In an industrial dielectric etching plasma reactor, the CF2 radical was measured in situ using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) around 1106.2 cm-1. We measured Doppler-resolved ro-vibrational absorption lines and determined absolute densities using transitions in the ν3 fundamental band of CF2 with the aid of an improved simulation of the line strengths. We found that the CF2 radical concentration during the etching plasma process directly correlates to the layer structure of the etched wafer. Hence, this correlation can serve as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes. Applying QCL based absorption spectroscopy opens up the way for advanced process monitoring and etching controlling in semiconductor manufacturing.

  1. Gas chromatography vs. quantum cascade laser-based N2O flux measurements using a novel chamber design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brümmer, Christian; Lyshede, Bjarne; Lempio, Dirk; Delorme, Jean-Pierre; Rüffer, Jeremy J.; Fuß, Roland; Moffat, Antje M.; Hurkuck, Miriam; Ibrom, Andreas; Ambus, Per; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2017-03-01

    Recent advances in laser spectrometry offer new opportunities to investigate the soil-atmosphere exchange of nitrous oxide. During two field campaigns conducted at a grassland site and a willow field, we tested the performance of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) connected to a newly developed automated chamber system against a conventional gas chromatography (GC) approach using the same chambers plus an automated gas sampling unit with septum capped vials and subsequent laboratory GC analysis. Through its high precision and time resolution, data of the QCL system were used for quantifying the commonly observed nonlinearity in concentration changes during chamber deployment, making the calculation of exchange fluxes more accurate by the application of exponential models. As expected, the curvature values in the concentration increase was higher during long (60 min) chamber closure times and under high-flux conditions (FN2O > 150 µg N m-2 h-1) than those values that were found when chambers were closed for only 10 min and/or when fluxes were in a typical range of 2 to 50 µg N m-2 h-1. Extremely low standard errors of fluxes, i.e., from ˜ 0.2 to 1.7 % of the flux value, were observed regardless of linear or exponential flux calculation when using QCL data. Thus, we recommend reducing chamber closure times to a maximum of 10 min when a fast-response analyzer is available and this type of chamber system is used to keep soil disturbance low and conditions around the chamber plot as natural as possible. Further, applying linear regression to a 3 min data window with rejecting the first 2 min after closure and a sampling time of every 5 s proved to be sufficient for robust flux determination while ensuring that standard errors of N2O fluxes were still on a relatively low level. Despite low signal-to-noise ratios, GC was still found to be a useful method to determine the mean the soil-atmosphere exchange of N2O on longer timescales during specific campaigns. Intriguingly

  2. Atmospheric ammonia measurements in Houston, TX using an external cavity-quantum cascade laser-based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, L.; Lewicki, R.; Griffin, R. J.; Flynn, J. H.; Lefer, B. L.; Tittel, F. K.

    2010-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. It has many anthropogenic (e.g., agricultural crops and mineral fertilizers) and natural sources (e.g., animals, oceans, and vegetation) in the environment. In certain areas, industrial and motor vehicle activities also can contribute to increases in atmospheric NH3 levels. From a perspective of environmental concern, NH3 is a precursor of particulate matter (PM) because it can lead to production of ammonium salts (e.g., (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3) through chemical reactions with sulfuric and nitric acid. As a result, the abundance of NH3 in the atmosphere has a great impact on aerosol nucleation and composition. Despite this, NH3 is not regulated. It is crucial, however, to improve our understanding of the dynamics of NH3 in an industrial and urban area such as Greater Houston where atmospheric NH3 data are limited. In this study, a 10.4 µm external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL)-based sensor was developed and utilized. To monitor atmospheric NH3 at trace gas concentration levels, an amplitude modulated photo-acoustic spectroscopy (AM-PAS) technique was employed. The minimum detection limit obtained from the sensor is ~1.5 ppb for a 5-second data acquisition time. After averaging data over 300 seconds a sub-ppb NH3 concentration level can be achieved. The NH3 sensor has been deployed on the roof of a ~60-meter-high building (North Moody Tower) located on the University of Houston campus since November 2009. Several episodes of high NH3 concentrations were observed. For example, the sensor recorded a significant and lasting increase in NH3 concentrations (~21 ppb) on August 14, 2010, when a major accident occurred during the same time period on the Gulf Freeway (I-45) in Houston only 2 miles from the sampling site. The elevated concentration levels are assumed to be associated with NH3 generation from a chemical fire resulting from the collision involving two 18-wheelers, one carrying fertilizer

  3. Enhancing the sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser-based cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy using RF current perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfred, Katherine M; Kirkbride, James M R; Ciaffoni, Luca; Peverall, Robert; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2014-12-15

    The sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), often limited by cavity mode structure and diffraction losses, was enhanced by applying a broadband RF noise to the laser current. A pump-probe measurement demonstrated that the addition of bandwidth-limited white noise effectively increased the laser linewidth, thereby reducing mode structure associated with CEAS. The broadband noise source offers a more sensitive, more robust alternative to applying single-frequency noise to the laser. Analysis of CEAS measurements of a CO(2) absorption feature at 1890  cm(-1) averaged over 100 ms yielded a minimum detectable absorption of 5.5×10(-3)  Hz(-1/2) in the presence of broadband RF perturbation, nearly a tenfold improvement over the unperturbed regime. The short acquisition time makes this technique suitable for breath applications requiring breath-by-breath gas concentration information.

  4. Direct determination of glucose, lactate and triglycerides in blood serum by a tunable quantum cascade laser-based mid-IR sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, M.; Volgger, L.; Genner, A.; Jungbauer, C.; Lendl, B.

    2013-02-01

    This work reports on a compact sensor for fast and reagent-free point-of-care determination of glucose, lactate and triglycerides in blood serum based on a tunable (1030-1230 cm-1) external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL). For simple and robust operation a single beam set-up was designed and only thermoelectric cooling was used for the employed laser and detector. Full computer control of analysis including liquid handling and data analysis facilitated routine measurements. A high optical pathlength (>100 μm) is a prerequisite for robust measurements in clinical practice. Hence, the optimum optical pathlength for transmission measurements in aqueous solution was considered in theory and experiment. The experimentally determined maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was around 140 μm for the QCL blood sensor and around 50 μm for a standard FT-IR spectrometer employing a liquid nitrogen cooled mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) detector. A single absorption spectrum was used to calculate the analyte concentrations simultaneously by using a partial-least-squares (PLS) regression analysis. Glucose was determined in blood serum with a prediction error (RMSEP) of 6.9 mg/dl and triglycerides with an error of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 17.5 mg/dl in a set of 42 different patients. In spiked serum samples the lactate concentration could be determined with an RMSECV of 8.9 mg/dl.

  5. Reagent-free monitoring of multiple clinically relevant parameters in human blood plasma using a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser based sensor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Markus; Sumalowitsch, Tamara; Genner, Andreas; Posch, Andreas E; Herwig, Christoph; Drolz, Andreas; Fuhrmann, Valentin; Perkmann, Thomas; Lendl, Bernhard

    2013-07-21

    We present a semi-automated point-of-care (POC) sensor approach for the simultaneous and reagent-free determination of clinically relevant parameters in blood plasma. The portable sensor system performed direct mid-infrared (MIR) transmission measurements of blood plasma samples using a broadly tunable external-cavity quantum cascade laser source with high spectral power density. This enabled the use of a flow cell with a long path length (165 μm) which resulted in high signal-to-noise ratios and a rugged system, insensitive to clogging. Multivariate calibration models were built using well established Partial-Least-Squares (PLS) regression analysis. Selection of spectral pre-processing procedures was optimized by an automated evaluation algorithm. Several analytes, including glucose, lactate, triglycerides, cholesterol, total protein as well as albumin, were successfully quantified in routinely taken blood plasma samples from 67 critically ill patients. Although relying on a spectral range from 1030 cm(-1) to 1230 cm(-1), which is optimal for glucose and lactate but rather unusual for protein analysis, it was possible to selectively determine the albumin and total protein concentrations with sufficient accuracy for POC application.

  6. Implementation of a quantum cascade laser-based gas sensor prototype for sub-ppmv H2S measurements in a petrochemical process gas stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Harald; Pölz, Walter; Waclawek, Johannes Paul; Ofner, Johannes; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of a sensitive and selective as well as industrial fit gas sensor prototype based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection (2f-WMS) employing an 8-μm continuous-wave distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (CW-DFB-QCL) for monitoring hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at sub-ppm levels is reported. Regarding the applicability for analytical and industrial process purposes aimed at petrochemical environments, a synthetic methane (CH4) matrix of up to 1000 ppmv together with a varying H2S content was chosen as the model environment for the laboratory-based performance evaluation performed at TU Wien. A noise-equivalent absorption sensitivity (NEAS) for H2S targeting the absorption line at 1247.2 cm(-1) was found to be 8.419 × 10(-10) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2), and a limit of detection (LOD) of 150 ppbv H2S could be achieved. The sensor prototype was then deployed for on-site measurements at the petrochemical research hydrogenation platform of the industrial partner OMV AG. In order to meet the company's on-site safety regulations, the H2S sensor platform was installed in an industry rack and equipped with the required safety infrastructure for protected operation in hazardous and explosive environments. The work reports the suitability of the sensor prototype for simultaneous monitoring of H2S and CH4 content in the process streams of a research hydrodesulfurization (HDS) unit. Concentration readings were obtained every 15 s and revealed process dynamics not observed previously.

  7. Short-lived species detection of nitrous acid by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Hongming [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l' Atmosphère, Université du Littoral Côte d' Opale, 189A, Av. Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Laboratory of Atmospheric Physico-Chemistry, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1125, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Maamary, Rabih; Fertein, Eric; Chen, Weidong, E-mail: chen@univ-littoral.fr [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l' Atmosphère, Université du Littoral Côte d' Opale, 189A, Av. Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Gao, Xiaoming [Laboratory of Atmospheric Physico-Chemistry, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1125, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sigrist, Markus W. [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, HPT H4.1, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-09

    Spectroscopic detection of short-lived gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) at 1254.85 cm{sup −1} was realized by off-beam coupled quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) in conjunction with an external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL). High sensitivity monitoring of HONO was performed within a very small gas-sample volume (of ∼40 mm{sup 3}) allowing a significant reduction (of about 4 orders of magnitude) of air sampling residence time which is highly desired for accurate quantification of chemically reactive short-lived species. Calibration of the developed QEPAS-based HONO sensor was carried out by means of lab-generated HONO samples whose concentrations were determined by direct absorption spectroscopy involving a ∼109.5 m multipass cell and a distributed feedback QCL. A minimum detection limit (MDL) of 66 ppbv (1 σ) HONO was achieved at 70 mbar using a laser output power of 50 mW and 1 s integration time, which corresponded to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 3.6 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. This MDL was down to 7 ppbv at the optimal integration time of 150 s. The corresponding 1σ minimum detected absorption coefficient is ∼1.1 × 10{sup −7 }cm{sup −1} (MDL ∼ 3 ppbv) in 1 s and ∼1.1 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1} (MDL ∼ 330 pptv) in 150 s, respectively, with 1 W laser power.

  8. Faraday rotation system. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, L.E.; Wang, W.

    1994-07-01

    The Faraday Rotation System (FRS) is one of the advanced laser-based diagnostics developed at DIAL to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the MHD channel, the system directly measures electron density through a measurement of the induced rotation in the polarization of a far infrared laser beam after passing through the MHD flow along the magnetic field lines. A measurement of the induced polarization ellipticity provides a measure of the electron collision frequency which together with the electron density gives the electron conductivity, a crucial parameter for MHD channel performance. The theory of the measurements, a description of the system, its capabilities, laboratory demonstration measurements on seeded flames with comparison to emission absorption measurements, and the current status of the system are presented in this final report.

  9. Michael Faraday's Bicentenary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L. Pearce; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Six articles discuss the work of Michael Faraday, a chemist whose work revolutionized physics and led directly to both classical field and relativity theory. The scientist as a young man, the electromagnetic experiments of Faraday, his search for the gravelectric effect, his work on optical glass, his laboratory notebooks, and his creative use of…

  10. Real time Faraday spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Tommy E.; Struve, Kenneth W.; Colella, Nicholas J.

    1991-01-01

    This invention uses a dipole magnet to bend the path of a charged particle beam. As the deflected particles exit the magnet, they are spatially dispersed in the bend-plane of the magnet according to their respective momenta and pass to a plurality of chambers having Faraday probes positioned therein. Both the current and energy distribution of the particles is then determined by the non-intersecting Faraday probes located along the chambers. The Faraday probes are magnetically isolated from each other by thin metal walls of the chambers, effectively providing real time current-versus-energy particle measurements.

  11. Michael Faraday, media man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Patricia

    2006-03-01

    Michael Faraday was an enthusiastic portrait collector, and he welcomed the invention of photography not only as a possible means of recording observations accurately, but also as a method for advertising science and its practitioners. This article (which is part of the Science in the Industrial Revolution series) shows that like many eminent scientists, Faraday took advantage of the burgeoning Victorian media industry by posing in various roles.

  12. The Faraday effect revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Nenciu, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series revisiting the (effect of) Faraday rotation. We formulate and prove the thermodynamic limit for the transverse electric conductivity of Bloch electrons, as well as for the Verdet constant. The main mathematical tool is a regularized magnetic and geometric...

  13. Following Michael Faraday's Footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Last fall I had the good fortune of receiving financial support to shoot a documentary about Michael Faraday. I took the opportunity to learn more about this great experimentalist and to visit the highlights of places in his life. In this paper, I would like to share a list and description of some of the most remarkable places in London suitable…

  14. SMAP Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    Faraday rotation is a change in the polarization as signal propagates through the ionosphere. At L-band it is necessary to correct for this change and measurements are made on the spacecraft of the rotation angle. These figures show that there is good agreement between the SMAP measurements (blue) and predictions based on models (red).

  15. Modified Faraday cup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1996-01-01

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0.degree. to 360.degree. and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-din-tensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment.

  16. Mobile Phone Faraday Cage

    CERN Document Server

    French, M M J

    2011-01-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physics phenomena where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can! The background of the physics behind this is described in some detail followed by a explanation of some demonstrations and experiments which I have used.

  17. Michael Faraday vs. the Spiritualists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfeld, Alan

    2006-12-01

    In the 1850s, renowned physicist Michael Faraday launched a public campaign against pseudoscience and spiritualism, which were rampant in England at the time. Faraday objected especially to claims that electrical or magnetic forces were responsible for paranormal phenomena, such as table-spinning and communication with the dead. Using scientific methods, Faraday unmasked the deceptions of spiritualists, clairvoyants and mediums and also laid bare the credulity of a public ill-educated in science. Despite his efforts, Victorian society's fascination with the paranormal swelled. Faraday's debacle anticipates current controversies about public science education and the interface between science and religion. This episode is one of many described in the new biography, The Electric Life of Michael Faraday (Walker & Co.), which chronicles Faraday's discoveries and his unlikely rise from poverty to the pinnacle of the English science establishment.

  18. Internal Subharmonic Resonance in Faraday Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-Long; CHEN Yi-Huang; WEI Rong-Jue

    2000-01-01

    The classical Faraday experiment is a tractable problem in nonlinear physics, and its rich spectrum of nonlinear phenomena has made it a prototype in studying nonlinear wave dynamics in general. Here we report the ob servation of a new type of subharmonic resonances which occurs at some smaller fractional frequencies, such as ν/3, ν/4, and ν/6, where ν is the forcing frequency. As a result of these resonances, the lower-order surface-wave modes whose eigenfrequencies are close to the fractional frequencies participate into the wave motions. Our theory involving quadratically nonlinear mode couplings shows that an already excited mode itself can act as a parametric source on the lower-order primary modes, thus leading to the cascading subharmonic resonances.

  19. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  20. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Reichert, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid.

  1. 2.9 THz束缚态向连续态跃迁量子级联激光器研制%Study of 2.9 THz quantum cascade laser based on bound-to-continuum transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万文坚; 尹嵘; 谭智勇; 王丰; 韩英军; 曹俊诚

    2013-01-01

    The material of GaAs/AlGaAs bound-to-continuum terahertz quantum-cascade laser (THz QCL) was grown by gas source molec-ular beam epitaxy. A THz QCL device was fabricated with semi-insulating surface-plasmon waveguide. Its spectrum and light intensity-current-voltage characteristics were studied. The device emits about 2.95 THz, and yields a maximum temperature of 67 K in pulse mode. In continuous-wave mode, it displays a threshold current density of 230 A/cm2 at 9 K with maximum emitted power of 1.2 mW and lases up to 30 K.%采用气源分子束外延技术生长了GaAs/AlGaAs束缚态向连续态跃迁的太赫兹量子级联激光器材料,基于半绝缘等离子体波导工艺制作了太赫兹量子级联激光器.测量了激光器的发射光谱和功率-电流-电压关系曲线,研究了器件的激光特性.器件激射频率约2.95 THz,脉冲模式下,最高工作温度为67 K.连续波模式下,阈值电流密度最低为230 A/cm2,最大光输出功率1.2 mW,最高工作温度为30 K.

  2. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks.

  3. Streaming patterns in Faraday waves

    CERN Document Server

    Périnet, Nicolas; Urra, Héctor; Mujica, Nicolás; Gordillo, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Waves patterns in the Faraday instability have been studied for decades. Besides the rich dynamics that can be observed on the waves at the interface, Faraday waves hide beneath them an elusive range of flow patterns --or streaming patterns-- which have not been studied in detail until now. The streaming patterns are responsible for a net circulation in the flow which are reminiscent of convection cells. In this article, we analyse these streaming flows by conducting experiments in a Faraday-wave setup. To visualize the flows, tracers are used to generate both trajectory maps and to probe the streaming velocity field via Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). We identify three types of patterns and experimentally show that identical Faraday waves can mask streaming patterns that are qualitatively very different. Next we propose a three-dimensional model that explains streaming flows in quasi-inviscid fluids. We show that the streaming inside the fluid arises from a complex coupling between the bulk and the boundar...

  4. THE EXPERIMENT WITH FARADAY CYLINDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛英

    2004-01-01

    Suppose there are two electricity testers, A and B(Figure A) . And a metal cylinder C which is almost closed (called Faraday Cylinder)is fixed to tester B, making both tester B and cylinder C charged. As a result, the aluminium foil on tester B opens.

  5. Various Paths to Faraday's Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzic, Dragan V.

    2008-01-01

    In a recent note, the author presented a derivation of Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction for a closed filamentary circuit C(t) which is moving at relativistic velocities and also changing its shape as it moves via the magnetic vector potential. Recently, Kholmetskii et al, while correcting an error in an equation, showed that it can be…

  6. A Mobile Phone Faraday Cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, M. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physical phenomenon where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can. The background of the physics behind this is…

  7. Faraday's Law and Seawater Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, R.

    2010-01-01

    Using Faraday's law, one can illustrate how an electromotive force generator, directly utilizing seawater motion, works. The conceptual device proposed is rather simple in its components and can be built in any high school or college laboratory. The description of the way in which the device generates an electromotive force can be instructive not…

  8. Faraday Cage Protects Against Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafferis, W.; Hasbrouck, R. T.; Johnson, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    Faraday cage protects electronic and electronically actuated equipment from lightning. Follows standard lightning-protection principles. Whether lightning strikes cage or cables running to equipment, current canceled or minimized in equipment and discharged into ground. Applicable to protection of scientific instruments, computers, radio transmitters and receivers, and power-switching equipment.

  9. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Based 3D Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Constellation program has a need to non-destructively test (NDT) non-metallic materials (foams, Shuttle Tile, Avcoat, etc) for defects such as delaminations...

  10. Faraday rotation in CMB maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Granados, Beatriz; Battaner, Eduardo; Florido, Estrella

    2016-10-01

    WMAP CMB polarization maps have been used to detect a low signal of Faraday Rotation (FR). If this detection is not interpreted as simple noise, it could be produced: at the last scattering surface (LSS) (z=1100), being primordial, at Reionization (z=10), in the Milky Way. The second interpretation is favoured here. In this case magnetic fields at Reionization with peak values of the order of 10-8 G should produce this observational FR.

  11. A mobile phone Faraday cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, M. M. J.

    2011-05-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physical phenomenon where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can. The background of the physics behind this is described in some detail, and this is followed by a explanation of some demonstrations and experiments which I have used.

  12. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.; Alvarez, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters on infrared and blue transitions of some alkali atoms is calculated. A composite system is designed to further increase the background noise rejection. The measured results of the solar background rejection and image quality through the filter are presented. The results show that the filter may provide high transmission and high background noise rejection with excellent image quality.

  13. Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system for current density measurement on EAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H Q; Jie, Y X; Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Zou, Z Y; Li, W M; Wang, Z X; Qian, J P; Yang, Y; Zeng, L; Lan, T; Wei, X C; Li, G S; Hu, L Q; Wan, B N

    2014-11-01

    A multichannel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique is under development for current density and electron density profile measurements in the EAST tokamak. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which will provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output, have been developed for use on the POINT system. Initial calibration indicates the electron line-integrated density resolution is less than 5 × 10(16) m(-2) (∼2°), and the Faraday rotation angle rms phase noise is <0.1°.

  14. A Note on Faraday Paradoxes

    CERN Document Server

    Auchmann, Bernhard; Russenschuck, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    The validity of the flux rule to determine the electromotive force in a cycle, epsilon = -d Phi/dt, has been the subject of a large amount of controversy since the beginning of electrical technology. Although most authors reach correct conclusions for a class of problems called Faraday paradoxes, the arguments that are used vary and often rely on ad-hoc physical reasoning. A didactic and insightful treatment should be based solely on Maxwell's equations, the constitutive laws, and a detailed study of the mathematics involved.

  15. Faraday Rotator Glass for Laser Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ya-si; ZHOU Bei-ming; WANG Biao; HU Li-li

    2007-01-01

    Glasses with strong Faraday rotation are interest for laser applications. The principles of diamagnetic and paramagnetic Faraday rotator glasses are described theoretically and experimentally. High performance Tb-paramagnetic glass series were developed and produced at Kigre in the US and SIOM in Shanghai. Large aperture glass disks have been used for high power laser fusion systems.

  16. Determination of Faraday rotation in a ferrofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Nihad A.; Rousan, Akram A.; El-Ghanem, Hassan M.

    1987-03-01

    Transmission of plane polarised light through ferrofluids in the presence of a magnetic field parallel to the direction of propagation depends on both chain formation and Faraday rotation. A procedure is proposed to separate between both factors. Faraday rotation in a dilute Fe 3O 4 ferrofluid measured by this procedure does not show saturation in fields up to 4000 G.

  17. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, James J.

    1993-01-01

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  18. Intrinsic polarization angle ambiguity in Faraday tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Kumazaki, Kohei; Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Takahashi, Keitaro

    2014-01-01

    Faraday tomography is a powerful method to diagnose polarizations and Faraday rotations along the line of sight. Quality of Faraday tomography is, however, limited by several conditions. Recently, it is reported that Faraday tomography indicates false signals in some specific situations. In this paper, we systematically investigate the condition of the appearance of false signals in Faraday tomography. We study the situations that we observe two sources within a beam, and change the intrinsic polarization angles, rotation measures, intensities, and frequency coverage. We find that false signals arise when rotation measure between the sources is less than 1.5 times the full width at half maximum of the rotation measure spread function. False signals also depend on the intensity ratio between the sources and are reduced for large ratio. On the other hand, the appearance of false signals does not depend on frequency coverage, meaning that the uncertainty should be correctly understood and taken into consideratio...

  19. Faraday wave lattice as an elastic metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, L; Tarpin, M; Patinet, S; Eddi, A

    2016-05-01

    Metamaterials enable the emergence of novel physical properties due to the existence of an underlying subwavelength structure. Here, we use the Faraday instability to shape the fluid-air interface with a regular pattern. This pattern undergoes an oscillating secondary instability and exhibits spontaneous vibrations that are analogous to transverse elastic waves. By locally forcing these waves, we fully characterize their dispersion relation and show that a Faraday pattern presents an effective shear elasticity. We propose a physical mechanism combining surface tension with the Faraday structured interface that quantitatively predicts the elastic wave phase speed, revealing that the liquid interface behaves as an elastic metamaterial.

  20. Faraday wave lattice as an elastic metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Domino, L; Patinet, Sylvain; Eddi, A

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials enable the emergence of novel physical properties due to the existence of an underlying sub-wavelength structure. Here, we use the Faraday instability to shape the fluid-air interface with a regular pattern. This pattern undergoes an oscillating secondary instability and exhibits spontaneous vibrations that are analogous to transverse elastic waves. By locally forcing these waves, we fully characterize their dispersion relation and show that a Faraday pattern presents an effective shear elasticity. We propose a physical mechanism combining surface tension with the Faraday structured interface that quantitatively predicts the elastic wave phase speed, revealing that the liquid interface behaves as an elastic metamaterial.

  1. Magnetic field tomography and differential Faraday rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Horellou, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Wide-band radio polarization observations offer the possibility to recover information about the magnetic fields in synchrotron sources, such as details of their three dimensional configuration, that has previously been inaccessible. The key physical process involved is the Faraday rotation of the polarized emission in the source (and elsewhere along its propagation path). In order to proceed reliable methods are required for inverting the signals observed in wavelength space into useful data in Faraday space, with robust estimates of their uncertainty. In this paper we examine how variations of the intrinsic angle of polarized emission chi0 with the Faraday depth phi within a source affect the observable quantities. Using simple models for the Faraday dispersion F(phi) and chi0(phi), along with the current and planned properties of the main radio interferometers, we demonstrate how degeneracies among the parameters describing the magneto-ionic medium can be minimised by combining observations in different wa...

  2. The hyperfine Paschen-Back Faraday effect

    OpenAIRE

    Zentile, Mark A.; Andrews, Rebecca; Weller, Lee; Knappe, Svenja; Adams, Charles S.; Hughes, Ifan G

    2014-01-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the Faraday effect in an atomic medium in the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime, where the Zeeman interaction is larger than the hyperfine splitting. We use a small permanent magnet and a micro-fabricated vapour cell, giving magnetic fields of the order of a Tesla. We show that for low absorption and small rotation angles, the refractive index is well approximated by the Faraday rotation signal, giving a simple way to measure the atomic refractive i...

  3. The gravitational analog of Faraday's induction law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zile, Daniel; Overduin, James

    2015-04-01

    Michael Faraday, the discoverer of electromagnetic induction, was convinced that there must also be a gravitational analog of this law, and he carried out drop-tower experiments in 1849 to look for the electric current induced in a coil by changes in gravitational flux through the coil. This work, now little remembered, was in some ways the first investigation of what we would now call a unified-field theory. We revisit Faraday's experiments in the light of current knowledge and ask what might be learned if they were to be performed today. We then review the gravitational analog for Faraday's law that arises within the vector (or gravito-electromagnetic) approximation to Einstein's theory of general relativity in the weak-field, low-velocity limit. This law relates spinning masses and induced ``mass currents'' rather than spinning charges and electric currents, but is otherwise remarkably similar to its electromagnetic counterpart. The predicted effects are completely unobservable in everyday settings like those envisioned by Faraday, but are thought to be relevant in astrophysical contexts like the accretion disks around collapsed stars, thus bearing out Faraday's remarkable intuition. Undergraduate student.

  4. Faraday caustics: Singularities in the Faraday spectrum and their utility as probes of magnetic field properties

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, M R; Enßlin, T A

    2011-01-01

    We describe singularities in the distribution of polarized intensity as a function of Faraday depth (i.e. the Faraday spectrum) that arise due to line of sight (LOS) magnetic field reversals. We call these features Faraday caustics due to their similarity to optical caustics. They appear sharply spiked in the Faraday spectrum with a tail that extends to one side. The direction in which the tail extends depends on the way in which the LOS magnetic field reversal occurs (either changing from oncoming to retreating or vice versa). We describe how surfaces of Faraday caustics relate to boundaries between regions where the LOS magnetic field has opposite polarity. Examples from simulations of the polarized synchrotron emission from the Milky Way are provided. We derive the probability or luminosity distribution of Faraday caustics produced in a Gaussian magnetic field distribution as a function of their strength, F, and find that for strong Faraday caustics P(F) ~ F^(-3). If fully resolved, this distribution is al...

  5. The hyperfine Paschen-Back Faraday effect

    CERN Document Server

    Zentile, Mark A; Weller, Lee; Knappe, Svenja; Adams, Charles S; Hughes, Ifan G

    2014-01-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the Faraday effect in an atomic medium in the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime, where the Zeeman interaction is larger than the hyperfine splitting. We use a small permanent magnet and a micro-fabricated vapour cell, giving magnetic fields of the order of a Tesla. We show that for low absorption and small rotation angles, the refractive index is well approximated by the Faraday rotation signal, giving a simple way to measure the atomic refractive index. Fitting to the atomic spectra, we achieve magnetic field sensitivity at the $10^{-4}$ level. Finally we note that the Faraday signal shows zero crossings which can be used as temperature insensitive error signals for laser frequency stabilisation at large detuning. The theoretical sensitivity for $^{87}$Rb is found to be $\\sim 40$ kHz/$^\\circ$C.

  6. The hyperfine Paschen-Back Faraday effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentile, Mark A.; Andrews, Rebecca; Weller, Lee; Knappe, Svenja; Adams, Charles S.; Hughes, Ifan G.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the Faraday effect in an atomic medium in the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime, where the Zeeman interaction is larger than the hyperfine splitting. We use a small permanent magnet and a micro-fabricated vapour cell, giving magnetic fields of the order of a tesla. We show that for low absorption and small rotation angles, the refractive index is well approximated by the Faraday rotation signal, giving a simple way to measure the atomic refractive index. Fitting to the atomic spectra, we achieve magnetic field sensitivity at the 10-4 level. Finally we note that the Faraday signal shows zero crossings which can be used as temperature insensitive error signals for laser frequency stabilization at large detuning. The theoretical sensitivity for 87Rb is found to be ˜40 kHz °C-1.

  7. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system--spectrally dependent losses--achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  8. Faraday polarization fluctuations of satellite beacon signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C.; Klobuchar, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The anisotropic effects of random density irregularities in causing Faraday polarization fluctuations of VHF radio signals are examined, taking both rod-like and sheet-like irregularities into consideration. It is found that the variance of Faraday polarization fluctuations depends on the ratio of perpendicular to parallel correlation lengths. The anisotropic effect of rod-like ionospheric irregularities are shown to be most appreciable for longitudinal propagation. The anisotropic effect of sheet-like ionospheric irregularities, however, is not strongly dependent on the radio propagation angle. During transionospheric propagation at large angles with respect to the geomagnetic field, sheet-like irregularities may cause greater Faraday polarization fluctuations than rod-like irregularities.

  9. Faraday waves under time-reversed excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  10. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M; Churkin, Dmitry V; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-08-09

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system-spectrally dependent losses-achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  11. Rapid determination of Faraday rotation in optical glasses by means of secondary Faraday modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronie, M; Elisa, M; Sava, B A; Boroica, L; Valeanu, M; Kuncser, V

    2015-05-01

    A rapid high sensitive method for determining the Faraday rotation of optical glasses is proposed. Starting from an experimental setup based on a Faraday rod coupled to a lock-in amplifier in the detection chain, two methodologies were developed for providing reliable results on samples presenting low and large Faraday rotations. The proposed methodologies were critically discussed and compared, via results obtained in transmission geometry, on a new series of aluminophosphate glasses with or without rare-earth doping ions. An example on how the method can be used for a rapid examination of the optical homogeneity of the sample with respect to magneto-optical effects is also provided.

  12. Ultrafast Faraday Rotation of Slow Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musorin, A. I.; Sharipova, M. I.; Dolgova, T. V.; Inoue, M.; Fedyanin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The active control of optical signals in the time domain is what science and technology demand in fast all-optical information processing. Nanostructured materials can modify the group velocity and slow the light down, as the artificial light dispersion emerges. We observe the ultrafast temporal behavior of the Faraday rotation within a single femtosecond laser pulse under conditions of slow light in a one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystal. The Faraday effect changes by 20% over the time of 150 fs. This might be applicable to the fast control of light in high-capacity photonic devices.

  13. A potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of a potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter operating on the blue and near infrared transitions are calculated. The results show that the filter can be designed to provide high transmission, very narrow pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth. The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) provides a narrow pass bandwidth (about GHz) optical filter for laser communications, remote sensing, and lidar. The general theoretical model for the FADOF has been established in our previous paper. In this paper, we have identified the optimum operational conditions for a potassium FADOF operating on the blue and infrared transitions. The signal transmission, bandwidth, and equivalent noise bandwidth (ENBW) are also calculated.

  14. Faraday Rotation and L Band Oceanographic Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Spaceborne radiometric measurements of the L band brightness temperature over the oceans make it possible to estimate sea surface salinity. However, Faraday rotation in the ionosphere disturbs the signals and must be corrected. Two different ways of assessing the disturbance directly from...

  15. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. For free electrons, the transverse...

  16. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. At zero temperature and zero frequency...

  17. Reflections of a Faraday Challenge Day Leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Keira

    2014-01-01

    Keira Sewell has just finished her second year as a Challenge Leader for the Faraday Challenge, a STEM-based scheme run by the Institution of Engineering and Technology. Aimed at 12-13 year-old students, its purpose is to engage students in future careers in engineering. Each year, a new challenge is held in over sixty schools and universities…

  18. The Minus Sign in Faraday's Law Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Colm; Hurley, Donal

    2013-01-01

    By introducing the mathematical concept of orientation, the significance of the minus sign in Faraday's law may be made clear to students with some knowledge of vector calculus. For many students, however, the traditional approach of treating the law as a relationship between positive scalars and of relying on Lenz's law to provide the information…

  19. Fast Faraday Cup With High Bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deibele, Craig E [Knoxville, TN

    2006-03-14

    A circuit card stripline Fast Faraday cup quantitatively measures the picosecond time structure of a charged particle beam. The stripline configuration maintains signal integrity, and stitching of the stripline increases the bandwidth. A calibration procedure ensures the measurement of the absolute charge and time structure of the charged particle beam.

  20. Learning Cascading

    CERN Document Server

    Covert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for software developers, system architects and analysts, big data project managers, and data scientists who wish to deploy big data solutions using the Cascading framework. You must have a basic understanding of the big data paradigm and should be familiar with Java development techniques.

  1. Multicomponent gas analysis using broadband quantum cascade laser spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes Reyes, A.; Hou, Z.; Van Mastrigt, E.; Horsten, R.C.; De Jongste, J.C.; Pijnenburg, M.W.; Urbach, H.P.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system covering the region between 850 and 1250 cm−1. Its robust multipass cavity ensures a constant interaction length over the entire spectral region. The device enables the detection and identification of numerous molecules present

  2. Faraday rotation assisted by linearly polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jai Min; Kim, Jang Myun; Cho, D.

    2007-11-01

    We demonstrate a type of chiral effect of an atomic medium. Polarization rotation of a probe beam is observed only when both a magnetic field and a linearly polarized coupling beam are present. We compare it with other chiral effects like optical activity, the Faraday effect, and the optically induced Faraday effect from the viewpoint of spatial inversion and time reversal transformations. As a theoretical model we consider a five-level configuration involving the cesium D2 transition. We use spin-polarized cold cesium atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap to measure the polarization rotation versus probe detuning. The result shows reasonable agreement with a calculation from the master equation of the five-level configuration.

  3. Faraday Pilot-Waves: Generation and Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano-Rios, Carlos; Milewski, Paul; Nachbin, André; Bush, John

    2015-11-01

    We examine the dynamics of drops bouncing on a fluid bath subjected to vertical vibration. We solve a system of linear PDEs to compute the surface wave generation and propagation. Waves are triggered at each bounce, giving rise to the Faraday pilot-wave field. The model captures several of the behaviors observed in the laboratory, including transitions between a variety of bouncing and walking states, the Doppler effect, and droplet-droplet interactions. Thanks to the NSF.

  4. Dynamic square superlattice of Faraday waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouadji, Lyes; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon; Tuckerman, Laurette

    2014-11-01

    Faraday waves are computed in a 3D container using BLUE, a code based on a hybrid Front-Tracking/Level-set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. A new dynamic superlattice pattern is described which consists of a set of square waves arranged in a two-by-two array. The corners of this array are connected by a bridge whose position oscillates in time between the two diagonals.

  5. MUSIC for Faraday Rotation Measure Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Andrecut, M

    2013-01-01

    Faraday Rotation Measure (RM) synthesis requires the recovery of the Faraday Dispersion Function (FDF) from measurements restricted to limited wavelength ranges, which is an ill-conditioned deconvolution problem. Here, we propose a novel deconvolution method based on an extension of the MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm. The complexity and speed of the method is determined by the eigen-decomposition of the covariance matrix of the observed polarizations. We show numerically that for high to moderate Signal to Noise (S/N) cases the RM-MUSIC method is able to recover the Faraday depth values of closely spaced pairs of thin RM components, even in situations where the peak response of the FDF is outside of the RM range between the two input RM components. This result is particularly important because the standard deconvolution approach based on RM-CLEAN fails systematically in such situations, due to its greedy mechanism used to extract the RM components. For low S/N situations, both the RM-MUSIC a...

  6. MUSIC for Faraday rotation measure synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrecut, M.

    2013-03-01

    Faraday rotation measure (RM) synthesis requires the recovery of the Faraday dispersion function (FDF) from measurements restricted to limited wavelength ranges, which is an ill-conditioned deconvolution problem. Here, we propose a novel deconvolution method based on an extension of the MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm. The complexity and speed of the method is determined by the eigen-decomposition of the covariance matrix of the observed polarizations. We show numerically that for high to moderate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) cases the RM-MUSIC method is able to recover the Faraday depth values of closely spaced pairs of thin RM components, even in situations where the peak response of the FDF is outside of the RM range between the two input RM components. This result is particularly important because the standard deconvolution approach based on RM-CLEAN fails systematically in such situations, due to its greedy mechanism used to extract the RM components. For low S/N situations, both the RM-MUSIC and RM-CLEAN methods provide similar results.

  7. Accurate Jones Matrix of the Practical Faraday Rotator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王林斗; 祝昇翔; 李玉峰; 邢文烈; 魏景芝

    2003-01-01

    The Jones matrix of practical Faraday rotators is often used in the engineering calculation of non-reciprocal optical field. Nevertheless, only the approximate Jones matrix of practical Faraday rotators has been presented by now. Based on the theory of polarized light, this paper presents the accurate Jones matrix of practical Faraday rotators. In addition, an experiment has been carried out to verify the validity of the accurate Jones matrix. This matrix accurately describes the optical characteristics of practical Faraday rotators, including rotation, loss and depolarization of the polarized light. The accurate Jones matrix can be used to obtain the accurate results for the practical Faraday rotator to transform the polarized light, which paves the way for the accurate analysis and calculation of practical Faraday rotators in relevant engineering applications.

  8. Support for Faraday`s View of Circulation in a Fine-Powder Chladni Heap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.; Squires, A.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061-0211 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Faraday, like Chladni, saw fine powder collect in a circular heap at an antinode of a vibrating plate. In each vibration cycle, the heap experiences a free-flight interval during which pressure gradients in the heap`s interior drive powder centerward, as Faraday proposed. When heap-floor collision terminates flight, pressure gradients reverse direction; but passage of a compaction front has locked particles against further movement. Before a next flight interval, an increase in porosity will reverse the compaction that accompanied heap-floor collision. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Competing Turing and Faraday Instabilities in Longitudinally Modulated Passive Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copie, François; Conforti, Matteo; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Mussot, Arnaud; Trillo, Stefano

    2016-04-08

    We experimentally investigate the interplay of Turing (modulational) and Faraday (parametric) instabilities in a bistable passive nonlinear resonator. The Faraday branch is induced via parametric resonance owing to a periodic modulation of the resonator dispersion. We show that the bistable switching dynamics is dramatically affected by the competition between the two instability mechanisms, which dictates two completely novel scenarios. At low detunings from resonance, switching occurs between the stable stationary lower branch and the Faraday-unstable upper branch, whereas at high detunings we observe the crossover between the Turing and Faraday periodic structures. The results are well explained in terms of the universal Lugiato-Lefever model.

  10. Generalized Faraday law derived from classical forces in a rotating frame

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Taeseung

    2009-01-01

    We show the additional spin dependent classical force due to the rotation of an electron spin's rest frame is essential to derive a spin-Faraday law by using an analogy with the usual Faraday law. The contribution of the additional spin dependent force to the spin-Faraday law is the same as that of the spin geometric phase. With this observations, Faraday law is generalized to include both the usual Faraday and the spin-Faraday laws in a unified manner.

  11. Cascading Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Nishant; Khoury, Justin; Trodden, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We develop a fully covariant, well-posed 5D effective action for the 6D cascading gravity brane-world model, and use this to study cosmological solutions. We obtain this effective action through the 6D decoupling limit, in which an additional scalar degree mode, \\pi, called the brane-bending mode, determines the bulk-brane gravitational interaction. The 5D action obtained this way inherits from the sixth dimension an extra \\pi self-interaction kinetic term. We compute appropriate boundary terms, to supplement the 5D action, and hence derive fully covariant junction conditions and the 5D Einstein field equations. Using these, we derive the cosmological evolution induced on a 3-brane moving in a static bulk. We study the strong- and weak-coupling regimes analytically in this static ansatz, and perform a complete numerical analysis of our solution. Although the cascading model can generate an accelerating solution in which the \\pi field comes to dominate at late times, the presence of a critical singularity prev...

  12. Laser Based 3D Volumetric Display System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Literature, Costa Mesa, CA July 1983. 3. "A Real Time Autostereoscopic Multiplanar 3D Display System", Rodney Don Williams, Felix Garcia, Jr., Texas...8217 .- NUMBERS LASER BASED 3D VOLUMETRIC DISPLAY SYSTEM PR: CD13 0. AUTHOR(S) PE: N/AWIU: DN303151 P. Soltan, J. Trias, W. Robinson, W. Dahlke 7...laser generated 3D volumetric images on a rotating double helix, (where the 3D displays are computer controlled for group viewing with the naked eye

  13. Synchronously pumped picosecond all-fibre Raman laser based on phosphorus-doped silica fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtsev, Sergey; Kukarin, Sergey; Kokhanovskiy, Alexey

    2015-07-13

    Reported for the first time is picosecond-range pulse generation in an all-fibre Raman laser based on P₂O₅-doped silica fibre. Employment of phosphor-silicate fibre made possible single-cascade spectral transformation of pumping pulses at 1084 nm into 270-ps long Raman laser pulses at 1270 nm. The highest observed fraction of the Stokes component radiation at 1270 nm in the total output of the Raman laser amounted to 30%. The identified optimal duration of the input pulses at which the amount of Stokes component radiation in a ~16-m long phosphorus-based Raman fibre converter reaches its maximum was 140-180 ps.

  14. Inverse Faraday Effect driven by Radiation Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Liseykina, T V; Macchi, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of extremely intense ($>10^{23}~\\mbox{W cm}^{-2}$), circularly polarized laser pulses with thick targets, theory and simulations show that a major fraction of the laser energy is converted into incoherent radiation because of collective electron motion during the "hole boring" dynamics. The effective dissipation due to radiative losses allows the absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum, which in turn leads to the generation of an axial magnetic field of tens of gigagauss value. This peculiar "inverse Faraday effect" is demonstrated in three-dimensional simulations including radiation friction.

  15. Observation of Phillips's spectrum in Faraday waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Gustavo; Falcon, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    We consider the problem of wave turbulence generated by singularities from an experimental point of view. We study a system of Faraday waves interacting with waves generated by a wave-maker driven with a random forcing. We measure the temporal fluctuations of the surface wave amplitude at a given location and we show that for a wide range of forcing parameters the surface height displays a power-law spectra that greatly differs from the one predicted by the WT theory. In the capillary region the power spectrum turns out to be proportional to f-5, which we believe is due to singularities moving across the system. Proyecto Postdoctorado Fondecyt Nro 3160032.

  16. The wavelength dependence of Faraday rotation in magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Nihad A.; Rousan, Akram A.; El-Ghanem, Hassan M.

    1988-09-01

    Measurements of Faraday rotation over the wavelength range 450-633 nm in a dilute Fe3O4 particle magnetic fluid are reported. The results, in agreement with the theory, show an enhancement of Faraday rotation near the wavelength λ≊500 nm.

  17. Faraday isolator based on TSAG crystal for high power lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, E A; Palashov, O V

    2014-09-22

    A Faraday isolator based on a new magneto-optical medium, TSAG (terbium scandium aluminum garnet) crystal, has been constructed and investigated experimentally. The device provides an isolation ratio of more than 30 dB at 500 W laser power. It is shown that this medium can be used in Faraday isolators for kilowatt-level laser powers.

  18. Rethinking Faraday's Law for Teaching Motional Electromotive Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuza, Kristina; Guisasola, Jenaro; Michelini, Marisa; Santi, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    This study shows physicists' discussions on the meaning of Faraday's law where situations involving extended conductors or moving contact points are particularly troublesome. We raise questions to test students' difficulties in applying Faraday's law in motional electromotive force phenomena. We suggest the benefit of analysing these phenomena…

  19. Searching for Faraday rotation in cosmic microwave background polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Granados, B.; Battaner, E.; Florido, E.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 9th-year foreground reduced data at 33, 41 and 61 GHz to derive a Faraday rotation at map and at angular power spectrum levels taking into account their observational errors. A processing mask provided by WMAP is used to avoid contamination from the disc of our Galaxy and local spurs. We have found a Faraday rotation component at both, map and power spectrum levels. The lack of correlation of the Faraday rotation with Galactic Faraday rotation, synchrotron and dust polarization from our Galaxy or with cosmic microwave background anisotropies or lensing suggests that it could be originated at reionization (ℓ ≲ 12). Even if the detected Faraday rotation signal is weak, the present study could contribute to establish magnetic fields strengths of B0 ˜ 10-8 G at reionization.

  20. Analytical balance-based Faraday magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riminucci, Alberto; Uhlarz, Marc; De Santis, Roberto; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a Faraday magnetometer based on an analytical balance in which we were able to apply magnetic fields up to 0.14 T. We calibrated it with a 1 mm Ni sphere previously characterized in a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The proposed magnetometer reached a theoretical sensitivity of 3 × 10-8 A m2. We demonstrated its operation on magnetic composite scaffolds made of poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/iron-doped hydroxyapatite. To confirm the validity of the method, we measured the same scaffold properties in a SQUID magnetometer. The agreement between the two measurements was within 5% at 0.127 T and 12% at 24 mT. With the addition, for a small cost, of a permanent magnet and computer controlled linear translators, we were thus able to assemble a Faraday magnetometer based on an analytical balance, which is a virtually ubiquitous instrument. This will make simple but effective magnetometry easily accessible to most laboratories, in particular, to life sciences ones, which are increasingly interested in magnetic materials.

