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Sample records for cartilaginous extracellular matrix

  1. Compaction enhances extracellular matrix content and mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilaginous constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, EunHee; Ge, Chenghao; Chen, Albert C; Schumacher, Barbara L; Sah, Robert L

    2012-06-01

    Many cell-based tissue-engineered cartilaginous constructs are mechanically softer than native tissue and have low content and abnormal proportions of extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents. We hypothesized that the load-bearing mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs improve with the inclusion of collagen (COL) and proteoglycan (PG) during assembly. The objectives of this work were to determine (1) the effect of addition of PG, COL, or COL+PG on compressive properties of 2% agarose constructs and (2) the ability of mechanical compaction to concentrate matrix content and improve the compressive properties of such constructs. The inclusion of COL+PG improved the compressive properties of hydrogel constructs compared with PG or COL alone. Mechanical compaction increased the PG and COL concentrations in and compressive stiffness of the constructs. Chondrocytes included in the constructs maintained high viability after compaction. These results support the concepts that the assembly of cartilaginous constructs with COL+PG and application of mechanical compaction enhance the ECM content and compressive properties of engineered cartilaginous constructs.

  2. Cartilaginous extracellular matrix-modified chitosan hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bogyu; Kim, Soyon; Lin, Brian; Wu, Benjamin M; Lee, Min

    2014-11-26

    Cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as type-II collagen (Col II) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) play a crucial role in chondrogenesis. However, direct clinical use of natural Col II or CS as scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering is limited by their instability and rapid enzymatic degradation. Here, we investigate the incorporation of Col II and CS into injectable chitosan hydrogels designed to gel upon initiation by exposure to visible blue light (VBL) in the presence of riboflavin. Unmodified chitosan hydrogel supported proliferation and deposition of cartilaginous ECM by encapsulated chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells. The incorporation of native Col II or CS into chitosan hydrogels further increased chondrogenesis. The incorporation of Col II, in particular, was found to be responsible for the enhanced cellular condensation and chondrogenesis observed in modified hydrogels. This was mediated by integrin α10 binding to Col II, increasing cell-matrix adhesion. These findings demonstrate the potential of cartilage ECM-modified chitosan hydrogels as biomaterials to promote cartilage regeneration.

  3. Tendon functional extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screen, Hazel R C; Berk, David E; Kadler, Karl E; Ramirez, Francesco; Young, Marian F

    2015-06-01

    This article is one of a series, summarizing views expressed at the Orthopaedic Research Society New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. This particular article reviews the three workshops held under the "Functional Extracellular Matrix" stream. The workshops focused on the roles of the tendon extracellular matrix, such as performing the mechanical functions of tendon, creating the local cell environment, and providing cellular cues. Tendon is a complex network of matrix and cells, and its biological functions are influenced by widely varying extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as age, nutrition, exercise levels, and biomechanics. Consequently, tendon adapts dynamically during development, aging, and injury. The workshop discussions identified research directions associated with understanding cell-matrix interactions to be of prime importance for developing novel strategies to target tendon healing or repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Shear stress magnitude and duration modulates matrix composition and tensile mechanical properties in engineered cartilaginous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmiti, Christopher V; Guldberg, Robert E

    2009-11-01

    Cartilage tissue-engineering strategies aim to produce a functional extracellular matrix similar to that of the native tissue. However, none of the myriad approaches taken have successfully generated a construct possessing the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of healthy articular cartilage. One possible approach to modulating the matrix composition and mechanical properties of engineered tissues is through the use of bioreactor-driven mechanical stimulation. In this study, we hypothesized that exposing scaffold-free cartilaginous tissue constructs to 7 days of continuous shear stress at 0.001 or 0.1 Pa would increase collagen deposition and tensile mechanical properties compared to that of static controls. Histologically, type II collagen staining was evident in all construct groups, while a surface layer of type I collagen increased in thickness with increasing shear stress magnitude. The areal fraction of type I collagen was higher in the 0.1-Pa group (25.2 +/- 2.2%) than either the 0.001-Pa (13.6 +/- 3.8%) or the static (7.9 +/- 1.5%) group. Type II collagen content, as assessed by ELISA, was also higher in the 0.1-Pa group (7.5 +/- 2.1%) compared to the 0.001-Pa (3.0 +/- 2.25%) or static groups (3.7 +/- 3.2%). Temporal gene expression analysis showed a flow-induced increase in type I and type II collagen expression within 24 h of exposure. Interestingly, while the 0.1-Pa group showed higher collagen content, this group retained less sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the matrix over time in bioreactor culture. Increases in both tensile Young's modulus and ultimate strength were observed with increasing shear stress, yielding constructs possessing a modulus of nearly 5 MPa and strength of 1.3 MPa. This study demonstrates that shear stress is a potent modulator of both the amount and type of synthesized extracellular matrix constituents in engineered cartilaginous tissue with corresponding effects on mechanical function. Copyright 2009 Wiley

  5. Extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Assembly of Fibronectin Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Purva; Carraher, Cara; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2013-01-01

    In the process of matrix assembly, multivalent extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are induced to self-associate and to interact with other ECM proteins to form fibrillar networks. Matrix assembly is usually initiated by ECM glycoproteins binding to cell surface receptors, such as fibronectin (FN) dimers binding to α5β1 integrin. Receptor binding stimulates FN self-association mediated by the N-terminal assembly domain and organizes the actin cytoskeleton to promote cell contractility. FN conformational changes expose additional binding sites that participate in fibril formation and in conversion of fibrils into a stabilized, insoluble form. Once assembled, the FN matrix impacts tissue organization by contributing to the assembly of other ECM proteins. Here, we describe the major steps, molecular interactions, and cellular mechanisms involved in assembling FN dimers into fibrillar matrix while highlighting important issues and major questions that require further investigation. PMID:20690820

  8. Glomerular extracellular matrix components and integrins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, L. M.; de Melker, A. A.; Kramer, D.; Kuikman, I.; Chand, A.; Claessen, N.; Weening, J. J.; Sonnenberg, A.

    1998-01-01

    It has become apparent that extracellular matrix components and their cellular receptors, the integrins, are important regulators of glomerular development and function. In this rapidly evolving field we studied the production of extracellular matrix components and integrins by rat glomerular

  9. Extracellular Matrix and Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriazu, Elena; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Varela-Rey, Marta; Pérez de Obanos, María Pilar; Leung, Tung Ming; Lopategi, Aritz; Benedicto, Aitor; Abraham-Enachescu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic microenvironment that undergoes continuous remodeling, particularly during injury and wound healing. Chronic liver injury of many different etiologies such as viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, drug-induced liver injury, obesity and insulin resistance, metabolic disorders, and autoimmune disease is characterized by excessive deposition of ECM proteins in response to persistent liver damage. Critical Issues: This review describes the main collagenous and noncollagenous components from the ECM that play a significant role in pathological matrix deposition during liver disease. We define how increased myofibroblasts (MF) from different origins are at the forefront of liver fibrosis and how liver cell-specific regulation of the complex scarring process occurs. Recent Advances: Particular attention is paid to the role of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and newly identified matricellular proteins in the regulation of fibrillar type I collagen, a field to which our laboratory has significantly contributed over the years. We compile data from recent literature on the potential mechanisms driving fibrosis resolution such as MF’ apoptosis, senescence, and reversal to quiescence. Future Directions: We conclude with a brief description of how epigenetics, an evolving field, can regulate the behavior of MF and of how new “omics” tools may advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which the fibrogenic response to liver injury occurs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1078–1097. PMID:24219114

  10. Bioactive polymer/extracellular matrix scaffolds fabricated with a flow perfusion bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jiehong; Guo, Xuan; Grande-Allen, K Jane; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2010-12-01

    In this study, electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) microfiber scaffolds, coated with cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM), were fabricated by first culturing chondrocytes under dynamic conditions in a flow perfusion bioreactor and then decellularizing the cellular constructs. The decellularization procedure yielded acellular PCL/ECM composite scaffolds containing glycosaminoglycan and collagen. PCL/ECM composite scaffolds were evaluated for their ability to support the chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro using serum-free medium with or without the addition of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). PCL/ECM composite scaffolds supported chondrogenic differentiation induced by TGF-β1 exposure, as evidenced in the up-regulation of aggrecan (11.6 ± 3.8 fold) and collagen type II (668.4 ± 317.7 fold) gene expression. The presence of cartilaginous matrix alone reduced collagen type I gene expression to levels observed with TGF-β1 treatment. Cartilaginous matrix further enhanced the effects of growth factor treatment on MSC chondrogenesis as evidenced in the higher glycosaminoglycan synthetic activity for cells cultured on PCL/ECM composite scaffolds. Therefore, flow perfusion culture of chondrocytes on electrospun microfiber scaffolds is a promising method to fabricate polymer/extracellular matrix composite scaffolds that incorporate both natural and synthetic components to provide biological signals for cartilage tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Proteases decode the extracellular matrix cryptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Vallet, Sylvain D

    2016-03-01

    The extracellular matrix is comprised of 1100 core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins and of glycosaminoglycans. This structural scaffold contributes to the organization and mechanical properties of tissues and modulates cell behavior. The extracellular matrix is dynamic and undergoes constant remodeling, which leads to diseases if uncontrolled. Bioactive fragments, called matricryptins, are released from the extracellular proteins by limited proteolysis and have biological activities on their own. They regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, cancer, diabetes, wound healing, fibrosis and infectious diseases and either improve or worsen the course of diseases depending on the matricryptins and on the molecular and biological contexts. Several protease families release matricryptins from core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins both in vitro and in vivo. The major proteases, which decrypt the extracellular matrix, are zinc metalloproteinases of the metzincin superfamily (matrixins, adamalysins and astacins), cysteine proteinases and serine proteases. Some matricryptins act as enzyme inhibitors, further connecting protease and matricryptin fates and providing intricate regulation of major physiopathological processes such as angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. They strengthen the role of the extracellular matrix as a key player in tissue failure and core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins as important therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  12. Optimisation of high-quality total ribonucleic acid isolation from cartilaginous tissues for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.; Huang, C. L.; Vonk, L. A.; Lu, Z. F.; Bank, R. A.; Helder, M. N.; Doulabi, B. Zandieh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Studies which consider the molecular mechanisms of degeneration and regeneration of cartilaginous tissues are seriously hampered by problematic ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolations due to low cell density and the dense, proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix of cartilage. Proteoglycans tend

  13. Optimisation of high-quality total ribonucleic acid isolation from cartilaginous tissues for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M; Huang, C L; Vonk, L A; Lu, Z F; Bank, R A; Helder, M N; Doulabi, B Zandieh

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies which consider the molecular mechanisms of degeneration and regeneration of cartilaginous tissues are seriously hampered by problematic ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolations due to low cell density and the dense, proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix of cartilage. Proteoglycans tend

  14. Fragmentation of extracellular matrix by hypochlorous acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    of the MPO-derived oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl) with extracellular matrix from vascular smooth muscle cells and healthy pig arteries has been examined. HOCl is rapidly consumed by such matrix samples, with the formation of matrix-derived chloramines or chloramides. The yield of these intermediates...... increases with HOCl dose. These materials undergo a time- and temperature-dependent decay, which parallels the release of sugar and protein components from the treated matrix, consistent with these species being important intermediates. Matrix damage is enhanced by species that increase chloramine....../chloramide decomposition, with copper and iron ions being effective catalysts, and decreased by compounds which scavenge chloramines/chloramides, or species derived from them. The effect of such matrix modifications on cellular behaviour is poorly understood, though it is known that changes in matrix materials can have...

  15. Preliminary research of recombinant matrix extracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and predentin, but not by dental pulp cells. Furthermore, we used von kossa staining and the results suggested that, MEPE could induce mineralization and we propose that this protein had a potential effect on dental rehabilitation. Key words: Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE), mineralization Von kossa.

  16. Extracellular matrix and tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, H.A.M.; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a key component during regeneration and maintenance of tissues and organs, and it therefore plays a critical role in successful tissue engineering as well. Tissue engineers should recognise that engineering technology can be deduced from natural repair processes. Due to

  17. Nanomechanics of the Cartilage Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated biomacromolecular fiber composite located at the ends of long bones that enables proper joint lubrication, articulation, loading, and energy dissipation. Degradation of extracellular matrix molecular components and changes in their nanoscale structure greatly influence the macroscale behavior of the tissue and result in dysfunction with age, injury, and diseases such as osteoarthritis. Here, the application of the field of nanomechanics to cartilage is reviewed. Nanomechanics involves the measurement and prediction of nanoscale forces and displacements, intra- and intermolecular interactions, spatially varying mechanical properties, and other mechanical phenomena existing at small length scales. Experimental nanomechanics and theoretical nanomechanics have been applied to cartilage at varying levels of material complexity, e.g., nanoscale properties of intact tissue, the matrix associated with single cells, biomimetic molecular assemblies, and individual extracellular matrix biomolecules (such as aggrecan, collagen, and hyaluronan). These studies have contributed to establishing a fundamental mechanism-based understanding of native and engineered cartilage tissue function, quality, and pathology.

  18. Extracellular matrix component signaling in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Leitinger, Birgit; Gullberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization...... and motility but also provides survival and proliferation cues. The major classes of cell surface receptors for matrix macromols. are the integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and transmembrane proteoglycans such as syndecans and CD44. Cells respond not only to specific ligands, such as collagen, fibronectin......, or basement membrane glycoproteins, but also in terms of matrix rigidity. This can regulate the release and subsequent biol. activity of matrix-bound growth factors, for example, transforming growth factor-β. In the environment of tumors, there may be changes in cell populations and their receptor profiles...

  19. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  20. Regulation of Corneal Stroma Extracellular Matrix Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shoujun; Mienaltowski, Michael J.; Birk, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The transparent cornea is the major refractive element of the eye. A finely controlled assembly of the stromal extracellular matrix is critical to corneal function, as well as in establishing the appropriate mechanical stability required to maintain corneal shape and curvature. In the stroma, homogeneous, small diameter collagen fibrils, regularly packed with a highly ordered hierarchical organization, are essential for function. This review focuses on corneal stroma assembly and the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis. Corneal collagen fibrillogenesis involves multiple molecules interacting in sequential steps, as well as interactions between keratocytes and stroma matrix components. The stroma has the highest collagen V:I ratio in the body. Collagen V regulates the nucleation of protofibril assembly, thus controlling the number of fibrils and assembly of smaller diameter fibrils in the stroma. The corneal stroma is also enriched in small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) that cooperate in a temporal and spatial manner to regulate linear and lateral collagen fibril growth. In addition, the fibril-associated collagens (FACITs) such as collagen XII and collagen XIV have roles in the regulation of fibril packing and inter-lamellar interactions. A communicating keratocyte network contributes to the overall and long-range regulation of stromal extracellular matrix assembly, by creating micro-domains where the sequential steps in stromal matrix assembly are controlled. Keratocytes control the synthesis of extracellular matrix components, which interact with the keratocytes dynamically to coordinate the regulatory steps into a cohesive process. Mutations or deficiencies in stromal regulatory molecules result in altered interactions and deficiencies in both transparency and refraction, leading to corneal stroma pathobiology such as stromal dystrophies, cornea plana and keratoconus. PMID:25819456

  1. Extracellular Matrix Biomarkers for Diagnosis, Prognosis, Imaging, and Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0240 TITLE: Extracellular Matrix Biomarkers for Diagnosis, Prognosis, Imaging, and Targeting PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Extracellular Matrix Biomarkers for Diagnosis, Prognosis, Imaging, and Targeting 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14...the management and treatment of metastatic breast cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast Cancer, Metastasis, Extracellular Matrix , Tumor Microenvironment

  2. Cysteine cathepsins and extracellular matrix degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonović, Marko; Turk, Boris

    2014-08-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are normally found in the lysosomes where they are involved in intracellular protein turnover. Their ability to degrade the components of the extracellular matrix in vitro was first reported more than 25years ago. However, cathepsins were for a long time not considered to be among the major players in ECM degradation in vivo. During the last decade it has, however, become evident that abundant secretion of cysteine cathepsins into extracellular milieu is accompanying numerous physiological and disease conditions, enabling the cathepsins to degrade extracellular proteins. In this review we will focus on cysteine cathepsins and their extracellular functions linked with ECM degradation, including regulation of their activity, which is often enhanced by acidification of the extracellular microenvironment, such as found in the bone resorption lacunae or tumor microenvironment. We will further discuss the ECM substrates of cathepsins with a focus on collagen and elastin, including the importance of that for pathologies. Finally, we will overview the current status of cathepsin inhibitors in clinical development for treatment of ECM-linked diseases, in particular osteoporosis. Cysteine cathepsins are among the major proteases involved in ECM remodeling, and their role is not limited to degradation only. Deregulation of their activity is linked with numerous ECM-linked diseases and they are now validated targets in a number of them. Cathepsins S and K are the most attractive targets, especially cathepsin K as a major therapeutic target for osteoporosis with drugs targeting it in advanced clinical trials. Due to their major role in ECM remodeling cysteine cathepsins have emerged as an important group of therapeutic targets for a number of ECM-related diseases, including, osteoporosis, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Matrix-mediated cell behaviour and properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  3. Bioengineering Human Myocardium on Native Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyette, Jacques P.; Charest, Jonathan M; Mills, Robert W; Jank, Bernhard J.; Moser, Philipp T.; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Gershlak, Joshua R.; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Milan, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ott, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale More than 25 million individuals suffer from heart failure worldwide, with nearly 4,000 patients currently awaiting heart transplantation in the United States. Donor organ shortage and allograft rejection remain major limitations with only about 2,500 hearts transplanted each year. As a theoretical alternative to allotransplantation, patient-derived bioartificial myocardium could provide functional support and ultimately impact the treatment of heart failure. Objective The objective of this study is to translate previous work to human scale and clinically relevant cells, for the bioengineering of functional myocardial tissue based on the combination of human cardiac matrix and human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results To provide a clinically relevant tissue scaffold, we translated perfusion-decellularization to human scale and obtained biocompatible human acellular cardiac scaffolds with preserved extracellular matrix composition, architecture, and perfusable coronary vasculature. We then repopulated this native human cardiac matrix with cardiac myocytes derived from non-transgenic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and generated tissues of increasing three-dimensional complexity. We maintained such cardiac tissue constructs in culture for 120 days to demonstrate definitive sarcomeric structure, cell and matrix deformation, contractile force, and electrical conduction. To show that functional myocardial tissue of human scale can be built on this platform, we then partially recellularized human whole heart scaffolds with human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes. Under biomimetic culture, the seeded constructs developed force-generating human myocardial tissue, showed electrical conductivity, left ventricular pressure development, and metabolic function. Conclusions Native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds maintain matrix components and structure to support the seeding and engraftment of human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes, and enable

  4. The epiphyseal growth plate and peripheral cartilaginous tumours : the neighbours matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrea, Carlos Eduardo de

    2012-01-01

    Chondrocytes interact with their neighbours through their cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM). Chondrocyte–matrix interactions compensate the lack of cell–cell contact and are modulated by proteoglycans and other molecules. The epiphyseal growth plate is a highly organized tissue responsible

  5. The matrix reorganized: extracellular matrix remodeling and integrin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Melinda; Artym, Vira V; Green, J Angelo; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2006-10-01

    Via integrins, cells can sense dimensionality and other physical and biochemical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Cells respond differently to two-dimensional substrates and three-dimensional environments, activating distinct signaling pathways for each. Direct integrin signaling and indirect integrin modulation of growth factor and other intracellular signaling pathways regulate ECM remodeling and control subsequent cell behavior and tissue organization. ECM remodeling is critical for many developmental processes, and remodeled ECM contributes to tumorigenesis. These recent advances in the field provide new insights and raise new questions about the mechanisms of ECM synthesis and proteolytic degradation, as well as the roles of integrins and tension in ECM remodeling.

  6. Extracellular matrix motion and early morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Rongish, Brenda J; Smith, Christopher M; Filla, Michael B; Czirok, Andras; Bénazéraf, Bertrand; Little, Charles D

    2016-06-15

    For over a century, embryologists who studied cellular motion in early amniotes generally assumed that morphogenetic movement reflected migration relative to a static extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold. However, as we discuss in this Review, recent investigations reveal that the ECM is also moving during morphogenesis. Time-lapse studies show how convective tissue displacement patterns, as visualized by ECM markers, contribute to morphogenesis and organogenesis. Computational image analysis distinguishes between cell-autonomous (active) displacements and convection caused by large-scale (composite) tissue movements. Modern quantification of large-scale 'total' cellular motion and the accompanying ECM motion in the embryo demonstrates that a dynamic ECM is required for generation of the emergent motion patterns that drive amniote morphogenesis. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Extracellular Matrix Molecules Facilitating Vascular Biointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K.C. Ng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available All vascular implants, including stents, heart valves and graft materials exhibit suboptimal biocompatibility that significantly reduces their clinical efficacy. A range of biomolecules in the subendothelial space have been shown to play critical roles in local regulation of thrombosis, endothelial growth and smooth muscle cell proliferation, making these attractive candidates for modulation of vascular device biointegration. However, classically used biomaterial coatings, such as fibronectin and laminin, modulate only one of these components; enhancing endothelial cell attachment, but also activating platelets and triggering thrombosis. This review examines a subset of extracellular matrix molecules that have demonstrated multi-faceted vascular compatibility and accordingly are promising candidates to improve the biointegration of vascular biomaterials.

  8. Defining the extracellular matrix using proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Humphries, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The cell microenvironment has a profound influence on the behaviour, growth and survival of cells. The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides not only mechanical and structural support to cells and tissues but also binds soluble ligands and transmembrane receptors to provide spatial coordination of signalling processes. The ability of cells to sense the chemical, mechanical and topographical features of the ECM enables them to integrate complex, multiparametric information into a coherent response to the surrounding microenvironment. Consequently, dysregulation or mutation of ECM components results in a broad range of pathological conditions. Characterization of the composition of ECM derived from various cells has begun to reveal insights into ECM structure and function, and mechanisms of disease. Proteomic methodologies permit the global analysis of subcellular systems, but extracellular and transmembrane proteins present analytical difficulties to proteomic strategies owing to the particular biochemical properties of these molecules. Here, we review advances in proteomic approaches that have been applied to furthering our understanding of the ECM microenvironment. We survey recent studies that have addressed challenges in the analysis of ECM and discuss major outcomes in the context of health and disease. In addition, we summarize efforts to progress towards a systems-level understanding of ECM biology. PMID:23419153

  9. Tumorigenic Potential of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Stanley; Hymowitz, Michelle; Rollo, Ellen E.; Mann, Richard; Conner, Cathleen E.; Cao, Jian; Foda, Hussein D.; Tompkins, David C.; Toole, Bryan P.

    2001-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a glycoprotein present on the cancer cell plasma membrane, enhances fibroblast synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The demonstration that peritumoral fibroblasts synthesize most of the MMPs in human tumors rather than the cancer cells themselves has ignited interest in the role of EMMPRIN in tumor dissemination. In this report we have demonstrated a role for EMMPRIN in cancer progression. Human MDA-MB-436 breast cancer cells, which are tumorigenic but slow growing in vivo, were transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA and injected orthotopically into mammary tissue of female NCr nu/nu mice. Green fluorescent protein was used to visualize metastases. In three experiments, breast cancer cell clones transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA were considerably more tumorigenic and invasive than plasmid-transfected cancer cells. Increased gelatinase A and gelatinase B expression (demonstrated by in situ hybridization and gelatin substrate zymography) was demonstrated in EMMPRIN-enhanced tumors. In contrast to de novo breast cancers in humans, human tumors transplanted into mice elicited minimal stromal or inflammatory cell reactions. Based on these experimental studies and our previous demonstration that EMMPRIN is prominently displayed in human cancer tissue, we propose that EMMPRIN plays an important role in cancer progression by increasing synthesis of MMPs. PMID:11395366

  10. Force spectroscopy of hepatocytic extracellular matrix components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsunthon, R., E-mail: YongsuntR@Corning.com [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States); Baker, W.A.; Bryhan, M.D.; Baker, D.E.; Chang, T.; Petzold, O.N.; Walczak, W.J.; Liu, J.; Faris, R.A.; Senaratne, W.; Seeley, L.A.; Youngman, R.E. [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    We present atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy data of live hepatocytes (HEPG2/C3A liver cell line) grown in Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, a complex solution of salts and amino acids commonly used for cell culture. Contact-mode imaging and force spectroscopy of this system allowed correlation of cell morphology and extracellular matrix (ECM) properties with substrate properties. Force spectroscopy analysis of cellular 'footprints' indicated that the cells secrete large polymers (e.g., 3.5 {mu}m contour length and estimated MW 1000 kDa) onto their substrate surface. Although definitive identification of the polymers has not yet been achieved, fluorescent-labeled antibody staining has specified the presence of ECM proteins such as collagen and laminin in the cellular footprints. The stretched polymers appear to be much larger than single molecules of known ECM components, such as collagen and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, thus suggesting that the cells create larger entangled, macromolecular structures from smaller components. There is strong evidence which suggests that the composition of the ECM is greatly influenced by the hydrophobicity of the substrate surface, with preferential production and/or adsorption of larger macromolecules on hydrophobic surfaces.

  11. Vascular Extracellular Matrix and Arterial Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    WAGENSEIL, JESSICA E.; MECHAM, ROBERT P.

    2009-01-01

    An important factor in the transition from an open to a closed circulatory system was a change in vessel wall structure and composition that enabled the large arteries to store and release energy during the cardiac cycle. The component of the arterial wall in vertebrates that accounts for these properties is the elastic fiber network organized by medial smooth muscle. Beginning with the onset of pulsatile blood flow in the developing aorta, smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall produce a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that will ultimately define the mechanical properties that are critical for proper function of the adult vascular system. This review discusses the structural ECM proteins in the vertebrate aortic wall and will explore how the choice of ECM components has changed through evolution as the cardiovascular system became more advanced and pulse pressure increased. By correlating vessel mechanics with physiological blood pressure across animal species and in mice with altered vessel compliance, we show that cardiac and vascular development are physiologically coupled, and we provide evidence for a universal elastic modulus that controls the parameters of ECM deposition in vessel wall development. We also discuss mechanical models that can be used to design better tissue-engineered vessels and to test the efficacy of clinical treatments. PMID:19584318

  12. Micro- and macrorheology of jellyfish extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Camille; Abou, Bérengère; Ponton, Alain; Cornelissen, Annemiek J M

    2012-01-04

    Mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play a key role in tissue organization and morphogenesis. Rheological properties of jellyfish ECM (mesoglea) were measured in vivo at the cellular scale by passive microrheology techniques: microbeads were injected in jellyfish ECM and their Brownian motion was recorded to determine the mechanical properties of the surrounding medium. Microrheology results were compared with macrorheological measurements performed with a shear rheometer on slices of jellyfish mesoglea. We found that the ECM behaved as a viscoelastic gel at the macroscopic scale and as a much softer and heterogeneous viscoelastic structure at the microscopic scale. The fibrous architecture of the mesoglea, as observed by differential interference contrast and scanning electron microscopy, was in accord with these scale-dependent mechanical properties. Furthermore, the evolution of the mechanical properties of the ECM during aging was investigated by measuring microrheological properties at different jellyfish sizes. We measured that the ECM in adult jellyfish was locally stiffer than in juvenile ones. We argue that this stiffening is a consequence of local aggregations of fibers occurring gradually during aging of the jellyfish mesoglea and is enhanced by repetitive muscular contractions of the jellyfish. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The extracellular matrix of plants: Molecular, cellular and developmental biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    A symposium entitled ``The Extracellular Matrix of Plants: Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology was held in Tamarron, Colorado, March 15--21, 1996. The following topics were explored in addresses by 43 speakers: structure and biochemistry of cell walls; biochemistry, molecular biology and biosynthesis of lignin; secretory pathway and synthesis of glycoproteins; biosynthesis of matrix polysaccharides, callose and cellulose; role of the extracellular matrix in plant growth and development; plant cell walls in symbiosis and pathogenesis.

  14. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Walter H; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an 'end-stage' process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  15. Extracellular matrix components as therapeutics for spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Agnes E; Marlow, Megan M; Oudega, Martin

    2017-06-23

    There is no treatment for people with spinal cord injury that leads to significant functional improvements. The extracellular matrix is an intricate, 3-dimensional, structural framework that defines the environment for cells in the central nervous system. The components of extracellular matrix have signaling and regulatory roles in the fate and function of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the central nervous system. This review discusses the therapeutic potential of extracellular matrix components for spinal cord repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sheng; Ding, Fei; Gong, Leiiei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is produced by the resident cells in tissues and organs, and secreted into the surrounding medium to provide biophysical and biochemical support to the surrounding cells due to its content of diverse bioactive molecules. Recently, the extracellular matrix has been used as a promising approach for tissue engineering. Emerging studies demonstrate that extracellular matrix scaffolds are able to create a favorable regenerative microenvironment, promote tissue-specific remodeling, and act as an inductive template for the repair and functional reconstruction of skin, bone, nerve, heart, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, and other organs. In the current review, we will provide a critical overview of the structure and function of various types of extracellular matrix, the construction of three-dimensional extracellular matrix scaffolds, and their tissue engineering applications, with a focus on translation of these novel tissue engineered products to the clinic. We will also present an outlook on future perspectives of the extracellular matrix in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Extracellular matrix type modulates cell migration on mechanical gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christopher D; Isenberg, Brett C; Chua, Samantha G; Wong, Joyce Y

    2017-10-15

    Extracellular matrix composition and stiffness are known to be critical determinants of cell behavior, modulating processes including differentiation, traction generation, and migration. Recent studies have demonstrated that the ECM composition can modulate how cells migrate in response to gradients in environmental stiffness, altering a cell's ability to undergo durotaxis. These observations were limited to single varieties of extracellular matrix, but typically cells are exposed to environments containing complex mixtures of extracellular matrix proteins. Here, we investigate migration of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts on mechanical gradients coated with one or more type of extracellular matrix protein. Our results show that NIH 3T3 fibroblasts exhibit durotaxis on fibronectin-coated mechanical gradients but not on those coated with laminin, demonstrating that extracellular matrix type can act as a regulator of cell response to mechanical gradients. Interestingly, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were also observed to migrate randomly on gradients coated with a mixture of both fibronectin and laminin, suggesting that there may be a complex interplay in the cellular response to mechanical gradients in the presence of multiple extracellular matrix signals. These findings indicate that specific composition of available adhesion ligands is a critical determinant of a cell's migratory response to mechanical gradients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. From mechanotransduction to extracellular matrix gene expression in fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiquet, Matthias; Gelman, Laurent; Lutz, Roman; Maier, Silke

    2009-05-01

    Tissue mechanics provide an important context for tissue growth, maintenance and function. On the level of organs, external mechanical forces largely influence the control of tissue homeostasis by endo- and paracrine factors. On the cellular level, it is well known that most normal cell types depend on physical interactions with their extracellular matrix in order to respond efficiently to growth factors. Fibroblasts and other adherent cells sense changes in physical parameters in their extracellular matrix environment, transduce mechanical into chemical information, and integrate these signals with growth factor derived stimuli to achieve specific changes in gene expression. For connective tissue cells, production of the extracellular matrix is a prominent response to changes in mechanical load. We will review the evidence that integrin-containing cell-matrix adhesion contacts are essential for force transmission from the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton, and describe novel experiments indicating that mechanotransduction in fibroblasts depends on focal adhesion adaptor proteins that might function as molecular springs. We will stress the importance of the contractile actin cytoskeleton in balancing external with internal forces, and describe new results linking force-controlled actin dynamics directly to the expression of specific genes, among them the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C. As assembly lines for diverse signaling pathways, matrix adhesion contacts are now recognized as the major sites of crosstalk between mechanical and chemical stimuli, with important consequences for cell growth and differentiation.

  19. Integration of concepts: cardiac extracellular matrix remodeling after myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleutjens, Jack P. M.; Creemers, Esther E. J. M.

    2002-01-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix consists of a three-dimensional structural network of interstitial collagens to which other matrix components are attached. The main physiological functions of this network are to retain tissue integrity and cardiac pump function. Collagen deposition is controlled

  20. 3-D extracellular matrix from sectioned human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Catherine B; Cukierman, Edna; Artym, Vira V

    2014-03-03

    Cell adhesion, migration, and signaling in physiologically normal and pathological processes depend highly on the extracellular matrix that the cell interacts with. A variety of in vitro models of two-dimensional and three-dimensional extracellular matrices have been developed to study multiple aspects of cellular behavior. However, there is a profound need for in vitro models of extracellular matrices to closely mimic both biochemical and physical aspects of a three-dimensional in vivo cellular environment. This unit outlines the preparation of human-tissue-derived, cell-free, three-dimensional extracellular matrices for studying cellular behavior and cell-extracellular matrix interactions ex vivo. These protocols can be used to prepare cell-free matrices from a variety of normal and cancerous tissues. This unit also provides protocols for quality control of acellular matrix preparations, and for immunostaining of cells for specific cellular proteins as well as of extracellular matrices for their components. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Syndecans as receptors and organizers of the extracellular matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Gopal, Sandeep; Couchman, John

    2009-01-01

    , the collagens and glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix are prominent. Frequently, they do so in conjunction with other receptors, most notably the integrins. For this reason, they are often referred to as "co-receptors". However, just as with integrins, syndecans can interact with actin-associated proteins...... and signalling molecules, such as protein kinases. Some aspects of syndecan signalling are understood but much remains to be learned. The functions of syndecans in regulating cell adhesion and extracellular matrix assembly are described here. Evidence from null mice suggests that syndecans have roles...

  2. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marlise I; Hwang, Geelsu; Santos, Paulo H S; Campanella, Osvaldo H; Koo, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS), eDNA, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan) synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases.

  3. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlise eKlein

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS, eDNA and lipoteichoic acid (LTA. EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases.

  4. An immunofluorescence assay for extracellular matrix components highlights the role of epithelial cells in producing a stable, fibrillar extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar S. Qureshi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Activated fibroblasts are considered major drivers of fibrotic disease progression through the production of excessive extracellular matrix (ECM in response to signals from damaged epithelial and inflammatory cells. Nevertheless, epithelial cells are capable of expressing components of the ECM, cross-linking enzymes that increase its stability and are sensitive to factors involved in the early stages of fibrosis. We therefore wanted to test the hypothesis that epithelial cells can deposit ECM in response to stimulation in a comparable manner to fibroblasts. We performed immunofluorescence analysis of components of stable, mature extracellular matrix produced by primary human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells and renal fibroblasts in response to cytokine stimulation. Whilst fibroblasts produced a higher basal level of extracellular matrix components, epithelial cells were able to deposit significant levels of fibronectin, collagen I, III and IV in response to cytokine stimulation. In response to hypoxia, epithelial cells showed an increase in collagen IV deposition but not in response to the acute stress stimuli aristolochic acid or hydrogen peroxide. When epithelial cells were in co-culture with fibroblasts we observed significant increases in the level of matrix deposition which could be reduced by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β blockade. Our results highlight the role of epithelial cells acting as efficient producers of stable extracellular matrix which could contribute to renal tubule thickening in fibrosis.

  5. An immunofluorescence assay for extracellular matrix components highlights the role of epithelial cells in producing a stable, fibrillar extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Omar S; Bon, Hélène; Twomey, Breda; Holdsworth, Gill; Ford, Kirsty; Bergin, Marianne; Huang, Linghong; Muzylak, Mariusz; Healy, Louise J; Hurdowar, Vanessa; Johnson, Timothy S

    2017-10-15

    Activated fibroblasts are considered major drivers of fibrotic disease progression through the production of excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) in response to signals from damaged epithelial and inflammatory cells. Nevertheless, epithelial cells are capable of expressing components of the ECM, cross-linking enzymes that increase its stability and are sensitive to factors involved in the early stages of fibrosis. We therefore wanted to test the hypothesis that epithelial cells can deposit ECM in response to stimulation in a comparable manner to fibroblasts. We performed immunofluorescence analysis of components of stable, mature extracellular matrix produced by primary human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells and renal fibroblasts in response to cytokine stimulation. Whilst fibroblasts produced a higher basal level of extracellular matrix components, epithelial cells were able to deposit significant levels of fibronectin, collagen I, III and IV in response to cytokine stimulation. In response to hypoxia, epithelial cells showed an increase in collagen IV deposition but not in response to the acute stress stimuli aristolochic acid or hydrogen peroxide. When epithelial cells were in co-culture with fibroblasts we observed significant increases in the level of matrix deposition which could be reduced by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) blockade. Our results highlight the role of epithelial cells acting as efficient producers of stable extracellular matrix which could contribute to renal tubule thickening in fibrosis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Control of extracellular matrix assembly by syndecan-2 proteoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klass, C M; Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    2000-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and organization is maintained by transmembrane signaling and integrins play major roles. We now show that a second transmembrane component, syndecan-2 heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is pivotal in matrix assembly. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were stably...... transfected with full length (S2) or truncated syndecan-2 lacking the C-terminal 14 amino acids of the cytoplasmic domain (S2deltaS). No differences in the amount of matrix assembly were noted with S2 cells, but those expressing S2deltaS could not assemble laminin or fibronectin into a fibrillar matrix....... The loss of matrix formation was not caused by a failure to synthesize or externalize ECM components as determined by metabolic labeling or due to differences in surface expression of alpha5 or beta1 integrin. The matrix assembly defect was at the cell surface, since S2deltaS cells also lost the ability...

  7. Accelerated extracellular matrix turnover during exacerbations of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Jannie M B; Knox, Alan J; Lange, Peter

    2015-01-01

    progression. Extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover reflects activity in tissues and consequently assessment of ECM turnover may serve as biomarkers of disease activity. We hypothesized that the turnover of lung ECM proteins were altered during exacerbations of COPD. METHODS: 69 patients with COPD hospitalised...

  8. Extracellular matrix proteins: A positive feedback loop in lung fibrosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer, M.E.; Boeijen, F.R.; Emson, C.L.; Turner, S.M.; Zandieh-Doulabi, B.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Smit, T.H.; Stoop, R.; Everts, V.

    2014-01-01

    Lung fibrosis is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix. This not only affects tissue architecture and function, but it also influences fibroblast behavior and thus disease progression. Here we describe the expression of elastin, type V collagen and tenascin C during the

  9. The Role of Extracellular Matrix Quality in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jacob Hull; Karsdal, Morten Asser; Genovese, Federica

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) quality in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis (PF). In PF, the highly ordered structure of collagens and elastin within the ECM of the lung is severely disrupted and lacks its original tissue quality. Discussions about the ECM have...

  10. In vivo extracellular matrix protein expression by human periodontal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is well known that the orthodontic force applied to teeth generates a series of events that remodel the periodontal ligament (PDL). Extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) are described as molecular regulators of these events. However, the exact contribution of these proteins in human PDL modeling by orthodontic force ...

  11. Regulation of Osteoblast Survival by the Extracellular Matrix and Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus. Ruth K.; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Spaceflight adversely affects the skeleton, posing a substantial risk to astronaut's health during long duration missions. The reduced bone mass observed in growing animals following spaceflight is due at least in part to inadequate bone formation by osteoblasts. Thus, it is of central importance to identify basic cellular mechanisms underlying normal bone formation. The fundamental ideas underlying our research are that interactions between extracellular matrix proteins, integrin adhesion receptors, cytoplasmic signaling and cytoskeletal proteins are key ingredients for the proper functioning of osteoblasts, and that gravity impacts these interactions. As an in vitro model system we used primary fetal rat calvarial cells which faithfully recapitulate osteoblast differentiation characteristically observed in vivo. We showed that specific integrin receptors ((alpha)3(beta)1), ((alpha)5(beta)1), ((alpha)8(betal)1) and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, laminin) were needed for the differentiation of immature osteoblasts. In the course of maturation, cultured osteoblasts switched from depending on fibronectin and laminin for differentiation to depending on these proteins for their very survival. Furthermore, we found that manipulating the gravity vector using ground-based models resulted in activation of key intracellular survival signals generated by integrin/extracellular matrix interactions. We are currently testing the in vivo relevance of some of these observations using targeted transgenic technology. In conclusion, mechanical factors including gravity may participate in regulating survival via cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix. This leads us to speculate that microgravity adversely affects the survival of osteoblasts and contributes to spaceflight-induced osteoporosis.

  12. Think About the Environment: Cellular Reprogramming by the Extracellular Matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huels, David J.; Medema, Jan Paul

    2018-01-01

    In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Yui et al. (2018) show how tissue regeneration is driven by changes in the micro-environment. During intestinal regeneration, the epithelium is reprogrammed into a fetal state by an altered extracellular matrix (ECM), which is dependent on YAP/TAZ activation

  13. Rho GEFs and GAPs: emerging integrators of extracellular matrix signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutys, Matthew L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    Investigating cell migration in 3D settings has revealed that specific extracellular matrix environments require differential activities of the Rho GTPases for efficient migration. However, it is largely unknown how the activities of specific Rho GTPases are modulated to direct cell migration in response to different extracellular matrix cues. We have recently reported that extracellular matrix-dependent regulation of a specific Rho GEF is a fundamental mechanism governing cell migration in different microenvironments, providing a direct mechanism for extracellular matrix-specific regulation of Rho GTPase activity directing cell motility. We discovered that the Rho GEF βPix has a unique function during cell migration in fibrillar collagen environments by restraining RhoA signaling through a conserved signaling axis involving Cdc42 and the Rho GAP srGAP1. In this Commentary, we expand upon this new pathway and discuss potential mechanotransductive and therapeutic applications. Additionally, we speculate on a generalized role for Rho GEFs and GAPs in providing localized, context-dependent responses to the cellular microenvironment during cell migration and other cellular processes.

  14. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Colagiorgi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS’s. In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments.

  15. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colagiorgi, Angelo; Di Ciccio, Pierluigi; Zanardi, Emanuela; Ghidini, Sergio; Ianieri, Adriana

    2016-07-05

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS's). In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM) of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments.

  16. Extracellular matrix changes in human corneas after radial keratotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubimov, A V; Alba, S A; Burgeson, R E; Ninomiya, Y; Sado, Y; Sun, T T; Nesburn, A B; Kenney, M C; Maguen, E

    1998-09-01

    Extracellular matrix and basement membrane alterations were identified in human corneas after radial keratotomy. Ten normal and five radial keratotomy autopsy corneas (two at 6 months post surgery, and three at 3 years post surgery) were studied by immunofluorescence with antibodies to 28 extracellular matrix and basement membrane components. Outside of radial keratotomy scars, all studied components had a normal distribution. Of stromal extracellular matrix, only type III collagen accumulated around the scars. The basement membrane around epithelial plugs had a normal composition except for type IV collagen. Its alpha1-alpha2 chains, normally present only in the limbal basement membrane, appeared around all plugs. alpha3 and alpha4 chains were very weak or absent in these areas, contrary to nonscarred areas. This basement membrane pattern was similar to the normal limbal but not to the central corneal pattern. Keratin 3 also had a limbal-like, suprabasal expression in the plug epithelium. The stroma around the scars accumulated tenascin-C, fibrillin-1, types VIII and XIV collagen, all of which were absent from normal corneal basement membrane and extracellular matrix. Only tenascin-C showed less staining in anterior scars 3 years post surgery than 6 months post surgery, but still persisted in posterior scars. Incomplete scar healing was evident even 3 years post radial keratotomy. It was manifested by the accumulation of abnormal extracellular matrix in the anterior and posterior scars and by the limbal-like pattern of type IV collagen isoforms in the basement membrane around epithelial plugs. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  17. Extracellular matrix alterations in late-onset Fuchs' corneal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Julia M; Zenkel, Matthias; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Bachmann, Bjoern O; Tourtas, Theofilos; Kruse, Friedrich E

    2014-05-15

    To characterize the alterations of extracellular matrix proteins in Descemet's membranes (DM) of patients with late-onset Fuchs' corneal dystrophy (FCD) and to differentiate them from nonspecific alterations in pseudophakic bullous keratopathy (PBK). Human DM-endothelial cell complexes were obtained from patients with late-onset FCD (n = 40), PBK (n = 6), and control eyes (n = 5). Gene expression profiles of endothelial cells were compared using a commercial real-time PCR array and quantitative real-time PCR assays for confirmation of differentially expressed genes. A total of 24 extracellular matrix proteins were also localized in cryosections of corneal specimens from FCD (n = 10), PBK (n = 4), and control eyes (n = 5) by immunohistochemistry. Polymerase chain reaction array analysis revealed a significant upregulation of 27 out of 84 extracellular matrix-related genes including collagens, proteoglycans, glycoproteins, cell adhesion molecules, and matrix metalloproteinases in FCD specimens as compared to normal controls, which could be partly confirmed and quantified by real-time PCR. Comparative analysis of FCD and PBK specimens showed a significant and consistent FCD-specific upregulation of collagen types I, III, and XVI; fibronectin; agrin; clusterin; transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI); and integrin α4 (3- to 18-fold, P matrix alterations in the pathophysiology of FCD. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  18. Specialisation of extracellular matrix for function in tendons and ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Helen L.; Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Rumian, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tendons and ligaments are similar structures in terms of their composition, organisation and mechanical properties. The distinction between them stems from their anatomical location; tendons form a link between muscle and bone while ligaments link bones to bones. A range of overlapping functions can be assigned to tendon and ligaments and each structure has specific mechanical properties which appear to be suited for particular in vivo function. The extracellular matrix in tendon and ligament varies in accordance with function, providing appropriate mechanical properties. The most useful framework in which to consider extracellular matrix differences therefore is that of function rather than anatomical location. In this review we discuss what is known about the relationship between functional requirements, structural properties from molecular to gross level, cellular gene expression and matrix turnover. The relevance of this information is considered by reviewing clinical aspects of tendon and ligament repair and reconstructive procedures. PMID:23885341

  19. LRP4 induces extracellular matrix productions and facilitates chondrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Nobuyuki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-08-22

    Endochondral ossification is an essential step for skeletal development, which requires chondrocyte differentiation in growth cartilage. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), a member of LDLR family, is an inhibitor for Wnt signaling, but its roles in chondrocyte differentiation remain to be investigated. Here we found by laser capture microdissection that LRP4 expression was induced during chondrocyte differentiation in growth plate. In order to address the roles, we overexpressed recombinant human LRP4 or knocked down endogenous LRP4 by lentivirus in mouse ATDC5 chondrocyte cells. We found that LRP4 induced gene expressions of extracellular matrix proteins of type II collagen (Col2a1), aggrecan (Acan), and type X collagen (Col10a1), as well as production of total proteoglycans in ATDC5 cells, whereas LRP4 knockdown had opposite effects. Interestingly, LRP4-knockdown reduced mRNA expression of Sox9, a master regulator for chondrogenesis, as well as Dkk1, an extracellular Wnt inhibitor. Analysis of Wnt signaling revealed that LRP4 blocked the Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity in ATDC5 cells. Finally, the reduction of these extracellular matrix productions by LRP4-knockdown was rescued by a β-catenin/TCF inhibitor, suggesting that LRP4 is an important regulator for extracellular matrix productions and chondrocyte differentiation by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Extracellular Matrix of Candida albicans Biofilms Impairs Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad J Johnson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs in response to planktonic C. albicans. These complexes composed of DNA, histones, and proteins inhibit Candida growth and dissemination. Considering the resilience of Candida biofilms to host defenses, we examined the neutrophil response to C. albicans during biofilm growth. In contrast to planktonic C. albicans, biofilms triggered negligible release of NETs. Time lapse imaging confirmed the impairment in NET release and revealed neutrophils adhering to hyphae and migrating on the biofilm. NET inhibition depended on an intact extracellular biofilm matrix as physical or genetic disruption of this component resulted in NET release. Biofilm inhibition of NETosis could not be overcome by protein kinase C activation via phorbol myristate acetate (PMA and was associated with suppression of neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS production. The degree of impaired NET release correlated with resistance to neutrophil attack. The clinical relevance of the role for extracellular matrix in diminishing NET production was corroborated in vivo using a rat catheter model. The C. albicans pmr1Δ/Δ, defective in production of matrix mannan, appeared to elicit a greater abundance of NETs by scanning electron microscopy imaging, which correlated with a decreased fungal burden. Together, these findings show that C. albicans biofilms impair neutrophil response through an inhibitory pathway induced by the extracellular matrix.

  1. Engineered cell-adhesive nanoparticles nucleate extracellular matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marian; Sharma, Ram I; Penkala, Rebecca; Gentzel, Thomas A; Schwarzbauer, Jean E; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2007-03-01

    Tissue engineering aims to regenerate new biological tissue for replacing diseased or injured tissues. We propose a new approach to accelerate the deposition of cell-secreted matrix proteins into extracellular matrix fibrils. We examined whether dynamic substrates with nanoscale ligand features allowing for alpha5beta1 integrin recruiting, cellular tension generation, and alpha5beta1 integrin mobility would enhance fibronectin matrix assembly in a ligand model system that is routinely not sufficient for its induction. To this end, we developed biodynamic substrates consisting of cell adhesive fragment from the 9th and 10th type repeats of fibronectin (FNf ) functionalized to 100 nm prefabricated albumin nanoparticles (ANPs). FNf-ANPs modulated cellular spreading processes, promoting the development of stellate or dendritic morphologies. Concomitant with the spreading, FNf-ANPs rapidly recruited beta1 integrins to focal contacts and promoted the migration of beta1 integrins centripetally from the cell periphery toward the center. FNf-ANPs stimulated the deposition of secreted fibronectin into matrix fibrils; FNf, the key ligand alone, was not sufficient for fibronectin fibrillogenesis. When FNf-ANPs were displayed from "immobilized" substrates, abolishing any mobility of ligated beta1 integrins, fibronectin matrix assembly was abrogated, implicating the role of dynamic matrix display on matrix assembly. Receptor ligation of FNf-ANPs via noncontractile adhesions was not sufficient to stimulate fibrillogenesis, and Rho-kinase inhibitors abolished fibronectin matrix deposition. Our approach highlights the possibility of engineering integrin-based extracellular matrix assembly using nanotechnology, which may have implications for improved biomaterials for wound repair and basic understanding of matrix remodeling within pathogenesis and biomedicine.

  2. The Extracellular Matrix Regulates Granuloma Necrosis in Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shammari, Basim; Shiomi, Takayuki; Tezera, Liku; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Workman, Victoria; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Mauri, Francesco; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Robertson, Brian D; D'Armiento, Jeanine; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2015-08-01

    A central tenet of tuberculosis pathogenesis is that caseous necrosis leads to extracellular matrix destruction and bacterial transmission. We reconsider the underlying mechanism of tuberculosis pathology and demonstrate that collagen destruction may be a critical initial event, causing caseous necrosis as opposed to resulting from it. In human tuberculosis granulomas, regions of extracellular matrix destruction map to areas of caseous necrosis. In mice, transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase 1 causes caseous necrosis, the pathological hallmark of human tuberculosis. Collagen destruction is the principal pathological difference between humanised mice and wild-type mice with tuberculosis, whereas the release of proinflammatory cytokines does not differ, demonstrating that collagen breakdown may lead to cell death and caseation. To investigate this hypothesis, we developed a 3-dimensional cell culture model of tuberculosis granuloma formation, using bioelectrospray technology. Collagen improved survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells analyzed on the basis of a lactate dehydrogenase release assay, propidium iodide staining, and measurement of the total number of viable cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that collagen destruction is an initial event in tuberculosis immunopathology, leading to caseous necrosis and compromising the immune response, revealing a previously unappreciated role for the extracellular matrix in regulating the host-pathogen interaction. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The extracellular matrix in myocardial injury, repair, and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2017-05-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) not only provides mechanical support, but also transduces essential molecular signals in health and disease. Following myocardial infarction, dynamic ECM changes drive inflammation and repair. Early generation of bioactive matrix fragments activates proinflammatory signaling. The formation of a highly plastic provisional matrix facilitates leukocyte infiltration and activates infarct myofibroblasts. Deposition of matricellular proteins modulates growth factor signaling and contributes to the spatial and temporal regulation of the reparative response. Mechanical stress due to pressure and volume overload and metabolic dysfunction also induce profound changes in ECM composition that contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure. This manuscript reviews the role of the ECM in cardiac repair and remodeling and discusses matrix-based therapies that may attenuate remodeling while promoting repair and regeneration.

  4. Extracellular vesicles are integral and functional components of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilla, Kirsi; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Arasu, Uma Thanigai; Härkönen, Kai; Matilainen, Johanna; Nieminen, Petteri

    2017-10-21

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are small plasma membrane-derived particles released into the extracellular space by virtually all cell types. Recently, EV have received increased interest because of their capability to carry nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and signaling molecules and to transfer their cargo into the target cells. Less attention has been paid to their role in modifying the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM), either directly or indirectly via regulating the ability of target cells to synthesize or degrade matrix molecules. Based on recent results, EV can be considered one of the structural and functional components of the ECM that participate in matrix organization, regulation of cells within it, and in determining the physical properties of soft connective tissues, bone, cartilage and dentin. This review addresses the relevance of EV as specific modulators of the ECM, such as during the assembly and disassembly of the molecular network, signaling through the ECM and formation of niches suitable for tissue regeneration, inflammation and tumor progression. Finally, we assess the potential of these aspects of EV biology to translational medicine. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. DMPD: Fragments of extracellular matrix as mediators of inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18243041 Fragments of extracellular matrix as mediators of inflammation. Adair-Kirk...l) Show Fragments of extracellular matrix as mediators of inflammation. PubmedID 18243041 Title Fragments of... extracellular matrix as mediators of inflammation. Authors Adair-Kirk TL, Senior

  6. Interaction of chondrocytes, extracellular matrix and growth factors: relevance for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, P.M. van der; Buma, P.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Berg, W.B. van den

    2002-01-01

    The abundant extracellular matrix of articular cartilage has to be maintained by a limited number of chondrocytes. Vice versa, the extracellular matrix has an important role in the regulation of chondrocyte function. OBJECTIVE: In this review we discuss the role of the extracellular matrix in the

  7. How best to preserve and reveal the structural intricacies of cartilaginous tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Hunziker, Ernst B.; Lippuner, Kurt; Shintani, Nahoko

    2014-01-01

    No single processing technique is capable of optimally preserving each and all of the structural entities of cartilaginous tissue. Hence, the choice of methodology must necessarily be governed by the nature of the component that is targeted for analysis, for example, fibrillar collagens or proteoglycans within the extracellular matrix, or the chondrocytes themselves. This article affords an insight into the pitfalls that are to be encountered when implementing the available techniques and how...

  8. Fibronectin Deposition Participates in Extracellular Matrix Assembly and Vascular Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hielscher, Abigail; Ellis, Kim; Qiu, Connie; Porterfield, Josh; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) has been demonstrated to facilitate angiogenesis. In particular, fibronectin has been documented to activate endothelial cells, resulting in their transition from a quiescent state to an active state in which the cells exhibit enhanced migration and proliferation. The goal of this study is to examine the role of polymerized fibronectin during vascular tubulogenesis using a 3 dimensional (3D) cell-derived de-cellularized matrix. A fibronectin-rich 3D de-cellularized ECM was used as a scaffold to study vascular morphogenesis of endothelial cells (ECs). Confocal analyses of several matrix proteins reveal high intra- and extra-cellular deposition of fibronectin in formed vascular structures. Using a small peptide inhibitor of fibronectin polymerization, we demonstrate that inhibition of fibronectin fibrillogenesis in ECs cultured atop de-cellularized ECM resulted in decreased vascular morphogenesis. Further, immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses reveal decreased expression of stromal matrix proteins in the absence of polymerized fibronectin with high co-localization of matrix proteins found in association with polymerized fibronectin. Evaluating vascular kinetics, live cell imaging showed that migration, migration velocity, and mean square displacement, are disrupted in structures grown in the absence of polymerized fibronectin. Additionally, vascular organization failed to occur in the absence of a polymerized fibronectin matrix. Consistent with these observations, we tested vascular morphogenesis following the disruption of EC adhesion to polymerized fibronectin, demonstrating that block of integrins α5β1 and αvβ3, abrogated vascular morphogenesis. Overall, fibronectin deposition in a 3D cell-derived de-cellularized ECM appears to be imperative for matrix assembly and vascular morphogenesis. PMID:26811931

  9. Intestinal Stem Cell Niche: The Extracellular Matrix and Cellular Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laween Meran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium comprises a monolayer of polarised columnar cells organised along the crypt-villus axis. Intestinal stem cells reside at the base of crypts and are constantly nourished by their surrounding niche for maintenance, self-renewal, and differentiation. The cellular microenvironment including the adjacent Paneth cells, stromal cells, smooth muscle cells, and neural cells as well as the extracellular matrix together constitute the intestinal stem cell niche. A dynamic regulatory network exists among the epithelium, stromal cells, and the matrix via complex signal transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. Dysregulation of these biological or mechanical signals could potentially lead to intestinal injury and disease. In this review, we discuss the role of different intestinal stem cell niche components and dissect the interaction between dynamic matrix factors and regulatory signalling during intestinal stem cell homeostasis.

  10. Incorporation of Tenascin-C into the Extracellular Matrix by Periostin Underlies an Extracellular Meshwork Architecture*

    OpenAIRE

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C...

  11. Association of Bordetella dermonecrotic toxin with the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Kamitani, Shigeki; Miyake, Masami; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2010-09-25

    Bordetella dermonecrotic toxin (DNT) causes the turbinate atrophy in swine atrophic rhinitis, caused by a Bordetella bronchiseptica infection of pigs, by inhibiting osteoblastic differentiation. The toxin is not actively secreted from the bacteria, and is presumed to be present in only small amounts in infected areas. How such small amounts can affect target tissues is unknown. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that DNT associated with a fibrillar structure developed on cultured cells. A cellular component cross-linked with DNT conjugated with a cross-linker was identified as fibronectin by mass spectrometry. Colocalization of the fibronectin network on the cells with DNT was also observed by fluorescence microscope. Several lines of evidence suggested that DNT interacts with fibronectin not directly, but through another cellular component that remains to be identified. The colocalization was observed in not only DNT-sensitive cells but also insensitive cells, indicating that the fibronectin network neither serves as a receptor for the toxin nor is involved in the intoxicating procedures. The fibronectin network-associated toxin was easily liberated when the concentration of toxin in the local environment decreased, and was still active. Components in the extracellular matrix are known to regulate activities of various growth factors by binding and liberating them in response to alterations in the extracellular environment. Similarly, the fibronectin-based extracellular matrix may function as a temporary storage system for DNT, enabling small amounts of the toxin to efficiently affect target tissues or cells.

  12. Association of Bordetella dermonecrotic toxin with the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyake Masami

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bordetella dermonecrotic toxin (DNT causes the turbinate atrophy in swine atrophic rhinitis, caused by a Bordetella bronchiseptica infection of pigs, by inhibiting osteoblastic differentiation. The toxin is not actively secreted from the bacteria, and is presumed to be present in only small amounts in infected areas. How such small amounts can affect target tissues is unknown. Results Fluorescence microscopy revealed that DNT associated with a fibrillar structure developed on cultured cells. A cellular component cross-linked with DNT conjugated with a cross-linker was identified as fibronectin by mass spectrometry. Colocalization of the fibronectin network on the cells with DNT was also observed by fluorescence microscope. Several lines of evidence suggested that DNT interacts with fibronectin not directly, but through another cellular component that remains to be identified. The colocalization was observed in not only DNT-sensitive cells but also insensitive cells, indicating that the fibronectin network neither serves as a receptor for the toxin nor is involved in the intoxicating procedures. The fibronectin network-associated toxin was easily liberated when the concentration of toxin in the local environment decreased, and was still active. Conclusions Components in the extracellular matrix are known to regulate activities of various growth factors by binding and liberating them in response to alterations in the extracellular environment. Similarly, the fibronectin-based extracellular matrix may function as a temporary storage system for DNT, enabling small amounts of the toxin to efficiently affect target tissues or cells.

  13. Fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix in right ventricular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2017-10-01

    Right ventricular failure predicts adverse outcome in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH), and in subjects with left ventricular heart failure and is associated with interstitial fibrosis. This review manuscript discusses the cellular effectors and molecular mechanisms implicated in right ventricular fibrosis. The right ventricular interstitium contains vascular cells, fibroblasts, and immune cells, enmeshed in a collagen-based matrix. Right ventricular pressure overload in PH is associated with the expansion of the fibroblast population, myofibroblast activation, and secretion of extracellular matrix proteins. Mechanosensitive transduction of adrenergic signalling and stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone cascade trigger the activation of right ventricular fibroblasts. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines may contribute to expansion and activation of macrophages that may serve as a source of fibrogenic growth factors, such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Endothelin-1, TGF-βs, and matricellular proteins co-operate to activate cardiac myofibroblasts, and promote synthesis of matrix proteins. In comparison with the left ventricle, the RV tolerates well volume overload and ischemia; whether the right ventricular interstitial cells and matrix are implicated in these favourable responses remains unknown. Expansion of fibroblasts and extracellular matrix protein deposition are prominent features of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies and may be implicated in the pathogenesis of arrhythmic events. Prevailing conceptual paradigms on right ventricular remodelling are based on extrapolation of findings in models of left ventricular injury. Considering the unique embryologic, morphological, and physiologic properties of the RV and the clinical significance of right ventricular failure, there is a need further to dissect RV-specific mechanisms of fibrosis and interstitial remodelling. Published on behalf of the European Society of

  14. Biglycan fragmentation in pathologies associated with extracellular matrix remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genovese, Federica; Barascuk, Natasha; Larsen, Lise Skakkebæk

    2013-01-01

    The proteoglycan biglycan (BGN) is involved in collagen fibril assembly and its fragmentation is likely to be associated with collagen turnover during the pathogenesis of diseases which involve dysregulated extracellular matrix remodeling (ECMR), such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and liver fibrosis...

  15. Extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal dynamics during branching morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Young; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2012-01-01

    Branching morphogenesis is a fundamental developmental process which results in amplification of epithelial surface area for exchanging molecules in organs including the lung, kidney, mammary gland and salivary gland. These complex tree-like structures are built by iterative rounds of simple routines of epithelial morphogenesis, including bud formation, extension, and bifurcation, that require constant remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cytoskeleton. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the role of the ECM and cytoskeletal dynamics in branching morphogenesis across these different organs. The cellular and molecular mechanisms shared during this morphogenetic process provide insight into the development of other branching organs. PMID:22609561

  16. Endothelial cell contraction increases Candida adherence to exposed extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, S A; Maca, R D

    1988-01-01

    Bovine vascular endothelial cells treated with EDTA, urea, or thrombin underwent a marked, reversible contraction resulting in exposure of the subendothelial extracellular matrix (ECM). Candida yeasts adhered more to contracted monolayers than to confluent monolayers (P less than 0.01) by preferentially adhering to the ECM. Two strains of Candida albicans and one strain of Candida tropicalis bound avidly to exposed ECM, but Pseudomonas aeruginosa did not. However, treatment of endothelium with forskolin, which induces cell shape changes without exposure of the ECM, did not cause an increase in adherence. Images PMID:3137171

  17. Repair of articular cartilage defects by tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with adipose-derived stem cells and acellular cartilaginous matrix in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z J; An, R Z; Zhao, J Y; Zhang, Q; Yang, J; Wang, J B; Wen, G Y; Yuan, X H; Qi, X W; Li, S J; Ye, X C

    2014-06-18

    After injury, inflammation, or degeneration, articular cartilage has limited self-repair ability. We aimed to explore the feasibility of repair of articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineered cartilage constructed by acellular cartilage matrices (ACMs) seeded with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). The ADSCs were isolated from 3-month-old New Zealand albino rabbit by using collagenase and cultured and amplified in vitro. Fresh cartilage isolated from adult New Zealand albino rabbit were freeze-dried for 12 h and treated with Triton X-100, DNase, and RNase to obtain ACMs. ADSCs were seeded in the acellular cartilaginous matrix at 2x10(7)/mL, and cultured in chondrogenic differentiation medium for 2 weeks to construct tissue-engineered cartilage. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, and C groups. Engineered cartilage was transplanted into cartilage defect position of rabbits in group A, group B obtained ACMs, and group C did not receive any transplants. The rabbits were sacrificed in week 12. The restored tissue was evaluated using macroscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the tissue-engineered cartilage group (group A), articular cartilage defects of the rabbits were filled with chondrocyte-like tissue with smooth surface. Immunohistochemistry showed type II-collagen expression and Alcian blue staining was positive. TEM showed chondrocytes in the recesses, with plenty of secretary matrix particles. In the scaffold group (group B), the defect was filled with fibrous tissue. No repaired tissue was found in the blank group (group C). Tissue-engineered cartilage using ACM seeded with ADSCs can help repair articular cartilage defects in rabbits.

  18. Extracellular matrix and its receptors in Drosophila neural development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadie, Kendal; Baumgartner, Stefan; Prokop, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) and matrix receptors are intimately involved in most biological processes. The ECM plays fundamental developmental and physiological roles in health and disease, including processes underlying the development, maintenance and regeneration of the nervous system. To understand the principles of ECM-mediated functions in the nervous system, genetic model organisms like Drosophila provide simple, malleable and powerful experimental platforms. This article provides an overview of ECM proteins and receptors in Drosophila. It then focuses on their roles during three progressive phases of neural development: 1) neural progenitor proliferation, 2) axonal growth and pathfinding and 3) synapse formation and function. Each section highlights known ECM and ECM-receptor components and recent studies done in mutant conditions to reveal their in vivo functions, all illustrating the enormous opportunities provided when merging work on the nervous system with systematic research into ECM-related gene functions. PMID:21688401

  19. The Extracellular Matrix In Development and Morphogenesis: A Dynamic View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozario, Tania; DeSimone, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is synthesized and secreted by embryonic cells beginning at the earliest stages of development. Our understanding of ECM composition, structure and function has grown considerably in the last several decades and this knowledge has revealed that the extracellular microenvironment is critically important for cell growth, survival, differentiation and morphogenesis. ECM and the cellular receptors that interact with it mediate both physical linkages with the cytoskeleton and the bidirectional flow of information between the extracellular and intracellular compartments. This review considers the range of cell and tissue functions attributed to ECM molecules and summarizes recent findings specific to key developmental processes. The importance of ECM as a dynamic repository for growth factors is highlighted along with more recent studies implicating the 3-dimensional organization and physical properties of the ECM as it relates to cell signaling and the regulation of morphogenetic cell behaviors. Embryonic cell and tissue generated forces and mechanical signals arising from ECM adhesion represent emerging areas of interest in this field. PMID:19854168

  20. Regulation of pituitary hormones and cell proliferation by components of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Paez-Pereda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix is a three-dimensional network of proteins, glycosaminoglycans and other macromolecules. It has a structural support function as well as a role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The extracellular matrix conveys signals through membrane receptors called integrins and plays an important role in pituitary physiology and tumorigenesis. There is a differential expression of extracellular matrix components and integrins during the pituitary development in the embryo and during tumorigenesis in the adult. Different extracellular matrix components regulate adrenocorticotropin at the level of the proopiomelanocortin gene transcription. The extracellular matrix also controls the proliferation of adrenocorticotropin-secreting tumor cells. On the other hand, laminin regulates the production of prolactin. Laminin has a dynamic pattern of expression during prolactinoma development with lower levels in the early pituitary hyperplasia and a strong reduction in fully grown prolactinomas. Therefore, the expression of extracellular matrix components plays a role in pituitary tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the remodeling of the extracellular matrix affects pituitary cell proliferation. Matrix metalloproteinase activity is very high in all types of human pituitary adenomas. Matrix metalloproteinase secreted by pituitary cells can release growth factors from the extracellular matrix that, in turn, control pituitary cell proliferation and hormone secretion. In summary, the differential expression of extracellular matrix components, integrins and matrix metalloproteinase contributes to the control of pituitary hormone production and cell proliferation during tumorigenesis.

  1. Cartilage extracellular matrix as a biomaterial for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyotake, Emi A; Beck, Emily C; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of various tissues possesses the model characteristics that biomaterials for tissue engineering strive to mimic; however, owing to the intricate hierarchical nature of the ECM, it has yet to be fully characterized and synthetically fabricated. Cartilage repair remains a challenge because the intrinsic properties that enable its durability and long-lasting function also impede regeneration. In the last decade, cartilage ECM has emerged as a promising biomaterial for regenerating cartilage, partly because of its potentially chondroinductive nature. As this research area of cartilage matrix-based biomaterials emerged, investigators facing similar challenges consequently developed convergent solutions in constructing robust and bioactive scaffolds. This review discusses the challenges, emerging trends, and future directions of cartilage ECM scaffolds, including a comparison between two different forms of cartilage matrix: decellularized cartilage (DCC) and devitalized cartilage (DVC). To overcome the low permeability of cartilage matrix, physical fragmentation greatly enhances decellularization, although the process itself may reduce the chondroinductivity of fabricated scaffolds. The less complex processing of a scaffold composed of DVC, which has not been decellularized, appears to have translational advantages and potential chondroinductive and mechanical advantages over DCC, without detrimental immunogenicity, to ultimately enhance cartilage repair in a clinically relevant way. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Extracellular matrix hydrogels from decellularized tissues: Structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin, Lindsey T; Cramer, Madeline C; Velankar, Sachin S; White, Lisa J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) bioscaffolds prepared from decellularized tissues have been used to facilitate constructive and functional tissue remodeling in a variety of clinical applications. The discovery that these ECM materials could be solubilized and subsequently manipulated to form hydrogels expanded their potential in vitro and in vivo utility; i.e. as culture substrates comparable to collagen or Matrigel, and as injectable materials that fill irregularly-shaped defects. The mechanisms by which ECM hydrogels direct cell behavior and influence remodeling outcomes are only partially understood, but likely include structural and biological signals retained from the native source tissue. The present review describes the utility, formation, and physical and biological characterization of ECM hydrogels. Two examples of clinical application are presented to demonstrate in vivo utility of ECM hydrogels in different organ systems. Finally, new research directions and clinical translation of ECM hydrogels are discussed. More than 70 papers have been published on extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels created from source tissue in almost every organ system. The present manuscript represents a review of ECM hydrogels and attempts to identify structure-function relationships that influence the tissue remodeling outcomes and gaps in the understanding thereof. There is a Phase 1 clinical trial now in progress for an ECM hydrogel. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Changes of extracellular matrix of the cornea in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, A; Wegscheider, K; Wiegand, W

    2009-10-01

    Differences in corneal viscoelasticity due to diabetes have been reported to have a protective effect on the progression of glaucoma and the development and progression of keratoconus. Due to longterm changes of tissue in diabetes mellitus, biomechanical changes of the cornea because of glycation and modified extracellular matrix may be detectable. The purpose of the study was to determine whether there is a difference in corneal biomechanical properties, characterized by corneal hysteresis (CH) and central corneal thickness (CCT), between diabetic and normal subjects, and relate these to the duration of diabetes. In a cross sectional study, a group of 484 eyes including 99 eyes of diabetic individuals was evaluated. CH as measured with the Ocular Response Analyzer, CCT (Orbscan II), Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) and slit-lamp examination were obtained from each patient. Linear mixed models were applied for statistical evaluation. CH showed a significant decrease with age (-0.036 mmHg/year, p age, IOP and CCT). This was not related to the duration of diabetes (mean 12.6 +/- 9.0y, p = 0.522). CCT did not differ with regard to diabetes. Intraclass correlation coefficients were 81% and 50% for CCT and CH respectively. CH is assumed to be an indicator for acquired changes of tissue such as diabetes-mediated. CCT is a more characteristic parameter for the individual patient. CH may provide more information about changes of the extracellular matrix in diabetes, and therefore offer a new monitoring parameter.

  4. Mifepristone inhibits extracellular matrix formation in uterine leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amrita; Malik, Minnie; Britten, Joy; Cox, Jeris; Catherino, William H

    2016-04-01

    To characterize the efficacy of mifepristone treatment on extracellular matrix (ECM) production in leiomyomas. Laboratory study. University research laboratory. None. Treatment of human immortalized two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) leiomyoma and myometrial cells with mifepristone and the progestin promegestone (R5020). Expression of COL1A1, fibronectin, versican variant V0, and dermatopontin in treated leiomyoma cells by Western blot analysis and confirmatory immunohistochemistry staining of treated 3D cultures. Treatment with progestin stimulated production of COL1A1, fibronectin, versican, and dermatopontin. Mifepristone treatment inhibited protein production of these genes, most notably with versican expression. Combination treatment with both the agonist and antagonist further inhibited protein expression of these genes. Immunohistochemistry performed on 3D cultures demonstrated generalized inhibition of ECM protein concentration. Our study demonstrated that the progesterone agonist R5020 directly stimulated extracellular matrix components COL1A1, fibronectin, versican, and dermatopontin production in human leiomyoma cells. Progesterone antagonist mifepristone decreased protein production of these genes to levels comparable with untreated leiomyoma cells. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Niche Extracellular Matrix Components and Their Influence on HSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Mélanie J; Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y; Cao, Benjamin; Nilsson, Susan K

    2017-08-01

    Maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) takes place in a highly specialized microenvironment within the bone marrow. Technological improvements, especially in the field of in vivo imaging, have helped unravel the complexity of the niche microenvironment and have completely changed the classical concept from what was previously believed to be a static supportive platform, to a dynamic microenvironment tightly regulating HSC homeostasis through the complex interplay between diverse cell types, secreted factors, extracellular matrix molecules, and the expression of different transmembrane receptors. To add to the complexity, non-protein based metabolites have also been recognized as a component of the bone marrow niche. The objective of this review is to discuss the current understanding on how the different extracellular matrix components of the niche regulate HSC fate, both during embryonic development and in adulthood. Special attention will be provided to the description of non-protein metabolites, such as lipids and metal ions, which contribute to the regulation of HSC behavior. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1984-1993, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Extracellular matrix adaptation of tendon and skeletal muscle to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, Peter; Krogsgaard, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues enables linking to other tissues, and plays a key role in force transmission and tissue structure maintenance in tendons, ligaments, bone and muscle. ECM turnover is influenced by physical activity, and both collagen synthesis and metalloprotea...... is supported by findings of gender-related differences in the activation of collagen synthesis with exercise. These findings may provide the basis for understanding tissue overloading and injury in both tendons and skeletal muscle.......The extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues enables linking to other tissues, and plays a key role in force transmission and tissue structure maintenance in tendons, ligaments, bone and muscle. ECM turnover is influenced by physical activity, and both collagen synthesis and metalloprotease...... is regulated by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-mediated pathways, and glucose uptake is regulated by specific pathways in tendons that differ from those in skeletal muscle. Chronic loading in the form of physical training leads both to increased collagen turnover as well as to some degree of net collagen synthesis...

  7. Can microcarrier-expanded chondrocytes synthesize cartilaginous tissue in vitro?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surrao, Denver C; Khan, Aasma A; McGregor, Aaron J; Amsden, Brian G; Waldman, Stephen D

    2011-08-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising approach for articular cartilage repair; however, it is challenging to produce adequate amounts of tissue in vitro from the limited number of cells that can be extracted from an individual. Relatively few cell expansion methods exist without the problems of de-differentiation and/or loss of potency. Recently, however, several studies have noted the benefits of three-dimensional (3D) over monolayer expansion, but the ability of 3D expanded chondrocytes to synthesize cartilaginous tissue constructs has not been demonstrated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the properties of engineered cartilage constructs from expanded cells (monolayer and 3D microcarriers) to those developed from primary chondrocytes. Isolated bovine chondrocytes were grown for 3 weeks in either monolayer (T-Flasks) or 3D microcarrier (Cytodex 3) expansion culture. Expanded and isolated primary cells were then seeded in high density culture on Millicell™ filters for 4 weeks to evaluate the ability to synthesize cartilaginous tissue. While microcarrier expansion was twice as effective as monolayer expansion (microcarrier: 110-fold increase, monolayer: 52-fold increase), the expanded cells (monolayer and 3D microcarrier) were not effectively able to synthesize cartilaginous tissue in vitro. Tissues developed from primary cells were substantially thicker and accumulated significantly more extracellular matrix (proteoglycan content: 156%-292% increase; collagen content: 70%-191% increase). These results were attributed to phenotypic changes experienced during the expansion phase. Monolayer expanded chondrocytes lost their native morphology within 1 week, whereas microcarrier-expanded cells were spreading by 3 weeks of expansion. While the use of 3D microcarriers can lead to large cellular yields, preservation of chondrogenic phenotype during expansion is required in order to synthesize cartilaginous tissue.

  8. Extracellular matrix of the bovine ovarian membrana granulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, R J; Irving Rodgers, H F

    2002-05-31

    Much is known about the control of the development of ovarian follicles by growth factors and hormones. The study of extracellular matrix in the ovary, though, is a relatively new area. To date much research has focused on identifying the matrix components present, and more recently, its production and the physiological roles. In this review we focus on the changes that occur in the follicular basal lamina from primordial follicles through to ovulation and formation of the corpus luteum, the changes that occur during follicular atresia, and we discuss our observations of a novel matrix which forms in the membrana granulosa. The follicular basal lamina changes considerably during follicular development in its expression pattern of type IV collagens. Of the laminin chains examined, there appears only to be an increase in amount, except for laminin alpha2. It is expressed only in a small proportion of healthy antral follicles and in the majority of atretic antral follicles. Call-Exner bodies have the same composition as the basal lamina, except they do not contain laminin alpha2, even when the follicular basal lamina does. The novel matrix that develops within the membrana granulosa is similar in composition to Call-Exner bodies which occur predominantly in preantral follicles, except that it is far more common in large antral follicles, does not induce polarization of the surrounding granulosa cells, and does not contain follicular fluid-like material as the Call-Exner bodies of some species do. The expression of this matrix occurs prior to and during the time when granulosa cells express steroidogenic enzymes. It does not exist in corpora lutea. In addition large luteal cells, derived from granulosa cells, do not appear to have a basal lamina. These findings suggest that the maturational changes in the membrana granulosa are accompanied by changes in the matrix.

  9. [Age-related dynamics of the main extracellular matrix components in residents of the Russian Arctic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, L B; Belisheva, N K; Putyatina, A N; Russkih, G S; Kozhin, P M; Tsypysheva, O B

    2017-01-01

    The main extracellular matrix components in Arctic residents were studied. Northerners had increased levels of total glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronan, and collagen IV in plasma and both general and peptide-bound hydroxyproline in urine, which indicates an accelerated metabolism of the main extracellular matrix components compared with comparison group (residents of Siberia). Age-related remodeling of extracellular matrix in northerners manifested in changing ratio and quantity of its main components. Levels of total glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronan, fibronectin, hydroxyproline and its fractions increased with age while the level of collagen IV changed insignificantly. Average positive correlation between extracellular matrix components and biological aging indicators is suggestive of relationship between these two processes: aging - which is accelerated in the Arctic and pathological remodeling of extracellular matrix as it is associated with accelerated aging. Changes in local regulation system including those related to matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors may be one of the reasons for pathological remodeling of extracellular matrix.

  10. Biochemical and biomechanical properties of the pacemaking sinoatrial node extracellular matrix are distinct from contractile left ventricular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Jessica M; Herren, Anthony W; Yechikov, Sergey; Kao, Hillary K J; Khan, Ambereen; Phinney, Brett S; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Chan, James W; Lieu, Deborah K

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular matrix plays a role in differentiation and phenotype development of its resident cells. Although cardiac extracellular matrix from the contractile tissues has been studied and utilized in tissue engineering, extracellular matrix properties of the pacemaking sinoatrial node are largely unknown. In this study, the biomechanical properties and biochemical composition and distribution of extracellular matrix in the sinoatrial node were investigated relative to the left ventricle. Extracellular matrix of the sinoatrial node was found to be overall stiffer than that of the left ventricle and highly heterogeneous with interstitial regions composed of predominantly fibrillar collagens and rich in elastin. The extracellular matrix protein distribution suggests that resident pacemaking cardiomyocytes are enclosed in fibrillar collagens that can withstand greater tensile strength while the surrounding elastin-rich regions may undergo deformation to reduce the mechanical strain in these cells. Moreover, basement membrane-associated adhesion proteins that are ligands for integrins were of low abundance in the sinoatrial node, which may decrease force transduction in the pacemaking cardiomyocytes. In contrast to extracellular matrix of the left ventricle, extracellular matrix of the sinoatrial node may reduce mechanical strain and force transduction in pacemaking cardiomyocytes. These findings provide the criteria for a suitable matrix scaffold for engineering biopacemakers.

  11. Cartilaginous features in matrix-producing carcinoma of the breast: four cases report with histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusafuka, Kimihide; Muramatsu, Koji; Kasami, Masako; Kuriki, Ken; Hirobe, Kumiko; Hayashi, Isamu; Watanabe, Hideto; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa; Mochizuki, Toru; Kameya, Toru

    2008-10-01

    Matrix-producing carcinoma of the breast is a well-established entity in the group of metaplastic carcinoma, which is histologically characterized by myxochondroid matrix formation and is extremely rare. We describe here four additional cases of matrix-producing carcinoma of the breast. All cases of matrix-producing carcinoma show nest-like, sheet-like, and cord-like growth of tumor cells with cellular atypia, in addition to scattered cancer cells within myxoid or myxohyalinous stroma. Three of four cases showed an acellular or oligocellular matrix-rich zone in the center of the tumor. Immunohistochemically, cancer cells of all cases were positive for cytokeratins and epithelial membrane antigens and partially positive for sox9 and p63. Aggrecan and type II collagen, which are cartilage-specific matrix molecules, were deposited in the stroma of all cases. Type I and type IV collagens were also deposited on the stroma of all cases. These findings suggest that, although cancer cells of matrix-producing carcinoma of the breast are epithelial, they transdifferentiate to chondrocyte-like cells and produce cartilage-specific matrix molecules, which are useful markers for diagnosing matrix-producing carcinoma.

  12. Extracellular Alix regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesions and extracellular matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shujuan; Wang, Ruoning; Zhou, Xi; Corvera, Joe; Kloc, Malgorzata; Sifers, Richard; Gallick, Gary E; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2008-08-06

    Alix (ALG-2-interacting protein X), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein involved in endosomal sorting and actin cytoskeleton assembly, is required for the maintenance of fibroblast morphology. As Alix has sequence similarity to adhesin in Entamoeba histolytica, and we observed that Alix is secreted, we determined whether extracellular Alix affects fibroblast morphology. Here, we demonstrate that secreted Alix is deposited on the substratum of non-immortalized WI38 fibroblasts. Antibody binding to extracellular Alix retards WI38 cell adhesion and spreading on fibronectin and vitronectin. Alix knockdown in WI38 cells reduces spreading and fibronectin assembly, and the effect is partially complemented by coating recombinant Alix on the cell substratum. Immortalized NIH/3T3 fibroblasts deposit less Alix on the substratum and have defects in alpha5beta1-integrin functions. Coating recombinant Alix on the culture substratum for NIH/3T3 cells promotes alpha5beta1-integrin-mediated cell adhesions and fibronectin assembly, and these effects require the aa 605-709 region of Alix. These findings demonstrate that a sub-population of Alix localizes extracellularly and regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesions and fibronectin matrix assembly.

  13. Clara cell adhesion and migration to extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    deMello Daphne

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clara cells are the epithelial progenitor cell of the small airways, a location known to be important in many lung disorders. Although migration of alveolar type II and bronchiolar ciliated epithelial cells has been examined, the migratory response of Clara cells has received little attention. Methods Using a modification of existing procedures for Clara cell isolation, we examined mouse Clara cells and a mouse Clara-like cell line (C22 for adhesion to and migration toward matrix substrate gradients, to establish the nature and integrin dependence of migration in Clara cells. Results We observed that Clara cells adhere preferentially to fibronectin (Fn and type I collagen (Col I similar to previous reports. Migration of Clara cells can be directed by a fixed gradient of matrix substrates (haptotaxis. Migration of the C22 cell line was similar to the Clara cells so integrin dependence of migration was evaluated with this cell line. As determined by competition with an RGD containing-peptide, migration of C22 cells toward Fn and laminin (Lm 511 (formerly laminin 10 was significantly RGD integrin dependent, but migration toward Col I was RGD integrin independent, suggesting that Clara cells utilize different receptors for these different matrices. Conclusion Thus, Clara cells resemble alveolar type II and bronchiolar ciliated epithelial cells by showing integrin mediated pro-migratory changes to extracellular matrix components that are present in tissues after injury.

  14. The Role of Stromal Myofibroblast and Extracellular Matrix in Tumor Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vong, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis, the building of blood vessels in an expanding tumor mass, is an elegantly coordinated process that dictates tumor growth and progression. Stromal components of the tumor microenvironment, such as myofibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, collaborate with tumor cells in regulating development. Such myofibroblasts and the extracellular matrix have ever-expanding roles in the angiogenic process as well. This review summarizes how stromal myofibroblasts and the extracellular matrix can modulate tumor angiogenesis, highlighting recent findings. PMID:22866205

  15. Enhanced assay of endothelial exocytosis using extracellular matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoMonaco, Michael B; Lowenstein, Charles J

    2014-05-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The first step in vascular inflammation is endothelial exocytosis, in which endothelial granules fuse with the plasma membrane, releasing prothrombotic and proinflammatory messenger molecules. The development of cell culture models to study endothelial exocytosis has been challenging because the factors that modulate exocytosis in vitro are not well understood. Here we report a method for studying endothelial exocytosis that optimizes extracellular matrix components, cell density, and duration of culture. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells plated on collagen I-coated plates and cultured in the confluent state for 7-12 days in low-serum medium showed robust secretion of von Willebrand factor when stimulated with various agonists. This exocytosis assay is rapid and applicable to high-throughput screening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Insight On Colorectal Carcinoma Infiltration by Studying Perilesional Extracellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebuloni, Manuela; Albarello, Luca; Andolfo, Annapaola; Magagnotti, Cinzia; Genovese, Luca; Locatelli, Irene; Tonon, Giovanni; Longhi, Erika; Zerbi, Pietro; Allevi, Raffaele; Podestà, Alessandro; Puricelli, Luca; Milani, Paolo; Soldarini, Armando; Salonia, Andrea; Alfano, Massimo

    2016-03-04

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) from perilesional and colorectal carcinoma (CRC), but not healthy colon, sustains proliferation and invasion of tumor cells. We investigated the biochemical and physical diversity of ECM in pair-wised comparisons of healthy, perilesional and CRC specimens. Progressive linearization and degree of organization of fibrils was observed from healthy to perilesional and CRC ECM, and was associated with a steady increase of stiffness and collagen crosslinking. In the perilesional ECM these modifications coincided with increased vascularization, whereas in the neoplastic ECM they were associated with altered modulation of matrisome proteins, increased content of hydroxylated lysine and lysyl oxidase. This study identifies the increased stiffness and crosslinking of the perilesional ECM predisposing an environment suitable for CRC invasion as a phenomenon associated with vascularization. The increased stiffness of colon areas may represent a new predictive marker of desmoplastic region predisposing to invasion, thus offering new potential application for monitoring adenoma with invasive potential.

  17. Extracellular Matrix and Integrins in Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Luo, Xie; Leighton, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent cells with great therapeutic potentials. The in vitro differentiation of ESC was designed by recapitulating embryogenesis. Significant progress has been made to improve the in vitro differentiation protocols by toning soluble maintenance factors. However, more robust methods for lineage-specific differentiation and maturation are still under development. Considering the complexity of in vivo embryogenesis environment, extracellular matrix (ECM) cues should be considered besides growth factor cues. ECM proteins bind to cells and act as ligands of integrin receptors on cell surfaces. Here, we summarize the role of the ECM and integrins in the formation of three germ layer progenies. Various ECM-integrin interactions were found, facilitating differentiation toward definitive endoderm, hepatocyte-like cells, pancreatic beta cells, early mesodermal progenitors, cardiomyocytes, neuroectoderm lineages, and epidermal cells, such as keratinocytes and melanocytes. In the future, ECM combinations for the optimal ESC differentiation environment will require substantial study.

  18. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Steven S., E-mail: san@jhsph.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Kim, Jina [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Ahn, Kwangmi [Division of Biostatistics, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Trepat, Xavier [CIBER, Enfermedades Respiratorias, 07110 Bunyola (Spain); Drake, Kenneth J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Fredberg, Jeffrey J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Biswal, Shyam [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses.

  19. Extracellular matrix-mediated cellular communication in the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente-Alandi, Iñigo; Schafer, Allison E.; Blaxall, Burns C.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex and dynamic scaffold that maintains tissue structure and dynamics. However, the view of the ECM as an inert architectural support has been increasingly challenged. The ECM is a vibrant meshwork, a crucial organizer of cellular microenvironments. It plays a direct role in cellular interactions regulating cell growth, survival, spreading, proliferation, differentiation and migration through the intricate relationship among cellular and acellular tissue components. This complex interrelationship preserves cardiac function during homeostasis; however it is also responsible for pathologic remodeling following myocardial injury. Therefore, enhancing our understanding of this cross-talk may provide mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of heart failure and suggest new approaches to novel, targeted pharmacologic therapies. This review explores the implications of ECM-cell interactions in myocardial cell behavior and cardiac function at baseline and following myocardial injury. PMID:26778458

  20. Engineering Three-dimensional Epithelial Tissues Embedded within Extracellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski-Daspit, Alexandra S; Nelson, Celeste M

    2016-07-10

    The architecture of branched organs such as the lungs, kidneys, and mammary glands arises through the developmental process of branching morphogenesis, which is regulated by a variety of soluble and physical signals in the microenvironment. Described here is a method created to study the process of branching morphogenesis by forming engineered three-dimensional (3D) epithelial tissues of defined shape and size that are completely embedded within an extracellular matrix (ECM). This method enables the formation of arrays of identical tissues and enables the control of a variety of environmental factors, including tissue geometry, spacing, and ECM composition. This method can also be combined with widely used techniques such as traction force microscopy (TFM) to gain more information about the interactions between cells and their surrounding ECM. The protocol can be used to investigate a variety of cell and tissue processes beyond branching morphogenesis, including cancer invasion.

  1. Targeting the extracellular matrix to disrupt cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freja Albjerg Venning

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic complications are responsible for more than 90% of cancer related deaths. The progression from an isolated tumor to disseminated metastatic disease is a multi-step process, with each step involving intricate cross-talk between the cancer cells and their non-cellular surroundings, the extracellular matrix (ECM. Many ECM proteins are significantly de-regulated during the progression of cancer, causing both biochemical and biomechanical changes that together promote the metastatic cascade. In this review, the influence of several ECM proteins on these multiple steps of cancer spread is summarized. In addition, we highlight the promising (pre-clinical data showing benefits of targeting these ECM macromolecules to prevent cancer progression.

  2. Cardiac extracellular matrix proteomics: Challenges, techniques, and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Wei; Dalgliesh, Ailsa J; López, Javier E; Griffiths, Leigh G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has emerged as a dynamic tissue component, providing not only structural support, but also functionally participating in a wide range of signaling events during development, injury, and disease remodeling. Investigation of dynamic changes in cardiac ECM proteome is challenging due to the relative insolubility of ECM proteins, which results from their macromolecular nature, extensive post-translational modification (PTM), and tendency to form protein complexes. Finally, the relative abundance of cellular and mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue further complicates cardiac ECM proteomic approaches. Recent developments of various techniques to enrich and analyze ECM proteins are playing a major role in overcoming these challenges. Application of cardiac ECM proteomics in disease tissues can further provide spatial and temporal information relevant to disease diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and engineering of therapeutic candidates for cardiac repair and regeneration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Extracellular matrix alterations in human corneas with bullous keratopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljubimov, A V; Burgeson, R E; Butkowski, R J

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE. To uncover abnormalities of extracellular matrix (ECM) distribution in human corneas with pseudophakic and aphakic bullous keratopathy (PBK/ABK). METHODS. Indirect immunofluorescence with antibodies to 27 ECM components was used on frozen sections of 14 normal and 20 PBK/ABK corneas....... RESULTS. Fibrillar deposits of an antiadhesive glycoprotein tenascin in the anterior and posterior stroma, epithelial basement membrane (BM), bullae and subepithelial fibrosis (SEF) areas, and posterior collagenous layer (PCL) were revealed in disease corneas. Tenascin in midstroma, which was observed...... in some cases, correlated with decreased visual acuity. In normal central corneas, tenascin was never found. Other major ECM abnormalities in PBK/ABK corneas compared to normals included: discontinuous epithelial BM straining for laminin-1 (alpha 1 beta 1 gamma 1), entactin/nidogen and fibronectin...

  4. Cells involved in extracellular matrix remodeling after acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Larissa Ferraz [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Mataveli, Fábio D’Aguiar [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mader, Ana Maria Amaral Antônio; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Justo, Giselle Zenker; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Evaluate the effects of VEGF{sub 165} gene transfer in the process of remodeling of the extracellular matrix after an acute myocardial infarct. Wistar rats were submitted to myocardial infarction, after the ligation of the left descending artery, and the left ventricle ejection fraction was used to classify the infarcts into large and small. The animals were divided into groups of ten, according to the size of infarcted area (large or small), and received or not VEGF{sub 165} treatment. Evaluation of different markers was performed using immunohistochemistry and digital quantification. The primary antibodies used in the analysis were anti-fibronectin, anti-vimentin, anti-CD44, anti-E-cadherin, anti-CD24, anti-alpha-1-actin, and anti-PCNA. The results were expressed as mean and standard error, and analyzed by ANOVA, considering statistically significant if p≤0.05. There was a significant increase in the expression of undifferentiated cell markers, such as fibronectin (protein present in the extracellular matrix) and CD44 (glycoprotein present in the endothelial cells). However, there was decreased expression of vimentin and PCNA, indicating a possible decrease in the process of cell proliferation after treatment with VEGF{sub 165}. Markers of differentiated cells, E-cadherin (adhesion protein between myocardial cells), CD24 (protein present in the blood vessels), and alpha-1-actin (specific myocyte marker), showed higher expression in the groups submitted to gene therapy, compared to non-treated group. The value obtained by the relation between alpha-1-actin and vimentin was approximately three times higher in the groups treated with VEGF{sub 165}, suggesting greater tissue differentiation. The results demonstrated the important role of myocytes in the process of tissue remodeling, confirming that VEGF{sub 165} seems to provide a protective effect in the treatment of acute myocardial infarct.

  5. Targeting extracellular matrix remodeling in disease: Could resveratrol be a potential candidate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Renu; Agarwal, Puneet

    2017-02-01

    Disturbances of extracellular matrix homeostasis are associated with a number of pathological conditions. The ability of extracellular matrix to provide contextual information and hence control the individual or collective cellular behavior is increasingly being recognized. Hence, newer therapeutic approaches targeting extracellular matrix remodeling are widely investigated. We reviewed the current literature showing the effects of resveratrol on various aspects of extracellular matrix remodeling. This review presents a summary of the effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix deposition and breakdown. Mechanisms of action of resveratrol in extracellular matrix deposition involving growth factors and their signaling pathways are discussed. Involvement of phosphoinositol-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and role of transcription factors and sirtuins on the effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix homeostasis are summarized. It is evident from the literature presented in this review that resveratrol has significant effects on both the synthesis and breakdown of extracellular matrix. The major molecular targets of the action of resveratrol are growth factors and their signaling pathways, phosphoinositol-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, transcription factors, and SIRT-1. The effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix and the molecular targets appear to be related to experimental models, experimental environment as well as the doses.

  6. Extracellular DNA and lipoteichoic acids interact with exopolysaccharides in the extracellular matrix of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Pedraza, Midian C; Novais, Tatiana F; Faustoferri, Roberta C; Quivey, Robert G; Terekhov, Anton; Hamaker, Bruce R; Klein, Marlise I

    2017-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans-derived exopolysaccharides are virulence determinants in the matrix of biofilms that cause caries. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) are found in cariogenic biofilms, but their functions are unclear. Therefore, strains of S. mutans carrying single deletions that would modulate matrix components were used: eDNA - ∆lytS and ∆lytT; LTA - ∆dltA and ∆dltD; and insoluble exopolysaccharide - ΔgtfB. Single-species (parental strain S. mutans UA159 or individual mutant strains) and mixed-species (UA159 or mutant strain, Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus gordonii) biofilms were evaluated. Distinct amounts of matrix components were detected, depending on the inactivated gene. eDNA was found to be cooperative with exopolysaccharide in early phases, while LTA played a larger role in the later phases of biofilm development. The architecture of mutant strains biofilms was distinct (vs UA159), demonstrating that eDNA and LTA influence exopolysaccharide distribution and microcolony organization. Thus, eDNA and LTA may shape exopolysaccharide structure, affecting strategies for controlling pathogenic biofilms.

  7. Tailoring material properties of a nanofibrous extracellular matrix derived hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Todd D.; Lin, Stephen Y.; Christman, Karen L.

    2011-12-01

    In the native tissue, the interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, mechanical stability, and signaling. It has been shown that decellularized ECMs can be processed into injectable formulations, thereby allowing for minimally invasive delivery. Upon injection and increase in temperature, these materials self-assemble into porous gels forming a complex network of fibers with nanoscale structure. In this study we aimed to examine and tailor the material properties of a self-assembling ECM hydrogel derived from porcine myocardial tissue, which was developed as a tissue specific injectable scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The impact of gelation parameters on ECM hydrogels has not previously been explored. We examined how modulating pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration affected the nanoscale architecture, mechanical properties, and gelation kinetics. These material characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy, rheometry, and spectrophotometry, respectively. Since the main component of the myocardial matrix is collagen, many similarities between the ECM hydrogel and collagen gels were observed in terms of the nanofibrous structure and modulation of properties by altering ionic strength. However, variation from collagen gels was noted for the gelation temperature along with varied times and rates of gelation. These discrepancies when compared to collagen are likely due to the presence of other ECM components in the decellularized ECM based hydrogel. These results demonstrate how the material properties of ECM hydrogels could be tailored for future in vitro and in vivo applications.

  8. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) modulates Leydig cell extracellular matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catizone, A; Ricci, G; Tufano, M A; Perfetto, B; Canipari, R; Galdieri, M

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic factor that plays multiple roles during mammalian development. We previously demonstrated that in the postnatal testes, the HGF receptor, c-met, is expressed by Leydig cells and HGF increases the steroidogenetic activity of the cells. In the present article, we report that HGF modifies the composition of the extracellular matrix of cultured Leydig cells. We show that HGF increases the metabolic activity of isolated Leydig cells; in particular, the factor increases urokinase plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinase 2 secretion. We have also shown that the levels of active transforming growth factor beta are increased by HGF. On the contrary, using the Western blotting technique, a strong reduction in the amount of fibronectin present in the culture medium of cells cultured in the presence of HGF has been detected. The presented data demonstrate that HGF modulates several functional activities of Leydig cells, further supporting the hypothesis that this factor has a relevant role in the regulation of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  9. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ha Hwang

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation.

  10. Interplay of extracellular matrix and leukocytes in lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Thomas N; Frevert, Charles W; Debley, Jason S; Reeves, Stephen R; Parks, William C; Ziegler, Steven F

    2017-02-01

    During inflammation, leukocytes influx into lung compartments and interact with extracellular matrix (ECM). Two ECM components, versican and hyaluronan, increase in a range of lung diseases. The interaction of leukocytes with these ECM components controls leukocyte retention and accumulation, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and activation as part of the inflammatory phase of lung disease. In addition, bronchial epithelial cells from asthmatic children co-cultured with human lung fibroblasts generate an ECM that is adherent for monocytes/macrophages. Macrophages are present in both early and late lung inflammation. Matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP10) is induced in alveolar macrophages with injury and infection and modulates macrophage phenotype and their ability to degrade collagenous ECM components. Collectively, studies outlined in this review highlight the importance of specific ECM components in the regulation of inflammatory events in lung disease. The widespread involvement of these ECM components in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation make them attractive candidates for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Extracellular matrix remodeling derangement in ex-obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prist, Iryna Hirata; Salles, Alessandra Grassi; de Lima, Thais Martins; Modolin, Miguel Luiz Antônio; Gemperli, Rolf; Souza, Heraldo Possolo

    2017-01-01

    A known consequence of the large weight loss after bariatric surgery is the appearance of large skinfolds, particularly in the abdomen region of the patients. The balance between the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) components and their proteolysis, mainly by fibrinolytic systems and matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), may be disturbed in these patients. The causes underlying the deregulation of ECM remodeling that occurs in these patients are not, however, clear. We investigated molecular mechanisms responsible for this dysfunction of ECM remodeling process, comparing it to normal skin. Collagen types, MMP2 and MMP9 expression and activity, interleukins 1β (IL1β) and 6 (IL6), and transcription coactivator PGC-1β expression were analyzed in 16 patients. Ex-obese patients presented increased expression of collagen types III and IV mRNA, increased expression of MMP2, decreased expression and activity of MMP9, and increased expression of PGC-1β in the skin. Inflammation markers IL1β and IL6 mRNA were not different. We have demonstrated that obese patients with extensive weight loss after bariatric surgery have increased expression of PGC-1β in the skin, which can result in a decreased expression and activity of MMP9 and increased collagen types III and IV deposition. These molecular changes may contribute for the formation of saggy skinfolds observed in these patients and impair wound healing.

  12. Extracellular Matrix Components in the Pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdani, Marika; Korpos, Eva; Simeonovic, Charmaine J.; Parish, Christopher R.; Sorokin, Lydia; Wight, Thomas N.

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from progressive immune cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic β cells. As immune cells migrate into the islets they pass through the extracellular matrix (ECM). This ECM is composed of different macromolecules localized to different compartments within and surrounding islets; however, the involvement of this ECM in the development of human T1D is not well understood. Here we summarize our recent findings from human and mouse studies illustrating how specific components of the islet ECM that constitute basement membranes and interstitial matrix of the islets, and surprisingly, the intracellular composition of islet beta (β) cells themselves, are significantly altered during the pathogenesis of T1D. Our focus is on the ECM molecules laminins, collagens, heparan sulfate/heparan sulfate proteoglycans, and hyaluronan, as well as on the enzymes that degrade these ECM components. We propose that islet and lymphoid tissue ECM composition and organization are critical to promoting immune cell activation, islet invasion and destruction of islet β cells in T1D. PMID:25344787

  13. Pneumococcal microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules targeting of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Gavin K; Orihuela, Carlos J

    2010-07-01

    The attachment of bacteria to host cells and tissues, and their subsequent invasion and dissemination are key processes during pathogenesis. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Jensch and co-workers provide further molecular insight into these events during infection with the Gram positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Their characterization of pneumococcal adherence and virulence factor B (PavB), a bacterial surface protein with orthologues in other streptococci, show that it binds to the extracellar matrix components fibronection and plasminogen by virtue of repetitive sequences-designated streptococcal surface repeats. In mice, a pavB mutant showed reduced nasopharyngeal colonization and was attenuated in a lung infection model. As discussed here in the context of the pneumococcus, the study of PavB highlights the central role during microbal pathogenesis of targetting the extracellular matrix by so-called microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs).

  14. Extracellular matrix proteomics identifies molecular signature of symptomatic carotid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Sarah R; Willeit, Karin; Didangelos, Athanasios; Matic, Ljubica Perisic; Skroblin, Philipp; Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Lengquist, Mariette; Rungger, Gregor; Kapustin, Alexander; Kedenko, Ludmilla; Molenaar, Chris; Lu, Ruifang; Barwari, Temo; Suna, Gonca; Yin, Xiaoke; Iglseder, Bernhard; Paulweber, Bernhard; Willeit, Peter; Shalhoub, Joseph; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Davies, Alun H; Monaco, Claudia; Hedin, Ulf; Shanahan, Catherine M; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan; Mayr, Manuel

    2017-04-03

    The identification of patients with high-risk atherosclerotic plaques prior to the manifestation of clinical events remains challenging. Recent findings question histology- and imaging-based definitions of the "vulnerable plaque," necessitating an improved approach for predicting onset of symptoms. We performed a proteomics comparison of the vascular extracellular matrix and associated molecules in human carotid endarterectomy specimens from 6 symptomatic versus 6 asymptomatic patients to identify a protein signature for high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Proteomics data were integrated with gene expression profiling of 121 carotid endarterectomies and an analysis of protein secretion by lipid-loaded human vascular smooth muscle cells. Finally, epidemiological validation of candidate biomarkers was performed in two community-based studies. Proteomics and at least one of the other two approaches identified a molecular signature of plaques from symptomatic patients that comprised matrix metalloproteinase 9, chitinase 3-like-1, S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100A8), S100A9, cathepsin B, fibronectin, and galectin-3-binding protein. Biomarker candidates measured in 685 subjects in the Bruneck study were associated with progression to advanced atherosclerosis and incidence of cardiovascular disease over a 10-year follow-up period. A 4-biomarker signature (matrix metalloproteinase 9, S100A8/S100A9, cathepsin D, and galectin-3-binding protein) improved risk prediction and was successfully replicated in an independent cohort, the SAPHIR study. The identified 4-biomarker signature may improve risk prediction and diagnostics for the management of cardiovascular disease. Further, our study highlights the strength of tissue-based proteomics for biomarker discovery. UK: British Heart Foundation (BHF); King's BHF Center; and the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Center based at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London in

  15. A novel assay for extracellular matrix remodeling associated with liver fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, N; Veidal, S S; Larsen, L

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components and increased matrix-metalloprotease (MMPs) activity are hallmarks of fibrosis. We developed an ELISA for quantification of MMP-9 derived collagen type III (CO3) degradation.......Accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components and increased matrix-metalloprotease (MMPs) activity are hallmarks of fibrosis. We developed an ELISA for quantification of MMP-9 derived collagen type III (CO3) degradation....

  16. Incorporation of Tenascin-C into the Extracellular Matrix by Periostin Underlies an Extracellular Meshwork Architecture*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C null mice exhibited a similar phenotype, confined tibial periostitis, which possibly corresponds to medial tibial stress syndrome in human sports injuries. Periostin possessed adjacent domains that bind to tenascin-C and the other ECM protein: fibronectin and type I collagen, respectively. These adjacent domains functioned as a bridge between tenascin-C and the ECM, which increased deposition of tenascin-C on the ECM. The deposition of hexabrachions of tenascin-C may stabilize bifurcations of the ECM fibrils, which is integrated into the extracellular meshwork architecture. This study suggests a role for periostin in adaptation of the ECM architecture in the mechanical environment. PMID:19887451

  17. Incorporation of tenascin-C into the extracellular matrix by periostin underlies an extracellular meshwork architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2010-01-15

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C null mice exhibited a similar phenotype, confined tibial periostitis, which possibly corresponds to medial tibial stress syndrome in human sports injuries. Periostin possessed adjacent domains that bind to tenascin-C and the other ECM protein: fibronectin and type I collagen, respectively. These adjacent domains functioned as a bridge between tenascin-C and the ECM, which increased deposition of tenascin-C on the ECM. The deposition of hexabrachions of tenascin-C may stabilize bifurcations of the ECM fibrils, which is integrated into the extracellular meshwork architecture. This study suggests a role for periostin in adaptation of the ECM architecture in the mechanical environment.

  18. Association between pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and prognosis in cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, Henry Johanna Maria Antonius Adrianus

    2014-01-01

    Growth and progression of cervical carcinoma is dependent on a complex interaction between cervical carcinoma cells and composition of the extracellular matrix. For local progression as well as metastasizing, the extracellular matrix needs to be rearranged creating space for tumor cells to expand

  19. Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor-Initiating Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0041 TITLE: Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor- Initiating Cell Therapy PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor-Initiating Cell Therapy 5b. GRANT

  20. The dynamic extracellular matrix: intervention strategies during heart failure and atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeneman, Sylvia; Cleutjens, Jack P.; Faber, Birgit C.; Creemers, Esther E.; van Suylen, Robert-Jan; Lutgens, Esther; Cleutjens, Kitty B.; Daemen, Mat J.

    2003-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is no longer seen as the static embedding in which cells reside; it has been shown to be involved in cell proliferation, migration and cell-cell interactions. Turnover of the different extracellular matrix components is an active process with multiple levels of regulation.

  1. Astrocytes as a source for Extracellular matrix molecules and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eWiese

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Research of the past 25 years has shown that astrocytes do more than participating and building up the blood brain barrier and detoxify the active synapse by reuptake of neurotransmitters and ions. Indeed, astrocytes express neurotransmitter receptors and, as a consequence, respond to stimuli. Deeper knowledge of the differentiation processes during development of the central nervous system (CNS might help explaining and even help treating neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and psychiatric disorders in which astrocytes have been shown to play a role. Astrocytes and oligodendrocytes develop from a multipotent stem cell that prior to this has produced primarily neuronal precursor cells. This switch towards the more astroglial differentiation is regulated by a change in receptor composition on the cell surface and responsiveness of the respective trophic factors Fibroblast growth factor (FGF and Epidermal growth factor (EGF. The glial precursor cell is driven into the astroglial direction by signaling molecules like Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs, and EGF. However, the early astrocytes influence their environment not only by releasing and responding to diverse soluble factors but also express a wide range of extracellular matrix (ECM molecules, in particular proteoglycans of the lectican family and tenascins. Lately these ECM molecules have been shown to participate in glial development. In this regard, especially the matrix protein Tenascin C (Tnc proved to be an important regulator of astrocyte precursor cell proliferation and migration during spinal cord development. On the other hand, ECM molecules expressed by reactive astrocytes are also known to act mostly in an inhibitory fashion under pathophysiological conditions. In this regard, we further summarize recent data concerning the role of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and Tnc under pathological

  2. Extracellular matrix inflammation in vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Gary A

    2017-03-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) include a wide spectrum of chronic manifestations of vascular disease related to large vessel strokes and small vessel disease (SVD). Lacunar strokes and white matter (WM) injury are consequences of SVD. The main vascular risk factor for SVD is brain hypoperfusion from cerebral blood vessel narrowing due to chronic hypertension. The hypoperfusion leads to activation and degeneration of astrocytes with the resulting fibrosis of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Elasticity is lost in fibrotic cerebral vessels, reducing the response of stiffened blood vessels in times of increased metabolic need. Intermittent hypoxia/ischaemia activates a molecular injury cascade, producing an incomplete infarction that is most damaging to the deep WM, which is a watershed region for cerebral blood flow. Neuroinflammation caused by hypoxia activates microglia/macrophages to release proteases and free radicals that perpetuate the damage over time to molecules in the ECM and the neurovascular unit (NVU). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) secreted in an attempt to remodel the blood vessel wall have the undesired consequences of opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and attacking myelinated fibres. This dual effect of the MMPs causes vasogenic oedema in WM and vascular demyelination, which are the hallmarks of the subcortical ischaemic vascular disease (SIVD), which is the SVD form of VCID also called Binswanger's disease (BD). Unravelling the complex pathophysiology of the WM injury-related inflammation in the small vessel form of VCID could lead to novel therapeutic strategies to reduce damage to the ECM, preventing the progressive damage to the WM. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. Inflammatory Alterations of the Extracellular Matrix in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, Junko [Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Konno, Kenjiro [Department of Animal Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Itano, Naoki, E-mail: itanon@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2011-08-09

    Complex interactions between cancer cells and host stromal cells result in the formation of the “tumor microenvironment”, where inflammatory alterations involve the infiltration of tumor-associated fibroblasts and inflammatory leukocytes that contribute to the acquisition of malignant characteristics, such as increased cancer cell proliferation, invasiveness, metastasis, angiogenesis, and avoidance of adaptive immunity. The microenvironment of a solid tumor is comprised not only of cellular compartments, but also of bioactive substances, including cytokines, growth factors, and extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM can act as a scaffold for cell migration, a reservoir for cytokines and growth factors, and a signal through receptor binding. During inflammation, ECM components and their degraded fragments act directly and indirectly as inflammatory stimuli in certain cases and regulate the functions of inflammatory and immune cells. One such ECM component, hyaluronan, has recently been implicated to modulate innate immune cell function through pattern recognition toll-like receptors and accelerate the recruitment and activation of tumor-associated macrophages in inflamed cancers. Here, we will summarize the molecular mechanism linking inflammation with ECM remodeling in the tumor microenvironment, with a particular emphasis on the role of hyaluronan in controlling the inflammatory response.

  4. Adipose extracellular matrix remodelling in obesity and insulin resistance☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, De; Chun, Tae-Hwa; Kang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of adipose tissues undergoes constant remodelling to allow adipocytes and their precursor cells to change cell shape and function in adaptation to nutritional cues. Abnormal accumulation of ECM components and their modifiers in adipose tissues has been recently demonstrated to cause obesity-associated insulin resistance, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Integrins and other ECM receptors (e.g. CD44) that are expressed in adipose tissues have been shown to regulate insulin sensitivity. It is well understood that a hypoxic response is observed in adipose tissue expansion during obesity progression and that hypoxic response accelerates fibrosis and inflammation in white adipose tissues. The expansion of adipose tissues should require angiogenesis; however, the excess deposition of ECM limits the angiogenic response of white adipose tissues in obesity. While recent studies have focused on the metabolic consequences and the mechanisms of adipose tissue expansion and remodelling, little attention has been paid to the role played by the interaction between peri-adipocyte ECM and their cognate cell surface receptors. This review will address what is currently known about the roles played by adipose ECM, their modifiers, and ECM receptors in obesity and insulin resistance. Understanding how excess ECM deposition in the adipose tissue deteriorates insulin sensitivity would provide us hints to develop a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27179976

  5. Degradation of extracellular matrix by peroxynitrite/peroxynitrous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, Eleanor C; Davies, Michael J

    2008-09-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides strength and elasticity to tissues and plays a key role in regulating cell behavior; damage to this material is believed to be a major factor in many inflammatory diseases. Peroxynitrite/peroxynitrous acid, which is generated at elevated levels at sites of inflammation, is believed to play a role in ECM damage; however, the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we examined the reactions of bolus peroxynitrite, and that generated in a time-dependent manner by SIN-1 decomposition, with ECM isolated from a vascular smooth muscle cell line and porcine thoracic aorta. Bolus peroxynitrite caused the release of ECM glycosaminoglycans and proteins, the formation of 3-nitroTyr, and the detection of ECM-derived radicals (by immuno-spin trapping) in a concentration-dependent manner. Release and nitration of ECM components were modulated by the local pH and bicarbonate. SIN-1 caused the release of glycosaminoglycan, but not protein, from vascular smooth muscle cell-derived ECM in a concentration-, time-, and pH-dependent manner. The data presented here suggest that peroxynitrite-mediated damage to ECM occurs via a radical-mediated pathway. These reactions may contribute to ECM damage at sites of inflammation and play a role in disease progression, including rupture of atherosclerotic lesions.

  6. The Extracellular Matrix Contributes to Mechanotransduction in Uterine Fibroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Phyllis C.; Jayes, Friederike L.; Segars, James H.

    2014-01-01

    The role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and mechanotransduction as an important signaling factor in the human uterus is just beginning to be appreciated. The ECM is not only the substance that surrounds cells, but ECM stiffness will either compress cells or stretch them resulting in signals converted into chemical changes within the cell, depending on the amount of collagen, cross-linking, and hydration, as well as other ECM components. In this review we present evidence that the stiffness of fibroid tissue has a direct effect on the growth of the tumor through the induction of fibrosis. Fibrosis has two characteristics: (1) resistance to apoptosis leading to the persistence of cells and (2) secretion of collagen and other components of the ECM such a proteoglycans by those cells leading to abundant disposition of highly cross-linked, disoriented, and often widely dispersed collagen fibrils. Fibrosis affects cell growth by mechanotransduction, the dynamic signaling system whereby mechanical forces initiate chemical signaling in cells. Data indicate that the structurally disordered and abnormally formed ECM of uterine fibroids contributes to fibroid formation and growth. An appreciation of the critical role of ECM stiffness to fibroid growth may lead to new strategies for treatment of this common disease. PMID:25110476

  7. The Biology of the Escherichia coli Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, David A.; DePas, William H.; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter Summary Escherichia coli (E. coli) is one of the world’s best-characterized organisms, as it has been extensively studied for over a century. However, most of this work has focused on E. coli grown under laboratory conditions that do not faithfully simulate its natural environments. Therefore, the historical perspectives on E. coli physiology and life cycle are somewhat skewed toward experimental systems that feature E. coli growing logarithmically in a test tube. Typically a commensal bacterium, E. coli resides in the lower intestines of a slew of animals. Outside of the lower intestine, E. coli can adapt and survive in a very different set of environmental conditions. Biofilm formation allows E. coli to survive, and even thrive, in environments that do not support the growth of planktonic populations. E. coli can form biofilms virtually everywhere; in the bladder during a urinary tract infection, on in-dwelling medical devices, and outside of the host on plants and in the soil. The E. coli extracellular matrix, primarily composed of the protein polymer named curli and the polysaccharide cellulose, promotes adherence to organic and inorganic surfaces, and resistance to desiccation, the host immune system and other antimicrobials. The pathways that govern E. coli biofilm formation, cellulose production, and curli biogenesis will be discussed in this book chapter, which concludes with insights into the future of E. coli biofilm research and potential therapies. PMID:26185090

  8. Extracellular matrix-based biomaterial scaffolds and the host response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, Joseph M; Grainger, David W

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) collectively represents a class of naturally derived proteinaceous biomaterials purified from harvested organs and tissues with increasing scientific focus and utility in tissue engineering and repair. This interest stems predominantly from the largely unproven concept that processed ECM biomaterials as natural tissue-derived matrices better integrate with host tissue than purely synthetic biomaterials. Nearly every tissue type has been decellularized and processed for re-use as tissue-derived ECM protein implants and scaffolds. To date, however, little consensus exists for defining ECM compositions or sources that best constitute decellularized biomaterials that might better heal, integrate with host tissues and avoid the foreign body response (FBR). Metrics used to assess ECM performance in biomaterial implants are arbitrary and contextually specific by convention. Few comparisons for in vivo host responses to ECM implants from different sources are published. This review discusses current ECM-derived biomaterials characterization methods including relationships between ECM material compositions from different sources, properties and host tissue response as implants. Relevant preclinical in vivo models are compared along with their associated advantages and limitations, and the current state of various metrics used to define material integration and biocompatibility are discussed. Commonly applied applications of these ECM-derived biomaterials as stand-alone implanted matrices and devices are compared with respect to host tissue responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Collagens and proteoglycans of the corneal extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.M. Michelacci

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The cornea is a curved and transparent structure that provides the initial focusing of a light image into the eye. It consists of a central stroma that constitutes 90% of the corneal depth, covered anteriorly with epithelium and posteriorly with endothelium. Its transparency is the result of the regular spacing of collagen fibers with remarkably uniform diameter and interfibrillar space. Corneal collagen is composed of heterotypic fibrils consisting of type I and type V collagen molecules. The cornea also contains unusually high amounts of type VI collagen, which form microfibrillar structures, FACIT collagens (XII and XIV, and other nonfibrillar collagens (XIII and XVIII. FACIT collagens and other molecules, such as leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans, play important roles in modifying the structure and function of collagen fibrils.Proteoglycans are macromolecules composed of a protein core with covalently linked glycosaminoglycan side chains. Four leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans are present in the extracellular matrix of corneal stroma: decorin, lumican, mimecan and keratocan. The first is a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan, and the other three are keratan sulfate proteoglycans. Experimental evidence indicates that the keratan sulfate proteoglycans are involved in the regulation of collagen fibril diameter, and dermatan sulfate proteoglycan participates in the control of interfibrillar spacing and in the lamellar adhesion properties of corneal collagens. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are minor components of the cornea, and are synthesized mainly by epithelial cells. The effect of injuries on proteoglycan synthesis is discussed.

  10. [Immunofluorescence study of the extracellular matrix of the human placenta].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukosuev, V S; Fokin, E I; Milovanov, A P

    1989-01-01

    Distribution of collagen types I, III, IV, V and fibronectin in human placental villi has been studied by indirect immunofluorescence. During 9-12 weeks of pregnancy the extracellular matrix of villi represents a network of filaments organized in bundles and aggregates that contain collagen types I and III and finer filaments of collagen types IV and V. Collagen type IV is regularly detected in basal membrane of capillaries and particularly in villous epithelium, collagen type V and fibronectin are occasionally detected there. Marked immunofluorescent reaction on collagen types IV and V and fibronectin, and weak reaction on collagen type III is observed in cellular islets around cytotrophoblasts. In the fetus born in term placental villi have uniform immunofluorescence in thick basal membranes of fetal capillaries and of chorionic epithelium. The immunofluorescent reaction specific for all collagen types is uniform in villous stroma. Distribution of different collagen types and fibronectin, including the unusual localization of membrane collagen type IV, in villous stroma and cellular islets of early and mature placenta is discussed.

  11. Extracellular matrix alterations in human corneas with bullous keratopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubimov, A V; Burgeson, R E; Butkowski, R J; Couchman, J R; Wu, R R; Ninomiya, Y; Sado, Y; Maguen, E; Nesburn, A B; Kenney, M C

    1996-05-01

    To uncover abnormalities of extracellular matrix (ECM) distribution in human corneas with pseudophakic and aphakic bullous keratopathy (PBK/ABK). Indirect immunofluorescence with antibodies to 27 ECM components was used on frozen sections of 14 normal and 20 PBK/ABK corneas. Fibrillar deposits of an antiadhesive glycoprotein tenascin in the anterior and posterior stroma, epithelial basement membrane (BM), bullae and subepithelial fibrosis (SEF) areas, and posterior collagenous layer (PCL) were revealed in disease corneas. Tenascin in midstroma, which was observed in some cases, correlated with decreased visual acuity. In normal central corneas, tenascin was never found. Other major ECM abnormalities in PBK/ABK corneas compared to normals included: discontinuous epithelial BM straining for laminin-1 (alpha 1 beta 1 gamma 1), entactin/nidogen and fibronectin; accumulation of fibronectin and alpha 1-alpha 2 type IV collagen on the endothelial face of the Descemet's membrane; and abnormal deposition of stromal ECM (tenascin, fibronectin, decorin, types I, III, V, VI, VIII, XII, XIV collagen) and BM components (type IV, collagen, perlecan, bamacan, laminin-1, entactin-nidogen, fibronectin) in SEF areas and in PCL. The study provides a molecular description of an ongoing fibrosis on the epithelial, stomal, and endothelial levels in PBK/ABK corneas. These fibrotic changes may follow initial endothelial damage after cataract surgery, may be caused by the upregulation of fibrogenic cytokines, and may play a significant role in the progression of bullous keratopathy.

  12. The extracellular matrix in bronchopulmonary dysplasia: target and source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana eMižíková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD is a common complication of preterm birth that contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units. BPD results from life saving interventions such as mechanical ventilation and oxygen supplementation used to manage preterm infants with acute respiratory failure, which may be complicated by pulmonary infection. The pathogenic pathways driving BPD are not well delineated, but include disturbances to the coordinated action of gene expression, cell cell communication, physical forces, and cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM, which together guide normal lung development. Efforts to further delineate these pathways have been assisted by the use of animal models of BPD which rely on infection, injurious mechanical ventilation, or oxygen supplementation, where histopathological features of BPD can be mimicked. Notable amongst these are perturbations to ECM structures, namely the organization of the elastin and collagen networks in the developing lung. Dysregulated collagen deposition and disturbed elastin fiber organization are pathological hallmarks of clinical and experimental BPD. Strides have been made in understanding the disturbances to ECM production in the developing lung, but much still remains to be discovered about how ECM maturation and turnover are dysregulated in aberrantly developing lungs. This review aims to inform the reader about the state-of-the-art concerning the ECM in BPD, to highlight the gaps in our knowledge and current controversies, and to suggest directions for future work in this exciting and complex area of lung development (pathobiology.

  13. The Extracellular Matrix in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: Target and Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mižíková, Ivana; Morty, Rory E.

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common complication of preterm birth that contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units. BPD results from life-saving interventions, such as mechanical ventilation and oxygen supplementation used to manage preterm infants with acute respiratory failure, which may be complicated by pulmonary infection. The pathogenic pathways driving BPD are not well-delineated but include disturbances to the coordinated action of gene expression, cell–cell communication, physical forces, and cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM), which together guide normal lung development. Efforts to further delineate these pathways have been assisted by the use of animal models of BPD, which rely on infection, injurious mechanical ventilation, or oxygen supplementation, where histopathological features of BPD can be mimicked. Notable among these are perturbations to ECM structures, namely, the organization of the elastin and collagen networks in the developing lung. Dysregulated collagen deposition and disturbed elastin fiber organization are pathological hallmarks of clinical and experimental BPD. Strides have been made in understanding the disturbances to ECM production in the developing lung, but much still remains to be discovered about how ECM maturation and turnover are dysregulated in aberrantly developing lungs. This review aims to inform the reader about the state-of-the-art concerning the ECM in BPD, to highlight the gaps in our knowledge and current controversies, and to suggest directions for future work in this exciting and complex area of lung development (patho)biology. PMID:26779482

  14. Brain extracellular matrix retains connectivity in neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikbaev, Arthur; Frischknecht, Renato; Heine, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of connectivity are critically important for the processing and storage of information in neuronal networks. The brain extracellular matrix (ECM) appears during postnatal development and surrounds most neurons in the adult mammalian brain. Importantly, the removal of the ECM was shown to improve plasticity and post-traumatic recovery in the CNS, but little is known about the mechanisms. Here, we investigated the role of the ECM in the regulation of the network activity in dissociated hippocampal cultures grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs). We found that enzymatic removal of the ECM in mature cultures led to transient enhancement of neuronal activity, but prevented disinhibition-induced hyperexcitability that was evident in age-matched control cultures with intact ECM. Furthermore, the ECM degradation followed by disinhibition strongly affected the network interaction so that it strongly resembled the juvenile pattern seen in naïve developing cultures. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the ECM plays an important role in retention of existing connectivity in mature neuronal networks that can be exerted through synaptic confinement of glutamate. On the other hand, removal of the ECM can play a permissive role in modification of connectivity and adaptive exploration of novel network architecture. PMID:26417723

  15. Chemical Decellularization Methods and Its Effects on Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Akbari Zahmati

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Extracellular matrix (ECM produced by tissue decellularization processes as a biological scaffold due to its unique properties compared to other scaffolds for migration and implantation of stem cells have been used successfully in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in the last years. The objective of this manuscript was to provide an overview of the chemical decellularization methods, evaluation of decellularized ECM and the potential effect of the chemical decellularization agents on the biochemical composition. Methods: We searched in Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct. The literature search was done by using the following keywords: “ECM, biologic scaffold, decellularization, chemical methods, tissue engineering.” We selected articles have been published from 2000 to 2016, and 15 full texts and 97 abstracts were reviewed. Results:Employing an optimization method to minimize damage to the ECM ultrastructure as for a result of the lack of reduction in mechanical properties and also the preservation of essential proteins such as laminin, fibronectin, Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, growth factor is required. Various methods include chemical, physical and enzymatic technics were studied. However, on each of these methods can have undesirable effects on ECM. Conclusion: It is suggested that instead of the Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS which have high strength degradation, we can use zwitterionic separately or in combination with SDS. Tributyl phosphate (TBP due to its unique properties can be used in decellularization process.