  1. Preinjector for Linac 1, Faraday cage

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The 50 MeV Linac 1 started up in 1958 as injector to the 26 GeV PS, with a 520 kV Cockcroft-Walton generator as its preinjector, housed in a vast Faraday cage, visible here. When the Cockcroft-Walton broke down in 1973, it was replaced by a much smaller SAMES generator, of the kind used for electrostatic separators. From 1980 on, Linac 2 took over as injector for the 800 MeV Booster, and Linac 1 continued as injector for LEAR. In 1984, the electrostatic preinjector (i.e. the Faraday cage with its contents, SAMES generator and all) was replaced by a 520 keV RFQ. At the lower left corner we see the HV connectors to the SAMES generator, at the right edge part of the opened electronics-platform. Jean-Luc Vallet sees to it that all parts are properly grounded. See also 7403073X, 7403074X, 7403081X, 7403083X.

  2. Observation of Phillips' spectrum in Faraday waves

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of the Phillips' spectrum of gravity surface waves driven by a horizontally moving wave maker interacting with Faraday waves. We measure the temporal fluctuations of the surface wave amplitude at a given location and we show that, for a wide range of forcing parameters, they display a power-law spectrum that greatly differs from the one predicted by the WT theory but coincides with Phillips' spectrum for gravity waves. We compute the probability density function of the local surface height increments, which show that they change strongly across time scales. The structure functions of these increments are shown to display power-laws as a function of the time lag, with exponents that are not linear with the order of the structure function, thus showing that the wave field is intermittent. We argue that the origin of this scale-invariant intermittent spectrum is the Faraday wave pattern breakup due to its advection by the propagating gravity waves, which can be related directly to the P...

  3. Faraday rotation measure synthesis of UGC 10288

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamieneski, Patrick; Wang, Q. Daniel; Pare, Dylan; Sullivan, Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Faraday rotation measure synthesis is a powerful tool that has been employed in the past decade when studying line-of-sight magnetic fields of galactic and extragalactic sources. Rotation measures, which are sensitive to the strength and direction of fields in an intervening medium between the source and observer, were classically determined by assuming a single, uniform Faraday-rotating medium. Rotation measure synthesis, on the other hand, is a more robust method that allows for probing a more complicated scenario. We will outline results from a study of magnetic field structure in the disk and halo of edge-on galaxy UGC 10288, using 6 cm and 20 cm observations from CHANG-ES (Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies - an EVLA Survey). The presence of a strongly polarized complex background source situated perpendicular to the foreground disk allows for an investigation of the disk-halo magnetic fields of UGC 10288. In particular, we present evidence of magnetic field reversals above the plane of the disk. This finding is not easily explained solely by the prevailing α-Ω dynamo mechanism. Rather, a field reversal may be indicative of different parities of the poloidal field components for the individual disk and halo mechanisms.

  4. Micro-position sensor using faraday effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElfresh, Michael; Lucas, Matthew; Silveira, Joseph P.; Groves, Scott E.

    2007-02-27

    A micro-position sensor and sensing system using the Faraday Effect. The sensor uses a permanent magnet to provide a magnetic field, and a magneto-optic material positioned in the magnetic field for rotating the plane of polarization of polarized light transmitted through the magneto-optic material. The magnet is independently movable relative to the magneto-optic material so as to rotate the plane of polarization of the polarized light as a function of the relative position of the magnet. In this manner, the position of the magnet relative to the magneto-optic material may be determined from the rotated polarized light. The sensing system also includes a light source, such as a laser or LED, for producing polarized light, and an optical fiber which is connected to the light source and to the magneto-optic material at a sensing end of the optical fiber. Processing electronics, such as a polarimeter, are also provided for determining the Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of the back-reflected polarized light to determine the position of the magnet relative to the sensing end of the optical fiber.

  5. Commercialization plan laser-based decoating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    F2 Associates Inc. (F2) is a small, high-technology firm focused on developing and commercializing environmentally friendly laser ablation systems for industrial-rate removal of surface coatings from metals, concrete, and delicate substrates such as composites. F2 has a contract with the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to develop and test a laser-based technology for removing contaminated paint and other contaminants from concrete and metal surfaces. Task 4.1 in Phase 2 of the Statement of Work for this DOE contract requires that F2 ``document its plans for commercializing and marketing the stationary laser ablation system. This document shall include a discussion of prospects for commercial customers and partners and may require periodic update to reflect changing strategy. This document shall be submitted to the DOE for review.`` This report is being prepared and submitted in fulfillment of that requirement. This report describes the laser-based technology for cleaning and coatings removal, the types of laser-based systems that have been developed by F2 based on this technology, and the various markets that are emerging for this technology. F2`s commercialization and marketing plans are described, including how F2`s organization is structured to meet the needs of technology commercialization, F2`s strategy and marketing approach, and the necessary steps to receive certification for removing paint from aircraft and DOE certification for D and D applications. The future use of the equipment built for the DOE contract is also discussed.

  6. Nanoscale Lasers Based on Carbon Peapods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shao-Long; SHEN Jian-Qi

    2006-01-01

    A scheme of nanoscale lasers based on the so-called carbon peapods is examined in detail.Since there is considerable cylindrical empty space in the middle of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT),it can serve as a laser resonant cavity that consists of two highly reflecting alignment "mirrors" separated by a distance.These mirrors refer to ordered arrays of C60 inside SWCNTs,which have photonic bandgap structures.Meanwhile,ideally single-mode lasers are supposed to be produced in the nanoscale resonant cavity.

  7. Simultaneous Faraday filtering of the Mollow triplet sidebands with the Cs-D1 clock transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portalupi, Simone Luca; Widmann, Matthias; Nawrath, Cornelius; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2016-11-01

    Hybrid quantum systems integrating semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and atomic vapours become important building blocks for scalable quantum networks due to the complementary strengths of individual parts. QDs provide on-demand single-photon emission with near-unity indistinguishability comprising unprecedented brightness--while atomic vapour systems provide ultra-precise frequency standards and promise long coherence times for the storage of qubits. Spectral filtering is one of the key components for the successful link between QD photons and atoms. Here we present a tailored Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter based on the caesium-D1 transition for interfacing it with a resonantly pumped QD. The presented Faraday filter enables a narrow-bandwidth (Δω=2π × 1 GHz) simultaneous filtering of both Mollow triplet sidebands. This result opens the way to use QDs as sources of single as well as cascaded photons in photonic quantum networks aligned to the primary frequency standard of the caesium clock transition.

  8. Simultaneous Faraday filtering of the Mollow triplet sidebands with the Cs-D1 clock transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portalupi, Simone Luca; Widmann, Matthias; Nawrath, Cornelius; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2016-11-25

    Hybrid quantum systems integrating semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and atomic vapours become important building blocks for scalable quantum networks due to the complementary strengths of individual parts. QDs provide on-demand single-photon emission with near-unity indistinguishability comprising unprecedented brightness-while atomic vapour systems provide ultra-precise frequency standards and promise long coherence times for the storage of qubits. Spectral filtering is one of the key components for the successful link between QD photons and atoms. Here we present a tailored Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter based on the caesium-D1 transition for interfacing it with a resonantly pumped QD. The presented Faraday filter enables a narrow-bandwidth (Δω=2π × 1 GHz) simultaneous filtering of both Mollow triplet sidebands. This result opens the way to use QDs as sources of single as well as cascaded photons in photonic quantum networks aligned to the primary frequency standard of the caesium clock transition.

  9. Growth, Faraday and inverse Faraday characteristics of Tb2Ti2O7 crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feiyun; Sun, Yilin; Yang, Xiongsheng; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Bin; Zhuang, Naifeng; Chen, Jianzhong

    2016-03-21

    Tb2Ti2O7 (TTO) single crystal with dimensions of 20 × 20 × 16 mm3 was grown by the Czochralski method. Rietveld structure refinement of X-ray diffraction (XRD) data confirms that the compound crystallizes in the cubic system with pyrochlore structure. Transmission spectra, Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra, Faraday and inverse Faraday characteristics of TTO crystal have been measured and analyzed in detail. The results demonstrate that TTO crystal has high transmittance at 700-1400 nm waveband and a larger Verdat constant than that of TGG reported. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra showed that the 4f→4f transitions of Tb3+ have significant contributions to the magneto-optical activity (MOA). In the time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, the rotation signals of the probe beam based on the inverse Faraday effect in magneto-optical crystal were observed at zero time delay, the full width at half maximum of the rotation and ellipticity signals can be as fast as ~500 fs, which indicates that TTO crystal can be a promising material for ultrafast all-optical magnetic switching.

  10. Miniature modified Faraday cup for micro electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruya, Alan T.; Elmer, John W.; Palmer, Todd A.; Walton, Chris C.

    2008-05-27

    A micro beam Faraday cup assembly includes a refractory metal layer with an odd number of thin, radially positioned traces in this refractory metal layer. Some of the radially positioned traces are located at the edge of the micro modified Faraday cup body and some of the radially positioned traces are located in the central portion of the micro modified Faraday cup body. Each set of traces is connected to a separate data acquisition channel to form multiple independent diagnostic networks. The data obtained from the two diagnostic networks are combined and inputted into a computed tomography algorithm to reconstruct the beam shape, size, and power density distribution.

  11. Faraday Conversion in Turbulent Blazar Jets

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, Nicholas R

    2016-01-01

    Low ($\\lesssim 3\\%$) levels of circular polarization (CP) detected at radio frequencies in the relativistic jets of some blazars can provide insight into the underlying nature of the jet plasma. CP can be produced through linear birefringence, in which initially linearly polarized emission produced in one region of the jet is altered by Faraday rotation as it propagates through other regions of the jet with various magnetic field orientations. Marscher has recently begun a study of jets with such magnetic geometries with the Turbulent Extreme Multi-Zone (TEMZ) model, in which turbulent plasma crossing a standing shock in the jet is represented by a collection of thousands of individual plasma cells, each with distinct magnetic field orientation. Here we develop a radiative transfer scheme that allows the numerical TEMZ code to produce simulated images of the time-dependent linearly and circularly polarized intensity at different radio frequencies. In this initial study, we produce synthetic polarized emission...

  12. TSAG-based cryogenic Faraday isolator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starobor, Aleksey; Yasyhara, Ryo; Snetkov, Ilya; Mironov, Evgeniy; Palashov, Oleg

    2015-09-01

    Thermooptical and magnetooptical properties of novel magnetoactive crystal terbium-scandium aluminum garnet were investigated at temperature range 80-300 K. It is shown that Verdet constant increases inversely proportional to temperature, and thermally induced depolarization, and the optical power of the thermal lens is reduced significantly with cooling from 290 K to 80 K. According to estimates, TSAG crystals in [1 1 1] orientation allow to create a cryogenic Faraday isolator provides a degree of isolation of 30 dB with the laser power exceeds ∼6 kW, it is estimated that the transition to the [0 0 1] orientation allows to provide degree of isolation of 30 dB at a laser power higher than 400 kW.

  13. Testing Ionospheric Faraday Rotation Corrections in CASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Moellenbrock, George

    2015-04-01

    The Earth’s ionosphere introduces direction- and time-dependent effects over a range of physical and temporal scales and so is a major source for unmodeled phase offsets for low frequency radioastronomical observations. Ionospheric effects are often the limiting factor to making sensitive radioastronomical measurements to probe the solar corona or coronal mass ejections at low frequencies (CASA) package. CASA, which was developed to meet the data post-processing needs of next generation telescopes such as the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), did not previously have the capability to mitigate ionospheric effects. This algorithm uses GPS-based global ionosphere maps to mitigate the first and second order ionospheric effects (dispersion delay and Faraday rotation, respectively). We investigated several data centers as potential sources for global ionospheric models and chose the International Global Navigation Satellite System Service data product because data from other sources are generally too sparse to use without additional interpolation schemes. This implementation of ionospheric corrections in CASA has been tested on several sets of VLA observations and all of them showed a significant reduction of the dispersion delay. In order to rigorously test CASA’s ability to mitigate ionospheric Faraday rotation, we made VLA full-polarization observations of the standard VLA phase calibrators J0359+5057 and J0423+4150 in August 2014, using L band (1 - 2 GHz), S band (2 - 4 GHz), and C band (4 - 6 GHz) frequencies in the D array configuration. The observations were 4 hours in duration, beginning near local sunrise. In this paper, we give a general description of how these corrections are implemented as well as discussion of the code’s ability to mitigate the ionospheric effects present in these test observations over a range of times and elevation angles. This work was supported at the University of Iowa by grant ATM09-56901.

  14. Non-reciprocity of Faraday rotation in gyrotropic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Vlokh R.; Adamenko D.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that, under the conditions of coexisting natural optical activity and non-zero linear optical birefringence, reversal of the light wave vector sign can result in changing angle of Faraday rotation.

  15. One-Piece Faraday Generator: A Paradoxical Experiment from 1851

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, M. J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment based on Faraday's one-piece generator, where the rotating disk is replaced by a cylindrical permanent magnet. Explains the apparent paradox that an observer in an inertial frame could measure his absolute velocity. (GA)

  16. Faraday effect in hybrid magneto-plasmonic photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, B; García-Martín, A; Cuevas, J C

    2015-08-24

    We present a theoretical study of the Faraday effect in hybrid magneto-plasmonic crystals that consist of Au-Co-Au perforated membranes with a periodic array of sub-wavelength holes. We show that in these hybrid systems the interplay between the extraordinary optical transmission and the magneto-optical activity leads to a resonant enhancement of the Faraday rotation, as compared to purely ferromagnetic membranes. In particular, we determine the geometrical parameters for which this enhancement is optimized and show that the inclusion of a noble metal like Au dramatically increases the Faraday rotation over a broad bandwidth. Moreover, we show that the analysis of the Faraday rotation in these periodically perforated membranes provides a further insight into the origin of the extraordinary optical transmission.

  17. Faraday rotation measures in 20 AGN jets at parsec scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravchenko Evgeniya V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present multi wavelength parsec-scale Faraday rotation measure properties of twenty active galactic nuclei, observed with the Very Long Baseline Array simultaneously at 1.4, 1.6, 2.2, 2.4, 4.6, 5.0, 8.1, 8.4 and 15.4 GHz in the full polarization mode. For the observed sources we construct Faraday rotation measure and Faraday-corrected linear polarization maps. Direction of electrical field in the optically thick core regions confirms bimodal distribution. No significant changes of a Faraday rotation measure transverse to the jet direction are found in any of the observed sources. We propose a new magnetic field spatial geometry reconstruction method based on core shift measurements. This technique is applied to the quasar 1004+141. Results indicate an existence of a large scale poloidal magnetic field in the jet of 1004+141.

  18. The Faraday effect of natural and artificial ferritins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralewski, M; Kłos, J W; Baranowski, M; Mitróová, Z; Kopčanský, P; Melníková, L; Okuda, M; Schwarzacher, W

    2012-09-07

    Measurements of the Faraday rotation at room temperature over the light wavelength range of 300-680 nm for horse spleen ferritin (HSF), magnetoferritin with different loading factors (LFs) and nanoscale magnetite and Fe(2)O(3) suspensions are reported. The Faraday rotation and the magnetization of the materials studied present similar magnetic field dependences and are characteristic of a superparamagnetic system. The dependence of the Faraday rotation on the magnetic field is described, excluding HSF and Fe(2)O(3), by a Langevin function with a log-normal distribution of the particle size allowing the core diameters of the substances studied to be calculated. It was found that the specific Verdet constant depends linearly on the LF. Differences in the Faraday rotation spectra and their magnetic field dependences allow discrimination between magnetoferritin with maghemite and magnetite cores which can be very useful in biomedicine.

  19. Faraday rotation due to excitation of magnetoplasmons in graphene microribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymchenko, Mykhailo; Nikitin, Alexey Yu; Martín-Moreno, Luis

    2013-11-26

    A single graphene sheet, when subjected to a perpendicular static magnetic field, provides a Faraday rotation that, per atomic layer, greatly surpasses that of any other known material. In continuous graphene, Faraday rotation originates from the cyclotron resonance of massless carriers, which allows dynamical tuning through either external electrostatic or magneto-static setting. Furthermore, the rotation direction can be controlled by changing the sign of the carriers in graphene, which can be done by means of an external electric field. However, despite these tuning possibilities, the requirement of large magnetic fields hinders the application of the Faraday effect in real devices, especially for frequencies higher than a few terahertz. In this work we demonstrate that large Faraday rotation can be achieved in arrays of graphene microribbons, through the excitation of the magnetoplasmons of individual ribbons, at larger frequencies than those dictated by the cyclotron resonance. In this way, for a given magnetic field and chemical potential, structuring graphene periodically can produce large Faraday rotation at larger frequencies than what would occur in a continuous graphene sheet. Alternatively, at a given frequency, graphene ribbons produce large Faraday rotation at much smaller magnetic fields than in continuous graphene.

  20. Novel Implementations of Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy - from In-Situ Radical Detection to Studies of Environmental Nitrogen Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Eric; Westberg, Jonas; Wysocki, Gerard

    2016-06-01

    Radical species play an important role in various chemical processes spanning atmospheric chemistry (e.g. ozone formation), bio-medical science, and combustion. These highly reactive chemicals usually occur at very low concentration levels, and are difficult to quantify in experiments1. Generally, laser-based techniques rely on careful selection of the target transition to minimize spectral interference and achieve high selectivity. In case of complex gas mixtures (such as air) a possibility of spectral interference always exists. Since Faraday rotation spectroscopy (FRS) is sensitive only to paramagnetic species (radicals), it can simultaneously provide ultra-high sensitivity and selectivity. In this talk an overview of novel designs of FRS instrumentation as well as applications of FRS sensing will be provided. Examples will be given for FRS systems that routinely operate at the fundamental limits of optical detection, cavity-enhanced FRS detection schemes for sensitivity enhancement towards sub-pptv detection limits2, and high-accuracy FRS spectrometers designed specifically for ratiometry of nitrogen isotopes (14N, 15N)3. Prospects for the FRS technology to monitor important atmospheric molecules such as HOx radicals (atmospheric "cleansing" agents) will be discussed. References: 1. Wennberg et al., "Aircraft-borne, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals," Rev. Sci. Instrum. 65, 1858-1876 (1994). 2. Westberg et al., "Optical feedback cavity-enhanced Faraday rotation spectroscopy for oxygen detection," in CES2015(Boulder, CO, 2015). 3. Zhang, "Nitric Oxide Isotopic Analyzer Based on a Compact Dual-Modulation Faraday Rotation Spectrometer," Sensors 15, 25992 (2015).

  1. Internal magnetic field measurements by laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. Q.; Jie, Y. X.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Zou, Z. Y.; Qian, J. P.; Li, W. M.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Zhang, S. B.; Lan, T.; Wang, S. X.; Hanada, K.; Wei, X. C.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-channel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique has been implemented for fully diagnosing the internal magnetic field in the EAST tokamak. Double-pass, horizontal, radially-viewing chords access the plasma via an equatorial port. The laser source consists of three CW formic acid (HCOOH) FIR lasers at nominal wavelength 432.5 μm which are optically pumped by independent infrared CO2 lasers. Output power is more than 30 mW of per cavity. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors, can with withstand baking temperature up to 350°C and discharge duration more than 1000 s, are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output for plasma control, have been developed for the POINT system. Reliability of both polarimetric and interferometric measurement are obtained in 22 s long pulse H mode discharge and 8 s NBI H mode discharge, indicating the POINT system works for any heating scheme on EAST so far. The electron line-integrated density resolution of POINT is less than 1 × 1016 m-2 (implemented in the plasma control system in the future.

  2. Linear diffusion into a Faraday cage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lin, Yau Tang; Merewether, Kimball O.; Chen, Kenneth C.

    2011-11-01

    Linear lightning diffusion into a Faraday cage is studied. An early-time integral valid for large ratios of enclosure size to enclosure thickness and small relative permeability ({mu}/{mu}{sub 0} {le} 10) is used for this study. Existing solutions for nearby lightning impulse responses of electrically thick-wall enclosures are refined and extended to calculate the nearby lightning magnetic field (H) and time-derivative magnetic field (HDOT) inside enclosures of varying thickness caused by a decaying exponential excitation. For a direct strike scenario, the early-time integral for a worst-case line source outside the enclosure caused by an impulse is simplified and numerically integrated to give the interior H and HDOT at the location closest to the source as well as a function of distance from the source. H and HDOT enclosure response functions for decaying exponentials are considered for an enclosure wall of any thickness. Simple formulas are derived to provide a description of enclosure interior H and HDOT as well. Direct strike voltage and current bounds for a single-turn optimally-coupled loop for all three waveforms are also given.

  3. Fluctuation dynamos and their Faraday rotation signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pallavi

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in many astrophysical systems like galaxies, galaxy clusters and possibly even the IGM filaments. We study fluctuation dynamo action in turbulent systems focusing on one observational signature; the Faraday rotation measure (RM) from background radio sources seen through the magnetic field generated by such a dynamo. We simulate the fluctuation dynamo (FD) in periodic boxes up to resolutions of 512^3, with varying fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, and measure the resulting random RMs. We show that the resulting rms value of RM is quite significant, given that the FD produces intermittent fields. When the dynamo saturates, it is of order 40%-50% of the value expected in a model where fields of strength B_rms uniformly fill cells of the largest turbulent eddy but are randomly oriented from one cell to another. This level of RM dispersion obtains across different values of magnetic Reynolds number and Prandtl number explored. We also use the random RMs to probe the structure of the ge...

  4. Applications of cw quantum cascade laser near 8 μm in gas sensing research

    KAUST Repository

    Sajid, Muhammad Bilal

    2014-01-01

    Quantum cascade laser based sensors operating near 8 μm to detect H2O2, C2H2, CH4, N2O and H2O are discussed and demonstrated for applications in chemical kinetics, combustion and spectroscopic measurements.

  5. Exhaled nitric oxide monitoring by quantum cascade laser: comparison with chemiluminescent and electrochemical sensors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandon, J.; Hogman, M.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.; Amsterdam, J. van; Harren, F.J.M.; Cristescu, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (F(E)NO) is considered an indicator in the diagnostics and management of asthma. In this study we present a laser-based sensor for measuring F(E)NO. It consists of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) combined with a multi-pass cell and wavelength modulation spectroscopy for

  6. A Quantum Cascade Laser-Based CO Sensor for Fire Warning Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maxion Technologies and Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) propose to jointly develop a compact, rugged, highly reliable, and autonomous sensor for in-situ monitoring of...

  7. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Sensors for Hypersonic Flows (7275-020) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) proposes to design, build, test, and deliver to NASA a THz wavelength absorption sensor for continuous monitoring of atomic oxygen...

  8. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Sensors for Hypersonic Flows (7274-050) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ground test facilities are used by NASA to simulate the conditions present during flight at hypersonic velocities, to test thermal protection materials for existing...

  9. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Local Oscillator for Terahertz Astronomy (7275-070) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Scientists at JPL measure radiation emitted in the far-infrared (or terahertz) region of the spectrum to study the history of the universe and the Earth's...

  10. A Quantum Cascade Laser-Based CO Sensor for Fire Warning Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maxion Technologies, Inc. (Maxion) proposes to develop and field test a Carbon Monoxide (CO)-sensor prototype for post fire cleanup and CO detection. The sensor will...

  11. Mapping Atmospheric Ammonia Emissions Using a Mobile Quantum Cascade Laser-based Open-path Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Miller, D. J.; Khan, M. A.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is a key precursor to atmospheric fine particulate matter, with strong implications for regional air quality and global climate change. Despite the importance of atmospheric ammonia, its spatial/temporal variation is poorly characterized, and the knowledge of its sources, sinks, and transport is severely limited. Existing measurements suggest that traffic exhaust may provide significant amounts of ammonia in urban areas, which cause greater impacts on particulate matter formation and urban air quality. To capture the spatial and temporal variation of ammonia emissions, a portable, low power sensor with high time resolution is necessary. We have developed a portable open-path ammonia sensor with a detection limit of 0.5 ppbv ammonia for 1 s measurements. The sensor has a power consumption of about 60 W and is capable of running on a car battery continuously for 24 hours. An additional laser has been coupled to the sensor to yield concurrent N2O and CO measurements as tracers for determining various sources. The overall sensor prototype fits on a 60 cm × 20 cm aluminum breadboard. Roadside measurements indicated NH3/CO emission ratios of 4.1±5.4 ppbv/ppmv from a fleet of 320 vehicles, which agree with existing on-ramp measurements. Urban measurements in the Baltimore and Washington, DC metropolitan areas have shown significant ammonia mixing ratios concurrent with carbon monoxide levels from the morning and evening rush hours. On-road measurements of our open-path sensor have also been performed continuously from the Midwest to Princeton, NJ including urban areas such as Pittsburgh, tunnels, and relatively clean conditions. The emission ratios of ammonia against CO and/or CO2 help identify the sources and amounts of both urban and agricultural ammonia emissions. Preliminary data from both spatial mapping, monitoring, and vehicle exhaust measurements suggest that urban ammonia emissions from fossil fuel combustion are significant and may provide an unrecognized source in the atmospheric ammonia budget. Ongoing efforts include spatial mapping of ammonia and other tracers in the New York City and Philadelphia metropolitan areas. Further comparison with TES satellite ammonia retrieval will help to put the measurements into a larger geographical and temporal context.

  12. VCSEL based Faraday rotation spectroscopy at 762nm for battery powered trace molecular oxygen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Stephen; Wysocki, Gerard

    2010-02-01

    Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy (FRS) is a polarization based spectroscopic technique which can provide higher sensitivity concentration measurements of paramagnetic gases and free radicals than direct absorption spectroscopic techniques. We have developed sensor systems which require only 0.2W to perform TDLAS (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy), and can additionally be quickly duty cycled, enabling operation in wireless sensor networks of laser-based trace gas sensors We adapted our integrated TDLAS electronics to perform FRS in a compact and more sensitive system for quantification of molecular oxygen (O2) using a 762.3nm VCSEL in the A band. Using an AC magnetic field, we demonstrate detector noise dominated performance, achieving 2.1×10-6/Hz1/2 equivalent detectable fractional absorption and a minimum detection limit of 462 ppmv O2 in 1 second in a 15cm path. At longer paths and integration times, such a sensor will enable oxygen measurements at biotic respiration levels (CO2 - O2 exchange for mapping natural exchange of greenhouse gases. Potential improvement of detection limits by increasing various system performance parameters is described.

  13. Anomalous Faraday rotation in the ISM/ICM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2016-10-01

    Faraday effect is a common and useful way to deduce cosmic magnetic fields in the interstellar and intracluster media (ISM and ICM). Faraday rotation is the result of magnetically-induced birefringence in a dielectric medium causing a linearly polarized wave to suffer a rotation of its polarization axis as it traverses such a medium. However, the standard λ2-law of the rotation angle may not hold in strongly turbulent plasmas. Electromagnetic high-frequency and/or small-scale fluctuations may lead to effective collisionality with the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient being an effective ``quasi-collision'' frequency. Recently, we showed that quasi-collisionality may radically alter radiative transport properties of plasmas, such as absorption, transmission and reflection and other effects, which can be very important in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Here we briefly discuss the quasi-collisional generalization of the classical Faraday effect, which is drastically modified and can even become negative. Furthermore, we explore the origin of the long-known anomaly of Faraday rotation in a famous Cygnus regions. We argue that the anomaly can be due to the anomalous Faraday rotation in a thin ``blanket'' of turbulent plasma at the front of an interstellar bubble/shock. Supported by KU CLAS and DOE Grant ID0000225143 (07/01/16).

  14. Faraday instability in a near-critical fluid under weightlessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandikota, G; Chatain, D; Amiroudine, S; Lyubimova, T; Beysens, D

    2014-01-01

    Experiments on near-critical hydrogen have been conducted under magnetic compensation of gravity to investigate the Faraday instability that arises at the liquid-vapor interface under zero-gravity conditions. We investigated such instability in the absence of stabilizing gravity. Under such conditions, vibration orients the interface and can destabilize it. The experiments confirm the existence of Faraday waves and demonstrate a transition from a square to a line pattern close to the critical point. They also show a transition very close to the critical point from Faraday to periodic layering of the vapor-liquid interface perpendicular to vibration. It was seen that the Faraday wave instability is favored when the liquid-vapor density difference is large enough (fluid far from the critical point), whereas periodic layering predominates for small difference in the liquid and vapor densities (close to the critical point). It was observed for the Faraday wave instability that the wavelength of the instability decreases as one approaches the critical point. The experimental results demonstrate good agreement to the dispersion relation for zero gravity except for temperatures very close to the critical point where a transition from a square pattern to a line pattern is detected, similarly to what is observed under 1g conditions.

  15. Faraday Induction and the Current Carriers in a Circuit

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Timothy H

    2014-01-01

    In this article, it is pointed out that Faraday induction can be treated from an untraditional, particle-based point of view. The electromagnetic fields of Faraday induction can be calculated explicitly from approximate point-charge fields derived from the Li\\'enard-Wiechert expressions or from the Darwin Lagrangian. Thus the electric fields of electrostatics, the magnetic fields of magnetostatics, and the electric fields of Faraday induction can all be regarded as arising from charged particles. Some aspects of electromagnetic induction are explored for a hypothetical circuit consisting of point charges which move frictionlessly in a circular orbit. For a small number of particles in the circuit (or for non-interacting particles), the induced electromagnetic fields depend upon the mass and charge of the current carriers while energy is transferred to the kinetic energy of the particles. However, for an interacting multiparticle circuit, the mutual electromagnetic interactions between the particles dominate t...

  16. Faraday tomography with LOFAR: new probe of the interstellar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M. I. R.; Jelić, V.; Ferrière, K.; Boulanger, F.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fields are a key constituent of the interstellar medium of our Galaxy. However, their exact role in the Galactic ecosystem is still poorly understood since we do not yet have a complete view of its structure in the Galaxy. This is about to change with the Faraday tomography technique, which allows us to derive the magnetic field in separate regions along the line of sight. We first describe the principle of Faraday tomography and illustrate the power of this novel technique with some of the latest results from the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR). We present preliminary results of our LOFAR project, aimed at investigating the origin of the filamentary-like structures revealed by Faraday tomography observations.

  17. Fabry-Perot enhanced Faraday rotation in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubrig, Nicolas; Crassee, Iris; Levallois, Julien; Nedoliuk, Ievgeniia O; Fromm, Felix; Kaiser, Michl; Seyller, Thomas; Kuzmenko, Alexey B

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate that giant Faraday rotation in graphene in the terahertz range due to the cyclotron resonance is further increased by constructive Fabry-Perot interference in the supporting substrate. Simultaneously, an enhanced total transmission is achieved, making this effect doubly advantageous for graphene-based magneto-optical applications. As an example, we present far-infrared spectra of epitaxial multilayer graphene grown on the C-face of 6H-SiC, where the interference fringes are spectrally resolved and a Faraday rotation up to 0.15 radians (9°) is attained. Further, we discuss and compare other ways to increase the Faraday rotation using the principle of an optical cavity.

  18. Evaluation of ion collection area in Faraday probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel L; Gallimore, Alec D

    2010-06-01

    A Faraday probe with three concentric rings was designed and fabricated to assess the effect of gap width and collector diameter in a systematic study of the diagnostic ion collection area. The nested Faraday probe consisted of two concentric collector rings and an outer guard ring, which enabled simultaneous current density measurements on the inner and outer collectors. Two versions of the outer collector were fabricated to create gaps of 0.5 and 1.5 mm between the rings. Distribution of current density in the plume of a low-power Hall thruster ion source was measured in azimuthal sweeps at constant radius from 8 to 20 thruster diameters downstream of the exit plane with variation in facility background pressure. A new analytical technique is proposed to account for ions collected in the gap between the Faraday probe collector and guard ring. This method is shown to exhibit excellent agreement between all nested Faraday probe configurations, and to reduce the magnitude of integrated ion beam current to levels consistent with Hall thruster performance analyses. The technique is further studied by varying the guard ring bias potential with a fixed collector bias potential, thereby controlling ion collection in the gap. Results are in agreement with predictions based on the proposed analytical technique. The method is applied to a past study comparing the measured ion current density profiles of two Faraday probe designs. These findings provide new insight into the nature of ion collection in Faraday probe diagnostics, and lead to improved accuracy with a significant reduction in measurement uncertainty.

  19. Faraday ghosts depolarization canals in the Galactic radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Shukurov, A M; Shukurov, Anvar; Berkhuijsen, Elly M.

    2003-01-01

    Narrow, elongated regions of very low polarized intensity -- so-called canals -- have recently been observed by several authors at decimeter wavelengths in various directions in the Milky Way, but their origin remains enigmatic. We show that the canals arise from depolarization by differential Faraday rotation in the interstellar medium and that they represent level lines of Faraday rotation measure RM, a random function of position in the sky. Statistical properties of the separation of canals depend on the autocorrelation function of RM, and so provide a useful tool for studies of interstellar turbulence.

  20. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Quantum Cascade Lasers for Trace Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Scamarcio

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Various applications, such as pollution monitoring, toxic-gas detection, noninvasive medical diagnostics and industrial process control, require sensitive and selectivedetection of gas traces with concentrations in the parts in 109 (ppb and sub-ppb range.The recent development of quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs has given a new aspect toinfrared laser-based trace gas sensors. In particular, single mode distributed feedback QCLsare attractive spectroscopic sources because of their excellent properties in terms of narrowlinewidth, average power and room temperature operation. In combination with these lasersources, photoacoustic spectroscopy offers the advantage of high sensitivity and selectivity,compact sensor platform, fast time-response and user friendly operation. This paper reportsrecent developments on quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for tracegas detection. In particular, different applications of a photoacoustic trace gas sensoremploying a longitudinal resonant cell with a detection limit on the order of hundred ppb ofozone and ammonia are discussed. We also report two QC laser-based photoacousticsensors for the detection of nitric oxide, for environmental pollution monitoring andmedical diagnostics, and hexamethyldisilazane, for applications in semiconductormanufacturing process.

  1. Laser based combustion laboratory at NTH/SINTEF applied thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, F.; Bjoerge, T.

    1993-12-01

    During the SPUNG-program, a laser based laboratory has been built up at NTH/SINTEF Applied Thermodynamics by the funding from that program. The laser based laboratory consists of a Nd:YAG laser and an image intensifier electronic camera system. There are numerous different laser based techniques that can be used, using the laser based laboratory, but we have concentrated on laser induced fluorescence (LIF). By shaping the laser beam into a flat plane, 2D imaging of combustion radicals (OH, CH) and emission species (NO) are possible. This can give valuable information about flame structure, flame stabilization, turbulence scales and so on, but at the time being not quantitative concentrations.

  2. Faraday, Dickens and Science Education in Victorian Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Wayne; Allingham, Philip V.

    2011-01-01

    The achievements of Michael Faraday in the fields of electricity and electrochemistry have led some to describe him as the greatest experimental scientist in history. Charles Dickens was the creative genius behind some of the most memorable characters in literature. In this article, we share an historical account of how the collaboration of these…

  3. Theoretical model for a Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter is presented. The model predicts a bandwidth of 0.6 GHz and a transmission peak of 0.98 for a filter operating on the Cs (D2) line. The model includes hyperfine effects and is valid for arbitrary magnetic fields.

  4. Assessment of the Usability of the Workbench Faraday Cage Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten; Franek, Ondrej; Christensen, Søren K.

    2011-01-01

    The workbench Faraday Cage method (WBFC) is a time efficient module pre-compliance test regarding radiated emission. This work investigates the method’s usability and credibility and concludes that for this particular case the WBFC perform a tolerable compliance test for frequencies below 360 MHz...

  5. The correspondence of Michael Faraday, v.2 1832-1840

    CERN Document Server

    James, F

    1993-01-01

    Volume 2 covers the 1830s, a period when Faraday pursued the consequences of his discovery of electromagnetic induction and revised entirely the theories of electrochemistry and the nature of electricity.His correspondents include scientists of the day as well as antiquaries, military men, artists and politicians.

  6. The correspondence of Michael Faraday, v.4 1849-1855

    CERN Document Server

    James, F

    2008-01-01

    This volume includes 70% of previously unpublished letters of Michael Farday spanning half of the 1850s and most of 1860. Topics include Faraday's work on regelation, the transmission of light through gold and his appointment by Emperor Napoleon III to be a Commander of the Legion of Honour.

  7. Correspondence of Michael Faraday, v.5 1855-1860

    CERN Document Server

    Faraday, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This volume includes 70% of previously unpublished letters of Michael Farday spanning half of the 1850s and most of 1860. Topics include Faraday's work on regelation, the transmission of light through gold and his appointment by Emperor Napoleon III to be a Commander of the Legion of Honour.

  8. Faraday effect revisited: sum rules and convergence issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Nenciu, Gheorghe

    2010-01-01

    This is the third paper of a series revisiting the Faraday effect. The question of the absolute convergence of the sums over the band indices entering the Verdet constant is considered. In general, sum rules and traces per unit volume play an important role in solid-state physics, and they give...

  9. Faraday's Investigation of Electromagnetic Induction. Experiment No. 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devons, Samuel

    This paper focuses on Michael Faraday's experimental research in electricity in the 1830's. Historical notes related to his work are included as well as experiments, his objectives, and illustrations of equipment for the experiments. Examples from his diary are given so that students can attempt to emulate his honest and systematic manner of…

  10. Concluding remarks: Faraday Discussion on chemistry in the urban atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Jose L

    2016-07-18

    This article summarises the Concluding remarks from the Faraday Discussion on Chemistry in the Urban Atmosphere. The following themes are addressed: (a) new results that inform our understanding of the evolving sources and composition of the urban atmosphere ("News"); (b) results that identify gaps in our understanding that necessitate further work ("Gaps");

  11. Cascade quantum teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Nan-run; GONG Li-hua; LIU Ye

    2006-01-01

    In this letter a cascade quantum teleportation scheme is proposed. The proposed scheme needs less local quantum operations than those of quantum multi-teleportation. A quantum teleportation scheme based on entanglement swapping is presented and compared with the cascade quantum teleportation scheme. Those two schemes can effectively teleport quantum information and extend the distance of quantum communication.

  12. Performance of laser based optical imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhrupesh S.; Banerjee, Arup; Vora, Anup; Biswas, Amiya; Patel, Naimesh; Kurulkar, Amit; Dutt, Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    rate (more than 100fps). Taking advantage of these, laser based camera system configuration was worked out and presented in this paper using scientific grade CMOS sensor and NIR Laser. Camera can image target range from 4km to 5km with resolution of 5cm. Camera can have instantaneous coverage of 100mx100m (at 5km). Scientific grade CMOS sensor could also be used for clear sky day time imaging conditions with Laser off condition. To reduce the laser energy requirement, FPA required to be operated in multi-integration mode where multiple low energy pulses could be thrown within given integration time and detector and its associated electronics will collect and accumulate only those photons which are reflected back from the target of interest using appropriate gating control mechanism. Paper will bring out system engineering aspects for finalization of imaging spectrum, optical parameters in terms of aperture & focal length, required laser energy, highlighting advantage of pulse mode operation of laser compared to continuous mode operation in terms of laser energy & back-scattered light, silicon based optical detector performance results and post processing aspects for target detection. Paper will also discuss achieved performance of proto-model camera.

  13. Diagnosing collisions of magnetized, high energy density plasma flows using a combination of collective Thomson scattering, Faraday rotation, and interferometry (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, G F; Lebedev, S V; Hall, G N; Patankar, S; Stewart, N H; Smith, R A; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Burdiak, G C; de Grouchy, P; Skidmore, J; Suttle, L; Suzuki-Vidal, F; Bland, S N; Kwek, K H; Pickworth, L; Bennett, M; Hare, J D; Rozmus, W; Yuan, J

    2014-11-01

    A suite of laser based diagnostics is used to study interactions of magnetised, supersonic, radiatively cooled plasma flows produced using the Magpie pulse power generator (1.4 MA, 240 ns rise time). Collective optical Thomson scattering measures the time-resolved local flow velocity and temperature across 7-14 spatial positions. The scattering spectrum is recorded from multiple directions, allowing more accurate reconstruction of the flow velocity vectors. The areal electron density is measured using 2D interferometry; optimisation and analysis are discussed. The Faraday rotation diagnostic, operating at 1053 nm, measures the magnetic field distribution in the plasma. Measurements obtained simultaneously by these diagnostics are used to constrain analysis, increasing the accuracy of interpretation.

  14. Diagnosing collisions of magnetized, high energy density plasma flows using a combination of collective Thomson scattering, Faraday rotation, and interferometry (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swadling, G. F., E-mail: swadling@imperial.ac.uk; Lebedev, S. V.; Hall, G. N.; Patankar, S.; Stewart, N. H.; Smith, R. A.; Burdiak, G. C.; Grouchy, P. de; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Bland, S. N.; Kwek, K. H.; Pickworth, L.; Bennett, M.; Hare, J. D. [Plasma Physics Group, Imperial College, London SW6 7LZ (United Kingdom); Harvey-Thompson, A. J. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1193 (United States); Rozmus, W. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Yuan, J. [Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAE, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-11-15

    A suite of laser based diagnostics is used to study interactions of magnetised, supersonic, radiatively cooled plasma flows produced using the Magpie pulse power generator (1.4 MA, 240 ns rise time). Collective optical Thomson scattering measures the time-resolved local flow velocity and temperature across 7–14 spatial positions. The scattering spectrum is recorded from multiple directions, allowing more accurate reconstruction of the flow velocity vectors. The areal electron density is measured using 2D interferometry; optimisation and analysis are discussed. The Faraday rotation diagnostic, operating at 1053 nm, measures the magnetic field distribution in the plasma. Measurements obtained simultaneously by these diagnostics are used to constrain analysis, increasing the accuracy of interpretation.

  15. Quantum noise for Faraday light–matter interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasliyev, D.V.; Hammerer, K.; Korolev, N.

    2012-01-01

    In light–matter interfaces based on the Faraday effect, quite a number of quantum information protocols have been successfully demonstrated. In order to further increase the performance and fidelities achieved in these protocols, a deeper understanding of the relevant noise and decoherence proces...... be applied to light–matter interfaces and quantum memories based on different mechanisms.......In light–matter interfaces based on the Faraday effect, quite a number of quantum information protocols have been successfully demonstrated. In order to further increase the performance and fidelities achieved in these protocols, a deeper understanding of the relevant noise and decoherence...... in effective equations of motion for collective atomic spins and the forward-propagating light modes to the full atomic level structure. We illustrate and apply our results to the case of a quantum memory protocol. Our results can be applied to any alkali atoms, and the general approach taken in this paper can...

  16. Faraday Rotation for Electron Beams Composed of Vortex Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Greenshields, Colin; Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Propagating vortex states, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), are well known in optics and have recently been demonstrated for electrons. While many analogies exist between photonic and electron vortex states, electron vortices in addition possess an orbital magnetic moment. We show here that propagation of electrons in a superposition of OAM states through a longitudinal magnetic field produces an analogue to optical Faraday rotation. In the optical domain, Faraday rotation is observed for polarisation, but not for superpositions of OAM states. The rotation we predict arises from the additional phase accumulated by the electron as it propagates in the presence of an external magnetic field. We propose an experiment in which this rotation can be measured directly in a transmission electron microscope, and discuss its relation to the well known classical image rotation associated with the Lorentz force.

  17. A Faraday effect position sensor for interventional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, M; Umathum, R; Sikora, J; Brenner, S; Aguor, E N; Semmler, W

    2006-02-21

    An optical sensor is presented which determines the position and one degree of orientation within a magnetic resonance tomograph. The sensor utilizes the Faraday effect to measure the local magnetic field, which is modulated by switching additional linear magnetic fields, the gradients. Existing methods for instrument localization during an interventional MR procedure often use electrically conducting structures at the instruments that can heat up excessively during MRI and are thus a significant danger for the patient. The proposed optical Faraday effect position sensor consists of non-magnetic and electrically non-conducting components only so that heating is avoided and the sensor could be applied safely even within the human body. With a non-magnetic prototype set-up, experiments were performed to demonstrate the possibility of measuring both the localization and the orientation in a magnetic resonance tomograph. In a 30 mT m(-1) gradient field, a localization uncertainty of 1.5 cm could be achieved.

  18. CRADA Final Report, 2011S003, Faraday Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraday Technologies

    2012-12-12

    This Phase I SBIR program addressed the need for an improved manufacturing process for electropolishing niobium RF superconducting cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The ILC is a proposed particle accelerator that will be used to gain a deeper understanding of the forces of energy and matter by colliding beams of electrons and positrons at nearly the speed of light. The energy required for this to happen will be achieved through the use of advanced superconducting technology, specifically ~16,000 RF superconducting cavities operating at near absolute zero. The RF superconductor cavities will be fabricated from highly pure Nb, which has an extremely low surface resistance at 2 Kelvin when compared to other materials. To take full advantage of the superconducting properties of the Nb cavities, the inner surface must be a) polished to a microscale roughness < 0.1 µm with removal of at least 100 µm of material, and b) cleaned to be free of impurities that would degrade performance of the ILC. State-of-the-art polishing uses either chemical polishing or electropolishing, both of which require hydrofluoric acid to achieve breakdown of the strong passive film on the surface. In this Phase I program, Faraday worked with its collaborators at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) to demonstrate the feasibility of an electropolishing process for pure niobium, utilizing an environmentally benign alternative to chemical or electrochemical polishing electrolytes containing hydrofluoric acid. Faraday utilized a 31 wt% aqueous sulfuric acid solution (devoid of hydrofluoric acid) in conjunction with the FARADAYICSM Process, which uses pulse/pulse reverse fields for electropolishing, to demonstrate the ability to electropolish niobium to the desired surface finish. The anticipated benefits of the FARADAYICSM Electropolishing process will be a simpler, safer, and less expensive method capable of surface finishing high purity niobium cavities

  19. Resonant microsphere gyroscope based on a double Faraday rotator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chengfeng; Tang, Jun; Cui, Danfeng; Wu, Dajin; Zhang, Chengfei; Li, Chunming; Zhen, Yongqiu; Xue, Chenyang; Liu, Jun

    2016-10-15

    The resonant microsphere gyroscope is proposed based on a double Faraday rotator system for the resonant microsphere gyroscope (RMSG) that is characterized by low insertion losses and does not destroy the reciprocity of the gyroscope system. Use of the echo suppression structure and the orthogonal polarization method can effectively inhibit both the backscattering noise and the polarization error, and reduce them below the system sensitivity limit. The resonance asymmetry rate dropped from 34.2% to 2.9% after optimization of the backscattering noise and the polarization noise, which greatly improved the bias stability and the scale factor linearity of the proposed system. Additionally, based on the optimum parameters for the double Faraday rotator system, a bias stability of 0.04°/s has been established for an integration time of 10 s in 1000 s in a resonator microsphere gyroscope using a microsphere resonator with a diameter of 1 mm and a Q of 7.2×106.