  16. The emerging role of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix remodelling in obesity and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Huenchullan, S; McLennan, S V; Verhoeven, A; Twigg, S M; Tam, C S

    2017-07-01

    Skeletal muscle extracellular matrix remodelling has been proposed as a new feature associated with obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Exercise training improves muscle function in obesity, which may be mediated by regulatory effects on the muscle extracellular matrix. This review examined available literature on skeletal muscle extracellular matrix remodelling during obesity and the effects of exercise. A non-systematic literature review was performed on PubMed of publications from 1970 to 2015. A total of 37 studies from humans and animals were retained. Studies reported overall increases in gene and protein expression of different types of collagen, growth factors and enzymatic regulators of the skeletal muscle extracellular matrix in obesity. Only two studies investigated the effects of exercise on skeletal muscle extracellular matrix during obesity, with both suggesting a regulatory effect of exercise. The effects of exercise on muscle extracellular matrix seem to be influenced by the duration and type of exercise training with variable effects from a single session compared with a longer duration of exercise. More studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms behind skeletal muscle extracellular matrix remodelling during obesity and the effects of exercise. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  17. 3D Extracellular Matrix from Sectioned Human Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Catherine B; Cukierman, Edna; Artym, Vira V

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) matrices have significant advantages compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) matrices for studying cell adhesion, migration, and tissue organization. Cellular behavior is dependent on the surrounding matrix environment for signaling and induction of biological responses (Carletti, et al., 2011; Pampaloni, et al., 2007; Vlodavsky, 1999). 2D cultures induce an artificial polarity in cultured cells between upper and lower surfaces not present normally in the in vivo environment. No longer nonpolar, many aspects of cellular behavior are altered (Beacham, et al., 2007; Grinnell and Petroll, 2010; Yamada and Cukierman, 2007). In addition, 2D models lack the physical properties of 3D matrix, such as topography, stiffness, and dimensionality. To begin to mimic the 3D environment of in vivo connective tissue extracellular matrix (ECM), collagen gels have been used widely (see Unit 10.3). Culture of cells in collagen gels results in a bipolar fibroblast morphology that resembles the in vivo phenotype (Friedl and Brocker, 2000; Even-Ram and Yamada, 2005; Grinnell and Petroll, 2010). Although more physiological, 3D collagen gels lack the complex biochemical and physical microenvironment present in an in vivo ECM that regulates cellular physiological properties (Beacham, et al., 2007). A variety of methods to create a more in vivo-like ECM have been published (Yamada and Cukierman, 2007). Adding critical ECM components to 3D collagen matrices, including fibronectin, hyaluronan, link protein and glycosaminoglycans, can more accurately mimic the structural microenvironment of the native ECM (Friedl and Brocker, 2000). Other ECM models use cultured cell lines, such as fibroblasts, to derive an ECM lattice through secretion of an organized ECM (Beacham, et al., 2007). Different cell lines have been chosen to generate a specific microenvironment for study of particularly types of cellular behavior (Kutys and Yamada, 2013). For example, cultured bovine

  18. Extracellular matrix alterations in the ketamine model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszko, Gabriela; Curreli, Sebastiano; Kaushik, Rahul; Becker, Axel; Dityatev, Alexander

    2017-05-14

    The neural extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in regulation of perisomatic GABAergic inhibition and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus and cortex. Decreased labeling of perineuronal nets, a form of ECM predominantly associated with parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in the brain, has been observed in post-mortem studies of schizophrenia patients, specifically, in brain areas such as prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex, and amygdala. Moreover, glial ECM in the form of dandelion clock-like structures was reported to be altered in schizophrenia patients. Here, we verified whether similar abnormalities in neural ECM can be reproduced in a rat model of schizophrenia, in which animals received sub-chronic administration of ketamine to reproduce the aspects of disease related to disrupted signaling through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Our study focused on two schizophrenia-related brain areas, namely the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate investigate ECM expression using Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA) and CS56 antibody, both labeling distinct chondroitin sulfate epitopes enriched in perineuronal nets and glial ECM, respectively. Our analysis revealed that ketamine-treated rats exhibit reduced number of WFA-labeled perineuronal nets, and a decreased intensity of parvalbumin fluorescence in mPFC interneurons somata. Moreover, we found an increased expression of CS56 immunoreactive form of ECM. Importantly, the loss of perineuronal nets was revealed in the mPFC, and was not detected in the hippocampus, suggesting regional specificity of ECM alterations. These data open an avenue for further investigations of functional importance of ECM abnormalities in schizophrenia as well as for search of treatments for their compensation. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Decellularized zebrafish cardiac extracellular matrix induces mammalian heart regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, William C W; Wang, Zhouguang; Missinato, Maria Azzurra; Park, Dae Woo; Long, Daniel Ward; Liu, Heng-Jui; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A; Kim, Kang; Wang, Yadong

    2016-11-01

    Heart attack is a global health problem that leads to significant morbidity, mortality, and health care burden. Adult human hearts have very limited regenerative capability after injury. However, evolutionarily primitive species generally have higher regenerative capacity than mammals. The extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to this difference. Mammalian cardiac ECM may not be optimally inductive for cardiac regeneration because of the fibrotic, instead of regenerative, responses in injured adult mammalian hearts. Given the high regenerative capacity of adult zebrafish hearts, we hypothesize that decellularized zebrafish cardiac ECM (zECM) made from normal or healing hearts can induce mammalian heart regeneration. Using zebrafish and mice as representative species of lower vertebrates and mammals, we show that a single administration of zECM, particularly the healing variety, enables cardiac functional recovery and regeneration of adult mouse heart tissues after acute myocardial infarction. zECM-treated groups exhibit proliferation of the remaining cardiomyocytes and multiple cardiac precursor cell populations and reactivation of ErbB2 expression in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, zECM exhibits pro-proliferative and chemotactic effects on human cardiac precursor cell populations in vitro. These contribute to the structural preservation and correlate with significantly higher cardiac contractile function, notably less left ventricular dilatation, and substantially more elastic myocardium in zECM-treated hearts than control animals treated with saline or decellularized adult mouse cardiac ECM. Inhibition of ErbB2 activity abrogates beneficial effects of zECM administration, indicating the possible involvement of ErbB2 signaling in zECM-mediated regeneration. This study departs from conventional focuses on mammalian ECM and introduces a new approach for cardiac tissue regeneration.

  20. Extracellular matrix components and matrix degrading enzymes in the feline placenta during gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, I; Schönkypl, S

    2006-01-01

    In the endotheliochorial placenta of the cat, the maternal surface epithelium and parts of the connective tissue have to be removed to bring the fetal blood vessels in close contact to the maternal capillaries. The composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the feline uterus is not known and it is still not clear if and which parts of the maternal ECM persist during gestation in the placental labyrinth. We demonstrated various extracellular matrix components (collagen types I, III, IV, and laminin) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, -2, -13) using immunohistochemistry and studied the distribution of intermediate filaments (vimentin, cytokeratin) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) in the placental girdle on specimens of different stages of gestation. Collagen types I and III were mainly present in the fetal chorionic lamellae whereas diminished in the maternal placental labyrinth part. Collagen IV and laminin were expressed in fetal basement membranes and mesenchyme. Maternal endothelial cells and stromal cells showed a positive immunoreaction for anti-collagen type IV and laminin. MMP-2 was identified in the maternal stroma, including decidual cells. Endothelia of maternal blood vessels within the labyrinth contained MMP-1, -2 and -13, probably associated with angiogenesis. In the trophoblast MMP-1 and -13 were demonstrated. Maternal stem vessels were accompanied by a thick layer of syncytiotrophoblast. Around these vessels, collagen type I and SMA were present in a periendothelial region between the endothelium and the trophoblast. These findings indicate that a strictly regulated balance between ECM deposition and ECM degradation in the feline placental labyrinth is necessary for proper placental development and function.

  1. Matrix gla protein: An extracellular matrix protein regulates myostatin expression in the muscle developmental program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sarafraz; Jan, Arif Tasleem; Baig, Mohammad Hassan; Lee, Eun Ju; Choi, Inho

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle development involves interactions between intracellular and extracellular factors that act in concert to regulate the myogenic process. Matrix gla protein (MGP), a well-known inhibitor of calcification in soft tissues, has been reported to be highly up-regulated during myogenesis. Our interest in the regulation of muscle satellite cells (MSCs) by extracellular matrix (ECM) led us to investigate the effects of MGP during the progression of myogenesis. Participation of MGP in the myogenic process was investigated in vitro using C2C12 cells, and knockdown of its gene was performed to determine its effects on the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and other ECM genes. In addition, interactions between MGP, Fibromodulin (FMOD), and Myostatin (MSTN) were investigated by conducting co-immunoprecipitation and in silico studies. Matrix gla protein knockdown (MGPkd) shows pronounced effects during myogenesis as evidenced by the down regulation of myogenic marker (MYOG and MYOD), and ECM (COL1α1 and FMOD) genes. Down-regulation of MSTN expression in MGPkd cells suggests its role in coordinating the regulation of MSTN expression. Having strong affinity for ACVRIIB receptor, in silico data confirms MGP interference in the interaction of MSTN with ACVRIIB. These findings show MGP inhibits MSTN functionally by disrupting its binding to receptor. The present study provides insights of an ECM protein that participates in the regulation of the myogenic program by inhibiting the activity of the myogenic negative regulator MSTN, which suggests that MGP might be used for designing novel inhibitors that can promote muscle regeneration or treat muscle atrophy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Interactions between Skeletal Muscle Myoblasts and their Extracellular Matrix Revealed by a Serum Free Culture System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaturvedi, V.; Dye, D.E.; Kinnear, B.F.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Grounds, M.D.; Coombe, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Decellularisation of skeletal muscle provides a system to study the interactions of myoblasts with muscle extracellular matrix (ECM). This study describes the efficient decellularisation of quadriceps muscle with the retention of matrix components and the use of this matrix for myoblast

  3. Elastin development-associated extracellular matrix constituents of subepithelial connective tissue in human pterygium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rico, Consuelo; Pascual, Gemma; Sotomayor, Sandra; Asúnsolo, Ángel; Cifuentes, Alberto; García-Honduvilla, Natalio; Buján, Julia

    2014-09-02

    We evaluated the expression of several extracellular matrix constituents implicated in the synthesis and reticulation of elastin in human pterygium, according to age and sex of the patients. Pterygia and normal conjunctiva samples were divided into groups according to age (extracellular matrix constituents, LOXs, FBN1, and FBLN5, implicated in the development of elastin, are overexpressed in the subepithelial connective tissue extracellular matrix of human pterygium, supporting our hypothesis that elastic synthesis and reticulation is dysregulated in this type of pathology. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  4. Epithelial morphogenesis in hydra requires de novo expression of extracellular matrix components and matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jinsong; Leontovich, Alexey; Fei, Kaiyin; Yan, Li; Sarras, Michael P

    2002-03-01

    As a member of the phylum Cnidaria, the body wall of hydra is organized as an epithelium bilayer (ectoderm and endoderm) with an intervening extracellular matrix (ECM). Previous studies have established the general molecular structure of hydra ECM and indicate that it is organized as two subepithelial zones that contain basement membrane components such as laminin and a central fibrous zone that contains interstitial matrix components such as a unique type I fibrillar collagen. Because of its simple structure and high regenerative capacity, hydra has been used as a developmental model to study cell-ECM interaction during epithelial morphogenesis. The current study extends previous studies by focusing on the relationship of ECM biogenesis to epithelial morphogenesis in hydra, as monitored during head regeneration or after simple incision of the epithelium. Histological studies indicated that decapitation or incision of the body column resulted in an immediate retraction of the ECM at the wound site followed by a re-fusion of the bilayer within 1 hour. After changes in the morphology of epithelial cells at the regenerating pole, initiation of de novo biogenesis of an ECM began within hours while full reformation of the mature matrix required approximately 2 days. These processes were monitored using probes to three matrix or matrix-associated components: basement membrane-associated hydra laminin beta1 chain (HLM-beta1), interstitial matrix-associated hydra fibrillar collagen (Hcol-I) and hydra matrix metalloproteinase (HMMP). While upregulation of mRNA for both HLM-beta1 and Hcol-I occurred by 3 hours, expression of the former was restricted to the endoderm and expression of the latter was restricted to the ectoderm. Upregulation of HMMP mRNA was also associated with the endoderm and its expression paralleled that for HLM-beta1. As monitored by immunofluorescence, HLM-beta1 protein first appeared in each of the two subepithelial zones (basal lamina) at about 7 hours

  5. Oxidation and modification of extracellular matrix and its role in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, C Y; Degendorfer, G; Davies, M J

    2014-09-01

    There is accumulating evidence that damage to extracellular materials and particularly the extracellular matrix, can play a major role in multiple human pathologies. In contrast to cells, the extracellular compartment of most biological tissues is relatively poorly equipped to prevent or repair damage caused by oxidation due to lower levels of antioxidant defenses (low molecular mass and enzymatic) and repair systems (both catabolic and enzymatic). The extracellular compartment is therefore likely to be subject to both an increased extent of damage and an overall accumulation of damage due to slow turnover and/or poor repair. The nature and consequences of damage to the extracellular matrix is poorly understood, despite evidence that changes in matrix structure influences not only structural integrity, but also cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and signaling, and cytokine and growth factor binding. In this article the nature of the extracellular matrix is briefly reviewed, together with evidence for the presence of matrix modifications in cardiovascular disease. The oxidants and mechanisms that are known to damage extracellular matrix are reviewed, together with the limited data available to date on how such changes affect structural properties and cellular behavior.

  6. Extracellular matrix remodelling in response to venous hypertension: proteomics of human varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Oklu, Rahmi; Lynch, Marc; Fava, Marika; Baig, Ferheen; Yin, Xiaoke; Barwari, Temo; Potier, David N; Albadawi, Hassan; Jahangiri, Marjan; Porter, Karen E; Watkins, Michael T; Misra, Sanjay; Stoughton, Julianne; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular matrix remodelling has been implicated in a number of vascular conditions, including venous hypertension and varicose veins. However, to date, no systematic analysis of matrix remodelling in human veins has been performed. To understand the consequences of venous hypertension, normal and varicose veins were evaluated using proteomics approaches targeting the extracellular matrix. Varicose saphenous veins removed during phlebectomy and normal saphenous veins obtained during coronary artery bypass surgery were collected for proteomics analysis. Extracellular matrix proteins were enriched from venous tissues. The proteomics analysis revealed the presence of >150 extracellular matrix proteins, of which 48 had not been previously detected in venous tissue. Extracellular matrix remodelling in varicose veins was characterized by a loss of aggrecan and several small leucine-rich proteoglycans and a compensatory increase in collagen I and laminins. Gene expression analysis of the same tissues suggested that the remodelling process associated with venous hypertension predominantly occurs at the protein rather than the transcript level. The loss of aggrecan in varicose veins was paralleled by a reduced expression of aggrecanases. Chymase and tryptase β1 were among the up-regulated proteases. The effect of these serine proteases on the venous extracellular matrix was further explored by incubating normal saphenous veins with recombinant enzymes. Proteomics analysis revealed extensive extracellular matrix degradation after digestion with tryptase β1. In comparison, chymase was less potent and degraded predominantly basement membrane-associated proteins. The present proteomics study provides unprecedented insights into the expression and degradation of structural and regulatory components of the vascular extracellular matrix in varicosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  7. Extracellular matrix directions estimation of the heart on micro-focus x-ray CT volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hirohisa; Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Akita, Toshiaki; Mori, Kensaku

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we propose an estimation method of extracellular matrix directions of the heart. Myofiber are surrounded by the myocardial cell sheets whose directions have strong correspondence between heart failure. Estimation of the myocardial cell sheet directions is difficult since they are very thin. Therefore, we estimate the extracellular matrices which are touching to the sheets as if piled up. First, we perform a segmentation of the extracellular matrices by using the Hessian analysis. Each extracellular matrix region has sheet-like shape. We estimate the direction of each extracellular matrix region by the principal component analysis (PCA). In our experiments, mean inclination angles of two normal canine hearts were 50.6 and 46.2 degrees, while the angle of a failing canine heart was 57.4 degrees. This results well fit the anatomical knowledge that failing hearts tend to have vertical myocardical cell sheets.

  8. Extracellular matrix endocytosis in controlling matrix turnover and beyond: emerging roles in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainero, Elena

    2016-10-15

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a network of secreted proteins that, beyond providing support for tissues and organs, is involved in the regulation of a variety of cell functions, including cell proliferation, polarity, migration and oncogenic transformation. ECM homeostasis is maintained through a tightly controlled balance between synthesis, deposition and degradation. While the role of metalloproteases in ECM degradation is widely recognised, the contribution of ECM internalisation and intracellular degradation to ECM maintenance has been mostly overlooked. In this review, I will summarise what is known about the molecular mechanisms mediating ECM endocytosis and how this process impacts on diseases, such as fibrosis and cancer. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Optimizing recellularization of whole decellularized heart extracellular matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Robertson

    Full Text Available Perfusion decellularization of cadaveric hearts removes cells and generates a cell-free extracellular matrix scaffold containing acellular vascular conduits, which are theoretically sufficient to perfuse and support tissue-engineered heart constructs. However, after transplantation, these acellular vascular conduits clot, even with anti-coagulation. Here, our objective was to create a less thrombogenic scaffold and improve recellularized-left ventricular contractility by re-lining vascular conduits of a decellularized rat heart with rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs.We used three strategies to recellularize perfusion-decellularized rat heart vasculature with RAECs: retrograde aortic infusion, brachiocephalic artery (BA infusion, or a combination of inferior vena cava (IVC plus BA infusion. The re-endothelialized scaffolds were maintained under vascular flow in vitro for 7 days, and then cell morphology, location, and viability were examined. Thrombogenicity of the scaffold was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Both BA and IVC+BA cell delivery resulted in a whole heart distribution of RAECs that proliferated, retained an endothelial phenotype, and expressed endothelial nitric oxide synthase and von Willebrand factor. Infusing RAECs via the combination IVC+BA method increased scaffold cellularity and the number of vessels that were lined with endothelial cells; re-endothelialization by using BA or IVC+BA cell delivery significantly reduced in vitro thrombogenicity. In vivo, both acellular and re-endothelialized scaffolds recruited non-immune host cells into the organ parenchyma and vasculature. Finally, re-endothelialization before recellularization of the left ventricular wall with neonatal cardiac cells enhanced construct contractility.This is the first study to re-endothelialize whole decellularized hearts throughout both arterial and venous beds and cavities by using arterial and venous delivery. The combination (IVC+BA delivery strategy

  10. Adaptive evolution of the matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado João

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE belongs to a family of small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs that play a key role in skeleton development, particularly in mineralization, phosphate regulation and osteogenesis. MEPE associated disorders cause various physiological effects, such as loss of bone mass, tumors and disruption of renal function (hypophosphatemia. The study of this developmental gene from an evolutionary perspective could provide valuable insights on the adaptive diversification of morphological phenotypes in vertebrates. Results Here we studied the adaptive evolution of the MEPE gene in 26 Eutherian mammals and three birds. The comparative genomic analyses revealed a high degree of evolutionary conservation of some coding and non-coding regions of the MEPE gene across mammals indicating a possible regulatory or functional role likely related with mineralization and/or phosphate regulation. However, the majority of the coding region had a fast evolutionary rate, particularly within the largest exon (1467 bp. Rodentia and Scandentia had distinct substitution rates with an increased accumulation of both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations compared with other mammalian lineages. Characteristics of the gene (e.g. biochemical, evolutionary rate, and intronic conservation differed greatly among lineages of the eight mammalian orders. We identified 20 sites with significant positive selection signatures (codon and protein level outside the main regulatory motifs (dentonin and ASARM suggestive of an adaptive role. Conversely, we find three sites under selection in the signal peptide and one in the ASARM motif that were supported by at least one selection model. The MEPE protein tends to accumulate amino acids promoting disorder and potential phosphorylation targets. Conclusion MEPE shows a high number of selection signatures, revealing the crucial role of positive selection in the

  11. Supercritical carbon dioxide extracted extracellular matrix material from adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun Kit; Luo, Baiwen; Guneta, Vipra; Li, Liang; Foo, Selin Ee Min; Dai, Yun; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang; Tan, Nguan Soon; Choong, Cleo; Wong, Marcus Thien Chong

    2017-06-01

    Adipose tissue is a rich source of extracellular matrix (ECM) material that can be isolated by delipidating and decellularizing the tissue. However, the current delipidation and decellularization methods either involve tedious and lengthy processes or require toxic chemicals, which may result in the elimination of vital proteins and growth factors found in the ECM. Hence, an alternative delipidation and decellularization method for adipose tissue was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) that eliminates the need of any harsh chemicals and also reduces the amount of processing time required. The resultant SC-CO2-treated ECM material showed an absence of nuclear content but the preservation of key proteins such as collagen Type I, collagen Type III, collagen Type IV, elastin, fibronectin and laminin. In addition, other biological factors such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also retained. Subsequently, the resulting SC-CO2-treated ECM material was used as a bioactive coating on tissue culture plastic (TCP). Four different cell types including adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs), human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), immortalized human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1) were used in this study to show that the SC-CO2-treated ECM coating can be potentially used for various biomedical applications. The SC-CO2-treated ECM material showed improved cell-material interactions for all cell types tested. In addition, in vitro scratch wound assay using HaCaT cells showed that the presence of SC-CO2-treated ECM material enhanced keratinocyte migration whilst the in vitro cellular studies using THP-1-derived macrophages showed that the SC-CO2-treated ECM material did not evoke pro-inflammatory responses from the THP-1-derived macrophages. Overall, this study shows the efficacy of SC-CO2

  12. Quantification of fibronectin as a method to assess ex vivo extracellular matrix remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Cecilie Liv; Gudmann, N.; Willumsen, N.

    2016-01-01

    Altered architecture, composition and quality of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are pathological hallmarks of several inflammatory and fibro-proliferative pathological processes such as osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), fibrosis and cancer. One of the most important components...

  13. Fibulin-1 is a marker for arterial extracellular matrix alterations in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cangemi, Claudia; Skov, Vibe; Poulsen, Michael Kjaer

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix alterations are important elements in the arterial changes seen in diabetes, being associated with increased vascular stiffness and the development of cardiovascular diseases. However, no biomarkers for diabetes-related arterial changes have been defined....

  14. Extracellular Matrix in Plants and Animals: Hooks and Locks for Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Stavolone, Livia; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of animal and plants cells plays important roles in viral diseases. While in animal cells extracellular matrix components can be exploited by viruses for recognition, attachment and entry, the plant cell wall acts as a physical barrier to viral entry and adds a higher level of difficulty to intercellular movement of viruses. Interestingly, both in plant and animal systems, ECM can be strongly remodeled during virus infection, and the understanding of remodeling ...

  15. Extracellular Matrix-Based Biohybrid Materials for Engineering Compliant, Matrix-Dense Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracaglia, Laura G; Fisher, John P

    2015-11-18

    An ideal tissue engineering scaffold should not only promote, but take an active role in, constructive remodeling and formation of site appropriate tissue. Extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived proteins provide unmatched cellular recognition, and therefore influence cellular response towards predicted remodeling behaviors. Materials built with only these proteins, however, can degrade rapidly or begin too weak to substitute for compliant, matrix-dense tissues. The focus of this Progress Report is on biohybrid materials that incorporate polymer components with ECM-derived proteins, to produce a substrate with desired mechanical and degradation properties, as well as actively guide tissue remodeling. Materials are described through four fabrication methods: 1) polymer and ECM-protein fibers woven together, 2) polymer and ECM proteins combined in a bilayer, 3) cell-built ECM on polymer scaffold, and 4) ECM proteins and polymers combined in a single hydrogel. Scaffolds from each fabrication method can achieve characteristics suitable for different types of tissue. In vivo testing has shown progressive remodeling in injury models, and suggests ECM-based biohybrid materials promote a prohealing immune response over single component alternatives. The prohealing immune response is associated with lasting success and long term host maintenance of the implant. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Extracellular matrix remodeling and matrix metalloproteinase inhibition in visceral adipose during weight cycling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caria, Cíntia Rabelo E Paiva; Gotardo, Érica Martins Ferreira; Santos, Paola Souza; Acedo, Simone Coghetto; de Morais, Thainá Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Gambero, Alessandra

    2017-10-15

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling is necessary for a health adipose tissue (AT) expansion and also has a role during weight loss. We investigate the ECM alteration during weight cycling (WC) in mice and the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was assessed using GM6001, an MMP inhibitor, during weight loss (WL). Obesity was induced in mice by a high-fat diet. Obese mice were subject to caloric restriction for WL followed by reintroduction to high-fat diet for weight regain (WR), resulting in a WC protocol. In addition, mice were treated with GM6001 during WL period and the effects were observed after WR. Activity and expression of MMPs was intense during WL. MMP inhibition during WL results in inflammation and collagen content reduction. MMP inhibition during WL period interferes with the period of subsequent expansion of AT resulting in improvements in local inflammation and systemic metabolic alterations induced by obesity. Our results suggest that MMPs inhibition could be an interesting target to improve adipose tissue inflammation during WL and to support weight cyclers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer in retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hong Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-2(MMP-2and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer(EMMPRINin retinoblastoma(Rband the relationships between MMP-2, EMMPRIN and tumor development.METHODS:Immunohistochemical technique was used to detect expressions of MMP-2 and EMMPRIN in 39 cases of paraffin embedded Rb samples. Quantitative analysis of expressions of MMP-2 and EMMPRIN were assessed by measuring the mean gray scale of Rb tissue with LEICA IM50 Color Pathologic Analysis System. The differences of expressions of MMP-2 and EMMPRIN in each clinical and pathological stage were statistically analyzed, and the same step was also undertaken to study the relationship between Rb with MMP-2 positive expression and that with EMMPRIN positive expression.RESULTS: The positive expression rate of MMP-2 was 90%(Gray value: 109.64±14.52; 35/39, and that of EMMPRIN was 85%(Gray value: 108.01±13.60; 33/39. The expressions of MMP-2 and EMMPRIN were significantly higher in tumors of glaucomatous stage(Gray value: 108.21±11.47 and 107.56±14.32than those in intraocular stage(Gray value: 121.13±11.32 and 119.34±12.66; PPPPPPCONCLUSION: The positive expression levels of MMP-2 and EMMPRIN may correlate with tumor infiltration and metastasis.

  18. Altered protein levels in the isolated extracellular matrix of failing human hearts with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAguero, Joshua L; McKown, Elizabeth N; Zhang, Liwen; Keirsey, Jeremy; Fischer, Edgar G; Samedi, Von G; Canan, Benjamin D; Kilic, Ahmet; Janssen, Paul M L; Delfín, Dawn A

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is associated with extensive pathological cardiac remodeling and involves numerous changes in the protein expression profile of the extracellular matrix of the heart. We obtained seven human, end-stage, failing hearts with DCM (DCM-failing) and nine human, nonfailing donor hearts and compared their extracellular matrix protein profiles. We first showed that the DCM-failing hearts had indeed undergone extensive remodeling of the left ventricle myocardium relative to nonfailing hearts. We then isolated the extracellular matrix from a subset of these hearts and performed a proteomic analysis on the isolated matrices. We found that the levels of 26 structural proteins were altered in the DCM-failing isolated cardiac extracellular matrix compared to nonfailing isolated cardiac extracellular matrix. Overall, most of the extracellular matrix proteins showed reduced levels in the DCM-failing hearts, while all of the contractile proteins showed increased levels. There was a mixture of increased and decreased levels of cytoskeletal and nuclear transport proteins. Using immunoprobing, we verified that collagen IV (α2 and α6 isoforms), zyxin, and myomesin protein levels were reduced in the DCM-failing hearts. We expect that these data will add to the understanding of the pathology associated with heart failure with DCM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The extracellular matrix: Structure, composition, age-related differences, tools for analysis and applications for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kular, Jaspreet K; Basu, Shouvik; Sharma, Ram I

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a structural support network made up of diverse proteins, sugars and other components. It influences a wide number of cellular processes including migration, wound healing and differentiation, all of which is of particular interest to researchers in the field of tissue engineering. Understanding the composition and structure of the extracellular matrix will aid in exploring the ways the extracellular matrix can be utilised in tissue engineering applications especially as a scaffold. This review summarises the current knowledge of the composition, structure and functions of the extracellular matrix and introduces the effect of ageing on extracellular matrix remodelling and its contribution to cellular functions. Additionally, the current analytical technologies to study the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-related cellular processes are also reviewed.

  20. Proteomics of Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy Support That the Extracellular Matrix of Descemet's Membrane is Disordered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Dyrlund, Thomas Franck; Runager, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) is a major corneal disorder affecting the innermost part of the cornea, leading to visual impairment. As the morphological changes in FECD are mainly observed in the extracellular matrix of the Descemet's membrane/endothelial layer we determined...... that the morphological changes observed in FECD is caused in part by an aberrant assembly of the extracellular matrix within the Descemet's membrane/endothelial layer....... differentially regulated proteins, many of which are extracellular proteins known to be involved in proper assembly of the basement membrane in other tissues. In total 26 differentially regulated proteins were identified, of which 6 proteins were regulated by both methods. These results support...

  1. Molecular Control of Vascular Tube Morphogenesis and Stabilization: Regulation by Extracellular Matrix, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Endothelial Cell-Pericyte Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, George E.; Stratman, Amber N.; Sacharidou, Anastasia

    Recent studies have revealed a critical role for both extracellular matrices and matrix metalloproteinases in the molecular control of vascular morphogenesis and stabilization in three-dimensional (3D) tissue environments. Key interactions involve endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes, which coassemble to affect vessel formation, remodeling, and stabilization events during development and postnatal life. EC-pericyte interactions control extracellular matrix remodeling events including vascular basement membrane matrix assembly, a necessary step for endothelial tube maturation and stabilization. ECs form tube networks in 3D extracellular matrices in a manner dependent on integrins, membrane-type metalloproteinases, and the Rho GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1. Recent work has defined an EC lumen signaling complex of proteins composed of these proteins that controls 3D matrix-specific signaling events required for these processes. The EC tube formation process results in the creation of a network of proteolytically generated vascular guidance tunnels. These tunnels are physical matrix spaces that regulate vascular tube remodeling and represent matrix conduits into which pericytes are recruited to allow dynamic cell-cell interactions with ECs. These dynamic EC-pericyte interactions induce vascular basement membrane matrix deposition, leading to vessel maturation and stabilization.

  2. Pivotal role of matrix metalloproteinase 13 in extracellular matrix turnover in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takwi Nkyimbeng

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a fatal disease characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM.We investigated the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs in lung fibrosis.MMP and TIMP expression, collagenolytic activity and collagen content was assessed in IPF (n=16 versus donor (n=6 lung homogenates and accomplished by in-situ-zymography for gelatinolytic and collagenolytic activities, combined with MMP antigen detection. Role of MMP13 was assessed employing the bleomycin model of lung fibrosis in MMP-13(-/- versus wild-type mice.In IPF, MMPs-1, 2, 7, 9 and 13, but not MMP-8, were significantly upregulated, whereas none of the TIMPs (1-4 were significantly altered. Collagen content was slightly increased and collagenolytic activity was most prominent in the airways and co-localized with MMP-13. We observed an exaggerated early inflammatory response and an augmented lung fibrosis in bleomycin-challenged MMP-13(-/- versus wild-type mice, with elevated lung collagen content 28d after bleomycin challenge in the MMP-13(-/- mice.Our data suggest that i collagen deposition in IPF lungs is not primarily due to excessive TIMP production, but rather due to overwhelming ECM production in face of an overall increased, but spatially imbalanced collagenolytic activity, ii preferential distribution of collagenolytic activity, largely MMP-13, in the airways offers an explanation for the development of honeycomb cysts and iii despite an overall increase in inflammatory cell content the presence of MMP-13 seems to limit the overall extent of ECM deposition in lung fibrosis.

  3. Preoperative radiotherapy and extracellular matrix remodeling in rectal mucosa and tumour matrix metalloproteinases and plasminogen components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angenete, Eva; Oeresland, Tom; Falk, Peter; Breimer, Michael; Ivarsson, Marie-Louise (Dept. of Surgery, Inst. of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Univ. of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Hultborn, Ragnar (Dept. of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital/Sahlgrenska, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2009-11-15

    Background. Preoperative radiotherapy reduces recurrence but increases postoperative morbidity. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of radiotherapy in rectal mucosa and rectal tumour extracellular matrix (ECM) by studying enzymes and growth factors involved in ECM remodeling. Materials and methods. Twenty patients with short-term preoperative radiotherapy and 12 control patients without radiotherapy were studied. Biopsies from rectal mucosa and tumour were collected prior to radiotherapy and at surgery. Tissue MMP-1, -2, -9, TIMP-1, uPA, PAI-1, TGF-beta1 and calprotectin were determined by ELISA. Biopsies from irradiated and non-irradiated peritoneal areas were also analysed. Results. Radiotherapy increased the tissue levels of MMP-2 and PAI-1 in both the rectal mucosa and tumours while calprotectin and uPA showed an increase only in the mucosa after irradiation. The increase of calprotectin was due to an influx of inflammatory cells as revealed by immunohistochemistry. Prior to irradiation, the tumour tissues had increased levels of MMP-1, -2, -9, total TGF-beta1, uPA, PAI-1 and calprotectin compared to mucosa, while TIMP-1 and the active TGF-beta1 fraction showed no statistical difference. Conclusions. This study indicates a radiation-induced effect on selected ECM remodeling proteases. This reaction may be responsible for early and late morbidity. Interference of this response might reduce these consequences.

  4. Extracellular DNA as matrix component in microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria in nature primarily live in surface-associated communities commonly known as biofilms. Because bacteria in biofilms, in many cases, display tolerance to host immune systems, antibiotics, and biocides, they are often difficult or impossible to eradicate. Biofilm formation, therefore, lead...... from the Gram-positive bacteria. Besides the role of extracellular DNA in biofilm formation, the mechanisms involved in DNA release from P. aeruginosa, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus are addressed....

  5. Urinary bladder extracellular matrix hydrogels and matrix-bound vesicles differentially regulate central nervous system neuron viability and axon growth and branching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Anne; Kandakatla, Apoorva; van der Merwe, Yolandi; Ren, Tanchen; Huleihel, Luai; Hussey, George; Naranjo, Juan Diego; Johnson, Scott; Badylak, Stephen; Steketee, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Central nervous system neurons often degenerate after trauma due to the inflammatory innate immune response to injury, which can lead to neuronal cell death, scarring, and permanently lost neurologic function. Extracellular matrix bioscaffolds, derived by decellularizing healthy tissues, have been widely used in both preclinical and clinical studies to promote positive tissue remodeling, including neurogenesis, in numerous tissues, with extracellular matrix from homologous tissues often inducing more positive responses. Extracellular matrix hydrogels are liquid at room temperature and enable minimally invasive extracellular matrix injections into central nervous system tissues, before gelation at 37℃. However, few studies have analyzed how extracellular matrix hydrogels influence primary central nervous system neuron survival and growth, and whether central nervous system and non-central nervous system extracellular matrix specificity is critical to neuronal responses. Urinary bladder extracellular matrix hydrogels increase both primary hippocampal neuron survival and neurite growth to similar or even greater extents, suggesting extracellular matrix from non-homologous tissue sources, such as urinary bladder matrix-extracellular matrix, may be a more economical and safer alternative to developing central nervous system extracellular matrices for central nervous system applications. Additionally, we show matrix-bound vesicles derived from urinary bladder extracellular matrix are endocytosed by hippocampal neurons and positively regulate primary hippocampal neuron neurite growth. Matrix-bound vesicles carry protein and RNA cargos, including noncoding RNAs and miRNAs that map to the human genome and are known to regulate cellular processes. Thus, urinary bladder matrix-bound vesicles provide natural and transfectable cargoes which offer new experimental tools and therapeutic applications to study and treat central nervous system neuron injury.

  6. Expression of cytokine and extracellular matrix mRNAs in fetal hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Keai Sinn; Kulkeaw, Kasem; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2017-09-01

    In mouse fetal liver, hepatoblasts, sinusoidal endothelial cells and macrophages (or erythroblastic islands) promote differentiation and proliferation of hematopoietic cells through cell-cell interactions and secretion of cytokines and extracellular matrix factors. Until now, we have had little knowledge of the hematopoietic cytokines or extracellular matrix mRNAs expressed in hepatic stellate cells. Using p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) to mark this cell population, we sorted 12.5, 14.5 and 16.5 dpc hepatic stellate cells and analyzed expression of cytokines and extracellular matrix mRNAs. Among cytokines, insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) was highly expressed at all three stages analyzed. The extracellular matrix molecule fibronectin (Fn1) was highly expressed in 12.5 dpc cells, whereas vitronectin (Vtn) was highly expressed in 14.5 and 16.5 dpc hepatic stellate cells. Among liver cells, Igf2 was predominantly expressed in hepatoblast-like cells at all three stages examined, suggesting that hepatoblast-like cells are an essential part of the niche that maintains homeostasis of hematopoietic cells in embryonic mouse liver. Defining these expression patterns could facilitate our understanding of cross talk between cytokine and extracellular matrix molecules in hepatic stellate cells and benefit research in developmental hematopoiesis as well as the study of liver biology. © 2017 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Factors Involved in Extracellular Matrix Turnover in Human Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregori Casals

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The molecular mechanisms by which myocardial ischemia translates into ventricular remodeling remain unclear. Methods: We investigated whether hypoxia and proinflammatory cytokines are specific inducers of remodeling signals in an in vitro model of cultured adult human ventricular myocytes (AC16 cells. Results:Hypoxia modified the ratio of matrix remodeling factors by increasing the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP and reducing tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase type 1 (TIMP-1 secretion in AC16 cells. These effects, however, were not associated with either modifications in expression of matrix metalloproteinase type 2, collagen-I or metalloproteinase activity. Hypoxia does, actually increase the production of the cardiac antifibrogenic growth factors, Apelin and VEGF, through an Hypoxia Inducible Factor type 1-dependent mechanism. Concerning proinflammatory signaling pathways, IL1β emerged as a powerful inducer of matrix turnover, since it significantly enhanced PIIINP, TIMP-1 and hyaluronic acid production and increased metalloproteinase activity. In contrast, TNFα did not modify matrix turnover but markedly induced the production of Apelin and VEGF. Conclusion: Hypoxia and increased TNFα activity likely exert cardioprotective actions by activating the cardiac antifibrogenic factors Apelin and VEGF. In contrast, IL1β is a strong promoter of interstitial collagen remodeling that may contribute to ventricular dilation and heart failure in the ischemic myocardium.

  8. Escherichia coli Biofilms Have an Organized and Complex Extracellular Matrix Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chia; Zhou, Yizhou; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Dodson, Karen W.; Crowley, Jan R.; Heuser, John; Chapman, Matthew R.; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria; Henderson, Jeffrey P.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous in nature, and their resilience is derived in part from a complex extracellular matrix that can be tailored to meet environmental demands. Although common developmental stages leading to biofilm formation have been described, how the extracellular components are organized to allow three-dimensional biofilm development is not well understood. Here we show that uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains produce a biofilm with a highly ordered and complex extracellular matrix (ECM). We used electron microscopy (EM) techniques to image floating biofilms (pellicles) formed by UPEC. EM revealed intricately constructed substructures within the ECM that encase individual, spatially segregated bacteria with a distinctive morphology. Mutational and biochemical analyses of these biofilms confirmed curli as a major matrix component and revealed important roles for cellulose, flagella, and type 1 pili in pellicle integrity and ECM infrastructure. Collectively, the findings of this study elucidated that UPEC pellicles have a highly organized ultrastructure that varies spatially across the multicellular community. PMID:24023384

  9. Presynaptic neurones may contribute a unique glycoprotein to the extracellular matrix at the synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroni, Pico; Carlson, Steven S.; Schweitzer, Erik; Kelly, Regis B.

    1985-04-01

    As the extracellular matrix at the original site of a neuromuscular junction seems to play a major part in the specificity of synaptic regeneration1-5, considerable attention has been paid to unique molecules localized to this region6-11. Here we describe an extracellular matrix glycoprotein of the elasmobranch electric organ that is localized near the nerve endings. By immunological criteria, it is synthesized in the cell bodies, transported down the axons and is related to a glycoprotein in the synaptic vesicles of the neurones that innervate the electric organ. It is apparently specific for these neurones, as it cannot be detected elsewhere in the nervous system of the fish. Therefore, neurones seem to contribute unique extracellular matrix glycoproteins to the synaptic region. Synaptic vesicles could be involved in transporting these glycoproteins to or from the nerve terminal surface.

  10. Tissue architecture and breast cancer: the role of extracellular matrix and steroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, R K; Bissell, M J

    2000-06-01

    The changes in tissue architecture that accompany the development of breast cancer have been the focus of investigations aimed at developing new cancer therapeutics. As we learn more about the normal mammary gland, we have begun to understand the complex signaling pathways underlying the dramatic shifts in the structure and function of breast tissue. Integrin-, growth factor-, and steroid hormone-signaling pathways all play an important part in maintaining tissue architecture; disruption of the delicate balance of signaling results in dramatic changes in the way cells interact with each other and with the extracellular matrix, leading to breast cancer. The extracellular matrix itself plays a central role in coordinating these signaling processes. In this review, we consider the interrelationships between the extracellular matrix, integrins, growth factors, and steroid hormones in mammary gland development and function.

  11. Tissue architecture and breast cancer: the role of extracellular matrix and steroid hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R K; Bissell, M J

    2010-01-01

    The changes in tissue architecture that accompany the development of breast cancer have been the focus of investigations aimed at developing new cancer therapeutics. As we learn more about the normal mammary gland, we have begun to understand the complex signaling pathways underlying the dramatic shifts in the structure and function of breast tissue. Integrin-, growth factor-, and steroid hormone-signaling pathways all play an important part in maintaining tissue architecture; disruption of the delicate balance of signaling results in dramatic changes in the way cells interact with each other and with the extracellular matrix, leading to breast cancer. The extracellular matrix itself plays a central role in coordinating these signaling processes. In this review, we consider the interrelationships between the extracellular matrix, integrins, growth factors, and steroid hormones in mammary gland development and function. PMID:10903527

  12. Extracellular Alix regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesions and extracellular matrix assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Shujuan; Wang, Ruoning; Zhou, Xi; Corvera, Joe; Kloc, Malgorzata; Sifers, Richard; Gallick, Gary E; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2008-01-01

    Alix (ALG-2-interacting protein X), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein involved in endosomal sorting and actin cytoskeleton assembly, is required for the maintenance of fibroblast morphology. As Alix has sequence similarity to adhesin in Entamoeba histolytica, and we observed that Alix is secreted, we determined whether extracellular Alix affects fibroblast morphology. Here, we demonstrate that secreted Alix is deposited on the substratum of non-immortalized WI38 fibroblasts. Antibody binding to e...

  13. Modifications in stromal extracellular matrix of aged corneas can be induced by ultraviolet A irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Sébastien P; Rochette, Patrick J

    2015-06-01

    With age, structural and functional changes can be observed in human cornea. Some studies have shown a loss of corneal transparency and an increase in turbidity associated with aging. These changes are caused by modifications in the composition and arrangement of extracellular matrix in the corneal stroma. In human skin, it is well documented that exposure to solar radiation, and mainly to the UVA wavelengths, leads to phenotypes of photoaging characterized by alteration in extracellular matrix of the dermis. Although the cornea is also exposed to solar radiation, the extracellular matrix modifications observed in aging corneas have been mainly attributed to chronological aging and not to solar exposure. To ascertain the real implication of UVA exposure in extracellular matrix changes observed with age in human cornea, we have developed a model of photoaging by chronically exposing corneal stroma keratocytes with a precise UVA irradiation protocol. Using this model, we have analyzed UVA-induced transcriptomic and proteomic changes in corneal stroma. Our results show that cumulative UVA exposure causes changes in extracellular matrix that are found in corneal stromas of aged individuals, suggesting that solar exposure catalyzes corneal aging. Indeed, we observe a downregulation of collagen and proteoglycan gene expression and a reduction in proteoglycan production and secretion in response to cumulative UVA exposure. This study provides the first evidence that chronic ocular exposure to sunlight affects extracellular matrix composition and thus plays a role in corneal changes observed with age. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. 3D Extracellular Matrix from Sectioned Human Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Catherine B.; Cukierman, Edna; Artym, Vira V.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) matrices have significant advantages compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) matrices for studying cell adhesion, migration, and tissue organization. Cellular behavior is dependent on the surrounding matrix environment for signaling and induction of biological responses (Carletti, et al., 2011; Pampaloni, et al., 2007; Vlodavsky, 1999). 2D cultures induce an artificial polarity in cultured cells between upper and lower surfaces not present normally in the in vivo ...

  15. Spatial and temporal variations in extracellular matrix of periocular and corneal regions during corneal stromal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doane, K J; Ting, W H; McLaughlin, J S; Birk, D E

    1996-03-01

    The development of the avian corneal stroma occurs in discrete developmental stages. During this sequence of events, the neural crest-derived corneal fibroblast precursor cells are surrounded by distinct extracellular matrices which change both spatially and temporally. To elucidate the role of these matrices, extracellular matrix components in the periocular mesenchyme and cornea were analysed prior to and during migration and differentiation of corneal fibroblasts using antibodies against collagens, proteoglycans and glycoproteins. Previous work has concentrated on the matrix of the corneal stroma rather than the matrix of the periocular mesenchyme. Since the precursors of the corneal fibroblasts are present within the must migrate through the periocular mesenchyme prior to entry into the cornea proper, this environment was fully evaluated. The present study documents the matrix composition of both the cornea and periocular mesenchyme at developmental stages that are prior to and after initiation of corneal invasion by the corneal fibroblast precursors. Variations in matrix molecules comprising both the periocular mesenchyme and cornea were demonstrated. These include changes in the distribution of collagen types I, II, III, IV and VI; the proteoglycans decorin and lumican; as well as the adhesive glycoproteins tenascin, fibronectin and laminin. It is hypothesized that the variations in matrix localization are important in the regulation of cell migration and differentiation during normal corneal development. Any regulation is likely to involve a combination of components found in the extracellular matrices and therefore, a consideration of the matrix rather than isolated components is required.

  16. Alterations in the biosynthesis of extracellular matrix molecules in connective tissues by electric and magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciombor, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) of certain configurations have been shown to be effective clinically in promoting the healing of fracture non-unions and are believed to enhance calcification of extracellular matrix. In vitro studies have suggested that PEMFs may also have the effect of modifying the extracellular matrix by promoting the synthesis of matrix molecules. This study examines the effect of one particular type of PEMF and a sinusoidal continuous wave upon the extracellular matrix and calcification of endochondral ossification in vivo. The pulsed magnetic field (SS-22) utilized in these studies is being used clinically for the treatment of fracture non-unions, a condition in which the bone is not restored to form or function. The sinusoidal continuous wave was designed to provide a 5 Gauss amplitude at a 15 Hz. rate. The synthesis of cartilage molecules is enhanced by this type of PEMF and since wave and subsequent endochondral calcification is stimulated. Histomorphometric studies indicate that the maturation of bone trabeculae is also promoted by this type of PEMF stimulation. These results indicate that a specific PEMF or continuous waveform can change the composition of cartilage extracellular matrix in vivo and raises the possibility that the effects on other processes of endochondral ossification (e.g., fracture healing and growth plates) may occur through a similar mechanism.

  17. Topological Control of Extracellular Matrix Growth: A Native-Like Model for Cell Morphodynamics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, David; Samitier, Josep

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of cells with their natural environment influences a large variety of cellular phenomena, including cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. The complex extracellular matrix network has challenged the attempts to replicate in vitro the heterogeneity of the cell environment and has threatened, in general, the relevance of in vitro studies. In this work, we describe a new and extremely versatile approach to generate native-like extracellular matrices with controlled morphologies for the in vitro study of cellular processes. This general approach combines the confluent culture of fibroblasts with microfabricated guiding templates to direct the three-dimensional growth of well-defined extracellular networks which recapitulate the structural and biomolecular complexity of features typically found in vivo. To evaluate its performance, we studied fundamental cellular processes, including cell cytoskeleton organization, cell-matrix adhesion, proliferation, and protrusions morphodynamics. In all cases, we found striking differences depending on matrix architecture and, in particular, when compared to standard two-dimensional environments. We also assessed whether the engineered matrix networks influenced cell migration dynamics and locomotion strategy, finding enhanced migration efficiency for cells seeded on aligned matrices. Altogether, our methodology paves the way to the development of high-performance models of the extracellular matrix for potential applications in tissue engineering, diagnosis, or stem-cell biology.

  18. Printing three-dimensional tissue analogues with decellularized extracellular matrix bioink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Jang, Jinah; Ha, Dong-Heon; Won Kim, Sung; Rhie, Jong-Won; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Deok-Ho; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2014-06-01

    The ability to print and pattern all the components that make up a tissue (cells and matrix materials) in three dimensions to generate structures similar to tissues is an exciting prospect of bioprinting. However, the majority of the matrix materials used so far for bioprinting cannot represent the complexity of natural extracellular matrix (ECM) and thus are unable to reconstitute the intrinsic cellular morphologies and functions. Here, we develop a method for the bioprinting of cell-laden constructs with novel decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) bioink capable of providing an optimized microenvironment conducive to the growth of three-dimensional structured tissue. We show the versatility and flexibility of the developed bioprinting process using tissue-specific dECM bioinks, including adipose, cartilage and heart tissues, capable of providing crucial cues for cells engraftment, survival and long-term function. We achieve high cell viability and functionality of the printed dECM structures using our bioprinting method.

  19. The importance of extracellular matrix for cell function and in vivo likeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, N U B; Genovese, F; Leeming, D J; Karsdal, M A

    2015-04-01

    Fibrotic diseases may be described as a disease of the extracellular matrix, where the balance between matrix formation and degradation has been shifted leading to an accumulation of matrix. Currently a fit for purpose model and readily available approach are adapted when doing cell cultures, which may not reflect physiology and pathophysiology optimally. The aim of this review is to draw special attention to the similarities and differences of current state of the art in vitro and ex vivo models, with special focus on the proteins, cell-cell interactions, and correct matrix composition, which may be a better representative of in vivo conditions in a disease where the extracellular matrix is the central player. We reviewed current literature with emphasis on the role of the extracellular matrix in health and disease, different fibrotic disease models, and highlighting the importance of this when looking at translational science. To further our fibrotic research one paramount problem is to fundamentally understand the core of the disease, the production and degradation of the extracellular matrix. For a surprisingly long time the ECM has been underestimated until recently, with the discovery that the ECM may control cell phenotype through cell-matrix interactions. This highlights the need of a native ECM when investigating pathways and response to potential therapy. Clearly, both in vitro and in vivo models provide fit to purpose benefits, but in particular for the fibrosis field we may ask, do single cell cultures in monolayers recapitulate the complicated ECM environment controlling cell fate? Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of the Vibrio cholerae extracellular matrix: a top-down solid-state NMR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Fong, Jiunn C N; Yildiz, Fitnat; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are communities of bacterial cells surrounded by a self-secreted extracellular matrix. Biofilm formation by Vibrio cholerae, the human pathogen responsible for cholera, contributes to its environmental survival and infectivity. Important genetic and molecular requirements have been identified for V. cholerae biofilm formation, yet a compositional accounting of these parts in the intact biofilm or extracellular matrix has not been described. As insoluble and non-crystalline assemblies, determinations of biofilm composition pose a challenge to conventional biochemical and biophysical analyses. The V. cholerae extracellular matrix composition is particularly complex with several proteins, complex polysaccharides, and other biomolecules having been identified as matrix parts. We developed a new top-down solid-state NMR approach to spectroscopically assign and quantify the carbon pools of the intact V. cholerae extracellular matrix using ¹³C CPMAS and ¹³C{(¹⁵N}, ¹⁵N{³¹P}, and ¹³C{³¹P}REDOR. General sugar, lipid, and amino acid pools were first profiled and then further annotated and quantified as specific carbon types, including carbonyls, amides, glycyl carbons, and anomerics. In addition, ¹⁵N profiling revealed a large amine pool relative to amide contributions, reflecting the prevalence of molecular modifications with free amine groups. Our top-down approach could be implemented immediately to examine the extracellular matrix from mutant strains that might alter polysaccharide production or lipid release beyond the cell surface; or to monitor changes that may accompany environmental variations and stressors such as altered nutrient composition, oxidative stress or antibiotics. More generally, our analysis has demonstrated that solid-state NMR is a valuable tool to characterize complex biofilm systems. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Differential effect of extracellular matrix derived from papillary and reticular fibroblasts on epidermal development in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, David; Rietveld, Marion; Mahé, Christian; Saintigny, Gaëlle; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb

    2017-06-01

    Papillary and reticular fibroblasts have different effects on keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these effects are caused by differential secretion of soluble factors or by differential generation of extracellular matrix from papillary and reticular fibroblasts. To study the effect of soluble factors, keratinocyte monolayer cultures were grown in papillary or reticular fibroblast-conditioned medium. To study the effect of extracellular matrix, keratinocytes were grown on papillary or reticular-derived matrix. Conditioned medium from papillary or reticular fibroblasts did not differentially affect keratinocyte viability or epidermal development. However, keratinocyte viability was increased when grown on matrix derived from papillary, compared with reticular, fibroblasts. In addition, the longevity of the epidermis was increased when cultured on papillary fibroblast-derived matrix skin equivalents compared with reticular-derived matrix skin equivalents. The findings indicate that the matrix secreted by papillary and reticular fibroblasts is the main causal factor to account for the differences in keratinocyte growth and viability observed in our study. Differences in response to soluble factors between both populations were less significant. Matrix components specific to the papillary dermis may account for the preferential growth of keratinocytes on papillary dermis.

  2. First demonstration of decorin, an extracellular matrix molecule, in bovine mammary tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the mammary gland, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is secreted by and surrounds cells located in both mammary parenchyma (PAR) and stroma. Decorin is an ECM proteoglycan with cell growth regulatory effects mediated by its ability to interact with growth factors or up-regulation of cyclin-dependent...

  3. The extracellular matrix of the dermis: flexible structures with dynamic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Thomas; Aumailley, Monique

    2011-08-01

    The current understanding of the role of extracellular matrix proteins is mainly based on their structural properties and their assembly into complex networks. The multiplicity of interactions between cells, cytokines and growth factors within the networks determines functional units dictating the biophysical properties of tissues. This review focuses on the understanding how alterations in the genes, modifying enzymes or biological functions of extracellular matrix molecules, lead to inborn or acquired skin disorders. Analysis of the disease mechanisms provides the basis for the emerging concept that not solely structural defects of single extracellular matrix proteins are at fault, but rather that the functional unit as a whole is not working properly, causing similar clinical symptoms although the causative genes are entirely different. The understanding of these disease-causing pathways has already led to surprising new therapeutic developments applied to rare inborn disorders. They now permit to design new concepts for the treatment of more common diseases associated with the accumulation of connective tissue and alterations of the biomechanical properties of the extracellular matrix. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. BIBF1120 inhibits fibroblasts proliferation and production of the extracellular matrix protein fibulin-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette; Munk, Lizzie; Jaffar, Jade; Black, Judith; Oliver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) transforming growth factorbeta 1 (TGFβ1) induces excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) protein deposition leading to fibrosis. Our recent studies have shown that the glycoprotein fibulin-1 is increased in serum and lung tissue from

  5. Extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause invasive disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trappetti

    Full Text Available During infection, pneumococci exist mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. However, relatively little is known about how biofilms contribute to pneumococcal pathogenesis. Here, we carried out a biofilm assay on opaque and transparent variants of a clinical serotype 19F strain WCH159. After 4 days incubation, scanning electron microscopy revealed that opaque biofilm bacteria produced an extracellular matrix, whereas the transparent variant did not. The opaque biofilm-derived bacteria translocated from the nasopharynx to the lungs and brain of mice, and showed 100-fold greater in vitro adherence to A549 cells than transparent bacteria. Microarray analysis of planktonic and sessile bacteria from transparent and opaque variants showed differential gene expression in two operons: the lic operon, which is involved in choline uptake, and in the two-component system, ciaRH. Mutants of these genes did not form an extracellular matrix, could not translocate from the nasopharynx to the lungs or the brain, and adhered poorly to A549 cells. We conclude that only the opaque phenotype is able to form extracellular matrix, and that the lic operon and ciaRH contribute to this process. We propose that during infection, extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of pneumococci to cause invasive disease.

  6. Interactions of human tenascin-X domains with dermal extracellular matrix molecules.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egging, D.; Berkmortel, F. van den; Taylor, G.; Bristow, J.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2007-01-01

    Tenascin-X (TNX) is a large 450 kDa extracellular matrix protein expressed in a variety of tissues including skin, joints and blood vessels. Deficiency of TNX causes a recessive form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by joint hypermobility, skin fragility and hyperextensible skin. Skin of TNX

  7. HEPARINS MODULATE EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX AND PROTEIN-SYNTHESIS OF CULTURED RAT MESANGIAL CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLTHUIS, A; BOES, A; BERDEN, JHM

    Heparins blunt the development of glomerulosclerosis in several disease models in the rat and this protective effect may be related to suppression of glomerular cell proliferation. In this study the direct effect of heparins on another key event in glomerulosclerosis, extracellular matrix (ECM)

  8. Preliminary results of recurrent cubital tunnel syndrome treated with neurolysis and porcine extracellular matrix nerve wrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K; Williams, Benjamin G; Sotereanos, Dean G

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical results of revision neurolysis and wrapping with porcine extracellular matrix (AxoGuard Nerve Protector, AxoGen Inc., Alachua, FL) for cubital tunnel syndrome after one previous surgical decompression. Twelve patients with recurrent cubital tunnel syndrome were treated with decompression, porcine extracellular matrix nerve wrap, and minimal medial epicondylectomy (if not previously performed). The average follow-up period was 41 months (range, 24-61 mo). All patients had recurrent symptoms after having previously undergone one surgical decompression. The mean patient age was 45 years (range, 30-58 y). All patients were evaluated subjectively and objectively (pain, satisfaction, static 2-point discrimination, grip strength, and pinch strength). A significant improvement was demonstrated in postoperative pain levels (from 8.5 to 1.7), grip strength (from 41% to 86% of the unaffected side), and pinch strength (from 64% to 83% of the unaffected side). Static 2-point discrimination improved from an average 10.4 mm preoperatively to 7.6 mm postoperatively. Eleven of 12 patients demonstrated 2 mm or more improvement in 2-point discrimination postoperatively. There were no complications related to the use of the porcine extracellular matrix for nerve wrapping. This study found that secondary decompression combined with porcine extracellular matrix nerve wrapping was an effective and safe treatment for patients with recurrent cubital tunnel syndrome. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamic compressive behavior of human meniscus correlates with its extra-cellular matrix composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursac, P; Arnoczky, S; York, A

    2009-01-01

    The menisci of the knee play a significant role in the complex biomechanics of the joint and are critically important in maintaining articular cartilage health. While a general form-function relationship has been identified for the structural orientation of the extra-cellular matrix of the meniscus, the role of individual biochemical components has yet to be fully explored. To determine if correlations exist between the dynamic and static compressive modulus of human menisci and their major extra-cellular matrix constituents (collagen, glycosoaminoglycan and water content), 12 lateral and 11 medial menisci from 13 adult donors were examined. The results showed that in dynamic compression at high loading frequencies (0.1-1 Hz) the menisci behave as a rubber-like elastic material while at lower frequencies (0.01-0.03 Hz) significant viscous dissipation occurs. While regional variations in compressive moduli and extra-cellular matrix composition were observed, the magnitude of both dynamic and static compressive moduli were found to be insensitive to collagen content (p>0.4). However, this magnitude was found to significantly increase with increasing glycosaminoglycan content (pmeniscus and its extra-cellular matrix composition.

  10. Proteoglycan changes in the extracellular matrix of lung tissue from patients with pulmonary emphysema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straaten, JFM; Coers, W; Noordhoek, JA; Flipsen, JTM; Kauffman, HF; Timens, W; Postma, DS

    To characterize the changes in the extracellular matrix in smoking-related pulmonary emphysema, we undertook immunohistochemical studies in lung tissues from controls (n = 7), from patients with mild (n = 11) and severe (n = 8) emphysema, and from patients with lung fibrosis (n = 6). We studied

  11. Topical application of amelogenin extracellular matrix protein in non-healing venous ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burçin Abud

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Treatment of chronic venous ulcers of the lower extremity is still an important difficulty. The principal treatment of these ulcers includes compression therapy, local wound care and surgery. Unresponsiveness to these standard treatments is a frequent situation with negative effects on life quality and reductions in personal productivity. Therefore, there is a need for new applications to increase the effectiveness of treatment in treatment-resistant cases. In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated the results of topical application of amelogenin extracellular matrix protein in resistant venous ulcers. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the records of patients with treatment-resistant venous ulceration who were treated with amelogenin extracellular matrix protein between June 2011 and December 2012.. Results: 26 patients (21 male and 5 female with a total number of 28 ulcers (24 patients with 1 ulcer, 2 patients with two ulcers were evaluated. The patients were treated with topically applied amelogenin extracellular matrix protein and regional four bandage compression. Bandages were changed weekly. Each cure continued for six weeks. In fourteen patients (15 ulcers, we observed a complete healing by the end of the first cure. In another twelve cases (13 ulcers, the same period resulted with a reduction in wound diameter. We continued to the second cure for these patients. By the end of the second cure, complete healing was achieved in five cases (6 ulcers. Conclusion: Topical application of amelogenin extracellular matrix protein may be considered as an effective therapeutic choice for refractory venous ulcers.

  12. Label-free Raman monitoring of extracellular matrix formation in three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunstar, A.; Leferink, Anne Marijke; Okagbare, P.I.; Morris, M.D.; Roessler, B.J.; Otto, Cornelis; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring extracellular matrix (ECM) components is one of the key methods used to determine tissue quality in three-dimensional scaffolds for regenerative medicine and clinical purposes. Raman spectroscopy can be used for non-invasive sensing of cellular and ECM biochemistry. We have investigated

  13. Extracellular Polymeric Matrix Production and Relaxation under Fluid Shear and Mechanical Pressure in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hou, Jiapeng; Veeregowda, Deepak H.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    The viscoelasticity of a biofilm's EPS (extracellular polymeric substance) matrix conveys protection against mechanical challenges, but adaptive responses of biofilm inhabitants to produce EPS are not well known. Here, we compare the responses of a biofilm of an EPS-producing (ATCC 12600) and a

  14. Extracellular matrix components of oral mucosa differ from skin and resemble that of foetal skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glim, J.E.; Everts, V.; Niessen, F.B.; Ulrich, M.M.W.; Beelen, R.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Wounds of both the oral mucosa and early-to-mid gestation foetuses have a propensity to heal scarless. Repair of skin wounds in adults, however, regularly results in scar formation. The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in the process of healing. The fate of scarless or

  15. The extracellular matrix - the under-recognized element in lung disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette K.; Mauad, Thais; Tjin, Gavin; Karlsson, Jenny C.; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    The lung is composed of airways and lung parenchyma, and the extracellular matrix (ECM) contains the main building blocks of both components. The ECM provides physical support and stability to the lung, and as such it has in the past been regarded as an inert structure. More recent research has

  16. Altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and integrins in oral lichen planus (OLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J; Schuppan, D

    1995-04-01

    The immunohistochemical distribution of collagens type I, III, IV, V, VI, of undulin and tenascin, and of integrins alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 4, alpha 5, alpha 6 and beta 4, was studied in 14 biopsies of oral lichen planus (OLP), 5 biopsies of orthokeratinized gingiva and 4 biopsies of oral fibrous hyperplasia. The localization of extracellular matrix proteins showed altered expression in OLP when compared to normal oral mucosa, with two principal patterns corresponding to the reticular or atrophic type. Whereas in the reticular type a focal loss of immunoreactivity for collagen types I, III, V, VI and undulin was noted in areas with a cellular infiltrate, in the atrophic variant almost complete loss of immunoreactivity of the subepithelial extracellular matrix was found. There was no clear correlation between the distribution of extracellular matrix proteins and their integrin receptors. The present findings suggest that the autoimmune reaction in OLP might not be primarily targeted to oral keratinocytes but to an unknown antigen in the connective tissue stroma. The changes in the subepithelial extracellular matrix associated with the inflammatory reaction might, especially in the atrophic variant, impair the cross-talk between epithelium and mesenchyme and favour both the loss of barrier function and the development of erosions in the clinical course of the disease.

  17. Six Years Experience with Porcine Extracellular Matrix: A New Paradigm for Pelvic Floor Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-06

    New Paradigm for Pelvic Floor Repair presented at/published to ACOG Annual Clinical Meeting, La J olla, CA, 6-9 May 2017 in accordance with MDWI 41...NIA 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Six Years Experience with Porcine Extracellular Matrix: A New Paradigm for Pelvic Floor Repair

  18. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 is Present in the Vascular Extracellular Matrix and Promotes Angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Enbergs, Helmut; Hu, Jiong; Popp, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    into the extracellular matrix (ECM) by endothelial cells in vitro and in situ and the presence of DMBT1 in the ECM increased endothelial cell adherence. Endothelial cell-derived DMBT1 associated with galectin-3 (coprecipitation), and human recombinant DMBT1 bound EGF, vascular endothelial growth factor and Delta...

  19. Extracellular matrix in airway smooth muscle is associated with dynamics of airway function in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yick, C. Y.; Ferreira, D. S.; Annoni, R.; von der Thüsen, J. H.; Kunst, P. W.; Bel, E. H.; Lutter, R.; Mauad, T.; Sterk, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Altered deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the airway smooth muscle (ASM) layer as observed in asthma may influence ASM mechanical properties. We hypothesized that ECM in ASM is associated with airway function in asthma. First, we investigated the difference in ECM expression in

  20. Targeting the extracellular matrix of ovarian cancer using functionalized, drug loaded lyophilisomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, S.C.H.A. van der; Raavé, R.; Langerak, S.; Houdt, L. van; Duijnhoven, S.M.J. van; Lith, S.A.M. van; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Daamen, W.F.; Leenders, W.P.J.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is characterized by a high mortality rate and is in need for novel therapeutic avenues to improve patient outcome. The tumor's extracellular matrix ("stroma") offers new possibilities for targeted drug-delivery. Recently we identified highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate

  1. Rat hair follicle dermal papillae have an extracellular matrix containing basement membrane components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R

    1986-01-01

    , to be replaced by synthesis of other components including type I and III collagens. It seems likely therefore that the dermal papilla cells in vivo synthesize a basement membrane type of extracellular matrix, although a contribution from epithelial, and in some cases capillary endothelial, cells cannot be ruled...

  2. Development-dependent modification of the extracellular matrix by a sulphated glycoprotein in Volvox carteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzl, S; Thym, D; Sumper, M

    1984-04-01

    We report the chemical characterization of the highly sulphated glycoprotein SSG 185 from Volvox carteri. SSG 185 is a hydroxyproline-containing, extracellular glycoprotein. The sulphate residues are clustered within the parent saccharide structure of SSG 185, since on mercaptolysis all the sulphate residues are recovered in a small saccharide fragment containing mannose, arabinose and sulphate (in a molar ratio of 112). SSG 185 is a short-lived molecule, serving as a precursor for a high mol. wt. component of the extracellular matrix. Synthesis of SSG 185 is developmentally controlled. Different SSG 185 variants, with unknown modifications in the sulphated saccharide fragment, are synthesized at different developmental stages or under the influence of the sexual inducer. These modifications remain conserved in the aggregated state of SSG 185, indicating the development-dependent modification of the extracellular matrix.

  3. Physicomechanical properties of the extracellular matrix of a demineralized bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, I. A.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Nikolaev, S. V.; Podorozhnaya, V. T.; Uvarkin, P. V.; Ratushnyak, A. S.; Chebodaeva, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The article describes the results of a study of physicomechanical properties of a demineralized bone matrix of human cancellous and compact bones. A demineralized cancellous bone was shown to have the best characteristics of a porous system for colonization of matrices by cells. The ultimate stress and elasticity modulus of samples of demineralized femoral heads isolated in primary hip replacement was demonstrated to vary in wide ranges. The elasticity modulus ranged from 50 to 250 MPa, and the tensile strength varied from 1.1 to 5.5 MPa. Microhardness measurements by the recovered indentation method were not possible because of the viscoelastic properties of a bone material. To study the piezoelectric properties of samples, a measuring system was developed that comprised a measuring chamber with contact electrodes, a system for controlled sample loading, an amplifier-converter unit, and signal recording and processing software. The measurement results were used to determine the dependence of the signal amplitude on the dynamic deformation characteristics. The findings are discussed in terms of the relationship between the mechanical and electrical properties and the structure of the organic bone component.

  4. A Hydrogel Derived From Decellularized Dermal Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Matthew T.; Daly, Kerry A.; Brennan-Pierce, Ellen P.; Johnson, Scott A.; Carruthers, Christopher; D’Amore, Antonio; Nagarkar, Shailesh P.; Velankar, Sachin S.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    The ECM of mammalian tissues has been used as a scaffold to facilitate the repair and reconstruction of numerous tissues. Such scaffolds are prepared in many forms including sheets, powders, and hydrogels. ECM hydrogels provide advantages such as injectability, the ability to fill an irregularly shaped space, and the inherent bioactivity of native matrix. However, material properties of ECM hydrogels and the effect of these properties upon cell behavior are neither well understood nor controlled. The objective of this study was to prepare and determine the structure, mechanics, and the cell response in vitro and in vivo of ECM hydrogels prepared from decellularized porcine dermis and urinary bladder tissues. Dermal ECM hydrogels were characterized by a more dense fiber architecture and greater mechanical integrity than urinary bladder ECM hydrogels, and showed a dose dependent increase in mechanical properties with ECM concentration. In vitro, dermal ECM hydrogels supported greater C2C12 myoblast fusion, and less fibroblast infiltration and less fibroblast mediated hydrogel contraction than urinary bladder ECM hydrogels. Both hydrogels were rapidly infiltrated by host cells, primarily macrophages, when implanted in a rat abdominal wall defect. Both ECM hydrogels degraded by 35 days in vivo, but UBM hydrogels degraded more quickly, and with greater amounts of myogenesis than dermal ECM. These results show that ECM hydrogel properties can be varied and partially controlled by the scaffold tissue source, and that these properties can markedly affect cell behavior. PMID:22789723

  5. Novel serological neo-epitope markers of extracellular matrix proteins for the detection of portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeming, Diana Julie; Karsdal, M A; Byrjalsen, I

    2013-01-01

    The hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) is an invasive, but important diagnostic and prognostic marker in cirrhosis with portal hypertension (PHT). During cirrhosis, remodelling of fibrotic tissue by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is a permanent process generating small fragments of degrade...... extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins known as neoepitopes, which are then released into the circulation.......The hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) is an invasive, but important diagnostic and prognostic marker in cirrhosis with portal hypertension (PHT). During cirrhosis, remodelling of fibrotic tissue by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is a permanent process generating small fragments of degraded...

  6. CELL-DENSITY MODULATES GROWTH, EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX, AND PROTEIN-SYNTHESIS OF CULTURED RAT MESANGIAL CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLTHUIS, A; BOES, A

    1993-01-01

    Mesangial cell (MC) hyperplasia and accumulation of extracellular matrix are hallmarks of chronic glomerular disease. The present in vitro study examined the effects of cell density on growth, extracellular matrix formation, and protein synthesis of cultured rat MCs. A negative linear relationship

  7. Impact of changes in extracellular matrix in the lumbar degenerative disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurea, AV; Mitrica, M; Mohan, A

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of the clinical, biochemical, hystochemical and immunologic aspects of the intervertebral disk, along with its molecular biology, justifies the object of our study on the extracellular matrix modifications in lumbar disk hernias and their impact on patient quality of life. Material and method: the research lot was composed of 50 patients, aged between 18 and 73, who have undergone lumbar disk hernia surgery. MMP–9 (metalloproteinase–9) and TIMP–1 (tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloprotease 1) have been dosed in order to study the modifications on extracellular disk matrix, and quality of life assessment was carried out both in pre–operatory and post–operatory periods. Conclusions: patients may prevent the appearance of degenerative processes of the intervertebral disk with care and responsibility by controlling their weight, avoiding intense physical activities and ceasing to smoke. PMID:22567050

  8. The extracellular matrix modulates fibroblast phenotype and function in the infarcted myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobaczewski, Marcin; de Haan, Judith J; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts are key cellular effectors of cardiac repair; their phenotype and function are modulated by interactions with extracellular matrix proteins. This review manuscript discusses the effects of the extracellular matrix on the inflammatory and reparative properties of fibroblasts in the infarcted myocardium. Early generation of matrix fragments in the infarct induces a pro-inflammatory and matrix-degrading fibroblast phenotype. Formation of a fibrin/fibronectin-rich provisional matrix serves as a conduit for migration of fibroblasts into the infarcted area. Induction of ED-A fibronectin and non-fibrillar collagens may contribute to myofibroblast transdifferentiation. Upregulation of matricellular proteins promotes transduction of growth factor and cytokine-mediated signals. As the scar matures, matrix cross-linking, clearance of matricellular proteins and reduced growth factor signaling cause deactivation and apoptosis of reparative infarct fibroblasts. Understanding the effects of matrix components on infarct fibroblasts may guide the design of peptides that reproduce, or inhibit, specific matricellular functions, attenuating adverse remodeling. PMID:22956156

  9. Fractional Excretion of Survivin, Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer, and Matrix Metalloproteinase 7 in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bargenda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT is defined as a transformation of tubular epithelial cells into mesenchymal ones. These cells migrate through the extracellular matrix and change into active myofibroblasts, which are responsible for excessive matrix deposition. Such changes may lead to tubular dysfunction and fibrosis of the renal parenchyma, characteristic of chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, there are no data on potential EMT markers in children with CKD. The aim of our study was to assess the usefulness of fractional excretion (FE of survivin, E-cadherin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP7, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 as potential markers of CKD-related complications such as tubular damage and fibrosis. Methods: Forty-one pre-dialysis children with CKD Stages 3–5 and 23 age-matched controls were enrolled in the study. The serum and urine concentrations of analysed parameters were assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. Results: Tubular reabsorption of all analysed parameters was >99% in the control group. All FE values rose significantly in children with CKD, yet they remained 1%. Conclusions: FE of the examined markers may become a useful tool in the assessment of tubular dysfunction during the course of CKD. The FE of survivin, EMMPRIN, and MMP7 warrant further research as potential independent markers of kidney-specific EMT.

  10. Biotensegrity of the extracellular matrix: physiology, dynamic mechanical balance and implications in oncology and mechanotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eTadeo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells have the capacity to convert mechanical stimuli into chemical changes. This process is based on the tensegrity principle, a mechanism of tensional integrity. To date, this principle has been demonstrated to act in physiological processes such as mechanotransduction and mechanosensing at different scales (from cell sensing through integrins to molecular mechanical interventions or even localized massage. The process involves intra- and extracellular components, including the participation of extracellular matrix and microtubules that act as compression structures, and actin filaments, which act as tension structures. The nucleus itself has its own tensegrity system which is implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Despite present advances, only the tip of the iceberg has so far been uncovered regarding the role of extracellular matrix compounds in influencing biotensegrity in pathological processes. Groups of cells, together with the surrounding ground substance, are subject to different and specific forces which certainly influence biological processes. In this paper we review the current knowledge on the role of extracellular matrix elements in determining biotensegrity in malignant processes, and describe their implication in therapeutic response, resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, and subsequent tumor progression. Original data based on the study of neuroblastic tumors will be provided.

  11. The extracellular-matrix-retaining cyanobacterium Nostoc verrucosum accumulates trehalose, but is sensitive to desiccation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Toshio; Kumihashi, Keisuke; Kunita, Shinpei; Masaura, Takuya; Inoue-Sakamoto, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Masaaki

    2011-08-01

    The aquatic cyanobacterium Nostoc verrucosum forms macroscopic colonies, which consist of both cellular filaments and massive extracellular matrix material. In this study, the physiological features of N. verrucosum were investigated and compared with those of the anhydrobiotic cyanobacterium Nostoc commune. Nostoc verrucosum cells were sensitive to desiccation, but tolerant of freeze-thawing treatment in terms of both cell viability and photosynthetic O(2) evolution. Natural colonies of these cyanobacteria contained similar levels of chlorophyll a, carotenoids, the UV-absorbing pigments scytonemin and mycosporine-like amino acids, and uronic acid [a component of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS)]. EPS from both N. verrucosum and N. commune indicated low acidity and a high affinity for divalent cations, although their sugar compositions differed. The WspA protein, known to be a major component of the extracellular matrix of N. commune, was detected in N. verrucosum. Desiccation caused similarly high levels of trehalose accumulation in both cyanobacteria. Although previously considered relevant to anhydrobiosis in the terrestrial cyanobacterium N. commune, the data presented here suggest that extracellular matrix production and trehalose accumulation are not enough for standing extreme desiccation in N. verrucosum. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Extracellular Phosphate Induces the Expression of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 Through the FGF Receptor in Osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Jin; Yamazaki, Miwa; Kawai, Masanobu; Tachikawa, Kanako; Yamamoto, Keiko; Miyagawa, Kazuaki; Kogo, Mikihiko; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi

    2017-05-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (Dmp1) is an extracellular matrix protein involved in phosphate metabolism and biomineralization, and its expression markedly increases during the maturation of osteoblasts into osteocytes. We previously reported that an increased level of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in media up-regulated the expression of Dmp1 in primary osteocytes isolated from mouse bones. In the present study, we found that elevated extracellular Pi strongly induced the expression of Dmp1 in osteoblasts and explored its underlying mechanism of action. In an osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1, increases in extracellular Pi induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and up-regulated the expression of Dmp1, fibroblast growth factor 2 (Fgf2), and Fgf receptor 1 (Fgfr1). A co-treatment with the MEK inhibitor U0126 abolished the increase in the expression of Dmp1 and Fgfr1 by elevated Pi, suggesting the involvement of the MEK/ERK pathway in this up-regulation. Elevated extracellular Pi also resulted in the phosphorylation of FGF receptor substrate 2α (FRS2α), which was diminished by knockdown of Slc20a1 encoding Pit1 sodium-phosphate co-transporter. The co-treatment with an inhibitor against FGFR (SU5402) abolished the up-regulation of Dmp1 induced by elevated extracellular Pi. In primary osteoblasts, a treatment with 4 mM Pi transiently increased the expression of early growth response 1 (Egr1) before the up-regulation of Dmp1. These results indicate that FGFR mediates the direct effects of extracellular Pi on the expression of Dmp1 in osteoblasts and enhance the close relationship between the signaling evoked by elevated extracellular Pi and FGF/FGFR signaling. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1151-1163, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Differential expression of extracellular matrix components in the Fallopian tubes throughout the menstrual cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Patricia S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the unique characteristics of the female genital tract is the extensive tissue remodeling observed throughout the menstrual cycle. Multiple components of the extracellular matrix take part in this tissue rebuilding; however, the individual components involved have not been identified. Methods In the present study, the expression of extracellular matrix proteins and selected matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activities in Fallopian tubes (FT throughout the menstrual cycle were examined by PCR array, immunocytochemistry, zymography and bioinformatics. Results Of the eighty-four genes analyzed, eighty-three were expressed in the FT during at least one stage of the menstrual cycle. We observed a significant increase (>/=2-fold in ADAMTS1, ADAMTS13, COL7A1, MMP3, MMP9, PECAM1, and THBS3 in the periovulatory phase compared to the follicular phase. Meanwhile, we observed a significant decrease (>/= 2-fold in COL7A1, ICAM1, ITGA8, MMP16, MMP9, CLEC3B, SELE and TIMP2 in the lutheal phase compared to the periovulatory phase. Immunocytochemistry showed that MMP-3 and MMP-9 were localized in the endosalpinx during all phases of the menstrual cycle. Gelatin zymograms detected non-cycle-dependent protease activity. Conclusions Several extracellular matrix components were regulated throughout the menstrual cycle in a cyclic pattern, suggesting a possible steroid regulation and a role in tissue remodeling and FT functions.

  14. Preserved extracellular matrix components and retained biological activity in decellularized porcine mesothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoganson, David M; Owens, Gwen E; O'Doherty, Elisabeth M; Bowley, Chris M; Goldman, Scott M; Harilal, Dina O; Neville, Craig M; Kronengold, Russell T; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2010-09-01

    Mesothelium tissues such as peritoneum and pleura have a thin and strong layer of extracellular matrix that supports mesothelial cells capable of rapid healing. Decellularized porcine mesothelium was characterized for strength, composition of the matrix and biological activity. The tensile strength of the material was 40.65 +/- 21.65 N/cm. Extracellular matrix proteins collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin as well as glycosaminoglycans were present in the material. Cytokines inherent in the extracellular matrix were preserved. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) were retained and the levels of VEGF and TGF-beta in the decellularized mesothelium were higher than those found in decellularized small intestinal submucosa (SIS). The decellularized mesothelium also stimulated human fibroblasts to produce more VEGF than fibroblasts grown on tissue culture plastic. Decellularized mesothelium is a sheet material with a combination of strength and biological activity that may have many potential applications in surgical repair and regenerative medicine. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of spaceflight on the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle after a crush injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, W. T.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaia, T. E.; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1992-01-01

    The organization and composition of the extracellular matrix were studied in the crush-injured gastrocnemius muscle of rats subjected to 0 G. After 14 days of flight on Cosmos 2044, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed and evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques from the five injured flight rodents and various earth-based treatment groups. In general, the repair process was similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to the organization of the extracellular matrix and myofibers. Small and large myofibers were present within an expanded extracellular matrix, indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with nonenlarged area of nonmuscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well organized and contained more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region, indicative of a delayed repair process, but did not demonstrate any chronic inflammation. Myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, being slowest in the flight animals and most complete in the tail-suspended ones.

  16. RNA sequencing identifies gene regulatory networks controlling extracellular matrix synthesis in intervertebral disk tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riester, Scott M; Lin, Yang; Wang, Wei; Cong, Lin; Mohamed Ali, Abdel-Moneim; Peck, Sun H; Smith, Lachlan J; Currier, Bradford L; Clark, Michelle; Huddleston, Paul; Krauss, William; Yaszemski, Michael J; Morrey, Mark E; Abdel, Matthew P; Bydon, Mohamad; Qu, Wenchun; Larson, Annalise N; van Wijnen, Andre J; Nassr, Ahmad

    2017-12-11

    Degenerative disk disease of the spine is a major cause of back pain and disability. Optimization of regenerative medical therapies for degenerative disk disease requires a deep mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling the structural integrity of spinal tissues. In this investigation, we sought to identify candidate regulatory genes controlling extracellular matrix synthesis in spinal tissues. To achieve this goal we performed high throughput next generation RNA sequencing on 39 annulus fibrosus and 21 nucleus pulposus human tissue samples. Specimens were collected from patients undergoing surgical discectomy for the treatment of degenerative disk disease. Our studies identified associations between extracellular matrix genes, growth factors, and other important regulatory molecules. The fibrous matrix characteristic of annulus fibrosus was associated with expression of the growth factors platelet derived growth factor beta (PDGFB), vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC), and fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9). Additionally we observed high expression of multiple signaling proteins involved in the NOTCH and WNT signaling cascades. Nucleus pulposus extracellular matrix related genes were associated with the expression of numerous diffusible growth factors largely associated with the transforming growth signaling cascade, including transforming factor alpha (TGFA), inhibin alpha (INHA), inhibin beta A (INHBA), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP2, BMP6), and others. this investigation provides important data on extracellular matrix gene regulatory networks in disk tissues. This information can be used to optimize pharmacologic, stem cell, and tissue engineering strategies for regeneration of the intervertebral disk and the treatment of back pain. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Interactions between Skeletal Muscle Myoblasts and their Extracellular Matrix Revealed by a Serum Free Culture System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Vishal; Dye, Danielle E; Kinnear, Beverley F; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Grounds, Miranda D; Coombe, Deirdre R

    2015-01-01

    Decellularisation of skeletal muscle provides a system to study the interactions of myoblasts with muscle extracellular matrix (ECM). This study describes the efficient decellularisation of quadriceps muscle with the retention of matrix components and the use of this matrix for myoblast proliferation and differentiation under serum free culture conditions. Three decellularisation approaches were examined; the most effective was phospholipase A2 treatment, which removed cellular material while maximizing the retention of ECM components. Decellularised muscle matrices were then solubilized and used as substrates for C2C12 mouse myoblast serum free cultures. The muscle matrix supported myoblast proliferation and differentiation equally as well as collagen and fibronectin. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that myoblasts seeded on muscle matrix and fibronectin differentiated to form long, well-aligned myotubes, while myoblasts seeded on collagen were less organized. qPCR analyses showed a time dependent increase in genes involved in skeletal muscle differentiation and suggested that muscle-derived matrix may stimulate an increased rate of differentiation compared to collagen and fibronectin. Decellularized whole muscle three-dimensional scaffolds also supported cell adhesion and spreading, with myoblasts aligning along specific tracts of matrix proteins within the scaffolds. Thus, under serum free conditions, intact acellular muscle matrices provided cues to direct myoblast adhesion and migration. In addition, myoblasts were shown to rapidly secrete and organise their own matrix glycoproteins to create a localized ECM microenvironment. This serum free culture system has revealed that the correct muscle ECM facilitates more rapid cell organisation and differentiation than single matrix glycoprotein substrates.

  18. Endocytosis of collagen by hepatic stellate cells regulates extracellular matrix dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yan; Mukhopadhyay, Dhriti; Drinane, Mary; Ji, Baoan; Li, Xing; Cao, Sheng; Shah, Vijay H

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) generate matrix, which in turn may also regulate HSCs function during liver fibrosis. We hypothesized that HSCs may endocytose matrix proteins to sense and respond to changes in microenvironment. Primary human HSCs, LX2, or mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) [wild-type; c-abl(-/-); or Yes, Src, and Fyn knockout mice (YSF(-/-))] were incubated with fluorescent-labeled collagen or gelatin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and confocal microscopy were used for measuring cellular internalization of matrix proteins. Targeted PCR array and quantitative real-time PCR were used to evaluate gene expression changes. HSCs and LX2 cells endocytose collagens in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Endocytosed collagen colocalized with Dextran 10K, a marker of macropinocytosis, and 5-ethylisopropyl amiloride, an inhibitor of macropinocytosis, reduced collagen internalization by 46%. Cytochalasin D and ML7 blocked collagen internalization by 47% and 45%, respectively, indicating that actin and myosin are critical for collagen endocytosis. Wortmannin and AKT inhibitor blocked collagen internalization by 70% and 89%, respectively, indicating that matrix macropinocytosis requires phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling. Overexpression of dominant-negative dynamin-2 K44A blocked matrix internalization by 77%, indicating a role for dynamin-2 in matrix macropinocytosis. Whereas c-abl(-/-) MEF showed impaired matrix endocytosis, YSF(-/-) MEF surprisingly showed increased matrix endocytosis. It was also associated with complex gene regulations that related with matrix dynamics, including increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) mRNA levels and zymographic activity. HSCs endocytose matrix proteins through macropinocytosis that requires a signaling network composed of PI3K/AKT, dynamin-2, and c-abl. Interaction with extracellular matrix regulates matrix dynamics through modulating multiple gene expressions including MMP-9

  19. Chondrogenic Differentiation Could Be Induced by Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds Without Exogenous Growth Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Jin, Chengzhe; Xu, Yan; Wei, Bo; Wang, Liming

    2016-02-01

    We previously found that the combination of an autologous bone mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular matrix (aBMSC-dECM) scaffold with bone marrow stimulation could enhance hyaline cartilage regeneration. We suspected that chondrogenic differentiation could be induced by the aBMSC-dECM scaffold. This study aimed to investigate whether aBMSC-dECM scaffolds could promote chondrogenic differentiation without exogenous growth factors. BMSCs were seeded on aBMSC-dECM scaffolds and cultured in vitro with or without transforming growth factor-β3 (E(+) or E(-) group). Atelocollagen scaffolds were used as controls (C(+) or C(-) group). The chondrogenic differentiation was evaluated by histological, biochemical, and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. After 3 weeks, cartilage-like tissue with a homogeneous structure, a high cartilaginous matrix content (proteoglycan and type II collagen), and high expression levels of cartilage-associated genes (COL2A1, ACAN, and SOX9) were observed in the E(+), E(-), and C(+) groups. In addition, BMSCs in each scaffold (E group or C group) were preconditioned with chondrogenic media in vitro for 1 week, and then implanted in the backs of nude mice for 3 weeks. Three weeks later, cartilage matrix formation (proteoglycan and type II collagen) was achieved only in the E group, confirmed by safranin O staining and immunohistochemical staining for type II collagen. Taken together, these results indicate that aBMSC-dECM scaffolds could induce chondrogenic differentiation. Thus, they could be successful candidate scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

  20. The extracellular matrix of the lung and its role in edema formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Pelosi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix is composed of a three-dimensional fiber mesh filled with different macromolecules such as: collagen (mainly type I and III, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, and proteoglycans. In the lung, the extracellular matrix has several functions which provide: 1 mechanical tensile and compressive strength and elasticity, 2 low mechanical tissue compliance contributing to the maintenance of normal interstitial fluid dynamics, 3 low resistive pathway for an effective gas exchange, d control of cell behavior by the binding of growth factors, chemokines, cytokines and the interaction with cell-surface receptors, and e tissue repair and remodeling. Fragmentation and disorganization of extracellular matrix components comprises the protective role of the extracellular matrix, leading to interstitial and eventually severe lung edema. Thus, once conditions of increased microvascular filtration are established, matrix remodeling proceeds fairly rapidly due to the activation of proteases. Conversely, a massive matrix deposition of collagen fiber decreases interstitial compliance and therefore makes the tissue safety factor stronger. As a result, changes in lung extracellular matrix significantly affect edema formation and distribution in the lung.A matriz extracelular é um aglomerado tridimensional demacromoléculas composta por: fibras colágenas (principalmente, tipos I e III, elastina, glicosaminoglicanos e proteoglicanos. No pulmão, a matriz extracelular tem várias funções, tais como: 1 promover estresse tensil e elasticidade tecidual, 2 contribuir para a manutenção da dinâmica de fluidos no interstício, 3 propiciar efetiva troca gasosa, 4 controlar a função celular através de sua ligação com fatores de crescimento, quimiocinas, citocinas e interação com receptores de superfície, e 5 remodelamento e reparo tecidual. A fragmentação e a desorganização da matriz extracelular pode acarretar edema intersticial e

  1. The Staphylococcus aureus extracellular matrix protein (Emp) has a fibrous structure and binds to different extracellular matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Jennifer; Neubauer, Svetlana; Pöllath, Christine; Hansen, Uwe; Rizzo, Fabio; Krafft, Christoph; Westermann, Martin; Hussain, Muzaffar; Peters, Georg; Pletz, Mathias W; Löffler, Bettina; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Tuchscherr, Lorena

    2017-10-20

    The extracellular matrix protein Emp of Staphylococcus aureus is a secreted adhesin that mediates interactions between the bacterial surface and extracellular host structures. However, its structure and role in staphylococcal pathogenesis remain unknown. Using multidisciplinary approaches, including circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron (TEM) and immunogold transmission electron microscopy, functional ELISA assays and in silico techniques, we characterized the Emp protein. We demonstrated that Emp and its truncated forms bind to suprastructures in human skin, cartilage or bone, among which binding activity seems to be higher for skin compounds. The binding domain is located in the C-terminal part of the protein. CD spectroscopy revealed high contents of β-sheets (39.58%) and natively disordered structures (41.2%), and TEM suggested a fibrous structure consisting of Emp polymers. The N-terminus seems to be essential for polymerization. Due to the uncommonly high histidine content, we suggest that Emp represents a novel type of histidine-rich protein sharing structural similarities to leucine-rich repeats proteins as predicted by the I-TASSER algorithm. These new findings suggest a role of Emp in infections of deeper tissue and open new possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  2. Association Between Extracellular Matrix Expansion Quantified by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and Short Term Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Timothy C.; Piehler, Kayla; Meier, Christopher G.; Testa, Stephen M.; Klock, Amanda M.; Aneizi, Ali A.; Shakesprere, Jonathan; Kellman, Peter; Shroff, Sanjeev G.; Schwartzman, David S.; Mulukutla, Suresh R.; Simon, Marc A.; Schelbert, Erik B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Extracellular matrix (ECM) expansion may be a fundamental feature of adverse myocardial remodeling, appears to be treatable, and its measurement may improve risk stratification. Yet, the relationship between mortality and ECM is not clear due to difficulties with its measurement. To assess its relationship with outcomes, we used novel, validated cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques to quantify the full spectrum of ECM expansion not readily detectable by conventional CMR. Methods and Results We recruited 793 consecutive patients at the time of CMR without amyloidosis or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as well as 9 healthy volunteers (ages 20–50). We measured the extracellular volume fraction (ECV) to quantify the extracellular matrix expansion in myocardium without myocardial infarction (MI). ECV employs gadolinium contrast (Gd) as an extracellular space marker based on T1 measures of blood and myocardium pre-/post-Gd and hematocrit measurement. In volunteers, ECV ranged from 21.7–26.2%, but in patients, it ranged from 21.0–45.8%, indicating considerable burden. There were 39 deaths over a median follow-up of 0.8 years (IQR 0.5–1.2 years), and 43 individuals who experienced the composite endpoint of death/cardiac transplant/left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. In Cox regression models, ECV related to all-cause mortality and the composite endpoint (HR 1.55; 95% CI 1.27–1.88 and HR 1.48; 95% CI 1.23–1.78, respectively, for every 3% increase in ECV), adjusting for age, left ventricular ejection fraction, and MI size. Conclusions ECV measures of extracellular matrix expansion may predict mortality as well as other composite endpoints (death/cardiac transplant/LVAD). PMID:22851543

  3. Young adult chondrocytes proliferate rapidly and produce a cartilaginous tissue at the gel-media interface in agarose cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Chevrier, Anik; Lascau-Coman, Viorica; Hoemann, Caroline D; Buschmann, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    Primary chondrocytes cultured in agarose can escape the gel, accumulate at the interface between agarose and the culture medium, and form an outgrowing tissue. These outgrowths can appear as voluminous cartilage-like nodules that have never been previously investigated. In the present study, bovine articular chondrocytes from three age groups (fetal, young adult, aged) were seeded and cultured in agarose to test the hypothesis that hyaline-like cartilage outgrowths develop at the interface by appositional growth, in an age-dependant manner. Macroscopic appearance, cell content, cell division, cytoskeletal morphology, and extracellular matrix (ECM) composition were analyzed. Fetal chondrocytes produced a fibrous interfacial tissue while aged chondrocytes produced ECM-poor cell clusters. In contrast young adult chondrocytes produced large cartilaginous outgrowths, rich in proteoglycan and collagen II, where cells in the central region displayed a chondrocyte morphology. Cell proliferation was confined to the peripheral edge of these outgrowths, where elongated cell morphology, cell-cell contacts, and cell extensions toward the culture medium were seen. Thus these voluminous cartilaginous outgrowths formed in an appositional growth process and only for donor chondrocytes from young adult animals. This system offers an interesting ability to proliferate chondrocytes in a manner that results in a chondrocyte morphology and a cartilaginous ECM in central regions of the outgrowing tissue. It also provides an in vitro model system to study neocartilage appositional growth.

  4. The ECM-Cell Interaction of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix on Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyun; Huang, Jingxiang; Guo, Weimin; Chen, Jifeng; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Bin; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi; Yuan, Mei; Guo, Quanyi

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is composed primarily of the network type II collagen (COLII) and an interlocking mesh of fibrous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs), hyaluronic acid (HA), and chondroitin sulfate (CS). Articular cartilage ECM plays a crucial role in regulating chondrocyte metabolism and functions, such as organized cytoskeleton through integrin-mediated signaling via cell-matrix interaction. Cell signaling through integrins regulates several chondrocyte functions, including differentiation, metabolism, matrix remodeling, responses to mechanical stimulation, and cell survival. The major signaling pathways that regulate chondrogenesis have been identified as wnt signal, nitric oxide (NO) signal, protein kinase C (PKC), and retinoic acid (RA) signal. Integrins are a large family of molecules that are central regulators in multicellular biology. They orchestrate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions from embryonic development to mature tissue function. In this review, we emphasize the signaling molecule effect and the biomechanics effect of cartilage ECM on chondrogenesis. PMID:24959581

  5. The ECM-Cell Interaction of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix on Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM is composed primarily of the network type II collagen (COLII and an interlocking mesh of fibrous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs, hyaluronic acid (HA, and chondroitin sulfate (CS. Articular cartilage ECM plays a crucial role in regulating chondrocyte metabolism and functions, such as organized cytoskeleton through integrin-mediated signaling via cell-matrix interaction. Cell signaling through integrins regulates several chondrocyte functions, including differentiation, metabolism, matrix remodeling, responses to mechanical stimulation, and cell survival. The major signaling pathways that regulate chondrogenesis have been identified as wnt signal, nitric oxide (NO signal, protein kinase C (PKC, and retinoic acid (RA signal. Integrins are a large family of molecules that are central regulators in multicellular biology. They orchestrate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions from embryonic development to mature tissue function. In this review, we emphasize the signaling molecule effect and the biomechanics effect of cartilage ECM on chondrogenesis.

  6. Mimicking cell/extracellular matrix adhesion with lipid membranes and solid substrates: requirements, pitfalls and proposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvelier, Damien; Vezy, Cyrille; Viallat, Annie; Bassereau, Patricia; Nassoy, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    The interest in physical approaches to the study of cell adhesion has generated numerous recent works on the development of substrates mimicking the extracellular matrix and the use of giant synthetic liposomes, commonly considered as basic models of living cells. The use of well-characterized bioactive substrates and artificial cells should allow us to gain new insight into the cell-extracellular matrix interactions, provided that their biomimetic relevance has been really proved. The aim of this paper is to define some minimal requirements for effective biomimetic features and to propose simple adhesion assays. We show, for instance, that immobilization of specific ligands is sometimes not sufficient to ensure specific adhesion of cells expressing the corresponding receptors. By investigating comparatively the adhesive behaviour of decorated erythrocytes and vesicles, we also discuss the potentialities and limitations of synthetic vesicles as test cells.

  7. Collective adhesion and displacement of retinal progenitor cells upon extracellular matrix substrates of transplantable biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ankush; Mishra, Shawn; Pena, Juan; Zhou, Jing; Redenti, Stephen; Majeska, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Strategies to replace retinal photoreceptors lost to damage or disease rely upon the migration of replacement cells transplanted into sub-retinal spaces. A significant obstacle to the advancement of cell transplantation for retinal repair is the limited migration of transplanted cells into host retina. In this work, we examine the adhesion and displacement responses of retinal progenitor cells on extracellular matrix substrates found in retina as well as widely used in the design and preparation of transplantable scaffolds. The data illustrate that retinal progenitor cells exhibit unique adhesive and displacement dynamics in response to poly-l-lysine, fibronectin, laminin, hyaluronic acid, and Matrigel. These findings suggest that transplantable biomaterials can be designed to improve cell integration by incorporating extracellular matrix substrates that affect the migratory behaviors of replacement cells. PMID:29344334

  8. [Changes in extracellular matrix in the lamina cribosa of patients with secondary glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thale, A B; Gordes, R S; Rochels, R; Tillmann, B

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the localization and distribution of extracellular matrix in normal and glaucomatous damaged optic discs using immunohistochemical methods. Five eyes donated for corneal allografting without any history of glaucoma and three other eyes with secondary glaucoma were studied. Immunohistochemical reactions were performed with antibodies against collagen types I, III, IV and VI and against laminin, proliferating antigen KI67 and GFAP. In glaucomatous eyes the characteristic arrangement of collagen fibrils is lacking. Septa of the lamina cribrosa appear enlarged. The immunoreactivity of all examined collagen types is stronger in glaucomatous eyes. The axon basement membranes show an irregular and interrupted pattern. The number of proliferating cells with positive GFAP staining in glaucomatous cribriform plates is distinctly higher. We postulate that fibroblasts and astrocytes in the stroma of glaucomatous lamina cribrosa could be stimulated to increased and uncontrolled proliferation. Associated disorganization and raised secretion of extracellular matrix may lead to axon constriction and, secondarily, to neural degeneration.

  9. Extracellular Matrix in Plants and Animals: Hooks and Locks for Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Stavolone

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of animal and plants cells plays important roles in viral diseases. While in animal cells extracellular matrix components can be exploited by viruses for recognition, attachment and entry, the plant cell wall acts as a physical barrier to viral entry and adds a higher level of difficulty to intercellular movement of viruses. Interestingly, both in plant and animal systems, ECM can be strongly remodeled during virus infection, and the understanding of remodeling mechanisms and molecular players offers new perspectives for therapeutic intervention. This review focuses on the different roles played by the ECM in plant and animal hosts during virus infection with special emphasis on the similarities and differences. Possible biotechnological applications aimed at improving viral resistance are discussed.

  10. Histologic examination of decellularized porcine intestinal submucosa extracellular matrix (CorMatrix) in pediatric congenital heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jennifer S; Fishbein, Michael C; Reemtsen, Brian

    2016-01-01

    CorMatrix is a decellularized porcine small intestinal submucosa extracellular matrix that has gained attention as a promising alternative to current materials used in cardiac repair. While animal models demonstrate integration of CorMatrix material with host tissue, the histologic characteristics of CorMatrix used in humans are less well-characterized. In this retrospective study, we report our experience with CorMatrix material used in pediatric congenital heart surgery and describe the histology of CorMatrix material and of surrounding native tissue in explanted specimens. Records were reviewed of all pediatric patients implanted with CorMatrix from a single institution (2011-2014). Histologic examinations were performed on CorMatrix and other tissues removed. Explanted samples of CorMatrix and adherent tissues were evaluated for inflammation (acute and chronic), fibrosis, necrosis, degenerative changes, eosinophil response, foreign-body giant cell reaction, neovascularization, and calcification of tissues on a semiquantitative basis (0, none; 1, mild; 2, moderate; 3, marked). Presence of degeneration within CorMatrix and necrosis of surrounding tissue were noted. CorMatrix was utilized in 532 pediatric heart reconstruction procedures since 2011. Twelve explanted CorMatrix specimens from 11 pediatric patients including 4 valves (2 mitral and 2 aortic) and 8 outflow/septal/conduit patches were identified and evaluated. Six cases (5 patients) demonstrated clinical evidence of graft failure prior to surgery (n=6, 1%). Chronic inflammation was seen in adjacent native tissue in 11/12 cases and consisted predominantly of a mixed population of lymphocytes, macrophages, and plasma cells. Acute inflammation was seen in three cases (3/12). Fibrosis of the surrounding native tissue was seen in all CorMatrix specimens. Eosinophils were present in 6/12 cases. Calcification in surrounding tissue was present in 3/12 cases. Giant cell reaction in adjacent native tissue was seen

  11. Extracellular matrix stiffness causes systematic variations in proliferation and chemosensitivity in myeloid leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-Won; Mooney, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix stiffness influences biological functions of some tumors. However, it remains unclear how cancer subtypes with different oncogenic mutations respond to matrix stiffness. In addition, the relevance of matrix stiffness to in vivo tumor growth kinetics and drug efficacy remains elusive. Here, we designed 3D hydrogels with physical parameters relevant to hematopoietic tissues and adapted them to a quantitative high-throughput screening format to facilitate mechanistic investigations into the role of matrix stiffness on myeloid leukemias. Matrix stiffness regulates proliferation of some acute myeloid leukemia types, including MLL-AF9+ MOLM-14 cells, in a biphasic manner by autocrine regulation, whereas it decreases that of chronic myeloid leukemia BCR-ABL+ K-562 cells. Although Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) integrin ligand and matrix softening confer resistance to a number of drugs, cells become sensitive to drugs against protein kinase B (PKB or AKT) and rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (RAF) proteins regardless of matrix stiffness when MLL-AF9 and BCR-ABL are overexpressed in K-562 and MOLM-14 cells, respectively. By adapting the same hydrogels to a xenograft model of extramedullary leukemias, we confirm the pathological relevance of matrix stiffness in growth kinetics and drug sensitivity against standard chemotherapy in vivo. The results thus demonstrate the importance of incorporating 3D mechanical cues into screening for anticancer drugs. PMID:27790998

  12. Macrophage-mediated proteolytic remodeling of the extracellular matrix in atherosclerosis results in neoepitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Barascuk, Natasha; Register, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    in almost all stages of atherosclerosis, by both initiating atherosclerotic plaques and degrading them through the secretion of proteolytic enzymes leading to rupture. This review summarizes the literature on the role of macrophages and their proteolytic activity on proteins in the extracellular matrix (ECM......) of the atherosclerotic plaque with a view to suggest a novel approach for identification of vulnerable plaques and turnover by the use of a new type of biomarker. The PubMed database was searched using the terms macrophages, foam cells, atherosclerosis, CVD, ECM remodeling, biomarker, neoepitope, matrix...

  13. MT1-MMP regulates the turnover and endocytosis of extracellular matrix fibronectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Feng; Sottile, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is dynamically remodeled by cells during development, normal tissue homeostasis and in a variety of disease processes. We previously showed that fibronectin is an important regulator of ECM remodeling. The deposition and/or polymerization of fibronectin into the ECM controls the deposition and stability of other ECM molecules. In addition, agents that inhibit fibronectin polymerization promote the turnover of fibronectin fibrils and enhance ECM fibronectin endocytosis and intracellular degradation. Endocytosis of ECM fibronectin is regulated by β1 integrins, including α5β1 integrin. We have examined the role of extracellular proteases in regulating ECM fibronectin turnover. Our data show that membrane type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP; also known as MMP14) is a crucial regulator of fibronectin turnover. Cells lacking MT1-MMP show reduced turnover and endocytosis of ECM fibronectin. MT1-MMP regulates ECM fibronectin remodeling by promoting extracellular cleavage of fibronectin and by regulating α5β1-integrin endocytosis. Our data also show that fibronectin polymerization stabilizes fibronectin fibrils and inhibits ECM fibronectin endocytosis by inhibiting α5β1-integrin endocytosis. These data are the first to show that an ECM protein and its modifying enzyme can regulate integrin endocytosis. These data also show that integrin trafficking plays a major role in modulating ECM fibronectin remodeling. The dual dependence of ECM fibronectin turnover on extracellular proteolysis and endocytosis highlights the complex regulatory mechanisms that control ECM remodeling to ensure maintenance of proper tissue function. PMID:22159414

  14. Regulation of corneal fibroblast morphology and collagen reorganization by extracellular matrix mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamichos, Dimitris; Lakshman, Neema; Petroll, W Matthew

    2007-11-01

    To investigate how extracellular matrix mechanical properties influence cell and matrix patterning in three-dimensional culture. Human corneal fibroblasts were seeded within 30 x 10 mm collagen matrices that were unconstrained (UN), fully constrained (CO) along the long axis by attaching the construct to two immobilized plastic bars, or partially constrained (PC) by allowing linear elastic displacement of one bar. After 24 hours, constructs were labeled with phalloidin and were imaged using fluorescent and reflected light (for collagen) confocal microscopy. Cell morphology and local collagen fibril density and alignment were measured using digital image processing. Corneal fibroblasts in UN matrices were less elongated (UN collagen density and the degree of cell/collagen coalignment were higher in constrained matrices (UN collagen were often observed between individual cells. These data suggest that cell spreading, alignment, and contractile force generation are directly influenced by the mechanical properties of the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). Corneal fibroblasts generally align and compact collagen parallel to the axis of greatest ECM stiffness. Mechanical cross-talk between adjacent cells leads to enhancement of matrix reorganization, and results in additional, more complex matrix patterning.

  15. TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF CARTILAGINOUS TISSUES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ar; Gu, Wy

    2009-02-01

    Cartilaginous tissues, such as articular cartilage and intervertebral disc, are avascular tissues which rely on transport for cellular nutrition. Comprehensive knowledge of transport properties in such tissues is therefore necessary in the understanding of nutritional supply to cells. Furthermore, poor cellular nutrition in cartilaginous tissues is believed to be a primary source of tissue degeneration, which may result in osteoarthritis (OA) or disc degeneration. In this mini-review, we present an overview of the current status of the study of transport properties and behavior in cartilaginous tissues. The mechanisms of transport in these tissues, as well as experimental approaches to measuring transport properties and results obtained are discussed. The current status of bioreactors used in cartilage tissue engineering is also presented.

  16. Extracellular matrix remodeling in wound healing of critical size defects in the mitral valve leaflet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Elizabeth H; Nguyen, Tom C; Blazejewski, Jack G; Vekilov, Dragoslava P; Connell, Jennifer P; Itoh, Akinobu; Ingels, Neil B; Miller, D Craig; Grande-Allen, K Jane

    2016-07-01

    The details of valvular leaflet healing following valvuloplasty and leaflet perforation from endocarditis are poorly understood. In this study, the synthesis and turnover of valvular extracellular matrix due to healing of a critical sized wound was investigated. Twenty-nine sheep were randomized to either CTRL (n = 11) or HOLE (n = 18), in which a 2.8-4.8 mm diameter hole was punched in the posterior mitral leaflet. After 12 weeks, posterior leaflets were harvested and histologically stained to localize extracellular matrix components. Immunohistochemistry was also performed to assess matrix components and markers of matrix turnover. A semi-quantitative grading scale was used to quantify differences between HOLE and CTRL. After 12 weeks, the hole diameter was reduced by 71.3 ± 1.4 % (p matrix turnover (prolyl 4-hydroxylase, metalloproteases, and lysyl oxidase, each p ≤ 0.025), along with fibrin accumulation. Two distinct remodeling regions were evident surrounding the hole, one directly bordering the hole rich in versican and hyaluronan and a second adjacent region with abundant collagen and elastic fiber turnover. The remodeling also caused reduced delineation between valve layers (p = 0.002), more diffuse staining of matrix components and markers of matrix turnover (p matrix composition and structure, resulting in partial wound closure. Because these changes could also affect leaflet mechanics and valve function, it will be important to determine their impact on healing wounds.

  17. Diet-induced obesity regulates adipose-resident stromal cell quantity and extracellular matrix gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Pincu, Yair; Huntsman, Heather D.; Zou, Kai; De Lisio, Michael; Ziad S. Mahmassani; Michael R. Munroe; Garg, Koyal; Jensen, Tor; Boppart, Marni D.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue expansion during periods of excess nutrient intake requires significant turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to allow for maximal lipid filling. Recent data suggest that stromal cells may be a primary contributor to ECM modifications in visceral adipose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the capacity for high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity to alter adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC) relative quantity and ECM gene expression, and determine the extent to which e...

  18. Three-dimensional extracellular matrix-mediated neural stem cell differentiation in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sewoon; Yang, Kisuk; Shin, Yoojin; Lee, Jung Seung; Kamm, Roger D; Chung, Seok; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2012-07-07

    Here, we report a unique method to quantify the effects of in vivo-like extracellular matrix (ECM) for guiding differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). We successfully monitored and quantified differentiation of NSCs in small volume ECMs and found that differentiation of NSCs, especially those differentiating towards neuronal and oligodendrocytic lineages, is significantly enhanced by 3D microenvironments reconstituted in the microfluidic channels.

  19. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Gillette, E. L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chaterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by gamma irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin immunoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid-remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

  20. Effects of oestrogen on the extracellular matrix in the endometrium of postmenopausal women.

    OpenAIRE

    Iwahashi, M; Ooshima, A; Nakano, R.

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To obtain insight into the effects of oestrogen on extracellular matrix (ECM) in the postmenopausal endometrium. METHODS: The distribution of the components of the ECM, including collagen types I, III, IV, and VI, and laminin, was investigated in the human postmenopausal endometrium by an indirect immunofluorescence method with specific monoclonal antibodies and a polyclonal antibody. Collagens were also extracted from the endometrial tissues of postmenopausal women who had or had not be...

  1. Interactions of human tenascin-X domains with dermal extracellular matrix molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Egging, D.; Berkmortel, F. van den; Taylor, G.; Bristow, J.; Schalkwijk, J

    2007-01-01

    Tenascin-X (TNX) is a large 450 kDa extracellular matrix protein expressed in a variety of tissues including skin, joints and blood vessels. Deficiency of TNX causes a recessive form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by joint hypermobility, skin fragility and hyperextensible skin. Skin of TNX deficient patients shows abnormal elastic fibers and reduced collagen deposition. The mechanism by which TNX deficiency leads to connective tissue alterations is unknown. Here we report that C-term...

  2. Targeting the extracellular matrix of ovarian cancer using functionalized, drug loaded lyophilisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, Sophieke C H A; Raavé, René; Langerak, Sjoerd; van Houdt, Laurens; van Duijnhoven, Sander M J; van Lith, Sanne A M; Massuger, Leon F A G; Daamen, Willeke F; Leenders, William P; van Kuppevelt, Toin H

    2017-04-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is characterized by a high mortality rate and is in need for novel therapeutic avenues to improve patient outcome. The tumor's extracellular matrix ("stroma") offers new possibilities for targeted drug-delivery. Recently we identified highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate (CS-E) as a component abundantly present in the ovarian cancer extracellular matrix, and as a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. Here, we report on the functionalization of drug-loaded lyophilisomes (albumin-based biocapsules) to specifically target the stroma of ovarian carcinomas with the potential to eliminate cancer cells. To achieve specific targeting, we conjugated single chain antibodies reactive with CS-E to lyophilisomes using a two-step approach comprising sortase-mediated ligation and bioorthogonal click chemistry. Antibody-functionalized lyophilisomes specifically targeted the ovarian cancer stroma through CS-E. In a CS-E rich micro-environment in vitro lyophilisomes induced cell death by extracellular release of doxorubicin which localized to the nucleus. Immunohistochemistry identified CS-E rich stroma in a variety of solid tumors other than ovarian cancer, including breast, lung and colon cancer indicating the potential versatility of matrix therapy and the use of highly sulfated chondroitin sulfates in cancer stroma as a micro-environmental hook for targeted drug delivery. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Osmotic spreading of Bacillus subtilis biofilms driven by an extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminara, Agnese; Angelini, Thomas E; Wilking, James N; Vlamakis, Hera; Ebrahim, Senan; Kolter, Roberto; Weitz, David A; Brenner, Michael P

    2012-01-24

    Bacterial biofilms are organized communities of cells living in association with surfaces. The hallmark of biofilm formation is the secretion of a polymeric matrix rich in sugars and proteins in the extracellular space. In Bacillus subtilis, secretion of the exopolysaccharide (EPS) component of the extracellular matrix is genetically coupled to the inhibition of flagella-mediated motility. The onset of this switch results in slow expansion of the biofilm on a substrate. Different strains have radically different capabilities in surface colonization: Flagella-null strains spread at the same rate as wild type, while both are dramatically faster than EPS mutants. Multiple functions have been attributed to the EPS, but none of these provides a physical mechanism for generating spreading. We propose that the secretion of EPS drives surface motility by generating osmotic pressure gradients in the extracellular space. A simple mathematical model based on the physics of polymer solutions shows quantitative agreement with experimental measurements of biofilm growth, thickening, and spreading. We discuss the implications of this osmotically driven type of surface motility for nutrient uptake that may elucidate the reduced fitness of the matrix-deficient mutant strains.

  4. Coming into focus: the role of extracellular matrix in vertebrate optic cup morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Kristen M

    2014-10-01

    The vertebrate eye acquires its basic form during the process of optic cup morphogenesis, during which the optic vesicle emerges from the brain neuroepithelium and, through a series of cell and tissue movements, transforms itself into the multilayered optic cup, containing neural retina (comprised of retinal progenitors), retinal pigmented epithelium, and the lens, which is derived from the overlying ectoderm. While great strides have been made to understand the developmental signals controlling specification, patterning, and differentiation of the optic cup, only in recent years have the cellular and molecular bases of optic cup morphogenesis begun to be unraveled. One critical component of the morphogenetic process is the extracellular matrix: the complex, glycoprotein-rich layer that surrounds the optic vesicle and lens. Though the extracellular matrix has long been visualized by classical histological techniques and postulated to play various roles in optic cup development, its functional role was uncertain. This is now beginning to change, as live imaging techniques, quantitative image analyses, molecular genetics and in vitro models yield new insights into the process of optic cup morphogenesis and the specific influences of particular extracellular matrix components and their associated signaling pathways. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Interaction between the extracellular matrix and lymphatics - consequences for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiig, Helge; Keskin, Doruk; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic system is important for body fluid balance as well as immunological surveillance. Due to the identification of new molecular markers during the last decade, there has been a recent dramatic increase in our knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in lymphatic vessel growth (lymphangiogenesis) and lymphatic function. Here we review data showing that although it is often overlooked, the extracellular matrix plays an important role in the generation of new lymphatic vessels as a response to physiological and pathological stimuli. Extracellular matrix-lymphatic interactions as well as biophysical characteristics of the stroma have consequences for tumor formation, growth and metastasis. During the recent years, anti-lymphangiogenesis has emerged as an additional therapeutic modality to the clinically applied anti-angiogenesis strategy. Oppositely, enhancement of lymphangiogenesis in situations of lymph accumulation is seen as a promising strategy to a set of conditions where few therapeutic avenues are available. Knowledge on the interaction between the extracellular matrix and the lymphatics may enhance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and may ultimately lead to better therapies for conditions where reduced or increased lymphatic function is the therapeutic target PMID:20727409

  6. Extracellular matrix components in a case of retrocorneal membrane associated with syphilitic interstitial keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, R; Saika, S; Wakayama, M; Ooshima, A; Ohnishi, Y; Yabe, H

    2001-01-01

    A web-like retrocorneal membrane (RCM) is an uncommon complication of chronic syphilitic interstitial keratitis. Extracellular matrix components have not yet been defined in this structure, although previous histologic examinations have suggested the presence of collagen. We examined the presence and distribution of extracellular matrix components in a patient with an RCM. A specimen of the opaque cornea affected by syphilitic interstitial keratitis with RCM formation was obtained during penetrating keratoplasty in a 62-year-old woman and was evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Antibodies against collagen types I, III, and IV; fibronectin; vimentin; alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA); heat shock protein 47 (Hsp 47); proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA); and Ki67 were used. Histologic analysis detected multiple concentric, acellular layers positive for collagen types I, III, and IV. The corneal endothelial cells (CECs) were positive for vimentin, collagen I, fibronectin, and Hsp 47 but not for alpha-SMA. Furthermore, the CECs were negative for PCNA and Ki67, indicating that they were not proliferating. SEM revealed the RCM was covered by CECs with a fibroblastic appearance. RCM associated with syphilitic interstitial keratitis contained collagen types I, III, and IV and fibroblast-like CECs. These CECs may secrete the extracellular matrix components found in the RCM. Hsp 47 up-regulation in the CECs may play an important role in RCM formation. These findings provide further insights into the phenotypic modulation of CECs.

  7. Relationships between melanocytes, mechanical properties and extracellular matrix composition in mouse heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Flavia; Kruithof, Boudewijn Pt; Balani, Kanthesh; Agarwal, Arvind; Gaussin, Vinciane; Kos, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Heart valves are complex structures composed of organized layers of extracellular matrix, and interstitial and overlying endothelial cells. In this article, we present the specific localization of a population of melanocytes within the murine heart valves at ages important for their post-natal development. In all stages analyzed in our study, melanocytes were found in high numbers populating the atrial aspect of the tricuspid and mitral leaflets. The pulmonary valve did not present melanocytes. To characterize a putative role for the valve melanocytes, the dynamic nanomechanical properties of tricuspid leaftets containing large numbers or no melanocytes were measured. The stiffness coefficient of hyperpigmented leaflets was higher (11.5 GPa) than the ones from wild-type (7.5 GPa) and hypopigmented (5.5 GPa) leaflets. These results suggest that melanocytes may contribute to the mechanical properties of the heart valves. The arrangement of extracellular matrix molecules such as Collagen I and Versican B is responsible for the mechanical characteristics of the leaflets. Melanocytes were found to reside primarily in areas of Versican B expression. The patterns of expression of Collagen I and Versican B were not, however, disrupted in hyper or hypopigmented leaflets. Melanocytes may affect other extracellular matrix molecules to alter the valves' microenvironment.

  8. Tensin 1 Is Essential for Myofibroblast Differentiation and Extracellular Matrix Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernau, Ksenija; Torr, Elizabeth E; Evans, Michael D; Aoki, Jason K; Ngam, Caitlyn R; Sandbo, Nathan

    2017-04-01

    Myofibroblasts, the primary effector cells that mediate matrix remodeling during pulmonary fibrosis, rapidly assemble an extracellular fibronectin matrix. Tensin (TNS) 1 is a key component of specialized cellular adhesions (fibrillar adhesions) that bind to extracellular fibronectin fibrils. We hypothesized that TNS1 may play a role in modulating myofibroblast-mediated matrix formation. We found that TNS1 expression is increased in fibroblastic foci from lungs with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β profoundly up-regulates TNS1 expression with kinetics that parallel the expression of the myofibroblast marker, smooth muscle α-actin. TGF-β-induced TNS1 expression is dependent on signaling through the TGF-β receptor 1 and is Rho coiled-coiled kinase/actin/megakaryoblastic leukemia-1/serum response factor dependent. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of TNS1 disrupted TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation, without affecting TGF-β/Smad signaling. In contrast, loss of TNS1 resulted in disruption of focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation, focal adhesion formation, and actin stress fiber development. Finally, TNS1 was essential for the formation of fibrillar adhesions and the assembly of nascent fibronectin and collagen matrix in myofibroblasts. In summary, our data show that TNS1 is a novel megakaryoblastic leukemia-1-dependent gene that is induced during pulmonary fibrosis. TNS1 plays an essential role in TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation and myofibroblast-mediated formation of extracellular fibronectin and collagen matrix. Targeted disruption of TNS1 and associated signaling may provide an avenue to inhibit tissue fibrosis.

  9. Toll-like receptor 2 activation and serum amyloid A regulate smooth muscle cell extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Stephanie E; Pessolano, Lawrence G; Bishop, Christopher A; Best, Michael; Rich, Celeste B; Stone, Phillip J; Schreiber, Barbara M

    2017-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells contribute to extracellular matrix remodeling during atherogenesis. De-differentiated, synthetic smooth muscle cells are involved in processes of migration, proliferation and changes in expression of extracellular matrix components, all of which contribute to loss of homeostasis accompanying atherogenesis. Elevated levels of acute phase proteins, including serum amyloid A (SAA), are associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis. Although infection with periodontal and respiratory pathogens via activation of inflammatory cell Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 has been linked to vascular disease, little is known about smooth muscle cell TLR2 in atherosclerosis. This study addresses the role of SAA and TLR2 activation on smooth muscle cell matrix gene expression and insoluble elastin accumulation. Cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells were treated with SAA or TLR2 agonists and the effect on expression of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and tropoelastin studied. SAA up-regulated MMP9 expression. Tropoelastin is an MMP9 substrate and decreased tropoelastin levels in SAA-treated cells supported the concept of extracellular matrix remodeling. Interestingly, SAA-induced down-regulation of tropoelastin was not only evident at the protein level but at the level of gene transcription as well. Contributions of proteasomes, nuclear factor κ B and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β on regulation of MMP9 vs. tropoleastin expression were revealed. Effects on Mmp9 and Eln mRNA expression persisted with long-term SAA treatment, resulting in decreased insoluble elastin accumulation. Interestingly, the SAA effects were TLR2-dependent and TLR2 activation by bacterial ligands also induced MMP9 expression and decreased tropoelastin expression. These data reveal a novel mechanism whereby SAA and/or infection induce changes in vascular elastin consistent with atherosclerosis.

  10. Cartilaginous tissue formation using a mechano-active scaffold and dynamic compressive stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Young Ha; Xie, Jun; Matsuda, Takehisa; Min, Byoung Goo

    2008-01-01

    It is known that complex loading is involved in the development and maintenance of articular cartilage in the body. It means the compressive mechanical stimulation is a very important factor for formation of articular cartilage using a tissue-engineering technique. The objective of this study is to engineer cartilaginous constructs with mechano-active scaffolds and to evaluate the effect of dynamic compression for regeneration of cartilage. The mechano-active scaffolds were prepared from a very elastic poly(L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) (PLCL) with 85% porosity and 300-500 mum pore size using a gel-pressing method. The scaffold was seeded with 2 x 10(6) chondrocytes and the continuous compressive deformation of 5% strain was applied with 0.1 Hz for 10 days and 24 days, respectively. Then, the chondrocytes-seeded constructs were implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. Mechano-active scaffolds with complete rubber-like elasticity showed almost complete (over 97%) recovery at an applied strain of up to 500%. The amount of chondral extracellular matrix was increased significantly by mechanical stimulation on the highly elastic mechano-active scaffolds. Histological analysis showed the mechanically stimulated implants formed mature and well-developed cartilaginous tissue, as evidenced by the chondrocytes within lacunae and the abundant accumulation of sulfated GAGs. However, unhealthy lacunae shapes and hypertrophy forms were observed in the implants stimulated mechanically for 24 days, compared with those stimulated for 10 days. In conclusion, the proper periodical application of dynamic compression can encourage chondrocytes to maintain their phenotypes and enhance the production of GAGs, which would improve the quality of cartilaginous tissue formed both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Development of a 3-D artificial extracellular matrix. Design concept and artificial vascular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, M J; Matsuda, T

    1991-01-01

    A photodimerizable monomer was synthesized and subsequently co-polymerized with a hydrophilic monomer to obtain a photocrosslinkable, water soluble polymer. This polymer attained a highly hydrated, gel-like phase on irradiation with ultraviolet (UV) light. Furthermore, incorporation of the well known cell adhesive ligand Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) peptidyl moiety into the above co-polymer resulted, on UV light irradiation, in a three-dimensional hydrophilic gel matrix containing cell adhesive ligands. The UV irradiation on a mixture of photocrosslinkable and cell adhesive polymer and smooth muscle cells in a medium trapped the cells throughout the gel matrix, indicating that the cell-entrapped gel and the designed synthetic polymer biomimic the media of the vascular wall and extracellular matrix, respectively.

  12. Mechanical phenotyping of cells and extracellular matrix as grade and stage markers of lung tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzetta, Valeria; Musella, Ida; Rapa, Ida; Volante, Marco; Netti, Paolo A; Fusco, Sabato

    2017-07-15

    The mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) regulates the properties, functions and healthiness of the tissues. When this is disturbed it changes the mechanical state of the tissue components, singularly or together, and cancer, along with other diseases, may start and progress. However, the bi-univocal mechanical interplay between cells and the ECM is still not properly understood. In this study we show how a microrheology technique gives us the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. The mechanical phenotyping was performed on the surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung. A correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Our findings suggest a sort of asymmetric modification of the mechanical properties of the cells and the extra-cellular matrix in the tumor, being the more compliant cell even though it resides in a stiffer matrix. Overall, the simultaneous mechanical characterization of the tissues constituents (cells and ECM) provided new support for diagnosis and offered alternative points of analysis for cancer mechanobiology. When the integrity of the mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix is disturbed cancer, along with other diseases, may initiate and progress. Here, we show how a new technique gives the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. It was applied on surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung and a correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hypoxia promotes primitive glycosaminoglycan-rich extracellular matrix composition in developing heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amofa, Dorothy; Hulin, Alexia; Nakada, Yuji; Sadek, Hesham A; Yutzey, Katherine E

    2017-12-01

    During postnatal heart valve development, glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-rich valve primordia transform into stratified valve leaflets composed of GAGs, fibrillar collagen, and elastin layers accompanied by decreased cell proliferation as well as thinning and elongation. The neonatal period is characterized by the transition from a uterine environment to atmospheric O2, but the role of changing O2 levels in valve extracellular matrix (ECM) composition or morphogenesis is not well characterized. Here, we show that tissue hypoxia decreases in mouse aortic valves in the days after birth, concomitant with ECM remodeling and cell cycle arrest of valve interstitial cells. The effects of hypoxia on late embryonic valve ECM composition, Sox9 expression, and cell proliferation were examined in chicken embryo aortic valve organ cultures. Maintenance of late embryonic chicken aortic valve organ cultures in a hypoxic environment promotes GAG expression, Sox9 nuclear localization, and indicators of hyaluronan remodeling but does not affect fibrillar collagen content or cell proliferation. Chronic hypoxia also promotes GAG accumulation in murine adult heart valves in vivo. Together, these results support a role for hypoxia in maintaining a primitive GAG-rich matrix in developing heart valves before birth and also in the induction of hyaluronan remodeling in adults.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Tissue hypoxia decreases in mouse aortic valves after birth, and exposure to hypoxia promotes glycosaminoglycan accumulation in cultured chicken embryo valves and adult murine heart valves. Thus, hypoxia maintains a primitive extracellular matrix during heart valve development and promotes extracellular matrix remodeling in adult mice, as occurs in myxomatous disease. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Mitochondrial function in engineered cardiac tissues is regulated by extracellular matrix elasticity and tissue alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra-Leite, Davi M; Andres, Allen M; Petersen, Andrew P; Ariyasinghe, Nethika R; Cho, Nathan; Lee, Jezell A; Gottlieb, Roberta A; McCain, Megan L

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondria in cardiac myocytes are critical for generating ATP to meet the high metabolic demands associated with sarcomere shortening. Distinct remodeling of mitochondrial structure and function occur in cardiac myocytes in both developmental and pathological settings. However, the factors that underlie these changes are poorly understood. Because remodeling of tissue architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM) elasticity are also hallmarks of ventricular development and disease, we hypothesize that these environmental factors regulate mitochondrial function in cardiac myocytes. To test this, we developed a new procedure to transfer tunable polydimethylsiloxane disks microcontact-printed with fibronectin into cell culture microplates. We cultured Sprague-Dawley neonatal rat ventricular myocytes within the wells, which consistently formed tissues following the printed fibronectin, and measured oxygen consumption rate using a Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer. Our data indicate that parameters associated with baseline metabolism are predominantly regulated by ECM elasticity, whereas the ability of tissues to adapt to metabolic stress is regulated by both ECM elasticity and tissue alignment. Furthermore, bioenergetic health index, which reflects both the positive and negative aspects of oxygen consumption, was highest in aligned tissues on the most rigid substrate, suggesting that overall mitochondrial function is regulated by both ECM elasticity and tissue alignment. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial function is regulated by both ECM elasticity and myofibril architecture in cardiac myocytes. This provides novel insight into how extracellular cues impact mitochondrial function in the context of cardiac development and disease.NEW & NOTEWORTHY A new methodology has been developed to measure O2 consumption rates in engineered cardiac tissues with independent control over tissue alignment and matrix elasticity. This led to the findings that matrix

  15. Visualization of extracellular matrix components within sectioned Salmonella biofilms on the surface of human gallstones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna M Marshall

    Full Text Available Chronic carriage of Salmonella Typhi is mediated primarily through the formation of bacterial biofilms on the surface of cholesterol gallstones. Biofilms, by definition, involve the formation of a bacterial community encased within a protective macromolecular matrix. Previous work has demonstrated the composition of the biofilm matrix to be complex and highly variable in response to altered environmental conditions. Although known to play an important role in bacterial persistence in a variety of contexts, the Salmonella biofilm matrix remains largely uncharacterized under physiological conditions. Initial attempts to study matrix components and architecture of the biofilm matrix on gallstone surfaces were hindered by the auto-fluorescence of cholesterol. In this work we describe a method for sectioning and direct visualization of extracellular matrix components of the Salmonella biofilm on the surface of human cholesterol gallstones and provide a description of the major matrix components observed therein. Confocal micrographs revealed robust biofilm formation, characterized by abundant but highly heterogeneous expression of polysaccharides such as LPS, Vi and O-antigen capsule. CsgA was not observed in the biofilm matrix and flagellar expression was tightly restricted to the biofilm-cholesterol interface. Images also revealed the presence of preexisting Enterobacteriaceae encased within the structure of the gallstone. These results demonstrate the use and feasibility of this method while highlighting the importance of studying the native architecture of the gallstone biofilm. A better understanding of the contribution of individual matrix components to the overall biofilm structure will facilitate the development of more effective and specific methods to disrupt these bacterial communities.