  20. Faraday effect in III-VI layer compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavaleshko, N.P.; Lyakhovich, A.N.; Vatamanyuk, P.P.; Savchuk, A.I. (Chernovitskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (Ukrainian SSR))

    1982-10-01

    The Faraday effect is investigated in fields up to 20 T and at temperatures from 77 to 300 K applied to the layer semiconductors GaS, GaSe, and InSe. As an example applicable to the InSe crystals, it is shown possible to separate the direct and indirect forbidden transitions both contributing to the Faraday rotation (FR). The oscillatory nature of the FR spectrum at lower temperatures is proved to be due to the exciton contribution. This is the original report about the FR observed in the depth of the fundamental absorption of InSe crystals. The linearity of the FR in the magnetic field is shown to hold for all the compounds under consideration up to 20 T. The observed data are analyzed in order to estimate some band and exciton parameters of the III-VI semiconductors.

  1. Faraday resonance in dynamical bar instability of differentially rotating stars

    CERN Document Server

    Saijo, Motoyuki

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the nonlinear behaviour of the dynamically unstable rotating star for the bar mode by three-dimensional hydrodynamics in Newtonian gravity. We find that an oscillation along the rotation axis is induced throughout the growth of the unstable bar mode, and that its characteristic frequency is twice as that of the bar mode, which oscillates mainly along the equatorial plane. A possibility to observe Faraday resonance in gravitational waves is demonstrated and discussed.

  2. On Bosonic Magnetic Flux Operator and Bosonic Faraday Operator Formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; WANG Tong-Tong; WANG Ji-Suo

    2007-01-01

    In the literature about mesoscopic Josephson devices the magnetic flux is considered as an operator, the fundamental commutative relation between the magnetic flux operator and the Cooper-pair charge operator is usually preengaged. In this paper we show that such a relation can be deduced from the basic Bose operators' commutative relation through the entangled state representation. The Faraday formula in bosonic form is then equivalent to the second Josephson equation. The current operator equation for LC mesoscopic circuit is also derived.

  3. Gravitational Faraday Rotation of the Earth and Its Possible Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lin-Xia; SHAO Cheng-Gang; LUO Jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ It is shown that the rotation of the polarization plane of rays induced by a rotating body can be accumulated by means of a long baseline optical cavity. Theoretical analysis shows that the presently proposal experimental scheme is possible to test this gravitational Faraday rotation effect on the Earth, especially including how to effectively suppress the dominant part of the Sagnac effect due to the rotation of the Earth with a reasonable experimental configuration.

  4. Toward instructional design principles: Inducing Faraday's law with contrasting cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Eric; Wieman, Carl E.

    2016-06-01

    Although physics education research (PER) has improved instructional practices, there are not agreed upon principles for designing effective instructional materials. Here, we illustrate how close comparison of instructional materials could support the development of such principles. Specifically, in discussion sections of a large, introductory physics course, a pair of studies compare two instructional strategies for teaching a physics concept: having students (i) explain a set of contrasting cases or (ii) apply and build on previously learned concepts. We compare these strategies for the teaching of Faraday's law, showing that explaining a set of related contrasting cases not only improves student performance on Faraday's law questions over building on a previously learned concept (i.e., Lorentz force), but also prepares students to better learn subsequent topics, such as Lenz's law. These differences persist to the final exam. We argue that early exposure to contrasting cases better focuses student attention on a key feature related to both concepts: change in magnetic flux. Importantly, the benefits of contrasting cases for both learning and enjoyment are enhanced for students who did not first attend a Faraday's law lecture, consistent with previous research suggesting that being told a solution can circumvent the benefits of its discovery. These studies illustrate an experimental approach for understanding how the structure of activities affects learning and performance outcomes, a first step toward design principles for effective instructional materials.

  5. Effects of interband transitions on Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysin, G M; Chikan, Viktor; Young, Nathan; Dani, Raj Kumar

    2013-08-14

    The Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles is considered based on a quantum model for the dielectric function ϵ(ω) in the presence of a DC magnetic field B. We focus on effects in ϵ(ω) due to interband transitions (IBTs), which are important in the blue and ultraviolet for noble metals used in plasmonics. The dielectric function is found using the perturbation of the electron density matrix due to the optical field of the incident electromagnetic radiation. The calculation is applied to transitions between two bands (d and p, for example) separated by a gap, as one finds in gold at the L-point of the Fermi surface. The result of the DC magnetic field is a shift in the effective optical frequency causing IBTs by ±μBB/ħ, where opposite signs are associated with left/right circular polarizations. The Faraday rotation for a dilute solution of 17 nm diameter gold nanoparticles is measured and compared with both the IBT theory and a simpler Drude model for the bound electron response. Effects of the plasmon resonance mode on Faraday rotation in nanoparticles are also discussed.

  6. Todd, Faraday, and the electrical basis of brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Edward H

    2004-09-01

    Robert Bentley Todd (1809-60) was the UK's first eminent neurologist and neuroscientist. An anatomist, physiologist, and clinical scientist with an interest in the nervous system, he was the first to confirm the electrical basis of brain activity in the 1840s. He was influenced by his contemporary, Michael Faraday at the Royal Institution, and by two colleagues at King's College, John Daniell and Charles Wheatstone, who were also working at the cutting edge of electrical science. Todd conceived of nervous polarity (force) generated in nervous centres and compared this with the polar force of voltaic electricity developed in the galvanic battery. He brilliantly foresaw each nerve vesicle (cell) and its related fibres (ie, neuron) as a distinct apparatus for the development and transmission of nervous polarity. Epilepsy was the result of periodic unnatural development of nervous force leading to the "disruptive discharge" described by Faraday. Faraday, who studied animal electricity in the Gymnotus (electric eel), and Todd saw nervous polarity as a higher form of interchangeable energy.

  7. Development and first experimental tests of Faraday cup array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokůpek, J; Kaufman, J; Margarone, D; Krůs, M; Velyhan, A; Krása, J; Burris-Mog, T; Busold, S; Deppert, O; Cowan, T E; Korn, G

    2014-01-01

    A new type of Faraday cup, capable of detecting high energy charged particles produced in a high intensity laser-matter interaction environment, has recently been developed and demonstrated as a real-time detector based on the time-of-flight technique. An array of these Faraday cups was designed and constructed to cover different observation angles with respect to the target normal direction. Thus, it allows reconstruction of the spatial distribution of ion current density in the subcritical plasma region and the ability to visualise its time evolution through time-of-flight measurements, which cannot be achieved with standard laser optical interferometry. This is a unique method for two-dimensional visualisation of ion currents from laser-generated plasmas. A technical description of the new type of Faraday cup is introduced along with an ad hoc data analysis procedure. Experimental results obtained during campaigns at the Petawatt High-Energy Laser for Heavy Ion Experiments (GSI, Darmstadt) and at the Prague Asterix Laser System (AS CR) are presented. Advantages and limitations of the used diagnostic system are discussed.

  8. Effects of Faraday Rotation Observed in Filter Magnetograph Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagyard, Mona J.; Adams, Mitzi L.; Smith, J. E.; West, Edward A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the effects of Faraday rotation on the azimuth of the transverse magnetic field from observations taken with the Marshall Space Flight Center's vector magnetograph for a simple sunspot observed on June 9, 1985. Vector magnetograms were obtained over the wavelength interval of 170 mA redward of line center of the Fe I 5250.22 A spectral line to 170 mA to the blue, in steps of 10 mA. These data were analyzed to produce the variation of the azimuth as a function of wavelength at each pixel over the field of vi ew of the sunspot. At selected locations in the sunspot, curves of the observed variation of azimuth with wavelength were compared with model calculations for the amount of Faraday rotation of the azimuth. From these comparisons we derived the amount of rotation as functions of bo th the magnitude and inclination of the sunspot's field and deduced the ranges of these field values for which Faraday rotation presents a significant problem in observations taken near the center of a spectral line.

  9. Wave-particle interaction in the Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2015-10-01

    Wave motion in disordered Faraday waves is analysed in terms of oscillons or quasi-particles. The motion of these oscillons is measured using particle tracking tools and it is compared with the motion of fluid particles on the water surface. Both the real floating particles and the oscillons, representing the collective fluid motion, show Brownian-type dispersion exhibiting ballistic and diffusive mean squared displacement at short and long times, respectively. While the floating particles motion has been previously explained in the context of two-dimensional turbulence driven by Faraday waves, no theoretical description exists for the random walk type motion of oscillons. It is found that the r.m.s velocity ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) of oscillons is directly related to the turbulent r.m.s. velocity ⟨μ̃⟩(rms) of the fluid particles in a broad range of vertical accelerations. The measured ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) accurately explains the broadening of the frequency spectra of the surface elevation observed in disordered Faraday waves. These results suggest that 2D turbulence is the driving force behind both the randomization of the oscillons motion and the resulting broadening of the wave frequency spectra. The coupling between wave motion and hydrodynamic turbulence demonstrated here offers new perspectives for predicting complex fluid transport from the knowledge of wave field spectra and vice versa.

  10. Analyzing Extragalactic Magnetic Fields Using Faraday Rotation Measure Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pare, Dylan; Wang, Q. Daniel; Kamieneski, Patrick; Sullivan, Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Extragalactic magnetic fields are a poorly understood element of galaxies that are likely to play an important role in galaxy formation and evolution. Until recently, however, there was no way to observe these fields to a high level of detail, making it difficult to map the spatial distribution of these fields to any high degree of accuracy. Fortunately, a new technique known as Faraday Rotation Measure Synthesis allows for a more precise analysis of galactic magnetism. This technique uses the observed Faraday rotation of polarized emission from background sources to map the magnetic field of a foreground galaxy. This Faraday rotation occurs when the polarized emission encounters ionized, magnetized gas within the galaxy, causing the emission to be rotated by an amount proportional the magnetic field subjected to the ionized gas. Working as part of CHANG-ES (Continuum HAlos in Nearby Galaxies - an EVLA Survey), we have applied this technique in order to learn about the distribution of magnetic fields in the disks and halos of edge-on spiral galaxies. We will present maps of the galactic magnetic fields of CHANG-ES galaxies using this technique, indicating the potential of this technique in successfully mapping these distant fields.

  11. Faraday rotation dispersion microscopy imaging of diamagnetic and chiral liquids with pulsed magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Masayori; Nakano, Yusuke; Tsukahara, Satoshi; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-21

    We have constructed an experimental setup for Faraday rotation dispersion imaging and demonstrated the performance of a novel imaging principle. By using a pulsed magnetic field and a polarized light synchronized to the magnetic field, quantitative Faraday rotation images of diamagnetic organic liquids in glass capillaries were observed. Nonaromatic hydrocarbons, benzene derivatives, and naphthalene derivatives were clearly distinguished by the Faraday rotation images due to the difference in Verdet constants. From the wavelength dispersion of the Faraday rotation images in the visible region, it was found that the resonance wavelength in the UV region, which was estimated based on the Faraday B-term, could be used as characteristic parameters for the imaging of the liquids. Furthermore, simultaneous acquisition of Faraday rotation image and natural optical rotation image was demonstrated for chiral organic liquids.

  12. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T; Huang, Yong; Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie, Yubing; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2010-09-01

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location (+/-5 microm) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing.

  13. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T [Biomedical Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Huang Yong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie Yubing [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY (United States); Chrisey, Douglas B, E-mail: schien@rpi.ed, E-mail: chrisd@rpi.ed [Material Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location ({+-}5 {mu}m) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing. (topical review)

  14. Observation of two-dimensional Faraday waves in extremely shallow depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaochen; Yu, Zhengyue; Liao, Shijun

    2015-09-01

    A family of two-dimensional Faraday waves in extremely shallow depth (1 mm to 2 mm) of absolute ethanol are observed experimentally using a Hele-Shaw cell that vibrates vertically. The same phenomena are not observed by means of water, ethanol solution, and silicone oil. These Faraday waves are quite different from the traditional ones. These phenomena are helpful to deepen and enrich our understandings about Faraday waves, and besides provide a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics.

  15. Generalized Faraday law derived from classical forces in a rotating frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Taeseung [Seoul Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    We show that an additional spin-dependent classical force due to the rotation of an electron spin's rest frame is essential to derive a spin-Faraday law that has the same form as the usual Faraday law. We show that the contribution of the additional spin-dependent force to the spin-Faraday law is the same as the time derivative of the spin geometric phase. With this observations, the spin-Faraday law is generalized to include both an Aharonov-Casher (AC) effect and a scalar AC effect in a unified manner.

  16. Quantized Faraday effect in 3D+1 and 2D+1 systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, L Cruz; Rojas, H Perez; Querts, E Rodriguez

    2013-01-01

    We study Faraday rotation in the quantum relativistic limit. Starting from the photon self-energy in the presence of a constant magnetic field the rotation of the polarization vector of a plane electromagnetic wave which travel along the fermion-antifermion gas is studied. The connection between Faraday Effect and Quantum Hall Effect (QHE) is discussed. The Faraday Effect is also investigated for a massless relativistic 2D+1 fermion system which is derived by using the compactification along the dimension parallel to the magnetic field. Faraday angle shows a quantized behavior as Hall conductivity in two and three dimensions.

  17. Ultrafast magnetic vortex core switching driven by the topological inverse Faraday effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Katsuhisa; Ohe, Jun-ichiro; Tatara, Gen

    2012-09-21

    We present a theoretical discovery of an unconventional mechanism of inverse Faraday effect which acts selectively on topological magnetic structures. The effect, topological inverse Faraday effect, is induced by the spin Berry's phase of the magnetic structure when a circularly polarized light is applied. Thus a spin-orbit interaction is not necessary unlike that in the conventional inverse Faraday effect. We demonstrate by numerical simulation that topological inverse Faraday effect realizes ultrafast switching of a magnetic vortex within a switching time of 150 ps without magnetic field.

  18. A novel Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope with closed-loop Faraday modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Qin, Jie; Zhang, Chen; Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Dong, Haifeng

    2013-08-01

    We report a novel Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope (ASG) with closed-loop Faraday modulation method. This ASG requires approximately 30 min to start-up and 110 °C to operate. A closed-loop Faraday modulation method for measurement of the optical rotation was used in this ASG. This method uses an additional Faraday modulator to suppress the laser intensity fluctuation and Faraday modulator thermal induced fluctuation. We theoretically and experimentally validate this method in the Cs-(129)Xe ASG and achieved a bias stability of approximately 3.25 °∕h.

  19. Cascade Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schlenker, Cody W.

    2011-09-27

    We demonstrate planar organic solar cells consisting of a series of complementary donor materials with cascading exciton energies, incorporated in the following structure: glass/indium-tin-oxide/donor cascade/C 60/bathocuproine/Al. Using a tetracene layer grown in a descending energy cascade on 5,6-diphenyl-tetracene and capped with 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyl- tetracene, where the accessibility of the π-system in each material is expected to influence the rate of parasitic carrier leakage and charge recombination at the donor/acceptor interface, we observe an increase in open circuit voltage (Voc) of approximately 40% (corresponding to a change of +200 mV) compared to that of a single tetracene donor. Little change is observed in other parameters such as fill factor and short circuit current density (FF = 0.50 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.55 ± 0.23 mA/cm2) compared to those of the control tetracene-C60 solar cells (FF = 0.54 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.86 ± 0.23 mA/cm2). We demonstrate that this cascade architecture is effective in reducing losses due to polaron pair recombination at donor-acceptor interfaces, while enhancing spectral coverage, resulting in a substantial increase in the power conversion efficiency for cascade organic photovoltaic cells compared to tetracene and pentacene based devices with a single donor layer. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Cascaded Poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kuniaki; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.; Teich, Malvin Carl

    1982-12-01

    We investigate the counting statistics for stationary and nonstationary cascaded Poisson processes. A simple equation is obtained for the variance-to-mean ratio in the limit of long counting times. Explicit expressions for the forward-recurrence and inter-event-time probability density functions are also obtained. The results are expected to be of use in a number of areas of physics.

  1. Advances in laser-based isotope ratio measurements: selected applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kerstel, E; Gianfrani, L.

    2008-01-01

    Small molecules exhibit characteristic ro-vibrational transitions in the near- and mid-infrared spectral regions, which are strongly influenced by isotopic substitution. This gift of nature has made it possible to use laser spectroscopy for the accurate analysis of the isotopic composition of gaseous samples. Nowadays, laser spectroscopy is clearly recognized as a valid alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Laser-based instruments are leaving the research laboratory stage and are be...

  2. Faraday effect in magnetic fluids at a frequency 10 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiorov, M.M. E-mail: maiorov@tesla.sal.1v

    2002-11-01

    This work presents some results of observed Faraday effect in magnetic fluids in the centimetric region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The effect is observed when a transversal electric wave of mode H{sub 11} propagates in the circular waveguide with a magnetic fluid. The constant magnetic field was applied along the waveguide. Magnetic fluids with different concentrations of magnetite core nanoparticles suspended in tetradecane (C{sub 14}H{sub 30}) are used in the magnetic fields from 0 to 1500 Oe. A 160 deg. rotation of wave polarization is obtained for a 200 mm sample.

  3. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Mørch, Troels

    2013-01-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit...... is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times...

  4. The Correspondence of Michael Faraday Pt 6 1860-1867

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, James

    2012-01-01

    Michael Faraday (1791-1867) was one of the most important men of science in nineteenth century Britain. His discoveries of electro-magnetic rotations (1821) and electro-magnetic induction (1831) laid the foundations of the modern electrical industry. His discovery of the magneto-optical effect and diamagnetism (1845) led him to formulate the field theory of electro-magnetism, which forms one of the cornerstones of modern physics.These and a whole host of other fundamental discoveries in physics and chemistry, together with his lecturing at the Royal Institution, his work for the state (includi

  5. Numerical simulation of super-square patterns in Faraday waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kahouadji, L; Tuckerman, L S; Shin, S; Chergui, J; Juric, D

    2015-01-01

    We report the first simulations of the Faraday instability using the full three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in domains much larger than the characteristic wavelength of the pattern. We use a massively parallel code based on a hybrid Front-Tracking/Level-set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. Simulations performed in rectangular and cylindrical domains yield complex patterns. In particular, a superlattice-like pattern similar to those of [Douady & Fauve, Europhys. Lett. 6, 221-226 (1988); Douady, J. Fluid Mech. 221, 383-409 (1990)] is observed. The pattern consists of the superposition of two square superlattices.

  6. New cylindrical gravitational soliton waves and gravitational Faraday rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Tomizawa, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    In terms of gravitational solitons, we study gravitational non-linear effects of gravitational solitary waves such as Faraday rotation. Applying the Pomeransky's procedure for inverse scattering method, which has been recently used for constructing stationary black hole solutions in five dimensions to a cylindrical spacetime in four dimensions, we construct a new cylindrically symmetric soliton solution. This is the first example to be applied to the cylindrically symmetric case. In particular, we clarify the difference from the Tomimatsu's single soliton solution, which was constructed by the Belinsky-Zakharov's procedure.

  7. Multispectral Kerr frequency comb initiated by Faraday ripples

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Shu-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In a uniform microresonator, the generation of a broadband Kerr frequency comb is triggered by Turing patterns. Here, we study a distinctly different route to initiate the Kerr frequency comb by Faraday ripples. Momentum conservation is ensured by azimuthal modulation of the cavity dispersion. With a good agreement with the theoretical analysis, we demonstrate a multispectral Kerr frequency comb covering telecommunication O, C, L, and 2 {\\mu}m bands. Comb coherence and absence of a subcomb offset are confirmed by cw heterodyne beat note and amplitude noise spectra measurements. The device can be used for achieving broadband optical frequency synthesizer and high-capacity coherent telecommunication.

  8. Faraday rotation in bilayer graphene-based integrated microcavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Hai-Xia; Yan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene has rich ground states with various broken symmetries, allowing the existence of magneto-optical (MO) effects even in the absence of an external magnetic field. Here we report controllable Faraday rotation (FR) of bilayer graphene induced by electrostatic gate voltage, whose value is 10 times smaller than the case of single layer graphene with a magnetic field. A proposed bilayer graphene-based microcavity configuration enables the enhanced FR angle due to the large localized electromagnetic field. Our results offer unique opportunities to apply bilayer graphene for MO devices.

  9. A model for Faraday pilot waves over variable topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Luiz M.

    2017-01-01

    Couder and Fort discovered that droplets walking on a vibrating bath possess certain features previously thought to be exclusive to quantum systems. These millimetric droplets synchronize with their Faraday wavefield, creating a macroscopic pilot-wave system. In this paper we exploit the fact that the waves generated are nearly monochromatic and propose a hydrodynamic model capable of quantitatively capturing the interaction between bouncing drops and a variable topography. We show that our reduced model is able to reproduce some important experiments involving the drop-topography interaction, such as non-specular reflection and single-slit diffraction.

  10. Preinjector for Linac 1, inside the Faraday cage

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    For a description of the Linac 1 preinjector, please see first 7403070X. Here, the view is towards the upper level of the Faraday cage. Far to the right, a technician is peering through the service door. The huge box-shaped cubicle is the electronics platform, at 520 kV potential during operation. The "bull eye" at the left back sits at the top end of the accelerating column (see 7403081X) and houses the ion source with its electronics (see 7403083X). The SAMES generator, providing the 520 kV HV (7403074) sits on the floor and is not visible here.

  11. Faraday rotator based on TSAG crystal with orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Ryo; Snetkov, Ilya; Starobor, Aleksey; Mironov, Evgeniy; Palashov, Oleg

    2016-07-11

    A Faraday isolator (FI) for high-power lasers with kilowatt-level average power and 1-µm wavelength was demonstrated using a terbium scandium aluminum garnet (TSAG) with its crystal axis aligned in the direction. Furthermore, no compensation scheme for thermally induced depolarization in a magnetic field was used. An isolation ratio of 35.4 dB (depolarization ratio γ of 2.9 × 10-4) was experimentally observed at a maximum laser power of 1470 W. This result for room-temperature FIs is the best reported, and provides a simple, practical solution for achieving optical isolation in high-power laser systems.

  12. High-field Faraday rotation in II-VI-based semimagnetic semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savchuk, AI; Fediv, [No Value; Nikitin, PI; Perrone, A; Tatzenko, OM; Platonov, VV

    1998-01-01

    The effects of d-d exchange interaction have been studied by measuring high-field Faraday rotation in II-VI-based semimagnetic semiconductors. For Cd1-xMnxTe crystals with x = 0.43 and at room temperature a saturation in magnetic field dependence of the Faraday rotation has been observed. In the cas

  13. Polarization-induced phase noise in fiber optic Michelson interferometer with Faraday rotator mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuefeng; Li, Fang; Zhang, Wentao; Xiao, Hao; Liu, Yuliang

    2008-11-01

    Polarization-induced phase noise in Michelson interferometer with imperfect Faraday rotator mirrors was investigated. This kind of noise generates from the rotation angle errors of Faraday rotator mirrors and external polarization perturbation. The conversion factor κ, representing the magnitude conversion ability from polarization-noise to polarization induced phase-noise, have been theoretically evaluated and experimentally investigated.

  14. Representing the Electromagnetic Field: How Maxwell's Mathematics Empowered Faraday's Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweney, Ryan D.

    2011-01-01

    James Clerk Maxwell "translated" Michael Faraday's experimentally-based field theory into the mathematical representation now known as "Maxwell's Equations." Working with a variety of mathematical representations and physical models Maxwell extended the reach of Faraday's theory and brought it into consistency with other…

  15. Faraday cup with nanosecond response and adjustable impedance for fast electron beam characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Rovey, Joshua L

    2011-07-01

    A movable Faraday cup design with simple structure and adjustable impedance is described in this work. This Faraday cup has external adjustable shunt resistance for self-biased measurement setup and 50 Ω characteristic impedance to match with 50 Ω standard BNC coaxial cable and vacuum feedthroughs for nanosecond-level pulse signal measurements. Adjustable shunt resistance allows self-biased measurements to be quickly acquired to determine the electron energy distribution function. The performance of the Faraday cup is validated by tests of response time and amplitude of output signal. When compared with a reference source, the percent difference of the Faraday cup signal fall time is less than 10% for fall times greater than 10 ns. The percent difference of the Faraday cup signal pulse width is below 6.7% for pulse widths greater than 10 ns. A pseudospark-generated electron beam is used to compare the amplitude of the Faraday cup signal with a calibrated F-70 commercial current transformer. The error of the Faraday cup output amplitude is below 10% for the 4-14 kV tested pseudospark voltages. The main benefit of this Faraday cup is demonstrated by adjusting the external shunt resistance and performing the self-biased method for obtaining the electron energy distribution function. Results from a 4 kV pseudospark discharge indicate a "double-humped" energy distribution.

  16. A Left-Hand Rule for Faraday's Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salu, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    A left-hand rule for Faraday's law is presented here. This rule provides a simple and quick way of finding directional relationships between variables of Faraday's law without using Lenz's rule.

  17. Nonreciprocal plasmonics enables giant enhancement of thin-film Faraday rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jessie Yao; Steinle, Tobias; Wehlus, Thomas; Dregely, Daniel; Weiss, Thomas; Belotelov, Vladimir I; Stritzker, Bernd; Giessen, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Light propagation is usually reciprocal. However, a static magnetic field along the propagation direction can break the time-reversal symmetry in the presence of magneto-optical materials. The Faraday effect in magneto-optical materials rotates the polarization plane of light, and when light travels backward the polarization is further rotated. This is applied in optical isolators, which are of crucial importance in optical systems. Faraday isolators are typically bulky due to the weak Faraday effect of available magneto-optical materials. The growing research endeavour in integrated optics demands thin-film Faraday rotators and enhancement of the Faraday effect. Here, we report significant enhancement of Faraday rotation by hybridizing plasmonics with magneto-optics. By fabricating plasmonic nanostructures on laser-deposited magneto-optical thin films, Faraday rotation is enhanced by one order of magnitude in our experiment, while high transparency is maintained. We elucidate the enhanced Faraday effect by the interplay between plasmons and different photonic waveguide modes in our system.

  18. Integrated Broadband Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Kamjou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A broadband, integrated quantum cascade laser is disclosed, comprising ridge waveguide quantum cascade lasers formed by applying standard semiconductor process techniques to a monolithic structure of alternating layers of claddings and active region layers. The resulting ridge waveguide quantum cascade lasers may be individually controlled by independent voltage potentials, resulting in control of the overall spectrum of the integrated quantum cascade laser source. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  19. Site-resolved imaging of single atoms with a Faraday quantum gas microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Ryuta; Kato, Kohei; Kuno, Takuma; Sakura, Yuto; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    We successfully demonstrate a quantum gas microscopy using the Faraday effect which has an inherently non-destructive nature. The observed Faraday rotation angle reaches 3.0(2) degrees for a single atom. We reveal the non-destructive feature of this Faraday imaging method by comparing the detuning dependence of the Faraday signal strength with that of the photon scattering rate. We determine the atom distribution with deconvolution analysis. We also demonstrate the absorption and the dark field Faraday imaging, and reveal the different shapes of the point spread functions for these methods, which are fully explained by theoretical analysis. Our result is an important first step towards an ultimate quantum non-demolition site-resolved imaging and furthermore opens up the possibilities for quantum feedback control of a quantum many-body system with a single-site resolution.

  20. A new cascadic multigrid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI; Zhongci

    2001-01-01

    [1]Bornemann, F., Deuflhard, P., The cascadic multigrid method for elliptic problems, Numer. Math., 996, 75: 35.[2]Bornemann, F., Deuflhard, P., The cascadic multigrid method, The Eighth International Conference on Domain Decomposition Methods for Partial Differential Equations (eds. Glowinski, R., Periaux, J., Shi, Z. et al.), New York: John Wiley and Sons, 997.[3]Bornemann, F., Krause, R., Classical and cascadic multigrid-methodogical comparison, Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Domain Decomposition (eds. Bjorstad, P., Espedal, M., Keyes, D.), New York: John Wiley and Sons, 998.[4]Shaidurov, V., Some estimates of the rate of convergence for the cascadic conjugate gradient method, Comp. Math. Applic., 996, 3: 6.[5]Shi, Z., Xu, X., Cascadic multigrid method for the second order elliptic problem, East-West J. Numer. Math., 998, 6: 309.[6]Shi, Z., Xu, X., Cascadic multigrid for elliptic problems, East-West J. Numer. Math., 999, 7: 99.[7]Shi, Z., Xu, X., Cascadic multigrid method for the plate bending problem, East-West J. Numer. Math., 998, 6: 37.[8]Braess, D., Dahmen, W., A cascade multigrid algorithm for the Stokes equations, Number. Math., 999, 82: 79.[9]Shi, Z., Xu, X., Cascadic multigrid for parabolic problems, J. Comput. Math., 2000, 8: 450.[10]Ciarlet, P.,The Finite Element Method for Elliptic Problems, Amsterdam: North-Holland, 978.[11]Zienkiewicz, O. C., The Finite Element Method, 3rd. ed., London: McGraw-Hill, 977.[12]Powell, M. J. D., Sabin, M. A., Piecewise quadratic approximations on triangles, ACM Trans. Mat. Software, 977, 3: 36.[13]Xu, J., The auxiliary space method and optimal multigrid precondition techniques for unstructured grids, Computing, 996, 56: 25.[14]Bank, R., Dupont, T., An optimal order process for solving finite element equations, Math. Comput., 980, 36: 35.[15]Brenner, S., Convergence of nonconforming multigrid methods without full elliptic regularity, Math

  1. Faraday rotation enhancement of gold coated Fe2O3 nanoparticles: comparison of experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Raj Kumar; Wang, Hongwang; Bossmann, Stefan H; Wysin, Gary; Chikan, Viktor

    2011-12-14

    Understanding plasmonic enhancement of nanoscale magnetic materials is important to evaluate their potential for application. In this study, the Faraday rotation (FR) enhancement of gold coated Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles (NP) is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiment shows that the Faraday rotation of a Fe(2)O(3) NP solution changes from approximately 3 rad/Tm to 10 rad/Tm as 5 nm gold shell is coated on a 9.7 nm Fe(2)O(3) core at 632 nm. The results also show how the volume fraction normalized Faraday rotation varies with the gold shell thickness. From the comparison of experiment and calculated Faraday rotation based on the Maxwell-Garnett theory, it is concluded that the enhancement and shell dependence of Faraday rotation of Fe(2)O(3) NPs is a result of the shifting plasmon resonance of the composite NP. In addition, the clustering of the NPs induces a different phase lag on the Faraday signal, which suggests that the collective response of the magnetic NP aggregates needs to be considered even in solution. From the Faraday phase lag, the estimated time of the full alignment of the magnetic spins of bare (cluster size 160 nm) and gold coated NPs (cluster size 90 nm) are found to be 0.65 and 0.17 μs. The calculation includes a simple theoretical approach based on the Bruggeman theory to account for the aggregation and its effect on the Faraday rotation. The Bruggeman model provides a qualitatively better agreement with the experimentally observed Faraday rotation and points out the importance of making a connection between component properties and the average "effective" optical behavior of the Faraday medium containing magnetic nanoparticles.

  2. Faraday rotation imaging microscope with microsecond pulse magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwa, Masayori, E-mail: msuwa@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Tsukahara, Satoshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Watarai, Hitoshi, E-mail: watarai@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute for NanoScience Design, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-11-01

    We have fabricated a high-performance Faraday rotation (FR) imaging microscope that uses a microsecond pulse magnet comprising an insulated gated bipolar transistor and a 2 μF capacitor. Our microscope produced images with greater stability and sensitivity than those of previous microscopes that used millisecond pulse magnet; these improvements are likely due to high repetition rate and negligible Joule heating effects. The mechanical vibrations in the magnet coil caused by the pulsed current were significantly reduced. The present FR microscope constructed an averaged image from 1000 FR images within 10 min under 1.7 T. Applications of the FR microscope to discriminating three benzene derivatives in micro-capillaries and oscillation-free imaging of spherical polystyrene and polymethyl methacrylate microparticles demonstrated its high performance. - Highlights: • A microsecond pulse magnet with high repetition rate of 10 Hz was fabricated. • Faraday rotation (FR) imaging microscope with the μs magnet was constructed. • Benzene derivatives in microcapillaries were distinguished with the FR microscope. • FR images of single polymer microspheres of 20 μm were correctly acquired. • Observed FR angles agreed quantitatively with those expected from Verdet constants.

  3. Protection characteristics of a Faraday cage compromised by lightning burnthrough.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Bystrom, Edward; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Montoya, Sandra L.; Merewether, Kimball O.; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Martinez, Leonard E.; Jojola, John M.

    2012-01-01

    A lightning flash consists of multiple, high-amplitude but short duration return strokes. Between the return strokes is a lower amplitude, continuing current which flows for longer duration. If the walls of a Faraday cage are made of thin enough metal, the continuing current can melt a hole through the metal in a process called burnthrough. A subsequent return stroke can couple energy through this newly-formed hole. This LDRD is a study of the protection provided by a Faraday cage when it has been compromised by burnthrough. We initially repeated some previous experiments and expanded on them in terms of scope and diagnostics to form a knowledge baseline of the coupling phenomena. We then used a combination of experiment, analysis and numerical modeling to study four coupling mechanisms: indirect electric field coupling, indirect magnetic field coupling, conduction through plasma and breakdown through the hole. We discovered voltages higher than those encountered in the previous set of experiments (on the order of several hundreds of volts).

  4. Technology development for the Solar Probe Plus Faraday Cup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Mark D.; Kasper, Justin; Case, Anthony W.; Daigneau, Peter; Gauron, Thomas; Bookbinder, Jay; Brodu, Étienne; Balat-Pichelin, Marianne; Wright, Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    The upcoming Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission requires novel approaches for in-situ plasma instrument design. SPP's Solar Probe Cup (SPC) instrument will, as part of the Solar Wind Electrons, Alphas, and Protons (SWEAP) instrument suite, operate over an enormous range of temperatures, yet must still accurately measure currents below 1 pico-amp, and with modest power requirements. This paper discusses some of the key technology development aspects of the SPC, a Faraday Cup and one of the few instruments on SPP that is directly exposed to the solar disk, where at closest approach to the Sun (less than 10 solar radii (Rs) from the center of the Sun) the intensity is greater than 475 earth-suns. These challenges range from materials characterization at temperatures in excess of 1400°C to thermal modeling of the behavior of the materials and their interactions at these temperatures. We discuss the trades that have resulted in the material selection for the current design of the Faraday Cup. Specific challenges include the material selection and mechanical design of insulators, particularly for the high-voltage (up to 8 kV) grid and coaxial supply line, and thermo-optical techniques to minimize temperatures in the SPC, with the specific intent of demonstrating Technology Readiness Level 6 by the end of 2013.

  5. VLA Measurements of Faraday Rotation through Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Kooi, Jason E; Buffo, Jacob J; Spangler, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun that play an important role in space weather. Faraday rotation (FR) is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma such as a CME. FR observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch. We report on simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of three CMEs in August 2012. We made sensitive Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations using 1 - 2 GHz frequencies of a "constellation" of radio sources through the solar corona at heliocentric distances that ranged from 6 - 15 solar radii. Of the nine sources observed, three were occulted by CMEs: two sources (0842+1835 and 0900+1832) were occulted by a single CME and one source (0843+1547) was occulted by two CMEs. In addition to our radioastronomical observations, which represent one of the first active hunts for CME Faraday r...

  6. Microreactors for Gold Nanoparticles Synthesis: From Faraday to Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Taifur Rahman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The seminal work of Michael Faraday in 1850s transmuted the “Alchemy of gold” into a fascinating scientific endeavor over the millennia, particularly in the past half century. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs arguably hold the central position of nanosciences due to their intriguing size-and-shape dependent physicochemical properties, non-toxicity, and ease of functionalization and potential for wide range of applications. The core chemistry involved in the syntheses is essentially not very different from what Michael Faraday resorted to: transforming ions into metallic gold using mild reducing agents. However, the process of such reduction and outcome (shapes and sizes are intricately dependent on basic operational parameters such as sequence of addition and efficiency of mixing of the reagents. Hence, irreproducibility in synthesis and maintaining batch-to-batch quality are major obstacles in this seemingly straightforward process, which poses challenges in scaling-up. Microreactors, by the virtue of excellent control over reagent mixing in space and time within narrow channel networks, opened a new horizon of possibilities to tackle such problems to produce GNPs in more reliable, reproducible and scalable ways. In this review, we will delineate the state-of-the-art of GNPs synthesis using microreactors and will discuss in length how such “flask-to-chip” paradigm shift may revolutionize the very concept of nanosyntheses.

  7. Faraday Rotation Measurements on Z-Pinches Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenley, J.B.

    1998-10-01

    The Campus Executive Program sponsored this research at Cornell University. The research was directed toward the implementation of laser-based diagnostics for wire-array Z-pinches. Under this contract we were able to carry out all the necessary preparations to setup the laser diagnostics to complement our x-ray backlighting measurements of the early phase of exploding wire z-pinch plasma formation.

  8. Information cascade on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisakado, Masato; Mori, Shintaro

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model by considering three different kinds of networks: a random graph, the Barabási-Albert (BA) model, and a fitness model. A voting model represents the way in which public perceptions are conveyed to voters. Our voting model is constructed by using two types of voters-herders and independents-and two candidates. Independents conduct voting based on their fundamental values; on the other hand, herders base their voting on the number of previous votes. Hence, herders vote for the majority candidates and obtain information relating to previous votes from their networks. We discuss the difference between the phases on which the networks depend. Two kinds of phase transitions, an information cascade transition and a super-normal transition, were identified. The first of these is a transition between a state in which most voters make the correct choices and a state in which most of them are wrong. The second is a transition of convergence speed. The information cascade transition prevails when herder effects are stronger than the super-normal transition. In the BA and fitness models, the critical point of the information cascade transition is the same as that of the random network model. However, the critical point of the super-normal transition disappears when these two models are used. In conclusion, the influence of networks is shown to only affect the convergence speed and not the information cascade transition. We are therefore able to conclude that the influence of hubs on voters' perceptions is limited.

  9. Semiconductor defect metrology using laser-based quantitative phase imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Edwards, Chris; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford

    2015-03-01

    A highly sensitive laser-based quantitative phase imaging tool, using an epi-illumination diffraction phase microscope, has been developed for silicon wafer defect inspection. The first system used a 532 nm solid-state laser and detected 20 nm by 100 nm by 110 nm defects in a 22 nm node patterned silicon wafer. The second system, using a 405 nm diode laser, is more sensitive and has enabled detection of 15 nm by 90 nm by 35 nm defects in a 9 nm node densely patterned silicon wafer. In addition to imaging, wafer scanning and image-post processing are also crucial for defect detection.

  10. Axion Search by Laser-based Experiment OSQAR

    OpenAIRE

    Sulc, Miroslav; Pugnat, Pierre; Ballou, Rafik; Deferne, Guy; Duvillaret, Lionel; Flekova, Lucie; Finger, Michael; Finger Jr, Michael; Hošek, Jan; Husek, Thomas; Jost, Rémy; Kral, Miroslav; Kunc, Štěpán; Macuchova, Karolina; Meissner, Krzysztof,

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Laser-based experimentOSQAR in CERN is aimed to the search of the axions by twomethods. The photon regeneration experiment is using two LHC dipole magnets of the length 14.3 m and magnetic field 9.5 T equipped with an optical barrier at the end of the first magnet. It looks as light shining through the wall. No excess of events above the background was detected at this arrangement. Nevertheless, this result extends the exclusion region for the axion mass. The second me...

  11. Design and Implementation of a Laser-Based Ammonia Breath Sensor for Medical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Owen, Kyle

    2012-06-01

    Laser-based sensors can be used as non-invasive monitoring tools to measure parts per billion (ppb) levels of trace gases. Ammonia sensors are useful for applications in environmental pollutant monitoring, atmospheric and combustion kinetic studies, and medical diagnostics. This sensor was specifically designed to measure ammonia in exhaled breath to be used as a medical diagnostic and monitoring tool, however, it can also be extended for use in other applications. Although ammonia is a naturally occurring species in exhaled breath, abnormally elevated levels can be an indication of adverse medical conditions. Laser-based breath diagnostics have many benefits since they are cost effective, non-invasive, painless, real time monitors. They have the potential to improve the quality of medical care by replacing currently used blood tests and providing immediate feedback to physicians. This sensor utilizes a Quantum Cascade Laser and Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with second harmonic normalized by first harmonic detection in a 76 m multi-pass absorption cell to measure ppb levels of ammonia with improved sensitivity over previous sensors. Initial measurements to determine the ammonia absorption line parameters were performed using direct absorption spectroscopy. This is the first experimental study of the ammonia absorption line transitions near 1103.46 cm1 with absorption spectroscopy. The linestrengths were measured with uncertainties less than 10%. The collisional broadening coefficients for each of the ammonia lines with nitrogen, oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide were also measured, many of which had uncertainties less than 5%. The sensor was characterized to show a detectability limit of 10 ppb with an uncertainty of less than 5% at typical breath ammonia levels. Initial breath test results showed that some of the patients with chronic kidney disease had elevated ammonia levels while others had ammonia levels in the same range as expected for healthy

  12. Enhanced Transmission and Giant Faraday Effect in Magnetic Metal-Dielectric Photonic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Kyle; Bodyfelt, Joshua D; Vitebskiy, Ilya; Chabanov, Andrey A

    2012-01-01

    Due to their large electric conductivity, stand-alone metallic films are highly reflective at microwave frequencies. For this reason, it is nearly impossible to observe Faraday rotation in ferromagnetic metal layers, even in films just tens of nanometers thick. Here, we show using numerical simulations that a stack of cobalt nano-layers interlaced between dielectric layers can become highly transmissive and display a large Faraday rotation in a finite frequency band. A 45-degree Faraday rotation can be achieved with metallic ferromagnetic layers as thin as tens of nanometers.

  13. Point-localized displacement measurement of the Faraday surface on a fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, C.; Gibiat, V.; Negreira, C.

    2002-10-01

    It has been well known for a long time that dynamic processes are generated by Faraday instability. However, only qualitative experimental results have been obtained in this regard. In this work, we report an original method designed to study and reconstruct the moving surface in Faraday experiments. The technique developed is accurate and a quantitative measurement of the surface displacement is achievable. Two important results have been obtained with this set-up: the numerical reconstruction of the patterns appearing on the surface because of the Faraday instability process and the dynamical evolution to chaos of a localized point of the surface.

  14. Electrical control of Faraday rotation at a liquid-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, Monica; Kornyshev, Alexei A; Flatté, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    A theory is developed for the Faraday rotation of light from a monolayer of charged magnetic nanoparticles at an electrified liquid-liquid interface. The polarization fields of neighboring nanoparticles enhance the Faraday rotation. At such interfaces, and for realistic sizes and charges of nanoparticles, their adsorption-desorption can be controlled with a voltage variationFaraday rotation. A calculation based on the Maxwell-Garnett theory predicts that the corresponding redistribution of 40 nm nanoparticles of yttrium iron garnet can switch a cavity with a quality factor larger than 10(4) for light of wavelength 500 nm at normal incidence.

  15. A two-in-one Faraday rotator mirror exempt of active optical alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qiong; Wan, Zhujun; Liu, Hai; Liu, Deming

    2014-02-10

    A two-in-one Faraday rotator mirror was presented, which functions as two independent Faraday rotation mirrors with a single device. With the introduction of a reflection lens as substitution of the mirror in traditional structure, this device is characterized by exemption of active optical alignment for the designers and manufacturers of Faraday rotator mirrors. A sample was fabricated by passive mechanical assembly. The insertion loss was measured as 0.46 dB/0.50 dB for the two independent ports, respectively.

  16. Permanent magnets for Faraday rotators inspired by the design of the magic sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trénec, Gérard; Volondat, William; Cugat, Orphée; Vigué, Jacques

    2011-08-20

    Faraday polarization rotators are commonly used in laser experiments. Most Faraday materials have a nonnegligible absorption, which is a limiting factor for high power laser optical isolators or for intracavity optical diodes. By using a stronger magnetic field and a shorter length of Faraday material, one can obtain the same polarization rotation and a reduced absorption. In this paper, we describe two permanent magnet arrangements that are easy to build and produce magnetic fields up to 1.7 T, substantially more than commonly used. The field homogeneity is largely sufficient for a 30 dB isolation ratio. We finally discuss the prospects for producing even larger fields with permanent magnets.

  17. Multifrequency transverse Faraday effect in single magneto-dielectric microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Maksymov, Ivan S

    2014-01-01

    We propose using a single magneto-dielectric microsphere as a device for enhancing the transverse Faraday effect at multiple wavelengths at the same time. Although the diameter of the sphere can be $<1$ $\\mu$m, the numerically predicted strength of its magneto-optical (MO) response can be an order of magnitude stronger than in MO devices based on thick magnetic plates. The MO response of a microsphere is also comparable with that of subwavelength magneto-dielectric gratings which, however, operate at a single wavelength and occupy a large area. In contrast to gratings and thick plates, the compact size of the microsphere and its capability to support spin-wave excitations make it suitable for applications in nanophotonics, imaging systems, and magnonics.