  16. Host-Parasite Interaction: Parasite-Derived and -Induced Proteases That Degrade Human Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Piña-Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic protozoa are among the most important pathogens worldwide. Diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichomoniasis, and trypanosomiasis affect millions of people. Humans are constantly threatened by infections caused by these pathogens. Parasites engage a plethora of surface and secreted molecules to attach to and enter mammalian cells. The secretion of lytic enzymes by parasites into host organs mediates critical interactions because of the invasion and destruction of interstitial tissues, enabling parasite migration to other sites within the hosts. Extracellular matrix is a complex, cross-linked structure that holds cells together in an organized assembly and that forms the basement membrane lining (basal lamina. The extracellular matrix represents a major barrier to parasites. Therefore, the evolution of mechanisms for connective-tissue degradation may be of great importance for parasite survival. Recent advances have been achieved in our understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of proteases from parasitic protozoa. The focus of this paper is to discuss the role of protozoan parasitic proteases in the degradation of host ECM proteins and the participation of these molecules as virulence factors. We divide the paper into two sections, extracellular and intracellular protozoa.

  17. The role of lysyl oxidase, the extracellular matrix and the pre-metastatic niche in bone metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gartland, Alison; Erler, Janine Terra; Cox, Thomas Robert

    2016-01-01

    and painful bone metastases is a complex process involving multiple cell types and steps. There is increasing evidence that modulation of the extracellular matrix plays an important role in the lethal transition from a primary to disseminated metastatic bone tumour. This review provides an overview...... of the current understanding on the role of role of lysyl oxidase, the extracellular matrix and the pre-metastatic niche in bone metastasis....

  18. Extracellular matrix mineralization in periodontal tissues: Noncollagenous matrix proteins, enzymes, and relationship to hypophosphatasia and X-linked hypophosphatemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Marc D.; Hoac, Betty; Addison, William N.; Barros, Nilana M.T.; Millán, José Luis; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    As broadly demonstrated for the formation of a functional skeleton, proper mineralization of periodontal alveolar bone and teeth – where calcium phosphate crystals are deposited and grow within an extracellular matrix – is essential to dental function. Mineralization defects in tooth dentin and cementum of the periodontium invariably lead to a weak (soft or brittle) dentition such that teeth become loose and prone to infection and are lost prematurely. Mineralization of the extremities of periodontal ligament fibres (Sharpey's fibres) where they insert into tooth cementum and alveolar bone is also essential for the function of the tooth suspensory apparatus in occlusion and mastication. Molecular determinants of mineralization in these tissues include mineral ion concentrations (phosphate and calcium), pyrophosphate, small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs), and matrix vesicles. Amongst the enzymes important in regulating these mineralization determinants, two are discussed at length here with clinical examples given, namely tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome (PHEX). Inactivating mutations in these enzymes in humans and in mouse models lead to the soft bones and teeth characteristic of hypophosphatasia (HPP) and X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), respectively, where levels of local and systemic circulating mineralization determinants are perturbed. In XLH, in addition to renal phosphate wasting causing low circulating phosphate levels, phosphorylated mineralization-regulating SIBLING proteins such as matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) and osteopontin (OPN), and the phosphorylated peptides proteolytically released from them such as the acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) peptide, may accumulate locally to impair mineralization in this disease. PMID:23931057

  19. Cytoskeletal filament assembly and the control of cell spreading and function by extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, D. J.; Langer, R.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze how cell binding to extracellular matrix produces changes in cell shape. We focused on the initial process of cell spreading that follows cell attachment to matrix and, thus, cell 'shape' changes are defined here in terms of alterations in projected cell areas, as determined by computerized image analysis. Cell spreading kinetics and changes in microtubule and actin microfilament mass were simultaneously quantitated in hepatocytes plated on different extracellular matrix substrata. The initial rate of cell spreading was highly dependent on the matrix coating density and decreased from 740 microns 2/h to 50 microns 2/h as the coating density was lowered from 1000 to 1 ng/cm2. At approximately 4 to 6 hours after plating, this initial rapid spreading rate slowed and became independent of the matrix density regardless of whether laminin, fibronectin, type I collagen or type IV collagen was used for cell attachment. Analysis of F-actin mass revealed that cell adhesion to extracellular matrix resulted in a 20-fold increase in polymerized actin within 30 minutes after plating, before any significant change in cell shape was observed. This was followed by a phase of actin microfilament disassembly which correlated with the most rapid phase of cell extension and ended at about 6 hours; F-actin mass remained relatively constant during the slow matrix-independent spreading phase. Microtubule mass increased more slowly in spreading cells, peaking at 4 hours, the time at which the transition between rapid and slow spreading rates was observed. However, inhibition of this early rise in microtubule mass using either nocodazole or cycloheximide did not prevent this transition. Use of cytochalasin D revealed that microfilament integrity was absolutely required for hepatocyte spreading whereas interference with microtubule assembly (using nocodazole or taxol) or protein synthesis (using cycloheximide) only partially suppressed cell extension. In

  20. Bioprinting of 3D Tissue Models Using Decellularized Extracellular Matrix Bioink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Bioprinting provides an exciting opportunity to print and pattern all the components that make up a tissue-cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) material-in three dimensions (3D) to generate tissue analogues. A large number of materials have been used for making bioinks; however, majority of them cannot represent the complexity of natural ECM and thus are unable to reconstitute the intrinsic cellular morphologies and functions. We present here a method for making of bioink from decellularized extracellular matrices (dECMs) and a protocol for bioprinting of cell-laden constructs with this novel bioink. The dECM bioink is capable of providing an optimized microenvironment that is conducive to the growth of 3D structured tissue. We have prepared bioinks from different tissues, including adipose, cartilage and heart tissues and achieved high cell viability and functionality of the bioprinted tissue structures using our novel bioink.

  1. The Dynamic Sclera: Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Normal Ocular Growth and Myopia Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Angelica R.; Summers, Jody A.

    2014-01-01

    Myopia is a common ocular condition, characterized by excessive elongation of the ocular globe. The prevalence of myopia continues to increase, particularly among highly educated groups, now exceeding 80% in some groups. In parallel with the increased prevalence of myopia, are increases in associated blinding ocular conditions including glaucoma, retinal detachment and macular degeneration, making myopia a significant global health concern. The elongation of the eye is closely related to the biomechanical properties of the sclera, which in turn are largely dependent on the composition of the scleral extracellular matrix. Therefore an understanding of the cellular and extracellular events involved in the regulation of scleral growth and remodeling during childhood and young adulthood will provide future avenues for the treatment of myopia and its associated ocular complications. PMID:25819458

  2. Extracellular matrix and cell shape: potential control points for inhibition of angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D.

    1991-01-01

    Capillary endothelial (CE) cells require two extracellular signals in order to switch from quiescence to growth and back to differentiation during angiogenesis: soluble angiogenic factors and insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Soluble endothelial mitogens, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), act over large distances to trigger capillary growth, whereas ECM molecules act locally to modulate cell responsiveness to these soluble cues. Recent studies reveal that ECM molecules regulate CE cell growth and differentiation by modulating cell shape and by activating intracellular chemical signaling pathways inside the cell. Recognition of the importance of ECM and cell shape during capillary morphogenesis has led to the identification of a series of new angiogenesis inhibitors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanism of capillary regulation may result in development of even more potent angiogenesis modulators in the future.

  3. [Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound promotes extracellular matrix synthesis of human osteoarthritis chondrocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Dengkui; Chen, Shirong; Yi, Gang; Wang, Pan; Tang, Ying; Zheng, Liwen; Chen, Junnan

    2016-11-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on the extracellular matrix synthesis of human osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes and explore the underlying mechanism. Methods Human osteoarthritis chondrocytes were collected from abandoned articular cartilage. Then the cells were cultured and identified by toluidine blue staining and immunocytochemical staining of type 2 collagen. The passage 2 cells were randomly divided into 3 groups: control OA group, 30 mW/cm(2) LIPUS-treated OA group, 30 mW/cm(2) LIPUS combined with 5 μmol/L LY294002-treated OA group. LIPUS treatment was performed for 20 minutes per day, totally 7 days. The mRNA levels of Col2, aggrecan and matrix metalloprotease 13 (MMP-13) were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The protein levels of Col2, aggrecan, Akt, p-Akt and MMP-13 were evaluated by Western blotting. Results Compared with the control OA group, the expressions of Col2 and aggrecan at both mRNA and protein levels significantly increased, and MMP-13 significantly reduced in the LIPUS-treated OA group. The p-Akt protein level was significantly elevated after LIPUS stimulation, but there was no significant difference in the Akt protein levels between the two groups. Moreover, LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt, significantly suppressed the biological effect activated by LIPUS. Conclusion LIPUS enhances the synthesis and inhibits the degradation of the extracellular matrix in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

  4. Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and extracellular matrix deposition by smooth-muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Shannon D.; Trent, Margaret B.; Boor, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    We have recently reported in vivo disruption of collagen and elastin architecture within blood vessel walls resulting from the selective inhibition of the enzyme semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO). This study further investigates the effects of SSAO inhibition on extracellular matrix deposition by smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) cultured from neonatal rat hearts. SMCs were characterized, SSAO activity was measured, and soluble and insoluble collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix (ECM) were quantified. Cultured neonatal rat heart SMC exhibited a monotypic synthetic phenotype that likely represents a myofibroblast. Detectable levels of SSAO activity present throughout 30-d culture peaked at 7-14 d, coinciding with the production of ECM. The addition of enzyme inhibitors and alternate SSAO substrates (benzylamine) produced varied and, in some cases, marked changes in SSAO activity as well as in the composition of mature and soluble matrix components. Similar to our previous in vivo findings, in vitro SSAO inhibition produced aberrations in collagen and elastin deposition by heart SMC. Because changes in SSAO activity are associated with cardiovascular pathologic states, this enzyme may play a protective or modulating role by regulating ECM production during pathologic insult.

  5. Scaffolding the retina: the interstitial extracellular matrix during rat retinal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Linnéa; Arnér, Karin; Engelsberg, Karl; Ghosh, Fredrik

    2015-05-01

    To examine the expression of interstitial extracellular matrix components and their role during retinal development. Fibronectin (FN), collagen IV (Coll IV) and laminin 5 (Lam 5) expression in rat retinas from developmental stages E17 to adult were studied. In addition, PN5 full-thickness retinas were cultured for 7 days with dispase, which selectively cleaves FN and Coll IV, at either 0.5 U/ml or 5.0 U/ml for 3 or 24h. Eyecups and retinal cultures were examined morphologically using hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Coll IV, Lam 5 and FN were all transiently expressed in the interstitial matrix of the retinal layers during development. The retinal layers in dispase treated explants was severely disturbed in a dose and time dependent manner. FN, Lam 5 and Coll IV, are present in the interstitial extracellular matrix during rat retinal development. Enzymatic cleavage of FN and Coll IV early in the lamination process disrupts the retinal layers implicating their pivotal role in this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. VANGL2 interacts with integrin αv to regulate matrix metalloproteinase activity and cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Tammy N; Jessen, Jason R

    2017-12-15

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins are implicated in a variety of morphogenetic processes including embryonic cell migration and potentially cancer progression. During zebrafish gastrulation, the transmembrane protein Vang-like 2 (VANGL2) is required for PCP and directed cell migration. These cell behaviors occur in the context of a fibrillar extracellular matrix (ECM). While it is thought that interactions with the ECM regulate cell migration, it is unclear how PCP proteins such as VANGL2 influence these events. Using an in vitro cell culture model system, we previously showed that human VANGL2 negatively regulates membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP14) and activation of secreted matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). Here, we investigated the functional relationship between VANGL2, integrin αvβ3, and MMP2 activation. We provide evidence that VANGL2 regulates cell surface integrin αvβ3 expression and adhesion to fibronectin, laminin, and vitronectin. Inhibition of MMP14/MMP2 activity suppressed the cell adhesion defect in VANGL2 knockdown cells. Furthermore, our data show that MMP14 and integrin αv are required for increased proteolysis by VANGL2 knockdown cells. Lastly, we have identified integrin αvβ3 as a novel VANGL2 binding partner. Together, these findings begin to dissect the molecular underpinnings of how VANGL2 regulates MMP activity and cell adhesion to the ECM. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Teaching the Extracellular Matrix and Introducing Online Databases within a Multidisciplinary Course with i-Cell-MATRIX: A Student-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Joao Carlos; Costa, Manuel Joao; Palha, Joana Almeida

    2010-01-01

    The biochemistry and molecular biology of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is difficult to convey to students in a classroom setting in ways that capture their interest. The understanding of the matrix's roles in physiological and pathological conditions study will presumably be hampered by insufficient knowledge of its molecular structure.…

  8. Hydrogel encapsulation environments functionalized with extracellular matrix interactions increase islet insulin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Laney M.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2009-01-01

    The individual and synergistic effects of extracellular matrix interactions on isolated islet function in culture were investigated within a three-dimensional poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel encapsulation environment. First, we observed similar glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from unencapsulated murine islets and islets photoencapsulated in PEG gels. Then islets were encapsulated in gels containing the basement membrane proteins collagen type IV and laminin, individually and in combination, at a total protein concentration of 100 μg/ml, and islet insulin secretion in response to high glucose was measured over time. Specific laminin interactions were investigated via islet encapsulation with adhesive peptide sequences found in laminin as well as via functional blocking of cell surface receptors known to bind laminin. Over 32 days, islet interactions with collagen type IV and laminin localized within the three-dimensional extracellular environment contributed to two-fold and four-fold increases in insulin secretion, respectively, relative to islets encapsulated without matrix proteins. Hydrogel compositions containing both matrix proteins and > 75% laminin further increased islet insulin secretion to approximately six-fold that of islets encapsulated in the absence of matrix proteins. Encapsulation with the peptide sequence IKVAV resulted in increased islet insulin secretion, but not to the extent observed in the presence of whole laminin. Increased insulin secretion in the presence of laminin was eliminated when islets were exposed to functionally blocking anti-α6 integrin antibody prior to islet encapsulation with laminin. Our results demonstrate the potential of specific matrix interactions within an islet encapsulation microenvironment to promote encapsulated islet function. PMID:18773957

  9. Pregnancy-induced adaptations in intramuscular extracellular matrix of rat pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Marianna; Kaddis, Timothy; Pichika, Rajeswari; Esparza, Mary C; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-08-01

    Birth trauma to pelvic floor muscles is a major risk factor for pelvic floor disorders. Intramuscular extracellular matrix determines muscle stiffness, supports contractile component, and shields myofibers from mechanical strain. Our goal was to determine whether pregnancy alters extracellular matrix mechanical and biochemical properties in a rat model, which may provide insights into the pathogenesis of pelvic floor muscle birth injury. To examine whether pregnancy effects were unique to pelvic floor muscles, we also studied a hind limb muscle. Passive mechanical properties of coccygeus, iliocaudalis, pubocaudalis, and tibialis anterior were compared among 3-month old Sprague-Dawley virgin, late-pregnant, and postpartum rats. Muscle tangent stiffness was calculated as the slope of the stress-sarcomere length curve between 2.5 and 4.0 μm, obtained from a stress-relaxation protocol at a bundle level. Elastin and collagen isoform concentrations were quantified by the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Enzymatic and glycosylated collagen crosslinks were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Data were compared by the use of repeated-measures, 2-way analysis of variance with Tukey post-hoc testing. Correlations between mechanical and biochemical parameters were assessed by linear regressions. Significance was set to P pelvic floor muscle stiffness did not differ from virgins (P > .3). A substantial increase in collagen V in coccygeus and pubocaudalis was observed in late-pregnant, compared with virgin, animals, (P pelvic floor muscles (P pelvic floor muscles, the tibialis anterior was unaltered by pregnancy. In contrast to other pelvic tissues, pelvic floor muscle stiffness increased in pregnancy, returning to prepregnancy state postpartum. This adaptation may shield myofibers from excessive mechanical strain during parturition. Biochemical alterations in pelvic floor muscle extracellular matrix due to pregnancy include increase in collagen V

  10. Cadherin-11 Overexpression Induces Extracellular Matrix Remodeling and Calcification in Mature Aortic Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Derek C; Bowen, Caitlin J; Vaidya, Kiran A; Zhou, Jingjing; Chapurin, Nikita; Recknagel, Andrew; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Jonathan; Kotlikoff, Michael; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2016-08-01

    Calcific aortic valve (AoV) disease is a significant clinical problem for which the regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Enhanced cell-cell adhesion is a common mechanism of cellular aggregation, but its role in calcific lesion formation is not known. Cadherin-11 (Cad-11) has been associated with lesion formation in vitro, but its function during adult valve homeostasis and pathogenesis is not known. This study aims to elucidate the specific functions of Cad-11 and its downstream targets, RhoA and Sox9, in extracellular matrix remodeling and AoV calcification. We conditionally overexpressed Cad-11 in murine heart valves using a novel double-transgenic Nfatc1(Cre);R26-Cad11(TglTg) mouse model. These mice developed hemodynamically significant aortic stenosis with prominent calcific lesions in the AoV leaflets. Cad-11 overexpression upregulated downstream targets, RhoA and Sox9, in the valve interstitial cells, causing calcification and extensive pathogenic extracellular matrix remodeling. AoV interstitial cells overexpressing Cad-11 in an osteogenic environment in vitro rapidly form calcific nodules analogous to in vivo lesions. Molecular analyses revealed upregulation of osteoblastic and myofibroblastic markers. Treatment with a Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor attenuated nodule formation, further supporting that Cad-11-driven calcification acts through the small GTPase RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase signaling pathway. This study identifies one of the underlying molecular mechanisms of heart valve calcification and demonstrates that overexpression of Cad-11 upregulates RhoA and Sox9 to induce calcification and extracellular matrix remodeling in adult AoV pathogenesis. The findings provide a potential molecular target for clinical treatment. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. The contribution of the extracellular matrix to gravisensing in characean cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    The cell-extracellular matrix junction, which includes the cell wall and the outer surface of the plasma membrane, may be an essential region for the perception of gravity by the internodal cells of Chara corallina. Typically, when an internodal cell is oriented vertically, the downwardly directed cytoplasmic stream travels at a velocity that is 10% faster than that of the upwardly directed stream. However when the cells are treated with impermeant hydrolytic enzymes that partially digest cellulose or hemicellulose, the cells lose their ability to respond to gravity even though streaming continues. By contrast, enzymes that digest pectins have no effect on the gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, gravisensing is sensitive to protease treatment; Proteinase K, thermolysin and collagenase but not trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin or carboxypeptidase B, inhibit gravisensing. These findings indicate that proteins in the cell-extracellular matrix junction may be required for gravisensing. Moreover, the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) inhibits gravisensing in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that the gravireceptor may be an integrin-like protein. The macromolecules necessary for gravisensing have been localized to the cell ends. As a consequence of the exoplasmic site of action of the enzymes and the tetrapeptides, we interpret the results to mean that they are acting on the gravireceptor, although we cannot eliminate the possibility that they are acting on the signal transduction chain. On the whole, our observations indicate that the cell-extracellular matrix junction is a sine qua non for graviperception in statolith-free Chara internodal cells and we suggest that the gravireceptor is located in this region.

  12. Gene Expression Profile of Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Molecules in the Human Normal Corneal Stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Huang, Hu; Sun, Guoying; Alwadani, Saeed; Semba, Richard D; Lutty, Gerard A; Yiu, Samuel; Edward, Deepak P

    2017-04-01

    There is limited information on region-specific gene expression in the human corneal stroma. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression profile of the extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules in the normal corneal stroma using laser capture microdissection (LCM) and molecular techniques. Frozen sections of human cornea without ocular disease were used to isolate the central and peripheral corneal stromal keratocytes by LCM. RNA was extracted from LCM-captured tissues and the RT2 Profiler PCR Arrays were used to examine the expression profile of extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules in the central and peripheral stroma. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to quantify gene expression. Proteomic and western blotting (WB) analyses were performed to confirm gene expression at protein level. Function association network was generated via the web tools String and Cytoscape. The gene expression profiling demonstrated that 35 out of the 84 extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules represented in the array were expressed in stromal keratocytes. Among them, 24 genes were not previously described in the corneal stroma. Two genes were found more abundantly expressed in the central stroma than in the periphery: TGFBI, COL6A2 (p < 0.05). ADAMTS13 was detected only in the central stroma. Proteomics and WB analysis confirmed the expression of 10 genes. Functional analysis revealed that most identified genes were presented in a core cluster that had multiple and strong associations with other genes. This study identified genes not previously described in the corneal stroma, revealed regional differences in gene expression between central and peripheral stroma, and also detected some interesting candidate genes that may play important roles in corneal function. These observations serve as the foundation to further investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating the pathogenesis of regional corneal stromal disorders such as keratoconus.

  13. CD44 Promotes Inflammation and Extracellular Matrix Production During Arteriovenous Fistula Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Go; Hashimoto, Takuya; Tsuneki, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Kota; Assi, Roland; Foster, Trenton R; Hanisch, Jesse J; Bai, Hualong; Hu, Haidi; Protack, Clinton D; Hall, Michael R; Schardt, John S; Jay, Steven M; Madri, Joseph A; Kodama, Shohta; Dardik, Alan

    2017-06-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) remain the optimal conduit for hemodialysis access but continue to demonstrate poor patency and poor rates of maturation. We hypothesized that CD44, a widely expressed cellular adhesion molecule that serves as a major receptor for extracellular matrix components, promotes wall thickening and extracellular matrix deposition during AVF maturation. AVF were created via needle puncture in wild-type C57BL/6J and CD44 knockout mice. CD44 mRNA and protein expression was increased in wild-type AVF. CD44 knockout mice showed no increase in AVF wall thickness (8.9 versus 26.8 μm; P=0.0114), collagen density, and hyaluronic acid density, but similar elastin density when compared with control AVF. CD44 knockout mice also showed no increase in vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in the AVF compared with controls; there were also no increased M2 macrophage markers (transglutaminase-2: 81.5-fold, P=0.0015; interleukin-10: 7.6-fold, P=0.0450) in CD44 knockout mice. Delivery of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 to CD44 knockout mice rescued the phenotype with thicker AVF walls (27.2 versus 14.7 μm; P=0.0306), increased collagen density (2.4-fold; P=0.0432), and increased number of M2 macrophages (2.1-fold; P=0.0335). CD44 promotes accumulation of M2 macrophages, extracellular matrix deposition, and wall thickening during AVF maturation. These data show the association of M2 macrophages with wall thickening during AVF maturation and suggest that enhancing CD44 activity may be a strategy to increase AVF maturation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Efficient decellularization for bovine pericardium with extracellular matrix preservation and good biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Li, Yang; Gong, Dejun; Xia, Cuiping; Liu, Xiaohong; Xu, Zhiyun

    2018-01-10

    In this study, we sought to explore an efficient decellularization protocol for bovine pericardia with better extracellular matrix preservation and good biocompatibility. Bovine pericardia were decellularized by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), SDS + sodium deoxycholate (SD), Triton X-100 (TX), TX + SD (TS), freeze-thaw cycles + SDS + SD (FSS) and freeze-thaw cycles + TX + SD (FTS), respectively. Untreated pericardia were used as native control. Histological examination, residual cellular content analysis, biochemical and biomechanical evaluations and cytotoxicity assay were performed to investigate decellularization efficiency, xenoantigens removal, extracellular matrix preservation and biocompatibility. In vivo biocompatibility was evaluated using a subcutaneous implantation method in rats. Among these protocols, FSS and FTS protocols were the most effective methods to remove both the DNA material and the galactose-α-1,3-galactose antigen. TX, TS and FTS bovine pericardia maintained the collagen content and had no cytotoxicity to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The contents of elastin and glycosaminoglycan were lost to different degrees after decellularization, with the highest content of preservation with TX, followed by TS and FTS. Consistently, no significant difference was found between native bovine pericardia and TX, TS or FTS bovine pericardia. In vivo, FTS implants had minimal infiltration of macrophages and T-lymphocytes, with no histological evidence of peri-implant necrosis and calcification. These results suggested that the FTS protocol showed optimal decellularization results with better extracellular matrix preservation and good biocompatibility. It may be a suitable protocol for producing a suitable scaffold for heart tissue engineering.

  15. Induction of Tenogenic Differentiation Mediated by Extracellular Tendon Matrix and Short-Term Cyclic Stretching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Burk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon and ligament pathologies are still a therapeutic challenge, due to the difficulty in restoring the complex extracellular matrix architecture and biomechanical strength. While progress is being made in cell-based therapies and tissue engineering approaches, comprehensive understanding of the fate of progenitor cells in tendon healing is still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of decellularized tendon matrix and moderate cyclic stretching as natural stimuli which could potentially direct tenogenic fate. Equine adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC were seeded on decellularized tendon matrix scaffolds. Mechanical stimulation was applied in a custom-made cyclic strain bioreactor. Assessment was performed 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h following mechanical stimulation. Scaffold culture induced cell alignment and changes in expression of tendon-related genes, although cell viability was decreased compared to monolayer culture. Short mechanical stimulation periods enhanced most of the scaffold-induced effects. Collagen 1A2 expression levels were decreased, while collagen 3A1 and decorin levels were increased. Tenascin-C and scleraxis expression showed an initial decrease but had increased 24 h after stimulation. The results obtained suggest that decellularized tendon matrix, supported by cyclic stretching, can induce tenogenic differentiation and the synthesis of tendon components important for matrix remodeling.

  16. In vitro enhancement of extracellular matrix formation as natural bioscaffold for stem cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naroeni, Aroem; Shalihah, Qonitha; Meilany, Sofy

    2017-02-01

    Growing cells in plastic with liquid media for in vitro study is very common but far from physiological. The use of scaffold materials is more biocompatible. Extracellular matrix provides tissue integrity which acts as a native scaffold for cell attachment and interaction, as well as it serves as a reservoir for growth factors. For this reason, we have developed natural scaffold from mice fibroblast to form a natural scaffold for stem cell culture. Fibroblasts were cultured under crowded condition and lysed to form natural scaffold. The natural scaffold formation was observed using immunofluorescence which then will be used and tested for stem cell propagation and differentiation.

  17. Understanding cardiac extracellular matrix remodeling to develop biomarkers of myocardial infarction outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Holm; Mouton, Alan J.; DeLeon-Pennell, Kristine Y.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is the most common cause of death in industrialized countries, and myocardial infarction (MI) is a major CVD with significant morbidity and mortality. Following MI, the left ventricle (LV) undergoes a wound healing response to ischemia that results in extracellular...... matrix (ECM) scar formation to replace necrotic myocytes. While ECM accumulation following MI is termed cardiac fibrosis, this is a generic term that does not differentiate between ECM accumulation that occurs in the infarct region to form a scar that is structurally necessary to preserve left ventricle...

  18. Of extracellular matrix, scaffolds, and signaling: Tissuearchitectureregulates development, homeostasis, and cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-03-09

    The microenvironment surrounding cells influences gene expression, such that a cell's behavior is largely determined by its interactions with the extracellular matrix, neighboring cells, and soluble cues released locally or by distant tissues. We describe the essential role of context and organ structure in directing mammary gland development and differentiated function, and in determining response to oncogenic insults including mutations. We expand on the concept of 'dynamic reciprocity' to present an integrated view of development, cancer, and aging, and posit that genes are like piano keys: while essential, it is the context that makes the music.

  19. Structural, biochemical, cellular, and functional changes in skeletal muscle extracellular matrix with aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Kjaer, M; Mackey, A L

    2011-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of skeletal muscle is critical for force transmission and for the passive elastic response of skeletal muscle. Structural, biochemical, cellular, and functional changes in skeletal muscle ECM contribute to the deterioration in muscle mechanical properties with aging...... of the changes in skeletal muscle ECM with aging may be preventable with resistance or weight training, but it is clear that more human studies are needed on the topic........ Structural changes include an increase in the collagen concentration, a change in the elastic fiber system, and an increase in fat infiltration of skeletal muscle. Biochemical changes include a decreased turnover of collagen with potential accumulation of enzymatically mediated collagen cross...

  20. Extracellular matrix regenerative graft attenuates the negative impact of polypropylene prolapse mesh on vagina in rhesus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rui; Knight, Katrina; Barone, William; Powers, Robert W; Nolfi, Alexis; Palcsey, Stacy; Abramowitch, Steven; Moalli, Pamela A

    2017-02-01

    The use of wide pore lightweight polypropylene mesh to improve anatomical outcomes in the surgical repair of prolapse has been hampered by mesh complications. One of the prototype prolapse meshes has been found to negatively impact the vagina by inducing a decrease in smooth muscle volume and contractility and the degradation of key structural proteins (collagen and elastin), resulting in vaginal degeneration. Recently, bioscaffolds derived from extracellular matrix have been used to mediate tissue regeneration and have been widely adopted in tissue engineering applications. Here we aimed to: (1) define whether augmentation of a polypropylene prolapse mesh with an extracellular matrix regenerative graft in a primate sacrocolpopexy model could mitigate the degenerative changes; and (2) determine the impact of the extracellular matrix graft on vagina when implanted alone. A polypropylene-extracellular matrix composite graft (n = 9) and a 6-layered extracellular matrix graft alone (n = 8) were implanted in 17 middle-aged parous rhesus macaques via sacrocolpopexy and compared to historical data obtained from sham (n = 12) and the polypropylene mesh (n = 12) implanted by the same method. Vaginal function was measured in passive (ball-burst test) and active (smooth muscle contractility) mechanical tests. Vaginal histomorphologic/biochemical assessments included hematoxylin-eosin and trichrome staining, immunofluorescent labeling of α-smooth muscle actin and apoptotic cells, measurement of total collagen, collagen subtypes (ratio III/I), mature elastin, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Statistical analyses included 1-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, and appropriate post-hoc tests. The host inflammatory response in the composite mesh-implanted vagina was reduced compared to that following implantation with the polypropylene mesh alone. The increase in apoptotic cells observed with the polypropylene mesh was blunted in the composite (overall P extracellular

  1. Enhanced Antimicrobial Effects of Decellularized Extracellular Matrix (CorMatrix) with Added Vancomycin and Gentamicin for Device Implant Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, Thomas F; Chang, Carlos; Snyder, Carl; Natarajan, Selvamuthu K; Matheny, Robert

    2017-06-01

    The incidence of cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) infections has risen significantly over the past years. Although several devices are currently available to decrease the incidence of infection, most are made from nonviable synthetic material and are more prone to infection than vascularized tissue. This study was undertaken to assess the resistance to infection of the CorMatrix CanGaroo (CorMatrix Cardiovascular, Roswell, GA, USA), a CIED envelope made of decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrated in different antibiotic solutions. This study was comprised of two in vitro tests and one animal trial. For all the tests, the ECM was hydrated in a mixture of vancomycin (25 mg/mL) and gentamicin (20 mg/mL) or gentamicin alone (40 mg/mL). The drug elution characteristics were assessed followed by the effectiveness of CanGaroo to prevent the bacterial growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis in culture. Then, the direct inoculation of pacemaker implant pockets with both Staphylococcus species was performed in rabbits implanted with either a pacemaker alone or a pacemaker with antibiotic-soaked CorMatrix ECM pouches. The hydration of CanGaroo envelopes in both antibiotic mixtures resulted in antimicrobial activity against both Staphylococcus species, with an early bolus release of antibiotics followed by a slow release lasting for up to 6 days. In vivo, there was a substantial decrease in the occurrence of infection. The hydration of the CanGaroo ECM with an antibiotic solution prevented Staphylococcus species growth in vitro and substantially reduced the incidence of CIED pocket infections in an in vivo rabbit model. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Extracellular Matrix Properties Regulate the Migratory Response of Glioblastoma Stem Cells in Three-Dimensional Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Perez, Marisol; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse infiltration across brain tissue is a hallmark of glioblastoma and the main cause of unsuccessful total resection that leads to tumor reappearance. A subpopulation termed glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) has been directly related to aggressive invasion; nonetheless, their migratory characteristics and regulation by the microenvironment are still unknown. In this study, we developed a composite matrix of hyaluronan (HA) structurally supported by a collagen-oligomer fibril network to simulate the brain tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Matrigel-coated microfibers were embedded within the matrix to create a tunable dual niche microenvironment that resembles the vascular network of the brain. This model was compared with the most commonly used in vitro three-dimensional (3D) culture formats, Matrigel and collagen type-I monomer matrices, to study how the mechanical and compositional properties of the ECM alter the migration characteristics of GSC neurospheres. The migration mode, distance, velocity, and morphology of the GSCs were monitored over a 72-h period. The cells altered their migration mode depending on the matrix composition, showing migration by expansive growth in Matrigel matrices, multicellular extension along rigid interfaces (as Matrigel glass and coated microfibers), and mesenchymal single-cell migration in collagen matrices. Velocity and distance of migration within each composition varied according to matrix mechanical properties. In the dual niche system, the presence of HA reduced velocity and number of migratory cells; however, cells that came in contact with the pseudovessels exhibited collective migration by an extensive strand and reached higher velocities than cells migrating individually across the 3D matrix. Our results show that GSCs adopt varied migration mechanisms to invade multiple ECM microenvironments, and the migration characteristics exhibited are highly influenced by the matrix physical properties. Moreover, GSC

  3. Embryonic lung morphogenesis in organ culture: experimental evidence for a proteoglycan function in the extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, B. S.; Bassett, K. E.; Spooner, B. S. Jr

    1993-01-01

    The lung rudiment, isolated from mid-gestation (11 day) mouse embryos, can undergo morphogenesis in organ culture. Observation of living rudiments, in culture, reveals both growth and ongoing bronchiolar branching activity. To detect proteoglycan (PG) biosynthesis, and deposition in the extracellular matrix, rudiments were metabolically labeled with radioactive sulfate, then fixed, embedded, sectioned and processed for autoradiography. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) types, composing the carbohydrate component of the proteoglycans, were evaluated by selective GAG degradative approaches that showed chondroitin sulfate PG principally associated with the interstitial matrix, and heparan sulfate PG principally associated with the basement membrane. Experiments using the proteoglycan biosynthesis disrupter, beta-xyloside, suggest that when chondroitin sulfate PG deposition into the ECM is perturbed, branching morphogenesis is compromised.

  4. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  5. Tendon development and musculoskeletal assembly: emerging roles for the extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Arul; Schilling, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments are extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich structures that interconnect muscles and bones. Recent work has shown how tendon fibroblasts (tenocytes) interact with muscles via the ECM to establish connectivity and strengthen attachments under tension. Similarly, ECM-dependent interactions between tenocytes and cartilage/bone ensure that tendon-bone attachments form with the appropriate strength for the force required. Recent studies have also established a close lineal relationship between tenocytes and skeletal progenitors, highlighting the fact that defects in signals modulated by the ECM can alter the balance between these fates, as occurs in calcifying tendinopathies associated with aging. The dynamic fine-tuning of tendon ECM composition and assembly thus gives rise to the remarkable characteristics of this unique tissue type. Here, we provide an overview of the functions of the ECM in tendon formation and maturation that attempts to integrate findings from developmental genetics with those of matrix biology. PMID:26672092

  6. Intracellular localization of the extracellular matrix enzyme lysyl oxidase in polarized epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Matthias K.; Csiszar, Katalin

    2007-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports novel functions for lysyl oxidase (LOX) beyond its traditional role in initiating crosslinkages in collagen and elastin within the extracellular matrix. These novel roles are particularly relevant during the transition of malignant epithelial cells towards a migratory and invasive phenotype. However, knowledge on cellular and matrix functions of LOX has been generated almost exclusively in mesenchymal cell types. But it is becoming increasingly evident that these cell types are not adequate to address these novel and highly significant roles for LOX in epithelial tissues. In this initial report, we demonstrate that active LOX is expressed by polarized MDCK II kidney and MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. Furthermore, we show evidence for the presence of mature LOX in the cytoplasm and establish these cell lines as models for epithelial LOX studies. PMID:17074474

  7. Selenoproteins regulate macrophage invasiveness and extracellular matrix-related gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladyshev Vadim N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selenium, a micronutrient whose deficiency in diet causes immune dysfunction and inflammatory disorders, is thought to exert its physiological effects mostly in the form of selenium-containing proteins (selenoproteins. Incorporation of selenium into the amino acid selenocysteine (Sec, and subsequently into selenoproteins is mediated by Sec tRNA[Ser]Sec. Results To define macrophage-specific selenoprotein functions, we generated mice with the Sec tRNA[Ser]Sec gene specifically deleted in myeloid cells. These mutant mice were devoid of the "selenoproteome" in macrophages, yet exhibited largely normal inflammatory responses. However, selenoprotein deficiency led to aberrant expression of extracellular matrix-related genes, and diminished migration of macrophages in a protein gel matrix. Conclusion Selenium status may affect immune defense and tissue homeostasis through its effect on selenoprotein expression and the trafficking of tissue macrophages.

  8. Interactions of human tenascin-X domains with dermal extracellular matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egging, David; van den Berkmortel, Franka; Taylor, Glen; Bristow, Jim; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2007-01-01

    Tenascin-X (TNX) is a large 450 kDa extracellular matrix protein expressed in a variety of tissues including skin, joints and blood vessels. Deficiency of TNX causes a recessive form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by joint hypermobility, skin fragility and hyperextensible skin. Skin of TNX deficient patients shows abnormal elastic fibers and reduced collagen deposition. The mechanism by which TNX deficiency leads to connective tissue alterations is unknown. Here we report that C-terminal domains of human TNX bind to major dermal fibrillar collagens and tropoelastin. We have mapped these interactions to the fibronectin type III repeat 29 (FNIII29) and the C-terminal fibrinogen domain (FbgX) of TNX. In addition we found that FNIII29 of TNX accelerates collagen fibrillogenesis in vitro. We hypothesize that TNX contributes to matrix stability and is possibly involved in collagen fibril formation.

  9. Levels of Circulating MMCN-151, a Degradation Product of Mimecan, Reflect Pathological Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, N; Vassiliadis, E; Zheng, Qiuju

    2011-01-01

    Arterial extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is one of the major hallmarks of atherosclerosis. Mimecan, also known as osteoglycin has been implicated in the integrity of the ECM. This study assessed the validity of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA...

  10. Matrilin-3 switches from anti- to pro-anabolic upon integration to the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Etienne, Stéphanie; Grossin, Laurent; Cottet, Justine; Bantsimba-Malanda, Claudie; Netter, Patrick; Mainard, Didier; Libante, Virginie; Gillet, Pierre; Magdalou, Jacques

    2012-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) has long been viewed primarily as an organized network of solid-phase ligands for integrin receptors. During degenerative processes, such as osteoarthritis, the ECM undergoes deterioration, resulting in its remodeling and in the release of some of its components. Matrilin-3 (MATN3) is an almost cartilage specific, pericellular protein acting in the assembly of the ECM of chondrocytes. In the past, MATN3 was found required for cartilage homeostasis, but also involved in osteoarthritis-related pro-catabolic functions. Here, to better understand the pathological and physiological functions of MATN3, its concentration as a circulating protein in articular fluids of human osteoarthritic patients was determined and its functions as a recombinant protein produced in human cells were investigated with particular emphasis on the physical state under which it is presented to chondrocytes. MATN3 down-regulated cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and up-regulated catabolism when administered as a soluble protein. When artificially immobilized, however, MATN3 induced chondrocyte adhesion via a α5β1 integrin-dependent mechanism, AKT activation and favored survival and ECM synthesis. Furthermore, MATN3 bound directly to isolated α5β1 integrin in vitro. TGFβ1 stimulation of chondrocytes allowed integration of exogenous MATN3 into their ECM and ECM-integrated MATN3 induced AKT phosphorylation and improved ECM synthesis and accumulation. In conclusion, the integration of MATN3 to the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes critically determines the direction toward which MATN3 regulates cartilage metabolism. These data explain how MATN3 plays either beneficial or detrimental functions in cartilage and highlight the important role played by the physical state of ECM molecules. Copyright © 2012 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Right ventricular function after repair of tetralogy of Fallot: a comparison between bovine pericardium and porcine small intestinal extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ronak; Johnson, Jason; Kumar, T K S; Philip, Ranjit; Boston, Umar; Knott-Craig, Christopher J

    2017-05-29

    The porcine small intestinal extracellular matrix reportedly has the potential to differentiate into viable myocardial cells. When used in tetralogy of Fallot repair, it may improve right ventricular function. We evaluated right ventricular function after repair of tetralogy of Fallot with extracellular matrix versus bovine pericardium. Subjects with non-transannular repair of tetralogy of Fallot with at least 1 year of follow-up were selected. The extracellular matrix and bovine pericardium groups were compared. We used three-dimensional right ventricular ejection fraction, right ventricle global longitudinal strain, and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion to assess right ventricular function. The extracellular matrix group had 11 patients, whereas the bovine pericardium group had 10 patients. No differences between the groups were found regarding sex ratio, age at surgery, and cardiopulmonary bypass time. The follow-up period was 28±12.6 months in the extracellular matrix group and 50.05±17.6 months in the bovine pericardium group (p=0.001). The mean three-dimensional right ventricular ejection fraction (55.7±5.0% versus 55.3±5.2%, p=0.73), right ventricular global longitudinal strain (-18.5±3.0% versus -18.0±2.2%, p=0.44), and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursions (1.59±0.16 versus 1.59±0.2, p=0.93) were similar in the extracellular matrix group and in the bovine pericardium group, respectively. Right ventricular global longitudinal strain in healthy children is reported at -29±3% in literature. In a small cohort of the patients undergoing non-transannular repair of tetralogy of Fallot, there was no significant difference in right ventricular function between groups having extracellular matrix versus bovine pericardium patches followed-up for more than 1 year. Lower right ventricular longitudinal strain noted in both the groups compared to healthy children.

  12. Identification of extracellular matrix components and their integrin receptors in the human fetal adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoux, E; Bolduc, L; Lehoux, J G; Gallo-Payet, N

    2001-05-01

    The development of the human fetal adrenal gland is characterized by a gradient of mitotic activity, cell migration, and cell apoptosis, all of which dictate its particular function. Such plasticity may possibly be under the control of the extracellular environment. The goal of this study was to identify components of the extracellular matrix in second-trimester fetal adrenal glands. Whereas collagen IV was expressed evenly throughout the gland, both fibronectin and laminin demonstrated a mirror-imaged distribution, with higher expression of fibronectin in the central portion and laminin at the periphery of the gland. The integrin subunit alpha1 was found mainly in the definitive zone and the alpha2-subunit mainly in the transitional zone, whereas integrin alpha3 (which binds both fibronectin and laminin) was detected only in the fetal zone. The beta2-subunit was observed solely in chromaffin cells. Such specific gradients of integrin and MEC component expression suggest that the extracellular environment does play a definite role during adrenal gland development. Indeed, compared with that in untreated plastic dishes, ACTH stimulation of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and cortisol was enhanced by collagen IV. In addition, fibronectin enhanced dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate but decreased cortisol secretion, compared with collagen IV substrates. These results provide fundamental insight into the contribution of the microenvironment in cellular processes leading to fetal adrenal gland development.

  13. Extra-cellular matrix changes in Schistosoma mansoni-infected Biomphalaria glabrata

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    Borges Claudia Maria da Cunha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactivity of snails against parasites exhibits a primitive focal reaction, with encapsulation, phagocytosis and destruction of parasite larvae by macrophage-like cells - the hemocytes. This reaction mimics granulomatous inflammation seen in higher animals. However, different from the latter, little is known about the participation of extra-cellular matrix in such snail defense reactions. Normal and Schistosoma mansoni-infected Biomphalaria glabrata of different strains were submitted to cytological, histological, ultrastructural and biochemical methods in order to investigate the behavior of extra-cellular tissues at the site of anti-parasite reactions. In spite of the presence of two cell-types in peripheral hemolymph, only one cell-type was present at the sites of tissue reactions. Although pre-existent collagen and elastic fibers and microfibrils sometimes appeared slightly compressed around focal reactions, no evidences of duplication, synthesis or deposition of connective-tissue extra-cellular components were observed within or around the zones of reactive cell accumulations. Thus, tissue reactions against S. mansoni in the snail B. glabrata appeared exclusively dependent on one specific population of hemocytes.

  14. Crosslinking of extracellular matrix scaffolds derived from pluripotent stem cell aggregates modulates neural differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sart, Sébastien; Yan, Yuanwei; Li, Yan; Lochner, Eric; Zeng, Changchun; Ma, Teng; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    At various developmental stages, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and their progeny secrete a large amount of extracellular matrices (ECMs) which could interact with regulatory growth factors to modulate stem cell lineage commitment. ECMs derived from PSC can be used as unique scaffolds that provide broad signaling capacities to mediate cellular differentiation. However, the rapid degradation of ECMs can impact their applications as the scaffolds for in vitro cell expansion and in vivo transplantation. To address this issue, this study investigated the effects of crosslinking on the ECMs derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and the regulatory capacity of the crosslinked ECMs on the proliferation and differentiation of reseeded ESC-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs). To create different biological cues, undifferentiated aggregates, spontaneous embryoid bodies, and ESC-derived NPC aggregates were decellularized. The derived ECMs were crosslinked using genipin or glutaraldehyde to enhance the scaffold stability. ESC-derived NPC aggregates were reseeded on different ECM scaffolds and differential cellular compositions of neural progenitors, neurons, and glial cells were observed. The results indicate that ESC-derived ECM scaffolds affect neural differentiation through intrinsic biological cues and biophysical properties. These scaffolds have potential for in vitro cell culture and in vivo tissue regeneration study. Dynamic interactions of acellular extracellular matrices and stem cells are critical for lineage-specific commitment and tissue regeneration. Understanding the synergistic effects of biochemical, biological, and biophysical properties of acellular matrices would facilitate scaffold design and the functional regulation of stem cells. The present study assessed the influence of crosslinked embryonic stem cell-derived extracellular matrix on neural differentiation and revealed the synergistic interactions of various matrix properties. While embryonic stem

  15. The Extracellular Matrix Component Psl Provides Fast-Acting Antibiotic Defense in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Nicole; Ramirez Millan, Maria; Caldara, Marina; Rusconi, Roberto; Tarasova, Yekaterina; Stocker, Roman; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria within biofilms secrete and surround themselves with an extracellular matrix, which serves as a first line of defense against antibiotic attack. Polysaccharides constitute major elements of the biofilm matrix and are implied in surface adhesion and biofilm organization, but their contributions to the resistance properties of biofilms remain largely elusive. Using a combination of static and continuous-flow biofilm experiments we show that Psl, one major polysaccharide in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix, provides a generic first line of defense toward antibiotics with diverse biochemical properties during the initial stages of biofilm development. Furthermore, we show with mixed-strain experiments that antibiotic-sensitive “non-producing” cells lacking Psl can gain tolerance by integrating into Psl-containing biofilms. However, non-producers dilute the protective capacity of the matrix and hence, excessive incorporation can result in the collapse of resistance of the entire community. Our data also reveal that Psl mediated protection is extendible to E. coli and S. aureus in co-culture biofilms. Together, our study shows that Psl represents a critical first bottleneck to the antibiotic attack of a biofilm community early in biofilm development. PMID:23950711

  16. Naturally Occurring Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Dermal Regeneration: Do They Really Need Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Eweida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pronounced effect of extracellular matrix (ECM scaffolds in supporting tissue regeneration is related mainly to their maintained 3D structure and their bioactive components. These decellularized matrix scaffolds could be revitalized before grafting via adding stem cells, fibroblasts, or keratinocytes to promote wound healing. We reviewed the online published literature in the last five years for the studies that performed ECM revitalization and discussed the results of these studies and the related literature. Eighteen articles met the search criteria. Twelve studies included adding cells to acellular dermal matrix (ADM, 3 studies were on small intestinal mucosa (SIS, one study was on urinary bladder matrix (UBM, one study was on amniotic membrane, and one study included both SIS and ADM loaded constructs. We believe that, in chronic and difficult-to-heal wounds, revitalizing the ECM scaffolds would be beneficial to overcome the defective host tissue interaction. This belief still has to be verified by high quality randomised clinical trials, which are still lacking in literature.

  17. Ubiquitylation functions in the calcium carbonate biomineralization in the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Dong; Pan, Cong; Lin, Huijuan; Lin, Ya; Xu, Guangrui; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2012-01-01

    Mollusks shell formation is mediated by matrix proteins and many of these proteins have been identified and characterized. However, the mechanisms of protein control remain unknown. Here, we report the ubiquitylation of matrix proteins in the prismatic layer of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. The presence of ubiquitylated proteins in the prismatic layer of the shell was detected with a combination of western blot and immunogold assays. The coupled ubiquitins were separated and identified by Edman degradation and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Antibody injection in vivo resulted in large amounts of calcium carbonate randomly accumulating on the surface of the nacreous layer. These ubiquitylated proteins could bind to specific faces of calcite and aragonite, which are the two main mineral components of the shell. In the in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization assay, they could reduce the rate of calcium carbonate precipitation and induce the calcite formation. Furthermore, when the attached ubiquitins were removed, the functions of the EDTA-soluble matrix of the prismatic layer were changed. Their potency to inhibit precipitation of calcium carbonate was decreased and their influence on the morphology of calcium carbonate crystals was changed. Taken together, ubiquitylation is involved in shell formation. Although the ubiquitylation is supposed to be involved in every aspect of biophysical processes, our work connected the biomineralization-related proteins and the ubiquitylation mechanism in the extracellular matrix for the first time. This would promote our understanding of the shell biomineralization and the ubiquitylation processes.

  18. Detection of Abnormal Extracellular Matrix in the Interstitium of Regenerating Renal Tubules

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    Will W. Minuth

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem/progenitor cells are promising candidates for the regeneration of parenchyma in acute and chronic renal failure. However, recent data exhibit that survival of stem/progenitor cells after implantation in diseased renal parenchyma is restricted. To elaborate basic parameters improving survival, cell seeding was simulated under advanced in vitro conditions. After isolation, renal stem/progenitor cells were mounted in a polyester interstitium for perfusion culture. During generation of tubules, chemically defined CO2 Independent Medium or Leibovitz’s L-15 Medium was applied. Specimens were then fixed for transmission electron microscopy to analyze morphological features in generated tubules. Fixation in conventional glutaraldehyde (GA solution shows development of tubules each exhibiting a polarized epithelium, an intact basal lamina and an inconspicuous interstitium. In contrast, special fixation of specimens in GA solution containing cupromeronic blue, ruthenium red or tannic acid unveils previously not visible extracellular matrix. Control experiments elucidate that a comparable extracellular matrix is not present in the interstitium of the matured kidney. Thus, generation of renal tubules in combination with advanced fixation of specimens for electron microscopy demonstrates that development of abnormal features in the newly developed interstitium has to be considered, when repair of renal parenchyma is performed by implantation of stem/progenitor cells.

  19. Extracellular matrix of dental pulp stem cells: Applications in pulp tissue engineering using somatic MSCs

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    Sriram eRavindran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental Caries affects approximately 90% of the world’s population. At present, the clinical treatment for dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality. Tissue engineering can potentially solve this problem by enabling regeneration of a functional pulp tissue. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs have been shown to be an excellent source for pulp regeneration. However, limited availability of these cells hinders its potential for clinical translation. We have investigated the possibility of using somatic mesenchymal stem cells from other sources for dental pulp tissue regeneration using a biomimetic dental pulp extracellular matrix (ECM incorporated scaffold. Human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and human bone marrow stromal cells (HMSCs were investigated for their ability to differentiate towards an odontogenic lineage. In vitro real-time PCR results coupled with histological and immunohistochemical examination of the explanted tissues confirmed the ability of PDLSCs and HMSCs to form a vascularized pulp-like tissue. These findings indicate that the dental pulp stem derived ECM scaffold stimulated odontogenic differentiation of PDLSCs and HMSCs without the need for exogenous addition of growth and differentiation factors. This study represents a translational perspective toward possible therapeutic application of using a combination of somatic stem cells and extracellular matrix for pulp regeneration.

  20. Expression of extracellular matrix proteins: tenascin-C, fibronectin and galectin-3 in prostatic adenocarcinoma

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    Monika Ulamec

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The interchanged stromal-epithelial relations and altered expression profiles of various extracellular matrix (ECM proteins creates a suitable microenvironment for cancer development and growth. We support the opinion that remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM plays an important role in the cancer progression. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of ECM proteins tenascin-C, fibronectin and galectin-3 in prostatic adenocarcinoma. Methods: Glands and surrounding stroma were analyzed in randomly selected specimens from 52 patients with prostate cancer and 28 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BHP. To evaluate the intensity of tenascin-C, fibronectin and galectin-3 expression the percentage of positively immunostained stromal cells was examined.Results: Compared to BPH, stroma of prostatic adenocarcinoma showed statistically significant increase in tenascin-C expression (p<0.001, predominantly around neoplastic glands, while fibronectin (p=0.001 and galectin-3 (p<0.001 expression in the same area was decreased.Conclusions: Our study confirms changes in the expression of ECM proteins of prostate cancer which may have important role in the cancer development.

  1. Heparanase isoform expression and extracellular matrix remodeling in intervertebral disc degenerative disease

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    Luciano Miller Reis Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the molecules involved in extracellular matrix remodeling and to identify and quantify heparanase isoforms present in herniated and degenerative discs. INTRODUCTION: Heparanase is an endo-beta-glucuronidase that specifically acts upon the heparan sulfate chains of proteoglycans. However, heparanase expression in degenerative intervertebral discs has not yet been evaluated. Notably, previous studies demonstrated a correlation between changes in the heparan sulfate proteoglycan pattern and the degenerative process associated with intervertebral discs. METHODS: Twenty-nine samples of intervertebral degenerative discs, 23 samples of herniated discs and 12 samples of non-degenerative discs were analyzed. The expression of both heparanase isoforms (heparanase-1 and heparanase-2 was evaluated using immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR analysis. RESULTS: Heparanase-1 and heparanase-2 expression levels were significantly higher in the herniated and degenerative discs in comparison to the control tissues, suggesting a possible role of these proteins in the intervertebral degenerative process. CONCLUSION: The overexpression of heparanase isoforms in the degenerative intervertebral discs and the herniated discs suggests a potential role of both proteins in the mediation of inflammatory processes and in extracellular matrix remodeling. The heparanase-2 isoform may be involved in normal metabolic processes, as evidenced by its higher expression in the control intervertebral discs relative to the expression of heparanase-1.

  2. TRANSGLUTAMINASE-2: A NEW ENDOSTATIN PARTNER IN THE EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX OF ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Clément; Inforzato, Antonio; Bignon, Marine; Hartmann, Daniel J.; Muller, Laurent; Ballut, Lionel; Olsen, Bjorn R.; Day, Anthony J.; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Endostatin, the C-terminal domain of collagen XVIII, binds to transglutaminase-2 (TG-2) in a cation-dependent manner. Recombinant human endostatin binds to TG-2 with an affinity in the nanomolar range (KD = 6.8 nM). Enzymatic assays indicated that, in contrast to other extracellular matrix proteins, endostatin is not a glutaminyl substrate of TG-2 and is not cross-linked to itself by the enzyme. Two arginine residues of endostatin, R27 and R139, are crucial for its binding to TG-2. They are also involved in the binding to heparin (Sasaki et al., EMBO J 18:6240–6248), and to α5β1 and αvβ3 integrins (Faye et al., J Biol Chem 284:22029–22040), suggesting that endostatin is not able to interact simultaneously with TG-2 and heparan sulfate, or with TG-2 and integrins. Inhibition experiments support the GTP binding site of TG-2 as a potential binding site for endostatin. Endostatin and TG-2 are colocalized in the extracellular matrix secreted by endothelial cells under hypoxia, that stimulates angiogenesis. This interaction occurring in a cellular context might participate in the concerted regulation of angiogenesis, and tumorigenesis by the two proteins. PMID:20156196

  3. Bubaline Cholecyst Derived Extracellular Matrix for Reconstruction of Full Thickness Skin Wounds in Rats

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    Poonam Shakya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An acellular cholecyst derived extracellular matrix (b-CEM of bubaline origin was prepared using anionic biological detergent. Healing potential of b-CEM was compared with commercially available collagen sheet (b-CS and open wound (C in full thickness skin wounds in rats. Thirty-six clinically healthy adult Sprague Dawley rats of either sex were randomly divided into three equal groups. Under general anesthesia, a full thickness skin wound (20 × 20 mm2 was created on the dorsum of each rat. The defect in group I was kept as open wound and was taken as control. In group II, the defect was repaired with commercially available collagen sheet (b-CS. In group III, the defect was repaired with cholecyst derived extracellular matrix of bovine origin (b-CEM. Planimetry, wound contracture, and immunological and histological observations were carried out to evaluate healing process. Significantly (P<0.05 increased wound contraction was observed in b-CEM (III as compared to control (I and b-CS (II on day 21. Histologically, improved epithelization, neovascularization, fibroplasia, and best arranged collagen fibers were observed in b-CEM (III as early as on postimplantation day 21. These findings indicate that b-CEM have potential for biomedical applications for full thickness skin wound repair in rats.

  4. Novel insights into the function and dynamics of extracellular matrix in liver fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsdal, Morten A; Manon-Jensen, Tina; Genovese, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that altered components and posttranslational modifications of proteins in the extracellular matrix (ECM) may both initiate and drive disease progression. The ECM is a complex grid consisting of multiple proteins, most of which play a vital role in containing the essent......Emerging evidence suggests that altered components and posttranslational modifications of proteins in the extracellular matrix (ECM) may both initiate and drive disease progression. The ECM is a complex grid consisting of multiple proteins, most of which play a vital role in containing......) explore key structural and functional components of the ECM as exemplified by monogenetic disorders leading to severe pathologies, 2) discuss selected pathological posttranslational modifications of ECM proteins resulting in altered functional (signaling) properties from the original structural proteins......, and 3) discuss how these findings support the novel concept that an increasing number of components of the ECM harbor signaling functions that can modulate fibrotic liver disease. The ECM entails functions in addition to anchoring cells and modulating their migratory behavior. Key ECM components...

  5. Salvage of Failed Local and Regional Flaps with Porcine Urinary Bladder Extracellular Matrix Aided Tissue Regeneration

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    Gregory J. Kruper

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Local and regional flap failure can be a major complication in head and neck surgery, which continue to be prevalent for a number of reasons including poor flap design, improper surgical technique, and poor tissue vascularity. Dealing with these failures can be quite difficult. Surgical debridement, flap revisions, and complex wound regimens are necessitated to reestablish appropriate tissue coverage. Traditional use of wet to dry dressing to enable proper wound granulation and possible closure with additional flaps or skin grafts is a laborious process. Such treatments place great time burdens on the patient, physicians, and nurses. Because the face and neck possess a complex three-dimensional topography, wound dressings are inherently complex to design and change. Many patients also require postoperative treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy to treat aggressive malignancies, and delay in wound healing leads to a delay in adjuvant treatment. Recently, advances in regenerative medicine, specifically xenogeneic extracellular matrix compounds, have been shown to promote tissue growth while limiting scar tissue formation (Badylak 2004. To our knowledge, this paper is the first case series using the porcine extracellular matrix bioscaffold (MatriStem ACell, Columbia, MD, USA to salvage flaps with extensive wound breakdown on the face and neck.

  6. Extracellular matrix components and culture regimen selectively regulate cartilage formation by self-assembling human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Johnathan; Wei, Yiyong; Zhou, Bin; Burapachaisri, Aonnicha; Guo, Edward; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-12-09

    Cartilage formation from self-assembling mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro recapitulate important cellular events during mesenchymal condensation that precedes native cartilage development. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) components and culture regimen on cartilage formation by self-assembling human MSCs in vitro and in vivo. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hMSCs) were seeded and compacted in 6.5-mm-diameter transwell inserts with coated (type I, type II collagen) or uncoated (vehicle) membranes, at different densities (0.5 × 10(6), 1.0 × 10(6), 1.5 × 10(6) per insert). Pellets were formed by aggregating hMSCs (0.25 × 10(6)) in round-bottomed wells. All tissues were cultured for up to 6 weeks for in vitro analyses. Discs (cultured for 6, 8 or 10 weeks) and pellets (cultured for 10 weeks) were implanted subcutaneously in immunocompromised mice to evaluate the cartilage stability in vivo. Type I and type II collagen coatings enabled cartilage disc formation from self-assembling hMSCs. Without ECM coating, hMSCs formed dome-shaped tissues resembling the pellets. Type I collagen, expressed in the prechondrogenic mesenchyme, improved early chondrogenesis versus type II collagen. High seeding density improved cartilage tissue properties but resulted in a lower yield of disc formation. Discs and pellets exhibited compositional and organizational differences in vitro and in vivo. Prolonged chondrogenic induction of the discs in vitro expedited endochondral ossification in vivo. The outcomes of cartilage tissues formed from self-assembling MSCs in vitro and in vivo can be modulated by the control of culture parameters. These insights could motivate new directions for engineering cartilage and bone via a cartilage template from self-assembling MSCs.

  7. An investigation of the influence of extracellular matrix anisotropy and cell–matrix interactions on tissue architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Dyson, R. J.

    2015-09-02

    © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg Mechanical interactions between cells and the fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) in which they reside play a key role in tissue development. Mechanical cues from the environment (such as stress, strain and fibre orientation) regulate a range of cell behaviours, including proliferation, differentiation and motility. In turn, the ECM structure is affected by cells exerting forces on the matrix which result in deformation and fibre realignment. In this paper we develop a mathematical model to investigate this mechanical feedback between cells and the ECM. We consider a three-phase mixture of collagen, culture medium and cells, and formulate a system of partial differential equations which represents conservation of mass and momentum for each phase. This modelling framework takes into account the anisotropic mechanical properties of the collagen gel arising from its fibrous microstructure. We also propose a cell–collagen interaction force which depends upon fibre orientation and collagen density. We use a combination of numerical and analytical techniques to study the influence of cell–ECM interactions on pattern formation in tissues. Our results illustrate the wide range of structures which may be formed, and how those that emerge depend upon the importance of cell–ECM interactions.

  8. Collagen XII and XIV, New Partners of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein in the Skin Extracellular Matrix Suprastructure*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R.; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-01-01

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone. PMID:22573329

  9. Preparation of a three-dimensional extracellular matrix by decellularization of rabbit livers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Nari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the availability of transplantable livers is not sufficient to fulfill the current demand for grafts, with the search for therapeutic alternatives having generated different lines of research, one of which is the use of decellularized three-dimensional biological matrices and subsequent cell seeding to obtain a functional organ. Objective: to produce a decellularization protocol from rabbit liver to generate a three-dimensional matrix. Methods: a combination of physical, chemical (Triton X-100 and SDS and enzymatic agents to decellularize rabbit livers was used. After 68 h of retrograde perfusion, a decellularized translucent matrix was generated. To evaluate if the decellularization protocol was successful, with the extracellular matrix being preserved, we carried out histological (light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy and biochemical (DNA quantification studies. Results: the decellularization process was verified by macroscopic observation of the organ using macroscopic staining, which revealed a correct conservation of bile and vascular trees. A microscopic observation corroborated these macroscopic results, with the hematoxylin-eosin staining showing no cells or nuclear material and the presence of a portal triad. Wilde's staining demonstrated the conservation of reticulin fibers in the decellularized matrix. In addition, scanning electron microscopy revealed a preserved Glisson's capsule and a decellularized matrix, with the DNA quantification being less than 10 % in the decellularized liver compared to control. Finally, the time taken to develop the decellularization protocol was less than 96 hours. Conclusions: the proposed decellularization protocol was correct, and was verified by an absence of cells. The hepatic matrix had preserved vascular and bile ducts with a suitable three-dimensional architecture permitting further cell seeding.