  18. Performance enhancement study of an electrostatic Faraday cup detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606-3390 (United States); Hodges, G.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606-3390 (United States); Seely, D.G. [Department of Physics, Albion College, Albion, MI 49224 (United States); Moroz, N.A. [Department of Physics, Albion College, Albion, MI 49224 (United States); Kvale, T.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606-3390 (United States)]. E-mail: tkvale@physics.utoledo.edu

    2005-01-01

    Faraday cups (FCs) have long been used to measure charged particle beam currents in experiments that seek to determine cross-sections in energetic particle collisions. The reliable operation of a FC as a detector depends on the ability of the device to recapture the electrons ejected when energetic particles strike its interior metal surfaces. We have conducted comparative performance studies of a traditional cylindrically-symmetric, electrostatic-based FC versus an alternative design in which the cylindrical symmetry is broken. The purpose of the alternative design is to generate a transverse electric field to recapture the ejected (secondary and tertiary) electrons. The alternate FC design is shown to be superior in its ability to recapture these electrons, including those having kinetic energies greater than the potential energy barrier determined by the repeller voltage applied to the FC.

  19. Pseudo Magnetic Faraday and Quantum Hall Effect In Oscillating Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Anita; Mullen, Kieran

    When a graphene layer is stressed, the strain changes the phase between sites in a tight binding model of the system. This phase can be viewed as a pseudo-magnetic vector potential. The corresponding pseudo-magnetic field has been experimentally verified in static cases. We examine the case of oscillating graphene ribbons and explore two new effects. The first is to investigate an oscillating pseudo-magnetic field that produces a quantum Hall effect: we calculate the I-V characteristic of an oscillating graphene nanoribbon as a function of frequency, and amplitude in both the oscillations and the applied driving voltage. Second, the time dependent pseudo-magnetic field should produce a pseudo-Faraday effect driving electrons in different valleys in opposite directions. In both cases, we make explicit calculations for experiment. This project was supported in part by the US National Science Foundation under Grant DMR-1310407.

  20. Numerical simulation of supersquare patterns in Faraday waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouadji, L.; Périnet, N.; Tuckerman, L. S.; Shin, S.; Chergui, J.; Juric, D.

    2015-06-01

    We report the first simulations of the Faraday instability using the full three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in domains much larger than the characteristic wavelength of the pattern. We use a massively parallel code based on a hybrid Front-Tracking/Level-set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. Simulations performed in rectangular and cylindrical domains yield complex patterns. In particular, a superlattice-like pattern similar to those of [Douady & Fauve, Europhys. Lett. 6, 221-226 (1988); Douady, J. Fluid Mech. 221, 383-409 (1990)] is observed. The pattern consists of the superposition of two square superlattices. We conjecture that such patterns are widespread if the square container is large compared to the critical wavelength. In the cylinder, pentagonal cells near the outer wall allow a square-wave pattern to be accommodated in the center.

  1. Can weakly nonlinear theory explain Faraday wave patterns near onset?

    CERN Document Server

    Skeldon, A C

    2015-01-01

    The Faraday problem is an important pattern-forming system that provides some middle ground between systems where the initial instability involves just a single mode and in which complexity then results from mode interactions or secondary bifurcations, and cases where a system is highly turbulent and many spatial and temporal modes are excited. It has been a rich source of novel patterns and of theoretical work aimed at understanding how and why such patterns occur. Yet it is particularly challenging to tie theory to experiment: the experiments are difficult to perform; the parameter regime of interest (large box, moderate viscosity) along with the technical difficulties of solving the free boundary Navier--Stokes equations make numerical solution of the problem hard; and the fact that the instabilities result in an entire circle of unstable wavevectors presents considerable theoretical difficulties. In principle, weakly nonlinear theory should be able to predict which patterns are stable near pattern onset. ...

  2. Using Faraday Rotation to Probe MHD Instabilities in Intracluster Media

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanovic, Tamara; Massey, Richard

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that conduction-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities may operate at all radii within an intracluster medium (ICM), and profoundly affect the structure of a cluster's magnetic field. Where MHD instabilities dominate the dynamics of an ICM, they will re-orient magnetic field lines perpendicular to the temperature gradient inside a cooling core, or parallel to the temperature gradient outside it. This characteristic structure of magnetic field could be probed by measurements of polarized radio emission from background sources. Motivated by this possibility we have constructed 3-d models of a magnetized cooling core cluster and calculated Faraday rotation measure (RM) maps in the plane of the sky under realistic observing conditions. We compare a scenario in which magnetic field geometry is characterized by conduction driven MHD instabilities to that where it is determined by the turbulent motions. We find that future high-sensitivity spectro-polarimetric measurements of R...

  3. Faraday Instability in a Surface-Frozen Liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, P; Embs, J; Wagner, C; Deutsch, M; Kumar, S; Huber, Patrick; Soprunyuk, Viktor; Embs, Jan; Wagner, Christian; Deutsch, Moshe; Kumar, Satish

    2005-01-01

    Faraday surface instability measurements of the critical acceleration, a_c, and wavenumber, k_c, for standing surface waves on a tetracosanol (C_24H_50) melt exhibit abrupt changes at T_s=54degC above the bulk freezing temperature. The measured variations of a_c and k_c vs. temperature and driving frequency are accounted for quantitatively by a hydrodynamic model, revealing a change from a free-slip surface flow, generic for a free liquid surface (T>T_s), to a surface-pinned, no-slip flow, characteristic of a flow near a wetted solid wall (T < T_s). The change at T_s is traced to the onset of surface freezing, where the steep velocity gradient in the surface-pinned flow significantly increases the viscous dissipation near the surface.

  4. Laser -Based Joining of Metallic and Non-metallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabham, G.; Shanmugarajan, B.

    Laser as a high intensity heat source can be effectively used for joining of materials by fusion welding and brazing in autogenous or in hybrid modes. In autogenous mode, welding is done in conduction , deep penetration , and keyhole mode. However, due to inherently high energy density available from a laser source, autogenous keyhole welding is the most popular laser welding mode. But, it has certain limitations like need for extremely good joint fit-up, formation of very hard welds in steel , keyhole instability, loss of alloying elements, etc. To overcome these limitations, innovative variants such as laser-arc hybrid welding , induction-assisted welding , dual beam welding , etc., have been developed. Using laser heat, brazing can be performed by melting a filler to fill the joints, without melting the base materials. Accomplishing laser-based joining as mentioned above requires appropriate choice of laser source, beam delivery system, processing head with appropriate optics and accessories. Basic principles of various laser-based joining processes, laser system technology, process parameters, metallurgical effects on different base materials, joint performance, and applications are explained in this chapter.

  5. Medical diagnostics by laser-based analysis of exhaled breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubileo, Gianfranco

    2002-08-01

    IMany trace gases can be found in the exhaled breath, some of them giving the possibility of a non invasive diagnosis of related diseases or allowing the monitoring of the disease in the course of its therapy. In the present lecture the principle of medical diagnosis based on the breath analysis will be introduced and the detection of trace gases in exhaled breath by high- resolution molecular spectroscopy in the IR spectral region will be discussed. A number of substrates and the optical systems for their laser detection will be reported. The following laser based experimental systems has been realised in the Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory in ENEA in Frascati for the analysis of specific substances in the exhaled breath. A tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) appartus for the measurement of 13C/12C isotopic ratio in carbon dioxide, a TDLAS apparatus for the detection of CH4 and a CO2 laser based photoacoustic system to detect trace ethylene at atmospheric pressure. The experimental set-up for each one of the a.m. optical systems will be shown and the related medical applications will be illustrated. The concluding remarks will be focuses on chemical species that are of major interest for medical people today and their diagnostic ability.

  6. Period-doubling cascades galore

    OpenAIRE

    Sander, Evelyn; Yorke, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The appearance of numerous period-doubling cascades is among the most prominent features of {\\bf parametrized maps}, that is, smooth one-parameter families of maps $F:R \\times {\\mathfrak M} \\to {\\mathfrak M}$, where ${\\mathfrak M}$ is a smooth locally compact manifold without boundary, typically $R^N$. Each cascade has infinitely many period-doubling bifurcations, and it is typical to observe -- such as in all the examples we investigate here -- that whenever there are any cascades, there are...

  7. Inferring Network Structure from Cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Ghonge, Sushrut

    2016-01-01

    Many physical, biological and social phenomena can be described by cascades taking place on a network. Often, the activity can be empirically observed, but not the underlying network of interactions. In this paper we solve the dynamics of general cascade processes. We then offer three topological inversion methods to infer the structure of any directed network given a set of cascade arrival times. Our forward and inverse formulas hold for a very general class of models where the activation probability of a node is a generic function of its degree and the number of its active neighbors. We report high success rates for synthetic and real networks, for 5 different cascade models.

  8. Information cascade on networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hisakado, Masato

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model by considering three different kinds of networks: a random graph, the Barab\\'{a}si-Albert(BA) model, and a fitness model. A voting model represents the way in which public perceptions are conveyed to voters. Our voting model is constructed by using two types of voters--herders and independents--and two candidates. Independents conduct voting based on their fundamental values; on the other hand, herders base their voting on the number of previous votes. Hence, herders vote for the majority candidates and obtain information relating to previous votes from their networks. We discussed the difference between the phases on which the networks depend. Two kinds of phase transitions, an information cascade transition and a super-normal transition, were identified. The first of these is a transition between a state in which most voters make the correct choices and a state in which most of them are wrong. The second is a transition of convergence speed. The information cascade t...

  9. Energy Cascades in MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Most astrophysical and planetary systems e.g., solar convection and stellar winds, are in a turbulent state and coupled to magnetic fields. Understanding and quantifying the statistical properties of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) turbulence is crucial to explain the involved physical processes. Although the phenomenological theory of hydro-dynamic (HD) turbulence has been verified up to small corrections, a similar statement cannot be made for MHD turbulence. Since the phenomenological description of Hydrodynamic turbulence by Kolmogorov in 1941 there have been many attempts to derive a similar description for turbulence in conducting fluids (i.e Magneto-Hydrodynamic turbulence). However such a description is going to be based inevitably on strong assumptions (typically borrowed from hydrodynamics) that do not however necessarily apply to the MHD case. In this talk I will discuss some of the properties and differences of the energy and helicity cascades in turbulent MHD and HD flows. The investigation is going to be based on the analysis of direct numerical simulations. The cascades in MHD turbulence appear to be a more non-local process (in scale space) than in Hydrodynamics. Some implications of these results to turbulent modeling will be discussed

  10. Broadband Radio Polarimetry and Faraday Rotation of 563 Extragalactic Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, C S; Feain, I J; Franzen, T M O

    2015-01-01

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 \\& 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We have used rotation measure synthesis to identify Faraday complex polarized sources --- i.e. objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behaviour indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday simple polarized sources (i.e. sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12\\% of polarized sources at $\\sim1'$ resolution, but demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations...

  11. The application of compressive sampling to radio astronomy II: Faraday rotation measure synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Feng; Cornwell, Tim J; de Hoog, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Faraday rotation measure (RM) synthesis is an important tool to study and analyze galactic and extra-galactic magnetic fields. Since there is a Fourier relation between the Faraday dispersion function and the polarized radio emission, full reconstruction of the dispersion function requires knowledge of the polarized radio emission at both positive and negative square wavelengths $\\lambda^2$. However, one can only make observations for $\\lambda^2 > 0$. Furthermore observations are possible only for a limited range of wavelengths. Thus reconstructing the Faraday dispersion function from these limited measurements is ill-conditioned. In this paper, we propose three new reconstruction algorithms for RM synthesis based upon compressive sensing/sampling (CS). These algorithms are designed to be appropriate for Faraday thin sources only, thick sources only, and mixed sources respectively. Both visual and numerical results show that the new RM synthesis methods provide superior reconstructions of both magnitude and p...

  12. HIE-ISOLDE Faraday cups tested with ion beams at TRIUMF

    CERN Document Server

    Cantero, E D

    2014-01-01

    The future HIE-ISOLDE Faraday cups for both the intercryomodule regions and the HEBTs have been tested using 34S+7, 4He+, 23Na+6 and 20Ne+5 beams from the ISAC-II accelerator at TRIUMF. Their performance has been characterized together with the Faraday cups from REX-ISOLDE and those from ISAC-II. The measurements were done at E/A = 1.5, 2.85 and 5.5 MeV/u, with beam intensities in the range of 100 pA to 4 nA. The performance of these Faraday cups has been compared under the same beam conditions for different bias voltages up to -350 V. Within the experimental uncertainties, most of them coming from fluctuations in beam intensity, all devices showed similar results. Biasing the Faraday cup repeller ring to voltages of at least -60 V, the escape of secondary electrons was suppressed.

  13. BROADBAND RADIO POLARIMETRY AND FARADAY ROTATION OF 563 EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Franzen, T. M. O., E-mail: craiga@physics.usyd.edu.au [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2015-12-10

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 and 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have used rotation-measure synthesis to identify Faraday-complex polarized sources, those objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behavior indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday-complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday-simple polarized sources (sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12% of polarized sources at ∼1′ resolution, but we demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations mean the true percentage is likely to be significantly higher in the polarized radio source population. We find that the properties of Faraday-complex objects are diverse, but that complexity is most often associated with depolarization of extended radio sources possessing a relatively steep total intensity spectrum. We find an association between Faraday complexity and LOS structure in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and claim that a significant proportion of the Faraday complexity we observe may be generated at interfaces of the ISM associated with ionization fronts near neutral hydrogen structures. Galaxy cluster environments and internally generated Faraday complexity provide possible alternative explanations in some cases.

  14. Geometric Phase Of The Faraday Rotation Of Electromagnetic Waves In Magnetized Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian Liu and Hong Qin

    2011-11-07

    The geometric phase of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied theoretically. The variation of the propagation direction of circularly polarized waves results in a geometric phase, which also contributes to the Faraday rotation, in addition to the standard dynamical phase. The origin and properties of the geometric phase is investigated. The in uence of the geometric phase to plasma diagnostics using Faraday rotation is also discussed as an application of the theory.

  15. Broadband Radio Polarimetry and Faraday Rotation of 563 Extragalactic Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J.; Franzen, T. M. O.

    2015-12-01

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 and 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have used rotation-measure synthesis to identify Faraday-complex polarized sources, those objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behavior indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday-complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday-simple polarized sources (sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12% of polarized sources at ∼1‧ resolution, but we demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations mean the true percentage is likely to be significantly higher in the polarized radio source population. We find that the properties of Faraday-complex objects are diverse, but that complexity is most often associated with depolarization of extended radio sources possessing a relatively steep total intensity spectrum. We find an association between Faraday complexity and LOS structure in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and claim that a significant proportion of the Faraday complexity we observe may be generated at interfaces of the ISM associated with ionization fronts near neutral hydrogen structures. Galaxy cluster environments and internally generated Faraday complexity provide possible alternative explanations in some cases.

  16. Dynamical behavior of digitations state in Faraday waves with a viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Cecilia; Rosen, Marta; Ferreyra, Gabriel; Bongiovanni, Gustavo

    2006-11-01

    Parametrically excited surface waves, well known as Faraday waves, are studied when finger structures are generated on the free surface. In this state, the surface breaks and ejects droplets from wave peaks when the applied force exceeds an acceleration threshold. In this work, both the chaotic and turbulent bifurcation behaviors of Faraday surface waves have been intensively studied and many different transitions have been examined and described. The spatial and temporal finger distribution is studied as a function of external acceleration.

  17. Diode-laser frequency stabilization based on the resonant Faraday effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present the results of a method for frequency stabilizing laser diodes based on the resonant Faraday effects. A Faraday cell in conjunction with a polarizer crossed with respect to the polarization of the laser diode comprises the intracavity frequency selective element. In this arrangement, a laser pull-in range of 9 A was measured, and the laser operated at a single frequency with a linewidth less than 6 MHz.

  18. FARADAY PLASMA CURRENT SENSOR WITH COMPENSATION FOR RECIPROCAL BIREFRINGENCE INDUCED BY MECHANICALPERTURBATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. O. Barmenkov

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A Faraday fiber-optic current sensor was employed to measure the tokamak plasma current. In order todecrease the influence of mechanical perturbations on the sensor sensitivity, a two-pass optical scheme witha variable Faraday mirror at the fiber end is proposed. A decrease, by two orders of magnitude, in theinfluence of the linear birefringence produced by an external piezoceramic fiber modulator was experimentallyobserved.

  19. Effects of Faraday Rotation on Microwave Remote Sensing From Space at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, D. M.; Kao, M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of Faraday rotation on the remote sensing of soil moisture from space is investigated using the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) to obtain electron density profiles and the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) to model the magnetic field. With a judicious choice of satellite orbit (6 am, sunsynchronous) the errors caused by ignoring Faraday rotation are less than 1 K at incidence angles less than 40 degrees.

  20. Effect of the Quadrupole Moment of a Rotating Massive Object on the Gravitational Faraday Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈贻汉; 邵常贵

    2002-01-01

    We study the rotation of the polarization plane for a ray of electromagnetic radiation propagating in the grav-itoelectromagnetic field caused by a rotating massive object with the quadrupole moment. The effect of thequadrupole moment on the gravitational Faraday rotation is investigated. It is found that the gravitational Fara-day effect of the quadrupole moment is negligible for Kerr black holes, but this effect is important for rapidlyrotating neutron stars.

  1. WSRT Faraday tomography of the Galactic ISM at \\lambda ~ 0.86 m

    CERN Document Server

    Schnitzeler, D H F M; De Bruyn, A G

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the Galactic ISM by applying Faraday tomography to a radio polarization data set in the direction of the Galactic anti-centre. We address the problem of missing large-scale structure in our data, and show that this does not play an important role for the results we present. The main peak of the Faraday depth spectra in our data set is not measurably resolved for about 8% of the lines of sight. An unresolved peak indicates a separation between the regions with Faraday rotation and synchrotron emission. However, cosmic rays pervade the ISM, and synchrotron emission would therefore also be produced where there is Faraday rotation. We suggest that the orientation of the magnetic field can separate the two effects. By modelling the thermal electron contribution to the Faraday depth, we map the strength of the magnetic field component along the line of sight. Polarized point sources in our data set have rotation measures that are comparable to the Faraday depths of the diffuse emiss...

  2. Study on simulation and experiment of array micro Faraday cup ion detector for FAIMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An array micro Faraday cup ion detector for FAIMS (High-field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry) was introduced, with which the size of the FAIMS system was reduced. With simple structure, good stability, low noise, large measurements range, this detector can work under the condition of atmospheric pressure. The array micro Faraday cup was composed of gate electrode, sensitive electrode and shielding electrode. The sensitive electrode was made of tens of crossing silicon columns with diameter of 200 μm. It was fabricated through typical MEMS technology, which was compatible completely with plane FAIMS. It was shown from FLUENT simulation result that the resistance to gas motion was low and the flow field distribution was helpful for full absorption of the ion in this array design. Through electricity simulation, the method to reduce interference on the detection signal of the micro Faraday cup was given out. Connecting with KEITHLEY 237 ampere meter, the noise level of the array micro Faraday cup was lower than 0.5 pA. The output signal of the acetone sample measured by experiment was about 210 pA. Through contrast experiment, the design parameter of the micro Faraday cup was obtained primarily. This array micro Faraday cup can meet the requirements of the FAIMS system.

  3. Linear theory on temporal instability of megahertz faraday waves for monodisperse microdroplet ejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shirley C; Tsai, Chen S

    2013-08-01

    A linear theory on temporal instability of megahertz Faraday waves for monodisperse microdroplet ejection based on mass conservation and linearized Navier-Stokes equations is presented using the most recently observed micrometer- sized droplet ejection from a millimeter-sized spherical water ball as a specific example. The theory is verified in the experiments utilizing silicon-based multiple-Fourier horn ultrasonic nozzles at megahertz frequency to facilitate temporal instability of the Faraday waves. Specifically, the linear theory not only correctly predicted the Faraday wave frequency and onset threshold of Faraday instability, the effect of viscosity, the dynamics of droplet ejection, but also established the first theoretical formula for the size of the ejected droplets, namely, the droplet diameter equals four-tenths of the Faraday wavelength involved. The high rate of increase in Faraday wave amplitude at megahertz drive frequency subsequent to onset threshold, together with enhanced excitation displacement on the nozzle end face, facilitated by the megahertz multiple Fourier horns in resonance, led to high-rate ejection of micrometer- sized monodisperse droplets (>10(7) droplets/s) at low electrical drive power (<;1 W) with short initiation time (<;0.05 s). This is in stark contrast to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability of a liquid jet, which ejects one droplet at a time. The measured diameters of the droplets ranging from 2.2 to 4.6 μm at 2 to 1 MHz drive frequency fall within the optimum particle size range for pulmonary drug delivery.

  4. Axion search by laser-based experiment OSQAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulc, M.; Pugnat, P.; Ballou, R.; Deferne, G.; Duvillaret, L.; Flekova, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Hosek, J.; Husek, T.; Jost, R.; Kral, M.; Kunc, S.; Macuchova, K.; Meissner, K. A.; Morville, J.; Romanini, D.; Schott, M.; Siemko, A.; Slunecka, M.; Vitrant, G.; Zicha, J.

    2013-08-01

    Laser-based experiment OSQAR in CERN is aimed to the search of the axions by two methods. The photon regeneration experiment is using two LHC dipole magnets of the length 14.3 m and magnetic field 9.5 T equipped with an optical barrier at the end of the first magnet. It looks as light shining through the wall. No excess of events above the background was detected at this arrangement. Nevertheless, this result extends the exclusion region for the axion mass. The second method wants to measure the ultra-fine vacuum magnetic birefringence for the first time. An optical scheme with electro-optical modulator has been proposed, validated and subsequently improved. Cotton-Mouton constant for air was determined in this experiment setup.

  5. Axion search by laser-based experiment OSQAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulc, M., E-mail: miroslav.sulc@tul.cz [Technical University of Liberec (Czech Republic); Pugnat, P. [LNCMI-G, CNRS-UJF-UPS-INSA, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex-9 (France); Ballou, R. [Institut Néel, CNRS and Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex-9 (France); Deferne, G. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva-23 (Switzerland); Duvillaret, L. [IMEP-LAHC, UMR CNRS 5130, Minatec-INPG, 3 parvis Louis Néel, BP 257, 38016 Grenoble Cedex-1 (France); Flekova, L. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Finger, M.; Finger, M. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Hosek, J. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Husek, T. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Jost, R. [LSP, UMR CNRS 5588, Université Joseph Fourier, BP 87, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Hères (France); Kral, M. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Kunc, S. [Technical University of Liberec (Czech Republic); Macuchova, K. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Meissner, K.A. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw (Poland); Morville, J. [LASIM, UMR CNRS 5579, Université Claude Bernard Lyon-1, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Romanini, D. [LSP, UMR CNRS 5588, Université Joseph Fourier, BP 87, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Hères (France); Schott, M.; Siemko, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva-23 (Switzerland); Slunecka, M. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); and others

    2013-08-01

    Laser-based experiment OSQAR in CERN is aimed to the search of the axions by two methods. The photon regeneration experiment is using two LHC dipole magnets of the length 14.3 m and magnetic field 9.5 T equipped with an optical barrier at the end of the first magnet. It looks as light shining through the wall. No excess of events above the background was detected at this arrangement. Nevertheless, this result extends the exclusion region for the axion mass. The second method wants to measure the ultra-fine vacuum magnetic birefringence for the first time. An optical scheme with electro-optical modulator has been proposed, validated and subsequently improved. Cotton–Mouton constant for air was determined in this experiment setup.

  6. Laser-based sensors for oil spill remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carl E.; Fingas, Mervin F.; Mullin, Joseph V.

    1997-07-01

    Remote sensing is becoming an increasingly important tool for the effective direction of oil spill countermeasures. Cleanup personnel have recognized that remote sensing can increase spill cleanup efficiency. It has long been recognized that there is no one sensor which is capable of detecting oil and related petroleum products in all environments and spill scenarios. There are sensors which possess a wide field-of- view and can therefore be used to map the overall extent of the spill. These sensors, however lack the capability to positively identify oil and related products, especially along complicated beach and shoreline environments where several substrates are present. The laser-based sensors under development by the Emergencies Science Division of Environment Canada are designed to fill specific roles in oil spill response. The scanning laser environmental airborne fluorosensor (SLEAF) is being developed to detect and map oil and related petroleum products in complex marine and shoreline environments where other non-specific sensors experience difficulty. The role of the SLEAF would be to confirm or reject suspected oil contamination sites that have been targeted by the non-specific sensors. This confirmation will release response crews from the time-consuming task of physically inspecting each site, and direct crews to sites that require remediation. The laser ultrasonic remote sensing of oil thickness (LURSOT) sensor will provide an absolute measurement of oil thickness from an airborne platform. There are presently no sensors available, either airborne or in the laboratory which can provide an absolute measurement of oil thickness. This information is necessary for the effective direction of spill countermeasures such as dispersant application and in-situ burning. This paper describes the development of laser-based airborne oil spill remote sensing instrumentation at Environment Canada and identifies the anticipated benefits of the use of this technology

  7. Applications of laser based measurements to combustion related fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingmann, J.

    1998-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with laser based techniques for the measurement of fluid dynamical properties and their application to combusting flow fields or flow fields related to combustion. As an introduction, the theory of turbulent flow and combustion is shortly presented. An overview of laser based measuring techniques is given. Next, seven papers are included. The main topic of papers 1 and 2 is the measurements of swirling pipe flows with sudden axi-symmetric expansions. These flow fields are related to the flow fields of gas turbine combustors. Measurements and computations using commercial software are compared. Papers 3 and 7 deal with a laser Doppler anemometry based method for the measurement of the turbulent dissipation rate and its application to an axi-symmetric free jet, respectively. The measurements rely on two-point measurements with high spatial resolution. Also three-component one-point measurements are used to obtain the triple velocity correlations. Together these measurements are sufficient to present the energy balance, if pressure effects are neglected. Papers 4, 5 and 6 are concerned with the turbulent flame speed under premixed conditions. Papers 4 and 5 present flame speed measurements from a stationary burner using methane and Danish natural gas. Particle image velocimetry and one- and two-point Laser Doppler anemometry is used to measure flame speed and turbulent quantities, including integral length scales. Paper 7 presents measurements of flame speed and turbulence parameters in a spark ignition engine. Here heat release analyses from pressure measurements are combined with one- and two-point laser Doppler anemometry to analyze influence of turbulence on flame propagation 50 refs, 25 figs

  8. Cascade Distillation System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargushingh, Miriam; Shull, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support System (LSS) Project is chartered with de-veloping advanced life support systems that will ena-ble NASA human exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The goal of AES is to increase the affordabil-ity of long-duration life support missions, and to re-duce the risk associated with integrating and infusing new enabling technologies required to ensure mission success. Because of the robust nature of distillation systems, the AES LSS Project is pursuing develop-ment of the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) as part of its technology portfolio. Currently, the system is being developed into a flight forward Generation 2.0 design.

  9. Interband cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurgaftman, I.; Weih, R.; Kamp, M.; Meyer, J. R.; Canedy, C. L.; Kim, C. S.; Kim, M.; Bewley, W. W.; Merritt, C. D.; Abell, J.; Höfling, S.

    2015-04-01

    We review the current status of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the midwave infrared (IR). The ICL may be considered the hybrid of a conventional diode laser that generates photons via electron-hole recombination, and an intersubband-based quantum cascade laser (QCL) that stacks multiple stages for enhanced current efficiency. Following a brief historical overview, we discuss theoretical aspects of the active region and core designs, growth by molecular beam epitaxy, and the processing of broad-area, narrow-ridge, and distributed feedback (DFB) devices. We then review the experimental performance of pulsed broad area ICLs, as well as the continuous-wave (cw) characteristics of narrow ridges having good beam quality and DFBs producing output in a single spectral mode. Because the threshold drive powers are far lower than those of QCLs throughout the λ = 3-6 µm spectral band, ICLs are increasingly viewed as the laser of choice for mid-IR laser spectroscopy applications that do not require high output power but need to be hand-portable and/or battery operated. Demonstrated ICL performance characteristics to date include threshold current densities as low as 106 A cm-2 at room temperature (RT), cw threshold drive powers as low as 29 mW at RT, maximum cw operating temperatures as high as 118 °C, maximum cw output powers exceeding 400 mW at RT, maximum cw wallplug efficiencies as high as 18% at RT, maximum cw single-mode output powers as high as 55 mW at RT, and single-mode output at λ = 5.2 µm with a cw drive power of only 138 mW at RT.

  10. Unsteady turbulence cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5 /3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935), 10.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  11. Probing the central parsecs of AGN using Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, R. T.; Taylor, G. B.

    2002-05-01

    A broad frequency range and low instrumental polarization makes the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) an ideal instrument for studying polarimetry at sub-milliarcsecond resolution. To take advantage of these unique capabilities we have conducted a multi-frequency polarization survey of 40 radio-loud AGN (Quasars, BL Lacs, and radio galaxies). Our aim is to use Faraday Rotation Measures (RMs) as a probe of the central 1-50 parsecs of these objects. The RM is produced by the line of sight magnetic field weighted by the electron density. Using the electron density established through spectral line diagnostics a magnetic field strength and topology can be estimated within a few parsecs of the central engines of these AGN. The observations for the survey are complete, and we present the first results for 8 quasars, 5 BL Lacs, and 4 radio galaxies. The magnitudes for the RMs range from several thousand rad m-2 in the quasars and radio galaxies to a few hundred rad m-2 in the BL Lac objects. These values are in agreement with the basic ideas of the unified model for AGN. We also observe variations in the RM on small spatial (time scales ( ~ 6 months) in the quasars 3C 273 and 3C 279. R.T.Z. gratefully acknowledges support from a pre-doctoral research appointment at NRAO and from the New Mexico Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professiorate through NSF grant HRD-0086701.

  12. Photoswitchable Faraday effect in EuS-Au nanosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Akira; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Fushimi, Koji; Hasegawa, Yasuchika [Division of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, North-13 West-8, Kita-ku, 060-8628, Sapporo (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Effective photoswitchable europium sulfide nanocrystals with gold nanoparticles using dithiol (DDT: 1,10-decanedithiol) joint molecules, EuS-Au nanosystems, are demonstrated. The TEM image indicates the formation of EuS-Au nanosystems composed of cube-shaped EuS nanocrystals and spherical Au nanoparticles. Under visible-light irradiation, a drastic change of absorption band of EuS-Au nanosystems at around 600 nm was observed. The Faraday effects of EuS-Au nanosystems were estimated using magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurements. The effective change of the MCD spectra of EuS-Au nanosystems under visible-light irradiation was successfully observed at around 670 nm for the first time. The effective reversible changes in MCD spectra with the alternative irradiation cycles of visible light (>440 nm) and dark are also presented. The decrease rate of rotation angle at 670 nm of EuS-Au nanosystems is larger than that of absorbance. These results indicate that the effective change of MCD spectra of EuS-Au nanosystems would be dominated not only by a drastic change of absorption band related to enhanced LSPR of Au nanoparticles but also by specific interaction between EuS and Au in nanosystem under irradiation. Illustration of photoswitch and TEM image of EuS-Au nanosystems. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Homogenized boundary conditions and resonance effects in Faraday cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, D. P.; Hewitt, I. J.

    2016-05-01

    We present a mathematical study of two-dimensional electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by a cage of conducting wires (the so-called `Faraday cage effect'). Taking the limit as the number of wires in the cage tends to infinity, we use the asymptotic method of multiple scales to derive continuum models for the shielding, involving homogenized boundary conditions on an effective cage boundary. We show how the resulting models depend on key cage parameters such as the size and shape of the wires, and, in the electromagnetic case, on the frequency and polarization of the incident field. In the electromagnetic case, there are resonance effects, whereby at frequencies close to the natural frequencies of the equivalent solid shell, the presence of the cage actually amplifies the incident field, rather than shielding it. By appropriately modifying the continuum model, we calculate the modified resonant frequencies, and their associated peak amplitudes. We discuss applications to radiation containment in microwave ovens and acoustic scattering by perforated shells.

  14. Theory of Kerr and Faraday rotation in Topological Weyl Semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargarian, Mehdi; Randeria, Mohit; Trivedi, Nandini

    2015-03-01

    Topological Weyl semimetals are characterized by bulk Dirac nodes separated in momentum space by a distance 2 b and lead to Fermi arcs in the surfaces electronic structure. We calculate the Faraday θF and Kerr θK angles for electromagnetic waves scattered from such a Weyl semimetal using the Kubo formalism. (1) For thin films with electromagnetic radiation incident on a surface without arcs, we show that θK = bd / απ and θF = απ / bd where α is the fine structure constant, and the film thickness d film on a substrate. (2) In the case when the electromagnetic radiation is incident on the surface with arcs, the wave propagating inside the material acquires a longitudinal component of the electric field proportional to b. We discuss the implications of our results for thin films of pyrochlore iridates, and also for the recently discovered Dirac semimetals in a magnetic field. We acknowledge the support of the CEM, an NSF MRSEC, under Grant DMR-1420451.

  15. A Sensitive Faraday Rotation Setup Using Triple Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Phelps, Gretchen; Broering, Mark; Korsch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of polarized targets in scattering experiments has become a common practice in many major accelerator laboratories. Noble gases are especially suitable for such applications, since they can be easily hyper-polarized using spin exchange or metastable pumping techniques. Polarized helium-3 is a very popular target because it often serves as an effective polarized neutron due to its simple nuclear structure. A favorite cell material to generate and store polarized helium-3 is GE-180, a relatively dense aluminosilicate glass. In this paper, we present a Faraday rotation method, using a new triple modulation technique, where the measurement of the Verdet constants of SF57 flint glass, pyrex glass, and air were tested. The sensitivity obtained shows that this technique may be implemented in future cell wall characterization and thickness measurements. We also discuss the first ever extraction of the Verdet constant of GE-180 glass for four wavelength values of 632 nm, 773 nm, 1500 nm, and 1547 nm, w...

  16. Homogenized boundary conditions and resonance effects in Faraday cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, I. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical study of two-dimensional electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by a cage of conducting wires (the so-called ‘Faraday cage effect’). Taking the limit as the number of wires in the cage tends to infinity, we use the asymptotic method of multiple scales to derive continuum models for the shielding, involving homogenized boundary conditions on an effective cage boundary. We show how the resulting models depend on key cage parameters such as the size and shape of the wires, and, in the electromagnetic case, on the frequency and polarization of the incident field. In the electromagnetic case, there are resonance effects, whereby at frequencies close to the natural frequencies of the equivalent solid shell, the presence of the cage actually amplifies the incident field, rather than shielding it. By appropriately modifying the continuum model, we calculate the modified resonant frequencies, and their associated peak amplitudes. We discuss applications to radiation containment in microwave ovens and acoustic scattering by perforated shells. PMID:27279775

  17. Scaling properties of weakly nonlinear coefficients in the Faraday problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeldon, A C; Porter, J

    2011-07-01

    Interesting and exotic surface wave patterns have regularly been observed in the Faraday experiment. Although symmetry arguments provide a qualitative explanation for the selection of some of these patterns (e.g., superlattices), quantitative analysis is hindered by mathematical difficulties inherent in a time-dependent, free-boundary Navier-Stokes problem. More tractable low viscosity approximations are available, but these do not necessarily capture the moderate viscosity regime of the most interesting experiments. Here we focus on weakly nonlinear behavior and compare the scaling results derived from symmetry arguments in the low viscosity limit with the computed coefficients of appropriate amplitude equations using both the full Navier-Stokes equations and a reduced set of partial differential equations due to Zhang and Vinãls. We find the range of viscosities over which one can expect "low viscosity" theories to hold. We also find that there is an optimal viscosity range for locating superlattice patterns experimentally-large enough that the region of parameters giving stable patterns is not impracticably small, yet not so large that crucial resonance effects are washed out. These results help explain some of the discrepancies between theory and experiment.

  18. A sensitive Faraday rotation setup using triple modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, G.; Abney, J.; Broering, M.; Korsch, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The utilization of polarized targets in scattering experiments has become a common practice in many major accelerator laboratories. Noble gases are especially suitable for such applications, since they can be easily hyper-polarized using spin exchange or metastable pumping techniques. Polarized helium-3 is a very popular target because it often serves as an effective polarized neutron due to its simple nuclear structure. A favorite cell material to generate and store polarized helium-3 is GE-180, a relatively dense aluminosilicate glass. In this paper, we present a Faraday rotation method, using a new triple modulation technique, where the measurement of the Verdet constants of SF57 flint glass, pyrex glass, and air was tested. The sensitivity obtained shows that this technique may be implemented in future cell wall characterization and thickness measurements. We also discuss the first ever extraction of the Verdet constant of GE-180 glass for four wavelength values of 632 nm, 773 nm, 1500 nm, and 1547 nm, whereupon the expected 1/λ{sup 2} dependence was observed.

  19. A Faraday rotation diagnostic for Z pinch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, K. W.; Intrator, T. P.; Weber, T. E.; Yoo, C. B.; Klarenbeek, J.

    2012-10-01

    The MagLIF experiment is an approach to Magneto Inertial Fusion (MIF) that will compress a laser preheated magnetized plasma inside a small sub cm size beryllium capsule and the magnetic field inside. A good measurement of the compressed magnetic field will help us understand how the compression proceeds, and the time scale over which field diffuses out. We are working on a first step to the direct measurement of vacuum magnetic field (expected to be mostly Bz) compression time history, potentially space-resolved, without a plasma fill. A small magneto-active section of optical fiber can measure magnetic fields in the 1-1000 Tesla range. Directly measured vacuum Bz is an initial but important step towards validating the codes supporting MagLIF. The technology will use a Terbium doped optical fiber as a Faraday rotation medium. The optical path and hardware is simple, inexpensive, and small enough to fit inside a MagLIF capsule, and can be radiation hardened. Low noise, optically coupled magnetic field measurements will be possible for vacuum MagLIF shots.

  20. Homogenized boundary conditions and resonance effects in Faraday cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, D P; Hewitt, I J

    2016-05-01

    We present a mathematical study of two-dimensional electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by a cage of conducting wires (the so-called 'Faraday cage effect'). Taking the limit as the number of wires in the cage tends to infinity, we use the asymptotic method of multiple scales to derive continuum models for the shielding, involving homogenized boundary conditions on an effective cage boundary. We show how the resulting models depend on key cage parameters such as the size and shape of the wires, and, in the electromagnetic case, on the frequency and polarization of the incident field. In the electromagnetic case, there are resonance effects, whereby at frequencies close to the natural frequencies of the equivalent solid shell, the presence of the cage actually amplifies the incident field, rather than shielding it. By appropriately modifying the continuum model, we calculate the modified resonant frequencies, and their associated peak amplitudes. We discuss applications to radiation containment in microwave ovens and acoustic scattering by perforated shells.

  1. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-07-15

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the (88)Sr (5s(2))(1)S0 - (5s5p)(1)P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization.

  2. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The Cascade mountain system extends from northern California to central British Columbia. In Oregon, it comprises the Cascade Range, which is 260 miles long and, at greatest breadth, 90 miles wide (fig. 1). Oregon’s Cascade Range covers roughly 17,000 square miles, or about 17 percent of the state, an area larger than each of the smallest nine of the fifty United States. The range is bounded on the east by U.S. Highways 97 and 197. On the west it reaches nearly to Interstate 5, forming the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and, farther south, abutting the Coast Ranges. 

  3. Faraday tomography of the local interstellar medium with LOFAR: Galactic foregrounds towards IC 342

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eck, C. L.; Haverkorn, M.; Alves, M. I. R.; Beck, R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Enßlin, T.; Farnes, J. S.; Ferrière, K.; Heald, G.; Horellou, C.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Jelić, V.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Sobey, C.; Sridhar, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the interstellar medium (ISM), but are difficult to detect and characterize. The new generation of low-frequency radio telescopes, such as the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR: a Square Kilometre Array-low pathfinder), provides advancements in our capability of probing Galactic magnetism through low-frequency polarimetry. Maps of diffuse polarized radio emission and the associated Faraday rotation can be used to infer properties of, and trace structure in, the magnetic fields in the ISM. However, to date very little of the sky has been probed at high angular and Faraday depth resolution. We observed a 5° by 5° region centred on the nearby galaxy IC 342 (ℓ = 138.2°,b = + 10.6°) using the LOFAR high-band antennae in the frequency range 115-178 MHz. We imaged this region at 4'.5x3'.8 resolution and performed Faraday tomography to detect foreground Galactic polarized synchrotron emission separated by Faraday depth (different amounts of Faraday rotation). Our Faraday depth cube shows a rich polarized structure, with up to 30 K of polarized emission at 150 MHz. We clearly detect two polarized features that extend over most of the field, but are clearly separated in Faraday depth. Simulations of the behaviour of the depolarization of Faraday-thick structures at such low frequencies show that such structures would be too strongly depolarized to explain the observations. These structures are therefore rejected as the source of the observed polarized features. Only Faraday thin structures will not be strongly depolarized at low frequencies; producing such structures requires localized variations in the ratio of synchrotron emissivity to Faraday depth per unit distance. Such variations can arise from several physical phenomena, such as a transition between regions of ionized and (mostly) neutral gas. We conclude that the observed polarized emission is Faraday thin, and propose that the emission originates from two mostly neutral clouds in the local ISM

  4. Cascade Product of Permutation Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Egri-Nagy, Attila; Nehaniv, Chrystopher L.

    2013-01-01

    We define the cascade product of permutation groups as an external product, an explicit construction of substructures of the iterated wreath product that are much smaller than the full wreath product. This construction is essential for computational implementations of algebraic hierarchical decompositions of finite automata. We show how direct, semidirect, and wreath products and group extensions can all be expressed as cascade products, and analyse examples of groups that can be constructed ...

  5. Low Noise Interband Cascade Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    National Laboratories, Zhaobing Tian, Zhihua Cai, R. T. Hinkey, L. Li, Tetsuya D. Mishima , Michael B. Santos, and Matthew B. Johnson at the...Phys. 107, No. 5, 054514 (2010). 2. R. Q. Yang, Z. Tian, J. F. Klem, T. D. Mishima , M. B. Santos, and M. B. Johnson, “Interband cascade photovoltaic...2012). 4. Z. Tian, Z. Cai, R. Q. Yang, T. D. Mishima , M. B. Santos, M. B. Johnson, and J. F. Klem, “Interband Cascade Infrared Photodetectors

  6. Are longer cascades more stable?

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Yes, they are. We consider data from experimental cascade games that were run in different laboratories, and find uniformly that subjects are more willing to follow the crowd, the bigger the crowd is �although the decision makers who are added to the crowd should in theory simply follow suit and hence reveal no information. This correlation of length and strength of cascades appears consistently across games with different parameters and different choice sets for the subjects. ...

  7. Aeroelasticity in Turbomachine-Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-10

    STABLE -180 UNSTABLE -360 ’ - ’ - -180 0. 󈧖O DIAGRAM 3 AERODYNAMIC LIFT (OENT)COEFFICIENTI AND PHASE LEADS IN DEPENDANCE OF FLOM GUANTATIES AND CASCADE...ABL -0.8 0.0 -5 0. -5 DIAGRAM ’. AERODYNAMIC NORK AND DAMPING COEFFICIENTS (FOR A RIGID NOTION) IN DEPENDANCE OF FLOW OURNTATIES AND CASCADE GEOMETRY...coefficients on blades + blade vibration + vizualization in the transonic flow domain (Schlieren) + instability dependance on flow conditions, blade

  8. Cascading Gravity is Ghost Free

    CERN Document Server

    de Rham, Claudia; Tolley, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    We perform a full perturbative stability analysis of the 6D cascading gravity model in the presence of 3-brane tension. We demonstrate that for sufficiently large tension on the (flat) 3-brane, there are no ghosts at the perturbative level, consistent with results that had previously only been obtained in a specific 5D decoupling limit. These results establish the cascading gravity framework as a consistent infrared modification of gravity.

  9. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A LASER BASED LOCAL POSITIONING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Lubbe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: There is no cheap, accurate device available with which the position of a slow moving object , such as a lawnmower cutting lawn, can be determined. If such a positioning system were available it would be possible to develop numerous programmable moving machines that can be taught computer-wise to perform daily chores. In this paper a prototype local positioning system, which could possibly be applied to determine the absolute position in relation to a fixed point for slow moving objects, is discussed. Accuracy, shortcomings and possible improvements of a laser based prototype are discussed.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Daar is geen goedkoop, akkurate wyse beskikbaar om die posisie van 'n stadigbewegende voorwerp soos 'n grassnyer oor 'n grasperk te bepaal nie. Indien so 'n posisioneringstelsel wei beskikbaar sou wees, sou dit moontlik wees om 'n groot verskeidenheid programmeerbare bewegende masjiene te ontwikkel wat rekenaargewys geleer kan word om alledaagse take te verrig. In hierdie artikel word 'n prototipe 10kale posisioneringstelsel bespreek wat moontlik aangewend kan word om die absolute posisie, ten opsigte van 'n vaste punt, van stadigbewegende voorwerpe te bepaal. Akkuraatheid, tekortkomings en moontlike verbeterings van 'n lasergebaseerde prototipestelsel word bespreek.

  10. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsin, Tse-Ming [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  11. Residual Stress Determination from a Laser-Based Curvature Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swank, William David; Gavalya, Rick Allen; Wright, Julie Knibloe; Wright, Richard Neil

    2000-05-01

    Thermally sprayed coating characteristics and mechanical properties are in part a result of the residual stress developed during the fabrication process. The total stress state in a coating/substrate is comprised of the quench stress and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch stress. The quench stress is developed when molten particles impact the substrate and rapidly cool and solidify. The CTE mismatch stress results from a large difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate material. It comes into effect when the substrate/coating combination cools from the equilibrated deposit temperature to room temperature. This paper describes a laser-based technique for measuring the curvature of a coated substrate and the analysis required to determine residual stress from curvature measurements. Quench stresses were determined by heating the specimen back to the deposit temperature thus removing the CTE mismatch stress. By subtracting the quench stress from the total residual stress at room temperature, the CTE mismatch stress was estimated. Residual stress measurements for thick (>1mm) spinel coatings with a Ni-Al bond coat on 304 stainless steel substrates were made. It was determined that a significant portion of the residual stress results from the quenching stress of the bond coat and that the spinel coating produces a larger CTE mismatch stress than quench stress.

  12. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Daehak-ro 291, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701) (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  13. The simulation of laser-based guided weapon engagements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jaberi, Mubarak; Richardson, Mark; Coath, John; Jenkin, Robin

    2006-05-01

    The laser is an integrated part of many weapon systems, such as laser guided bombs, laser guided missiles and laser beam-riding missiles. These systems pose a significant threat to military assets on the modern battlefield. The lasers used in beam-riding missiles are particularly hard to detect as they typically use relatively low power lasers. Beamriders are also particularly difficult to defeat as current countermeasure systems have not been optimized against this threat. Some recent field trails conducted in the United Arab Emirates desert have demonstrated poor performance of both laser beam-riding systems and the LWRs designed to detect them. The aim of this research is to build a complete evaluation tool capable of assessing all the phases of an engagement of a main battle tank or armoured fighting vehicle with a laser based guided weapon. To this end a software model has been produced using Matlab & Simulink. This complete model has been verified using lab based experimentation and by comparison to the result of the mentioned field trials. This project will enable both the evaluation and design of any generic laser warning receiver or missile seeker and specific systems if various parameters are known. Moreover, this model will be used as a guide to the development of reliable countermeasures for laser beam-riding missiles.

  14. Dental hard tissue characterization using laser-based ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, David W.; Massey, Ward L.

    2003-07-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. One critical need is the detection of tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated to help re-mineralize the tooth. Currently employed x-ray imaging is limited in its ability to visualize interfaces and incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration. To this end, non-destructive and non-contact in vitro measurements on extracted human molars using laser-based ultrasonics are presented. Broadband ultrasonic waves are excited in the extracted sections by using a pulsed carbon-dioxide (CO2) laser operating in a region of high optical absorption in the dental hard tissues. Optical interferometric detection of the ultrasonic wave surface displacements in accomplished with a path-stabilized Michelson-type interferometer. Results for bulk and surface in-vitro characterization of caries are presented on extracted molars with pre-existing caries.

  15. A view through Faraday's Fog: Parsec scale Rotation Measures in AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, R. T.; Taylor, G. B.

    2002-12-01

    The magnetic field orientations and strengths, and thermal gas densities and pressures can all be probed on parsec scales in active galactic nuclei using VLBA polarimetry. Faraday's Fog, a foreground Faraday rotating medium in the AGN core, is what makes this possible. To take advantage of this effect to explore the central engine we have completed a rotation measure survey of 40 quasars, BL Lac objects, and radio galaxies. We summarize a few interesting results here. Quasars and radio galaxies show substantial rotation measures (> 1000 rad m-2) but BL Lacertae objects do not. A decreasing core percent polarization appears correlated with an increasing Faraday rotation measure. Faraday depolarization cannot account for this as the rotation measures are approximately two orders of magnitude too small to cause depolarization across an observing bandwidth. A more likely explanation for the depolarization is a gradient in the rotation measure across the synthesized beam. Multi-epoch observations of 3C 279 suggest that rotation measure variations may be tracked over time by changes in the percent polarization. The core rotation measures of the sample appears to be independent of core dominance. We will suggest possible identifications of the Faraday screen. R.T.Z gratefully acknowledges support from a pre-doctoral research appointment at NRAO and from the New Mexico Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professiorate through NSF grant HRD-0086701.

  16. Diagnostics of the solar corona from comparison between Faraday rotation measurements and magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Chat, G.; Cohen, O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kasper, J. C. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Spangler, S. R., E-mail: gaetan.lechat@obspm.fr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-07-10

    Polarized natural radio sources passing behind the Sun experience Faraday rotation as a consequence of the electron density and magnetic field strength in coronal plasma. Since Faraday rotation is proportional to the product of the density and the component of the magnetic field along the line of sight of the observer, a model is required to interpret the observations and infer coronal structures. Faraday rotation observations have been compared with relatively ad hoc models of the corona. Here for the first time we compare these observations with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the solar corona driven by measurements of the photospheric magnetic field. We use observations made with the NRAO Very Large Array of 34 polarized radio sources occulted by the solar corona between 5 and 14 solar radii. The measurements were made during 1997 May, and 2005 March and April. We compare the observed Faraday rotation values with values extracted from MHD steady-state simulations of the solar corona. We find that (1) using a synoptic map of the solar magnetic field just one Carrington rotation off produces poorer agreements, meaning that the outer corona changes in the course of one month, even in solar minimum; (2) global MHD models of the solar corona driven by photospheric magnetic field measurements are generally able to reproduce Faraday rotation observations; and (3) some sources show significant disagreement between the model and the observations, which appears to be a function of the proximity of the line of sight to the large-scale heliospheric current sheet.

  17. Faraday laser using 1.2 km fiber as an extended cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaogang; Pan, Duo; Chen, Mo; Zhu, Chuanwen; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a Faraday laser using a 1.2 km fiber as an extended cavity, which provides optical feedback and obtains small free spectrum range (FSR) of 83 kHz, and have succeeded in limiting the laser frequency to a crossover transition {5}2{S}1/2,F=2\\to {5}2{P}3/2,F\\prime =1,3 of the natural 87Rb at 780 nm. The Faraday laser is based on a Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) with an ultra-narrow bandwidth and the long fiber extended cavity of 1.2 km. The peak transmission assigned to the crossover transition F=2\\to F\\prime =1,3 in the FADOF is 20.5% with an ultra-narrow bandwidth of 29.1 MHz. The Allan deviation of the Faraday laser is around 6.0× {10}-11 in 0.06 to 1 s sampling time. Laser frequency is always kept in the center of the transmitted peak assigned to F=2\\to F\\prime =1,3. The Faraday laser realized here can provide light exactly resonant with an atomic transition used for atom-photon interaction experiments and is insensitive to diode temperature and injection current fluctuations.

  18. Position control of desiccation cracks by memory effect and Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yousuke; Takeshi, Ooshida; Nakahara, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation of desiccation cracks on a layer of a calcium carbonate paste is studied experimentally. This paste is known to exhibit a memory effect, which means that a short-time application of horizontal vibration to the fresh paste predetermines the direction of the cracks that are formed after the paste is dried. While the position of the cracks (as opposed to their direction) is still stochastic in the case of horizontal vibration, the present work reports that their positioning is also controllable, at least to some extent, by applying vertical vibration to the paste and imprinting the pattern of Faraday waves, thus breaking the translational symmetry of the system. The experiments show that the cracks tend to appear in the node zones of the Faraday waves: in the case of stripe-patterned Faraday waves, the cracks are formed twice more frequently in the node zones than in the anti-node zones, presumably due to the localized horizontal motion. As a result of this preference of the cracks to the node zones, the memory of the square lattice pattern of Faraday waves makes the cracks run in the oblique direction differing by 45 degrees from the intuitive lattice direction of the Faraday waves.

  19. Through the Looking Glass: Faraday Conversion in Turbulent Blazar Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Roy MacDonald

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Faint levels of circular polarization (Stokes V have been detected in several relativistic jets. While typically less than a few percent, circular polarization can give us critical insight into the underlying nature of the jet plasma. Circular polarization can be produced through a process known as linear birefringence, in which initially linearly polarized emission produced in one region of the jet is altered by Faraday rotation as it propagates through other regions of the jet with distinct magnetic field orientations. Recently, Marscher has developed the Turbulent Extreme Multi-Zone (TEMZ model for blazar emission, in which turbulent plasma crossing a standing shock in the jet is represented by a collection of thousands of individual plasma cells, each with distinct magnetic field orientation. In order to test whether the TEMZ model can reproduce circularly polarized radiation at levels comparable to those observed in blazars, I have developed a numerical algorithm to solve the full Stokes equations of polarized radiative transfer. I have embedded this algorithm into the ray-tracing code RADMC3D (http://ascl.net/1202.015. RADMC3D was originally developed to model continuum radiative transfer in dusty media. This code, however, has been written in a modularized fashion that allows the user to specify the physics that is incorporated into the radiative transfer. I have replaced RADMC3D’s thermal emission and absorption coefficients with non-thermal coefficients pertaining to polarized synchrotron emission. This code is applied to ray-tracing through the 3-D TEMZ computational grid. Here I present a suite of synthetic polarized emission maps that highlight the effect that thousands of distinct cells of plasma within a jet can have on the observed linear and circular polarization.

  20. Interband Cascade Photovoltaic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui Q. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Santos, Michael B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Johnson, Matthew B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2014-09-24

    In this project, we are performing basic and applied research to systematically investigate our newly proposed interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) cells [1]. These cells follow from the great success of infrared IC lasers [2-3] that pioneered the use of quantum-engineered IC structures. This quantum-engineered approach will enable PV cells to efficiently convert infrared radiation from the sun or other heat source, to electricity. Such cells will have important applications for more efficient use of solar energy, waste-heat recovery, and power beaming in combination with mid-infrared lasers. The objectives of our investigations are to: achieve extensive understanding of the fundamental aspects of the proposed PV structures, develop the necessary knowledge for making such IC PV cells, and demonstrate prototype working PV cells. This research will focus on IC PV structures and their segments for utilizing infrared radiation with wavelengths from 2 to 5 μm, a range well suited for emission by heat sources (1,000-2,000 K) that are widely available from combustion systems. The long-term goal of this project is to push PV technology to longer wavelengths, allowing for relatively low-temperature thermal sources. Our investigations address material quality, electrical and optical properties, and their interplay for the different regions of an IC PV structure. The tasks involve: design, modeling and optimization of IC PV structures, molecular beam epitaxial growth of PV structures and relevant segments, material characterization, prototype device fabrication and testing. At the end of this program, we expect to generate new cutting-edge knowledge in the design and understanding of quantum-engineered semiconductor structures, and demonstrate the concepts for IC PV devices with high conversion efficiencies.

  1. Communication Scheme via Cascade Chaotic Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Chang-Chun; GUAN Xin-Ping

    2004-01-01

    @@ A new chaotic communication scheme is constructed. Different from the existing literature, cascade chaotic systems are employed. Two cascade modes are considered. First, we investigate the input to state cascade mode;cascade systems between different kinds of chaotic systems are considered. Then the parameter cascade case of chaotic system is studied. Under the different cases, the corresponding receivers are designed, which can succeed in recovering the former emitted signal. Simulations are performed to verify the validity of the proposed main results.

  2. Faraday and resonant waves in binary collisionally-inhomogeneous Bose-Einstein condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Sudharsan, J B; Raportaru, Mihaela Carina; Nicolin, Alexandru I; Balaz, Antun

    2016-01-01

    We study Faraday and resonant waves in two-component quasi-one-dimensional (cigar-shaped) collisionally inhomogeneous Bose-Einstein condensates subject to periodic modulation of the radial confinement. We show by means of extensive numerical simulations that, as the system exhibits stronger spatially-localised binary collisions (whose scattering length is taken for convenience to be of Gaussian form), the system becomes effectively a linear one. In other words, as the scattering length approaches a delta-function, we observe that the two nonlinear configurations typical for binary cigar-shaped condensates, namely the segregated and the symbiotic one, turn into two overlapping Gaussian wave functions typical for linear systems, and that the instability onset times of the Faraday and resonant waves become longer. Moreover, our numerical simulations show that the spatial period of the excited waves (either resonant or Faraday ones) decreases as the inhomogeneity becomes stronger. Our results also demonstrate tha...

  3. Giant Faraday rotation of high-order plasmonic modes in graphene-covered nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzmin, Dmitry A; Shavrov, Vladimir G; Temnov, Vasily V

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic Faraday rotation in nanowires manifests itself in the rotation of the spatial intensity distribution of high-order surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes around the nanowire axis. Here we predict theoretically the giant Faraday rotation for SPP propagating on graphene-coated magneto-optically active nanowires. Upon the reversal of the external magnetic field pointing along the nanowire axis some high-order plasmonic modes may be rotated by up to ~ 100 degrees on scale of about 500 nm at mid-infrared frequencies. Tuning carrier concentration in graphene by chemical doping or gate voltage allows for controlling SPP-properties and notably the rotation angle of high-order azimuthal modes. Our results open the door to novel plasmonic applications ranging from nanowire-based Faraday isolators to the magnetic control in quantum-optical applications.

  4. Giant Faraday Rotation of High-Order Plasmonic Modes in Graphene-Covered Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Dmitry A; Bychkov, Igor V; Shavrov, Vladimir G; Temnov, Vasily V

    2016-07-13

    Plasmonic Faraday rotation in nanowires manifests itself in the rotation of the spatial intensity distribution of high-order surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes around the nanowire axis. Here we predict theoretically the giant Faraday rotation for SPPs propagating on graphene-coated magneto-optically active nanowires. Upon the reversal of the external magnetic field pointing along the nanowire axis some high-order plasmonic modes may be rotated by up to ∼100° on the length scale of about 500 nm at mid-infrared frequencies. Tuning the carrier concentration in graphene by chemical doping or gate voltage allows for controlling SPP-properties and notably the rotation angle of high-order azimuthal modes. Our results open the door to novel plasmonic applications ranging from nanowire-based Faraday isolators to the magnetic control in quantum-optical applications.

  5. Stochastic Faraday rotation induced by the electric current fluctuations in nanosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, D. S.; Glazov, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that in gyrotropic semiconductors and semiconductor nanosystems the Brownian motion of electrons results in temporal fluctuations of the polarization plane of light passing through or reflected from the structure, i.e., in stochastic Faraday or Kerr rotation effects. The theory of the effects is developed for a number of prominent gyrotropic systems such as bulk tellurium, ensembles of chiral carbon nanotubes, and GaAs-based quantum wells of different crystallographic orientations. We show that the power spectrum of these fluctuations in thermal equilibrium is proportional to the a c conductivity of the system. We evaluate contributions resulting from the fluctuations of the electric current, as well as of spin, valley polarization, and the spin current to the noise of the Faraday/Kerr rotation. Hence all-optical measurements of the Faraday and Kerr rotation noise provide an access to the transport properties of the semiconductor systems.

  6. Effective optical Faraday rotations of semiconductor EuS nanocrystals with paramagnetic transition-metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yasuchika; Maeda, Masashi; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Doi, Yoshihiro; Hinatsu, Yukio; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa; Koizumi, Hitoshi; Fushimi, Koji

    2013-02-20

    Novel EuS nanocrystals containing paramagnetic Mn(II), Co(II), or Fe(II) ions have been reported as advanced semiconductor materials with effective optical rotation under a magnetic field, Faraday rotation. EuS nanocrystals with transition-metal ions, EuS:M nanocrystals, were prepared by the reduction of the Eu(III) dithiocarbamate complex tetraphenylphosphonium tetrakis(diethyldithiocarbamate)europium(III) with transition-metal complexes at 300 °C. The EuS:M nanocrystals thus prepared were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroanalysis (ICP-AES), and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Enhanced Faraday rotations of the EuS:M nanocrystals were observed around 550 nm, and their enhanced spin polarization was estimated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. In this report, the magneto-optical relationship between the Faraday rotation efficiency and spin polarization is discussed.

  7. Faraday Cup for Electron Flux Measurements on the Microtron MT 25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vognar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic criteria for constructing of an evacuated Faraday cup for precise measurement of 5 to 25 MeV electron beam currents in air from a microtron are established. The Faraday cup, built in the microtron laboratory of the Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering of CTU Prague, is described together with the electronic chain and its incorporation in the measuring line on the beam. Measures to reduce the backward escape of electrons are explained. The range of currents is from 10–5 to 10–10 A. The diameter of the Al entry window of the Faraday cup is 1.8 cm, and its area is 2.54 cm2. The thickness of the entry window is 0.1 mm.

  8. Faraday-effect polarimeter diagnostic for internal magnetic field fluctuation measurements in DIII-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Finkenthal, D; Muscatello, C; Taussig, D; Boivin, R

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the need to measure fast equilibrium temporal dynamics, non-axisymmetric structures, and core magnetic fluctuations (coherent and broadband), a three-chord Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system with fast time response and high phase resolution has recently been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. A novel detection scheme utilizing two probe beams and two detectors for each chord results in reduced phase noise and increased time response [δb ∼ 1G with up to 3 MHz bandwidth]. First measurement results were obtained during the recent DIII-D experimental campaign. Simultaneous Faraday and density measurements have been successfully demonstrated and high-frequency, up to 100 kHz, Faraday-effect perturbations have been observed. Preliminary comparisons with EFIT are used to validate diagnostic performance. Principle of the diagnostic and first experimental results is presented.

  9. Soft X-Ray Magneto-optical Faraday Effect around Ni M2,3 Edges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Kai; CUI Ming-Qi; YAN Fen; ZHAO Jia; SUN Li-Juan; ZHENG Lei; MA Chen-Yan; XI Shi-So; ZHAO Yi-Dong

    2008-01-01

    @@ We present magneto-optical (MO) Faraday spectra measured around the M2,3 edges (60-70eV) of Ni films at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF).A polarization analysis of the final state of the transmitted radiation from the Ni film is employed to determine the Faraday rotation at the edges.The MO effect becomes resonantly enhanced at the M2,3 edges,and accordingly large values for the rotation angle β of 1.85 ± 0.19°for this ferromagnetic Ni film with thickness of 31 nm are measured. Without the magnetic field,the azimuthal angles do not shift; with parallel and antiparallel magnetic field the rotation angles shift in the opposite way and they are symmetrical.The uncertainty of Faraday rotation angles mainly comes from the data fitting and the state change of the beamline when the angles are measured.

  10. Cavity-enhanced Faraday rotation measurement with auto-balanced photodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2015-10-01

    Optical cavity enhancement for a tiny Faraday rotation is demonstrated with auto-balanced photodetection. This configuration is analyzed using the Jones matrix formalism. The resonant rotation signal is amplified, and thus, the angular sensitivity is improved. In the experiment, the air Faraday rotation is measured with an auto-balanced photoreceiver in single-pass and cavity geometries. The result shows that the measured Faraday rotation in the single-pass geometry is enhanced by a factor of 85 in the cavity geometry, and the sensitivity is improved to 7.54×10(-10)  rad Hz(-1/2), which agrees well with the Jones matrix analysis. With this verification, we propose an AC magnetic sensor whose magnetic sensitivity is expected to achieve 10  pT Hz(-1/2).

  11. Magneto-optical Faraday rotation of semiconductor nanoparticles embedded in dielectric matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchuk, Andriy I; Stolyarchuk, Ihor D; Makoviy, Vitaliy V; Savchuk, Oleksandr A

    2014-04-01

    Faraday rotation has been studied for CdS, CdTe, and CdS:Mn semiconductor nanoparticles synthesized by colloidal chemistry methods. Additionally these materials were prepared in a form of semiconductor nanoparticles embedded in polyvinyl alcohol films. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy analyses served as confirmation of nanocrystallinity and estimation of the average size of the nanoparticles. Spectral dependence of the Faraday rotation for the studied nanocrystals and nanocomposites is correlated with a blueshift of the absorption edge due to the confinement effect in zero-dimensional structures. Faraday rotation spectra and their temperature behavior in Mn-doped nanocrystals demonstrates peculiarities, which are associated with s, p-d exchange interaction between Mn²⁺ ions and band carriers in diluted magnetic semiconductor nanostructures.

  12. Peculiarities of the inverse Faraday effect induced in iron garnet films by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhaev, M. A.; Chernov, A. I.; Savochkin, I. V.; Kuz'michev, A. N.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Belotelov, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    The inverse Faraday effect in iron garnet films subjected to femtosecond laser pulses is experimentally investigated. It is found that the magnitude of the observed effect depends nonlinearly on the energy of the optical pump pulses, which is in contradiction with the notion that the inverse Faraday effect is linear with respect to the pump energy. Thus, for pump pulses with a central wavelength of 650 nm and an energy density of 1 mJ/cm2, the deviation from a linear dependence is as large as 50%. Analysis of the experimental data demonstrates that the observed behavior is explained by the fact that the optically induced normal component of the magnetization is determined, apart from the field resulting from the inverse Faraday effect, by a decrease in the magnitude of the precessing magnetization under the influence of the femtosecond electromagnetic field.

  13. Calibrating high-precision Faraday rotation measurements for LOFAR and the next generation of low-frequency radio telescopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotomayor-Beltran, C.; Sobey, C.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Bruyn, de G.; Noutsos, A.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I.M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M.E.; Bell, M.R.; Bentum, M.J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Birzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brouw, W.N.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Gasperin, de F.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Duin, van A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R.A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M.A.; Griessmeier, J.; Grit, T.; Gunst, A.W.; Hassall, T.E.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Keane, E.; Kohler, J; Kramer, M.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Leeuwen, van J.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Markoff, S.; McKean, J.P.; Mulcahy, D.D.; Munk, H.; Orrú, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pilia, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Serylak, M.; Sluman, J.; Stappers, B.W.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Veen, ter S.; Vermeulen, R.; Weeren, van R.J.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Wijnholds, S.J.; Wise, M.W.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.

    2013-01-01

    Faraday rotation measurements using the current and next generation of low-frequency radio telescopes will provide a powerful probe of astronomical magnetic fields. However, achieving the full potential of these measurements requires accurate removal of the time-variable ionospheric Faraday rotation

  14. Laser-based analytical monitoring in nuclear-fuel processing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1978-09-01

    The use of laser-based analytical methods in nuclear-fuel processing plants is considered. The species and locations for accountability, process control, and effluent control measurements in the Coprocessing, Thorex, and reference Purex fuel processing operations are identified and the conventional analytical methods used for these measurements are summarized. The laser analytical methods based upon Raman, absorption, fluorescence, and nonlinear spectroscopy are reviewed and evaluated for their use in fuel processing plants. After a comparison of the capabilities of the laser-based and conventional analytical methods, the promising areas of application of the laser-based methods in fuel processing plants are identified.

  15. Constraining atmospheric ammonia emissions through new observations with an open-path, laser-based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kang

    As the third most abundant nitrogen species in the atmosphere, ammonia (NH3) is a key component of the global nitrogen cycle. Since the industrial revolution, humans have more than doubled the emissions of NH3 to the atmosphere by industrial nitrogen fixation, revolutionizing agricultural practices, and burning fossil fuels. NH3 is a major precursor to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), which has adverse impacts on air quality and human health. The direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcings currently constitute the largest uncertainties for future climate change predictions. Gas and particle phase NH3 eventually deposits back to the Earth's surface as reactive nitrogen, leading to the exceedance of ecosystem critical loads and perturbation of ecosystem productivity. Large uncertainties still remain in estimating the magnitude and spatiotemporal patterns of NH3 emissions from all sources and over a range of scales. These uncertainties in emissions also propagate to the deposition of reactive nitrogen. To improve our understanding of NH3 emissions, observational constraints are needed from local to global scales. The first part of this thesis is to provide quality-controlled, reliable NH3 measurements in the field using an open-path, quantum cascade laser-based NH3 sensor. As the second and third part of my research, NH3 emissions were quantified from a cattle feedlot using eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements, and the similarities between NH3 turbulent fluxes and those of other scalars (temperature, water vapor, and CO2) were investigated. The fourth part involves applying a mobile laboratory equipped with the open-path NH3 sensor and other important chemical/meteorological measurements to quantify fleet-integrated NH3 emissions from on-road vehicles. In the fifth part, the on-road measurements were extended to multiple major urban areas in both the US and China in the context of five observation campaigns. The results significantly improved current urban NH3

  16. El concepto de estado electro-tónico en Faraday

    OpenAIRE

    Romo Feito, José

    1991-01-01

    Sabemos la centralidad que la noción de estado electro-tónico tuvo en la primera formulación de las ecuaciones de Maxwell. El concepto, sin embargo, proviene de Faraday, que lo introdujo a raíz de su descubrimiento de la inducción electromagnética en 1831, y recurrió a él intermitentemente en los años siguientes. La tesis pretende trazar la evolución del concepto en la obra de Faraday.El capitulo 1 se ocupa, en primer lugar, de proporcionar algunos elementos para comprender la situación de la...

  17. Enhanced Faraday Rotation via Resonant Tunnelling in Tri-Layers Containing Magneto-Optical Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Moccia, Massimo; Galdi, Vincenzo; Alu', Andrea; Engheta, Nader

    2013-01-01

    We study resonant tunnelling effects that can occur in tri-layer structures featuring a dielectric layer sandwiched between two magneto-optical-metal layers. We show that the resonance splitting associated with these phenomena can be exploited to enhance Faraday rotation at optical frequencies. Our results indicate that, in the presence of realistic loss levels, a tri-layer structure of sub-wavelength thickness is capable of yielding sensible (~10{\\deg}) Faraday rotation with transmittance levels that are an order of magnitude larger than those attainable with a standalone slab of magneto-optical metal of same thickness.

  18. Orthotropic conductivity reconstruction with virtual-resistive network and Faraday's law

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Min-Gi

    2015-06-01

    We obtain the existence and the uniqueness at the same time in the reconstruction of orthotropic conductivity in two-space dimensions by using two sets of internal current densities and boundary conductivity. The curl-free equation of Faraday\\'s law is taken instead of the elliptic equation in a divergence form that is typically used in electrical impedance tomography. A reconstruction method based on layered bricks-type virtual-resistive network is developed to reconstruct orthotropic conductivity with up to 40% multiplicative noise.

  19. Support for Faraday's View of Circulation in a Fine-Powder Chladni Heap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Benku; Squires, Arthur M.

    1998-07-01

    Faraday, like Chladni, saw fine powder collect in a circular heap at an antinode of a vibrating plate. In each vibration cycle, the heap experiences a free-flight interval during which pressure gradients in the heap's interior drive powder centerward, as Faraday proposed. When heap-floor collision terminates flight, pressure gradients reverse direction; but passage of a compaction front has locked particles against further movement. Before a next flight interval, an increase in porosity will reverse the compaction that accompanied heap-floor collision.

  20. Polarization-induced noise in a fiber-optic Michelson interferometer with Faraday rotator mirror elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L A; Santos, J L; Farahi, F

    1995-10-01

    Faraday rotator mirror elements have been used in a number of applications as compensators for induced birefringence in retracing paths. In interferometric systems, such as the fiber-optic Michelson interferometer, this approach proved to be useful in providing maximum fringe visibility and insensitivity to the polarization state of light injected into the interferometer. However, it is found that, when the characteristics of the fiber coupler depend on the polarization state of the input beam, the efficiency of the Faraday mirror elements is limited. Theoretical analysis and experimental results in support of this statement are presented.

  1. Polarization-induced noise in a fiber-optic Michelson interferometer with Faraday rotator mirror elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Santos, J. L.; Farahi, F.

    1995-10-01

    Faraday rotator mirror elements have been used in a number of applications as compensators for induced birefringence in retracing paths. In interferometric systems, such as the fiber-optic Michelson interferometer, this approach proved to be useful in providing maximum fringe visibility and insensitivity to the polarization state of light injected into the interferometer. However, it is found that, when the characteristics of the fiber coupler depend on the polarization state of the input beam, the efficiency of the Faraday mirror elements is limited. Theoretical analysis and experimental results in support of this statement are presented.

  2. Nitric Oxide Isotopic Analyzer Based on a Compact Dual-Modulation Faraday Rotation Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Zhang; Stacey Huang; Qixing Ji; Michael Silvernagel; Yin Wang; Bess Ward; Daniel Sigman; Gerard Wysocki

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a transportable spectroscopic nitrogen isotopic analyzer. The spectrometer is based on dual-modulation Faraday rotation spectroscopy of nitric oxide isotopologues with near shot-noise limited performance and baseline-free operation. Noise analysis indicates minor isotope (15NO) detection sensitivity of 0.36 ppbv·Hz−1/2, corresponding to noise-equivalent Faraday rotation angle (NEA) of 1.31 × 10−8 rad·Hz−1/2 and noise-equivalent absorbance (αL)min of 6.27 × 10−8 Hz−1/2. White...

  3. Faraday Effect sensor redressed by Nd2Fe14B biasing magnetic film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xinbing; Nguyen, Truong Giang; Qian, Bo; Jiang, Chunping; Ma, Lixin

    2012-01-16

    A Faraday Effect sensor with Nd(2)Fe(14)B biasing magnetic film was described. Ta/Nd(2)Fe(14)B/Ta films were grown by magnetron sputtering method. The magnetic domain in the sensor with the Nd(2)Fe(14)B biasing magnetic film can persist its distribution. The average linearity error of Faraday Effect sensor with biasing magnetic film decreased from 1.42% to 0.125% compared with non-biasing magnetic film, and the measurement range increased from 820 Oe to 900 Oe.

  4. Theoretical model for frequency locking a diode laser with a Faraday cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanninger, P.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    A new method was developed for frequency locking a diode lasers, called 'the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical transmitter (FADOT) laser locking', which is much simpler than other known locking schemes. The FADOT laser locking method uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. The FADOT method is vibration insensitive and exhibits minimal thermal expansion effects. The system has a frequency pull in the range of 443.2 GHz (9 A). The method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters.

  5. Strong interband Faraday rotation in 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnoutek, L; Hakl, M; Veis, M; Piot, B A; Faugeras, C; Martinez, G; Yakushev, M V; Martin, R W; Drašar, Č; Materna, A; Strzelecka, G; Hruban, A; Potemski, M; Orlita, M

    2016-01-11

    The Faraday effect is a representative magneto-optical phenomenon, resulting from the transfer of angular momentum between interacting light and matter in which time-reversal symmetry has been broken by an externally applied magnetic field. Here we report on the Faraday rotation induced in the prominent 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3 due to bulk interband excitations. The origin of this non-resonant effect, extraordinarily strong among other non-magnetic materials, is traced back to the specific Dirac-type Hamiltonian for Bi2Se3, which implies that electrons and holes in this material closely resemble relativistic particles with a non-zero rest mass.

  6. Cascaded-cladding-pumped cascaded Raman fiber amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huawei; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The conversion efficiency of double-clad Raman fiber laser is limited by the cladding-to-core area ratio. To get high conversion efficiency, the inner-cladding-to-core area ratio has to be less than about 8, which limits the brightness enhancement. To overcome the problem, a cascaded-cladding-pumped cascaded Raman fiber laser with multiple-clad fiber as the Raman gain medium is proposed. A theoretical model of Raman fiber amplifier with multiple-clad fiber is developed, and numerical simulation proves that the proposed scheme can improve the conversion efficiency and brightness enhancement of cladding pumped Raman fiber laser.

  7. A Laser-Based Diagnostic Suite for Hypersonic Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a suite of laser-based diagnostics for the study of reactive and non-reactive hypersonic flows....

  8. Autoregressive cascades on random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Srikanth K.; Vaze, Rahul; Narasimha, Dheeraj

    2016-04-01

    A network cascade model that captures many real-life correlated node failures in large networks via load redistribution is studied. The considered model is well suited for networks where physical quantities are transmitted, e.g., studying large scale outages in electrical power grids, gridlocks in road networks, and connectivity breakdown in communication networks, etc. For this model, a phase transition is established, i.e., existence of critical thresholds above or below which a small number of node failures lead to a global cascade of network failures or not. Theoretical bounds are obtained for the phase transition on the critical capacity parameter that determines the threshold above and below which cascade appears or disappears, respectively, that are shown to closely follow numerical simulation results.

  9. Narrow Bandwidth Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Filter%窄带 Faraday 反常色散光学滤波器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘阳; 王健; 王海华; 康智慧; 王磊; 罗梦希; 闫西章; 王潇潇; 高锦岳

    2014-01-01

    研究 Faraday 反常色散光学滤波器,给出其理论计算过程和模拟结果。结果表明, Faraday反常色散光学滤波器有线翼和线芯透过两种工作方式,其中线翼透过单峰谱线线宽约为600 MHz,透过率约为25%,线芯透过谱线线宽约为700 MHz,透过率约为100%。实验结果与理论结果相符。%To obtain the weak signal light from the high background light,a narrow bandwidth Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF)was studied.The theoretical model for the filter was reported.The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters have two working modes:two side peak transmission and center peak transmission.The former work mode can get single peak transmission of 25% with a bandwidth of about 600 MHz.The other work mode can get a spectra with a transmission rate of almost 100% and a bandwith of about 700 MHz.The experimental measurements are consistent with theoretical results.

  10. Patterns beyond Faraday waves: observation of parametric crossover from Faraday instabilities to the formation of vortex lattices in open dual fluid strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlin, Kjell; Berggren, Karl Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    Faraday first characterised the behaviour of a fluid in a container subjected to vertical periodic oscillations. His study pertaining to hydrodynamic instability, the ‘Faraday instability’, has catalysed a myriad of experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies shedding light on the mechanisms responsible for the transition of a system at rest to a new state of well-ordered vibrational patterns at fixed frequencies. Here we study dual strata in a shallow vessel containing distilled water and high-viscosity lubrication oil on top of it. At elevated driving power, beyond the Faraday instability, the top stratum is found to ‘freeze’ into a rigid pattern with maxima and minima. At the same time there is a dynamic crossover into a new state in the form of a lattice of recirculating vortices in the lower layer containing the water. Instrumentation and the physics behind are analysed in a phenomenological way together with a basic heuristic modelling of the wave field. The study, which is based on relatively low-budget equipment, stems from related art projects that have evolved over the years. The study is of value within basic research as well as in education, especially as more advanced collective project work in e.g. engineering physics, where it invites further studies of pattern formation, the emergence of vortex lattices and complexity.

  11. Exploring Faraday's Law of Electrolysis Using Zinc-Air Batteries with Current Regulative Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Paku, Miei

    2007-01-01

    Current regulative diodes (CRDs) are applied to develop new educational experiments on Faraday's law by using a zinc-air battery (PR2330) and a resistor to discharge it. The results concluded that the combination of zinc-air batteries and the CRD array is simpler, less expensive, and quantitative and gives accurate data.

  12. Optical absorption and Faraday rotation in spin doped Cd1-xHgxSe : Mn crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savchuk, AI; Paranchich, SY; Paranchich, LD; Romanyuk, OS; Andriychuk, MD; Nikitin, PI; Tomlinson, RD; Hill, AE; Pilkington, RD

    1998-01-01

    Optical absorption spectra and the Faraday effect in crystals of Cd1-xHgxSe : Mn have been studied. The studied samples have been characterized abrupt absorption edge and transparency region with high transmission coefficient. The measured values of Verdet constant were considerably larger than in I

  13. Stratification in polarization and Faraday rotation in the jet of 3C 120

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, J L; Marscher, A P; Jorstad, S G; Roca-Sogorb, M

    2008-01-01

    Very long baseline interferometric observations of the radio galaxy 3C 120 show a systematic presence of gradients in Faraday rotation and degree of polarization across and along the jet. These are revealed by the passage of multiple superluminal components throughout the jet as they move out from the core in a sequence of 12 monthly polarimetric observations taken with the VLBA at 15, 22, and 43 GHz. The degree of polarization has an asymmetric profile in which the northern side of the jet is more highly polarized. The Faraday rotation measure is also stratified across the jet width, with larger values for the southern side. Superposed on this structure we find a localized region of high Faraday rotation measure (about 6000 rad/m^2) between approximately 3 and 4 mas from the core. This region of enhanced Faraday rotation may result from the interaction of the jet with the ambient medium, which may also explain the stratification in degree of polarization. The data are also consistent with a helical magnetic ...

  14. Faraday waves in quasi-one-dimensional superfluid Fermi-Bose mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Ögren, Magnus; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2013-01-01

    The generation of Faraday waves in superfluid Fermi-Bose mixtures in elongated traps is investigated. The generation of waves is achieved by periodically changing a parameter of the system in time. Two types of modulations of parameters are considered: a variation of the fermion-boson scattering...

  15. Stray-field-induced Faraday contributions in wide-field Kerr microscopy and -magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markó, D.; Soldatov, I. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, PO 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Materials Science, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Tekielak, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Bialystok, Lipowa 41, Bialystok 15-424 Poland (Poland); Schäfer, R., E-mail: r.schaefer@ifw-dresden.de [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, PO 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Materials Science, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The magnetic domain contrast in wide-field Kerr microscopy on bulk specimens can be substantially distorted by non-linear, field-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective lens that are caused by stray-field components emerging from the specimen. These Faraday contributions, which were detected by Kerr-magnetometry on grain-oriented iron–silicon steel samples, are thoroughly elaborated and characterized. They express themselves as a field-dependent gray-scale offset to the domain contrast and in highly distorted surface magnetization curves if optically measured in a wide field Kerr microscope. An experimental method to avoid such distortions is suggested. In the course of these studies, a low-permeability part in the surface magnetization loop of slightly misoriented (110)-surfaces in iron–silicon sheets was discovered that is attributed to demagnetization effects in direction perpendicular to the sheet surface. - Highlights: • Magnetizing a finite sample in a Kerr microscope leads to sample-generated stray-fields. • They cause non-linear, field- and position-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective. • This leads to a modulation of the Kerr contrast and to distorted MOKE loops. • A method to compensate these Faraday rotations is presented.

  16. Design and construction of a Faraday cup for measurement of small electronic currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyssiere, A.

    1985-01-01

    The design of a device to measure and integrate very small currents generated by the impact of a charged particle beam upon a Faraday cut is described. The main component is a graphite block capable of stopping practically all the incident changes. The associated electronic apparatus required to measure better than 10/13 ampere with a precision of 10/0 is described.

  17. Far off-resonance laser frequency stabilization using multipass cells in Faraday rotation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Wei; Li, Yang; Li, Rujie; Shang, Huining; Fang, Zishan; Qin, Jie; Wan, Shuangai

    2016-04-01

    We propose a far off-resonance laser frequency stabilization method by using multipass cells in Rb Faraday rotation spectroscopy. Based on the detuning equation, if multipass cells with several meters optical path length are used in the conventional Faraday spectroscopy, the detuning of the lock point can be extended much further from the alkali metal resonance. A plate beam splitter was used to generate two different Faraday signals at the same time. The transmitted optical path length was L=50  mm and the reflected optical path length was 2L=100  mm. When the optical path length doubled, the detuning of the lock points moved further away from the atomic resonance. The temperature dependence of the detuning of the lock point was also analyzed. A temperature-insensitive lock point was found near resonance when the cell temperature was between 110°C and 130°C. We achieved an rms fluctuation of 0.9 MHz/23 h at a detuning of 0.5 GHz. A frequency drift of 16 MHz/h at a detuning of -5.6  GHz and 4 MHz/h at a detuning of -5.2  GHz were also obtained for the transmitted and reflected light Faraday signal.

  18. Giant magneto-optical Faraday effect of nanometer Fe-In2O3 granular films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lin; ZHANG LianSheng; XIAO ShuQin

    2008-01-01

    The giant magneto-optical Faraday effect of nanometer ferromagnetic metal-semiconductor matrix Fe-In2O3 granular films prepared by the radio frequency sputtering are studied. The result shows that the Faraday rotation angle θF value of the granular film samples with Fe volume fraction x=35% is of the order of 105(°)/cm at room temperature. Temperature dependence of the Faraday rotation angle θF of Fe0.35(In2O2)0.65 granular films shows that θF value below 10 K increases rapidly with the decrease of the temperature, and when T=4.2 K,θF value is 106(°)/cm. Through the study of the dependence of low field susceptibility on temperature and the hysteresis loops at different temperatures, it has been found that when the temperature decreases to a critical point TP=10K, the transformation of state from ferro-magnetic to spin-glass-like occurs in Fe0.35(In2O3)0.65 granular films. The remarkable increase of the Faraday rotation angle eF value of Fe0.35(In2O3)0.65 granular films below 10 K seems to arise from the sp-d exchange interaction of the granular film samples in the spin-glass-like state.

  19. A Bright Spark: Open Teaching of Science Using Faraday's Lectures on Candles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mark; Groger, Martin; Schutler, Kirsten; Mosler, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    As well as being a founding father of modern chemistry and physics Michael Faraday was also a skilled lecturer, able to explain scientific principles and ideas simply and concisely to nonscientific audiences. However science didactics today emphasizes the use of open and student-centered methods of teaching in which students find and develop…

  20. A New Method for Analyzing Near-Field Faraday Probe Data in Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for analyzing near-field Faraday probe data obtained from Hall thrusters. Traditional methods spawned from far-field Faraday probe analysis rely on assumptions that are not applicable to near-field Faraday probe data. In particular, arbitrary choices for the point of origin and limits of integration have made interpretation of the results difficult. The new method, called iterative pathfinding, uses the evolution of the near-field plume with distance to provide feedback for determining the location of the point of origin. Although still susceptible to the choice of integration limits, this method presents a systematic approach to determining the origin point for calculating the divergence angle. The iterative pathfinding method is applied to near-field Faraday probe data taken in a previous study from the NASA-300M and NASA-457Mv2 Hall thrusters. Since these two thrusters use centrally mounted cathodes the current density associated with the cathode plume is removed before applying iterative pathfinding. A procedure is presented for removing the cathode plume. The results of the analysis are compared to far-field probe analysis results. This paper ends with checks on the validity of the new method and discussions on the implications of the results.

  1. Evidence of high-frequency/small-scale turbulence in the Cygnus region and anomalous Faraday rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2017-01-01

    Faraday effect - a common and useful probe of cosmic magnetic fields - is the result of magnetically-induced birefringence in plasmas causing rotation of the polarization plane of a linearly polarized electromagnetic wave. Classically, the rotation angle scales with the wavelength as Δϕ =RMλ2 , where RM is the rotation measure. Although a typical RM in the Milky Way is of the order of a few hundred to a few thousand, a famous Cygnus region shows anomalously small, even negative rotation measures. Moreover, Faraday rotation measurements seem to be inconsistent with the standard λ2-law. We argue that fast micro-turbulence can cause this anomaly. We demonstrate that electromagnetic high-frequency and/or small-scale fluctuations can lead to effective plasma collisionality by scattering electrons over pitch-angle. We show that such quasi-collisionality radically alters Faraday rotation and other radiative transport properties, e.g., absorption, transmission and reflection. Thus, we explain the Cygnus puzzle by anomalous Faraday rotation in a thin ``blanket'' of highly turbulent plasma at the front of an interstellar bubble/shock. Supported by DOE grant DE-SC0016368.

  2. Michael Faraday on the Learning of Science and Attitudes of Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Elspeth

    1998-01-01

    Makes use of Michael Faraday's ideas on learning, focusing on his attitudes toward the unknowns of science and the development of an attitude that improves scientific decision making. This approach acknowledges that there is an inner struggle involved in facing unknowns. (DDR)

  3. Theory of Kerr and Faraday rotations and linear dichroism in Topological Weyl Semimetals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargarian, Mehdi; Randeria, Mohit; Trivedi, Nandini

    2015-08-03

    We consider the electromagnetic response of a topological Weyl semimetal (TWS) with a pair of Weyl nodes in the bulk and corresponding Fermi arcs in the surface Brillouin zone. We compute the frequency-dependent complex conductivities σαβ(ω) and also take into account the modification of Maxwell equations by the topological θ-term to obtain the Kerr and Faraday rotations in a variety of geometries. For TWS films thinner than the wavelength, the Kerr and Faraday rotations, determined by the separation between Weyl nodes, are significantly larger than in topological insulators. In thicker films, the Kerr and Faraday angles can be enhanced by choice of film thickness and substrate refractive index. We show that, for radiation incident on a surface with Fermi arcs, there is no Kerr or Faraday rotation but the electric field develops a longitudinal component inside the TWS, and there is linear dichroism signal. Our results have implications for probing the TWS phase in various experimental systems.

  4. Conditions for the Validity of Faraday's Law of Induction and Their Experimental Confirmation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Ramos, A.; Menendez, J. R.; Pique, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper, as its main didactic objective, shows the conditions needed for the validity of Faraday's law of induction. Inadequate comprehension of these conditions has given rise to several paradoxes about the issue; some are analysed and solved in this paper in the light of the theoretical deduction of the induction law. Furthermore, an…

  5. The Faraday Pavilion: activating bending in the design and analysis of an elastic gridshell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholas, Paul; Lafuente Hernandez, Elisa; Gengnagel, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the architectural and engineering design, and construction, of The Faraday Pavilion, a GFRP elastic gridshell with an irregular grid topology. Gridshell structures are self-formed through an erection process in which they are elastically deformed, and the prediction and steering...

  6. Faraday rotation and magneto-optical figure of merit for the magnetite magnetic fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalandadze L.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, using magnetite magnetic fluids as examples, we consider the optical and magneto-optical properties of magnetic fluids based on particles of magnetic oxides, for the optical constants of the material of which, n and k , the relation k2 ≺≺ n2 holds. In this work the Faraday rotation is represented within the theoretical Maxwell-Garnett model. A theoretical analysis has shown that Faraday rotation for magnetic fluids is related to the Faraday rotation on the material of particles by the simple relation. According to this result  in specific experimental conditions the values of the Faraday rotation prorate to q , which is the occupancy of the volume of the magnetic fluid with magnetic particles and spectral dependences of effect in magnetic fluid and in the proper bulk magnetic are similar. We also show that the values of the magneto-optical figure of merit for ultrafine medium and for the bulk material are equal.

  7. Detection of a Coherent Magnetic Field in the Magellanic Bridge through Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, J. F.; Purcell, C. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Stevens, J.

    2017-01-01

    We present an investigation into the magnetism of the Magellanic Bridge, carried out through the observation of Faraday rotation towards 167 polarized extragalactic radio sources spanning the continuous frequency range of 1.3 - 3.1 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Comparing measured Faraday depth values of sources `on' and `off' the Bridge, we find that the two populations are implicitly different. Assuming that this difference in populations is due to a coherent field in the Magellanic Bridge, the observed Faraday depths indicate a median line-of-sight coherent magnetic-field strength of B∥ ≃ 0.3 μG directed uniformly away from us. Motivated by the varying magnitude of Faraday depths of sources on the Bridge, we speculate that the coherent field observed in the Bridge is a consequence of the coherent magnetic fields from the Large and SMCs being pulled into the tidal feature. This is the first observation of a coherent magnetic field spanning the entirety of the Magellanic Bridge and we argue that this is a direct probe of a `pan-Magellanic' field.

  8. Unsteady transonic flow in cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, S. P.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    There is a need for methods to predict the unsteady air loads associated with flutter of turbomachinery blading at transonic speeds. The results of such an analysis in which the steady relative flow approaching a cascade of thin airfoils is assumed to be transonic, irrotational, and isentropic is presented. The blades in the cascade are allowed to undergo a small amplitude harmonic oscillation which generates a small unsteady flow superimposed on the existing steady flow. The blades are assumed to oscillate with a prescribed motion of constant amplitude and interblade phase angle. The equations of motion are obtained by linearizing about a uniform flow the inviscid nonheat conducting continuity and momentum equations. The resulting equations are solved by employing the Weiner Hopf technique. The solution yields the unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on the cascade at Mach number equal to 1. Making use of an unsteady transonic similarity law, these results are compared with the results obtained from linear unsteady subsonic and supersonic cascade theories. A parametric study is conducted to find the effects of reduced frequency, solidity, stagger angle, and position of pitching axis on the flutter.