  10. High resolution three-dimensional reconstruction of fibrotic skeletal muscle extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Allison R; Chapman, Mark A; Bushong, Eric A; Deerinck, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Lieber, Richard L

    2017-02-15

    Fibrosis occurs secondary to many skeletal muscle diseases and injuries, and can alter muscle function. It is unknown how collagen, the most abundant extracellular structural protein, alters its organization during fibrosis. Quantitative and qualitative high-magnification electron microscopy shows that collagen is organized into perimysial cables which increase in number in a model of fibrosis, and cables have unique interactions with collagen-producing cells. Fibrotic muscles are stiffer and have a higher concentration of collagen-producing cells. These results improve our understanding of the organization of fibrotic skeletal muscle extracellular matrix and identify novel structures that might be targeted by antifibrotic therapy. Skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) structure and organization are not well understood, yet the ECM plays an important role in normal tissue homeostasis and disease processes. Fibrosis is common to many muscle diseases and is typically quantified based on an increase in ECM collagen. Through the use of multiple imaging modalities and quantitative stereology, we describe the structure and composition of wild-type and fibrotic ECM, we show that collagen in the ECM is organized into large bundles of fibrils, or collagen cables, and the number of these cables (but not their size) increases in desmin knockout muscle (a fibrosis model). The increase in cable number is accompanied by increased muscle stiffness and an increase in the number of collagen producing cells. Unique interactions between ECM cells and collagen cables were also observed and reconstructed by serial block face scanning electron microscopy. These results demonstrate that the muscle ECM is more highly organized than previously reported. Therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle fibrosis should consider the organization of the ECM to target the structures and cells contributing to fibrotic muscle function. © 2016 Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. The Journal of

  11. High fidelity visualization of cell-to-cell variation and temporal dynamics in nascent extracellular matrix formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Claire M.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix dynamics are key to tissue morphogenesis, homeostasis, injury, and repair. The spatiotemporal organization of this matrix has profound biological implications, but is challenging to monitor using standard techniques. Here, we address these challenges by using noncanonical amino acid tagging to fluorescently label extracellular matrix synthesized in the presence of bio-orthogonal methionine analogs. This strategy labels matrix proteins with high resolution, without compromising their distribution or mechanical function. We demonstrate that the organization and temporal dynamics of the proteinaceous matrix depend on the biophysical features of the microenvironment, including the biomaterial scaffold and the niche constructed by cells themselves. Pulse labeling experiments reveal that, in immature constructs, nascent matrix is highly fibrous and interdigitates with pre-existing matrix, while in more developed constructs, nascent matrix lacks fibrous organization and is retained in the immediate pericellular space. Inhibition of collagen crosslinking increases matrix synthesis, but compromises matrix organization. Finally, these data demonstrate marked cell-to-cell heterogeneity amongst both chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells undergoing chondrogenesis. Collectively, these results introduce fluorescent noncanonical amino acid tagging as a strategy to investigate spatiotemporal matrix organization, and demonstrate its ability to identify differences in phenotype, microenvironment, and matrix assembly at the single cell level. PMID:27941914

  12. [Effect of electroacupuncture intervention on expression of extracellular matrix collagen and metabolic enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jun; Zhang, Le; Ke, Mei-gui; Xu, Teng

    2013-12-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) at "Dazhui" (GV 14) on the contents of extracellular matrix (ECM), collagen type II (COL-II), collagen type V (COL-V), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 in rats with cervicovertebral disc degeneration so as to explore its mechanism underlying relief of intervertebral disc degeneration. A total of 28 SD rats were randomly divided into sham group (n = 7), model group (n = 7), EA group (n = 7) and medication group (n = 7). The model of cervical intervertebral disc degeneration was established by trans-section of the deep neck splenius, the longest muscles of head, neck costocervicalis, head semi-spinatus muscle, supraspinous ligament and interspinal ligaments of cervical 2-7 segments, etc. to produce imbalance between the dynamic and static force. EA was applied to "Dazhui" (GV 14) for 30 min, once daily for 28 days, with a 2 days' interval between two courses. Animals of the medication group were treated by oral administration of meloxicam tablets (0.75 mg/kg) once daily for 28 days, with a 2 days' interval between two courses. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure the expression of ECM, COL- II, COL-V, MMP-13 and TIMP-1 in the cervicovertebral disc tissue. Compared with the sham group, the expression levels of ECM and COL-II proteins in the cervicovertebral disc tissue were significantly decreased in the model group (P 0.05). EA of "Dazhui" (GV 14) can effectively regulate extracellular matrix system in rats with cervical intervertebral disc degeneration, which is possibly related to its effect in relieving cervical spondylosis.

  13. The effect on the extracellular matrix of the deep fascia in response to leg lengthening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yi-Yong

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whereas the alterations of diverse tissues in cellular and molecular levels have been investigated during leg lengthening via microscopy and biochemical studies, little is known about the response of deep fascia. This study aims to investigate the changes of the extracellular matrix in deep fascia in response to leg lengthening. Methods Animal model of leg lengthening was established in New Zealand white rabbits. Distraction was initiated at a rate of 1 mm/day and 2 mm/day in two steps, and preceded until increases of 10% and 20% in the initial length of tibia had been achieved. Alcian blue stain and picrosirius-polarization method were used for the study of the extracellular matrix of deep fascia samples. Leica DM LA image analysis system was used to investigate the quantitative changes of collagen type I and III. Results Alcian blue stain showed that glycosaminoglycans of fascia of each group were composed of chondroitin sulphate and heparin sulphate, but not of keratan sulphate. Under the polarization microscopy, the fascia consisted mainly of collagen type I. After leg lengthening, the percentage of collagen type III increased. The most similar collagen composition of the fascia to that of the normal fascia was detected at a 20% increase in tibia length achieved via a distraction rate of 1 mm/d. Conclusion The changes in collagen distribution and composition occur in deep fascia during leg lengthening. Although different lengthening schemes resulted in varied matrix changes, the most comparable collagen composition to be demonstrated under the scheme of a distraction rate of 1 mm/day and 20% increase in tibia length. Efficient fascia regeneration is initiated only in certain combinations of the leg load parameters including appropriate intensity and duration time, e.g., either low density distraction that persist a relatively short time or high distraction rates.

  14. Extracellular matrix from human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a scaffold for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Rao, Feng; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Wang, Yi-Guo; Liu, Shu-Yun; Wang, Ai-Yuan; Guo, Quan-Yi; Meng, Hao-Ye; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Lu, Shi-Bi

    2016-07-01

    The extracellular matrix, which includes collagens, laminin, or fibronectin, plays an important role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Recently, a Schwann cell-derived extracellular matrix with classical biomaterial was used to mimic the neural niche. However, extensive clinical use of Schwann cells remains limited because of the limited origin, loss of an autologous nerve, and extended in vitro culture times. In the present study, human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs), which are easily accessible and more proliferative than Schwann cells, were used to prepare an extracellular matrix. We identified the morphology and function of hUCMSCs and investigated their effect on peripheral nerve regeneration. Compared with a non-coated dish tissue culture, the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix enhanced Schwann cell proliferation, upregulated gene and protein expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion neurons. These findings suggest that the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix promotes peripheral nerve repair and can be used as a basis for the rational design of engineered neural niches.

  15. Sum of the parts: composition and architecture of the bacterial extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrate, Oscar A; Zhou, Xiaoxue; Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2013-11-15

    Bacterial biofilms are complex multicellular assemblies that exhibit resistance to antibiotics and contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative data are needed to define the molecular composition of bacterial biofilms. Escherichia coli biofilms are known to contain polysaccharides and functional amyloid fibers termed curli, yet accurate determinations of biofilm composition at the molecular level have been elusive. The ability to define the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial for the elucidation of structure-function relationships that will aid the development of chemical strategies to disrupt biofilms. We have developed an approach that integrates non-perturbative preparation of the ECM with electron microscopy, biochemistry, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy to define the chemical composition of the intact and insoluble ECM of a clinically important pathogenic bacterium--uropathogenic E. coli. Our data permitted a sum-of-all-the-parts analysis. Electron microscopy revealed supramolecular shell-like structures that encapsulated single cells and enmeshed the bacterial community. Biochemical and solid-state NMR measurements of the matrix and constitutive parts established that the matrix is composed of two major components, curli and cellulose, each in a quantifiable amount. This approach to quantifying the matrix composition is widely applicable to other organisms and to examining the influence of biofilm inhibitors. Collectively, our NMR spectra and the electron micrographs of the purified ECM inspire us to consider the biofilm matrix not as an undefined slime, but as an assembly of polymers with a defined composition and architecture. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel culture device for the evaluation of three-dimensional extracellular matrix materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhyari, Payam; Ziegler, Heiko; Gwanmesia, Patricia; Barth, Mareike; Schilp, Soeren; Huelsmann, Joern; Hoffmann, Stefanie; Bosch, Julia; Kögler, Gesine; Lichtenberg, Artur

    2014-09-01

    Cell-matrix interactions in a three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) are of fundamental importance in living tissue, and their in vitro reconstruction in bioartificial structures represents a core target of contemporary tissue engineering concepts. For a detailed analysis of cell-matrix interaction under highly controlled conditions, we developed a novel ECM evaluation culture device (EECD) that allows for a precisely defined surface-seeding of 3D ECM scaffolds, irrespective of their natural geometry. The effectiveness of EECD was evaluated in the context of heart valve tissue engineering. Detergent decellularized pulmonary cusps were mounted in EECD and seeded with endothelial cells (ECs) to study EC adhesion, morphology and function on a 3D ECM after 3, 24, 48 and 96 h. Standard EC monolayers served as controls. Exclusive top-surface-seeding of 3D ECM by viable ECs was demonstrated by laser scanning microscopy (LSM), resulting in a confluent re-endothelialization of the ECM after 96 h. Cell viability and protein expression, as demonstrated by MTS assay and western blot analysis (endothelial nitric oxide synthase, von Willebrand factor), were preserved at maintained levels over time. In conclusion, EECD proves as a highly effective system for a controlled repopulation and in vitro analysis of cell-ECM interactions in 3D ECM. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Expression of Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Basal Membranes During Fetal Nephron Development in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan GÜRCÜ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the distribution of laminin, collagen type IV, nidogen and fibronectine during metanephric development in fetal mouse kidney by immunohistochemistry. Stain density of basement membranes of tubules, glomerules and mesangial matrix were compared in pre-capillary, immature glomerular and mature glomerular stages of fetal kidney. All the matrix proteins were strongly stained in precapillary stage. In immature glomerular stage, a strong staining was observed for fibronectin. Staining intensity was slightly decreased for the other proteins in this stage. In mature glomerular stage, diminished staining for all proteins was observed similar to the previous stage, except fibronectin. The strongest immunoreactions were found for fibronectin and nidogen in all investigated stages. In general, there was a similar staining intensity for all glycoproteins during maturation except for laminin. It was thought that the distribution of extracellular matrix molecules plays an important role for the kidney development. Interactions amoung these molecules probably crucial on cell behavior like migration, proliferation and differentiation in normal development of the nephron.

  18. Morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of extracellular matrix changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Usha; Rai, Himanshu; Jain, Arun K

    2011-01-01

    The biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), including its progression from dysplasia to carcinoma, "field effects", genetic changes in tumor associated mucosa (TAM) and effect of matrix metalloproteinases in breaking down of matrix proteins to facilitate invasion, has been well documented. However, what remains to be done is to extrapolate this knowledge to improve patient care. The aim of this study was to observe the extracellular matrix (ECM) changes with the routine histochemical stains available to most histopathologists. The study includes 72 cases of OSCC in which the tumor and adjacent normal appearing areas were sampled to study the ECM changes with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and Verhoeff's-Van Gieson elastic stain (VVG). Basophilic fragmentation of collagen (H and E) and clumped short elastic fibers (VVG) were seen in 12 (16.7%) cases. Of the remaining cases, 18 (25%) had a dense lymphocytic infiltrate and had no demonstrable elastic fibers. Those cases with H and E changes were further studied and compared with normal mucosa for ultrastructural changes. The ultrastructural study demonstrated an increase in oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibers and decrease in collagen fibers with some transformation changes associated with OSCCs and lymph node metastasis. Changes in transformation of collagen to elastic fibers and also the loss of both the fibers in areas of lymphocytic infiltration possibly indicate degradation of ECM fibers by factors released from the lymphocytes or tumor cells and the limiting effect on the tumor by ECM remodeling.

  19. Effects of Ethanol on Brain Extracellular Matrix: Implications for Alcohol Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasek, Amy W

    2016-10-01

    The brain extracellular matrix (ECM) occupies the space between cells and is involved in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion. However, in addition to providing structural support to brain tissue, the ECM activates cell signaling and controls synaptic transmission. The expression and activity of brain ECM components are regulated by alcohol exposure. This review will discuss what is currently known about the effects of alcohol on the activity and expression of brain ECM components. An interpretation of how these changes might promote alcohol use disorder (AUD) will be also provided. Ethanol (EtOH) exposure decreases levels of structural proteins involved in the interstitial matrix and basement membrane, with a concomitant increase in proteolytic enzymes that degrade these components. In contrast, EtOH exposure generally increases perineuronal net components. Because the ECM has been shown to regulate both synaptic plasticity and behavioral responses to drugs of abuse, regulation of the brain ECM by alcohol may be relevant to the development of alcoholism. Although investigation of the function of brain ECM in alcohol abuse is still in early stages, a greater understanding of the interplay between ECM and alcohol might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for treating AUD. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  20. Dynamin Participates in Focal Extracellular Matrix Degradation by Invasive CellsV⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, Massimiliano; Pompeo, Arsenio; Beznoussenko, Galina; Castaldi, Claudia; Cortellino, Salvatore; McNiven, Mark A.; Luini, Alberto; Buccione, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) by matrix metalloproteases is crucial in physiological and pathological cell invasion alike. Degradation occurs at specific sites where invasive cells make contact with the ECM via specialized plasma membrane protrusions termed invadopodia. Herein, we show that the dynamin 2 (Dyn2), a GTPase implicated in the control of actin-driven cytoskeletal remodeling events and membrane transport, is necessary for focalized matrix degradation at invadopodia. Dynamin was inhibited by using two approaches: 1) expression of dominant negative GTPase-impaired or proline-rich domain-deleted Dyn2 mutants; and 2) inhibition of the dynamin regulator calcineurin by cyclosporin A. In both cases, the number and extension of ECM degradation foci were drastically reduced. To understand the site and mechanism of dynamin action, the cellular structures devoted to ECM degradation were analyzed by correlative confocal light-electron microscopy. Invadopodia were found to be organized into a previously undescribed ECM-degradation structure consisting of a large invagination of the ventral plasma membrane surface in close spatial relationship with the Golgi complex. Dyn2 seemed to be concentrated at invadopodia. PMID:12631724

  1. Preferential Enhancement of Sensory and Motor Axon Regeneration by Combining Extracellular Matrix Components with Neurotrophic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Daniel; González-Pérez, Francisco; Giudetti, Guido; Micera, Silvestro; Udina, Esther; Del Valle, Jaume; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-12-29

    After peripheral nerve injury, motor and sensory axons are able to regenerate but inaccuracy of target reinnervation leads to poor functional recovery. Extracellular matrix (ECM) components and neurotrophic factors (NTFs) exert their effect on different neuronal populations creating a suitable environment to promote axonal growth. Here, we assessed in vitro and in vivo the selective effects of combining different ECM components with NTFs on motor and sensory axons regeneration and target reinnervation. Organotypic cultures with collagen, laminin and nerve growth factor (NGF)/neurotrophin-3 (NT3) or collagen, fibronectin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) selectively enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons and motor neurite outgrowth from spinal cord slices respectively. For in vivo studies, the rat sciatic nerve was transected and repaired with a silicone tube filled with a collagen and laminin matrix with NGF/NT3 encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres (MP) (LM + MP.NGF/NT3), or a collagen and fibronectin matrix with BDNF in PLGA MPs (FN + MP.BDNF). Retrograde labeling and functional tests showed that LM + MP.NGF/NT3 increased the number of regenerated sensory neurons and improved sensory functional recovery, whereas FN + MP.BDNF preferentially increased regenerated motoneurons and enhanced motor functional recovery. Therefore, combination of ECM molecules with NTFs may be a good approach to selectively enhance motor and sensory axons regeneration and promote appropriate target reinnervation.

  2. Preferential Enhancement of Sensory and Motor Axon Regeneration by Combining Extracellular Matrix Components with Neurotrophic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Daniel; González-Pérez, Francisco; Giudetti, Guido; Micera, Silvestro; Udina, Esther; Del Valle, Jaume; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, motor and sensory axons are able to regenerate but inaccuracy of target reinnervation leads to poor functional recovery. Extracellular matrix (ECM) components and neurotrophic factors (NTFs) exert their effect on different neuronal populations creating a suitable environment to promote axonal growth. Here, we assessed in vitro and in vivo the selective effects of combining different ECM components with NTFs on motor and sensory axons regeneration and target reinnervation. Organotypic cultures with collagen, laminin and nerve growth factor (NGF)/neurotrophin-3 (NT3) or collagen, fibronectin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) selectively enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons and motor neurite outgrowth from spinal cord slices respectively. For in vivo studies, the rat sciatic nerve was transected and repaired with a silicone tube filled with a collagen and laminin matrix with NGF/NT3 encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres (MP) (LM + MP.NGF/NT3), or a collagen and fibronectin matrix with BDNF in PLGA MPs (FN + MP.BDNF). Retrograde labeling and functional tests showed that LM + MP.NGF/NT3 increased the number of regenerated sensory neurons and improved sensory functional recovery, whereas FN + MP.BDNF preferentially increased regenerated motoneurons and enhanced motor functional recovery. Therefore, combination of ECM molecules with NTFs may be a good approach to selectively enhance motor and sensory axons regeneration and promote appropriate target reinnervation. PMID:28036084

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 loss associated with impaired extracellular matrix remodeling disrupts chondrocyte differentiation by concerted effects on multiple regulatory factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzí, Rosa Maria; Olivotto, Eleonora; Pagani, Stefania; Vitellozzi, Roberta; Neri, Simona; Battistelli, Michela; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Facchini, Annalisa; Flamigni, Flavio; Penzo, Marianna; Platano, Daniela; Santi, Spartaco; Facchini, Andrea; Marcu, Kenneth B

    2010-08-01

    To link matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13) activity and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling to alterations in regulatory factors leading to a disruption in chondrocyte homeostasis. MMP-13 expression was ablated in primary human chondrocytes by stable retrotransduction of short hairpin RNA. The effects of MMP-13 knockdown on key regulators of chondrocyte differentiation (SOX9, runt-related transcription factor 2 [RUNX-2], and beta-catenin) and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) were scored at the protein level (by immunohistochemical or Western blot analysis) and RNA level (by real-time polymerase chain reaction) in high-density monolayer and micromass cultures under mineralizing conditions. Effects on cellular viability in conjunction with chondrocyte progression toward a hypertrophic-like state were assessed in micromass cultures. Alterations in SOX9 subcellular distribution were assessed using confocal microscopy in micromass cultures and also in osteoarthritic cartilage. Differentiation of control chondrocyte micromasses progressed up to a terminal phase, with calcium deposition in conjunction with reduced cell viability and scant ECM. MMP-13 knockdown impaired ECM remodeling and suppressed differentiation in conjunction with reduced levels of RUNX-2, beta-catenin, and VEGF. MMP-13 levels in vitro and ECM remodeling in vitro and in vivo were linked to changes in SOX9 subcellular localization. SOX9 was largely excluded from the nuclei of chondrocytes with MMP-13-remodeled or -degraded ECM, and exhibited an intranuclear staining pattern in chondrocytes with impaired MMP-13 activity in vitro or with more intact ECM in vivo. MMP-13 loss leads to a breakdown in primary human articular chondrocyte differentiation by altering the expression of multiple regulatory factors.

  4. HGF potentiates extracellular matrix-driven migration of human myoblasts: involvement of matrix metalloproteinases and MAPK/ERK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Mariela Natacha; de Mello, Wallace; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Silva-Barbosa, Suse Dayse; Mouly, Vincent; Savino, Wilson; Riederer, Ingo

    2017-10-10

    The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is required for the activation of muscle progenitor cells called satellite cells (SC), plays a role in the migration of proliferating SC (myoblasts), and is present as a soluble factor during muscle regeneration, along with extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. In this study, we aimed at determining whether HGF is able to interact with ECM proteins, particularly laminin 111 and fibronectin, and to modulate human myoblast migration. We evaluated the expression of the HGF-receptor c-Met, laminin, and fibronectin receptors by immunoblotting, flow cytometry, or immunofluorescence and used Transwell assays to analyze myoblast migration on laminin 111 and fibronectin in the absence or presence of HGF. Zymography was used to check whether HGF could modulate the production of matrix metalloproteinases by human myoblasts, and the activation of MAPK/ERK pathways was evaluated by immunoblotting. We demonstrated that human myoblasts express c-Met, together with laminin and fibronectin receptors. We observed that human laminin 111 and fibronectin have a chemotactic effect on myoblast migration, and this was synergistically increased when low doses of HGF were added. We detected an increase in MMP-2 activity in myoblasts treated with HGF. Conversely, MMP-2 inhibition decreased the HGF-associated stimulation of cell migration triggered by laminin or fibronectin. HGF treatment also induced in human myoblasts activation of MAPK/ERK pathways, whose specific inhibition decreased the HGF-associated stimulus of cell migration triggered by laminin 111 or fibronectin. We demonstrate that HGF induces ERK phosphorylation and MMP production, thus stimulating human myoblast migration on ECM molecules. Conceptually, these data state that the mechanisms involved in the migration of human myoblasts comprise both soluble and insoluble moieties. This should be taken into account to optimize the design of therapeutic cell transplantation strategies by improving

  5. Effect of advanced glycation end products, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer and matrix metalloproteinases on type-I collagen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wang; Ling, Wang; Teng, Xiaomei; Quan, Cuixia; Cai, Shengnan; Hu, Shuqun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association among advanced glycation end products (AGEs), extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), and investigate whether AGEs affect type I collagen (COL-I) through EMMPRIN or MMPs. A co-culture system with the osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3E1) and mouse RAW264.7 cells was employed to examine the effects of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) (50 mg/l), EMMPRIN antibody (5 mg/l) and AGE-BSA+EMMPRIN antibody separately on COL-I expression for 24 h. Culture media were analyzed for the content of COL-I by ELISA. The effect of different concentrations of AGE-BSA (0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/l) for 24 h was assessed on COL-I levels. Finally, semiquantitative RT-PCR was used to detect the osteoblast COL-I mRNA expression and MMP-2 and MMP-9's PMAO were also measured in the culture medium. COL-I content in the culture medium decreased significantly following treatment with AGE-BSA (P<0.05). EMMPRIN antibody increased COL-I content (P<0.05). EMMPRIN antibody+AGE-BSA increased COL-I significantly (P<0.05). Different concentrations of AGE-BSA increased COL-I mRNA expression significantly compared with the control group (P<0.05), and were enhanced with increasing AGE-BSA concentration (P<0.05). Also MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion increased significantly (P<0.05), with the increasing AGE-BSA concentration. In conclusion, an increase in AGE levels in vitro stimulates the secretion of EMMPRIN/MMPs, promotes the degradation of COL-I and reduces bone strength.

  6. The extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C and matrix metalloproteinases modify cerebellar structural plasticity by exposure to an enriched environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenkovic, Vera; Stamenkovic, Stefan; Jaworski, Tomasz; Gawlak, Maciej; Jovanovic, Milos; Jakovcevski, Igor; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Schachner, Melitta; Radenovic, Lidija; Andjus, Pavle R

    2017-01-01

    The importance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoprotein tenascin-C (TnC) and the ECM degrading enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2 and -9, in cerebellar histogenesis is well established. This study aimed to examine whether there is a functional relationship between these molecules in regulating structural plasticity of the lateral deep cerebellar nucleus. To this end, starting from postnatal day 21, TnC- or MMP-9-deficient mice were exposed to an enriched environment (EE). We show that 8 weeks of exposure to EE leads to reduced lectin-based staining of perineuronal nets (PNNs), reduction in the size of GABAergic and increase in the number and size of glutamatergic synaptic terminals in wild-type mice. Conversely, TnC-deficient mice showed reduced staining of PNNs compared to wild-type mice maintained under standard conditions, and exposure to EE did not further reduce, but even slightly increased PNN staining. EE did not affect the densities of the two types of synaptic terminals in TnC-deficient mice, while the size of inhibitory, but not excitatory synaptic terminals was increased. In the time frame of 4-8 weeks, MMP-9, but not MMP-2, was observed to influence PNN remodeling and cerebellar synaptic plasticity as revealed by measurement of MMP-9 activity and colocalization with PNNs and synaptic markers. These findings were supported by observations on MMP-9-deficient mice. The present study suggests that TnC contributes to the regulation of structural plasticity in the cerebellum and that interactions between TnC and MMP-9 are likely to be important for these processes to occur.

  7. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Li, Zheng-Wei; Luo, Min; Li, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Ke-Qiang

    2015-06-01

    The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better regeneration was

  8. Impact of TGF-β inhibition during acute exercise on Achilles tendon extracellular matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potter, Ross M; Huynh, Richard T; Volper, Brent D

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of TGF-β1 in regulating tendon extracellular matrix after acute exercise. Wistar rats exercised (n = 15) on a treadmill for four consecutive days (60 min/day) or maintained normal cage activity. After each exercise bout, the peritendinous space...... of each Achilles tendon was injected with a TGF-β1 receptor inhibitor or sham. Independent of group, tendons injected with inhibitor exhibited ~50% lower Smad 3 (Ser423/425) (P ... not alter collagen content in either group (P > 0.05). In exercised rats, hydroxylyslpyridinoline content and collagen III expression were lower (P tendons injected with inhibitor when compared with sham. In nonexercised rats, collagen I and lysyl oxidase (LOX) expression was lower (P

  9. Biomaterials approaches to modeling macrophage-extracellular matrix interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Nora L; Fischbach, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Tumors are characterized by aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and chronic inflammation. While advances in biomaterials and tissue engineering strategies have led to important new insights regarding the role of ECM composition, structure, and mechanical properties in cancer in general, the functional link between these parameters and macrophage phenotype is poorly understood. Nevertheless, increasing experimental evidence suggests that macrophage behavior is similarly controlled by physicochemical properties of the ECM and consequential changes in mechanosignaling. Here, we will summarize the current knowledge of macrophage biology and ECM-mediated differences in mechanotransduction and discuss future opportunities of biomaterials and tissue engineering platforms to interrogate the functional relationship between these parameters and their relevance to cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Brain extracellular matrix affects AMPA receptor lateral mobility and short-term synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischknecht, Renato; Heine, Martin; Perrais, David; Seidenbecher, Constanze I; Choquet, Daniel; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2009-07-01

    Many synapses in the mature CNS are wrapped by a dense extracellular matrix (ECM). Using single-particle tracking and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we found that this net-like ECM formed surface compartments on rat primary neurons that acted as lateral diffusion barriers for AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Enzymatic removal of the ECM increased extrasynaptic receptor diffusion and the exchange of synaptic AMPA receptors. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording revealed an increased paired-pulse ratio as a functional consequence of ECM removal. These results suggest that the surface compartments formed by the ECM hinder lateral diffusion of AMPA receptors and may therefore modulate short-term synaptic plasticity.

  11. Sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to curcumin and its derivatives depends on the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Paul J; Han, Zhiyong; Sindhwani, Puneet; Hurst, Robert E

    2007-01-01

    Because the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents depends upon the supporting extracellular matrix (ECM), the response in vivo may not be reproduced in 2-dimensional cell culture. The dose-response to curcumin and two derivatives by bladder cancer cells grown on both normal (SISgel) and cancer-derived ECM (Matrigel) and on plastic were contrasted. Cells grown on Matrigel were resistant to curcumins, but cells growing on SISgel, which mimic cancer cells suppressed by normal ECM, were nearly as sensitive as cells grown on plastic. SV40-immortalized urothelial cells, which are models for premalignant cells, were the most sensitive, but even aggressive cell lines were nearly as sensitive when grown on SISgel as on plastic. Curcumin response depends highly on the supporting ECM, and cells grown on plastic poorly models cells growing on natural ECM. Curcumin could prove an effective chemopreventive for bladder cancer recurrence when administered intravesically post-therapy.

  12. Static stretch affects neural stem cell differentiation in an extracellular matrix-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulmoli, Janahan; Pathak, Medha M; McDonnell, Lisa P; Nourse, Jamison L; Tombola, Francesco; Earthman, James C; Flanagan, Lisa A

    2015-02-17

    Neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) fate is strongly influenced by mechanotransduction as modulation of substrate stiffness affects lineage choice. Other types of mechanical stimuli, such as stretch (tensile strain), occur during CNS development and trauma, but their consequences for NSPC differentiation have not been reported. We delivered a 10% static equibiaxial stretch to NSPCs and examined effects on differentiation. We found static stretch specifically impacts NSPC differentiation into oligodendrocytes, but not neurons or astrocytes, and this effect is dependent on particular extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin linkages. Generation of oligodendrocytes from NSPCs was reduced on laminin, an outcome likely mediated by the α6 laminin-binding integrin, whereas similar effects were not observed for NSPCs on fibronectin. Our data demonstrate a direct role for tensile strain in dictating the lineage choice of NSPCs and indicate the dependence of this phenomenon on specific substrate materials, which should be taken into account for the design of biomaterials for NSPC transplantation.

  13. Extracellular matrix-inspired growth factor delivery systems for bone regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, Mikaël M. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Immunology Frontier Research Center; Briquez, Priscilla S. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. of Bioengineering; Maruyama, Kenta [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Immunology Frontier Research Center; Hubbell, Jeffrey A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. of Bioengineering; Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Inst. for Molecular Engineering; Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-04-17

    Growth factors are very promising molecules to enhance bone regeneration. However, their translation to clinical use has been seriously limited, facing issues related to safety and cost-effectiveness. These problems derive from the vastly supra-physiological doses of growth factor used without optimized delivery systems. Therefore, these issues have motivated the development of new delivery systems allowing better control of the spatio-temporal release and signaling of growth factors. Because the extracellular matrix (ECM) naturally plays a fundamental role in coordinating growth factor activity in vivo, a number of novel delivery systems have been inspired by the growth factor regulatory function of the ECM. After introducing the role of growth factors during the bone regeneration process, this review exposes different issues that growth factor-based therapies have encountered in the clinic and highlights recent delivery approaches based on the natural interaction between growth factor and the ECM.

  14. Alterations in Cell-Extracellular Matrix Interactions during Progression of Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeswari Jinka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer progression is a multistep process during which normal cells exhibit molecular changes that culminate into the highly malignant and metastatic phenotype, observed in cancerous tissues. The initiation of cell transformation is generally associated with genetic alterations in normal cells that lead to the loss of intercellular- and/or extracellular-matrix- (ECM- mediated cell adhesion. Transformed cells undergo rapid multiplication and generate more modifications in adhesion and motility-related molecules which allow them to escape from the original site and acquire invasive characteristics. Integrins, which are multifunctional adhesion receptors, and are present, on normal as well as transformed cells, assist the cells undergoing tumor progression in creating the appropriate environment for their survival, growth, and invasion. In this paper, we have briefly discussed the role of ECM proteins and integrins during cancer progression and described some unique conditions where adhesion-related changes could induce genetic mutations in anchorage-independent tumor model systems.

  15. Peri-implantitis and extracellular matrix antibodies: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Piero; Di Carlo, Stefano; Rosella, Daniele; De Angelis, Francesca; Capogreco, Mario; Pompa, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to compare patients with a healthy peri-implant environment and patients affected by peri-implantitis, evaluating the occurrence of antibodies to extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. The authors hypothesized the presence of ECM autoantibodies in serum of peri-implantitis patients. Patients were divided into two groups: one with dental implants with a diagnosis of peri-implantitis and one control group with implants classified as being "healthy." Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed on patients' sera to detect human antibodies to type I, III, IV, and V collagens, laminin, and fibronectin. Fisher exact test was performed to evaluate statistical association, with a significant P implantitis.

  16. Peri-implantitis and extracellular matrix antibodies: A case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Piero; Di Carlo, Stefano; Rosella, Daniele; De Angelis, Francesca; Capogreco, Mario; Pompa, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this case–control study was to compare patients with a healthy peri-implant environment and patients affected by peri-implantitis, evaluating the occurrence of antibodies to extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. The authors hypothesized the presence of ECM autoantibodies in serum of peri-implantitis patients. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided into two groups: one with dental implants with a diagnosis of peri-implantitis and one control group with implants classified as being “healthy.” Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed on patients’ sera to detect human antibodies to type I, III, IV, and V collagens, laminin, and fibronectin. Fisher exact test was performed to evaluate statistical association, with a significant P implantitis. PMID:28932144

  17. Bromelain surface modification increases the diffusion of silica nanoparticles in the tumor extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Alessandro; Haddix, Seth G; Taghipour, Nima; Scaria, Shilpa; Taraballi, Francesca; Cevenini, Armando; Yazdi, Iman K; Corbo, Claudia; Palomba, Roberto; Khaled, Sm Z; Martinez, Jonathan O; Brown, Brandon S; Isenhart, Lucas; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2014-10-28

    Tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a major obstacle to the diffusion of therapeutics and drug delivery systems in cancer parenchyma. This biological barrier limits the efficacy of promising therapeutic approaches including the delivery of siRNA or agents intended for thermoablation. After extravasation due to the enhanced penetration and retention effect of tumor vasculature, typical nanotherapeutics are unable to reach the nonvascularized and anoxic regions deep within cancer parenchyma. Here, we developed a simple method to provide mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with a proteolytic surface. To this extent, we chose to conjugate MSN to Bromelain (Br-MSN), a crude enzymatic complex, purified from pineapple stems, that belongs to the peptidase papain family. This surface modification increased particle uptake in endothelial, macrophage, and cancer cell lines with minimal impact on cellular viability. Most importantly Br-MSN showed an increased ability to digest and diffuse in tumor ECM in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Aristoyunnolin H attenuates extracellular matrix secretion in cardiac fibroblasts by inhibiting calcium influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Rui; Zhang, Wen-Ping; Bao, Jing-Mei; Cheng, Zhong-Bin; Yin, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Aristoyunnolin H is a novel aristophyllene sesquiterpenoid isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Aristolochia yunnanensis Franch. The present research was designed to explore the anti-fibrotic effects of aristoyunnolin H in adult rat cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) stimulated with angiotensin II (Ang II). Western blot analysis data showed that aristoyunnolin H reduced the upregulation of fibronectin (FN), connective tissue growth factor and collagen I(Col I) production induced by Ang II in CFs. By studying the dynamic intracellular changes of Ca(2+), we further found that while aristoyunnolin H relieved the calcium influx, it has no effect on intracellular calcium store release. Meanwhile, aristoyunnolin H also inhibited the Ang II-stimulated phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. In conclusion, aristoyunnolin H may attenuate extracellular matrix secretion in vitro by inhibiting Ang II-induced calcium signaling.

  19. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  20. Tumor-extracellular matrix interactions: Identification of tools associated with breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giussani, Marta; Merlino, Giuseppe; Cappelletti, Vera; Tagliabue, Elda; Daidone, Maria Grazia

    2015-12-01

    Several evidences support the concept that cancer development and progression are not entirely cancer cell-autonomous processes, but may be influenced, and possibly driven, by cross-talk between cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment in which, besides immune cells, stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) play a major role in regulating distinct biologic processes. Stroma and ECM-related signatures proved to influence breast cancer progression, and to contribute to the identification of tumor phenotypes resistant to cytotoxic and hormonal treatments. The possible clinical implications of the interplay between tumor cells and the microenvironment, with special reference to ECM remodelling, will be discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural, biochemical, cellular, and functional changes in skeletal muscle extracellular matrix with aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, T W; Kjaer, M; Mackey, A L

    2011-01-01

    in skeletal muscle ECM contribute to the increased stiffness and impairment in force generated by the contracting muscle fibers seen with aging. The cellular interactions provide and potentially coordinate an adaptation to mechanical loading and ensure successful regeneration after muscle injury. Some......The extracellular matrix (ECM) of skeletal muscle is critical for force transmission and for the passive elastic response of skeletal muscle. Structural, biochemical, cellular, and functional changes in skeletal muscle ECM contribute to the deterioration in muscle mechanical properties with aging......-links and a buildup of advanced glycation end-product cross-links. Altered mechanotransduction, poorer activation of satellite cells, poorer chemotactic and delayed inflammatory responses, and a change in modulators of the ECM are important cellular changes. It is possible that the structural and biochemical changes...

  2. Extracellular Matrix Proteins Mediate HIV-1 gp120 Interactions with α4β7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnik, David; Guo, Wenjin; Cleveland, Brad; von Haller, Priska; Eng, Jimmy K; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K; Arthos, James; Hu, Shiu-Lok

    2017-11-01

    Gut-homing α4β7high CD4+ T lymphocytes have been shown to be preferentially targeted by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and are implicated in HIV-1 pathogenesis. Previous studies demonstrated that HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 binds and signals through α4β7 and that this likely contributes to the infection of α4β7high T cells and promotes cell-to-cell virus transmission. Structures within the second variable loop (V2) of gp120, including the tripeptide motif LDV/I, are thought to mediate gp120-α4β7 binding. However, lack of α4β7 binding has been reported in gp120 proteins containing LDV/I, and the precise determinants of gp120-α4β7 binding are not fully defined. In this work, we report the novel finding that fibronectins mediate indirect gp120-α4β7 interactions. We show that Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells used to express recombinant gp120 produced fibronectins and other extracellular matrix proteins that copurified with gp120. CHO cell fibronectins were able to mediate the binding of a diverse panel of gp120 proteins to α4β7 in an in vitro cell binding assay. The V2 loop was not required for fibronectin-mediated binding of gp120 to α4β7, nor did V2-specific antibodies block this interaction. Removal of fibronectin through anion-exchange chromatography abrogated V2-independent gp120-α4β7 binding. Additionally, we showed a recombinant human fibronectin fragment mediated gp120-α4β7 interactions similarly to CHO cell fibronectin. These findings provide an explanation for the apparently contradictory observations regarding the gp120-α4β7 interaction and offer new insights into the potential role of fibronectin and other extracellular matrix proteins in HIV-1 biology.IMPORTANCE Immune tissues within the gut are severely damaged by HIV-1, and this plays an important role in the development of AIDS. Integrin α4β7 plays a major role in the trafficking of lymphocytes, including CD4+ T cells, into gut lymphoid tissues. Previous reports

  3. Extracellular Matrix Receptor Expression in Subtypes of Lung Adenocarcinoma Potentiates Outgrowth of Micrometastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Laura E; Cheung, William K C; Adua, Sally J; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Zhao, Minghui; Liu, Zongzhi; Brewer, Kelly; Herbst, Roy S; Nguyen, Don X

    2017-04-15

    Mechanisms underlying the propensity of latent lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) to relapse are poorly understood. In this study, we show how differential expression of a network of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and their interacting proteins contributes to risk of relapse in distinct LUAD subtypes. Overexpression of the hyaluronan receptor HMMR in primary LUAD was associated with an inflammatory molecular signature and poor prognosis. Attenuating HMMR in LUAD cells diminished their ability to initiate lung tumors and distant metastases. HMMR upregulation was not required for dissemination in vivo, but enhanced ECM-mediated signaling, LUAD cell survival, and micrometastasis expansion in hyaluronan-rich microenvironments in the lung and brain metastatic niches. Our findings reveal an important mechanism by which disseminated cancer cells can coopt the inflammatory ECM to persist, leading to brain metastatic outgrowths. Cancer Res; 77(8); 1905-17. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. The Role of Structural Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Urothelial Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brunner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM plays a key role in the modulation of cancer cell invasion. In urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UC the role of ECM proteins has been widely studied. The mechanisms, which are involved in the development of invasion, progression and generalization, are complex, depending on the interaction of ECM proteins with each other as well as with cancer cells. The following review will focus on the pathogenetic role and prognostic value of structural proteins, such as laminins, collagens, fi bronectin (FN, tenascin (Tn-C and thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 in UC. In addition, the role of integrins mediating the interaction of ECM molecules and cancer cells will be addressed, since integrin-mediated FN, Tn-C and TSP1 interactions seem to play an important role during tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis.

  5. Invasion-promoting extracellular matrix composition enhances photodynamic therapy response in 3D pancreatic cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn M.; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by extracellular matrix-rich stromal involvement, but it is not clear how ECM properties that affect invasiveness and chemotherapy response influence efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT). To disentangle the mechanical and biochemical effects of ECM composition, we measured the effects of various combinations of ECM proteins on growth behavior, invasive potential, and therapeutic response of multicellular 3D pancreatic tumor models. These spheroids were grown in attachment-free conditions before embedding in combinations of rheologically characterized collagen 1 and Matrigel combinations and treated with oxaliplatin chemotherapy and PDT. We find that cells invading from collagen-embedded tumor spheroids, the least rigid ECM substrate described here, displayed better response to PDT than to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. Overall, our results support that ECM-mediated invading PDAC populations remain responsive to PDT in conditions that induce chemoresistance.

  6. A non-equilibrium thermodynamic model for tumor extracellular matrix with enzymatic degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shi-Lei; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2017-07-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of a solid tumor not only affords scaffolding to support tumor architecture and integrity but also plays an essential role in tumor growth, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutics. In this paper, a non-equilibrium thermodynamic theory is established to study the chemo-mechanical behaviors of tumor ECM, which is modeled as a poroelastic polyelectrolyte consisting of a collagen network and proteoglycans. By using the principle of maximum energy dissipation rate, we deduce a set of governing equations for drug transport and mechanosensitive enzymatic degradation in ECM. The results reveal that osmosis is primarily responsible for the compression resistance of ECM. It is suggested that a well-designed ECM degradation can effectively modify the tumor microenvironment for improved efficiency of cancer therapy. The theoretical predictions show a good agreement with relevant experimental observations. This study aimed to deepen our understanding of tumor ECM may be conducive to novel anticancer strategies.

  7. Extracellular matrix proteins as temporary coating for thin-film neural implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyssens, Frederik; Deprez, Marjolijn; Turner, Neill; Kil, Dries; van Kuyck, Kris; Welkenhuysen, Marleen; Nuttin, Bart; Badylak, Stephen; Puers, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Objective. This study investigates the suitability of a thin sheet of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins as a resorbable coating for temporarily reinforcing fragile or ultra-low stiffness thin-film neural implants to be placed on the brain, i.e. microelectrocorticographic (µECOG) implants. Approach. Thin-film polyimide-based electrode arrays were fabricated using lithographic methods. ECM was harvested from porcine tissue by a decellularization method and coated around the arrays. Mechanical tests and an in vivo experiment on rats were conducted, followed by a histological tissue study combined with a statistical equivalence test (confidence interval approach, 0.05 significance level) to compare the test group with an uncoated control group. Main results. After 3 months, no significant damage was found based on GFAP and NeuN staining of the relevant brain areas. Significance. The study shows that ECM sheets are a suitable temporary coating for thin µECOG neural implants.

  8. TSP-1 promotes glomerular mesangial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix secretion in Thy-1 nephritis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wen; Li, Yan; Zhou, Jianbo; Zhao, Chenhui; Zhang, Jing; Shan, Kai; Zhao, Dan; Wang, Yingwei

    2011-11-01

    The proliferation of glomerular mesangial cells (GMC) and secretion of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in rat with Thy-1 nephritis (Thy-1N) resembling human mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis have been explored for many years; however, the molecular mechanisms of GMC proliferation and ECM production remain unclear. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) gene was involved in mediating rat GMC proliferation and ECM synthesis induced by sublytic C5b-9 in vitro. In the present study, the roles of the TSP-1 gene in GMC proliferation, ECM production, and urinary protein secretion in Thy-1N rats were determined by using TSP-1 small hairpin RNA, and the results revealed that silencing of the TSP-1 gene in rat renal tissues could diminish GMC proliferation (P TSP-1 gene expression was required for GMC proliferation and ECM production in Thy-1N rats.

  9. Prediction of extracellular matrix proteins based on distinctive sequence and domain characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Juhyun; Ryu, Taewoo; Hwang, Yongdeuk; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Doheon

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are secreted to the exterior of the cell, and function as mediators between resident cells and the external environment. These proteins not only support cellular structure but also participate in diverse processes, including growth, hormonal response, homeostasis, and disease progression. Despite their importance, current knowledge of the number and functions of ECM proteins is limited. Here, we propose a computational method to predict ECM proteins. Specific features, such as ECM domain score and repetitive residues, were utilized for prediction. Based on previously employed and newly generated features, discriminatory characteristics for ECM protein categorization were determined, which significantly improved the performance of Random Forest and support vector machine (SVM) classification. We additionally predicted novel ECM proteins from non-annotated human proteins, validated with gene ontology and earlier literature. Our novel prediction method is available at biosoft.kaist.ac.kr/ecm.

  10. PYK2 mediates BzATP-induced extracellular matrix proteins synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torigoe, Go; Nagao, Mayu; Tanabe, Natsuko; Manaka, Soichiro; Kariya, Taro; Kawato, Takayuki; Sekino, Jumpei; Kato, Shunichiro; Maeno, Masao; Suzuki, Naoto; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2017-12-16

    Mechanical stimuli such as fluid shear and cyclic tension force induced extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release in osteoblasts. In particular, cyclic tension force-induced ATP enhances bone formation through P2X7 activation. Proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2) mediate osteoblasts differentiation is induced by mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, activation of PYK2 also was a response to integrin by mechanical stimuli. Extracellular matrix protein (ECMP)s, which are important factors for bone formation are expressed by osteoblasts. However, the effect of the interaction of 2'(3)-Ο-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl) adenosine-5'-triphosphate (BzATP), which is the agonist of the mechanosensitive receptor P2X7, with PYK2 on ECMP production is poorly understood. Thus, our purpose was to investigate the effects of PYK2 on BzATP-induced ECMP production in osteoblasts. BzATP increased phospho-PYK2 protein expression on days 3 and 7 of culture. Furthermore, the PYK2 inhibitor PF431394 inhibited the stimulatory effect of BzATP on the expression of type I collagen, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin expression. PF431396 did not inhibit the stimulatory effect of BzATP on osteopontin (OPN) mRNA expression. These results suggest that mechanical stimuli activate P2X7 might induce ECMPs expression through PYK2 except in the case of OPN expression. Altogether, mechanical stimuli-induced ECMPs production might be implicated by extracellular ATP secretion or integrin via PYK2 activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Guanine derivatives modulate extracellular matrix proteins organization and improve neuron-astrocyte co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Helena; Francisco, Sheila S; Mendes-de-Aguiar, Cláudia B N; Romão, Luciana F; Boeck, Carina R; Trentin, Andréa G; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Tasca, Carla I

    2007-07-01

    Guanine derivatives (GD) have been shown to exert relevant extracellular effects as intercellular messengers, neuromodulators in the central nervous system, and trophic effects on astrocytes and neurons. Astrocytes have been pointed out as the major source of trophic factors in the nervous system, however, several trophic effects of astrocytic-released soluble factors are mediated through modulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In this study, we investigated the effects of guanosine-5'-monophosphate (GMP) and guanosine (GUO) on the expression and organization of ECM proteins in cerebellar astrocytes. Moreover, to evaluate the effects of astrocytes pre-treated with GMP or GUO on cerebellar neurons we used a neuron-astrocyte coculture model. GMP or GUO alters laminin and fibronectin organization from a punctate to a fibrillar pattern, however, the expression levels of the ECM proteins were not altered. Guanine derivatives-induced alteration of ECM proteins organization is mediated by activation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), CA(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK-II), protein kinase C (PKC), and protein kinase A (PKA) pathways. Furthermore, astrocytes treated with GMP or GUO promoted an increased number of cerebellar neurons in coculture, without altering the neuritogenesis pattern. No proliferation of neurons or astrocytes was observed due to GMP or GUO treatment. Our results show that guanine derivatives promote a reorganization of the ECM proteins produced by astrocytes, which might be responsible for a better interaction with neurons in cocultures.

  12. ADAMTS9-Mediated Extracellular Matrix Dynamics Regulates Umbilical Cord Vascular Smooth Muscle Differentiation and Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeda Nandadasa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the significance for fetal nourishment in mammals, mechanisms of umbilical cord vascular growth remain poorly understood. Here, the secreted metalloprotease ADAMTS9 is shown to be necessary for murine umbilical cord vascular development. Restricting it to the cell surface using a gene trap allele, Adamts9Gt, impaired umbilical vessel elongation and radial growth via reduced versican proteolysis and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM. Both Adamts9Gt and conditional Adamts9 deletion revealed that ADAMTS9 produced by mesenchymal cells acted non-autonomously to regulate smooth muscle cell (SMC proliferation, differentiation, and orthogonal reorientation during growth of the umbilical vasculature. In Adamts9Gt/Gt, we observed interference with PDGFRβ signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, which regulates cytoskeletal dynamics during SMC rotation. In addition, we observed disrupted Shh signaling and perturbed orientation of the mesenchymal primary cilium. Thus, ECM dynamics is a major influence on umbilical vascular SMC fate, with ADAMTS9 acting as its principal mediator.

  13. Extracellular matrix dynamics and functions in the social amoeba Dictyostelium: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Robert J; O'Day, Danton H

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic complex of glycoproteins, proteoglycans, carbohydrates, and collagen that serves as an interface between mammalian cells and their extracellular environment. Essential for normal cellular homeostasis, physiology, and events that occur during development, it is also a key functionary in a number of human diseases including cancer. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum secretes an ECM during multicellular development that regulates multicellularity, cell motility, cell differentiation, and morphogenesis, and provides structural support and protective layers to the resulting differentiated cell types. Proteolytic processing within the Dictyostelium ECM leads to specific bioactive factors that regulate cell motility and differentiation. Here we review the structure and functions of the Dictyostelium ECM and its role in regulating multicellular development. The questions and challenges that remain and how they can be answered are also discussed. The Dictyostelium ECM shares many of the features of mammalian and plant ECM, and thus presents an excellent system for studying the structure and function of the ECM. As a genetically tractable model organism, Dictyostelium offers the potential to further elucidate ECM functions, and to possibly reveal previously unknown roles for the ECM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Myogenic Progenitor Cells Control Extracellular Matrix Production by Fibroblasts during Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Christopher S; Kirby, Tyler J; Kosmac, Kate; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2017-01-05

    Satellite cells, the predominant stem cell population in adult skeletal muscle, are activated in response to hypertrophic stimuli and give rise to myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs) within the extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds myofibers. This ECM is composed largely of collagens secreted by interstitial fibrogenic cells, which influence satellite cell activity and muscle repair during hypertrophy and aging. Here we show that MPCs interact with interstitial fibrogenic cells to ensure proper ECM deposition and optimal muscle remodeling in response to hypertrophic stimuli. MPC-dependent ECM remodeling during the first week of a growth stimulus is sufficient to ensure long-term myofiber hypertrophy. MPCs secrete exosomes containing miR-206, which represses Rrbp1, a master regulator of collagen biosynthesis, in fibrogenic cells to prevent excessive ECM deposition. These findings provide insights into how skeletal stem and progenitor cells interact with other cell types to actively regulate their extracellular environments for tissue maintenance and adaptation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  16. Differential Expression of Extracellular Matrix and Growth Factors by Embryoid Bodies in Hydrodynamic and Static Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridley, Krista M.; Nair, Rekha

    2014-01-01

    During development, cell fate specification and tissue development are orchestrated by the sequential presentation of soluble growth factors (GF) and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Similarly, differentiation of stem cells in vitro relies upon the temporal presence of extracellular cues within the microenvironment. Hydrodynamic culture systems are not limited by volume restrictions and therefore offer several practical advantages for scalability over static cultures; however, hydrodynamic cultures expose cells to physical parameters not present in static culture, such as fluid shear stress and mass transfer through convective forces. In this study, the differences between static and hydrodynamic culture conditions on the expression of ECM and GF molecules during the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells were examined at both the gene and protein level. The expression of ECM and GF genes exhibited an early decrease in static cultures based on heat map and hierarchical clustering analysis and a relative delayed increase in hydrodynamic cultures. Although the temporal patterns of specific ECM and GF protein expression were comparable between static and hydrodynamic cultures, several notable differences in the magnitudes of expression were observed at similar time points. These results describe the establishment of an analytical framework that can be used to examine the expression patterns of ECM and GF molecules expressed by pluripotent stem cells undergoing differentiation as 3D multicellular aggregates under different culture conditions, and suggest that physical parameters of stem cell microenvironments can alter endogenous ECM and GF expression profiles that may, in turn, influence cell fate decisions. PMID:25423310

  17. Nanoscale engineering of extracellular matrix-mimetic bioadhesive surfaces and implants for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekaran, Asha; Garcia, Andres J

    2011-03-01

    The goal of tissue engineering is to restore tissue function using biomimetic scaffolds which direct desired cell fates such as attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Cell behavior in vivo is determined by a complex interaction of cells with extracellular biosignals, many of which exist on a nanoscale. Therefore, recent efforts in tissue engineering biomaterial development have focused on incorporating extracellular matrix- (ECM) derived peptides or proteins into biomaterials in order to mimic natural ECM. Concurrent advances in nanotechnology have also made it possible to manipulate protein and peptide presentation on surfaces on a nanoscale level. This review discusses protein and peptide nanopatterning techniques and examples of how nanoscale engineering of bioadhesive materials may enhance outcomes for regenerative medicine. Synergy between ECM-mimetic tissue engineering and nanotechnology fields can be found in three major strategies: (1) Mimicking nanoscale orientation of ECM peptide domains to maintain native bioactivity, (2) Presenting adhesive peptides at unnaturally high densities, and (3) Engineering multivalent ECM-derived peptide constructs. Combining bioadhesion and nanopatterning technologies to allow nanoscale control of adhesive motifs on the cell-material interface may result in exciting advances in tissue engineering. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Nanotechnologies - Emerging Applications in Biomedicine. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurement of biomolecular diffusion in extracellular matrix condensed by fibroblasts using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Kihara

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM comprises the heterogeneous environment outside of cells in a biological system. The ECM is dynamically organized and regulated, and many biomolecules secreted from cells diffuse throughout the ECM, regulating a variety of cellular processes. Therefore, investigation of the diffusive behaviors of biomolecules in the extracellular environment is critical. In this study, we investigated the diffusion coefficients of biomolecules of various sizes, measuring from 1 to 10 nm in radius, by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in contracted collagen gel caused by fibroblasts, a traditional culture model of dynamic rearrangement of collagen fibers. The diffusion coefficients of the biomolecules in control collagen gel without cells decreased slightly as compared to those in solution, while the diffusion coefficients of biomolecules in the contracted gel at the cell vicinity decreased dramatically. Additionally, the diffusion coefficients of biomolecules were inversely correlated with molecular radius. In collagen gels populated with fibroblasts, the diffusion coefficient at the cell vicinity clearly decreased in the first 24 h of culture. Furthermore, molecular diffusion was greatly restricted, with a central focus on the populated cells. By using the obtained diffusion coefficients of biomolecules, we calculated the collagen fiber condensation ratio by fibroblasts in the cell vicinity at 3 days of culture to represent a 52-fold concentration. Thus, biomolecular diffusion is restricted in the vicinity of the cells where collagen fibers are highly condensed.

  19. Differential expression of extracellular matrix and growth factors by embryoid bodies in hydrodynamic and static cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridley, Krista M; Nair, Rekha; McDevitt, Todd C

    2014-12-01

    During development, cell fate specification and tissue development are orchestrated by the sequential presentation of soluble growth factors (GF) and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Similarly, differentiation of stem cells in vitro relies upon the temporal presence of extracellular cues within the microenvironment. Hydrodynamic culture systems are not limited by volume restrictions and therefore offer several practical advantages for scalability over static cultures; however, hydrodynamic cultures expose cells to physical parameters not present in static culture, such as fluid shear stress and mass transfer through convective forces. In this study, the differences between static and hydrodynamic culture conditions on the expression of ECM and GF molecules during the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells were examined at both the gene and protein level. The expression of ECM and GF genes exhibited an early decrease in static cultures based on heat map and hierarchical clustering analysis and a relative delayed increase in hydrodynamic cultures. Although the temporal patterns of specific ECM and GF protein expression were comparable between static and hydrodynamic cultures, several notable differences in the magnitudes of expression were observed at similar time points. These results describe the establishment of an analytical framework that can be used to examine the expression patterns of ECM and GF molecules expressed by pluripotent stem cells undergoing differentiation as 3D multicellular aggregates under different culture conditions, and suggest that physical parameters of stem cell microenvironments can alter endogenous ECM and GF expression profiles that may, in turn, influence cell fate decisions.

  20. Co-transfection of decorin and interleukin-10 modulates pro-fibrotic extracellular matrix gene expression in human tenocyte culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbah, Sunny A.; Thomas, Dilip; Browne, Shane; O'Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix synthesis and remodelling are driven by increased activity of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). In tendon tissue repair, increased activity of TGF-β1 leads to progressive fibrosis. Decorin (DCN) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) antagonise pathological collagen synthesis by exerting a neutralising effect via downregulation of TGF-β1. Herein, we report that the delivery of DCN and IL-10 transgenes from a collagen hydrogel system supresses the constitutive expression of TGF-β1 and a range of pro-fibrotic extracellular matrix genes.

  1. Dynamic culture substrate that captures a specific extracellular matrix protein in response to light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Nakanishi, Hidekazu Nakayama, Kazuo Yamaguchi, Andres J Garcia and Yasuhiro Horiike

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods for the off–on switching of immobilization or presentation of cell-adhesive peptides and proteins during cell culture is important because such surfaces are useful for the analysis of the dynamic processes of cell adhesion and migration. This paper describes a chemically functionalized gold substrate that captures a genetically tagged extracellular matrix protein in response to light. The substrate was composed of mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs of three disulfide compounds containing (i a photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (PEG, (ii nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA and (iii hepta(ethylene glycol (EG7. Although the NTA group has an intrinsic high affinity for oligohistidine tag (His-tag sequences in its Ni2+-ion complex, the interaction was suppressed by the steric hindrance of coexisting PEG on the substrate surface. Upon photoirradiation of the substrate to release the PEG chain from the surface, this interaction became possible and hence the protein was captured at the irradiated regions, while keeping the non-specific adsorption of non-His-tagged proteins blocked by the EG7 underbrush. In this way, we selectively immobilized a His-tagged fibronectin fragment (FNIII7–10 to the irradiated regions. In contrast, when bovine serum albumin—a major serum protein—was added as a non-His-tagged protein, the surface did not permit its capture, with or without irradiation. In agreement with these results, cells were selectively attached to the irradiated patterns only when a His-tagged FNIII7-10 was added to the medium. These results indicate that the present method is useful for studying the cellular behavior on the specific extracellular matrix protein in cell-culturing environments.

  2. Gene expression in human hippocampus from cocaine abusers identifies genes which regulate extracellular matrix remodeling.

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    Deborah C Mash

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The chronic effects of cocaine abuse on brain structure and function are blamed for the inability of most addicts to remain abstinent. Part of the difficulty in preventing relapse is the persisting memory of the intense euphoria or cocaine "rush". Most abused drugs and alcohol induce neuroplastic changes in brain pathways subserving emotion and cognition. Such changes may account for the consolidation and structural reconfiguration of synaptic connections with exposure to cocaine. Adaptive hippocampal plasticity could be related to specific patterns of gene expression with chronic cocaine abuse. Here, we compare gene expression profiles in the human hippocampus from cocaine addicts and age-matched drug-free control subjects. Cocaine abusers had 151 gene transcripts upregulated, while 91 gene transcripts were downregulated. Topping the list of cocaine-regulated transcripts was RECK in the human hippocampus (FC = 2.0; p<0.05. RECK is a membrane-anchored MMP inhibitor that is implicated in the coordinated regulation of extracellular matrix integrity and angiogenesis. In keeping with elevated RECK expression, active MMP9 protein levels were decreased in the hippocampus from cocaine abusers. Pathway analysis identified other genes regulated by cocaine that code for proteins involved in the remodeling of the cytomatrix and synaptic connections and the inhibition of blood vessel proliferation (PCDH8, LAMB1, ITGB6, CTGF and EphB4. The observed microarray phenotype in the human hippocampus identified RECK and other region-specific genes that may promote long-lasting structural changes with repeated cocaine abuse. Extracellular matrix remodeling in the hippocampus may be a persisting effect of chronic abuse that contributes to the compulsive and relapsing nature of cocaine addiction.

  3. RAGE-mediated extracellular matrix proteins accumulation exacerbates HySu-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Daile; He, Yuhu; Zhu, Qian; Liu, Huan; Zuo, Caojian; Chen, Guilin; Yu, Ying; Lu, Ankang

    2017-05-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins accumulation contributes to the progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a rare and fatal cardiovascular condition defined by high pulmonary arterial pressure, whether primary, idiopathic, or secondary to other causes. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is constitutively expressed in the lungs and plays an important role in ECM deposition. Nonetheless, the mechanisms by which RAGE mediates ECM deposition/formation in pulmonary arteries and its roles in PAH progression remain unclear. Expression of RAGE and its activating ligands, S100/calgranulins and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), were increased in both human and mouse pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) under hypoxic conditions and were also strikingly upregulated in pulmonary arteries in hypoxia plus SU5416 (HySu)-induced PAH in mice. RAGE deletion alleviated pulmonary arterial pressure and restrained extracellular matrix accumulation in pulmonary arteries in HySu-induced PAH murine model. Moreover, blocking RAGE activity with a neutralizing antibody in human PASMCs, or RAGE deficiency in mouse PASMCs exposed to hypoxia, suppressed the expression of fibrotic proteins by reducing TGF-β1 expression. RAGE reconstitution in deficient mouse PASMCs restored hypoxia-stimulated TGF-β1 production via ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK pathway activation and subsequently increased ECM protein expression. Interestingly, HMGB1 acting on RAGE, not toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), induced ECM deposition in PASMCs. Finally, in both idiopathic PAH patients and HySu-induced PAH mice, soluble RAGE (sRAGE) levels in serum were significantly elevated compared to those in controls. Activation of RAGE facilitates the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by increase of ECM deposition in pulmonary arteries. Our results indicate that sRAGE may be a potential biomarker for PAH diagnosis and disease severity, and that RAGE may be a promising target for

  4. Tailoring the properties of cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix using carbodiimide cross-linking.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burugapalli, Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Modulation of properties of extracellular matrix (ECM) based scaffolds is key for their application in the clinical setting. In the present study, cross-linking was used as a tool for tailoring the properties of cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix (CEM). CEM was cross-linked with varying cross-linking concentrations of N,N-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl)-N\\'-ethyl carbodiimide (EDC) in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Shrink temperature measurements and ATR-FT-IR spectra were used to determine the degree of cross-linking. The effect of cross-linking on degradation was tested using the collagenase assay. Uniaxial tensile properties and the ability to support fibroblasts were also evaluated as a function of cross-linking. Shrink temperature increased from 59 degrees C for non-cross-linked CEM to 78 degrees C for the highest EDC cross-linking concentration, while IR peak area ratios for the free -NH(2) group at 3290 cm(-1) to that of the amide I band at 1635 cm(-1) decreased with increasing EDC cross-linking concentration. Collagenase assay demonstrated that degradation rates for CEM can be tailored. EDC concentrations 0 to 0.0033 mmol\\/mg CEM were the cross-linking concentration range in which CEM showed varied susceptibility to collagenase degradation. Furthermore, cross-linking concentrations up to 0.1 mmol EDC\\/mg CEM did not have statistically significant effect on the uniaxial tensile strength, as well as morphology, viability and proliferation of fibroblasts on CEM. In conclusion, the degradation rates of CEM can be tailored using EDC-cross-linking, while maintaining the mechanical properties and the ability of CEM to support cells.

  5. Doxycycline inhibits TGF-β1-induced extracellular matrix production in nasal polyp-derived fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-Min; Park, Joo-Hoo; Park, Il-Ho; Lee, Heung-Man

    2016-03-01

    Doxycycline has been shown to have antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects and suppresses collagen biosynthesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of doxycycline on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced myofibroblast differentiation and extracellular matrix production in nasal polyp-derived fibroblasts (NPDFs). We also determined the molecular mechanisms of action for doxycycline. NPDFs were isolated from nasal polyps from 8 patients. Doxycycline was used to pretreat TGF-β1-induced NPDFs. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and fibronectin were measured using Western blot, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence staining. Total collagen production was analyzed with the Sircol collagen assay, while mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB activation were determined using Western blot analysis. Luciferase assay was used to evaluate the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. Although doxycycline (0 to 40 μg/mL) had no significant cytotoxic effects in TGF-β1-induced NPDFs, it significantly reduced the expression levels of α-SMA, fibronectin, and collagen in TGF-β1-induced NPDFs in a dose-dependent manner. Doxycycline also inhibited the TGF-β1-induced activation of p38, c-Jun NH2 -terminal kinase (JNK), and NF-κB, and its inhibitory effects were similar to those of the specific inhibitors for each. Doxycycline has an inhibitory effect on TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast differentiation and extracellular matrix production via the p38 and JNK/NF-κB signal pathways in NPDFs. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  6. Regulation of extracellular matrix organization by BMP signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbie D Schultz

    Full Text Available In mammals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP pathway signaling is important for the growth and homeostasis of extracellular matrix, including basement membrane remodeling, scarring, and bone growth. A conserved BMP member in Caenorhabditis elegans, DBL-1, regulates body length in a dose-sensitive manner. Loss of DBL-1 pathway signaling also results in increased anesthetic sensitivity. However, the physiological basis of these pleiotropic phenotypes is largely unknown. We created a DBL-1 over-expressing strain and show that sensitivity to anesthetics is inversely related to the dose of DBL-1. Using pharmacological, genetic analyses, and a novel dye permeability assay for live, microwave-treated animals, we confirm that DBL-1 is required for the barrier function of the cuticle, a specialized extracellular matrix. We show that DBL-1 signaling is required to prevent animals from forming tail-entangled aggregates in liquid. Stripping lipids off the surface of wild-type animals recapitulates this phenotype. Finally, we find that DBL-1 signaling affects ultrastructure of the nematode cuticle in a dose-dependent manner, as surface lipid content and cuticular organization are disrupted in animals with genetically altered DBL-1 levels. We propose that the lipid layer coating the nematode cuticle normally prevents tail entanglement, and that reduction of this layer by loss of DBL-1 signaling promotes aggregation. This work provides a physiological mechanism that unites the DBL-1 signaling pathway roles of not only body size regulation and drug responsiveness, but also the novel Hoechst 33342 staining and aggregation phenotypes, through barrier function, content, and organization of the cuticle.

  7. Regulation and use of the extracellular matrix by Trypanosoma cruzi during early infection

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    Pius N. Nde

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, which was once thought to be confined to endemic regions of Latin America, has now gone global becoming a new worldwide challenge. For more than a century since its discovery, it has remained neglected with no effective drugs or vaccines. The mechanisms by which Trypanosoma cruzi regulates and uses the extracellular matrix to invade cells and cause disease are just beginning to be understood. Here we critically review and discuss the regulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM interactome by T. cruzi, the use of the ECM by T. cruzi and analyze the molecular ECM/T. cruzi interphase during the early process of infection. It has been shown that invasive trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi use and modulate components of the ECM during the initial process of infection. Infective trypomastigotes up-regulate the expression of laminin γ-1 (LAMC1 and thrombospondin (THBS1 to facilitate the recruitment of trypomastigotes to enhance cellular infection. Silencing the expression of LAMC1 and THBS1 by stable RNAi dramatically reduces trypanosome infection. T. cruzi gp83, a ligand that mediates the attachment of trypanosomes to cells to initiate infection, up-regulates LAMC1 expression to enhance cellular infection. Infective trypomastigotes use Tc85 to interact with laminin, p45 mucin to interact with LAMC1 through galectin-3 (LGALS3, a human lectin, and calreticulin (TcCRT to interact with TSB1 to enhance cellular infection. Silencing the expression of LGALS3 also reduces cellular infection. Despite the role of the ECM in T. cruzi infection, almost nothing is known about the ECM interactome networks operating in the process of T. cruzi infection and its ligands. Here, we present the first elucidation of the human ECM interactome network regulated by T. cruzi and its gp83 ligand that facilitates cellular infection. The elucidation of the human ECM interactome regulated by T. cruzi and the dissection of the molecular ECM/T. cruzi interphase using

  8. Physical, Spatial, and Molecular Aspects of Extracellular Matrix of In Vivo Niches and Artificial Scaffolds Relevant to Stem Cells Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmanova, Maria; Osidak, Egor; Domogatsky, Sergey; Rodin, Sergey; Domogatskaya, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix can influence stem cell choices, such as self-renewal, quiescence, migration, proliferation, phenotype maintenance, differentiation, or apoptosis. Three aspects of extracellular matrix were extensively studied during the last decade: physical properties, spatial presentation of adhesive epitopes, and molecular complexity. Over 15 different parameters have been shown to influence stem cell choices. Physical aspects include stiffness (or elasticity), viscoelasticity, pore size, porosity, amplitude and frequency of static and dynamic deformations applied to the matrix. Spatial aspects include scaffold dimensionality (2D or 3D) and thickness; cell polarity; area, shape, and microscale topography of cell adhesion surface; epitope concentration, epitope clustering characteristics (number of epitopes per cluster, spacing between epitopes within cluster, spacing between separate clusters, cluster patterns, and level of disorder in epitope arrangement), and nanotopography. Biochemical characteristics of natural extracellular matrix molecules regard diversity and structural complexity of matrix molecules, affinity and specificity of epitope interaction with cell receptors, role of non-affinity domains, complexity of supramolecular organization, and co-signaling by growth factors or matrix epitopes. Synergy between several matrix aspects enables stem cells to retain their function in vivo and may be a key to generation of long-term, robust, and effective in vitro stem cell culture systems. PMID:26351461

  9. Quantitative differential proteomics of yeast extracellular matrix: there is more to it than meets the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria-Oliveira, Fábio; Carvalho, Joana; Ferreira, Célia; Hernáez, Maria Luisa; Gil, Concha; Lucas, Cândida

    2015-11-25

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae multicellular communities are sustained by a scaffolding extracellular matrix, which provides spatial organization, and nutrient and water availability, and ensures group survival. According to this tissue-like biology, the yeast extracellular matrix (yECM) is analogous to the higher Eukaryotes counterpart for its polysaccharide and proteinaceous nature. Few works focused on yeast biofilms, identifying the flocculin Flo11 and several members of the HSP70 in the extracellular space. Molecular composition of the yECM, is therefore mostly unknown. The homologue of yeast Gup1 protein in high Eukaryotes (HHATL) acts as a regulator of Hedgehog signal secretion, therefore interfering in morphogenesis and cell-cell communication through the ECM, which mediates but is also regulated by this signalling pathway. In yeast, the deletion of GUP1 was associated with a vast number of diverse phenotypes including the cellular differentiation that accompanies biofilm formation. S. cerevisiae W303-1A wt strain and gup1∆ mutant were used as previously described to generate biofilm-like mats in YPDa from which the yECM proteome was extracted. The proteome from extracellular medium from batch liquid growing cultures was used as control for yECM-only secreted proteins. Proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 2DE. Identification was performed by HPLC, LC-MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF. The protein expression comparison between the two strains was done by DIGE, and analysed by DeCyder Extended Data Analysis that included Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis. The proteome of S. cerevisiae yECM from biofilm-like mats was purified and analysed by Nano LC-MS/MS, 2D Difference Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE), and MALDI-TOF/TOF. Two strains were compared, wild type and the mutant defective in GUP1. As controls for the identification of the yECM-only proteins, the proteome from liquid batch cultures was also identified. Proteins were grouped into distinct

  10. Decellularized bone extracellular matrix and human dental pulp stem cells as a construct for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduano, Francesco; Marrelli, Massimo; Alom, Noura; Amer, Mahetab; White, Lisa J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Tatullo, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Dental pulp tissue represents a source of mesenchymal stem cells that have a strong differentiation potential towards the osteogenic lineage. The objective of the current study was to examine in vitro osteogenic induction of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) cultured on hydrogel scaffolds derived from decellularized bone extracellular matrix (bECM) compared to collagen type I (Col-I), the major component of bone matrix. DPSCs in combination with bECM hydrogels were cultured under three different conditions: basal medium, osteogenic medium and medium supplemented with growth factors (GFs) and cell growth, mineral deposition, gene and protein expression were investigated. The DPSCs/bECM hydrogel constructs cultured in basal medium showed that cells were viable after three weeks and that the expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) were significantly upregulated in the absence of extra osteogenic inducers compared to Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. In addition, the protein expression levels of BSP and osteocalcin were higher on bECM with respect to Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. Furthermore, DPSCs/bECM hydrogels cultured with osteogenic or GFs supplemented medium displayed a higher upregulation of the osteo-specific markers compared to Col-I hydrogels in identical media. Collectively, our results demonstrate that bECM hydrogels might be considered as suitable scaffolds to support osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs.

  11. αII-spectrin regulates invadosome stability and extracellular matrix degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Ponceau

    Full Text Available Invadosomes are actin-rich adhesion structures involved in tissue invasion and extracellular matrix (ECM remodelling. αII-Spectrin, an ubiquitous scaffolding component of the membrane skeleton and a partner of actin regulators (ABI1, VASP and WASL, accumulates highly and specifically in the invadosomes of multiple cell types, such as mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs expressing SrcY527F, the constitutively active form of Src or activated HMEC-1 endothelial cells. FRAP and live-imaging analysis revealed that αII-spectrin is a highly dynamic component of invadosomes as actin present in the structures core. Knockdown of αII-spectrin expression destabilizes invadosomes and reduces the ability of the remaining invadosomes to digest the ECM and to promote invasion. The ECM degradation defect observed in spectrin-depleted-cells is associated with highly dynamic and unstable invadosome rings. Moreover, FRAP measurement showed the specific involvement of αII-spectrin in the regulation of the mobile/immobile β3-integrin ratio in invadosomes. Our findings suggest that spectrin could regulate invadosome function and maturation by modulating integrin mobility in the membrane, allowing the normal processes of adhesion, invasion and matrix degradation. Altogether, these data highlight a new function for spectrins in the stability of invadosomes and the coupling between actin regulation and ECM degradation.

  12. A Protein Involved in the Assembly of an Extracellular Calcium Storage Matrix*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Lilah; Shechter, Assaf; Tom, Moshe; Yudkovski, Yana; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu David; Pamuru, Ramachandra Reddy; Khalaila, Isam; Bentov, Shmuel; Berman, Amir; Sagi, Amir

    2010-01-01

    Gastroliths, the calcium storage organs of crustaceans, consist of chitin-protein-mineral complexes in which the mineral component is stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. To date, only three proteins, GAP 65, gastrolith matrix protein (GAMP), and orchestin, have been identified in gastroliths. Here, we report a novel protein, GAP 10, isolated from the gastrolith of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus and specifically expressed in its gastrolith disc. The encoding gene was cloned by partial sequencing of the protein extracted from the gastrolith matrix. Based on an assembled microarray cDNA chip, GAP 10 transcripts were found to be highly (12-fold) up-regulated in premolt gastrolith disc and significantly down-regulated in the hypodermis at the same molt stage. The deduced protein sequence of GAP 10 lacks chitin-binding domains and does not show homology to known proteins in the GenBankTM data base. It does, however, have an amino acid composition that has similarity to proteins extracted from invertebrate and ascidian-calcified extracellular matrices. The GAP 10 sequence contains a predicted signal peptide and predicted phosphorylation sites. In addition, the protein is phosphorylated and exhibits calcium-binding ability. Repeated daily injections of GAP 10 double strand RNA to premolt C. quadricarinatus resulted in a prolonged premolt stage and in the development of gastroliths with irregularly rough surfaces. These findings suggest that GAP 10 may be involved in the assembly of the gastrolith chitin-protein-mineral complex, particularly in the deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate. PMID:20150428

  13. Extracellular matrix and growth factor engineering for controlled angiogenesis in regenerative medicine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, Mikael M.; Brkic, Sime; Bovo, Emmanuela; Burger, Maximilian; Schaefer, Dirk J.; Wolff, Thomas; Gurke, Lorenz; Briquez, Priscilla S.; Larsson, Hans M.; Gianni-Barrera, Roberto; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Banfi, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Blood vessel growth plays a key role in regenerative medicine, both to restore blood supply to ischemic tissues and to ensure rapid vascularization of clinical-size tissue-engineered grafts. For example, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the master regulator of physiological blood vessel growth and is one of the main molecular targets of therapeutic angiogenesis approaches. However, angiogenesis is a complex process and there is a need to develop rational therapeutic strategies based on a firm understanding of basic vascular biology principles, as evidenced by the disappointing results of initial clinical trials of angiogenic factor delivery. In particular, the spatial localization of angiogenic signals in the extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to ensure the proper assembly and maturation of new vascular structures. Here, we discuss the therapeutic implications of matrix interactions of angiogenic factors, with a special emphasis on VEGF, as well as provide an overview of current approaches, based on protein and biomaterial engineering that mimic the regulatory functions of ECM to optimize the signaling microenvironment of vascular growth factors.

  14. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Modulates the Glycolysis of Chondrocyte and Extracellular Matrix in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaobo; Chen, Weiping; Zhao, Xiang; Chen, Linwei; Li, Wanli; Ran, Jisheng; Wu, Lidong

    2018-01-22

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been wildly verified to modulate glycolysis in tumor cells. However, the role of PKM2 on the glycolysis of osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes is still unclear. In present study, we investigate the function of PKM2 on OA chondrocyte glycolysis and the collagen matrix generation in vitro. Results showed that PKM2 was upregulated in OA chondrocytes compared with healthy control chondrocytes. In OA chondrocytes, ATP expression was lower compared with healthy control chondrocytes. Loss-of-function experiment showed that PKM2 knockdown mediated by lentivirus transfection could significantly suppress the glucose consumption and lactate secretion levels and decrease glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), and hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α), indicating the inhibition of PKM2 knockdown on glycolysis. Moreover, Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay showed that PKM2 knockdown inhibited OA chondrocyte proliferation and promoted the apoptosis. Western blot and immunocytochemical staining showed that PKM2 knockdown downregulated the expression levels of COL2A1 and SOX-9. In summary, our results conclude that PKM2 modulates the glycolysis and extracellular matrix generation, providing the vital role of PKM2 on OA pathogenesis and a novel therapeutic target for OA.

  15. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) is a potential biomarker of angiogenesis in proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M; Ahmad, Ajmal; Alam, Kaiser; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj; Mohammad, Ghulam; Hertogh, Gert De; Mousa, Ahmed; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2017-11-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) promotes angiogenesis through matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production. We investigated the expression levels of EMMPRIN and correlated these levels with VEGF, MMP-1 and MMP-9 in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). In addition, we examined the expression of EMMPRIN in the retinas of diabetic rats and the effect of EMMPRIN on the induction of angiogenesis regulatory factors in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs). Vitreous samples from 40 PDR and 19 non-diabetic patients, epiretinal membranes from 12 patients with PDR, retinas of rats and HRMECs were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, zymography analysis and RT-PCR. We showed a significant increase in the expression of EMMPRIN, VEGF, MMP-1 and MMP-9 in vitreous samples from PDR patients compared with non-diabetic controls (p diabetes. EMMPRIN induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, VEGF and MMP-1 expression in HRMEC. These results suggest that EMMPRIN/MMPs/VEGF pathway is involved in PDR angiogenesis. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Osteoblasts extracellular matrix induces vessel like structures through glycosylated collagen I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmieri, D. [Genetics, DIBIO, University of Genova, Corso Europa 26, 16132 Genova (Italy); Valli, M.; Viglio, S. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Pavia (Italy); Ferrari, N. [Istituto Nazionale per la ricerca sul Cancro, Genova (Italy); Ledda, B.; Volta, C. [Genetics, DIBIO, University of Genova, Corso Europa 26, 16132 Genova (Italy); Manduca, P., E-mail: man-via@unige.it [Genetics, DIBIO, University of Genova, Corso Europa 26, 16132 Genova (Italy)

    2010-03-10

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a fundamental role in angiogenesis affecting endothelial cells proliferation, migration and differentiation. Vessels-like network formation in vitro is a reliable test to study the inductive effects of ECM on angiogenesis. Here we utilized matrix deposed by osteoblasts as substrate where the molecular and structural complexity of the endogenous ECM is preserved, to test if it induces vessel-like network formation by endothelial cells in vitro. ECM is more similar to the physiological substrate in vivo than other substrates previously utilized for these studies in vitro. Osteogenic ECM, prepared in vitro from mature osteoblasts at the phase of maximal deposition and glycosylation of collagen I, induces EAhy926, HUVEC, and HDMEC endothelial cells to form vessels-like structures and promotes the activation of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2); the functionality of the p-38/MAPK signaling pathway is required. Osteogenic ECM also induces a transient increase of CXCL12 and a decrease of the receptor CXCR4. The induction of vessel-like networks is dependent from proper glycosylation of collagens and does not occur on osteogenic ECMs if deglycosylated by -galactosidase or on less glycosylated ECMs derived from preosteoblasts and normal fibroblasts, while is sustained on ECM from osteogenesis imperfecta fibroblasts only when their mutation is associated with over-glycosylation of collagen type I. These data support that post-translational glycosylation has a role in the induction in endothelial cells in vitro of molecules conductive to self-organization in vessels-like structures.

  17. Extracellular Matrix-Inspired Growth Factor Delivery Systems for Skin Wound Healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briquez, Priscilla S.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Martino, Mikaël M.

    2015-08-01

    Blood vessel growth plays a key role in regenerative medicine, both to restore blood supply to ischemic tissues and to ensure rapid vascularization of clinical-size tissue-engineered grafts. For example, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the master regulator of physiological blood vessel growth and is one of the main molecular targets of therapeutic angiogenesis approaches. However, angiogenesis is a complex process and there is a need to develop rational therapeutic strategies based on a firm understanding of basic vascular biology principles, as evidenced by the disappointing results of initial clinical trials of angiogenic factor delivery. In particular, the spatial localization of angiogenic signals in the extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to ensure the proper assembly and maturation of new vascular structures. Here, we discuss the therapeutic implications of matrix interactions of angiogenic factors, with a special emphasis on VEGF, as well as provide an overview of current approaches, based on protein and biomaterial engineering that mimic the regulatory functions of ECM to optimize the signaling microenvironment of vascular growth factors.

  18. Integrin-extracellular matrix interactions in connective tissue remodeling and osteoblast differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, R. K.; Moursi, A.; Zimmerman, D.; Lull, J.; Damsky, C.

    1995-01-01

    The differentiaton of bone cells is a complex multistep process. Bone is somewhat unusual in that it is very actively and continually remodeled in the adult and that maintenance of its mass in the mature organism is exquisitely sensitive to mechanical as well as chemical signals. Bone is also unique because it consists of a very large amount of extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mineralized. The integrin family of ECM receptors has been shown to play an important role in tissue morphogenesis in several systems. Our studies on the regulation of matrix remodeling enzymes by integrins in rabbit synovial fibroblasts show that two b1 integrin fibronectin (FN) receptor complexes (alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 1) cooperate in detecting subtle changes in the composition of the ECM. As a result of signal transduction by these integrins, the levels of mRNA and protein for several members of the metalloproteinase family are regulated in these cells. We have also used antibody and RGD peptide perturbation studies to determine the significance of cell/ECM interactions to normal osteogenesis. We found that interactions between the cell binding domain of FN and integrins are required for both normal morphogenesis and gene expression in cultured osteoblasts that differentiate to form bone-like tissue in culture. These data lead us to propose that beta 1 integrins play an important role in osteoblast differentiation as well as in bone remodeling.

  19. Genetic Background is a Key Determinant of Glomerular Extracellular Matrix Composition and Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randles, Michael J; Woolf, Adrian S; Huang, Jennifer L; Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Price, Karen L; Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Collinson, Sophie; Denny, Thomas; Knight, David; Mironov, Aleksandr; Starborg, Toby; Korstanje, Ron; Humphries, Martin J; Long, David A; Lennon, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    Glomerular disease often features altered histologic patterns of extracellular matrix (ECM). Despite this, the potential complexities of the glomerular ECM in both health and disease are poorly understood. To explore whether genetic background and sex determine glomerular ECM composition, we investigated two mouse strains, FVB and B6, using RNA microarrays of isolated glomeruli combined with proteomic glomerular ECM analyses. These studies, undertaken in healthy young adult animals, revealed unique strain- and sex-dependent glomerular ECM signatures, which correlated with variations in levels of albuminuria and known predisposition to progressive nephropathy. Among the variation, we observed changes in netrin 4, fibroblast growth factor 2, tenascin C, collagen 1, meprin 1-α, and meprin 1-β. Differences in protein abundance were validated by quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, and the collective differences were not explained by mutations in known ECM or glomerular disease genes. Within the distinct signatures, we discovered a core set of structural ECM proteins that form multiple protein-protein interactions and are conserved from mouse to man. Furthermore, we found striking ultrastructural changes in glomerular basement membranes in FVB mice. Pathway analysis of merged transcriptomic and proteomic datasets identified potential ECM regulatory pathways involving inhibition of matrix metalloproteases, liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, notch, and cyclin-dependent kinase 5. These pathways may therefore alter ECM and confer susceptibility to disease. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Characterization of glomerular extracellular matrix by proteomic analysis of laser-captured microdissected glomeruli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobeika, Liliane; Barati, Michelle T; Caster, Dawn J; McLeish, Kenneth R; Merchant, Michael L

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling is a prominent feature of many glomerular diseases and is a final common pathway of glomerular injury. However, changes in ECM composition accompanying disease-related remodeling are unknown. The physical properties of ECM create challenges for characterization of composition using standard protein extraction techniques, as the insoluble components of ECM are frequently discarded and many ECM proteins are in low abundance compared to other cell proteins. Prior proteomic studies defining normal ECM composition used a large number of glomeruli isolated from human kidneys retrieved for transplantation or by nephrectomy for cancer. Here we examined the ability to identify ECM proteins by mass spectrometry using glomerular sections compatible with those available from standard renal biopsy specimens. Proteins were classified as ECM by comparison to the Matrisome database and previously identified glomerular ECM proteins. Optimal ECM protein identification resulted from sequential decellularization and protein extraction of 100 human glomerular sections isolated by laser capture microdissection from either frozen or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. In total, 147 ECM proteins were identified, including the majority of structural and GBM proteins previously identified along with a number of matrix and glomerular basement membrane proteins not previously associated with glomeruli. Thus, our study demonstrates the feasibility of proteomic analysis of glomerular ECM from retrieved glomerular sections isolated from renal biopsy tissue and expands the list of known ECM proteins in glomeruli. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. All rights reserved.

  1. Cellular and nerve regeneration within a biosynthetic extracellular matrix for corneal transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengfu; Carlsson, David; Lohmann, Chris; Suuronen, Erik; Vascotto, Sandy; Kobuch, Karin; Sheardown, Heather; Munger, Rejean; Nakamura, Masatsugu; Griffith, May

    2003-12-01

    Our objective was to determine whether key properties of extracellular matrix (ECM) macromolecules can be replicated within tissue-engineered biosynthetic matrices to influence cellular properties and behavior. To achieve this, hydrated collagen and N-isopropylacrylamide copolymer-based ECMs were fabricated and tested on a corneal model. The structural and immunological simplicity of the cornea and importance of its extensive innervation for optimal functioning makes it an ideal test model. In addition, corneal failure is a clinically significant problem. Matrices were therefore designed to have the optical clarity and the proper dimensions, curvature, and biomechanical properties for use as corneal tissue replacements in transplantation. In vitro studies demonstrated that grafting of the laminin adhesion pentapeptide motif, YIGSR, to the hydrogels promoted epithelial stratification and neurite in-growth. Implants into pigs' corneas demonstrated successful in vivo regeneration of host corneal epithelium, stroma, and nerves. In particular, functional nerves were observed to rapidly regenerate in implants. By comparison, nerve regeneration in allograft controls was too slow to be observed during the experimental period, consistent with the behavior of human cornea transplants. Other corneal substitutes have been produced and tested, but here we report an implantable matrix that performs as a physiologically functional tissue substitute and not simply as a prosthetic device. These biosynthetic ECM replacements should have applicability to many areas of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, especially where nerve function is required. regenerative medicine | tissue engineering | cornea | implantation | innervation

  2. Role of extracellular matrix remodelling in adipose tissue pathophysiology: relevance in the development of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, V; Gómez-Ambrosi, J; Rodríguez, A; Frühbeck, G

    2012-12-01

    Adipose tissue responds dynamically to alterations in nutrient excess through adipocyte hypertrophy and hyperplasia, followed by increased angiogenesis, immune cell infiltration, extracellular matrix (ECM) overproduction, and thus, increased production of proinflammatory adipokines during the progression of chronic inflammation. Adipose tissue remodelling is an ongoing process that is pathologically accelerated in the obese state in large part mediated by ECM proteins and proteases. The ECM is subject to major modifications by adipocytes and other cell types that are infiltrated in the adipose tissue, such as macrophages and vascular cells. In obesity, unusual expression of ECM components and fragments derived from tissue-remodelling processes can influence immune cell recruitment and activation, actively contributing to inflammation. ECM turnover requires a tightly regulated balance between the synthesis of the components and their proteolysis, mainly by fibrinolytic systems and matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). In this review, we discuss the key cellular steps that lead to adipose tissue remodelling and the main molecular mechanisms and mediators in this process. We highlight the importance of hypoxia and angiogenesis in the adipose remodelling process, as well as the cross-talk between adipocytes, macrophages and ECM components.

  3. Extracellular Wound Matrices:A Novel Regenerative Tissue Matrix (RTM) Technology for Connective Tissue Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, John R; McQuillan, David J

    2007-06-01

    The restoration of structure, function, and physiology to damaged or missing tissue through the use of a regenerative tissue matrix (RTM) leads to regenerative healing rather than reparative scarring. While many processes exist to transform biologic materials into an extracellular matrix (ECM), only those that maintain the required structural and biochemical properties necessary to capture the intrinsic regenerative abilities of the body are suitable to produce an RTM. Histological examination using differential staining with hematoxylin and eosin stain or Verhoeff von Geisen stain of human biopsies of RTM obtained from 2 different abdominal surgery patients taken at 8- and 12 months were consistent with RTM remodeling into fascia-like tissue. A synopsis of recent studies on the use of the RTM GraftJacket® (Wright Medical Technologies, Memphis, Tenn) in successful closure of diabetic foot wounds is presented. Collectively, these reports indicate that LifeCell produced ECMs exemplified by GraftJacket exhibit the required clinical outcomes associated with an RTM.

  4. Histochemical study of fibrillar proteins of the extracellular matrix in benign and malignant mammary neoplasms in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Martins,Ana Maria Cristina Rabello Pinto da Fonseca; Tamaso,Elia; Guerra,José Luiz

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to study some of the proteins that form the extracellular matrix of 54 benign and malignant mammary neoplasms in dogs, using histochemical methods: Picrosirius and polarization microscopy for collagenous fibers, Gordon -Sweats's method for reticular fibers and Weigert's fucsine-resorcine method for elastic fibers. A large variability in quantity, distribution and characteristics of the matrix components was observed in the different types of neoplasms. Collage...

  5. Pilot Study of the Efficacy of Extracellular Matrix Arterial Interposition Grafts in a Sheep (Ovis aries) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-18

    arteries via a midline neck incision. The grafts were created with CorMatrix extracellular matrix. The wounds were closed and the animals recovered...Lovenox was administered starting post-operatively daily for the remainder of the experiment. Duplex ultrasonography was conducted at 1 and 6 weeks...surgery, two animals had uncomplicated courses without clinical evidence of thrombosis or wound complication. The third animal succumbed from graft failure

  6. Pilot Study of the Efficacy of Extracellular Matrix Arterio-Venous Bypass Grafts in a Sheep (Ovis aries) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    midline neck incision. The fistula was created with CorMatrix extracellular matrix. The wounds were closed and the animals recovered. Lovenox was...administered starting post-operatively daily for the remainder of the experiment. Duplex ultrasonography was conducted at 1 and 6 weeks, followed by...thorough necropsy and histologic evaluation of the fistulas using hematoxylin and eosin and Massons Trichrome stains. Results: Following surgery, two animals

  7. 3D bioprinted extracellular matrix mimics facilitate directed differentiation of epithelial progenitors for sweat gland regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sha; Yao, Bin; Xie, Jiangfan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-03-01

    Sweat glands perform a vital thermoregulatory function in mammals. Like other skin appendages, they originate from epidermal progenitors. However, they have low regenerative potential in response to injury, and whether adult epidermal progenitors could be specified to differentiate to a sweat gland cell lineage remains largely unexplored. We used bioprinting technology to create a functional in vitro cell-laden 3D extracellular matrix mimics (3D-ECM) with composite hydrogels based on gelatin and sodium alginate because of chemical and structural similarity to ECM components. To achieve specific cell differentiation, mouse plantar dermis and epidermal growth factor were synchronously incorporated into the 3D-ECM mimics to create an inductive niche for epidermal progenitor cells obtained from mice. The biological 3D construct could maintain cell viability, thereby facilitating cell spreading and matrix formation. In vitro data by immunofluorescence and gene expression assay of key cell-surface markers demonstrated that the bioprinted 3D-ECM could effectively create a restrictive niche for epidermal progenitors that ensures unilateral differentiation into sweat gland cells. Furthermore, direct delivery of bioprinted 3D-ECM into burned paws of mice resulted in functional restoration of sweat glands. This study represents the rational design to enhance the specific differentiation of epidermal lineages using 3D bioprinting and may have clinical and translational implications in regenerating sweat glands. Sweat gland regeneration after injury is of clinical importance but remains largely unsolved because of low regenerative potential and lack of a definite niche. Some studies have shown sweat gland regeneration with gene-based interventions or cell-based induction via embryonic components, but translation to clinic is challenging. The novelty and significance of the work lies in the fact that we design a 3D bioprinted extracellular matrix that provides the spatial

  8. Extracellular matrix Influence in Streptococcus mutans gene expression in a cariogenic biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamanca, Elkin Jahir Florez; Klein, Marlise Inêz

    2017-12-28

    Caries etiology is biofilm-diet dependent. Biofilms are highly dynamic and structured microbial communities enmeshed in a three-dimensional extracellular matrix. The study evaluated the expression dynamics of Streptococcus mutans genes associated with exopolysaccharides (EPS) (gtfBCD, gbpB, dexA), lipoteichoic acids (LTA) (dltABCD, SMU_775c) and extracellular DNA (eDNA) (lytST, lrgAB, ccpA) during matrix development within a mixed-species biofilm of S. mutans, Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus gordonii. Mixed-species biofilms using S. mutans strains UA159 or ΔgtfB formed on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs were submitted to a nutritional challenge (providing an abundance of sucrose and starch). Biofilms were removed at eight developmental stages for gene expression analysis by qPCR. The pH of spent culture media remained acidic throughout the experimental periods, being lower after sucrose and starch exposure. All genes were expressed at all biofilm developmental phases. EPS- and LTA-associated genes had a similar expression profile for both biofilms, presenting lowers levels of expression at 67, 91 and 115h and peak of higher expression at 55h, but having distinct expression magnitude, with lower values for ΔgtfB (e.g., fold-difference of ~382 for gtfC and ~16 for dltB at 43h). eDNA-associated genes presented different dynamic of expression between both strains. In UA159 biofilms lrgA and lrgB genes were highly expressed at 29h (which were ~13- and ~5.4-times vs. ΔgtfB, respectively), while in ΔgtfB biofilms an inverse relationship between lytS and lrgA and lrgB expression was detected. Therefore, the deletion of gtfB influences dynamics and magnitude of expression of genes associated with matrix main components. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Bioelectrical signals improve cardiac function and modify gene expression of extracellular matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfelda, Karin; Kapeller, Barbara; Holly, Alexander; Podesser, Bruno K; Losert, Udo; Brandes, Kersten; Goettel, Peter; Mueller, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    Beyond the influence of stimulating devices on cardiac excitation, their use in treating patients with heart failure has positive effects on the myocardium at the molecular level. Electrical signals can induce a wide spectrum of effects in living tissue. Therefore, we sought to determine whether applying electrical microcurrent directly to failing hearts leads to functional improvement. Sixteen male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) with heart failure underwent application of a patch electrode to the left ventricular epicardium and placement of a subcutaneous counter electrode. The electrode delivered a 0.35 μA microcurrent to nine of the SHRs for 45 ± 3 days; the other seven SHRs were used as controls. At baseline and before the SHRs were humanely put to death, we measured the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and the thickness of the LV posterior wall during systole and diastole (LVPWs/d). We used quantitative PCR to determine extracellular matrix parameters [collagen I-III, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3), TIMP4, connexins (Cxs) 40/43/45, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and interleukin (IL)-6]. Among SHRs undergoing microcurrent application, LVEF normalized (mean decrease, 22.8%; P = 0.009), and LVPWs decreased (mean, 35.3%; P = 0.001). Compared with the control group, the SHRs receiving microcurrent exhibited a mean decrease in the gene expression of collagen I (10.6%, P = 0.003), TIMP3 (18.5%, P = 0.005), Cx43 (14.3%, P = 0.003), Cx45 (12.7%, P = 0.020), TGF-β (13.0%, P = 0.005), and IL-6 (53.7%, P = 0.000). Microcurrent application induced no changes in the expression of collagen III, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP4, or Cx40. Applying microcurrent to the LV epicardium of SHRs leads to statistically significant functional improvement and alterations in the levels of inflammatory and extracellular matrix components. © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John

  10. DNA methylation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes in children exposed to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Cortes, Tania; Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Lantz, Robert Clark; Chau, Binh T

    2017-08-15

    Several novel mechanistic findings regarding to arsenic's pathogenesis has been reported and some of them suggest that the etiology of some arsenic induced diseases are due in part to heritable changes to the genome via epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation, histone maintenance, and mRNA expression. Recently, we reported that arsenic exposure during in utero and early life was associated with impairment in the lung function and abnormal receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) sputum levels. Based on our results and the reported arsenic impacts on DNA methylation, we designed this study in our cohort of children exposed in utero and early childhood to arsenic with the aim to associate DNA methylation of MMP9, TIMP1 and RAGE genes with its protein sputum levels and with urinary and toenail arsenic levels. The results disclosed hypermethylation in MMP9 promotor region in the most exposed children; and an increase in the RAGE sputum levels among children with the mid methylation level; there were also positive associations between MMP9 DNA methylation with arsenic toenail concentrations; RAGE DNA methylation with iAs, and %DMA; and finally between TIMP1 DNA methylation with the first arsenic methylation. A negative correlation between MMP9 sputum levels with its DNA methylation was registered. In conclusion, arsenic levels were positive associated with the DNA methylation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes;, which in turn could modifies the biological process in which they are involved causing or predisposing to lung diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Extracellular matrix biomimicry for the creation of investigational and therapeutic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellowe, Amanda S; Gonzalez, Anjelica L

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a web of fibrous proteins that serves as a scaffold for tissues and organs, and is important for maintaining homeostasis and facilitating cellular adhesion. Integrin transmembrane receptors are the primary adhesion molecules that anchor cells to the ECM, thus integrating cells with their microenvironments. Integrins play a critical role in facilitating cell-matrix interactions and promoting signal transduction, both from the cell to the ECM and vice versa, ultimately mediating cell behavior. For this reason, many advanced biomaterials employ biomimicry by replicating the form and function of fibrous ECM proteins. The ECM also acts as a reservoir for small molecules and growth factors, wherein fibrous proteins directly bind and present these bioactive moieties that facilitate cell activity. Therefore biomimicry can be enhanced by incorporating small molecules into ECM-like substrates. Biomimetic ECM materials have served as invaluable research tools for studying interactions between cells and the surrounding ECM, revealing that cell-matrix signaling is driven by mechanical forces, integrin engagement, and small molecules. Mimicking pathological ECMs has also elucidated disease specific cell behaviors. For example, biomimetic tumor microenvironments have been used to induce metastatic cell behaviors, and have thereby shown promise for in vitro cancer drug testing and targeting. Further, ECM-like substrates have been successfully employed for autologous cell recolonization for tissue engineering and wound healing. As we continue to learn more about the mechanical and biochemical characteristics of the ECM, these properties can be harnessed to develop new biomaterials, biomedical devices, and therapeutics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of extracellular matrix changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Agrawal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, including its progression from dysplasia to carcinoma, "field effects", genetic changes in tumor associated mucosa (TAM and effect of matrix metalloproteinases in breaking down of matrix proteins to facilitate invasion, has been well documented. However, what remains to be done is to extrapolate this knowledge to improve patient care. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the extracellular matrix (ECM changes with the routine histochemical stains available to most histopathologists. Materials and Methods: The study includes 72 cases of OSCC in which the tumor and adjacent normal appearing areas were sampled to study the ECM changes with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E and Verhoeff′s-Van Gieson elastic stain (VVG. Results: Basophilic fragmentation of collagen (H and E and clumped short elastic fibers (VVG were seen in 12 (16.7% cases. Of the remaining cases, 18 (25% had a dense lymphocytic infiltrate and had no demonstrable elastic fibers. Those cases with H and E changes were further studied and compared with normal mucosa for ultrastructural changes. The ultrastructural study demonstrated an increase in oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibers and decrease in collagen fibers with some transformation changes associated with OSCCs and lymph node metastasis. Conclusion: Changes in transformation of collagen to elastic fibers and also the loss of both the fibers in areas of lymphocytic infiltration possibly indicate degradation of ECM fibers by factors released from the lymphocytes or tumor cells and the limiting effect on the tumor by ECM remodeling.

  13. Bioengineered Bruch's-like extracellular matrix promotes retinal pigment epithelial differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel McLenachan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the eye, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE adheres to a complex protein matrix known as Bruch's membrane (BrM. The aim of this study was to provide enriched conditions for RPE cell culture through the production of a BrM-like matrix. Our hypothesis was that a human RPE cell line would deposit an extracellular matrix (ECM resembling BrM. The composition and structure of ECM deposited by ARPE19 cells (ARPE19-ECM was characterized. To produce ARPE19-ECM, ARPE19 cells were cultured in the presence dextran sulphate. ARPE19-ECM was decellularized using deoxycholate and characterized by immunostaining and western blot analysis. Primary human RPE and induced pluripotent stem cells were seeded onto ARPE19-ECM or geltrex coated surfaces and examined by microscopy or RT-PCR. Culture of ARPE19 cells with dextran sulphate promoted nuclear localization of SOX2, formation of tight junctions and deposition of ECM. ARPE19 cells deposited ECM proteins found in the inner layers of BrM, including fibronectin, vitronectin, collagens IV and V as well as laminin-alpha-5, but not those found in the middle elastic layer (elastin or the outer layers (collagen VI. ARPE19-ECM promoted pigmentation in human RPE and pluripotent stem cell cultures. Expression of RPE65 was significantly increased on ARPE19-ECM compared with geltrex in differentiating pluripotent stem cell cultures. ARPE19 cells deposit ECM with a composition and structure similar to BrM in the retina. Molecular cues present in ARPE19-ECM promote the acquisition and maintenance of the RPE phenotype. Together, these results demonstrate a simple method for generating a BrM-like surface for enriched RPE cell cultures.

  14. Extracellular Matrix Peptides of Artemia Cyst Shell Participate in Protecting Encysted Embryos from Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Li; Chen, Dian-Fu; Liu, Yu-Lei; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Fan; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Background Many species of the brine shrimp Artemia are found in various severe environments in many parts of the world where extreme salinity, high UV radiation levels, high pH, anoxia, large temperature fluctuations, and intermittent dry conditions are often recorded. To withstand adverse environments, Artemia undergoes an oviparous developmental pathway to release cysts whereas, under favorable conditions, swimming nauplius larvae are formed directly via an ovoviviparous pathway. In the former case these cysts have an extraordinary ability to keep the embryos protected from the harsh environment for long periods. This is achieved through the protection by a complex out-wrapping cyst shell. However, the formation and function of the cyst shell is complex; the details remain largely unclear. Principal Finding A shell gland-specific gene (SGEG2) was cloned and identified from a suppression subtractive hybridization library. Western blot analysis showed that SGEG2 presumably requires post-translational proteolysis in order to be processed into two mature peptides (SGEG2a and 2b). The three matrix peptides (SGEG1 reported previously, 2a, and 2b) were found to distribute throughout the cyst shell. The results of gene knockdown by RNAi and subsequent resistance to environmental stresses assays indicated that these matrix peptides are required for cyst shell formation and are involved in protecting the encysted embryos from environmental stress. Conclusions/Significance This study revealed that extracellular matrix peptides participate in protecting embryos from extreme salinity, UV radiation, large temperature fluctuations and dry environments, thereby facilitating their survival. The cyst shell provides an excellent opportunity to link the ecological setting of an organism to the underlying physiological and biochemical processes enabling its survival. The cyst shell material has also a high potential to become an excellent new biomaterial with a high number of

  15. Differences in extracellular matrix proteins between Friesian horses with aortic rupture, unaffected Friesians and Warmblood horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, M; Gröne, A; van de Lest, C H A; Saey, V; Duchateau, L; Wolsein, P; Chiers, K; Ducatelle, R; van Weeren, P R; de Bruijn, M; Delesalle, C

    2017-09-01

    Unlike in Warmblood horses, aortic rupture is quite common in Friesian horses, in which a hereditary trait is suspected. The aortic connective tissue in affected Friesians shows histological changes such as medial necrosis, elastic fibre fragmentation, mucoid material accumulation and fibrosis with aberrant collagen morphology. However, ultrastructural examination of the collagen fibres of the mid-thoracic aorta has been inconclusive in further elucidating the pathogenesis of the disease. To assess several extracellular matrix (ECM) components biochemically in order to explore a possible underlying breed-related systemic ECM defect in Friesians with aortic rupture. Cadaver study. Tissues from affected Friesians (n = 18), unaffected Friesians (n = 10) and Warmblood horses (n = 30) were compared. Samples were taken from the thoracic aorta at the level of the rupture site, from two locations caudal to the rupture and from the deep digital flexor tendon. Total collagen content, post-translational modifications of collagen formation including lysine hydroxylation, and hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP), lysylpyridinoline (LP) and pyrrole cross-links were analysed. Additionally, elastin cross-links, glycosaminoglycan content and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity were assessed. Significantly increased MMP activity and increased LP and HP cross-linking, lysine hydroxylation and elastin cross-linking were found at the site of rupture in affected Friesians. These changes may reflect processes involved in healing and aneurysm formation. Unaffected Friesians had less lysine hydroxylation and pyrrole cross-linking within the tendons compared with Warmblood horses. No differences in the matrix of the aorta were found between normal Warmbloods and Friesian horses. Small sample size. The differences in collagen parameters in tendon tissue may reflect differences in connective tissue metabolism between Friesians and Warmblood horses. © 2017 EVJ Ltd.

  16. Constructing Human Skin Equivalents on Porcine Acellular Peritoneum Extracellular Matrix for In Vitro Irritation Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Chin; Zhang, Zheng; Florek, Charles; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B

    2016-01-01

    The irritancy of topical products has to be investigated to ensure the safety and compliance. Although several reconstructed human epidermal models have been adopted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to replace in vivo animal irritation testing, these models are based on a single cell type and lack dermal components, which may be insufficient to reflect all of the components of irritation. In our study, we investigated the use of acellular porcine peritoneum extracellular matrix as a substrate to construct full-thickness human skin equivalents (HSEs) for use as irritation screening tool. The acellular peritoneum matrix (APM) exhibited excellent skin cell attachment (>80%) and proliferation for human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). APM-HSEs based on coculture of HDF and HaCaT were prepared. Increased HDF seeding density up to 5 × 10(4)/cm(2) resulted in APM-HSEs with a thicker and more organized epidermis. The epidermis of APM-HSEs expressed keratin 15, a keratinocyte proliferation marker, and involucrin, a differentiation marker, respectively. To assess the use of APM-HSEs for irritation testing, six proficiency chemicals, including three nonirritants (phosphate-buffered saline, polyethylene glycol 400, and isopropanol) and three irritants (1-bromohexane, heptanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate) were applied. The APM-HSEs were able to discriminate nonirritants from irritants based on the viability. Levels of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1α, IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-8, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) in these treatment groups further assisted the irritancy ranking. In conclusion, we have developed partially differentiated full-thickness APM-HSEs based on acellular porcine peritoneum matrix, and these APM-HSEs demonstrated utility as an in vitro irritation screening tool.

  17. Investigating the role of the extracellular matrix on differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and MC3T3 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, H.A.M.; Dechering, Koen; Someren, Eugene; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a promising cell source for bone tissue engineering, but due to their limited number and donor variation, other cell types are used to answer relevant questions in bone tissue engineering. Since the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex entity with

  18. beta-Catenin signaling is required for TGF-beta(1)-induced extracellular matrix production by airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarsma, Hoeke A.; Menzen, Mark H.; Halayko, Andrew J.; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2011-01-01

    Baarsma HA, Menzen MH, Halayko AJ, Meurs H, Kerstjens HA, Gosens R. beta-Catenin signaling is required for TGF-beta(1)-induced extracellular matrix production by airway smooth muscle cells. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 301: L956-L965, 2011. First published September 9, 2011; doi:

  19. Molecular constituents of the extracellular matrix in rat liver mounting a hepatic progenitor cell response for tissue repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestentoft, Peter Siig; Jelnes, Peter; Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2013-01-01

    Tissue repair in the adult mammalian liver occurs in two distinct processes, referred to as the first and second tiers of defense. We undertook to characterize the changes in molecular constituents of the extracellular matrix when hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) respond in a second tier of defense...

  20. Variation in extracellular matrix genes is associated with weight regain after weight loss in a sex-specific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roumans, Nadia J T; Vink, Roel G; Gielen, Marij

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of adipocytes is important for body weight regulation. Here, we investigated whether genetic variation in ECM-related genes is associated with weight regain among participants of the European DiOGenes study. Overweight and obese subjects (n = 469, 310 females, 159 m...

  1. Proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis of smooth muscle cells cultured from human coronary atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. MacLeod (Donald); B.H. Strauss (Bradley); J. Escaned (Javier); V.A.W.M. Umans (Victor); R-J. van Suylen (Robert-Jan); A. Verkerk (Anton); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M. de Jong (Marcel)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to examine the proliferative capacity and extracellular matrix synthesis of human coronary plaque cells in vitro. BACKGROUND. Common to both primary atherosclerosis and restenosis are vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and production of

  2. Plasma concentrations of extracellular matrix protein fibulin-1 are related to cardiovascular risk markers in chronic kidney disease and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Sidelmann, Johannes J

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Fibulin-1 is one of a few extracellular matrix proteins present in blood in high concentrations. We aimed to define the relationship between plasma fibulin-1 levels and risk markers of cardiovascular disease. METHODS: Plasma fibulin-1 was determined in subjects with chronic...

  3. The extracellular matrix of Gadus morhua muscle contains types III, V, VI and IV collagens in addition to type I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Lawson, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Confocal microscopy and immuno‐histochemistry were used to examine collagens in the extracellular matrix of cod Gadus morhua swimming muscle. In addition to the well known presence of type I fibrous collagen, types III and VI were also found in the myocommata and the endomysium. The beaded collagen...

  4. The extracellular matrix niche microenvironment of neural and cancer stem cells in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Jacqueline; Brösicke, Nicole; Theocharidis, Ursula; Faissner, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that neural stem cells and cancer stem cells (NSCs/CSCs) share several overlapping characteristics such as self-renewal, multipotency and a comparable molecular repertoire. In addition to the intrinsic cellular properties, NSCs/CSCs favor a similar environment to acquire and maintain their characteristics. In the present review, we highlight the shared properties of NSCs and CSCs in regard to their extracellular microenvironment called the NSC/CSC niche. Moreover, we point out that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and their complementary receptors influence the behavior of NSCs/CSCs as well as brain tumor progression. Here, we focus on the expression profile and functional importance of the ECM glycoprotein tenascin-C, the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan DSD-1-PG/phosphacan but also on other important glycoprotein/proteoglycan constituents. Within this review, we specifically concentrate on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults and is associated with poor prognosis despite intense and aggressive surgical and therapeutic treatment. Recent studies indicate that GBM onset is driven by a subpopulation of CSCs that display self-renewal and recapitulate tumor heterogeneity. Based on the CSC hypothesis the cancer arises just from a small subpopulation of self-sustaining cancer cells with the exclusive ability to self-renew and maintain the tumor. Besides the fundamental stem cell properties of self-renewal and multipotency, GBM stem cells share further molecular characteristics with NSCs, which we would like to review in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gene expression signatures of extracellular matrix and growth factors during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

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    Nair, Rekha; Ngangan, Alyssa V; Kemp, Melissa L; McDevitt, Todd C

    2012-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are uniquely capable of differentiating into somatic cell derivatives of all three germ lineages, therefore holding tremendous promise for developmental biology studies and regenerative medicine therapies. Although temporal patterns of phenotypic gene expression have been relatively well characterized during the course of differentiation, coincident patterns of endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factor expression that accompany pluripotent stem cell differentiation remain much less well-defined. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine the global dynamic profiles of ECM and growth factor genes associated with early stages of pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation. Gene expression analysis of ECM and growth factors by ESCs differentiating as embryoid bodies for up to 14 days was assessed using PCR arrays (172 unique genes total), and the results were examined using a variety of data mining methods. As expected, decreases in the expression of genes regulating pluripotent stem cell fate preceded subsequent increases in morphogen expression associated with differentiation. Pathway analysis generated solely from ECM and growth factor gene expression highlighted morphogenic cell processes within the embryoid bodies, such as cell growth, migration, and intercellular signaling, that are required for primitive tissue and organ developmental events. In addition, systems analysis of ECM and growth factor gene expression alone identified intracellular molecules and signaling pathways involved in the progression of pluripotent stem cell differentiation that were not contained within the array data set. Overall, these studies represent a novel framework to dissect the complex, dynamic nature of the extracellular biochemical milieu of stem cell microenvironments that regulate pluripotent cell fate decisions and morphogenesis.

  6. Native extracellular matrix-derived semipermeable, optically transparent, and inexpensive membrane inserts for microfluidic cell culture.

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    Mondrinos, Mark J; Yi, Yoon-Suk; Wu, Nan-Kun; Ding, Xueting; Huh, Dongeun

    2017-09-12

    Semipermeable cell culture membranes are commonly used in multilayered microfluidic devices to mimic the basement membrane in vivo and to create compartmentalized microenvironments for physiological cell growth and differentiation. However, existing membranes are predominantly made up of synthetic polymers, providing limited capacity to replicate cellular interactions with native extracellular matrices that play a crucial role in the induction of physiological phenotypes. Here we describe a new type of cell culture membranes engineered from native extracellular matrix (ECM) materials that are thin, semipermeable, optically transparent, and amenable to integration into microfluidic cell culture devices. Facile and cost-effective fabrication of these membranes was achieved by controlled sequential steps of vitrification that transformed three-dimensional (3D) ECM hydrogels into structurally stable thin films. By modulating the composition of the ECM, our technique provided a means to tune key membrane properties such as optical transparency, stiffness, and porosity. For microfluidic cell culture, we constructed a multilayered microdevice consisting of two parallel chambers separated by a thin membrane insert derived from different types of ECM. This study showed that our ECM membranes supported attachment and growth of various types of cells (epithelial, endothelial, and mesenchymal cells) under perfusion culture conditions. Our data also revealed the promotive effects of the membranes on adhesion-associated intracellular signaling that mediates cell-ECM interactions. Moreover, we demonstrated the use of these membranes for constructing compartmentalized microfluidic cell culture systems to induce physiological tissue differentiation or to replicate interfaces between different tissue types. Our approach provides a robust platform to produce and engineer biologically active cell culture substrates that serve as promising alternatives to conventional synthetic

  7. Development of an acellular tumor extracellular matrix as a three-dimensional scaffold for tumor engineering.

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    Wei-Dong Lü

    Full Text Available Tumor engineering is defined as the construction of three-dimensional (3D tumors in vitro with tissue engineering approaches. The present 3D scaffolds for tumor engineering have several limitations in terms of structure and function. To get an ideal 3D scaffold for tumor culture, A549 human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells were implanted into immunodeficient mice to establish xenotransplatation models. Tumors were retrieved at 30-day implantation and sliced into sheets. They were subsequently decellularized by four procedures. Two decellularization methods, Tris-Trypsin-Triton multi-step treatment and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS treatment, achieved complete cellular removal and thus were chosen for evaluation of histological and biochemical properties. Native tumor tissues were used as controls. Human breast cancer MCF-7 cells were cultured onto the two 3D scaffolds for further cell growth and growth factor secretion investigations, with the two-dimensional (2D culture and cells cultured onto the Matrigel scaffolds used as controls. Results showed that Tris-Trypsin-Triton multi-step treated tumor sheets had well-preserved extracellular matrix structures and components. Their porosity was increased but elastic modulus was decreased compared with the native tumor samples. They supported MCF-7 cell repopulation and proliferation, as well as expression of growth factors. When cultured within the Tris-Trypsin-Triton treated scaffold, A549 cells and human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (SW-480 had similar behaviors to MCF-7 cells, but human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells (KYSE-510 had a relatively slow cell repopulation rate. This study provides evidence that Tris-Trypsin-Triton treated acellular tumor extracellular matrices are promising 3D scaffolds with ideal spatial arrangement, biomechanical properties and biocompatibility for improved modeling of 3D tumor microenvironments.

  8. Biomimetic tendon extracellular matrix composite gradient scaffold enhances ligament-to-bone junction reconstruction.

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    Liu, Huanhuan; Yang, Long; Zhang, Erchen; Zhang, Rui; Cai, Dandan; Zhu, Shouan; Ran, Jisheng; Bunpetch, Varitsara; Cai, Youzhi; Heng, Boon Chin; Hu, Yejun; Dai, Xuesong; Chen, Xiao; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2017-07-01

    Management of ligament/tendon-to-bone-junction healing remains a formidable challenge in the field of orthopedic medicine to date, due to deficient vascularity and multi-tissue transitional structure of the junction. Numerous strategies have been employed to improve ligament-bone junction healing, including delivery of stem cells, bioactive factors, and synthetic materials, but these methods are often inadequate at recapitulating the complex structure-function relationships at native tissue interfaces. Here, we developed an easily-fabricated and effective biomimetic composite to promote the regeneration of ligament-bone junction by physically modifying the tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) into a Random-Aligned-Random composite using ultrasound treatment. The differentiation potential of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells on the modified ECM were examined in vitro. The results demonstrated that the modified ECM enhanced expression of chondrogenesis and osteogenesis-associated epigenetic genes (Jmjd1c, Kdm6b), transcription factor genes (Sox9, Runx2) and extracellular matrix genes (Col2a1, Ocn), resulting in higher osteoinductivity than the untreated tendon ECM in vitro. In the rabbit anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction model in vivo, micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) and histological analysis showed that the modified Random-Aligned-Random composite scaffold enhanced bone and fibrocartilage formation at the interface, more efficaciously than the unmodified tendon ECM. Therefore, these results demonstrated that the biomimetic Random-Aligned-Random composite could be a promising scaffold for ligament/tendon-bone junction repair. The native transitional region consists of several distinct yet contiguous tissue regions, composed of soft tissue, non-calcified fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage, and bone. A stratified graft whose phases are interconnected with each other is essential for supporting the formation of functionally continuous multi

  9. Adipose Extracellular Matrix/Stromal Vascular Fraction Gel: A Novel Adipose Tissue-Derived Injectable for Stem Cell Therapy.

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    Yao, Yao; Dong, Ziqing; Liao, Yunjun; Zhang, Pan; Ma, Jingjing; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2017-04-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells and other stromal vascular fraction cells were used more often for stem cell therapy, even though limitations such as poor cell retention rate, complicated and expensive isolation processes, and the use of specific laboratory equipment need to be overcome. Here, the authors developed a novel but simple method for generating an injectable mixture of stromal vascular fraction cells and native adipose extracellular matrix. It is a purely mechanical process in which lipoaspirate is processed into an extracellular matrix/stromal vascular fraction gel. The standard processing procedure was established using quantized tests. The therapeutic potential of the product for wound healing was then tested. Extracellular matrix/stromal vascular fraction gel derived from lipoaspirate and processed using a standard Coleman technique, followed by 1 minute of mechanical processing by passage back and forth between two 10-ml syringes at a flow rate of 10 ml/second, showed the highest adipose-derived stem cell and endothelial cell density. The stromal vascular fraction cells within the product also showed potential for multipotent differentiation similar to that of normal fat samples. In addition, the product showed better therapeutic results than stromal vascular fraction cell suspension when used to treat a nude mouse model of wound healing. Extracellular matrix/stromal vascular fraction gel is an autologous injectable derived from native extracellular matrix and is a functional cellular component generated using a simple mechanical process. As such, it may offer a novel mode of tissue repair suitable for clinical application in stem cell therapies.

  10. Phospholipids reduce gastric cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix in vitro

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    Jansen Petra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nidation of floating tumour cells initiates peritoneal carcinosis and limits prognosis of gastro-intestinal tumours. Adhesion of tumour cells to extracellular matrix components is a pivotal step in developing peritoneal dissemination of intraabdominal malignancies. Since phospholipids efficaciously prevented peritoneal adhesion formation in numerous animal studies we investigated their capacity to reduce adhesions of gastric cancer cells to extracellular matrix components (ECM. Methods Human gastric cancer cells (NUGC-4, Japanese Cancer Research Resources Bank, Tokyo, Japan were used in this study. Microtiter plates were coated with collagen IV (coll, laminin (ln and fibronectin (fn. Non-specific protein binding of the coated wells was blocked by adding 1% (w/v BSA (4°C, 12 h and rinsing the wells with Hepes buffer. 50.000 tumour cells in 100 μl medium were seeded into each well. Beside the controls, phospholipids were added in concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0/100 μl medium. After an incubation interval of 30 min, attached cells were fixed and stained with 0.1% (w/v crystal violet. The dye was resuspended with 50 μl of 0.2% (v/v Triton X-100 per well and colour yields were then measured by an ELISA reader at 590 nm. Optical density (OD showed a linear relationship to the amount of cells and was corrected for dying of BSA/polystyrene without cells. Results The attachment of gastric cancer cells to collagen IV, laminin, and fibronectin could be significantly reduced up to 53% by phospholipid concentrations of 0.5 mg/100 μl and higher. Conclusion These results, within the scope of additional experimental studies on mice and rats which showed a significant reduction of peritoneal carcinosis, demonstrated the capacity of phospholipids in controlling abdominal nidation of tumour cells to ECM components. Lipid emulsions may be a beneficial adjunct in surgery of gastrointestinal malignancies.

  11. Changes in the Chondrocyte and Extracellular Matrix Proteome during Post-natal Mouse Cartilage Development*

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    Wilson, Richard; Norris, Emma L.; Brachvogel, Bent; Angelucci, Constanza; Zivkovic, Snezana; Gordon, Lavinia; Bernardo, Bianca C.; Stermann, Jacek; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Gorman, Jeffrey J.; Bateman, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal growth by endochondral ossification involves tightly coordinated chondrocyte differentiation that creates reserve, proliferating, prehypertrophic, and hypertrophic cartilage zones in the growth plate. Many human skeletal disorders result from mutations in cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) components that compromise both ECM architecture and chondrocyte function. Understanding normal cartilage development, composition, and structure is therefore vital to unravel these disease mechanisms. To study this intricate process in vivo by proteomics, we analyzed mouse femoral head cartilage at developmental stages enriched in either immature chondrocytes or maturing/hypertrophic chondrocytes (post-natal days 3 and 21, respectively). Using LTQ-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry, we identified 703 cartilage proteins. Differentially abundant proteins (q cartilage development (tenascin X, vitrin, Urb, emilin-1, and the sushi repeat-containing proteins SRPX and SRPX2). Meta-analysis of cartilage development in vivo and an in vitro chondrocyte culture model (Wilson, R., Diseberg, A. F., Gordon, L., Zivkovic, S., Tatarczuch, L., Mackie, E. J., Gorman, J. J., and Bateman, J. F. (2010) Comprehensive profiling of cartilage extracellular matrix formation and maturation using sequential extraction and label-free quantitative proteomics. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 9, 1296–1313) identified components involved in both systems, such as Urb, and components with specific roles in vivo, including vitrin and CILP-2 (cartilage intermediate layer protein-2). Immunolocalization of Urb, vitrin, and CILP-2 indicated specific roles at different maturation stages. In addition to ECM-related changes, we provide the first biochemical evidence of changing endoplasmic reticulum function during cartilage development. Although the multifunctional chaperone BiP was not differentially expressed, enzymes and chaperones required specifically for collagen biosynthesis, such as the prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1

  12. Texas 3-step decellularization protocol: looking at the cardiac extracellular matrix.

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    de Castro Brás, Lisandra E; Ramirez, Trevi A; DeLeon-Pennell, Kristine Y; Chiao, Ying Ann; Ma, Yonggang; Dai, Qiuxia; Halade, Ganesh V; Hakala, Kevin; Weintraub, Susan T; Lindsey, Merry L

    2013-06-28

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical tissue component, providing structural support as well as important regulatory signaling cues to govern cellular growth, metabolism, and differentiation. The study of ECM proteins, however, is hampered by the low solubility of ECM components in common solubilizing reagents. ECM proteins are often not detected during proteomics analyses using unbiased approaches due to solubility issues and relatively low abundance compared to highly abundant cytoplasmic and mitochondrial proteins. Decellularization has become a common technique for ECM protein-enrichment and is frequently used in engineering studies. Solubilizing the ECM after decellularization for further proteomic examination has not been previously explored in depth. In this study, we describe testing of a series of protocols that enabled us to develop a novel optimized strategy for the enrichment and solubilization of ECM components. Following tissue decellularization, we use acid extraction and enzymatic deglycosylation to facilitate re-solubilization. The end result is the generation of three fractions for each sample: soluble components, cellular components, and an insoluble ECM fraction. These fractions, developed in mass spectrometry-compatible buffers, are amenable to proteomics analysis. The developed protocol allows identification (by mass spectrometry) and quantification (by mass spectrometry or immunoblotting) of ECM components in tissue samples. The study of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in pathological and non-pathological conditions is often hampered by the low solubility of ECM components in common solubilizing reagents. Additionally, ECM proteins are often not detected during global proteomic analyses due to their relatively low abundance compared to highly abundant cytoplasmic and mitochondrial proteins. In this manuscript we describe testing of a series of protocols that enabled us to develop a final novel optimized strategy for the enrichment

  13. Increase of glycosaminoglycans and metalloproteinases 2 and 9 in liver extracellular matrix on early stages of extrahepatic cholestasis.

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    Guedes, Pedro Luiz Rodrigues; Castañon, Maria Christina Marques Nogueira; Nagaoka, Márcia Regina; Aguiar, Jair Adriano Kopke de

    2014-01-01

    Cholestasis produces hepatocellular injury, leukocyte infiltration, ductular cells proliferation and fibrosis of liver parenchyma by extracellular matrix replacement. Analyze bile duct ligation effect upon glycosaminoglycans content and matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) activities. Animals (6-8 weeks; n = 40) were euthanized 2, 7 or 14 days after bile duct ligation or Sham-surgery. Disease evolution was analyzed by body and liver weight, seric direct bilirubin, globulins, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (Alk-P), alanine and aspartate aminotransferases (ALT and AST), tissue myeloperoxidase and MMP-9, pro MMP-2 and MMP-2 activities, histopathology and glycosaminoglycans content. Cholestasis caused cellular damage with elevation of globulins, GGT, Alk-P, ALT, AST. There was neutrophil infiltration observed by the increasing of myeloperoxidase activity on 7 (P = 0.0064) and 14 (P = 0.0002) groups which leads to the magnification of tissue injuries. Bile duct ligation increased pro-MMP-2 (P = 0.0667), MMP-2 (P = 0.0003) and MMP-9 (P<0.0001) activities on 14 days indicating matrix remodeling and establishment of inflammatory process. Bile duct ligation animals showed an increasing on dermatan sulfate and/or heparan sulfate content reflecting extracellular matrix production and growing mitosis due to parenchyma depletion. Cholestasis led to many changes on rats' liver parenchyma, as so as on its extracellular matrix, with major alterations on MMPs activities and glycosaminoglycans content.

  14. INCREASE OF GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS AND METALLOPROTEINASES 2 AND 9 IN LIVER EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX ON EARLY STAGES OF EXTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS

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    Pedro Luiz Rodrigues GUEDES

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Cholestasis produces hepatocellular injury, leukocyte infiltration, ductular cells proliferation and fibrosis of liver parenchyma by extracellular matrix replacement. Objective Analyze bile duct ligation effect upon glycosaminoglycans content and matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs activities. Methods Animals (6-8 weeks; n = 40 were euthanized 2, 7 or 14 days after bile duct ligation or Sham-surgery. Disease evolution was analyzed by body and liver weight, seric direct bilirubin, globulins, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, alkaline phosphatase (Alk-P, alanine and aspartate aminotransferases (ALT and AST, tissue myeloperoxidase and MMP-9, pro MMP-2 and MMP-2 activities, histopathology and glycosaminoglycans content. Results Cholestasis caused cellular damage with elevation of globulins, GGT, Alk-P, ALT, AST. There was neutrophil infiltration observed by the increasing of myeloperoxidase activity on 7 (P = 0.0064 and 14 (P = 0.0002 groups which leads to the magnification of tissue injuries. Bile duct ligation increased pro-MMP-2 (P = 0.0667, MMP-2 (P = 0.0003 and MMP-9 (P<0.0001 activities on 14 days indicating matrix remodeling and establishment of inflammatory process. Bile duct ligation animals showed an increasing on dermatan sulfate and/or heparan sulfate content reflecting extracellular matrix production and growing mitosis due to parenchyma depletion. Conclusions Cholestasis led to many changes on rats’ liver parenchyma, as so as on its extracellular matrix, with major alterations on MMPs activities and glycosaminoglycans content.

  15. A Gene Expression-Based Comparison of Cell Adhesion to Extracellular Matrix and RGD-Terminated Monolayers

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    Sobers, Courtney J.; Wood, Sarah E.; Mrksich, Milan

    2015-01-01

    This work uses global gene expression analysis to compare the extent to which model substrates presenting peptide adhesion motifs mimic the use of conventional extracellular matrix protein coated substrates for cell culture. We compared the transcriptional activities of genes in cells that were cultured on matrix-coated substrates with those cultured on self-assembled monolayers presenting either a linear or cyclic RGD peptide. Cells adherent to cyclic RGD were most similar to those cultured on native ECM, while cells cultured on monolayers presenting the linear RGD peptide had transcriptional activities that were more similar to cells cultured on the uncoated substrates. This study suggests that biomaterials presenting the cyclic RGD peptide are substantially better mimics of extracellular matrix than are uncoated materials or materials presenting the common linear RGD peptide. PMID:25818445

  16. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis.

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    Frauke Seehusen

    Full Text Available In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL, histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease.

  17. Specialized podosome- or invadopodia-like structures (PILS) for focal trabecular meshwork extracellular matrix turnover.