  9. Azobenzene-functionalized cascade molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archut, A.; Vogtle, F.; De Cola, L.;

    1998-01-01

    Cascade molecules bearing up to 32 azobenzene groups in the periphery have been prepared from poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. The dendritic azobenzene species show similar isomerization properties as the corresponding azobenzene monomers. The all-E azobenzene...

  10. CASCADE: Introducing AI into CBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendley, R. J.; Jurascheck, N.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses changes in training requirements of commerce and industry in the United Kingdom and describes a project, CASCADE, that was developed to investigate and implement the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques into computer-based training (CBT). An overview of pilot projects in higher education settings is provided. (eight…

  11. Applications of cascade multilevel inverters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭方正; 钱照明

    2003-01-01

    Cascade multilevel inverters have been developed for electric utility applications. A cascade M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 H-bridges in which each bridge's dc voltage is supported by its own dc capacitor. The new inverter can: (1) generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage while only switching one time per fundamental cycle; (2) dispense with multi-pulse inverters' transformers used in conventional utility interfaces and static var compensators; (3) enables direct parallel or series transformer-less connection to medium- and high-voltage power systems. In short, the cascade inverter is much more efficient and suitable for utility applications than traditional multi-pulse and pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters. The authors have experimentally demonstrated the superiority of the new inverter for power supply, (hybrid) electric vehicle (EV) motor drive, reactive power (var) and harmonic compensation. This paper summarizes the features, feasibility, and control schemes of the cascade inverter for utility applications including utility interface of renewable energy, voltage regulation, var compensation, and harmonic filtering in power systems. Analytical, simulated, and experimental results demonstrated the superiority of the new inverters.

  12. Applications of cascade multilevel inverters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭方正; 钱照明

    2003-01-01

    Cascade multilevel inverters have been developed for electric utility applications. A cascade M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 H-bridges in which each bridge's dc voltage is supported by its own de ca-pacitor. The new inverter can : ( 1 ) generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage while only switching one timeper fundamental cycle ; (2) dispense with multi-pulse inverters' transformers used in conventional utility in-terfaces and static var compensators; (3) enables direct parallel or series transformer-less connection to medium- and high-voltage power systems. In short, the cascade inverter is much more efficient and suitable for utility applications than traditional multi-pulse and pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters. The authors have experimentally demonstrated the superiority of the new inverter for power supply, (hybrid) electric vehicle (EV) motor drive, reactive power (var) and harmonic compensation. This paper summarizes the features,feasibility, and control schemes of the cascade inverter for utility applications including utility interface of renewable energy, voltage regulation, var compensation, and harmonic filtering in power systems. Analytical,simulated, and experimental results demonstrated the superiority of the new inverters.

  13. Cascade Support Vector Machines with Dimensionality Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kramer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cascade support vector machines have been introduced as extension of classic support vector machines that allow a fast training on large data sets. In this work, we combine cascade support vector machines with dimensionality reduction based preprocessing. The cascade principle allows fast learning based on the division of the training set into subsets and the union of cascade learning results based on support vectors in each cascade level. The combination with dimensionality reduction as preprocessing results in a significant speedup, often without loss of classifier accuracies, while considering the high-dimensional pendants of the low-dimensional support vectors in each new cascade level. We analyze and compare various instantiations of dimensionality reduction preprocessing and cascade SVMs with principal component analysis, locally linear embedding, and isometric mapping. The experimental analysis on various artificial and real-world benchmark problems includes various cascade specific parameters like intermediate training set sizes and dimensionalities.

  14. Parsec-scale Faraday rotation and polarization of 20 active galactic nuclei jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, E. V.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Sokolovsky, K. V.

    2017-01-01

    We perform polarimetry analysis of 20 active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 1.4, 1.6, 2.2, 2.4, 4.6, 5.0, 8.1, 8.4, and 15.4 GHz. The study allowed us to investigate linearly polarized properties of the jets at parsec-scales: distribution of the Faraday rotation measure (RM) and fractional polarization along the jets, Faraday effects and structure of Faraday-corrected polarization images. Wavelength-dependence of the fractional polarization and polarization angle is consistent with external Faraday rotation, while some sources show internal rotation. The RM changes along the jets, systematically increasing its value towards synchrotron self-absorbed cores at shorter wavelengths. The highest core RM reaches 16,900 rad m-2 in the source rest frame for the quasar 0952+179, suggesting the presence of highly magnetized, dense media in these regions. The typical RM of transparent jet regions has values of an order of a hundred rad m-2 . Significant transverse rotation measure gradients are observed in seven sources. The magnetic field in the Faraday screen has no preferred orientation, and is observed to be random or regular from source to source. Half of the sources show evidence for the helical magnetic fields in their rotating magnetoionic media. At the same time jets themselves contain large-scale, ordered magnetic fields and tend to align its direction with the jet flow. The observed variety of polarized signatures can be explained by a model of spine-sheath jet structure.

  15. Cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Genty, G; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We report on a theoretical and experimental study of cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics. We show that the usual energy-momentum conservation of Bragg scattering can be considerably relaxed via cascade-induced phase-matching. Experimentally we demonstrate frequency translation over six- and 11-fold cascades, in excellent agreement with derived phase-matching conditions.

  16. Bankruptcy Cascades in Interbank Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Gabriele; Mazloumian, Amin; Gallegati, Mauro; Helbing, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank’s liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable. PMID:23300760

  17. Thermal cascaded lattice Boltzmann method

    CERN Document Server

    Fei, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a thermal cascaded lattice Boltzmann method (TCLBM) is developed in combination with the double-distribution-function (DDF) approach. A density distribution function relaxed by the cascaded scheme is employed to solve the flow field, and a total energy distribution function relaxed by the BGK scheme is used to solve temperature field, where two distribution functions are coupled naturally. The forcing terms are incorporated by means of central moments, which is consistent with the previous force scheme [Premnath \\emph{et al.}, Phys. Rev. E \\textbf{80}, 036702 (2009)] but the derivation is more intelligible and the evolution process is simpler. In the method, the viscous heat dissipation and compression work are taken into account, the Prandtl number and specific-heat ratio are adjustable, the external force is considered directly without the Boussinesq assumption, and the low-Mach number compressible flows can also be simulated. The forcing scheme is tested by simulating a steady Taylor-Green f...

  18. Cascade Chaotic System With Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yicong; Hua, Zhongyun; Pun, Chi-Man; Chen, C L Philip

    2015-09-01

    Chaotic maps are widely used in different applications. Motivated by the cascade structure in electronic circuits, this paper introduces a general chaotic framework called the cascade chaotic system (CCS). Using two 1-D chaotic maps as seed maps, CCS is able to generate a huge number of new chaotic maps. Examples and evaluations show the CCS's robustness. Compared with corresponding seed maps, newly generated chaotic maps are more unpredictable and have better chaotic performance, more parameters, and complex chaotic properties. To investigate applications of CCS, we introduce a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a data encryption system using a chaotic map generated by CCS. Simulation and analysis demonstrate that the proposed PRNG has high quality of randomness and that the data encryption system is able to protect different types of data with a high-security level.

  19. Optimally Training a Cascade Classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Chunhua; Hengel, Anton van den

    2010-01-01

    Cascade classifiers are widely used in real-time object detection. Different from conventional classifiers that are designed for a low overall classification error rate, a classifier in each node of the cascade is required to achieve an extremely high detection rate and moderate false positive rate. Although there are a few reported methods addressing this requirement in the context of object detection, there is no a principled feature selection method that explicitly takes into account this asymmetric node learning objective. We provide such an algorithm here. We show a special case of the biased minimax probability machine has the same formulation as the linear asymmetric classifier (LAC) of \\cite{wu2005linear}. We then design a new boosting algorithm that directly optimizes the cost function of LAC. The resulting totally-corrective boosting algorithm is implemented by the column generation technique in convex optimization. Experimental results on object detection verify the effectiveness of the proposed bo...

  20. Bankruptcy cascades in interbank markets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Tedeschi

    Full Text Available We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank's liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable.

  1. A Faraday rotation search for magnetic fields in quasar damped Ly alpha absorption systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Abraham L.; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a Faraday rotation survey of 61 radio-bright QSOs conducted at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA). The Galactic contribution to the Faraday rotation is estimated and subtracted to determine the extragalactic rotation measure (RRM) for each source. Eleven of these QSOs are known to exhibit damped Ly alpha absorption. The rate of incidence of significant Faraday rotation of these 11 sources is compared to the remaining 50 and is found to be higher at the 99.8% confidence level. However, as this is based upon only two detections of Faraday rotation in the damped Ly alpha sample, the result is only tentative. If the two detections in the damped Ly alpha sample are dug to the absorbing systems, then the inferred rotation measure induced by these systems is roughly 250 rad/sq m. The two detections were for the two lowest redshift absorbers in the sample. We find that a rotation measure of 250 rad/sq m would have gone undetected for any other absorber in the damped Ly alpha sample due to the 1/(1 + 2) squared dilution of the observed RRM with redshift. Thus the data are consistent with, but do not prove, the hypothesis that Faraday rotation is a generic property of damped Ly alpha absorbers. We do not confirm the suggestion that the amplitude of RRMs increases with redshift. Rather, the data are consistent with no redshift evolution. We find that the uncertainty in the estimation of the Galactic rotation measure (GRM) is a more serious problem than previously realized for extra-galactic Faraday rotation studies of QSO absorbers. A careful analysis of current methods for estimating GRM indicate that it can be determined to an accuracy of about 15 - 20 rad/sq m. Previous studies underestimated this uncertainty by more than a factor of 2. Due to this uncertainty, rotation measures such as we suspect are associated with damped Ly alpha absorption systems can only be detected at redshifts less than z approximately

  2. Comment on 'Note on Faraday's law and Maxwell's equations'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redzic, Dragan V [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, PO Box 368, 11001 Beograd (Yugoslavia)], E-mail: redzic@ff.bg.ac.yu

    2008-11-15

    We discuss some problematic contentions in a recent note on Faraday's law (Kholmetskii et al 2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 N5-10). We also do justice to Hertz, Helmholtz and Maxwell. (letters and comments)

  3. Reply to comment on 'Faraday's law via the magnetic vector potential'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redzic, Dragan V [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, PO Box 368, 11001 Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    2008-01-15

    Kholmetskii, Missevitch and Yarman correct an error that appeared in my recent note on Faraday's law and present an alternative derivation of the law. The wrong step in the derivation is pointed out. (letters and comments)

  4. Calibrating High-Precision Faraday Rotation Measurements for LOFAR and the Next Generation of Low-Frequency Radio Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Sotomayor-Beltran, C; Hessels, J W T; de Bruyn, G; Noutsos, A; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Birzan, L; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brouw, W N; Brueggen, M; Ciardi, B; de Gasperin, F; Dettmar, R -J; van Duin, A; Duscha, S; Eisloeffel, J; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Griessmeier, J; Grit, T; Gunst, A W; Hassall, T E; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Keane, E; Kohler, J; Kramer, M; Kondratiev, V I; Koopmans, L V E; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Maat, P; Macario, G; Markoff, S; McKean, J P; Mulcahy, D D; Munk, H; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pilia, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Roettgering, H; Serylak, M; Sluman, J; Stappers, B W; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Vermeulen, R; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wijnholds, S J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P; 10.1051/0004-6361/201220728

    2013-01-01

    Faraday rotation measurements using the current and next generation of low-frequency radio telescopes will provide a powerful probe of astronomical magnetic fields. However, achieving the full potential of these measurements requires accurate removal of the time-variable ionospheric Faraday rotation contribution. We present ionFR, a code that calculates the amount of ionospheric Faraday rotation for a specific epoch, geographic location, and line-of-sight. ionFR uses a number of publicly available, GPS-derived total electron content maps and the most recent release of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field. We describe applications of this code for the calibration of radio polarimetric observations, and demonstrate the high accuracy of its modeled ionospheric Faraday rotations using LOFAR pulsar observations. These show that we can accurately determine some of the highest-precision pulsar rotation measures ever achieved. Precision rotation measures can be used to monitor rotation measure variations - e...

  5. Giant Faraday rotation in Bi(x)Ce(3-x)Fe5O12 epitaxial garnet films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra Sekhar, M; Singh, Mahi R; Basu, Shantanu; Pinnepalli, Sai

    2012-04-23

    Thin films of Bi(x)Ce(3-x)Fe(5)O(12) with x = 0.7 and 0.8 compositions were prepared by using pulsed laser deposition. We investigated the effects of processing parameters used to fabricate these films by measuring various physical properties such as X-ray diffraction, transmittance, magnetization and Faraday rotation. In this study, we propose a phase diagram which provides a suitable window for the deposition of Bi(x)Ce(3-x)Fe(5)O(12) epitaxial films. We have also observed a giant Faraday rotation of 1-1.10 degree/µm in our optimized films. The measured Faraday rotation value is 1.6 and 50 times larger than that of CeYIG and YIG respectively. A theoretical model has been proposed for Faraday rotation based on density matrix method and an excellent agreement between experiment and theory is found.

  6. Lens Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor); Lee, Alan Wei Min (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade (QC) devices are disclosed that can operate, e.g., in a range of about 1 THz to about 10 THz. In some embodiments, QC lasers are disclosed in which an optical element (e.g., a lens) is coupled to an output facet of the laser's active region to enhance coupling of the lasing radiation from the active region to an external environment. In other embodiments, terahertz amplifier and tunable terahertz QC lasers are disclosed.

  7. Control of Cascaded Multilevel Inverters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Abstract-A new type of multilevel inverter is introduced which is created by cascading two three-phase three-level inverters using the load connection, but requires only one DC voltage source. This new inverter can operateas a seven-level inverter and naturally splits the power conversion into a higher-voltage lower-frequency inverter and a lower-voltage higher-fre-quency inverter. This type of system presents particular advantages to Naval ship propulsion systems which rely on high power quality, survivable drives. New control methods are described involving both joint and separate control of the individual three-level inverters. Simulation resuits demonstrate the effectiveness of both controls. A laboratory set-up at the Naval Surface Warfare Center power electronics laboratory was used to validate the proposed joint-inverter control. Due to the effect of compounding levels in the cascaded inverter, a high number of levels are available resulting in a voltage THD of 9% (without filtering). Index Terms-Cascaded inverter, multilevel inverter, three-level inverter.

  8. Turbulence: does energy cascade exist?

    CERN Document Server

    Josserand, Christophe; Lehner, Thierry; Pomeau, Yves

    2016-01-01

    To answer the question whether a cascade of energy exists or not in turbulence, we propose a set of correlation functions able to test if there is an irreversible transfert of energy, step by step, from large to small structures. These tests are applied to real Eulerian data of a turbulent velocity flow, taken in the wind grid tunnel of Modane, and also to a prototype model equation for wave turbulence. First we demonstrate the irreversible character of the flow by using multi-time correlation function at a given point of space. Moreover the unexpected behavior of the test function leads us to connect irreversibility and finite time singularities (intermittency). Secondly we show that turbulent cascade exists, and is a dynamical process, by using a test function depending on time and frequency. The cascade shows up only in the inertial domain where the kinetic energy is transferred more rapidly (on average) from the wavenumber $k_{1}$ to $k_{2}$ than from $k_{1}$ to $k'_{2}$ larger than $k_{2}$.

  9. Research data supporting "InGaAs spin light emitting diodes measured in the Faraday and oblique Hanle geometries"

    OpenAIRE

    Mansell, R; Laloë, J-B.; Holmes, S. N.; Petrou, A.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D A; Barnes, C. H. W.

    2016-01-01

    Supporting data for 'InGaAs spin light emitting diodes measured in the Faraday and oblique Hanle geometries' published as JPhysD 49 165103 (2016). Contains underlying data for figures 1 and 3. This research data supports “InGaAs spin light emitting diodes measured in the Faraday and oblique Hanle geometries” which has been published in “Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics”. This work was supported by the EPSRC [grant number EPSRC DTA award].

  10. Giant photoinduced Faraday rotation due to the spin-polarized electron gas in an n-GaAs microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, R.; Cronenberger, S.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D.; Kavokin, K. V.; Glazov, M. M.; Nawrocki, M.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2012-05-01

    Faraday rotation up to 19∘ in the absence of an external magnetic field is demonstrated in an n-type bulk GaAs microcavity under circularly polarized optical excitation. This strong effect is achieved because (i) the spin-polarized electron gas is an efficient Faraday rotator and (ii) the light wave makes multiple round trips in the cavity. We introduce a concept of Faraday rotation cross section as a proportionality coefficient between the rotation angle, electron spin density and optical path and calculate this cross section for our system. From independent measurements of photoinduced Faraday rotation and electron spin polarization we obtain quantitatively the cross section of the Faraday rotation induced by free electron spin polarization σFexp=-(2.5±0.6)×10-15 rad×cm2 for photon energy 18 meV below the band gap of GaAs, and electron concentration 2×1016 cm-3. It appears to exceed the theoretical value σFth=-0.7×10-15 rad×cm2, calculated without fitting parameters. We also demonstrate the proof-of-principle of a fast optically controlled Faraday rotator.

  11. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  12. Transfer matrix approach for the Kerr and Faraday rotation in layered nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Széchenyi, Gábor; Vigh, Máté; Kormányos, Andor; Cserti, József

    2016-09-01

    To study the optical rotation of the polarization of light incident on multilayer systems consisting of atomically thin conductors and dielectric multilayers we present a general method based on transfer matrices. The transfer matrix of the atomically thin conducting layer is obtained using the Maxwell equations. We derive expressions for the Kerr (Faraday) rotation angle and for the ellipticity of the reflected (transmitted) light as a function of the incident angle and polarization of the light. The method is demonstrated by calculating the Kerr (Faraday) angle for bilayer graphene in the quantum anomalous Hall state placed on the top of dielectric multilayers. The optical conductivity of the bilayer graphene is calculated in the framework of a four-band model.

  13. Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography: Japanese SKA Cosmic Magnetism Science

    CERN Document Server

    Akahori, Takuya; Ichaki, Kiyotomo; Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Kudoh, Takahiro; Kudoh, Yuki; Machida, Mami; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takizawa, Motokazu

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields play essential roles in various astronomical objects. Radio astronomy has revealed that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our Universe. However, the real origin and evolution of magnetic fields is poorly proven. In order to advance our knowledge of cosmic magnetism in coming decades, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) should have supreme sensitivity than ever before, which provides numerous observation points in the cosmic space. Furthermore, the SKA should be designed to facilitate wideband polarimetry so as to allow us to examine sightline structures of magnetic fields by means of depolarization and Faraday Tomography. The SKA will be able to drive cosmic magnetism of the interstellar medium, the Milky Way, galaxies, AGN, galaxy clusters, and potentially the cosmic web which may preserve information of the primeval Universe. The Japan SKA Consortium (SKA-JP) Magnetism Science Working Group (SWG) proposes the project "Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography"...

  14. Limits to the Magnetic Field in the Planetary Nebula NGC 246 from Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, L. F.; Carrasco-González, C.; Cantó, J.; Pasetto, A.; Raga, A. C.; Tafoya, D.

    2017-04-01

    We present radio continuum observations of the linearly polarized extragalactic source J0047-1150, whose line of sight traverses the galactic planetary nebula NGC 246. We determine the position angle of the electric vector at seven frequencies between 1.3 and 1.8 GHz, finding no evidence of Faraday rotation and setting a 4-σ upper limit to the rotation measure of 9.6 rad m-2, which implies an upper limit to the average line-of-sight component of the magnetic field in NGC 246 of 1.3 μG. However, we show that the rotation measure across a source with a dipolar magnetic field morphology practically cancels out. Therefore, if the magnetic field has this morphology, the local values of the magnetic field in NGC 246 could be much larger and will not be evident in a Faraday rotation experiment.

  15. Mutual adaptation of a Faraday instability pattern with its flexible boundaries in floating fluid drops

    CERN Document Server

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Amar, Martine Ben; Couder, Yves; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.024503

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities are usually investigated in confined geometries where the resulting spatiotemporal pattern is constrained by the boundary conditions. Here we study the Faraday instability in domains with flexible boundaries. This is implemented by triggering this instability in floating fluid drops. An interaction of Faraday waves with the shape of the drop is observed, the radiation pressure of the waves exerting a force on the surface tension held boundaries. Two regimes are observed. In the first one there is a coadaptation of the wave pattern with the shape of the domain so that a steady configuration is reached. In the second one the radiation pressure dominates and no steady regime is reached. The drop stretches and ultimately breaks into smaller domains that have a complex dynamics including spontaneous propagation.

  16. Optimization of a Short Faraday Cup for Low-Energy Ions using Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bravin, E; Garcia Sosa, A; Welsch, CP

    2014-01-01

    ISOLDE, the heavy-ion facility at CERN is undergoing a major upgrade with the installation of a superconducting LINAC that will allow post-acceleration of ion beams up to 10 MeV/u. In this framework, customized beam diagnostics are being developed in order to fulfill the design requirements as well as to fit in the compact diagnostic boxes foreseen. The main detector of this system is a compact Faraday cup that will measure beam intensities in the range of 1 pA to 1 nA. In this contribution, simulation results of electrostatic fields and particle tracking are detailed for different Faraday cup prototypes taking into account the energy spectrum and angle of emission of the ion-induced secondary electrons.

  17. Faraday, Maxwell, and the electromagnetic field how two men revolutionized physics

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    The story of two brilliant nineteenth-century scientists who discovered the electromagnetic field, laying the groundwork for the amazing technological and theoretical breakthroughs of the twentieth century Two of the boldest and most creative scientists of all time were Michael Faraday (1791-1867) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879). This is the story of how these two men - separated in age by forty years - discovered the existence of the electromagnetic field and devised a radically new theory which overturned the strictly mechanical view of the world that had prevailed since Newton's time. The authors, veteran science writers with special expertise in physics and engineering, have created a lively narrative that interweaves rich biographical detail from each man's life with clear explanations of their scientific accomplishments. Faraday was an autodidact, who overcame class prejudice and a lack of mathematical training to become renowned for his acute powers of experimental observation, technological skil...

  18. Closing remarks on Faraday Discussion 107: Interactions of acoustic waves with thin films and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    The papers in this Faraday Discussion represent the state-of-the-art in using acoustic devices to measure the properties of thin films and interfaces. Sauerbrey first showed that the mass sensitivity of a quartz crystal could be used to measure the thickness of vacuum-deposited metals. Since then, significant progress has been made in understanding other interaction mechanisms between acoustic devices and contacting media. Bruckenstein and Shay and Kanazawa and Gordon showed that quartz resonators could be operated in a fluid to measure surface mass accumulation and fluid properties. The increased understanding of interactions between acoustic devices and contacting media has allowed new information to be obtained about thin films and interfaces. These closing remarks will summarize the current state of using acoustic techniques to probe thin films and interfaces, describe the progress reported in this Faraday Discussion, and outline some remaining problems. Progress includes new measurement techniques, novel devices, new applications, and improved modeling and data analysis.

  19. Probing the gravitational Faraday rotation using quasar X-ray microlensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin

    2015-11-17

    The effect of gravitational Faraday rotation was predicted in the 1950s, but there is currently no practical method for measuring this effect. Measuring this effect is important because it will provide new evidence for correctness of general relativity, in particular, in the strong field limit. We predict that the observed degree and angle of the X-ray polarization of a cosmologically distant quasar microlensed by the random star field in a foreground galaxy or cluster lens vary rapidly and concurrently with flux during caustic-crossing events using the first simulation of quasar X-ray microlensing polarization light curves. Therefore, it is possible to detect gravitational Faraday rotation by monitoring the X-ray polarization of gravitationally microlensed quasars. Detecting this effect will also confirm the strong gravity nature of quasar X-ray emission.

  20. Faraday effect of polycrystalline bismuth iron garnet thin film prepared by mist chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Situ; Kamakura, Ryosuke; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa

    2017-01-01

    We have synthesized polycrystalline thin film composed of a single phase of metastable bismuth iron garnet, Bi3Fe5O12, on a fused silica substrate, one of the most widely utilized substrates in the solid-state electronics, by using mist chemical vapor deposition (mist CVD) method. The phase purity and stoichiometry are confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The resultant thin film shows a small surface roughness of 3.251 nm. The saturation magnetization at room temperature is 1200 G, and the Faraday rotation angle at 633 nm reaches -5.2 deg/μm. Both the magnetization and the Faraday rotation angles are somewhat higher than those of polycrystalline BIG thin films prepared by other methods.

  1. Universal Faraday Rotation in HgTe Wells with Critical Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvaev, A; Dziom, V; Kvon, Z D; Mikhailov, N N; Pimenov, A

    2016-09-09

    The universal value of the Faraday rotation angle close to the fine structure constant (α≈1/137) is experimentally observed in thin HgTe quantum wells with a thickness on the border between trivial insulating and the topologically nontrivial Dirac phases. The quantized value of the Faraday angle remains robust in the broad range of magnetic fields and gate voltages. Dynamic Hall conductivity of the holelike carriers extracted from the analysis of the transmission data shows a theoretically predicted universal value of σ_{xy}=e^{2}/h, which is consistent with the doubly degenerate Dirac state. On shifting the Fermi level by the gate voltage, the effective sign of the charge carriers changes from positive (holes) to negative (electrons). The electronlike part of the dynamic response does not show quantum plateaus and is well described within the classical Drude model.

  2. Terahertz spectroscopy on Faraday and Kerr rotations in a quantum anomalous Hall state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ken N; Takahashi, Youtarou; Mogi, Masataka; Yoshimi, Ryutaro; Tsukazaki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kei S; Ogawa, Naoki; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-07-20

    Electrodynamic responses from three-dimensional topological insulators are characterized by the universal magnetoelectric term constituent of the Lagrangian formalism. The quantized magnetoelectric coupling, which is generally referred to as topological magnetoelectric effect, has been predicted to induce exotic phenomena including the universal low-energy magneto-optical effects. Here we report the experimental indication of the topological magnetoelectric effect, which is exemplified by magneto-optical Faraday and Kerr rotations in the quantum anomalous Hall states of magnetic topological insulator surfaces by terahertz magneto-optics. The universal relation composed of the observed Faraday and Kerr rotation angles but not of any material parameters (for example, dielectric constant and magnetic susceptibility) well exhibits the trajectory towards the fine structure constant in the quantized limit.

  3. Dual role of gravity on the Faraday threshold for immiscible viscous layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, W; Zoueshtiagh, F; Narayanan, R

    2013-12-01

    This work discusses the role of gravity on the Faraday instability, and the differences one can expect to observe in a low-gravity experiment when compared to an earth-based system. These differences are discussed in the context of the viscous linear theory for laterally infinite systems, and a surprising result of the analysis is the existence of a crossover frequency where an interface in low gravity switches from being less to more stable than an earth-based system. We propose this crossover exists in all Faraday systems, and the frequency at which it occurs is shown to be strongly influenced by layer height. In presenting these results physical explanations are provided for the behavior of the predicted forcing amplitude thresholds and wave number selection.

  4. Transfer matrix approach for the Kerr and Faraday rotation in layered nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Széchenyi, Gábor; Vigh, Máté; Kormányos, Andor; Cserti, József

    2016-09-21

    To study the optical rotation of the polarization of light incident on multilayer systems consisting of atomically thin conductors and dielectric multilayers we present a general method based on transfer matrices. The transfer matrix of the atomically thin conducting layer is obtained using the Maxwell equations. We derive expressions for the Kerr (Faraday) rotation angle and for the ellipticity of the reflected (transmitted) light as a function of the incident angle and polarization of the light. The method is demonstrated by calculating the Kerr (Faraday) angle for bilayer graphene in the quantum anomalous Hall state placed on the top of dielectric multilayers. The optical conductivity of the bilayer graphene is calculated in the framework of a four-band model.

  5. Faraday-Active Fabry-Perot Resonator: Transmission, Reflection, and Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptuga, Anatoliy; Morozhenko, Vasyl; Pipa, Viktor; Venger, Evgen; Kostiuk, Theodor

    2011-01-01

    The propagation of light within a semiconductor Faraday-active Fabry-Perot resonator (FAFR) is investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that an external magnetic field radically changes the angular and spectral characteristics of transmission, reflection and emissivity of the resonator not only for polarized, but also for unpolarized light. Suppression of interference patterns and phase inversion of the interference extrema were observed in both monochromatic and polychromatic light. The investigations were carried out for the plane-parallel plates of n-InAs in the spectral range of free charge carrier absorption. The results can be used to create new controllable optical and spectroscopic devices for investigation of Faraday-active material properties and for control of parameters of plane-parallel layers and structures.

  6. Enhancement of optical Faraday effect of nonanuclear Tb(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yuki; Doi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Tomohiro; Koizumi, Hitoshi; Fushimi, Koji; Fujita, Koji; Hinatsu, Yukio; Ito, Hajime; Tanaka, Katsuhisa; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2014-07-21

    The effective magneto-optical properties of novel nonanuclear Tb(III) complexes with Tb-O lattice (specifically, [Tb9(sal-R)16(μ-OH)10](+)NO3(-), where sal-R = alkyl salicylate (R = -CH3 (Me), -C2H5 (Et), -C3H7 (Pr), or -C4H9 (Bu)) are reported. The geometrical structures of these nonanuclear Tb(III) complexes were characterized using X-ray single-crystal analysis and shape-measure calculation. Optical Faraday rotation was observed in nonanuclear Tb(III) complexes in the visible region. The Verdet constant per Tb(III) ion of the Tb9(sal-Me) complex is 150 times larger than that of general Tb(III) oxide glass. To understand their large Faraday rotation, electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of Gd(III) complexes were carried out. In this Report, the magneto-optical relation to the coordination geometry of Tb ions is discussed.

  7. Mixed-cation designs of magnetic perovskites for Faraday rotation at IR wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Gerald F.; Taussig, Alexander R.; Bolduc, Martin; Bi, Lei; Ross, Caroline A.

    2007-05-01

    Magnetic garnets with Bi3+ are the standard media of discrete Faraday rotation isolators for IR-laser/fiber-optical transmission at 1.55μm wavelength. For monolithic integration with semiconductors, perovskites of generic formula A[B ]O3 offer promising alternatives that involve combinations of select transition-metal ions in octahedral B sites. In this paper, two concepts are described. In both cases, the 180° B -O-B bonding of the perovskite lattice could provide superexchange fields large enough to maintain spin ordering at room temperature. One model proposes a quasiferrite arrangement with antiferromagnetic alignment between Fe3+ and Ni2+ charge ordered in the double perovskite compound {A3+A'4+}[Fe3+Ni2+]O6. The other concept relies on ferromagnetism through delocalization superexchange with the composition A23+[Mn4+Ni2+]O6. Where appropriate to enhance Faraday rotation, Bi3+ can be used for A3+.

  8. Single-mode interband cascade laser sources for mid-infrared spectroscopic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, J.; von Edlinger, M.; Weih, R.; Becker, S.; Nähle, L.; Fischer, M.; Koeth, J.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2016-05-01

    Compared to the near infrared, many technologically and industrially relevant gas species have more than an order of magnitude higher absorption features in the mid-infrared (MIR) wavelength range. These species include for example important hydrocarbons (methane, acetylene), nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides. Tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) has proven to be a versatile tool for gas sensing applications with significant advantages compared to other techniques. These advantages include real time measurement, standoff detection and ruggedness of the sensor. We present interband cascade lasers (ICLs), which have evolved into important laser sources for the MIR spectral range from 3 to 7 μm. ICLs achieve high efficiency by cascading optically active zones whilst using interband transitions, so they combine common diode laser as well as quantum cascade laser based technologies. Our application grade singlemode distributed feedback devices operate continuous wave at room temperature and are offering several features especially useful for high performance TLAS applications like: side mode suppression ratio of > 30 dB, continuous tuning ranges up to 30 nm, low threshold power densities and low overall power consumption. The devices are typically integrated in a thermoelectrically cooled TO-style package, hermetically sealed using a cap with anti-reflection coated window. This low power consumption as well as the compact size and ruggedness of the fabricated laser sources makes them perfectly suited for battery powered portable solutions for in field spectroscopy applications.

  9. Measurements of the linewidth enhancement factor of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers by different optical feedback techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jumpertz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise knowledge of the linewidth enhancement factor of a semiconductor laser under actual operating conditions is of prime importance since this parameter dictates various phenomena such as linewidth broadening or optical nonlinearities enhancement. The above-threshold linewidth enhancement factor of a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser structure operated at 10∘C is determined experimentally using two different methods based on optical feedback. Both Fabry-Perot and distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers based on the same active area design are studied, the former by following the wavelength shift as a function of the feedback strength and the latter by self-mixing interferometry. The results are consistent and unveil a clear pump current dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor, with values ranging from 0.8 to about 3.

  10. Measurements of the linewidth enhancement factor of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers by different optical feedback techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumpertz, L., E-mail: louise.jumpertz@telecom-paristech.fr [Université Paris-Saclay, Télécom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI, 46 rue Barrault, F-75013 Paris (France); MirSense, 8 avenue de la Vauve, F-91120 Palaiseau (France); Michel, F.; Pawlus, R.; Elsässer, W. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstr. 7, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Schires, K. [Université Paris-Saclay, Télécom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI, 46 rue Barrault, F-75013 Paris (France); Carras, M. [MirSense, 8 avenue de la Vauve, F-91120 Palaiseau (France); Grillot, F. [Université Paris-Saclay, Télécom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI, 46 rue Barrault, F-75013 Paris (France); also with Center for High Technology Materials, University of New-Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Precise knowledge of the linewidth enhancement factor of a semiconductor laser under actual operating conditions is of prime importance since this parameter dictates various phenomena such as linewidth broadening or optical nonlinearities enhancement. The above-threshold linewidth enhancement factor of a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser structure operated at 10{sup ∘}C is determined experimentally using two different methods based on optical feedback. Both Fabry-Perot and distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers based on the same active area design are studied, the former by following the wavelength shift as a function of the feedback strength and the latter by self-mixing interferometry. The results are consistent and unveil a clear pump current dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor, with values ranging from 0.8 to about 3.

  11. Measurements of coronal Faraday rotation at 4.6 R {sub ☉}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, Patrick D.; Buffo, Jacob J.; Spangler, Steven R., E-mail: jason-kooi@uiowa.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52240 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    Many competing models for the coronal heating and acceleration mechanisms of the high-speed solar wind depend on the solar magnetic field and plasma structure in the corona within heliocentric distances of 5 R {sub ☉}. We report on sensitive Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations made in 2011 August, at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz) of the radio galaxy 3C 228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6-5.0 R {sub ☉}. Observations at 5.0 GHz permit measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. These Faraday rotation observations provide unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. The measured Faraday rotation on this day was lower than our a priori expectations, but we have successfully modeled the measurement in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. Our data on 3C 228 provide two lines of sight (separated by 46'', 33,000 km in the corona). We detected three periods during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation measure between these two closely spaced lines of sight. These measurements (termed differential Faraday rotation) yield an estimate of 2.6-4.1 GA for coronal currents. Our data also allow us to impose upper limits on rotation measure fluctuations caused by coronal waves; the observed upper limits were 3.3 and 6.4 rad m{sup –2} along the two lines of sight. The implications of these results for Joule heating and wave heating are briefly discussed.

  12. An analytical stability theory for Faraday waves and the observation of the harmonic surface response

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, H W; Wagner, C; Albers, J; Knorr, K

    1996-01-01

    We present an analytical stability theory for the onset of the Faraday instability, applying over a wide frequency range between shallow water gravity and deep water capillary waves. For sufficiently thin fluid layers the surface is predicted to occur in harmonic rather than subharmonic resonance with the forcing. An experimental confirmation of this result is given. PACS: 47.20.Ma, 47.20.Gv, 47.15.Cb

  13. Observation of highly localized structures in a Faraday experiment with highly dissipative fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, C.; Gibiat, V.; Negreira, C.

    2003-09-01

    We present an experimental study about the Faraday instability using a highly dissipative fluid. The fluid layer is excited with a vertical periodic acceleration field. In this regimen of high viscosity and shallow fluid depth, we have found two very interesting phenomena. On the one hand, we observed a periodicity windows appearing after the whole classical crispation, on the other hand highly spatially localized structures are generated within the periodicity window that propagates on fluid surface.

  14. In-electrode vs. on-electrode: ultrasensitive Faraday cage-type electrochemiluminescence immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiyong; Sha, Yuhong; Hu, Yufang; Wang, Sui

    2016-03-28

    A new-concept of an "in-electrode" Faraday cage-type electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA) method for the ultrasensitive detection of neurotensin (NT) was reported with capture antibody (Ab1)-nanoFe3O4@graphene (GO) and detector antibody (Ab2)&N-(4-aminobutyl)-N-ethylisoluminol (ABEI)@GO, which led to about 1000-fold improvement in sensitivity by extending the Helmholtz plane (OHP) of the proposed electrode assembly effectively.

  15. Faraday Cup - it is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    A Faraday Cup is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams. An electrically isolated metallic electrode intercepts the beam and captures all its charges. These charges are integrated using an current sensitive amplifier. When the beam impinges onto the electrode surface low energy electrons are liberated. In order to prevent these electrons from escaping the cup and thus falsifying the measurement, a repeller electrode with negative potential pushes the electrons back onto the electrode.

  16. Energy cascades in the upper ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ray Q.Lin; Scott Chubb

    2006-01-01

    Wave-wave interactions cause energy cascades. These are the most important processes in the upper ocean because they govern wave-growth and dissipation. Through indirect cascades, wave energy is transferred from higher frequencies to lower frequencies, leading to wave growth. In direct cascades, energy is transferred from lower frequencies to the higher frequencies, which causes waves to break, and dissipation of wave energy. However, the evolution and origin of energy cascade processes are still not fully understood. In particular, for example, results from a recent theory (Kalmykov, 1998) suggest that the class I wave-wave interactions (defined by situations involving 4-, 6-, 8-, etc, even numbers of resonantly interacting waves) cause indirect cascades, and Class II wave-wave interactions (involving, 5-, 7-, 9-, etc, .., odd numbers of waves) cause direct cascades. In contrast to this theory, our model results indicate the 4-wave interactions can cause significant transfer of wave energy through both direct and indirect cascades. In most situations, 4-wave interactions provide the major source of energy transfer for both direct cascades and indirect cascades, except when the wave steepness is larger than 0.28. Our model results agree well with wave measurements, obtained using field buoy data (for example, Lin and Lin, 2002). In particular, in these observations, asymmetrical wave-wave interactions were studied. They found that direct and indirect cascades both are mainly due to the 4-wave interactions when wave steepness is less than 0.3.

  17. Faraday effect of bismuth iron garnet thin film prepared by mist CVD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Situ; Sato, Takafumi; Kaneko, Kentaro; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Metastable bismuth iron garnet (BIG, an abbreviation of Bi3Fe5O12), one kind of garnet-type ferrites, is known to manifest very large Faraday rotation as well as low optical absorption in the visible to infrared region. We report on successful synthesis of thin film composed of single-phase BIG epitaxially grown on single-crystalline gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd3Ga5O12, GGG) substrate by using mist chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, which is an emerging technique for preparation of thin films. The crystal structure, surface morphology, and magnetic, optical and magneto-optical properties of the resultant thin films have been explored. The BIG thin film has a relatively flat surface free from roughness compared to those prepared by other vapor deposition methods. Saturation magnetization is about 1620 G at room temperature, which is close to that expected from the ideal magnetic structure of BIG. The maximum value of Faraday rotation angle reaches 54.3 deg/µm at a wavelength of 424 nm. This value is rather large when compared with those reported for BIG thin films prepared by other techniques. The wavelength dependence of Faraday rotation angle is analyzed well in terms of the crystal electric field (CEF) level schema. Our result suggests that the mist CVD method is a simple and effective technique to synthesize BIG thin film with excellent magneto-optical properties.

  18. Faraday effect in alkali-metal vapors in a strong bichromatic field of laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagodova, T. Ya.; Kuptsova, A. V.

    2002-04-01

    Results of a numerical study of the Faraday effect arising upon propagation of the light beams with the frequencies ω L1 (resonant to the nS 1/2- nP 1/2, 3/2 transitions) and ω L2 (resonant to the nP 1/2, 3/2-( n+2) S 1/2 transitions) through alkali-metal vapors are presented. Characteristics of the magneto-optical rotation spectra at each of the frequencies are strongly affected by the second intense radiation field resonant to the adjacent transition. When the atoms interact with two strong light waves, resonant to adjacent transitions, and with a magnetic field, the shape of the Faraday rotation spectra depends on the energy shifts of the atomic states that arise due to the dynamic Stark effect and the Zeeman effect (the Paschen-Back or an intermediate-type effect), as well as due to the difference of populations of these states caused by the interaction of the atoms with the fields. The results obtained show that in the frequency selection method, based on the resonance Faraday effect, the frequency of the generated narrow-band beam can be tuned by the intensity of the strong wave, resonant to the transition between the excited states.

  19. Vito Volterra and his commemoration for the centenary of Faraday's discovery of electromagnetic induction

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a memoir of 1931 written by Vito Volterra on the Italian physicists of the nineteenth century and the researches these scientists made after the discoveries of Michael Faraday on electromagnetism. Here, the memoir entitled "I fisici italiani e le ricerche di Faraday" is translated from Italian. It was written to commemorate the centenary of Faraday's discovery of the electromagnetic induction. Besides being a remarkable article on the history of science, it was also, in a certain extent, a political paper. In fact, in 1931, the same year of the publication of this article, Mussolini imposed a mandatory oath of loyalty to Italian academies. Volterra was one of the very few professors who refused to take this oath of loyalty. Because of the political situation in Italy, Volterra wanted to end his paper sending a message to the scientists of the world, telling that the feeling of admiration and gratitude that in Italy the scientists had towards "the great thinker and British experimentalist" w...

  20. Faraday synthesis study and polarized properties of PSR J1745-2900 at 7 mm

    CERN Document Server

    Kravchenko, E V; Yusef-Zadeh, F; Kovalev, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    We present results of interferometric polarization observations of the recently discovered magnetar J1745-2900 in the vicinity of the Galactic center. The observations were made with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) on 21 February 2014 in the range 40-48 GHz. The full polarization mode and A configuration of the array were used. The average total and linearly polarized flux density of the pulsar amounts to 2.3$\\pm$0.31 mJy/beam and 1.5$\\pm$0.2 mJy/beam, respectively. Analysis shows a rotation measure (RM) of (-67$\\pm$3)x10$^3$ rad/m$^2$, which is in a good agreement with previous measurements at longer wavelengths. These high frequency observations are sensitive to RM values of up to ~2x10$^7$ rad/m$^2$. However, application of the Faraday synthesis technique did not reveal other significant RM components in the pulsar emission. This supports an external nature of a single thin Faraday-rotating screen which should be located close to the Galactic center. The Faraday corrected intrinsic electric vecto...

  1. Periodic reversal of magneto-optic Faraday rotation on uniaxial birefringence crystal with ultrathin magnetic films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Su

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental approach of inclined incidence magneto-optic Faraday effect observed in the polar plane is applied. Three samples containing ferromagnetic cobalt ultrathin films on a semiconductor zinc oxide (0001 single crystal substrate with in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropy are evaluated. Through the fine adjustment of crossed polarizers in the magneto-optic effect measurement completely recorded the detail optical and magneto-optical responses from the birefringent crystal substrate and the magnetic film, especially for the signal induced from the substrate with uniaxial optical axis. The angle dependency of interference phenomena periodically from the optical and magneto-optical responses is attributed to the birefringence even in the absence of a magnetic field. The new type of observation finds that the transmission Faraday intensity in the oblique incidence includes a combination of polarization rotations, which results from optical compensation from the substrate and magneto-optical Faraday effects from the film. The samples grown at different rates and examined by this method exhibit magnetic structure discriminations. This result can be applied in the advanced polarized-light technologies to enhance the spatial resolution of magnetic surfaces with microstructural information under various magnetic field direction.

  2. Giant Faraday effect due to Pauli exclusion principle in 3D topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Hari P; Leuenberger, Michael N

    2014-02-26

    Experiments using ARPES, which is based on the photoelectric effect, show that the surface states in 3D topological insulators (TI) are helical. Here we consider Weyl interface fermions due to band inversion in narrow-bandgap semiconductors, such as Pb1-xSnxTe. The positive and negative energy solutions can be identified by means of opposite helicity in terms of the spin helicity operator in 3D TI as ĥ(TI) = (1/ |p|_ |) β (σ|_ x p|_ ) · z^, where β is a Dirac matrix and z^ points perpendicular to the interface. Using the 3D Dirac equation and bandstructure calculations we show that the transitions between positive and negative energy solutions, giving rise to electron-hole pairs, obey strict optical selection rules. In order to demonstrate the consequences of these selection rules, we consider the Faraday effect due to the Pauli exclusion principle in a pump-probe setup using a 3D TI double interface of a PbTe/Pb₀.₃₁Sn₀.₆₉Te/PbTe heterostructure. For that we calculate the optical conductivity tensor of this heterostructure, which we use to solve Maxwell's equations. The Faraday rotation angle exhibits oscillations as a function of probe wavelength and thickness of the heterostructure. The maxima in the Faraday rotation angle are of the order of mrds.

  3. A Comparison of Methods for Cascade Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Ruocheng

    2016-01-01

    Information cascades exist in a wide variety of platforms on Internet. A very important real-world problem is to identify which information cascades can go viral. A system addressing this problem can be used in a variety of applications including public health, marketing and counter-terrorism. As a cascade can be considered as compound of the social network and the time series. However, in related literature where methods for solving the cascade prediction problem were proposed, the experimental settings were often limited to only a single metric for a specific problem formulation. Moreover, little attention was paid to the run time of those methods. In this paper, we first formulate the cascade prediction problem as both classification and regression. Then we compare three categories of cascade prediction methods: centrality based, feature based and point process based. We carry out the comparison through evaluation of the methods by both accuracy metrics and run time. The results show that feature based met...

  4. Spray formation: an inverse cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Yue; Tryggvason, Gretar; zaleski, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of droplet formation in a gas-liquid mixing layer using direct numerical simulation. It is seen that two mechanisms compete to generate the droplets: fingering at the tip of the waves and hole formation in the thin liquid sheet. The three dimensional liquid structures are much shorter than the longitudinal wavelength of the instability at the first instant of their formation. As time evolves, the structures evolves to larger and larger scales, in a way similar to the inverse cascade of length scales in droplet impact and impact crown formation.

  5. Disaster Mythology and Availability Cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Grow Sun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sociological research conducted in the aftermath of natural disasters has uncovered a number of “disaster myths” – widely shared misconceptions about typical post-disaster human behavior. This paper discusses the possibility that perpetuation of disaster mythology reflects an “availability cascade,” defined in prior scholarship as a “self-reinforcing process of collective belief formation by which an expressed perception triggers a chain reaction that gives the perception increasing plausibility through its rising availability in public discourse.” (Kuran and Sunstein 1999. Framing the spread of disaster mythology as an availability cascade suggests that certain tools may be useful in halting the myths’ continued perpetuation. These tools include changing the legal and social incentives of so-called “availability entrepreneurs” – those principally responsible for beginning and perpetuating the cascade, as well as insulating decision-makers from political pressures generated by the availability cascade. This paper evaluates the potential effectiveness of these and other solutions for countering disaster mythology. Las investigaciones sociológicas realizadas tras los desastres naturales han hecho evidentes una serie de “mitos del desastre”, conceptos erróneos ampliamente compartidos sobre el comportamiento humano típico tras un desastre. Este artículo analiza la posibilidad de que la perpetuación de los mitos del desastre refleje una “cascada de disponibilidad”, definida en estudios anteriores como un “proceso de auto-refuerzo de la formación de una creencia colectiva, a través del que una percepción expresada produce una reacción en cadena que hace que la percepción sea cada vez más verosímil, a través de una mayor presencia en el discurso público” (Kuran y Sunstein 1999. Enmarcar la propagación de los mitos del desastre como una cascada de disponibilidad sugiere que ciertas herramientas pueden ser

  6. A novel intelligent adaptive control of laser-based ground thermal test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zhengtao; Yu Gang; Li Shaoxia; He Xiuli; Chen Ru; Zheng Caiyun; Ning Weijian

    2016-01-01

    Laser heating technology is a type of potential and attractive space heat flux simulation technology, which is characterized by high heating rate, controlled spatial intensity distribution and rapid response. However, the controlled plant is nonlinear, time-varying and uncertainty when implementing the laser-based heat flux simulation. In this paper, a novel intelligent adaptive controller based on proportion–integration–differentiation (PID) type fuzzy logic is proposed to improve the performance of laser-based ground thermal test. The temperature range of thermal cycles is more than 200 K in many instances. In order to improve the adaptability of controller, output scaling factors are real time adjusted while the thermal test is underway. The initial values of scaling factors are optimized using a stochastic hybrid particle swarm optimization (H-PSO) algorithm. A validating system has been established in the laboratory. The performance of the pro-posed controller is evaluated through extensive experiments under different operating conditions (reference and load disturbance). The results show that the proposed adaptive controller performs remarkably better compared to the conventional PID (PID) controller and the conventional PID type fuzzy (F-PID) controller considering performance indicators of overshoot, settling time and steady state error for laser-based ground thermal test. It is a reliable tool for effective temperature control of laser-based ground thermal test.

  7. Seam gap bridging of laser based processes for the welding of aluminium sheets for industrial applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalderink, Bernard Johan; Pathiraj, B.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.

    2010-01-01

    Laser welding has a large potential for the production of tailor welded blanks in the automotive industry, due to the low heat input and deep penetration. However, due to the small laser spot and melt pool, laser-based welding processes in general have a low tolerance for seam gaps. In this paper, f

  8. A novel intelligent adaptive control of laser-based ground thermal test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Zhengtao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser heating technology is a type of potential and attractive space heat flux simulation technology, which is characterized by high heating rate, controlled spatial intensity distribution and rapid response. However, the controlled plant is nonlinear, time-varying and uncertainty when implementing the laser-based heat flux simulation. In this paper, a novel intelligent adaptive controller based on proportion–integration–differentiation (PID type fuzzy logic is proposed to improve the performance of laser-based ground thermal test. The temperature range of thermal cycles is more than 200 K in many instances. In order to improve the adaptability of controller, output scaling factors are real time adjusted while the thermal test is underway. The initial values of scaling factors are optimized using a stochastic hybrid particle swarm optimization (H-PSO algorithm. A validating system has been established in the laboratory. The performance of the proposed controller is evaluated through extensive experiments under different operating conditions (reference and load disturbance. The results show that the proposed adaptive controller performs remarkably better compared to the conventional PID (PID controller and the conventional PID type fuzzy (F-PID controller considering performance indicators of overshoot, settling time and steady state error for laser-based ground thermal test. It is a reliable tool for effective temperature control of laser-based ground thermal test.

  9. Cascades on clique-based graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Hackett, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We present an analytical approach to determining the expected cascade size in a broad range of dynamical models on the class of highly-clustered random graphs introduced in [J. P. Gleeson, Phys. Rev. E 80, 036107 (2009)]. A condition for the existence of global cascades is also derived. Applications of this approach include analyses of percolation, and Watts's model. We show how our techniques can be used to study the effects of in-group bias in cascades on social networks.

  10. Lateral Modes in Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C. Dente

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We will examine the waveguide mode losses in ridge-guided quantum cascade lasers. Our analysis illustrates how the low-loss mode for broad-ridge quantum cascade lasers (QCLs can be a higher-order lateral waveguide mode that maximizes the feedback from the sloped ridge-wall regions. The results are in excellent agreement with the near- and far-field data taken on broad-ridge-guided quantum cascade lasers processed with sloped ridge walls.

  11. 77 FR 14838 - General Electric-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment LLC, Commercial Laser-Based Uranium Enrichment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... COMMISSION General Electric-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment LLC, Commercial Laser-Based Uranium Enrichment... applicant) to authorize construction of a laser-based uranium enrichment facility and possession and use of...-based uranium enrichment facility. Revisions to the application were submitted on March 23, 2010;...

  12. WHISTLER TURBULENCE FORWARD CASCADE VERSUS INVERSE CASCADE: THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ouliang [Oracle Corporation, Redwood Shores, CA (United States); Gary, S. Peter [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO (United States); Wang, Joseph, E-mail: ouliang@usc.edu, E-mail: pgary@lanl.gov, E-mail: josephjw@usc.edu [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We present the results of the first fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma in which both forward cascades to shorter wavelengths, and inverse cascades to longer wavelengths are allowed to proceed. For the electron beta β {sub e} = 0.10 initial value considered here, the early-time rate of inverse cascade is very much smaller than the rate of forward cascade, so that at late times the fluctuation energy in the regime of the inverse cascade is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime. Similarly, the wavevector anisotropy in the inverse cascade regime is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime.

  13. Unsteady transonic flow over cascade blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, S. P.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop an efficient staggered cascade blade unsteady aerodynamics model for the neighborhood of March 1, representing the blade row by a rectilinear two-dimensional cascade of thin, flat plate airfoils. The equations of motion are derived on the basis of linearized transonic small perturbation theory, and an analytical solution is obtained by means of the Wiener-Hopf procedure. Making use of the transonic similarity law, the results obtained are compared with those of other linearized cascade analyses. A parametric study is conducted to find the effects of reduced frequency, stagger angle, solidity, and the location of the pitching axis on cascade stability.

  14. Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

    2011-03-01

    As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

  15. Single-Seed Cascades on Clustered Networks

    CERN Document Server

    McSweeney, John K

    2015-01-01

    We consider a dynamic network cascade process developed by Watts applied to a random networks with a specified amount of clustering, belonging to a class of random networks developed by Newman. We adapt existing tree-based methods to formulate an appropriate two-type branching process to describe the spread of a cascade started with a single active node, and obtain a fixed-point equation to implicitly express the extinction probability of such a cascade. In so doing, we also recover a special case of a formula of Hackett et al. giving conditions for certain extinction of the cascade.

  16. Multifunctional Cascaded Metamaterials: Integrated Transmitarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsakka, Amr A.; Asadchy, Viktar S.; Faniayeu, Ihar A.; Tcvetkova, Svetlana N.; Tretyakov, Sergei A.

    2016-10-01

    Control of electromagnetic waves using engineered materials is very important in a wide range of applications, therefore there is always a continuous need for new and more efficient solutions. Known natural and artificial materials and surfaces provide a particular functionality in the frequency range they operate but cast a "shadow" and produce reflections at other frequencies. Here, we introduce a concept of multifunctional engineered materials that possess different predetermined functionalities at different frequencies. Such response can be accomplished by cascading metasurfaces (thin composite layers) that are designed to perform a single operation at the desired frequency and are transparent elsewhere. Previously, out-of-band transparent metasurfaces for control over reflection and absorption were proposed. In this paper, to complete the full set of functionalities for wave control, we synthesize transmitarrays that tailor transmission in a desired way, being "invisible" beyond the operational band. The designed transmitarrays for wavefront shaping and anomalous refraction are tested numerically and experimentally. To demonstrate our concept of multifunctional engineered materials, we have designed a cascade of three metasurfaces that performs three different functions for waves at different frequencies. Remarkably, applied to volumetric metamaterials, our concept can enable a single composite possessing desired multifunctional response.

  17. Time evolution of cascade decay

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We study non-perturbatively the time evolution of cascade decay for generic fields $\\pi \\rightarrow \\phi_1\\phi_2\\rightarrow \\phi_2\\chi_1\\chi_2$ and obtain the time dependence of amplitudes and populations for the resonant and final states. We analyze in detail the different time scales and the manifestation of unitary time evolution in the dynamics of production and decay of resonant intermediate and final states. The probability of occupation (population) ``flows'' as a function of time from the initial to the final states. When the decay width of the parent particle $\\Gamma_\\pi$ is much larger than that of the intermediate resonant state $\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$ there is a ``bottleneck'' in the flow, the population of resonant states builds up to a maximum at $t^* = \\ln[\\Gamma_\\pi/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}]/(\\Gamma_\\pi-\\Gamma_{\\phi_1})$ nearly saturating unitarity and decays to the final state on the longer time scale $1/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$. As a consequence of the wide separation of time scales in this case the cascade decay ...

  18. A phonon scattering assisted injection and extraction based terahertz quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, E.; Fathololoumi, S.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Aers, G.; Laframboise, S. R.; Lindskog, M.; Razavipour, S. G.; Wacker, A.; Ban, D.; Liu, H. C.

    2012-04-01

    A lasing scheme for terahertz quantum cascade lasers, based on consecutive phonon-photon-phonon emissions per module, is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The charge transport of the proposed structure is modeled using a rate equation formalism. An optimization code based on a genetic algorithm was developed to find a four-well design in the GaAs/Al0.25Ga0.75As material system that maximizes the product of population inversion and oscillator strength at 150 K. The fabricated devices using Au double-metal waveguides show lasing at 3.2 THz up to 138 K. The electrical characteristics display no sign of differential resistance drop at lasing threshold, which, in conjunction with the low optical power of the device, suggest—thanks to the rate equation model—a slow depopulation rate of the lower lasing state, a hypothesis confirmed by non-equilibrium Green's function calculations.

  19. X-ray Faraday effect at the L2,3 edges of Fe, Co, and Ni: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuneš, J.; Oppeneer, P. M.; Mertins, H.-Ch.; Schäfers, F.; Gaupp, A.; Gudat, W.; Novák, P.

    2001-11-01

    The x-ray Faraday effect at the L2,3 edges of the 3d ferromagnets Fe, Co, Ni and of Fe0.5Ni0.5 alloy is studied both theoretically and experimentally. We perform ab initio calculations of the x-ray Faraday effect on the basis of the local spin-density approximation and we adopt the linear-response formalism to describe the material's response to the incident light. Experimental x-ray Faraday rotation and ellipticity spectra are measured with linearly polarized soft-x-ray synchrotron radiation at BESSY, Berlin. The measured x-ray Faraday rotations are remarkably large, up to 2.8×105 deg/mm, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than those observed in the visible range. From the measured Faraday spectra we determine the intrinsic dichroic contributions to the dispersive and absorptive parts of the refractive index, and compare these to ab initio calculated counterparts. The theoretical dichroic spectra are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The inclusion of the spin polarization of the core states leads to a small, yet non-negligible, improvement of the theoretical dichroic spectra. Our results illustrate that the many-particle x-ray excitation spectrum can be sufficiently well approximated by the Kohn-Sham single-particle spectrum. From the computed magneto-x-ray spectra we determine, using the sum rules, the orbital moments, which we compare to the exact orbital moments.

  20. Competition of Faraday rotation and birefringence in femtosecond laser direct written waveguides in magneto-optical glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Gross, S; Dekker, P; Withford, M J; Steel, M J

    2014-11-17

    We consider the process of Faraday rotation in femtosecond laser direct-write waveguides. The birefringence commonly associated with such waveguides may be expected to impact the observable Faraday rotation. Here, we theoretically calculate and experimentally verify the competition between Faraday rotation and birefringence in two waveguides created by laser writing in a commercial magneto-optic glass. The magnetic field applied to induce Faraday rotation is nonuniform, and as a result, we find that the two effects can be clearly separated and used to accurately determine even weak birefringence. The birefringence in the waveguides was determined to be on the scale of Δn = 10(-6) to 10(-5). The reduction in Faraday rotation caused by birefringence of order Δn = 10(-6) was moderate and we obtained approximately 9° rotation in an 11 mm waveguide. In contrast, for birefringence of order 10(-5), a significant reduction in the polarization azimuth change was found and only 6° rotation was observed.

  1. DISTURBANCE ATTENUATION FOR UNCERTAIN NONLINEAR CASCADED SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Weiping; MU Xiaowu; SUN Yuqiang

    2004-01-01

    In present paper, the disturbance attenuation problem of uncertain nonlinear cascaded systems is studied. Based on the adding one power integrator technique and recursive design, a feedback controller that solves the disturbance attenuation problem is constructed for uncertain nonlinear cascaded systems with internal stability.

  2. Cascade Harvest’ red raspberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascade Harvest’ is a new floricane fruiting raspberry cultivar (Rubus idaeus L.) jointly released by Washington State University (WSU), Oregon State University (OSU) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). ‘Cascade Harvest’ produces a high yield of large, firm fruit suited to machine harves...

  3. A NOTE ON VECTOR CASCADE ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-hui Chen; Jin-zhao Liu; Wen-sheng Zhang

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the relationship between accuracy of multivariate refinable vector and vector cascade algorithm. We show that, if the vector cascade algorithm (1.5) with isotropic dilation converges to a vector-valued function with regularity, then the initial function must satisfy the Strang-Fix conditions.

  4. Cascading costs: An economic nitrogen cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William R. Moomaw; Melissa B. L. Birch

    2005-01-01

    The chemical nitrogen cycle is becoming better characterized in terms of fluxes and reservoirs on a variety of scales. Galloway has demonstrated that reactive nitrogen can cascade through multiple ecosystems causing environmental damage at each stage before being denitrifled to N2. We propose to construct a parallel economic nitrogen cascade (ENC) in which economic impacts of nitrogen fluxes can be estimated by the costs associated with each stage of the chemical cascade. Using economic data for the benefits of damage avoided and costs of mitigation in the Chesapeake Bay basin, we have constructed an economic nitrogen cascade for the region. Since a single tonne of nitrogen can cascade through the system, the costs also cascade.Therefore evaluating the benefits of mitigating a tonne of reactive nitrogen released needs to consider the damage avoided in all of the ecosystems through which that tonne would cascade.The analysis reveals that it is most cost effective to remove a tonne of nitrogen coming from combustion since it has the greatest impact on human health and creates cascading damage through the atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We will discuss the implications of this analysis for determining the most cost effective policy option for achieving environmental quality goals.

  5. Multifunctional Cascaded Metamaterials: Integrated Transmitarrays

    CERN Document Server

    Elsakka, Amr A; Faniayeu, Ihar A; Tcvetkova, Svetlana N; Tretyakov, Sergei A

    2016-01-01

    Control of electromagnetic waves using engineered materials is very important in a wide range of applications, therefore there is always a continuous need for new and more efficient solutions. Known natural and artificial materials and surfaces provide a particular functionality in the frequency range they operate but cast a "shadow" and produce reflections at other frequencies. Here, we introduce a concept of multifunctional engineered materials that possess different predetermined functionalities at different frequencies. Such response can be accomplished by cascading metasurfaces (thin composite layers) that are designed to perform a single operation at the desired frequency and are transparent elsewhere. Previously, out-of-band transparent metasurfaces for control over reflection and absorption were proposed. In this paper, to complete the full set of functionalities for wave control, we synthesize transmitarrays that tailor transmission in a desired way, being "invisible" beyond the operational band. The...

  6. Network reconstruction from infection cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Braunstein, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing propagation networks from observations is a fundamental inverse problem, and it's crucial to understand and control dynamics in complex systems. Here we show that it is possible to reconstruct the whole structure of an interaction network and to simultaneously infer the complete time course of activation spreading, relying just on single snapshots of a small number of activity cascades. The method, that we called Inverse Dynamics Network Reconstruction (IDNR), is shown to work successfully on several synthetic and real networks, inferring the networks and the sources of infection based on sparse observations, including single snapshots. IDNR is built on a Belief Propagation approximation, that has an impressive performance in a wide variety of topological structures. The method can be applied in absence of complete time-series data by providing a detailed modeling of the posterior distribution of trajectories conditioned to the observations. Furthermore, we show by experiments that the informat...

  7. Availability Cascades & the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In search of a new concept that will provide answers to as to how modern societies should not only make sense but also resolve the social and environmental problems linked with our modes of production and consumption, collaborative consumption and the sharing economy are increasingly attracting...... attention. This conceptual paper attempts to explain the emergent focus on the sharing economy and associated business and consumption models by applying cascade theory. Risks associated with this behavior will be especially examined with regard to the sustainability claim of collaborative consumption....... With academics, practitioners, and civil society alike having a shared history in being rather fast in accepting new concepts that will not only provide business opportunities but also a good conscience, this study proposes a critical study of the implications of collaborative consumption, before engaging...

  8. Availability Cascades & the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In search of a new concept that will provide answers to as to how modern societies should not only make sense but also resolve the social and environmental problems linked with our modes of production and consumption, collaborative consumption and the sharing economy are increasingly attracting...... attention. This conceptual paper attempts to explain the emergent focus on the sharing economy and associated business and consumption models by applying cascade theory. Risks associated with this behavior will be especially examined with regard to the sustainability claim of collaborative consumption....... With academics, practitioners, and civil society alike having a shared history in being rather fast in accepting new concepts that will not only provide business opportunities but also a good conscience, this study proposes a critical study of the implications of collaborative consumption, before engaging...

  9. Cascades in interdependent flow networks

    CERN Document Server

    Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; D'Agostino, Gregorio

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the abrupt breakdown behavior of coupled distribution grids under load growth. This scenario mimics the ever-increasing customer demand and the foreseen introduction of energy hubs interconnecting the different energy vectors. We extend an analytical model of cascading behavior due to line overloads to the case of interdependent networks and find evidence of first order transitions due to the long-range nature of the flows. Our results indicate that the foreseen increase in the couplings between the grids has two competing effects: on the one hand, it increases the safety region where grids can operate without withstanding systemic failures; on the other hand, it increases the possibility of a joint systems' failure.

  10. MAPK Cascades in Guard Cell Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuree; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwak, June M.

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions. PMID:26904052

  11. MAPK cascades in guard cell signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuree eLee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions.

  12. A low-mass faraday cup experiment for the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, A. J.; Steinberg, J. T.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    Faraday cups have proven to be very reliable and accurate instruments capable of making 3-D velocity distribution measurements on spinning or 3-axis stabilized spacecraft. Faraday cup instrumentation continues to be appropriate for heliospheric missions. As an example, the reductions in mass possible relative to the solar wind detection system about to be flown on the WIND spacecraft were estimated. Through the use of technology developed or used at the MIT Center for Space Research but were not able to utilize for WIND: surface-mount packaging, field-programmable gate arrays, an optically-switched high voltage supply, and an integrated-circuit power converter, it was estimated that the mass of the Faraday Cup system could be reduced from 5 kg to 1.8 kg. Further redesign of the electronics incorporating hybrid integrated circuits as well as a decrease in the sensor size, with a corresponding increase in measurement cycle time, could lead to a significantly lower mass for other mission applications. Reduction in mass of the entire spacecraft-experiment system is critically dependent on early and continual collaborative efforts between the spacecraft engineers and the experimenters. Those efforts concern a range of issues from spacecraft structure to data systems to the spacecraft power voltage levels. Requirements for flight qualification affect use of newer, lighter electronics packaging and its implementation; the issue of quality assurance needs to be specifically addressed. Lower cost and reduced mass can best be achieved through the efforts of a relatively small group dedicated to the success of the mission. Such a group needs a fixed budget and greater control over quality assurance requirements, together with a reasonable oversight mechanism.

  13. A low-mass faraday cup experiment for the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, A. J.; Steinberg, J. T.; Mcnutt, R. L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Faraday cups have proven to be very reliable and accurate instruments capable of making 3-D velocity distribution measurements on spinning or 3-axis stabilized spacecraft. Faraday cup instrumentation continues to be appropriate for heliospheric missions. As an example, the reductions in mass possible relative to the solar wind detection system about to be flown on the WIND spacecraft were estimated. Through the use of technology developed or used at the MIT Center for Space Research but were not able to utilize for WIND: surface-mount packaging, field-programmable gate arrays, an optically-switched high voltage supply, and an integrated-circuit power converter, it was estimated that the mass of the Faraday Cup system could be reduced from 5 kg to 1.8 kg. Further redesign of the electronics incorporating hybrid integrated circuits as well as a decrease in the sensor size, with a corresponding increase in measurement cycle time, could lead to a significantly lower mass for other mission applications. Reduction in mass of the entire spacecraft-experiment system is critically dependent on early and continual collaborative efforts between the spacecraft engineers and the experimenters. Those efforts concern a range of issues from spacecraft structure to data systems to the spacecraft power voltage levels. Requirements for flight qualification affect use of newer, lighter electronics packaging and its implementation; the issue of quality assurance needs to be specifically addressed. Lower cost and reduced mass can best be achieved through the efforts of a relatively small group dedicated to the success of the mission. Such a group needs a fixed budget and greater control over quality assurance requirements, together with a reasonable oversight mechanism.

  14. Conditions for the validity of Faraday's law of induction and their experimental confirmation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Ramos, A; Menendez, J R; Pique, C [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Escuela Politecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Gijon, Campus de Viesques, Edificio Este, 33203 Gijon (Spain)], E-mail: lramos@uniovi.es, E-mail: jrhevia@uniovi.es, E-mail: pique@uniovi.es

    2008-09-15

    This paper, as its main didactic objective, shows the conditions needed for the validity of Faraday's law of induction. Inadequate comprehension of these conditions has given rise to several paradoxes about the issue; some are analysed and solved in this paper in the light of the theoretical deduction of the induction law. Furthermore, an experimental set-up, in which such conditions are experimentally tested, is included. The experiment is not complicated and the method we use, and similar methods used elsewhere, is widely considered as suitable laboratory practice for students of first university courses in physics and engineering.

  15. Highly Sensitive Fiber-Optic Faraday-Effect Magnetic Field Sensor Based on Yttrium Iron Garnet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The principle and performance of a fiber-optic Faraday-effect magnetic-field sensor based on an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and two flux concentrations are described. A single polarization maintaining optical fiber links the sensor head to the source and detection system, in which the technique of phase shift cancellation is used to cancel the phase shift that accumulate in the optical fiber. Flux concentrators were exploited to enhance the YIG crystal magneto optic sensitivity .The sensor system exhibited a noise-equivalent field of 8 and a 3 dB bandwidth of ~10 MHz.

  16. Faraday-cup-type lost fast ion detector on Heliotron J

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S.; Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Kobayashi, S.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Kado, S.; Ohshima, S.; Weir, G. M.; Nakamura, Y.; Konoshima, S.; Kemmochi, N.; Ohtani, Y.; Mizuuchi, T.

    2016-11-01

    A Faraday-cup type lost-fast ion probe (FLIP) has been designed and installed in Heliotron J for the purpose of the studies of interaction between fast ions and MHD instabilities. The FLIP can measure the co-going fast ions whose energy is in the range of 1.7-42.5 keV (proton) and pitch angle of 90∘-140∘, especially for fast ions having the injection energy of neutral beam injection (NBI). The FLIP successfully measured the re-entering passing ions and trapped lost-fast ions caused by fast-ion-driven energetic particle modes in NBI heated plasmas.

  17. The magnetic field of the Large Magellanic Cloud revealed through Faraday rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Gaensler, B M; Staveley-Smith, L; Dickey, J M; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Dickel, J R; Wolleben, M

    2005-01-01

    We have measured the Faraday rotation toward a large sample of polarized radio sources behind the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), to determine the structure of this galaxy's magnetic field. The magnetic field of the LMC consists of a coherent axisymmetric spiral of field strength ~1 microgauss. Strong fluctuations in the magnetic field are also seen, on small (<0.5 parsecs) and large (~100 parsecs) scales. The significant bursts of recent star formation and supernova activity in the LMC argue against standard dynamo theory, adding to the growing evidence for rapid field amplification in galaxies.

  18. Faraday Future获加州自动驾驶测试执照

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    美国当地时间6月22日,源自硅谷的智能互联网电动车公司Faraday Future(简称FF)宣布,美国加利福尼亚州机动车管理局(DMV)已正式批准FF自动驾驶测试执照申请。未来,FF将在加州进行自动驾驶技术的相关测试工作。

  19. Highlights from Faraday Discussion 184: Single-Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy, London, UK, September 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellings, E; Faez, S; Piatkowski, L

    2016-02-07

    The 2015 Faraday Discussion on single-molecule microscopy and spectroscopy brought together leading scientists involved in various topics of single-molecule research. It attracted almost a hundred delegates from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and experience levels - from experimentalists to theoreticians, from biologists to materials scientists, from masters students to Nobel Prize Laureates. The meeting was merely a reflection of how big of an impact the ability to detect individual molecules has had on science over the past quarter of a century. In the following we give an overview of the topics covered during this meeting and briefly highlight the content of each presentation.

  20. Faraday-cup-type lost fast ion detector on Heliotron J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S; Ogawa, K; Isobe, M; Darrow, D S; Kobayashi, S; Nagasaki, K; Okada, H; Minami, T; Kado, S; Ohshima, S; Weir, G M; Nakamura, Y; Konoshima, S; Kemmochi, N; Ohtani, Y; Mizuuchi, T

    2016-11-01

    A Faraday-cup type lost-fast ion probe (FLIP) has been designed and installed in Heliotron J for the purpose of the studies of interaction between fast ions and MHD instabilities. The FLIP can measure the co-going fast ions whose energy is in the range of 1.7-42.5 keV (proton) and pitch angle of 90(∘)-140(∘), especially for fast ions having the injection energy of neutral beam injection (NBI). The FLIP successfully measured the re-entering passing ions and trapped lost-fast ions caused by fast-ion-driven energetic particle modes in NBI heated plasmas.

  1. High-sensitivity optical Faraday magnetometry with intracavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiaolin; Sun, Hui; Fan, Shuangli; Guo, Hong

    2016-12-01

    We suggest a multiatom cavity quantum electrodynamics system for the detection of a weak magnetic field, based on Faraday rotation with intracavity electromagnetically induced transparency. Our study demonstrates that the collective coupling between the cavity modes and the atomic ensemble can be used to improve the sensitivity. With single-probe photon input, the sensitivity is inversely proportional to the number of atoms, and a sensitivity of 2.45 nT Hz-1/2 could be attained. With multiphoton measurement, our numerical calculations show that the magnetic field sensitivity can be improved to 105.6 aT Hz-1/2 with realistic experimental conditions.

  2. Magnetophotonic crystal with cerium substituted yttrium iron garnet and enhanced Faraday rotation angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Takuya; Goto, Taichi; Isogai, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Yuichi; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Ross, C A; Inoue, M

    2016-04-18

    Magnetophotonic crystals (MPCs) comprising cerium-substituted yttrium iron garnet (CeYIG) sandwiched by two Bragg mirrors were fabricated by vacuum annealing. CeYIG was deposited on Bragg mirrors at room temperature and annealed in 5 Pa of residual air. No ceria or other non-garnet phases were detected. Cerium 3 + ions substituted on the yttrium sites and no cerium 4 + ions were found. The Faraday rotation angle of the MPC was -2.92° at a wavelength of λ = 1570 nm was 30 times larger than that of the CeYIG film. These results showed good agreement with calculated values derived using a matrix approach.

  3. Filter Performance of a Cesium Faraday Optical Filter at 852 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    掌蕴东; 贾晓玲; 毕勇; 马祖光; 王骐

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated a cesium Faraday filter at 852nm in relatively weak and strong magnetic fields, theoretically and experimentally. With a cesium cell of 0.02m length in an axial magnetic field of 0.06T, the line-centre operation has been achieved. The calculated peak transmission reached 99% with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) bandwidth of only 3.9 GHz. The measured FWHM bandwidth of the filter is 3.29 GHz, which is in general agreement with the theoretical result.

  4. Faraday rotation in a resonant five-level system via electromagnetically induced transparency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Hang; Guoxiang Huang

    2007-01-01

    We study the Faraday rotation of polarization of a probe field in a cold, coherently driven five-level system with an M-type configuration. By means of a method of multiple scales we derive two coupled nonlinear envelope equations, which govern the evolution of two circularly polarized components of the probe field.It is shown that due to the quantum interference effect induced by two control fields, one can obtain a large rotation angle with a very low absorption of the probe field. In addition, an efficient control over the polarization state of the probe field in the system can also be easily realized.

  5. Dynamics of Turing and Faraday instabilities in a longitudinally modulated fiber-ring cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copie, F; Conforti, M; Kudlinski, A; Trillo, S; Mussot, A

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally investigate the round-trip-to-round-trip dynamics of the modulation instability spectrum in a passive fiber-ring cavity presenting an inhomogeneous dispersion profile. By implementing a real-time spectroscopy technique, we are able to record successive single-shot spectra, which display the evolution of the system toward a stationary state. We find that the two instability regimes (Turing and Faraday) that compete in this kind of inhomogeneous cavity not only differ by their characteristic frequency but also by their dynamical behavior. The dynamic transition between those two regimes of instability is also presented.

  6. A study of broadband Faraday rotation and polarization behaviour over 1.3--10 GHz in 36 discrete radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, C S; Feain, I J

    2016-01-01

    We present a broadband polarization analysis of 36 discrete polarized radio sources over a very broad, densely-sampled frequency band. Our sample was selected on the basis of polarization behaviour apparent in narrowband archival data at 1.4 GHz: half the sample show complicated frequency-dependent polarization behaviour (i.e. Faraday complexity) at these frequencies, while half show comparatively simple behaviour (i.e. they appear Faraday simple). We re-observed the sample using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) in full polarization, with 6 GHz of densely sampled frequency coverage spanning 1.3 to 10 GHz. We have devised a general polarization modelling technique that allows us to identify multiple polarized emission components in a source, and to characterize their properties. We detect Faraday complex behaviour in almost every source in our sample. Several sources exhibit particularly remarkable polarization behaviour. By comparing our new and archival data, we have identified temporal variabili...

  7. Calibration and characterisation with a new laser-based magnetostriction measurement system

    OpenAIRE

    Rafferty, Aran; Bakir, S.; BRABAZON, Dermot; Prescott, Tim

    2009-01-01

    A laser-based magnet measurement system has been developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of large cylindrical samples. The measurement system incorporates a solenoid capable of generating a maximum magnetic field intensity of 3000 Oe and a laser displacement sensor. For calibration and evaluation purposes, the positive magnetostrictions of two different types of giant magnetostrictive Tb–Dy–Fe-based materials were accessed with this system. A magnetostrictive strain of 622 ppm was ob...

  8. Power scaling of a picosecond vortex laser based on a stressed Yb-doped fiber amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Mio; Hirose, Tetsuya; Okida, Masahito; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige

    2011-01-17

    Power scaling of a picosecond vortex laser based on a stressed Yb-doped fiber amplifier is analyzed. An output power of 25 W was obtained for 53 W of pumping, with a peak power of 37 kW. Frequency doubling of the vortex output was demonstrated using a nonlinear PPSLT crystal. A second-harmonic output power of up to 1.5 W was measured at a fundamental power of 11.2 W.

  9. Advanced Laser-Based Techniques for Gas-Phase Diagnostics in Combustion and Aerospace Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, Andreas; Zhu, Jiajian; Li, Xuesong; Kiefer, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Gaining information of species, temperature, and velocity distributions in turbulent combustion and high-speed reactive flows is challenging, particularly for conducting measurements without influencing the experimental object itself. The use of optical and spectroscopic techniques, and in particular laser-based diagnostics, has shown outstanding abilities for performing non-intrusive in situ diagnostics. The development of instrumentation, such as robust lasers with high pulse energy, ultra-short pulse duration, and high repetition rate along with digitized cameras exhibiting high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and frame rates on the order of MHz, has opened up for temporally and spatially resolved volumetric measurements of extreme dynamics and complexities. The aim of this article is to present selected important laser-based techniques for gas-phase diagnostics focusing on their applications in combustion and aerospace engineering. Applicable laser-based techniques for investigations of turbulent flows and combustion such as planar laser-induced fluorescence, Raman and Rayleigh scattering, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, laser-induced grating scattering, particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler anemometry, and tomographic imaging are reviewed and described with some background physics. In addition, demands on instrumentation are further discussed to give insight in the possibilities that are offered by laser flow diagnostics.

  10. All-fiber optical magnetic-field sensor based on Faraday rotation in highly terbium-doped fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Jiang, S; Marciante, J R

    2010-03-15

    An all-fiber optical magnetic field sensor is demonstrated. It consists of a fiber Faraday rotator and a fiber polarizer. The fiber Faraday rotator uses a 2-cm-long section of 56-wt.%-terbium-doped silicate fiber with a Verdet constant of -24.5 rad/(Tm) at 1053 nm. The fiber polarizer is Corning SP1060 single-polarization fiber. The sensor has a sensitivity of 0.49 rad/T and can measure magnetic fields from 0.02 to 3.2 T.

  11. Cascade Hierarchy in SUSY SU(5) GUT

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Kentaro; Takahashi, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    We study cascade hierarchy in supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified theory. The neutrino Dirac mass matrix of the cascade form can lead to the tri-bimaximal generation mixing at the leading order in the seesaw mechanism while the down quark mass matrix of a hybrid cascade form naturally gives the CKM structure. We embed such experimentally favored mass textures into supersymmetric SU(5) GUT, which gives a relation between the down quark and charged lepton mass matrices. Related phenomenologies, such as lepton flavor violating processes and leptogenesis, are also investigated in addition to lepton mixing angles.

  12. Cascades on clique-based graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Adam; Gleeson, James P.

    2013-06-01

    We present an analytical approach to determining the expected cascade size in a broad range of dynamical models on the class of highly clustered random graphs introduced by Gleeson [J. P. Gleeson, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.80.036107 80, 036107 (2009)]. A condition for the existence of global cascades is also derived. Applications of this approach include analyses of percolation, and Watts's model. We show how our techniques can be used to study the effects of in-group bias in cascades on social networks.

  13. Measurements of Coronal Faraday Rotation at 4.6 Solar Radii

    CERN Document Server

    Kooi, Jason E; Buffo, Jacob J; Spangler, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    Many competing models for the coronal heating and acceleration mechanisms of the high-speed solar wind depend on the solar magnetic field and plasma structure inside the corona within heliocentric distances of 5 R_sun. We report on sensitive VLA full-polarization observations made in August, 2011, at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz) of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 R_sun. Observations at 5.0 GHz permit measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. These Faraday rotation observations provide unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. The measured Faraday rotation on this day was lower than our a priori expectations, but we have successfully modeled the measurement in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. Our data on 3C228 provide two lines of sight (separated by 46'', 33,000 km in the corona). We detected three periods during which there a...

  14. Faraday Waves-Based Integrated Ultrasonic Micro-Droplet Generator and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen S. Tsai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An in-depth review on a new ultrasonic micro-droplet generator which utilizes megahertz (MHz Faraday waves excited by silicon-based multiple Fourier horn ultrasonic nozzles (MFHUNs and its potential applications is presented. The new droplet generator has demonstrated capability for producing micro droplets of controllable size and size distribution and desirable throughput at very low electrical drive power. For comparison, the serious deficiencies of current commercial droplet generators (nebulizers and the other ultrasonic droplet generators explored in recent years are first discussed. The architecture, working principle, simulation, and design of the multiple Fourier horns (MFH in resonance aimed at the amplified longitudinal vibration amplitude on the end face of nozzle tip, and the fabrication and characterization of the nozzles are then described in detail. Subsequently, a linear theory on the temporal instability of Faraday waves on a liquid layer resting on the planar end face of the MFHUN and the detailed experimental verifications are presented. The linear theory serves to elucidate the dynamics of droplet ejection from the free liquid surface and predict the vibration amplitude onset threshold for droplet ejection and the droplet diameters. A battery-run pocket-size clogging-free integrated micro droplet generator realized using the MFHUN is then described. The subsequent report on the successful nebulization of a variety of commercial pulmonary medicines against common diseases and on the experimental antidote solutions to cyanide poisoning using the new droplet generator serves to support its imminent application to inhalation drug delivery.

  15. Constraints from Faraday rotation on the magnetic field structure in the Galactic halo

    CERN Document Server

    Terral, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We examine the constraints imposed by Faraday rotation measures of extragalactic point sources on the structure of the magnetic field in the halo of our Galaxy. Guided by radio polarization observations of external spiral galaxies, we look in particular into the possibility that field lines in the Galactic halo have an X shape. We employ the analytical models of spiraling, possibly X-shape magnetic fields derived in a previous paper to generate synthetic all-sky maps of the Galactic Faraday depth, which we fit to an observational reference map with the help of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the magnetic field in the Galactic halo is slightly more likely to be bisymmetric (azimuthal wavenumber, $m = 1$) than axisymmetric ($m = 0$). If it is indeed bisymmetric, it must appear as X-shaped in radio polarization maps of our Galaxy seen edge-on from outside, but if it is actually axisymmetric, it must instead appear as nearly parallel to the Galactic plane.

  16. Constraining regular and turbulent magnetic field strengths in M51 via Faraday depolarization

    CERN Document Server

    Shneider, Carl; Fletcher, Andrew; Shukurov, Anvar

    2014-01-01

    We employ an analytical model that incorporates both wavelength-dependent and wavelength-independent depolarization to describe radio polarimetric observations of polarization at $\\lambda \\lambda \\lambda \\, 3.5, 6.2, 20.5$ cm in M51 (NGC 5194). The aim is to constrain both the regular and turbulent magnetic field strengths in the disk and halo, modeled as a two- or three-layer magneto-ionic medium, via differential Faraday rotation and internal Faraday dispersion, along with wavelength-independent depolarization arising from turbulent magnetic fields. A reduced chi-squared analysis is used for the statistical comparison of predicted to observed polarization maps to determine the best-fit magnetic field configuration at each of four radial rings spanning $2.4 - 7.2$ kpc in $1.2$ kpc increments. We find that a two-layer modeling approach provides a better fit to the observations than a three-layer model, where the near and far sides of the halo are taken to be identical, although the resulting best-fit magnetic...

  17. Measurement of the infrared complex Faraday angle in semiconductors and insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, M -H; Acbas, G; Ellis, C T; Cerne, J

    2009-01-01

    We measure the infrared (wavelength 11 - 0.8 microns; energy E = 0.1 - 1.5 eV) Faraday rotation and ellipticity in GaAs, BaF2, LaSrGaO4, LaSrAlO4, and ZnSe. Since these materials are commonly used as substrates and windows in infrared magneto-optical measurements, it is important to measure their Faraday signals for background subtraction. These measurement also provide a rigorous test of the accuracy and sensitivity of our unique magneto-polarimetry system. The light sources used in these measurements consist of gas and semiconductor lasers, which cover 0.1 - 1.3 eV, as well as a custom-modified prism monochromator with a Xe lamp, which allows continuous broadband measurements in the 0.28 - 1.5 eV energy range. The sensitivity of this broad-band system is approximately 10 micro-rad. Our measurements reveal that the Verdet coefficients of these materials are proportional to $1/\\lambda^2$, which is expected when probing with radiation energies below the band gap. Reproducible ellipticity signals are also seen,...

  18. Faraday effect improvement by Dy{sup 3+}-doping of terbium gallium garnet single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhe, E-mail: zhenzhe1201@sina.com; Yang, Lei; Hang, Yin; Wang, Xiangyong

    2016-01-15

    Highly transparent Dy{sup 3+}-doped terbium gallium garnet (TGG) single crystal was grown by Czochralski (Cz) method. Phase composition of the crystal was tested by XRD measurements. The distribution coefficient of Dy{sup 3+} in the crystal was obtained. The optical and magneto-optical properties were analyzed in detail, and magnetic properties of the Dy{sup 3+}-TGG crystal were studied. The paramagnetic behavior is observed down to 10 K. The as-grown crystal exhibited high optical transmittance, particularly in the visible region. The Faraday rotation was investigated over visible and near-infrared regions (VIS–NIR) at room temperature. The Verdet constants increase at measured wavelengths and high thermal stability was found in Dy{sup 3+}-doped TGG, as compared to the properties of pure TGG, indicating that Dy{sup 3+}-doped crystals are preferable for magneto-active materials used in Faraday devices at VIS–NIR wavelengths. - Graphical abstract: Highly transparent Dy{sup 3+}-doped terbium gallium garnet (TGG) and pure TGG single crystals were grown by Czochralski method. The Dy{sup 3+}-doped TGG possesses 20–30% higher Verdet values in reference to TGG independently on wavelength.

  19. Electrogyration and Faraday rotation in pure and Cr-doped lead germanate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamenko, D; Klymiv, I; Vlokh, R; Vlokh, O [Institute of Physical Optics, 23 Dragomanov Street, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Duda, V M [Dnipropetrovsk National University, 13 Naukova Street, Dnipropetrovsk (Ukraine)], E-mail: vlokh@ifo.lviv.ua

    2008-02-20

    We present the results of studies on the temperature dependence of the electrogyration (EG) effect, Faraday rotation and natural optical activity in Pb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 11} and Pb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 11}:Cr crystals at the phase transition. A high EG coefficient is found for Pb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 11}:Cr crystals. We demonstrate how the Curie-Weiss constant, the critical exponents of the order parameter and the dielectric permittivity in Pb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 11}:Cr crystals, as well as the coefficients of thermodynamic potential, could be derived from the temperature dependences of optical activity and the EG coefficient. We also show that the increment of the Faraday rotation in Pb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 11} and Pb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 11}:Cr crystals appearing at the phase transition is caused by a combined magneto-electrooptic effect induced by spontaneous polarization. It is proportional to the square of spontaneous polarization. The phenomenon revealed by us corresponds to combined effects of crystal optics, which appear due to the common action of different fields.

  20. Connecting Magnetic Towers with Faraday Rotation Gradients in Active Galactic Nuclei Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmud, Mehreen; Murphy, Eoin; Gabuzda, Denise C; Hallahan, Redmond

    2013-01-01

    The idea that systematic Faraday Rotation gradients across the parsec-scale jets of AGNs can reveal the presence of helical magnetic (B) fields has been around since the early 1990s. These gradients are taken to be due to the systematic variation of the line of sight-B-field across the jet. We present here the parsec-scale Faraday Rotation distributions for the BL Lac objects 0716+714 and 1749+701, based on polarization data obtained with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at two wavelengths near each of the 2cm, 4cm and 6cm bands (0716+714) and at four wavelengths in the range 18-22 cm (1749+701). The Rotation Measure (RM) maps for both these sources indicate systematic gradients across their jets, as expected if these jets have helical B fields. The significance of these transverse RM gradients is > 3 sigma in all cases. We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations directly demonstrating the possibility of observing such transverse RM gradients even if the intrinsic jet structure is much narrower than...

  1. On the source of Faraday rotation in the jet of the radio galaxy 3C120

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, José L; Agudo, Iván; Marscher, Alan P; Jorstad, Svetlana G

    2011-01-01

    The source of Faraday rotation in the jet of the radio galaxy 3C120 is analyzed through Very Long Baseline Array observations carried out between 1999 and 2007 at 86, 43, 22, 15, 12, 8, 5, 2, and 1.7 GHz. Comparison of observations from 1999 to 2001 reveals uncorrelated changes in the linear polarization of the underlying jet emission and the Faraday rotation screen: while the rotation measure (RM) remains constant between approximately 2 and 5 mas from the core, the RM-corrected electric vector position angles (EVPAs) of two superluminal components are rotated by almost 90 degrees when compared to other components moving through similar jet locations. On the other hand, the innermost 2 mas experiences a significant change in RM -- including a sign reversal -- but without variations in the RM-corrected EVPAs. Similarly, observations in 2007 reveal a double sign reversal in RM along the jet, while the RM-corrected EVPAs remain perpendicular to the jet axis. Although the observed coherent structure and gradient...

  2. Spectropolarimetry with the Allen Telescope Array: Faraday Rotation toward Bright Polarized Radio Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Law, C J; Bower, G C; Backer, D C; Bauermeister, A; Croft, S; Forster, R; Gutierrez-Kraybill, C; Harvey-Smith, L; Heiles, C; Hull, C; Keating, G; MacMahon, D; Whysong, D; Williams, P K G; Wright, M

    2010-01-01

    We have observed 37 bright, polarized radio sources with the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) to present a novel analysis of their Faraday rotation properties. Each source was observed during the commissioning phase with 2 to 4 100-MHz bands at frequencies ranging from 1 to 2 GHz. These observations demonstrate how the continuous frequency coverage of the ATA's log-periodic receiver can be applied to the study of Faraday rotation measures (RMs). We use RM synthesis to show that wide-bandwidth data can find multiple RM components toward a single source. Roughly a quarter of the sources studied have extra RM components with high confidence (brighter than ~40 mJy), when observing with a RM resolution of roughly 100 rad/m2. These extra components contribute 10%-70% of the total polarized flux. This is the first time multiple RM components have been identified in a large sample of point sources. For our observing configuration, these extra RM components bias the measurement of the peak RM by 10-15 rad/m2 ; more general...

  3. Ultraviolet-visible optical isolators based on CeF3 Faraday rotator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Víllora, Encarnación G.; Shimamura, Kiyoshi; Plaza, Gustavo R.

    2015-06-01

    The first ultraviolet (UV) and visible optical isolators based on CeF3 are demonstrated. CeF3 possesses unique properties as Faraday rotator for the UV-visible wavelength region: a wide transparency range (wavelength of >300 nm) and an outstanding Verdet constant. In contrast, currently used terbium-gallium garnets and magneto-optical glasses possess a low transparency in the visible and a small Verdet constant in the UV, respectively. The optical isolator prototypes consist of a CeF3 rod, a single ring magnet, and a couple of beam splitters. The ring magnets have been designed to guarantee a homogeneous magnetic field; for it, numerical simulations have been carried out. The two prototypes are very compact and operate in the UV at 355 and in the visible at 405 nm, respectively. The performance of these devices indicates the high potential of CeF3 as a new UV-visible Faraday rotator, specially for shorter wavelengths where at present there are no optical isolators available.

  4. The birth of the electric machines: a commentary on Faraday (1832) 'Experimental researches in electricity'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2015-04-13

    The history of science is filled with examples of key discoveries and breakthroughs that have been published as landmark texts or journal papers, and to which one can trace the origins of whole disciplines. Such paradigm-shifting publications include Copernicus' De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (1543), Isaac Newton's Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1687) and Albert Einstein's papers on relativity (1905 and 1915). Michael Faraday's 1832 paper on electromagnetic induction sits proudly among these works and in a sense can be regarded as having an almost immediate effect in transforming our world in a very real sense more than any of the others listed. Here we review the status of the subject-the relationship between magnetism and electricity both before and after Faraday's paper and delve into the details of the key experiments he carried out at the Royal Institution outlining clearly how he discovered the process of electromagnetic induction, whereby an electric current could be induced to flow through a conductor that experiences a changing magnetic field. His ideas would not only enable Maxwell's later development of his theory of classical electromagnetism, but would directly lead to the development of the electric dynamo and electric motor, two technological advances that are the very foundations of the modern world. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.

  5. Anomalous effects on radiation detectors and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milián-Sánchez, V., E-mail: vicmisan@iqn.upv.es [Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain); Mocholí-Salcedo, A., E-mail: amocholi@eln.upv.es [Traffic Control Systems Group, ITACA Institute, Universitat Politécnica de, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain); Milián, C., E-mail: carles.milian@cpht.polytechnique.fr [Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS, École Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Kolombet, V.A., E-mail: kolombet@iteb.ru [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow Region, Pushchino 142290 (Russian Federation); Verdú, G., E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Universitat Politécnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-08-21

    We present experimental results showing certain anomalies in the measurements performed inside a modified Faraday cage of decay rates of Ra-226, Tl-204 and Sr-90/I-90, of the gamma spectrum of a Cs-137 preparation, and of the capacitance of both a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor and of the interconnection cable between the radiation detector and the scaler. Decay rates fluctuate significantly up to 5% around the initial value and differently depending on the type of nuclide, and the spectrum photopeak increases in 4.4%. In the case of the capacitor, direct capacitance measurements at 100 Hz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz show variations up to 0.7%, the most significant taking place at 100 Hz. In the case of the interconnection cable, the capacitance varies up to 1%. Dispersion also tends to increase inside the enclosure. However, the measured capacitance variations do not explain the variations observed in decay rates. - Highlights: • Background counts and decay rates changes of different nuclides are described. • Those changes are observed inside a multilayer modified Faraday cage. • Noise in a multichannel analyzer increases inside the multilayer enclosure. • Capacitance of a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor varies inside the enclosure. • Capacitance changes depend on the used frequency.

  6. Scientific Verification of Faraday Rotation Modulators: Detection of Diffuse Polarized Galactic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyerman, S.; Bierman, E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aiken, R.; Barkats, D.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J. J.; Chiang, H. C.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapel, W. L.; Hristov, V. V.; Jones, W. C.; Kaufman, J.; Keating, B. G.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.; Mason, P. V.; Matsumura, T.; Nguyen, H. T.; Ponthieu, N.; Pryke, C.; Wollack, E.

    2012-01-01

    The design and performance of a wide bandwidth linear polarization-modulator based on the Faraday effect is described. Faraday Rotation Modulators (FRMs) are solid-state polarization switches that are capable of modulation up to approx 10 kHz. Six FRMs were utilized during the 2006 observing season in the Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP) experiment; three FRMs were used at each of BICEP fs 100 and 150 GHz frequency bands. The technology was verified through high signal-to-noise detection of Galactic polarization using two of the six FRMs during four observing runs in 2006. The features exhibit strong agreement with BICEP fs measurements of the Galaxy using non-FRM pixels and with the Galactic polarization models. This marks the first detection of high signal-to-noise mm-wave celestial polarization using fast, active optical modulation. The performance of the FRMs during periods when they were not modulated was also analyzed and compared to results from BICEP fs 43 pixels without FRMs.

  7. Nitric oxide isotopic analyzer based on a compact dual-modulation Faraday rotation spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Eric; Huang, Stacey; Ji, Qixing; Silvernagel, Michael; Wang, Yin; Ward, Bess; Sigman, Daniel; Wysocki, Gerard

    2015-10-14

    We have developed a transportable spectroscopic nitrogen isotopic analyzer. The spectrometer is based on dual-modulation Faraday rotation spectroscopy of nitric oxide isotopologues with near shot-noise limited performance and baseline-free operation. Noise analysis indicates minor isotope ((15)NO) detection sensitivity of 0.36 ppbv·Hz(-1/2), corresponding to noise-equivalent Faraday rotation angle (NEA) of 1.31 × 10(-8) rad·Hz(-1/2) and noise-equivalent absorbance (αL)min of 6.27 × 10(-8) Hz(-1/2). White-noise limited performance at 2.8× the shot-noise limit is observed up to ~1000 s, allowing reliable calibration and sample measurement within the drift-free interval of the spectrometer. Integration with wet-chemistry based on acidic vanadium(III) enables conversion of aqueous nitrate/nitrite samples to gaseous NO for total nitrogen isotope analysis. Isotopic ratiometry is accomplished via time-multiplexed measurements of two NO isotope transitions. For 5 μmol potassium nitrate samples, the instrument consistently yields ratiometric precision below 0.3‰, thus demonstrating potential as an in situ diagnostic tool for environmental nitrogen cycle studies.

  8. High-Throughput, Protein-Targeted Biomolecular Detection Using Frequency-Domain Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Richard J; Putnam, Shawn A; Das, Soumen; Gupta, Ankur; Chase, Elyse D Z; Seal, Sudipta

    2017-01-16

    A clinically relevant magneto-optical technique (fd-FRS, frequency-domain Faraday rotation spectroscopy) for characterizing proteins using antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is demonstrated. This technique distinguishes between the Faraday rotation of the solvent, iron oxide core, and functionalization layers of polyethylene glycol polymers (spacer) and model antibody-antigen complexes (anti-BSA/BSA, bovine serum albumin). A detection sensitivity of ≈10 pg mL(-1) and broad detection range of 10 pg mL(-1) ≲ cBSA ≲ 100 µg mL(-1) are observed. Combining this technique with predictive analyte binding models quantifies (within an order of magnitude) the number of active binding sites on functionalized MNPs. Comparative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) studies are conducted, reproducing the manufacturer advertised BSA ELISA detection limits from 1 ng mL(-1) ≲ cBSA ≲ 500 ng mL(-1) . In addition to the increased sensitivity, broader detection range, and similar specificity, fd-FRS can be conducted in less than ≈30 min, compared to ≈4 h with ELISA. Thus, fd-FRS is shown to be a sensitive optical technique with potential to become an efficient diagnostic in the chemical and biomolecular sciences.

  9. Strong enhancement of Faraday rotation using one-dimensional conjugated photonic crystals containing graphene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardakani, Abbas Ghasempour

    2014-12-20

    We propose a one-dimensional conjugated photonic crystal single heterojunction infiltrated with a single graphene layer to achieve large Faraday rotation (FR) angles as well as high transmission simultaneously. The effects of the external magnetic field values, incidence angle, number of unit cells, layer thickness of constituents of the conjugated photonic crystals, chemical potential of graphene, and ambient temperature on the Faraday rotation angle and transmission are investigated. Our results reveal that both the sign reversal and shifting of the FR peak can be obtained by changing the width of layers in the conjugated photonic crystal. In the case of negative FR angle, an increase of magnetic field enhances the FR angle and degrades the transmission. However, in the case of positive FR angle, when the magnetic field increases to a certain value, the FR angle is improved too. Further increase of the magnetic field leads to a decrease of FR angle. With increasing the number of unit cells, the FR angle is enhanced at the cost of decreasing the transmission. It is shown that normal incidence results in higher FR angle and transmission. It is also demonstrated that sign reversal and change of the FR angle is possible by manipulating the chemical potential of graphene and the ambient temperature.

  10. Faraday Rotation Measure Synthesis of intermediate redshift quasars as a probe of intervening matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kwang Seong; Miniati, Francesco; Bernet, M L; Beck, Rainer; O'Sullivan, S P; Gaensler, B M

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that magnetized material along the line of sight to distant quasars is detectable in the polarization properties of the background sources, which appear to be correlated with the presence of intervening MgII absorption, which is itself thought to arise in outflowing material from star forming galaxies. In order to investigate this further, we have obtained high spectral resolution polarization measurements, with the VLA and ATCA, of a set of 49 unresolved quasars for which we have high quality optical spectra. These enable us to produce a Faraday Depth spectrum for each source, using Rotation Measure Synthesis. We characterize the complexity of the Faraday Depth spectrum using a number of parameters and show how these are related, or not, to the overall depolarization and to the presence of MgII absorption along the line of sight. Our new independent radio data confirms that interveners are strongly associated with depolarization and also, at lower significance, with the mean Rotation Measur...

  11. Nitric Oxide Isotopic Analyzer Based on a Compact Dual-Modulation Faraday Rotation Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a transportable spectroscopic nitrogen isotopic analyzer. The spectrometer is based on dual-modulation Faraday rotation spectroscopy of nitric oxide isotopologues with near shot-noise limited performance and baseline-free operation. Noise analysis indicates minor isotope (15NO detection sensitivity of 0.36 ppbv·Hz−1/2, corresponding to noise-equivalent Faraday rotation angle (NEA of 1.31 × 10−8 rad·Hz−1/2 and noise-equivalent absorbance (αLmin of 6.27 × 10−8 Hz−1/2. White-noise limited performance at 2.8× the shot-noise limit is observed up to ~1000 s, allowing reliable calibration and sample measurement within the drift-free interval of the spectrometer. Integration with wet-chemistry based on acidic vanadium(III enables conversion of aqueous nitrate/nitrite samples to gaseous NO for total nitrogen isotope analysis. Isotopic ratiometry is accomplished via time-multiplexed measurements of two NO isotope transitions. For 5 μmol potassium nitrate samples, the instrument consistently yields ratiometric precision below 0.3‰, thus demonstrating potential as an in situ diagnostic tool for environmental nitrogen cycle studies.

  12. Quantum Cascade Laser Frequency Combs

    CERN Document Server

    Faist, Jérôme; Scalari, Giacomo; Rösch, Markus; Bonzon, Christopher; Hugi, Andreas; Beck, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that broadband quantum cascade lasers can operate as frequency combs. As such, they operate under direct electrical pumping at both mid-infrared and THz frequencies, making them very attractive for dual-comb spectroscopy. Performance levels are continuously improving, with average powers over 100 mW and frequency coverage of 100 cm$^{-1}$ in the mid-infrared. In the THz range, 10 mW of average power and 600 GHz of frequency coverage are reported. As a result of the very short upper state lifetime of the gain medium, the mode proliferation in these sources arises from four wave mixing rather than saturable absorption. As a result, their optical output is characterized by the tendency of small intensity modulation of the output power, and the relative phases of the modes to be similar to the ones of a frequency modulated laser. Recent results include the proof of comb operation down to a metrological level, the observation of a Schawlow-Townes broadened linewidth, as well as the fir...

  13. An indirectly pumped terahertz quantum cascade laser with low injection coupling strength operating above 150 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavipour, S. G.; Dupont, E.; Fathololoumi, S.; Chan, C. W. I.; Lindskog, M.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Aers, G.; Laframboise, S. R.; Wacker, A.; Hu, Q.; Ban, D.; Liu, H. C.

    2013-05-01

    We designed and demonstrated a terahertz quantum cascade laser based on indirect pump injection to the upper lasing state and phonon scattering extraction from the lower lasing state. By employing a rate equation formalism and a genetic algorithm, an optimized active region design with four-well GaAs/Al0.25Ga0.75As cascade module was obtained and epitaxially grown. A figure of merit which is defined as the ratio of modal gain versus injection current was maximized at 150 K. A fabricated device with a Au metal-metal waveguide and a top n+ GaAs contact layer lased at 2.4 THz up to 128.5 K, while another one without the top n+ GaAs lased up to 152.5 K (1.3ℏω /kB). The experimental results have been analyzed with rate equation and nonequilibrium Green's function models. A high population inversion is achieved at high temperature using a small oscillator strength of 0.28, while its combination with the low injection coupling strength of 0.85 meV results in a low current. The carefully engineered wavefunctions enhance the quantum efficiency of the device and therefore improve the output optical power even with an unusually low injection coupling strength.

  14. Surface-Enhanced Faraday Magneto-Optical Effect In Multilayer Films Containing Faraday-Active Metal%多层膜中法拉第磁光效应的增强

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪秀平

    2012-01-01

    运用传输矩阵的方法研究由法拉第旋光金属和电介质交替组成的多层膜的法拉第磁光效应.数值计算的结果显示,由于表面等离子的激励,在金属和电介质之间界面会出现很强的光局域性,法拉第旋转角和透射率在高频区都出现了共振峰.同时可通过调节多层膜的周期重叠数和法拉第旋光金属层的厚度来控制法拉第磁光特性.%The Faraday magneto-optical properties of periodic multilayer films made of alternating Faraday-active metal (M) and dielectric (D) materials are investigated. Calculations, Based on transfer matrix method, demonstrate that Faraday magnetic-optical rotation angle exhibits several resonant peaks with considerable transmittance in high-frequency region, due to effective excitation of surface plasmon polaritons in interfaces between metal and dielectric layers. As a consequence, the Faraday magnetic-optical properties can be controlled by varying the repetition number of film structure and the thickness of the magnetic layer.

  15. Michael Faraday: o caminho da livraria à descoberta da indução eletromagnética Michael Faraday: the road from the bookstore to the discovery of electromagnetic induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Silva Dias

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudando o trabalho experimental sobre eletromagnetismo realizado por Michael Faraday no início do século XIX, encontramos vários elementos que poderiam ser utilizados no Ensino de Ciências. Um conhecimento histórico sobre o trabalho experimental desenvolvido por Faraday e que o levou à descoberta da indução eletromagnética pode transmitir aos estudantes uma concepção mais adequada do processo de desenvolvimento da Ciência. No entanto, isso só pode ser feito utilizando-se um estudo detalhado e bem fundamentado do processo histórico ocorrido, deixando de lado as simplificações e os mitos que costumam ser apresentados.The study of Michael Faraday's experimental research on electromagnetism developed in the early 19th century provides several components which could be used in Science Teaching. A historical knowledge of the experimental work that led Faraday to the discovery of electromagnetic induction may convey to students a more adequate process of the development of science. However, this can only be done by the use of a detailed and well grounded study of the historical process, leaving aside the naïve simplifications and the myths that are usually told.

  16. North Cascades Grizzly Bear Ecosystem Evaluation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — We conducted a 6-year evaluation of the North Cascades Grizzly Bear Ecosystem (NCGBE) in north-central Washington to determine the suitability of the area to support...

  17. Multilevel Inverter by Cascading Industrial VSI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Blaabjerg, Frede; Pedersen, John Kim

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the modularity concept applied to medium-voltage adjustable speed drives is addressed. First, the single-phase cascaded voltage-source inverter that uses series connection of IGBT H-bridge modules with isolated dc-buses is presented. Next, a novel three-phase cascaded voltage...... of the motor rated kVA. The concept of using cascaded inverters is further extended to a new modular motor-modular inverter system where the motor winding connections are reconnected into several three-phase groups, either six-lead or 12-lead connection according to the voltage level, each powered...... by a standard triphase IGBT inverter module. Thus, a high fault tolerance is being achieved and the output transformer requirement is eliminated. A staggered space-vector modulation technique applicable to three-phase cascaded voltage-source inverter topologies is also demonstrated. Both computer simulations...

  18. Cascade of period doublings of tori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, A.; Coullet, P. H.; Spiegel, E. A.

    1983-02-01

    A three-dimensional map is proposed to model the effects of periodic forcing on a system displaying a transition to chaos through a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations. The study outlined here raises the problem of the existence and bifurcation of invariant tori. A principal feature of the simulations of both the differential equations and the discrete dynamical systems is that it is possible to disrupt period-doubling sequences (and inverse sequences as well) by periodic external forcing. Even though the way in which this abortion works is not understood, the mechanism is thought to be associated with the destruction of tori (Aronson et al., 1982) when the system is on the verge of bifurcation. The simulations therefore suggest that in moving farther along the cascade, the tori become more fragile. It is suspected that for arbitrarily weak driving, the cascade will eventually be disrupted after the cascade has proceeded through a sufficient number of steps.

  19. Bursting behaviours in cascaded stimulated Brillouin scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhan-Jun; He Xian-Tu; Zheng Chun-Yang; Wang Yu-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering is studied by numerically solving the Vlasov-Maxwell system.A cascade of stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur when a linearly polarized laser pulse propagates in a plasma.It is found that a stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can reduce the scattering and increase the transmission of light,as well as introduce a bursting behaviour in the evolution of the laser-plasma interaction.The bursting time in the reflectivity is found to be less than half the ion acoustic period.The ion temperature can affect the stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade,which can repeat several times at low ion temperatures and can be completely eliminated at high ion temperatures.For stimulated Brillouin scattering saturation,higher-harmonic generation and wave-wave interaction of the excited ion acoustic waves can restrict the amplitude of the latter.In addition,stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can restrict the amplitude of the scattered light.

  20. Picturing perturbative parton cascades in QCD matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksi Kurkela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on parametric reasoning, we provide a simple dynamical picture of how a perturbative parton cascade, in interaction with a QCD medium, fills phase space as a function of time.

  1. MAP kinase cascades in Arabidopsis innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Magnus Wohlfahrt; Roux, Milena Edna; Petersen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades generally transduce extracellular stimuli into cellular responses. These stimuli include the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by host transmembrane pattern recognition receptors which trigger MAPK-dependent innate ...

  2. Chemoenzymatic cascade processes for sustainable organic synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, C.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical production processes often require wasteful and expensive isolation as well as purification of intermediates. Catalytic cascades offer a unique opportunity to eliminate these inefficient and polluting steps, in particular when carefully orchestrated, involving enzymes and chemocatalysts. Th

  3. Model for cascading failures in congested Internet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian WANG; Yan-heng LIU; Jian-qi ZHU; Yu JIAO

    2008-01-01

    Cascading failures often occur in congested networks such as the Internet. A cascading failure can be described as a three-phase process: generation, diffusion, and dissipation of the congestion. In this account, we present a function that represents the extent of congestion on a given node. This approach is different from existing functions based on betweenness centrality. By introducing the concept of 'delay time', we designate an intergradation between permanent removal and nouremoval. We also construct an evaluation function of network efficiency, based on congestion, which measures the damage caused by cascading failures. Finally, we investigate the effects of network structure and size, delay time, processing ability and packet generation speed on congestion propagation. Also, we uncover the relationship between the cascade dynamics and some properties of the network such as structure and size.

  4. Transport properties of cascading gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, A

    2005-01-01

    Cascading gauge theories of Klebanov et.al. provide a model within a framework of gauge theory/string theory duality for a four dimensional non-conformal gauge theory with a spontaneously generated mass scale. Using the dual supergravity description we study sound wave propagation in strongly coupled cascading gauge theory plasma. We analytically compute the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of cascading gauge theory plasma at a temperature much larger than the strong coupling scale of the theory. The sound wave dispersion relation is obtained from the hydrodynamic pole in the stress-energy tensor two-point correlation function. The speed of sound extracted from the pole of the correlation function agrees with its value computed in [hep-th/0506002] using the equation of state. We find that the bulk viscosity of the hot cascading gauge theory plasma is non-zero at the leading order in the deviation from conformality.

  5. A quantum cascade phonon-polariton laser

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtani, Keita; Bosco, Lorenzo; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    We report a laser that coherently emits phonon-polaritons, quasi-particles arising from the coupling between photons and transverse optical phonons. The gain is provided by an intersubband transition in a quantum cascade structure. The polaritons at h$\

  6. Innovation cascades: artefacts, organization and attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, David A

    2016-03-19

    Innovation cascades inextricably link the introduction of new artefacts, transformations in social organization, and the emergence of new functionalities and new needs. This paper describes a positive feedback dynamic, exaptive bootstrapping, through which these cascades proceed, and the characteristics of the relationships in which the new attributions that drive this dynamic are generated. It concludes by arguing that the exaptive bootstrapping dynamic is the principal driver of our current Innovation Society.

  7. Cascade Textures and SUSY SO(10) GUT

    CERN Document Server

    Adulpravitchai, Adisorn; Takahashi, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    We give texture analyses of cascade hierarchical mass matrices in supersymmetric SO(10) grand unified theory. We embed cascade mass textures of the standard model fermion with right-handed neutrinos into the theory, which gives relations among the mass matrices of the fermions. The related phenomenologies, such as the lepton flavor violating processes and leptogenesis, are also investigated in addition to the PMNS mixing angles.

  8. Supersonic Chordwise Bending Flutter in Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-31

    such a flutter boundary can be made by utilizing the trend lines predicted from a supersonic analysis based on supersonic cascade theory (Appendix I...bonding agent was injected via hypodermic needles after the blade tabs were properly inserted, The integrity and repeatability of the mounting of the indi...in conjunction with NASTRAN predictions and supersonic cascade aerodynamic computa- tions. Comparisons between theory and experiment are discussed. DD

  9. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw;

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  10. Emergence of event cascades in inhomogeneous networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaga, Tomokatsu; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2016-09-01

    There is a commonality among contagious diseases, tweets, and neuronal firings that past events facilitate the future occurrence of events. The spread of events has been extensively studied such that the systems exhibit catastrophic chain reactions if the interaction represented by the ratio of reproduction exceeds unity; however, their subthreshold states are not fully understood. Here, we report that these systems are possessed by nonstationary cascades of event-occurrences already in the subthreshold regime. Event cascades can be harmful in some contexts, when the peak-demand causes vaccine shortages, heavy traffic on communication lines, but may be beneficial in other contexts, such that spontaneous activity in neural networks may be used to generate motion or store memory. Thus it is important to comprehend the mechanism by which such cascades appear, and consider controlling a system to tame or facilitate fluctuations in the event-occurrences. The critical interaction for the emergence of cascades depends greatly on the network structure in which individuals are connected. We demonstrate that we can predict whether cascades may emerge, given information about the interactions between individuals. Furthermore, we develop a method of reallocating connections among individuals so that event cascades may be either impeded or impelled in a network.

  11. Observation of two coupled Faraday waves in a vertically vibrating Hele-Shaw cell with one of them oscillating horizontally

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiaochen; Liao, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    A system of two-dimensional, two coupled Faraday interfacial waves is experimentally observed at the two interfaces of the three layers of fluids (air, pure ethanol and silicon oil) in a sealed Hele-Shaw cell with periodic vertical vibration. The upper and lower Faraday waves coexist: the upper vibrates vertically, but the crests of the lower one oscillate horizontally with unchanged wave height and a frequency equal to the half of the forcing one of the vertically vibrating basin, while the troughs of the lower one always stay in the same place (relative to the basin). Besides, they are strongly coupled: the wave height of the lower Faraday wave is either a linear function (in the case of a fixed forcing frequency) or a parabolic function (in the case of a fixed acceleration amplitude) of that of the upper, with the same wave length. In addition, the upper Faraday wave temporarily loses its smoothness at around $t=T/4$ and $t=3T/4$, where $T$ denotes the wave period, and thus has fundamental difference from ...

  12. Highlights from Faraday Discussion 182: Solid Oxide Electrolysis: Fuels and Feedstocks from Water and Air, York, UK, July 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Elena; Norby, Truls

    2016-01-31

    The rising importance of converting high peak electricity from renewables to fuels has urged field specialists to organize this Faraday Discussion on Solid Oxide Electrolysis. The topic is of essential interest in order to achieve a greater utilization of renewable energy and storage at higher densities.

  13. Faraday cage-type electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of Vibrio vulnificus based on multi-functionalized graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiyong; Sha, Yuhong; Hu, Yufang; Yu, Zhongqing; Tao, Yingying; Wu, Yanjie; Zeng, Min; Wang, Sui; Li, Xing; Zhou, Jun; Su, Xiurong

    2016-10-01

    A novel Faraday cage-type electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor devoted to the detection of Vibrio vulnificus (VV) was fabricated. The sensing strategy was presented by a unique Faraday cage-type immunocomplex based on immunomagnetic beads (IMBs) and multi-functionalized graphene oxide (GO) labeled with (2,2'-bipyridine)(5-aminophenanthroline)ruthenium (Ru-NH2). The multi-functionalized GO could sit on the electrode surface directly due to the large surface area, abundant functional groups, and good electronic transport property. It ensures that more Ru-NH2 is entirely caged and become "effective," thus improving sensitivity significantly, which resembles extending the outer Helmholtz plane (OHP) of the electrode. Under optimal conditions, the developed immunosensor achieves a limit of detection as low as 1 CFU/mL. Additionally, the proposed immunosensor with high sensitivity and selectivity can be used for the detection of real samples. The novel Faraday cage-type method has shown potential application for the diagnosis of VV and opens up a new avenue in ECL immunoassay. Graphical abstract Faraday cage-type immunoassay mode for ultrasensitive detection by extending OHP.

  14. Quantum Cascade Photonic Crystal lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Federico

    2004-03-01

    QC lasers have emerged in recent years as the dominant laser technology for the mid-to far infrared spectrum in light of their room temperature operation, their tunability, ultrahigh speed operation and broad range of applications to chemical sensing, spectroscopy etc. (Ref. 1-3). After briefly reviewing the latter, I will describe a new class of mid-infrared QC lasers, Quantum Cascade Photonic Crystal Surface Emitting Lasers (QCPCSELS), that combine electronic and photonic band structure engineering to achieve vertical emission from the surface (Ref. 4). Devices operating on bandedge mode and on defect modes will be discussed. Exciting potential uses of these new devices exist in nonlinear optics, microfluidics as well as novel sensors. Finally a bird's eye view of other exciting areas of QC laser research will be given including broadband QCLs and new nonlinear optical sources based on multiwavelength QCLs. 1. F. Capasso, C. Gmachl, D. L. Sivco, and A. Y. Cho, Physics Today 55, 34 (May 2002) 2. F. Capasso, C. Gmachl, R. Paiella, A. Tredicucci, A. L. Hutchinson, D. L. Sivco, J. N. Baillargeon, A. Y. Cho and H. C. Liu, IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, 6, 931 (2000). 3. F. Capasso, R. Paiella, R. Martini, R. Colombelli, C. Gmachl, T. L. Myers, M. S. Taubman, R. M. Williams, C. G. Bethea, K. Unterrainer, H. Y. Hwang, D. L. Sivco, A. Y. Cho, A. M. Sergent, H. C. Liu, E. A. Whittaker, IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 38, 511 (2002) 4. R. Colombelli, K. Srivasan, M. Troccoli, O. Painter, C. Gmachl, D. M. Tennant, A. M. Sergent, D. L. Sivco, A. Y. Cho and F. Capasso, Science 302, 1374 (2003)

  15. Period-doubling cascades for large perturbations of Henon families

    OpenAIRE

    Sander, Evelyn; Yorke, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The Henon family has been shown to have period-doubling cascades. We show here that the same occurs for a much larger class: Large perturbations do not destroy cascades. Furthermore, we can classify the period of a cascade in terms of the set of orbits it contains, and count the number of cascades of each period. This class of families extends a general theory explaining why cascades occur.

  16. Direct measurement of the spectral transfer function of a laser based anemometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelou, Nikolas; Mann, Jakob; Sjöholm, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    The effect of a continuous-wave (cw) laser based anemometer's probe volume on the measurement of wind turbulence is studied in this paper. Wind speed time series acquired by both a remote sensing cw laser anemometer, whose line-of-sight was aligned with the wind direction, and by a reference sensor...... (sonic anemometer) located in the same direction, were used. The spectral transfer function, which describes the attenuation of the power spectral density of the wind speed turbulence, was calculated and found to be in good agreement with the theoretical exponential function, which is based...

  17. Multi-wavelength hybrid gain fiber ring laser based on Raman and erbium-doped fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Qin; Yongbo Tang; Daru Chen

    2006-01-01

    A stable and uniform multi-wavelength fiber laser based on the hybrid gain of a dispersion compensating fiber as the Raman gain medium and an erbium-doped fiber (EDF) is introduced. The gain competition effects in the fiber Raman amplification (FRA) and EDF amplification are analyzed and compared experimentaUy. The FRA gain mechanism can suppress the gain competition effectively and make the present multi-wavelength laser stable at room temperature. The hybrid gain medium can also increase the lasing bandwidth compared with a pure EDF laser, and improve the power conversion efficiency compared with a pure fiber Raman laser.

  18. Past, Present and Future Aspects of Laser-Based Synchronization at FLASH

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Sebastian; Bousonville, Michael; Steffen, Bernd; Sydlo, Cezary; Zummack, Falco; Kozak, Tomasz; Predki, Pawel; Kuhl, Alexander; Czwalinna, Marie Kristin; Felber, Matthias; Heuer, Michael; Lamb, Thorsten; Mueller, Jost; Peier, Peter; Ruzin, Sergej

    2013-01-01

    Free-electron lasers, like FLASH and the upcoming European XFEL, are capable of producing XUV and X-ray pulses of a few femtoseconds duration. For time-resolved pump-probe experiments and the externally seeded operation mode it is crucial not only to stabilize the arrival time of the electron bunches, but also to achieve a synchronization accuracy of external lasers on the same timescale. This can only be realized with a laser-based synchronization infrastructure. At FLASH, a periodic femtose...

  19. Yb3+-Doped Double-Clad Fibre Laser Based on Fibre Bragg Grating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范万德; 付圣贵; 张强; 宁鼎; 李丽君; 王志; 袁树忠; 董孝义

    2003-01-01

    A novel Yb3+-doped double-clad fibre laser based on a double-clad fibre Bragg grating is presented. The fibre Bragg grating, as the output mirror, has been formed in Yb3+-doped double-clad fibre with the phase-mask method. When the input pump power is 2.8 W, the maximum laser output power is 570mW, with < 0.2 nm in line-width at the wavelength of 1.058μm, over 40dB signal-to-noise ratio and 24% slope efficiency.

  20. All-solid-state ultraviolet laser based on frequency doubling in an external ring cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An all-solid-state ultraviolet laser based on frequency doubling in an external ring cavity with low input pump power is reported. Both second harmonic generation (SHG) and fourth harmonic generation (FHG) occurred in an external threemirrors ring cavity. The need for impedance matching of this cavity to the input radiation was eliminated and the cavity adaptation was simplified, because the mirrors were not highly reflecting at 1064 nm and the cavity resonates only at 532 nm. Experiment results demonstrate that the conversion efficiency of this external cavity is higher than that of the singlepass condition.

  1. Multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on random distributed feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyang; Dong, Xinyong; Jiang, Meng; Yu, Xia; Shum, Ping

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a multi-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on random distributed feedback via a 20-km-long single-mode fiber together with a Sagnac loop mirror. The number of channels can be modulated from 2 to 8 at room temperature when the pump power is changed from 30 to 180 mW, indicating that wavelength competition caused by homogenous gain broadening of erbium-doped fiber is significantly suppressed. Other advantages of the laser include low cost, low-threshold pump power and simple fabrication.

  2. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  3. A superradiant laser based on two-photon Raman transition of caesium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    We propose a superradiant laser based on two-photon Raman transition of caesium-133 atoms which collectively emit photons on an ultra narrow transition into the mode of a low Q resonator known as optical bad-cavity regime. The spin-spin correlation which characterizes the collective effect is demonstrated. We theoretically predict that the optical radiation has an extremely narrow linewidth in the 98 (1) *10-2 mHz range, smaller than the transition itself due to collective effects, and a power level of 7 (1)*10-10 W is possible, which can provide a possible new way to realize an optical clock with a millihertz linewidth.

  4. Development of Field-deployable Diode-laser-based Water Vapor Dial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Hoai Phong Pham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a field-deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL has been developed for lower-tropospheric water vapor observation in Tokyo, Japan. A photoacoustic cell is used for spectroscopy experiment around absorption peaks of 829.022 nm and 829.054 nm. The water vapor density extracted from the observational data agrees with the referenced radiosonde data. Furthermore, we applied modulated pulse technique for DIAL transmitter. It enables DIAL to measure water vapor profile for both low and high altitude regions.

  5. Faraday rotation dispersion measurements of diamagnetic organic liquids and simultaneous determination of natural optical rotatory dispersion using a pulsed magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Masayori; Miyamoto, Kayoko; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    We constructed an apparatus to measure the wavelength dispersion of the Faraday rotation in the visible region, and determined the Verdet constants of diamagnetic organic liquids, including aliphatic compounds, benzene derivatives, and naphthalene derivatives. These three groups were easily distinguished by the magnitudes of their Verdet constants. Based on the theory developed by Serber, we determined the enhancing effect of π*←π transitions on the visible-light Faraday rotation angles observed for aromatic compounds. Furthermore, we propose a novel approach for simultaneously observing Faraday rotation dispersion and natural optical rotatory dispersion.

  6. Anomalous effects on radiation detectors and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milián-Sánchez, V.; Mocholí-Salcedo, A.; Milián, C.; Kolombet, V. A.; Verdú, G.

    2016-08-01

    We present experimental results showing certain anomalies in the measurements performed inside a modified Faraday cage of decay rates of Ra-226, Tl-204 and Sr-90/I-90, of the gamma spectrum of a Cs-137 preparation, and of the capacitance of both a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor and of the interconnection cable between the radiation detector and the scaler. Decay rates fluctuate significantly up to 5% around the initial value and differently depending on the type of nuclide, and the spectrum photopeak increases in 4.4%. In the case of the capacitor, direct capacitance measurements at 100 Hz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz show variations up to 0.7%, the most significant taking place at 100 Hz. In the case of the interconnection cable, the capacitance varies up to 1%. Dispersion also tends to increase inside the enclosure. However, the measured capacitance variations do not explain the variations observed in decay rates.

  7. Magnetic moment of a single metal nanoparticle determined from the Faraday effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczytko, Jacek; Vaupotič, Nataša; Madrak, Karolina; Sznajder, Paweł; Górecka, Ewa

    2013-03-01

    Optical properties of a composite material made of ferromagnetic metal nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric host are studied. We constructed an effective dielectric tensor of the composite material taking into account the orientational distribution of nanoparticle magnetic moments in external magnetic field. A nonlinear dependence of the optical rotation on magnetic field resulting from the reorientation of nanoparticles is demonstrated. The theoretical findings were applied to the magneto-optical experimental data of cobalt ferromagnetic nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric liquid host. The dependence of the Faraday rotation on Co-based ferromagnetic nanoparticles was measured as a function of the external magnetic field, varying the size of nanoparticles and the wavelength of light. The proposed approach enables quantitative determination of the magnetic moment and the plasma frequency of a single nanoparticle, and from this the size of the nonmagnetic shell of magnetic nanoparticles.

  8. Parsec-scale Faraday Rotation Measures from General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Active Galactic Nuclei Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Broderick, Avery E

    2010-01-01

    For the first time it has become possible to compare global 3D general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) jet formation simulations directly to very-long baseline interferometric multi-frequency polarization observations of the pc-scale structure of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets. Unlike the jet emission, which requires post hoc modeling of the non-thermal electrons, the Faraday rotation measures (RMs) depend primarily upon simulated quantities and thus provide a robust way in which to confront simulations with observations. We compute RM distributions of 3D global GRMHD jet formation simulations, with which we explore the dependence upon model and observational parameters, emphasizing the signatures of structures generic to the theory of MHD jets. With typical parameters, we find that it is possible to reproduce the observed magnitudes and many of the structures found in AGN jet RMs, including the presence of transverse RM gradients. In our simulations the RMs are generated within a smooth extensio...

  9. Faraday rotation spectroscopy based on permanent magnets for sensitive detection of oxygen at atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumfield, Brian; Wysocki, Gerard

    2012-12-31

    A low-power Faraday rotation spectroscopy system that uses permanent rare-earth magnets has been developed for detection of O₂ at 762 nm. The experimental signals are generated using laser wavelength modulation combined with a balanced detection scheme that permits quantum shot noise limited performance. A noise equivalent polarization rotation angle of 8 × 10⁻⁸ rad/Hz¹/² is estimated from the experimental noise, and this agrees well with a theoretical model based on Jones calculus. A bandwidth normalized minimum detection limit to oxygen of 6 ppmv/Hz¹/² with an ultimate minimum of 1.3 ppmv at integration times of ~1 minute has been demonstrated.

  10. Synergetic interaction of Dark-Modes and Faraday Rotation for Enhanced Magneto-Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mazor, Y; Steinberg, Ben Z

    2016-01-01

    We examine the efficacy of Dark-mode plasmonics as a platform for enhanced magneto-optics. Dark-mode of a small particle consists of two co-existing equal-intensity and mutually opposing dipolar excitations. Each of these two opposing dipoles may even resonate intensely at or near the dark-mode frequency, but the net dipole moment of the system vanishes due to the mutual cancelation between the opposing dipoles. We show that application of external magnetic bias may alleviate the intense destructive interference. Furthermore, under external magnetic bias the opposing dark-resonances of a plasmonic particle shift in opposite directions and create a region of extremely sensitive Faraday rotation. We show that the magnetized dark resonance in Ag particle may provide 50 degrees rotation under magnetic fields of the order of 1-2 Tesla, exhibiting magneto-plasmonic activity that is nearly three orders of magnitude larger than that observed in conventional plasmonic particle.

  11. Fast sweep-rate plastic Faraday force magnetometer with simultaneous sample temperature measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobinsky, D; Borzi, R A; Mackenzie, A P; Grigera, S A

    2012-12-01

    We present a design for a magnetometer capable of operating at temperatures down to 50 mK and magnetic fields up to 15 T with integrated sample temperature measurement. Our design is based on the concept of a Faraday force magnetometer with a load-sensing variable capacitor. A plastic body allows for fast sweep rates and sample temperature measurement, and the possibility of regulating the initial capacitance simplifies the initial bridge balancing. Under moderate gradient fields of ~1 T/m our prototype performed with a resolution better than 1 × 10(-5) emu. The magnetometer can be operated either in a dc mode, or in an oscillatory mode which allows the determination of the magnetic susceptibility. We present measurements on Dy(2)Ti(2)O(7) and Sr(3)Ru(2)O(7) as an example of its performance.

  12. An analytical model of Faraday rotation in hot alkali metal vapours

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, Stefan L; Cornish, Simon L

    2011-01-01

    We report a thorough investigation into the absorptive and dispersive properties of hot caesium vapour, culminating in the development of a simple analytical model for off-resonant Faraday rotation. The model, applicable to all hot alkali metal vapours, is seen to predict the rotation observed in caesium, at temperatures as high as 115 $^{\\circ}$C, to within 1% accuracy for probe light detuned by greater than 2 GHz from the $D_{2}$ lines. We also demonstrate the existence of a weak probe intensity limit, below which the effect of hyperfine pumping is negligible. Following the identification of this regime we validate a more comprehensive model for the absorption and dispersion in the vicinity of the $D_{2}$ lines, implemented in the form of a computer code. We demonstrate the ability of this model to predict Doppler-broadened spectra to within 0.5% rms deviation for temperatures up to 50 $^{\\circ}$C.

  13. Dynamic Chiral Magnetic Effect and Faraday Rotation in Macroscopically Disordered Helical Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J.; Pesin, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    We develop an effective medium theory for electromagnetic wave propagation through gapless nonuniform systems with a dynamic chiral magnetic effect. The theory allows us to calculate macroscopic-disorder-induced corrections to the values of optical, as well as chiral magnetic conductivities. In particular, we show that spatial fluctuations of the optical conductivity induce corrections to the effective value of the chiral magnetic conductivity. The absolute value of the effect varies strongly depending on the system parameters, but yields the leading frequency dependence of the polarization rotation and circular dichroism signals. Experimentally, these corrections can be observed as features in the Faraday rotation angle near frequencies that correspond to the bulk plasmon resonances of a material. Such features are not expected to be present in single-crystal samples.

  14. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Based on a Potassium Faraday Dispersive Filter for Daytime Temperature Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abo Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new high-spectral-resolution lidar technique is proposed for measuring the profiles of atmospheric temperature in daytime. Based on the theory of high resolution Rayleigh scattering, the feasibility and advantages of using potassium (K Faraday dispersive optical filters as blocking filters for measuring atmospheric temperature are demonstrated with a numerical simulation. It was found that temperature profiles could be measured within 1K error for the height of 9 km with a 500 m range resolution in 60 min by using laser pulses with 1mJ/pulse and 1 kHz, and a 50 cm diameter telescope. Furthermore, we are developing compact pulsed laser system for temperature lidar transmitter.

  15. Design and Construction of a Fast Ion Loss Faraday Cup Array Diagnostic for JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.S. Darrow; S. Bauumel; F.E. Cecil; V. Kiptily; R. Ellis; L. Pedrick; A. Werner

    2004-04-26

    A thin foil Faraday cup array is being built to measure the loss of 3.5 MeV alpha particles and MeV ion cyclotron heating (ICH) tail ions on JET. It will consist of nine detectors spread over five different poloidal locations and three radial positions. They will measure the poloidal distribution and radial scrape off of the losses. The detectors will be comprised of four layers of thin (2.5 micron) Ni foil, giving some resolution of the lost particle energy distribution as different ranges of energies will stop in different layers of the detector. One detector will utilize eight thinner (1.0 micron) foils to obtain a better resolved energy distribution. These detectors will accept particles incident up to 45{sup o} from the normal to the foils.

  16. Highlights from Faraday Discussion: Designing New Heterogeneous Catalysts, London, UK, April 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nico; Manyar, Haresh G; Roldan, Alberto

    2016-06-28

    The Faraday Discussion on the design of new heterogeneous catalysts took place from 4-6 April 2016 in London, United Kingdom. It brought together world leading scientists actively involved in the synthesis, characterisation, modelling and testing of solid catalysts, attracting more than one hundred delegates from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and experience levels - academic and industrial researchers, experimentalists and theoreticians, and students. The meeting was a reflection of how big of an impact the ability to control and design catalysts with specific properties for particular processes can potentially have on the chemical industry, environment, economy and society as a whole. In the following, we give an overview of the topics covered during this meeting and briefly highlight the content of each presentation.

  17. Analysis of excited-state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter at 1529 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Junyu; Yin, Longfei; Luo, Bin; Guo, Hong

    2016-06-27

    In this work, a detailed theoretical analysis of 1529 nm ES-FADOF (excited state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter) based on rubidium atoms pumped by 780 nm laser is introduced, where Zeeman splitting, Doppler broadening, and relaxation processes are considered. Experimental results are carefully compared with the derivation. The results prove that the optimal pumping frequency is affected by the working magnetic field. The population distribution among all hyperfine Zeeman sublevels under the optimal pumping frequency has also been obtained, which shows that 85Rb atoms are the main contribution to the population. The peak transmittance above 90% is obtained, which is in accordance with the experiment. The calculation also shows that the asymmetric spectra observed in the experiment are caused by the unbalanced population distribution among Zeeman sublevels. This theoretical model can be used for all kinds of calculations for FADOF.

  18. Quantized Faraday and Kerr rotation and axion electrodynamics of a 3D topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Salehi, M.; Koirala, N.; Moon, J.; Oh, S.; Armitage, N. P.

    2016-12-01

    Topological insulators have been proposed to be best characterized as bulk magnetoelectric materials that show response functions quantized in terms of fundamental physical constants. Here, we lower the chemical potential of three-dimensional (3D) Bi2Se3 films to ~30 meV above the Dirac point and probe their low-energy electrodynamic response in the presence of magnetic fields with high-precision time-domain terahertz polarimetry. For fields higher than 5 tesla, we observed quantized Faraday and Kerr rotations, whereas the dc transport is still semiclassical. A nontrivial Berry’s phase offset to these values gives evidence for axion electrodynamics and the topological magnetoelectric effect. The time structure used in these measurements allows a direct measure of the fine-structure constant based on a topological invariant of a solid-state system.

  19. Slit disk for modified faraday cup diagnostic for determining power density of electron and ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruya, Alan T.; Elmer; John W.; Palmer, Todd A.

    2011-03-08

    A diagnostic system for characterization of an electron beam or an ion beam includes an electrical conducting disk of refractory material having a circumference, a center, and a Faraday cup assembly positioned to receive the electron beam or ion beam. At least one slit in the disk provides diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam. The at least one slit is located between the circumference and the center of the disk and includes a radial portion that is in radial alignment with the center and a portion that deviates from radial alignment with the center. The electron beam or ion beam is directed onto the disk and translated to the at least one slit wherein the electron beam or ion beam enters the at least one slit for providing diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam.

  20. Sub-atom shot noise Faraday imaging of ultracold atom clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kristensen, Mick A; Pedersen, Poul L; Klempt, Carsten; Sherson, Jacob F; Arlt, Jan J; Hilliard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that a dispersive imaging technique based on the Faraday effect can measure the atom number in a large, ultracold atom cloud with a precision below the atom shot noise level. The minimally destructive character of the technique allows us to take multiple images of the same cloud, which enables sub-atom shot noise measurement precision of the atom number and allows for an in situ determination of the measurement precision. We have developed a noise model that quantitatively describes the noise contributions due to photon shot noise in the detected light and the noise associated with single atom loss. This model contains no free parameters and is calculated through an analysis of the fluctuations in the acquired images. For clouds containing $N \\sim 5 \\times 10^6$ atoms, we achieve a precision more than a factor of two below the atom shot noise level.