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    Aga, Mini; Bradley, John M; Keller, Kate E; Kelley, Mary J; Acott, Ted S

    2008-12-01

    There are distinctive areas of colocalization of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -14 on trabecular meshwork (TM) cells that resemble podosomes or invadopodia. Studies were conducted to determine whether TM cells exhibit podosome- or invadopodia-like structures (PILS) and whether they produce focal extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover. Porcine and human TM cells and perfused anterior segment organ cultures were studied. Localization of PILS components on TM cells and in sections from anterior segments was determined by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Cells were grown on type I collagen labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) for degradation analysis. Confocal time lapse images were taken of labeled TM cells on FITC-collagen. Immunostaining for MMP-2, MMP-14, and the typical PILS components cortactin, caldesmon, alpha-actinin, N-WASP, Arp-3, and cdc42 colocalized on these distinctive structures. Integrin-alphaV and -beta1, fibronectin, and versican colocalized with PILS components. TM cells on FITC-conjugated collagen developed focal regions of degradation. Time-lapse imaging showed dramatic and controlled movement of TM cell processes during this ECM degradation and fragment internalization. MMP-2, MMP-14, and cortactin colocalized at regions that appear to be PILS on cells within the outflow pathway in sections of human anterior segments. TM cells exhibit areas where PILS components colocalize with MMP-2 and -14. Similar structures are found in sections, suggesting that PILS occur in situ in the outflow pathway. The collagen degradation suggests that PILS may serve as focal sites for targeted ECM turnover, an event linked to modifications of aqueous outflow resistance and intraocular pressure homeostasis.

  18. Cardiac differentiation of cardiosphere-derived cells in scaffolds mimicking morphology of the cardiac extracellular matrix.

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    Xu, Yanyi; Patnaik, Sourav; Guo, Xiaolei; Li, Zhenqing; Lo, Wilson; Butler, Ryan; Claude, Andrew; Liu, Zhenguo; Zhang, Ge; Liao, Jun; Anderson, Peter M; Guan, Jianjun

    2014-08-01

    Stem cell therapy has the potential to regenerate heart tissue after myocardial infarction (MI). The regeneration is dependent upon cardiac differentiation of the delivered stem cells. We hypothesized that timing of the stem cell delivery determines the extent of cardiac differentiation as cell differentiation is dependent on matrix properties such as biomechanics, structure and morphology, and these properties in cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) continuously vary with time after MI. In order to elucidate the relationship between ECM properties and cardiac differentiation, we created an in vitro model based on ECM-mimicking fibers and a type of cardiac progenitor cell, cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs). A simultaneous fiber electrospinning and cell electrospraying technique was utilized to fabricate constructs. By blending a highly soft hydrogel with a relatively stiff polyurethane and modulating fabrication parameters, tissue constructs with similar cell adhesion property but different global modulus, single fiber modulus, fiber density and fiber alignment were achieved. The CDCs remained alive within the constructs during a 1week culture period. CDC cardiac differentiation was dependent on the scaffold modulus, fiber volume fraction and fiber alignment. Two constructs with relatively low scaffold modulus, ∼50-60kPa, most significantly directed the CDC differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes as evidenced by gene expressions of cardiac troponin T (cTnT), calcium channel (CACNA1c) and cardiac myosin heavy chain (MYH6), and protein expressions of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and connexin 43 (CX43). Of these two low-modulus constructs, the extent of differentiation was greater for lower fiber alignment and higher fiber volume fraction. These results suggest that cardiac ECM properties may have an effect on cardiac differentiation of delivered stem cells. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis

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    Seehusen, Frauke; Al-Azreg, Seham A.; Raddatz, Barbara B.; Haist, Verena; Puff, Christina; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Ulrich, Reiner; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL), histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease. PMID:27441688

  20. Genes responsible for vaginal extracellular matrix metabolism are modulated by women's reproductive cycle and menopause

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    Oksana Shynlova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To analyze the expression of genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM biogenesis and remodeling in vaginal tissue of women with clinically normal pelvic floor support (defined as controls according to the phase of menstrual cycle and postmenopausal women with and without pelvic organ prolapse (POP. Materials and Methods This study examined the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs, and the Lysyl oxidase (LOX family genes in the anterior vaginal wall of Caucasian women by real-time RT-PCR. Initially, mRNA expression was assessed in premenopausal controls in the secretory (group 1, n = 10 vs. proliferative (group 2, n = 8 phase of menstrual cycle. In addition, we compared premenopausal controls in the proliferative phase (group 2 vs. postmenopausal controls (group 3, n = 5. Finally, we analyzed postmenopausal controls (group 3 vs. postmenopausal women with advanced POP (group 4, n = 13. Results According to the phase of menstrual cycle, MMP1 was significantly reduced (p = 0.003, whereas the expression of TIMP1 and LOXL4 was significantly up-regulated during proliferative phase (both p < 0.01 when compared to the secretory phase in premenopausal control women. Regarding menopausal status/ageing, all MMPs were down-regulated, while TIMP3, TIMP4 and LOXL2 were significantly up-regulated in postmenopausal control women when compared to premenopausal controls (p = 0.005, p = 0.01 and p < 0.001, correspondingly. TIMP4 and LOXL2 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in postmenopausal POP patients compared to asymptomatic postmenopausal controls (p < 0.01 for both. Conclusions Our results indicate that ovarian cycle and age-related changes influence the expression of genes encoding proteins responsible for ECM metabolism in human vagina. Moreover, POP is associated with alteration in vaginal ECM components after menopause.

  1. Extracellular Matrix Hydrogel Promotes Tissue Remodeling, Arteriogenesis, and Perfusion in a Rat Hindlimb Ischemia Model

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    Jessica L. Ungerleider, BS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although surgical and endovascular revascularization can be performed in peripheral arterial disease (PAD, 40% of patients with critical limb ischemia do not have a revascularization option. This study examines the efficacy and mechanisms of action of acellular extracellular matrix-based hydrogels as a potential novel therapy for treating PAD. We tested the efficacy of using a tissue-specific injectable hydrogel derived from decellularized porcine skeletal muscle (SKM and compared this to a new human umbilical cord-derived matrix (hUC hydrogel, which could have greater potential for tissue regeneration because of the younger age of the tissue source. In a rodent hindlimb ischemia model, both hydrogels were injected 1-week post-surgery and perfusion was regularly monitored with laser speckle contrast analysis to 35 days post-injection. There were significant improvements in hindlimb tissue perfusion and perfusion kinetics with both biomaterials. Histologic analysis indicated that the injected hydrogels were biocompatible, and resulted in arteriogenesis, rather than angiogenesis, as well as improved recruitment of skeletal muscle progenitors. Skeletal muscle fiber morphology analysis indicated that the muscle treated with the tissue-specific SKM hydrogel more closely matched healthy tissue morphology. Whole transcriptome analysis indicated that the SKM hydrogel caused a shift in the inflammatory response, decreased cell death, and increased blood vessel and muscle development. These results show the efficacy of an injectable ECM hydrogel alone as a potential therapy for treating patients with PAD. Our results indicate that the SKM hydrogel improved functional outcomes through stimulation of arteriogenesis and muscle progenitor cell recruitment.

  2. Anisotropic silk biomaterials containing cardiac extracellular matrix for cardiac tissue engineering.

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    Stoppel, Whitney L; Hu, Dongjian; Domian, Ibrahim J; Kaplan, David L; Black, Lauren D

    2015-03-31

    Cardiac malformations and disease are the leading causes of death in the United States in live-born infants and adults, respectively. In both of these cases, a decrease in the number of functional cardiomyocytes often results in improper growth of heart tissue, wound healing complications, and poor tissue repair. The field of cardiac tissue engineering seeks to address these concerns by developing cardiac patches created from a variety of biomaterial scaffolds to be used in surgical repair of the heart. These scaffolds should be fully degradable biomaterial systems with tunable properties such that the materials can be altered to meet the needs of both in vitro culture (e.g. disease modeling) and in vivo application (e.g. cardiac patch). Current platforms do not utilize both structural anisotropy and proper cell-matrix contacts to promote functional cardiac phenotypes and thus there is still a need for critically sized scaffolds that mimic both the structural and adhesive properties of native tissue. To address this need, we have developed a silk-based scaffold platform containing cardiac tissue-derived extracellular matrix (cECM). These silk-cECM composite scaffolds have tunable architectures, degradation rates, and mechanical properties. Subcutaneous implantation in rats demonstrated that addition of the cECM to aligned silk scaffold led to 99% endogenous cell infiltration and promoted vascularization of a critically sized scaffold (10 × 5 × 2.5 mm) after 4 weeks in vivo. In vitro, silk-cECM scaffolds maintained the HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes and human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and promoted a more functional phenotype in both cell types. This class of hybrid silk-cECM anisotropic scaffolds offers new opportunities for developing more physiologically relevant tissues for cardiac repair and disease modeling.

  3. Redox-Relevant Aspects of the Extracellular Matrix and Its Cellular Contacts via Integrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rezende, Flávia Figueiredo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The extracellular matrix (ECM) fulfills essential functions in multicellular organisms. It provides the mechanical scaffold and environmental cues to cells. Upon cell attachment, the ECM signals into the cells. In this process, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are physiologically used as signalizing molecules. Recent Advances: ECM attachment influences the ROS-production of cells. In turn, ROS affect the production, assembly and turnover of the ECM during wound healing and matrix remodeling. Pathological changes of ROS levels lead to excess ECM production and increased tissue contraction in fibrotic disorders and desmoplastic tumors. Integrins are cell adhesion molecules which mediate cell adhesion and force transmission between cells and the ECM. They have been identified as a target of redox-regulation by ROS. Cysteine-based redox-modifications, together with structural data, highlighted particular regions within integrin heterodimers that may be subject to redox-dependent conformational changes along with an alteration of integrin binding activity. Critical Issues: In a molecular model, a long-range disulfide-bridge within the integrin β-subunit and disulfide bridges within the genu and calf-2 domains of the integrin α-subunit may control the transition between the bent/inactive and upright/active conformation of the integrin ectodomain. These thiol-based intramolecular cross-linkages occur in the stalk domain of both integrin subunits, whereas the ligand-binding integrin headpiece is apparently unaffected by redox-regulation. Future Directions: Redox-regulation of the integrin activation state may explain the effect of ROS in physiological processes. A deeper understanding of the underlying mechanism may open new prospects for the treatment of fibrotic disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1977–1993. PMID:24040997

  4. The anchorless adhesin Eap (extracellular adherence protein) from Staphylococcus aureus selectively recognizes extracellular matrix aggregates but binds promiscuously to monomeric matrix macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Uwe; Hussain, Muzaffar; Villone, Daniela; Herrmann, Mathias; Robenek, Horst; Peters, Georg; Sinha, Bhanu; Bruckner, Peter

    Besides a number of cell wall-anchored adhesins, the majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains produce anchorless, cell wall-associated proteins, such as Eap (extracellular adherence protein). Eap contains four to six tandem repeat (EAP)-domains. Eap mediates diverse biological functions, including

  5. Effect of Extracellular Matrix Membrane on Bone Formation in a Rabbit Tibial Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wook Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorbable extracellular matrix (ECM membrane has recently been used as a barrier membrane (BM in guided tissue regeneration (GTR and guided bone regeneration (GBR. Absorbable BMs are mostly based on collagen, which is more biocompatible than synthetic materials. However, implanted absorbable BMs can be rapidly degraded by enzymes in vivo. In a previous study, to delay degradation time, collagen fibers were treated with cross-linking agents. These compounds prevented the enzymatic degradation of BMs. However, cross-linked BMs can exhibit delayed tissue integration. In addition, the remaining cross-linker could induce inflammation. Here, we attempted to overcome these problems using a natural ECM membrane. The membrane consisted of freshly harvested porcine pericardium that was stripped from cells and immunoreagents by a cleaning process. Acellular porcine pericardium (APP showed a bilayer structure with a smooth upper surface and a significantly coarser bottom layer. APP is an ECM with a thin layer (0.18–0.35 mm but with excellent mechanical properties. Tensile strength of APP was 14.15±2.24 MPa. In in vivo experiments, APP was transplanted into rabbit tibia. The biocompatible material was retained for up to 3 months without the need for cross-linking. Therefore, we conclude that APP could support osteogenesis as a BM for up to 3 months.

  6. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Stimulates Extra-Cellular Matrix Production in Cellular Spheroids

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    Megan Casco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnologies have been integrated into drug delivery, and non-invasive imaging applications, into nanostructured scaffolds for the manipulation of cells. The objective of this work was to determine how the physico-chemical properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs and their spatial distribution into cellular spheroids stimulated cells to produce an extracellular matrix (ECM. The MNP concentration (0.03 mg/mL, 0.1 mg/mL and 0.3 mg/mL, type (magnetoferritin, shape (nanorod—85 nm × 425 nm and incorporation method were studied to determine each of their effects on the specific stimulation of four ECM proteins (collagen I, collagen IV, elastin and fibronectin in primary rat aortic smooth muscle cell. Results demonstrated that as MNP concentration increased there was up to a 6.32-fold increase in collagen production over no MNP samples. Semi-quantitative Immunohistochemistry (IHC results demonstrated that MNP type had the greatest influence on elastin production with a 56.28% positive area stain compared to controls and MNP shape favored elastin stimulation with a 50.19% positive area stain. Finally, there are no adverse effects of MNPs on cellular contractile ability. This study provides insight on the stimulation of ECM production in cells and tissues, which is important because it plays a critical role in regulating cellular functions.

  7. Brimonidine reduces TGF-beta-induced extracellular matrix synthesis in human Tenon's fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Samin; Han, Sueng-Han; Kim, Chan Yun; Kim, Kang Yoon; Song, Yoo Kyung; Seong, Gong Je

    2015-05-28

    Brimonidine is a highly selective α2 adrenergic agonist that has been widely used in anti-glaucoma eyedrops. The aim of this study was to investigate its putative anti-fibrotic role in the fibrosis caused by activated Tenon's fibroblasts. Primary cultured human Tenon's fibroblasts were exposed to 2.0 ng/mL of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) for up to 48 h. In the presence of various concentrations of brimonidine (from 0.0 to 10.0 μM), the expression levels of fibronectin, collagen types I and III, and β-actin were determined by Western immunoblots. The expression of phosphorylated SMAD2/3 (p-SMAD2/3) was then evaluated using immunofluorescence. TGF-β1 significantly increased the synthesis of fibronectin and collagens in human Tenon's fibroblasts; however brimonidine treatment distinctly attenuated the TGF-β1-induced production of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. TGF-β1 also changed the cellular morphology to be plump, while brimonidine treatment returned the cells to a spindle shape, similar to control fibroblasts. Regarding p-SMAD2/3, brimonidine treatment did not show any apparent changes in its expression. Our data revealed that brimonidine reduces TGF-β-induced ECM synthesis in human Tenon's fibroblasts in vitro. This finding implies that topical administration of brimonidine may be helpful in reducing the fibrosis caused by the long-term use of topical anti-glaucoma medications.

  8. Vibrio cholerae O1 secretes an extracellular matrix in response to antibody-mediated agglutination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, Danielle E.; Levinson, Kara J.

    2018-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 is one of two serogroups responsible for epidemic cholera, a severe watery diarrhea that occurs after the bacterium colonizes the human small intestine and secretes a potent ADP-ribosylating toxin. Immunity to cholera is associated with intestinal anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies, which are known to inhibit V. cholerae motility and promote bacterial cell-cell crosslinking and aggregation. Here we report that V. cholerae O1 classical and El Tor biotypes produce an extracellular matrix (ECM) when forcibly immobilized and agglutinated by ZAC-3 IgG, an intestinally-derived monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the core/lipid A region of LPS. ECM secretion, as demonstrated by crystal violet staining and scanning electron microscopy, occurred within 30 minutes of antibody exposure and peaked by 3 hours. Non-motile mutants of V. cholerae did not secrete ECM following ZAC-3 IgG exposure, even though they were susceptible to agglutination. The ECM was enriched in O-specific polysaccharide (OSP) but not Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS). Finally, we demonstrate that ECM production by V. cholerae in response to ZAC-3 IgG was associated with bacterial resistant to a secondary complement-mediated attack. In summary, we propose that V. cholerae O1, upon encountering anti-LPS antibodies in the intestinal lumen, secretes an ECM (or O-antigen capsule) possibly as a strategy to shield itself from additional host immune factors and to exit an otherwise inhospitable host environment. PMID:29293563

  9. Composition of the extracellular matrix of lymphatic novel threadlike structures: is it keratin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Hyub; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Yoon, Ji Woong; Lee, Soo Jae; Cho, Eun Jung; Yoon, Seung Zhoo

    2013-01-01

    Background. The lumen of novel threadlike structures (NTSs) is enclosed by a single layer of endothelial cells surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM). We hypothesized that collagen may be a component of the ECM associated with lymphatic NTSs. Methods. Six female New Zealand white rabbits were anesthetized, and the NTS structures within lymphatic vessels were identified by contrast-enhanced stereomicroscopy or alcian blue staining. Isolated NTS specimens were stained with acridine orange, YOYO-1, and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI). The structural and molecular composition of the ECM was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, and proteomic analysis. Results. The lymph vessel wall was stained red by DiI, and rod-shaped nuclei were stained green by YOYO-1. The area surrounding the NTS was also stained red and contained green rod-shaped nuclei. TEM images showed that the NTS consisted of many ECM fibers and the ECM fibers appeared to be ~100 nm in diameter and had narrowly spaced striated bands. Proteomic analysis of the lymphatic NTS-associated ECM identified 4 proteins: keratin 10, cytokeratin 3, cytokeratin 12, and soluble adenylyl cyclase. Conclusion. The TEM study suggested that the lymphatic NTS-associated ECM did not contain collagen. This was confirmed by proteomic analysis, which showed that keratin was the major component of the ECM.

  10. Glycoproteomics of the Extracellular Matrix: A Method for Intact Glycopeptide Analysis Using Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Baig, Ferheen; Fava, Marika; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel

    2017-04-21

    Fibrosis is a hallmark of many cardiovascular diseases and is associated with the exacerbated secretion and deposition of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Using proteomics, we have previously identified more than 150 ECM and ECM-associated proteins in cardiovascular tissues. Notably, many ECM proteins are glycosylated. This post-translational modification affects protein folding, solubility, binding, and degradation. We have developed a sequential extraction and enrichment method for ECM proteins that is compatible with the subsequent liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of intact glycopeptides. The strategy is based on sequential incubations with NaCl, SDS for tissue decellularization, and guanidine hydrochloride for the solubilization of ECM proteins. Recent advances in LC-MS/MS include fragmentation methods, such as combinations of higher-energy collision dissociation (HCD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD), which allow for the direct compositional analysis of glycopeptides of ECM proteins. In the present paper, we describe a method to prepare the ECM from tissue samples. The method not only allows for protein profiling but also the assessment and characterization of glycosylation by MS analysis.

  11. Composition of the Extracellular Matrix of Lymphatic Novel Threadlike Structures: Is It Keratin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyub Huh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The lumen of novel threadlike structures (NTSs is enclosed by a single layer of endothelial cells surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM. We hypothesized that collagen may be a component of the ECM associated with lymphatic NTSs. Methods. Six female New Zealand white rabbits were anesthetized, and the NTS structures within lymphatic vessels were identified by contrast-enhanced stereomicroscopy or alcian blue staining. Isolated NTS specimens were stained with acridine orange, YOYO-1, and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI. The structural and molecular composition of the ECM was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, and proteomic analysis. Results. The lymph vessel wall was stained red by DiI, and rod-shaped nuclei were stained green by YOYO-1. The area surrounding the NTS was also stained red and contained green rod-shaped nuclei. TEM images showed that the NTS consisted of many ECM fibers and the ECM fibers appeared to be ~100 nm in diameter and had narrowly spaced striated bands. Proteomic analysis of the lymphatic NTS-associated ECM identified 4 proteins: keratin 10, cytokeratin 3, cytokeratin 12, and soluble adenylyl cyclase. Conclusion. The TEM study suggested that the lymphatic NTS-associated ECM did not contain collagen. This was confirmed by proteomic analysis, which showed that keratin was the major component of the ECM.

  12. Diet-induced obesity regulates adipose-resident stromal cell quantity and extracellular matrix gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Pincu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue expansion during periods of excess nutrient intake requires significant turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM to allow for maximal lipid filling. Recent data suggest that stromal cells may be a primary contributor to ECM modifications in visceral adipose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the capacity for high fat diet (HFD-induced obesity to alter adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC relative quantity and ECM gene expression, and determine the extent to which exercise training can mitigate such changes. Male C57BL/6J mice were placed on control or HFD for 8 weeks prior to and following initiation of a 16 week treadmill exercise program. ADSCs (Sca-1+CD45− were isolated from epididymal adipose tissue and mRNA was evaluated using high throughput qPCR. Stromal cells were also obtained from skeletal muscle (MDSC. HFD decreased the quantity of ADSCs and markedly altered gene expression related to ECM remodeling (Col1α1, MMP2, MMP9, Timp1. Exercise did not reverse these changes. MDSCs were minimally altered by HFD or exercise. Overall, the data from this study suggest that ADSCs decrease in quantity and contribute to adipose ECM remodeling in response to obesity, and exercise training does not significantly impact these outcomes.

  13. Diet-induced obesity regulates adipose-resident stromal cell quantity and extracellular matrix gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincu, Yair; Huntsman, Heather D; Zou, Kai; De Lisio, Michael; Mahmassani, Ziad S; Munroe, Michael R; Garg, Koyal; Jensen, Tor; Boppart, Marni D

    2016-07-01

    Adipose tissue expansion during periods of excess nutrient intake requires significant turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to allow for maximal lipid filling. Recent data suggest that stromal cells may be a primary contributor to ECM modifications in visceral adipose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the capacity for high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity to alter adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC) relative quantity and ECM gene expression, and determine the extent to which exercise training can mitigate such changes. Male C57BL/6J mice were placed on control or HFD for 8weeks prior to and following initiation of a 16week treadmill exercise program. ADSCs (Sca-1(+)CD45(-)) were isolated from epididymal adipose tissue and mRNA was evaluated using high throughput qPCR. Stromal cells were also obtained from skeletal muscle (MDSC). HFD decreased the quantity of ADSCs and markedly altered gene expression related to ECM remodeling (Col1α1, MMP2, MMP9, Timp1). Exercise did not reverse these changes. MDSCs were minimally altered by HFD or exercise. Overall, the data from this study suggest that ADSCs decrease in quantity and contribute to adipose ECM remodeling in response to obesity, and exercise training does not significantly impact these outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A new method for the preparation of biomedical hydrogels comprised of extracellular matrix and oligourethanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio-Rizo, Jesús A; Mendoza-Novelo, Birzabith; Delgado, Jorge; Castellano, Laura E; Mata-Mata, José L

    2016-06-15

    This paper reports a new method to modify hydrogels derived from the acellular extracellular matrix (ECM) and consequently to improve their properties. The method is comprised of the combination of liquid precursors derived from hydrolyzed acellular small intestinal submucosa (hECM) and water-soluble oligourethanes that bear protected isocyanate groups, synthesized from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI). The results demonstrate that the reactivity of oligourethanes, along with their water solubility, properly induce simultaneously the polymerization of type I collagen and its crosslinking. The polymerization rate and the gel network parameters such as fiber diameter, porosity, crosslinking degree, mechanics, swelling, in vitro degradation and cell proliferation, keep a direct relationship with the oligourethane concentration. Consequently, the hybrid hydrogels formulated with 15 wt.% of oligourethane exhibit enhanced storage modulus and degradation resistance, while maintaining the cell viability and impeding the fibroblast-induced contraction in comparison with the hECM hydrogels without oligourethanes. Therefore, this method is adequate to prepare novel hydrogels where the adjustment of the crosslinking degree controls the materials structure and their properties. This new method offers advantages for regulating the features of ECM-derived templates, thereby extending their possibilities for tissue engineering (TE) applications.

  15. Neuron-Glia Interactions in Neural Plasticity: Contributions of Neural Extracellular Matrix and Perineuronal Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egor Dzyubenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synapses are specialized structures that mediate rapid and efficient signal transmission between neurons and are surrounded by glial cells. Astrocytes develop an intimate association with synapses in the central nervous system (CNS and contribute to the regulation of ion and neurotransmitter concentrations. Together with neurons, they shape intercellular space to provide a stable milieu for neuronal activity. Extracellular matrix (ECM components are synthesized by both neurons and astrocytes and play an important role in the formation, maintenance, and function of synapses in the CNS. The components of the ECM have been detected near glial processes, which abut onto the CNS synaptic unit, where they are part of the specialized macromolecular assemblies, termed perineuronal nets (PNNs. PNNs have originally been discovered by Golgi and represent a molecular scaffold deposited in the interface between the astrocyte and subsets of neurons in the vicinity of the synapse. Recent reports strongly suggest that PNNs are tightly involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity. Moreover, several studies have implicated PNNs and the neural ECM in neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we highlight current concepts relating to neural ECM and PNNs and describe an in vitro approach that allows for the investigation of ECM functions for synaptogenesis.

  16. Interaction between extracellular matrix molecules and microbial pathogens: the missing link in autoimmunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi eSofat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disease characterised by inflammation, tissue rebuilding and fibrosis. Inability by the body to regulate inflammation effectively is one of the hallmarks of RA. Interactions between the external environment and the human host play an important role in the development of autoimmunity. In RA, the observation of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA to autoantigens is well recognised. Citrullination is a post-translational modification mediated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PADs, which exist in both mammalian and bacterial forms. Previous studies have shown how proteins expressed in the human extracellular matrix (ECM acquire properties of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs in RA and include collagens, tenascin-C and fibronectin. ECM DAMPs can further potentiate tissue damage in RA. Recent work has shown that citrullination in RA occurs at mucosal sites, including the oral cavity and lung. Mucosal sites have been linked with bacterial infection e.g. periodontal disease, where exogenous pathogens are implicated in the development of autoimmunity via an infectious trigger. Here we explore how mucosal surfaces exposed to bacteria could trigger autoimmunity in RA.

  17. Mussel-inspired nano-building block assemblies for mimicking extracellular matrix microenvironments with multiple functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenming; Jia, Zhanrong; Jiang, Yanan; Li, Pengfei; Han, Lu; Lu, Xiong; Ren, Fuzeng; Wang, Kefeng; Yuan, Huiping

    2017-08-03

    The assembly of nano-building blocks is an effective way to produce artificial extracellular matrix microenvironments with hierarchical micro/nano structures. However, it is hard to assemble different types of nano-building blocks, to form composite coatings with multiple functions, by traditional layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly methods. Inspired by the mussel adhesion mechanism, we developed polydopamine (PDA)-decorated bovine serum albumin microspheres (BSA-MS) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA), and assembled them to form bioactive coatings with micro/nano structures encapsulating bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). First, PDA-decorated nano-HA (nano-pHA) was obtained by oxidative polymerization of dopamine on nano-HA. Second, BMP-2-encapsulated BSA microspheres were prepared through desolvation, and then were also decorated by PDA (pBSA-MS). Finally, the nano-pHA and pBSA-MS were assembled using the adhesive properties of PDA. Bone marrow stromal cell cultures and in vivo implantation, showed that the pHA/pBSA (BMP-2) coatings can promote cell adhesion, proliferation, and benefited for osteoinductivity. PDA decoration was also applied to assemble various functional nanoparticles, such as nano-HA, polystyrene, and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. In summary, this study provides a novel strategy for the assembly of biofunctional nano-building blocks, which surpasses traditional LbL self-assembly of polyelectrolytes, and can find broad applications in bioactive agents delivery or multi-functional coatings.

  18. Extracellular matrix administration as a potential therapeutic strategy for periodontal ligament regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masahiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    The current strategies employed for the treatment of connective tissue disease include the application of stem cells, the use of functional molecules that can reorganize tissue integrity and cellular activities to recover connective tissue function. Approaches to the regeneration of periodontal tissue, which is the tooth-supporting connective tissue, have made some progress recently and provide a useful experimental model for the evaluation of future strategies to treat connective tissue diseases such as periodontal disease. The ultimate goal of periodontal tissue regeneration is to reconstruct the ligament structure that will sustain the required mechanical force to connect with mineralized tissues such as cementum and alveolar bone. In this review, we discuss the proposed use of extracellular matrix (ECM) administration therapy as an additional therapeutic strategy to stem cell transplantation and cytokine administration in the current field of periodontal tissue regeneration therapy. Although various available tissue engineering technologies can now achieve periodontal tissue regeneration, ECM administration therapy is likely to play an essential future role in the development and regeneration of periodontal tissue and attenuate the signaling events that mediate tissue degradation. Hence, ECM administration could serve as a novel technology in periodontal tissue regeneration and also as a viable approach to alleviating connective tissue disorders such as Marfan's syndrome.

  19. The Use of Natural Polymers in Tissue Engineering: A Focus on Electrospun Extracellular Matrix Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary L. Bowlin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural polymers such as collagens, elastin, and fibrinogen make up much of the body’s native extracellular matrix (ECM. This ECM provides structure and mechanical integrity to tissues, as well as communicating with the cellular components it supports to help facilitate and regulate daily cellular processes and wound healing. An ideal tissue engineering scaffold would not only replicate the structure of this ECM, but would also replicate the many functions that the ECM performs. In the past decade, the process of electrospinning has proven effective in creating non-woven ECM analogue scaffolds of micro to nanoscale diameter fibers from an array of synthetic and natural polymers. The ability of this fabrication technique to utilize the aforementioned natural polymers to create tissue engineering scaffolds has yielded promising results, both in vitro and in vivo, due in part to the enhanced bioactivity afforded by materials normally found within the human body. This review will present the process of electrospinning and describe the use of natural polymers in the creation of bioactive ECM analogues in tissue engineering.

  20. Effect of eosinophils activated with Alternaria on the production of extracellular matrix from nasal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung-Heon; Ye, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Sung-Yong; Kim, Yee-Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Eosinophils and fibroblasts are known to play major roles in the pathogenesis of nasal polyps. Fungi are commonly found in nasal secretion and are associated with airway inflammation. To investigate whether activated eosinophils by airborne fungi can influence the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) from nasal fibroblasts. Inferior turbinate and nasal polyp fibroblasts were stimulated with Alternaria or Aspergillus, respectively, for 24 hours and ECM messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions were measured. Eosinophils isolated from healthy volunteers were stimulated with Alternaria or Aspergillus for 4 hours then superoxide, eosinophil peroxidase, and transforming growth factor β1 were measured. Then activated eosinophils were cocultured with nasal fibroblasts for 24 hours, and ECM mRNA expressions were measured. Alternaria strongly enhanced ECM mRNA expression and protein production from nasal fibroblasts. Alternaria also induced the production of superoxide, eosinophil peroxidase, and transforming growth factor β1 from eosinophils, and activated eosinophils enhanced ECM mRNA expression when they were cocultured without the Transwell insert system. Eosinophils activated with Alternaria enhanced ECM mRNA expression from nasal polyp fibroblasts. Alternaria plays an important role in tissue fibrosis in the pathogenesis of nasal polyps by directly or indirectly influencing the production of ECM from nasal fibroblasts. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oxygen diffusion and consumption in extracellular matrix gels: implications for designing three-dimensional cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colom, Adai; Galgoczy, Roland; Almendros, Isaac; Xaubet, Antonio; Farré, Ramon; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cultures are increasingly used as tissue surrogates to study many physiopathological processes. However, to what extent current 3D culture protocols provide physiologic oxygen tension conditions remains ill defined. To address this limitation, oxygen tension was measured in a panel of acellular or cellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) gels with A549 cells, and analyzed in terms of oxygen diffusion and consumption. Gels included reconstituted basement membrane, fibrin and collagen. Oxygen diffusivity in acellular gels was up to 40% smaller than that of water, and the lower values were observed in the denser gels. In 3D cultures, physiologic oxygen tension was achieved after 2 days in dense (≥3 mg/mL) but not sparse gels, revealing that the latter gels are not suitable tissue surrogates in terms of oxygen distribution. In dense gels, we observed a dominant effect of ECM composition over density in oxygen consumption. All diffusion and consumption data were used in a simple model to estimate ranges for gel thickness, seeding density and time-window that may support physiologic oxygen tension. Thus, we identified critical variables for oxygen tension in ECM gels, and introduced a model to assess initial values of these variables, which may short-cut the optimization step of 3D culture studies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Effects of extracts of Dragon's blood on fibroblast proliferation and extracellular matrix hyaluronic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Hui, Rui; Hu, Yongwu; Han, Yan; Guo, Shuzhong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of Dragon' s blood extract on proliferation and secret extracellular matrix function of fibroblasts in vitro. Dragon' s blood was extracted by chloroform, acetoacetic ester, alcohol. Human fibroblast were cultured in vitro in media containing gradient dilutions of Dragon' s blood extracts (0.002, 0.02, 0.2, 2, 20 mg/ml) , which was followed by cell proliferation assessed with MTT assay on 0, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 h. Under the optimal concentration, the cell growth curves were drawn and the flow cytometry (FCM) was used to determine the changes of cell cycle. On 0, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 h, the concentration of hyaluronic acid in the supernatant of fibroblast culture was measured by radioimmunoassay. 0.2-2 mg/ml Dragon' s blood extracts enhanced the proliferation of fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. 2 mg/ml was the optimal dilution of Dragon's blood extract, and it increased the ratio of S cells in cell cycle [(25.80 ± 3.10)%] than control group [(7.50 ± 0.70)%, P < 0.01]. From 12 h to 72 h, in 2 mg/ml Dragon's blood group, concentration of Hyaluronic acid secreted by fibroblasts gradually increased, but were less than control (P < 0.01). Dragon's blood acetoacetic ester extract improved the proliferation of cultured human fibroblasts in vitro, might be beneficial to promote wound healing.

  3. Amine functionalization of cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix with generation 1 PAMAM dendrimer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Jeffrey C Y

    2008-02-01

    A method to functionalize cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix (CEM) with free amine groups was established in an attempt to improve its potential for tethering of bioactive molecules. CEM was incorporated with Generation-1 polyamidoamine (G1 PAMAM) dendrimer by using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N\\'-ethylcarbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide cross-linking system. The nature of incorporation of PAMAM dendrimer was evaluated using shrink temperature measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) assessment, ninhydrin assay, and swellability. The effects of PAMAM incorporation on mechanical and degradation properties of CEM were evaluated using a uniaxial mechanical test and collagenase degradation assay, respectively. Ninhydrin assay and FTIR assessment confirmed the presence of increasing free amine groups with increasing quantity of PAMAM in dendrimer-incorporated CEM (DENCEM) scaffolds. The amount of dendrimer used was found to be critical in controlling scaffold degradation, shrink temperature, and free amine content. Cell culture studies showed that fibroblasts seeded on DENCEM maintained their metabolic activity and ability to proliferate in vitro. In addition, fluorescence cell staining and scanning electron microscopy analysis of cell-seeded DENCEM showed preservation of normal fibroblast morphology and phenotype.

  4. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M.; Kerwin, James; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24 hr biofilms, two were found only in 96 hr biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or were cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation. PMID:24942343

  5. Ionizing radiation effects on the secretory-stage ameloblasts and enamel organic extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes Ramos-Perez, Flávia Maria; do Espírito Santo, Alexandre Ribeiro; da Cruz Perez, Danyel Elias; Novaes, Pedro Duarte; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto; Line, Sérgio Roberto Peres; de Almeida, Solange Maria

    2014-08-01

    This study assessed the effects of high doses of ionizing radiation on eruption rate, odontogenic region morphology, secretory-stage ameloblasts, and enamel organic extracellular matrix (EOECM) of rat maxillary incisors. For the study, 30 male rats were divided into three experimental groups: control (non-irradiated), irradiated by 15 Gy, and irradiated by 25 Gy. Irradiated groups received a single dose of 15 or 25 Gy of X-rays in the head and neck region. The maxillary incisor eruption rate was measured. Sections of 5-µm thickness of the maxillary incisor odontogenic regions were evaluated using bright field light microscopy. Ultrathin sections of secretory ameloblasts and their EOECM were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Irradiated groups showed significantly diminished eruption rate values at the 4th and at the 6th day after irradiation. Reduced optical retardation values were observed in the irradiated groups. The odontogenic region of maxillary incisors from irradiated rats exhibited altered and poorly organized preameloblasts. TEM showed degeneration areas in the secretory-stage EOECM and several autophagosomes in the secretory ameloblasts from irradiated animals. In conclusion, high radiation doses delay eruption and induce disturbances in secretory ameloblasts and EOECM of rat maxillary incisors. These findings may be associated with structural defects of mature enamel.

  6. Cryotherapy Reduces Inflammatory Response Without Altering Muscle Regeneration Process and Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Rat Muscle.

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    Vieira Ramos, Gracielle; Pinheiro, Clara Maria; Messa, Sabrina Peviani; Delfino, Gabriel Borges; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Salvini, Tania de Fátima; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2016-01-04

    The application of cryotherapy is widely used in sports medicine today. Cooling could minimize secondary hypoxic injury through the reduction of cellular metabolism and injury area. Conflicting results have also suggested cryotherapy could delay and impair the regeneration process. There are no definitive findings about the effects of cryotherapy on the process of muscle regeneration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a clinical-like cryotherapy on inflammation, regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling on the Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of rats 3, 7 and 14 days post-injury. It was observed that the intermittent application of cryotherapy (three 30-minute sessions, every 2 h) in the first 48 h post-injury decreased inflammatory processes (mRNA levels of TNF-α, NF-κB, TGF-β and MMP-9 and macrophage percentage). Cryotherapy did not alter regeneration markers such as injury area, desmin and Myod expression. Despite regulating Collagen I and III and their growth factors, cryotherapy did not alter collagen deposition. In summary, clinical-like cryotherapy reduces the inflammatory process through the decrease of macrophage infiltration and the accumulation of the inflammatory key markers without influencing muscle injury area and ECM remodeling.

  7. Transchromosomic cell model of Down syndrome shows aberrant migration, adhesion and proteome response to extracellular matrix

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    Cotter Finbarr E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS, caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21, is the most common genetic birth defect. Congenital heart defects (CHD are seen in 40% of DS children, and >50% of all atrioventricular canal defects in infancy are caused by trisomy 21, but the causative genes remain unknown. Results Here we show that aberrant adhesion and proliferation of DS cells can be reproduced using a transchromosomic model of DS (mouse fibroblasts bearing supernumerary HSA21. We also demonstrate a deacrease of cell migration in transchromosomic cells independently of their adhesion properties. We show that cell-autonomous proteome response to the presence of Collagen VI in extracellular matrix is strongly affected by trisomy 21. Conclusion This set of experiments establishes a new model system for genetic dissection of the specific HSA21 gene-overdose contributions to aberrant cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and specific proteome response to collagen VI, cellular phenotypes linked to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  8. Featured Article: Cardioprotective effects of lysyl oxidase inhibition against volume overload-induced extracellular matrix remodeling

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    El Hajj, Elia C; El Hajj, Milad C; Ninh, Van K

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of heart failure (HF) is adverse extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, which is regulated by the collagen cross-linking enzyme, lysyl oxidase (LOX). In this study, we evaluate the efficacy of LOX inhibition to prevent adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling and dysfunction using an experimental model of HF. Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to surgically induced volume overload (VO) by creation of aortocaval fistula (ACF). A LOX inhibitor, beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN; 100 mg/kg/day), was administered to rats with ACF or sham surgery at eight weeks postsurgery. Echocardiography was used to assess progressive alterations in cardiac ventricular structure and function. Left ventricular (LV) catheterization was used to assess alterations in contractility, stiffness, LV pressure and volume, and other indices of cardiac function. The LV ECM alterations were assessed by: (a) histological staining of collagen, (b) protein expression of collagen types I and III, (c) hydroxyproline assay, and (d) cross-linking assay. LOX inhibition attenuated VO-induced increases in cardiac stress, and attenuated increases in interstitial myocardial collagen, total collagen, and protein levels of collagens I and III. Both echocardiography and catheterization measurements indicated improved cardiac function post-VO in BAPN treated rats vs. untreated. Inhibition of LOX attenuated VO-induced decreases in LV stiffness and cardiac function. Overall, our data indicate that LOX inhibition was cardioprotective in the volume overloaded heart. PMID:26582054

  9. Remodeling and homeostasis of the extracellular matrix: implications for fibrotic diseases and cancer

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    Thomas R. Cox

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM is essential for development, wound healing and normal organ homeostasis. Life-threatening pathological conditions arise when ECM remodeling becomes excessive or uncontrolled. In this Perspective, we focus on how ECM remodeling contributes to fibrotic diseases and cancer, which both present challenging obstacles with respect to clinical treatment, to illustrate the importance and complexity of cell-ECM interactions in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Fibrotic diseases, which include pulmonary fibrosis, systemic sclerosis, liver cirrhosis and cardiovascular disease, account for over 45% of deaths in the developed world. ECM remodeling is also crucial for tumor malignancy and metastatic progression, which ultimately cause over 90% of deaths from cancer. Here, we discuss current methodologies and models for understanding and quantifying the impact of environmental cues provided by the ECM on disease progression, and how improving our understanding of ECM remodeling in these pathological conditions is crucial for uncovering novel therapeutic targets and treatment strategies. This can only be achieved through the use of appropriate in vitro and in vivo models to mimic disease, and with technologies that enable accurate monitoring, imaging and quantification of the ECM.

  10. Inhibition of extracellular matrix production and remodeling by doxycycline in smooth muscle cells

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    Rogelio Palomino-Morales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the extracellular matrix (ECM production and remodeling of smooth muscle cells (SMCs have been implicated in processes related to the differentiation in atherosclerosis. Due to the anti-atherosclerotic properties of the tetracyclines, we aimed to investigate whether cholesterol supplementation changes the effect of doxycycline over the ECM proteins synthesis and whether isoprenylated proteins and Rho A protein activation are affected. SMC primary culture isolated from chicks exposed to atherogenic factors in vivo (a cholesterol-rich diet, SMC-Ch, comparing it with control cultures isolated after a standard diet (SMC-C. After treatment with 20 nM doxycycline, [H3]-proline and [H3]-mevalonate incorporation were used to measure the synthesis of collagen and isoprenylated proteins, respectively. Real-time PCR was assessed to determine col1a2, col2a1, col3a1, fibronectin, and mmp2 gene expression and the pull-down technique was applied to determine the Rho A activation state. A higher synthesis of collagens and isoprenylated proteins in SMC-Ch than in SMC-C was determined showing that doxycycline inhibits ECM production and remodeling in both SMC types of cultures. Moreover, preliminary results about the effect of doxycycline on protein isoprenylation and Rho A protein activation led us to discuss the possibility that membrane G-protein activation pathways could mediate the molecular mechanism.

  11. Integrin activation and internalization mediated by extracellular matrix elasticity: a biomechanical model.

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    Xu, Guang-Kui; Yang, Chun; Du, Jing; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2014-04-11

    Cells sense and respond to the elasticity of extracellular matrix (ECM) via integrin-mediated adhesion. As a class of well-documented mechanosenors in cells, integrins switch among inactive, bound, and dissociated states, depending upon the variation of forces acting on them. However, it remains unclear how the ECM elasticity directs and affects the states of integrins and, in turn, their cellular functions. On the basis of our recent experiments, a biomechanical model is proposed to reveal the role of ECM elasticity in the state-switching of integrins. It is demonstrated that a soft ECM can increase the activation level of integrins while a stiff ECM has a tendency to prevent the dissociation and internalization of bound integrins. In addition, it is found that more stable focal adhesions can form on stiffer and thinner ECMs. The theoretical results agree well with relevant experiments and shed light on the ECM elasticity-sensing mechanisms of cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Extracellular matrix elasticity and topography: material-based cues that affect cell function via conserved mechanisms.

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    Janson, Isaac A; Putnam, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    Chemical, mechanical, and topographic extracellular matrix (ECM) cues have been extensively studied for their influence on cell behavior. These ECM cues alter cell adhesion, cell shape, and cell migration and activate signal transduction pathways to influence gene expression, proliferation, and differentiation. ECM elasticity and topography, in particular, have emerged as material properties of intense focus based on strong evidence these physical cues can partially dictate stem cell differentiation. Cells generate forces to pull on their adhesive contacts, and these tractional forces appear to be a common element of cells' responses to both elasticity and topography. This review focuses on recently published work that links ECM topography and mechanics and their influence on differentiation and other cell behaviors. We also highlight signaling pathways typically implicated in mechanotransduction that are (or may be) shared by cells subjected to topographic cues. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the potential implications of these commonalities for cell based therapies and biomaterial design. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Adhesion of indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum to gut extracellular matrix and its physicochemical characterization.

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    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Tyagi, Ashish; Kumar, Ashwani; Saklani, Asha Chandola; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Adhesion to the human intestinal epithelial cell is considered as one of the important selection criteria of lactobacilli for probiotic attributes. Sixteen Lactobacillus plantarum strains from human origins were subjected for adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) components, and their physiochemical characterization, incubation time course and effect of different pH on bacterial adhesion in vitro were studied. Four strains showed significant binding to both fibronectin and mucin. After pretreatment with pepsin and trypsin, the bacterial adhesion to ECM reduced to the level of 50 % and with lysozyme significantly decreased by 65-70 %. Treatment with LiCl also strongly inhibited (90 %) the bacterial adhesion to ECM. Tested strains showed highest binding efficacy at time course of 120 and 180 min. Additionally, the binding of Lp91 to ECM was highest at pH 6 (155 ± 2.90 CFU/well). This study proved that surface layer components are proteinaceous in nature, which contributed in adhesion of lactobacillus strains. Further, the study can provide a better platform for introduction of new indigenous probiotic strains having strong adhesion potential for future use.

  14. From Nano to Macro: Studying the Hierarchical Structure of the Corneal Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantock, Andrew J.; Winkler, Moritz; Parfitt, Geraint J.; Young, Robert D.; Brown, Donald J.; Boote, Craig; Jester, James V.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss current methods for studying ocular extracellular matrix (ECM) assembly from the ‘nano’ to the ‘macro’ levels of hierarchical organization. Since collagen is the major structural protein in the eye, providing mechanical strength and controlling ocular shape, the methods presented focus on understanding the molecular assembly of collagen at the nanometer level using x-ray scattering through to the millimeter to centimeter level using nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging of second harmonic generated (SHG) signals. Three-dimensional analysis of ECM structure is also discussed, including electron tomography, serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) and digital image reconstruction. Techniques to detect non-collagenous structural components of the ECM are also presented, and these include immunoelectron microscopy and staining with cationic dyes. Together, these various approaches are providing new insights into the structural blueprint of the ocular ECM, and in particular that of the cornea, which impacts upon our current understanding of the control of corneal shape, pathogenic mechanisms underlying ectatic disorders of the cornea and the potential for corneal tissue engineering. PMID:25819457

  15. Effects of oestrogen on the extracellular matrix in the endometrium of postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahashi, M; Ooshima, A; Nakano, R

    1997-09-01

    To obtain insight into the effects of oestrogen on extracellular matrix (ECM) in the postmenopausal endometrium. The distribution of the components of the ECM, including collagen types I, III, IV, and VI, and laminin, was investigated in the human postmenopausal endometrium by an indirect immunofluorescence method with specific monoclonal antibodies and a polyclonal antibody. Collagens were also extracted from the endometrial tissues of postmenopausal women who had or had not been treated with oestrogen for three weeks. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that type I collagen was the predominant interstitial collagen, and that types III and VI collagens were absent or very sparsely distributed in the stroma of the postmenopausal endometrium. However, types I, III, and VI collagens were diffusely localised in the stroma of the postmenopausal endometrium after administration of oestrogen. Even though type IV collagen was not seen in the basement membrane of the endometrial glands in the endometrium of postmenopausal women in the absence of oestrogen treatment, both type IV collagen and laminin were localised exclusively in the basement membrane of the endometrial glands in the postmenopausal endometrium after three weeks of oestrogen treatment. The level of type III collagen relative to that of type I collagen was significantly increased (p distribution of components and in the composition of the ECM in the endometrium of postmenopausal women.

  16. Extracellular matrix controls neuronal features that mediate the persistence of fear.

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    Pignataro, Annabella; Pagano, Roberto; Guarneri, Giorgia; Middei, Silvia; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2017-12-01

    Degradation of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by injections of the bacterial enzyme chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) does not impair fear memory formation but accelerates its extinction and disrupts its reactivation. These observations suggest that the treatment might selectively interfere with the post-extinction features of neurons that mediate the reinstatement of fear. Here, we report that ChABC mice show regular fear memory and memory-driven c-fos activation and dendritic spine formation in the BLA. These mice then rapidly extinguish their fear response and exhibit a post-extinction concurrent reduction in c-fos activation and large dendritic spines that extends to the anterior cingulate cortex 7 days later. At this remote time point, fear renewal and fear retrieval are impaired. These findings show that a non-cellular component of the brain tissue controls post-extinction levels of neuronal activity and spine enlargement in the regions sequentially remodelled during the formation of recent and remote fear memory. By preventing BLA and aCC neurons to retain neuronal features that serve to reactivate an extinguished fear memory, ECM digestion might offer a therapeutic strategy for durable attenuation of traumatic memories.

  17. A finite dissipative theory of temporary interfibrillar bridges in the extracellular matrix of ligaments and tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarletta, P.; Ben Amar, M.

    2009-01-01

    The structural integrity and the biomechanical characteristics of ligaments and tendons result from the interactions between collagenous and non-collagenous proteins (e.g. proteoglycans, PGs) in the extracellular matrix. In this paper, a dissipative theory of temporary interfibrillar bridges in the anisotropic network of collagen type I, embedded in a ground substance, is derived. The glycosaminoglycan chains of decorin are assumed to mediate interactions between fibrils, behaving as viscous structures that transmit deformations outside the collagen molecules. This approach takes into account the dissipative effects of the unfolding preceding fibrillar elongation, together with the slippage of entire fibrils and the strain-rate-dependent damage evolution of the interfibrillar bridges. Thermodynamic consistency is used to derive the constitutive equations, and the transition state theory is applied to model the rearranging properties of the interfibrillar bridges. The constitutive theory is applied to reproduce the hysteretic spectrum of the tissues, demonstrating how PGs determine damage evolution, softening and non-recoverable strains in their cyclic mechanical response. The theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental response of ligaments and tendons from referenced studies. The relevance of the proposed model in mechanobiology research is discussed, together with several applications from medical practice to bioengineering science. PMID:19106068

  18. How changes in extracellular matrix mechanics and gene expression variability might combine to drive cancer progression.

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    Justin Werfel

    Full Text Available Changes in extracellular matrix (ECM structure or mechanics can actively drive cancer progression; however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we explore whether this process could be mediated by changes in cell shape that lead to increases in genetic noise, given that both factors have been independently shown to alter gene expression and induce cell fate switching. We do this using a computer simulation model that explores the impact of physical changes in the tissue microenvironment under conditions in which physical deformation of cells increases gene expression variability among genetically identical cells. The model reveals that cancerous tissue growth can be driven by physical changes in the microenvironment: when increases in cell shape variability due to growth-dependent increases in cell packing density enhance gene expression variation, heterogeneous autonomous growth and further structural disorganization can result, thereby driving cancer progression via positive feedback. The model parameters that led to this prediction are consistent with experimental measurements of mammary tissues that spontaneously undergo cancer progression in transgenic C3(1-SV40Tag female mice, which exhibit enhanced stiffness of mammary ducts, as well as progressive increases in variability of cell-cell relations and associated cell shape changes. These results demonstrate the potential for physical changes in the tissue microenvironment (e.g., altered ECM mechanics to induce a cancerous phenotype or accelerate cancer progression in a clonal population through local changes in cell geometry and increased phenotypic variability, even in the absence of gene mutation.

  19. Extracellular matrix formation in self-assembled minimalistic bioactive hydrogels based on aromatic peptide amphiphiles

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    Mi Zhou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The hitherto inconsistency in clinical performance for engineered skin drives the current development of novel cell-scaffolding materials; one challenge is to only extract essential characteristics from the complex native ECM (extracellular matrix and incorporate them into a scaffold with minimal complexity to support normal cell functions. This study involved small-molecule-based bioactive hydrogels produced by the co-assembly of two aromatic peptide amphiphiles: Fmoc-FF (Fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-diphenylalanine and Fmoc-RGD (arginine–glycine–aspartic acid. Three-dimensionally cultured human dermal fibroblasts deposited dense ECM networks including fibronectin and collagen I within the hydrogels in a 14-day culture. The fibroblasts organized the fibrous ECM and contracted the gel without differentiating into myofibroblasts. The stiffness of the cell-gel constructs increased dramatically due to ECM formation and gel contraction. This created an economical biomimetic model-scaffold to further understand skin reconstruction in vitro and supplied a design pathway to create versatile cell-scaffolds with varied bioactivities and simplicity.

  20. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell behavior by the nanostructured presentation of extracellular matrix components.

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    Christine Anna Muth

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are maintained in stem cell niches, which regulate stem cell fate. Extracellular matrix (ECM molecules, which are an essential part of these niches, can actively modulate cell functions. However, only little is known on the impact of ECM ligands on HSCs in a biomimetic environment defined on the nanometer-scale level. Here, we show that human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC adhesion depends on the type of ligand, i.e., the type of ECM molecule, and the lateral, nanometer-scaled distance between the ligands (while the ligand type influenced the dependency on the latter. For small fibronectin (FN-derived peptide ligands such as RGD and LDV the critical adhesive interligand distance for HSPCs was below 45 nm. FN-derived (FN type III 7-10 and osteopontin-derived protein domains also supported cell adhesion at greater distances. We found that the expression of the ECM protein thrombospondin-2 (THBS2 in HSPCs depends on the presence of the ligand type and its nanostructured presentation. Functionally, THBS2 proved to mediate adhesion of HSPCs. In conclusion, the present study shows that HSPCs are sensitive to the nanostructure of their microenvironment and that they are able to actively modulate their environment by secreting ECM factors.

  1. Extracellular Matrix Proteins Expression Profiling in Chemoresistant Variants of the A2780 Ovarian Cancer Cell Line

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    Radosław Januchowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynaecological malignancies. Extracellular matrix (ECM can affect drug resistance by preventing the penetration of the drug into cancer cells and increased resistance to apoptosis. This study demonstrates alterations in the expression levels of ECM components and related genes in cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, topotecan-, and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line. Affymetrix Gene Chip Human Genome Array Strips were used for hybridisations. The genes that had altered expression levels in drug-resistant sublines were selected and filtered by scatter plots. The genes that were up- or downregulated more than fivefold were selected and listed. Among the investigated genes, 28 genes were upregulated, 10 genes were downregulated, and two genes were down- or upregulated depending on the cell line. Between upregulated genes 12 were upregulated very significantly—over 20-fold. These genes included COL1A2, COL12A1, COL21A1, LOX, TGFBI, LAMB1, EFEMP1, GPC3, SDC2, MGP, MMP3, and TIMP3. Four genes were very significantly downregulated: COL11A1, LAMA2, GPC6, and LUM. The expression profiles of investigated genes provide a preliminary insight into the relationship between drug resistance and the expression of ECM components. Identifying correlations between investigated genes and drug resistance will require further analysis.

  2. Extracellular matrix defects in aneurysmal Fibulin-4 mice predispose to lung emphysema.

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    Natasja W M Ramnath

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In this study we set out to investigate the clinically observed relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and aortic aneurysms. We tested the hypothesis that an inherited deficiency of connective tissue might play a role in the combined development of pulmonary emphysema and vascular disease. METHODS: We first determined the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a clinical cohort of aortic aneurysms patients and arterial occlusive disease patients. Subsequently, we used a combined approach comprising pathological, functional, molecular imaging, immunological and gene expression analysis to reveal the sequence of events that culminates in pulmonary emphysema in aneurysmal Fibulin-4 deficient (Fibulin-4(R mice. RESULTS: Here we show that COPD is significantly more prevalent in aneurysm patients compared to arterial occlusive disease patients, independent of smoking, other clinical risk factors and inflammation. In addition, we demonstrate that aneurysmal Fibulin-4(R/R mice display severe developmental lung emphysema, whereas Fibulin-4(+/R mice acquire alveolar breakdown with age and upon infectious stress. This vicious circle is further exacerbated by the diminished antiprotease capacity of the lungs and ultimately results in the development of pulmonary emphysema. CONCLUSIONS: Our experimental data identify genetic susceptibility to extracellular matrix degradation and secondary inflammation as the common mechanisms in both COPD and aneurysm formation.

  3. Polo-like Kinase I is involved in Invasion through Extracellular Matrix

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    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-04-02

    Polo-like kinase 1, PLK1, has important functions in maintaining genome stability and is involved in regulation of mitosis. PLK1 is up regulated in many invasive carcinomas. We asked whether it may also play a role in acquisition of invasiveness, a crucial step in transition to malignancy. In a model of metaplastic basal-like breast carcinoma progression, we found that PLK1 expression is necessary but not sufficient to induce invasiveness through laminin-rich extracellular matrix. PLK1 mediates invasion via Vimentin and {beta}1 integrin, both of which are necessary. We observed that PLK1 phosphorylates Vimentin on serine 82, which in turn regulates cell surface levels of {beta}1 integrin. We found PLK1 to be also highly expressed in pre-invasive in situ carcinomas of the breast. These results support a role for the involvement of PLK1 in the invasion process and point to this pathway as a potential therapeutic target for pre-invasive and invasive breast carcinoma treatment.

  4. Vibrio cholerae O1 secretes an extracellular matrix in response to antibody-mediated agglutination.

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    Danielle E Baranova

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae O1 is one of two serogroups responsible for epidemic cholera, a severe watery diarrhea that occurs after the bacterium colonizes the human small intestine and secretes a potent ADP-ribosylating toxin. Immunity to cholera is associated with intestinal anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS antibodies, which are known to inhibit V. cholerae motility and promote bacterial cell-cell crosslinking and aggregation. Here we report that V. cholerae O1 classical and El Tor biotypes produce an extracellular matrix (ECM when forcibly immobilized and agglutinated by ZAC-3 IgG, an intestinally-derived monoclonal antibody (MAb against the core/lipid A region of LPS. ECM secretion, as demonstrated by crystal violet staining and scanning electron microscopy, occurred within 30 minutes of antibody exposure and peaked by 3 hours. Non-motile mutants of V. cholerae did not secrete ECM following ZAC-3 IgG exposure, even though they were susceptible to agglutination. The ECM was enriched in O-specific polysaccharide (OSP but not Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS. Finally, we demonstrate that ECM production by V. cholerae in response to ZAC-3 IgG was associated with bacterial resistant to a secondary complement-mediated attack. In summary, we propose that V. cholerae O1, upon encountering anti-LPS antibodies in the intestinal lumen, secretes an ECM (or O-antigen capsule possibly as a strategy to shield itself from additional host immune factors and to exit an otherwise inhospitable host environment.

  5. Alternatively spliced Spalax heparanase inhibits extracellular matrix degradation, tumor growth, and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Nicola J.; Avivi, Aaron; Shafat, Itay; Edovitsky, Evgeny; Zcharia, Eyal; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel; Nevo, Eviatar

    2009-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that degrades heparan sulfate (HS) at the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix. Heparanase is expressed mainly by cancer cells, and its expression is correlated with increased tumor aggressiveness, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Here, we report the cloning of a unique splice variant (splice 36) of heparanase from the subterranean blind mole rat (Spalax). This splice variant results from skipping part of exon 3, exons 4 and 5, and part of exon 6 and functions as a dominant negative to the wild-type enzyme. It inhibits HS degradation, suppresses glioma tumor growth, and decreases experimental B16–BL6 lung colonization in a mouse model. Intriguingly, Spalax splice variant 7 of heparanase (which results from skipping of exon 7) is devoid of enzymatic activity, but unlike splice 36 it enhances tumor growth. Our results demonstrate that alternative splicing of heparanase regulates its enzymatic activity and might adapt the heparanase function to the fluctuating normoxic–hypoxic subterranean environment that Spalax experiences. Development of anticancer drugs designed to suppress tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis is a major challenge, of which heparanase inhibition is a promising approach. We anticipate that the heparanase splicing model, evolved during 40 million years of Spalacid adaptation to underground life, would pave the way for the development of heparanase-based therapeutic modalities directed against angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis. PMID:19164514

  6. Characterization of and host response to tyramine substituted-hyaluronan enriched fascia extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, LiKang; Calabro, Anthony; Rodriguez, E. Rene; Tan, Carmela D.; Walker, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    Naturally-occurring biomaterial scaffolds derived from extracellular matrix (ECM) have been previously investigated for soft tissue repair. We propose to enrich fascia ECM with high molecular weight tyramine substituted-hyaluronan (TS-HA) to modulate inflammation associated with implantation and enhance fibroblast infiltration. As critical determinants of constructive remodeling, the host inflammatory response and macrophage polarization to TS-HA enriched fascia were characterized in a rat abdominal wall model. TS-HA treated fascia with cross-linking had a similar lymphocyte (P = 0.11) and plasma cell (P = 0.13) densities, greater macrophage (P = 0.001) and giant cell (P fascia, with or without cross-linking, exhibited a predominantly M2 pro-remodeling macrophage profile similar to water controls (P = 0.82), which is suggestive of constructive tissue remodeling. Our findings demonstrated that HA augmentation can alter the host response to an ECM, but the appropriate concentration and molecular weight needed to minimize chronic inflammation within the scaffold remains to be determined. PMID:21553156

  7. Development and characterization of a naturally derived lung extracellular matrix hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Robert A; Link, Patrick A; Mikhaiel, Nabil S; Schneck, Matthew B; Valentine, Michael S; Kamga Gninzeko, Franck J; Herbert, Joseph A; Sakagami, Masahiro; Heise, Rebecca L

    2016-08-01

    The complexity and rapid clearance mechanisms of lung tissue make it difficult to develop effective treatments for many chronic pathologies. We are investigating lung derived extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels as a novel approach for delivery of cellular therapies to the pulmonary system. The main objectives of this study include effective decellularization of porcine lung tissue, development of a hydrogel from the porcine ECM, and characterization of the material's composition, mechanical properties, and ability to support cellular growth. Our evaluation of the decellularized tissue indicated successful removal of cellular material and immunogenic remnants in the ECM. The self-assembly of the lung ECM hydrogel was rapid, reaching maximum modulus values within 3 min at 37°C. Rheological characterization showed the lung ECM hydrogel to have a concentration dependent storage modulus between 15 and 60 Pa. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our novel ECM derived hydrogel and measure its ability to support 3D culture of MSCs in vitro and in vivo delivery of MSCs. Our in vitro experiments using human mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated our novel ECM hydrogel's ability to enhance cellular attachment and viability. Our in vivo experiments demonstrated that rat MSC delivery in pre-gel solution significantly increased cell retention in the lung over 24 h in an emphysema rat model. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1922-1935, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cardiac extracellular matrix-fibrin hybrid scaffolds with tunable properties for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

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    Williams, Corin; Budina, Erica; Stoppel, Whitney L; Sullivan, Kelly E; Emani, Sirisha; Emani, Sitaram M; Black, Lauren D

    2015-03-01

    Solubilized cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) is being developed as an injectable therapeutic that offers promise for promoting cardiac repair. However, the ECM alone forms a hydrogel that is very soft compared to the native myocardium. As both the stiffness and composition of the ECM are important in regulating cell behavior and can have complex synergistic effects, we sought to develop an ECM-based scaffold with tunable biochemical and mechanical properties. We used solubilized rat cardiac ECM from two developmental stages (neonatal, adult) combined with fibrin hydrogels that were cross-linked with transglutaminase. We show that ECM was retained within the gels and that the Young's modulus could be tuned to span the range of the developing and mature heart. C-kit+ cardiovascular progenitor cells from pediatric patients with congenital heart defects were seeded into the hybrid gels. Both the elastic modulus and composition of the scaffolds impacted the expression of endothelial and smooth muscle cell genes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the hybrid gels are injectable, and thus have potential for minimally invasive therapies. ECM-fibrin hybrid scaffolds offer new opportunities for exploiting the effects of both composition and mechanical properties in directing cell behavior for tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cell Invasion Dynamics into a Three Dimensional Extracellular Matrix Fibre Network.

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    Min-Cheol Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of filopodia interacting with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM play a key role in various cell-ECM interactions, but their mechanisms of interaction with the ECM in 3D environment remain poorly understood. Based on first principles, here we construct an individual-based, force-based computational model integrating four modules of 1 filopodia penetration dynamics; 2 intracellular mechanics of cellular and nuclear membranes, contractile actin stress fibers, and focal adhesion dynamics; 3 structural mechanics of ECM fiber networks; and 4 reaction-diffusion mass transfers of seven biochemical concentrations in related with chemotaxis, proteolysis, haptotaxis, and degradation in ECM to predict dynamic behaviors of filopodia that penetrate into a 3D ECM fiber network. The tip of each filopodium crawls along ECM fibers, tugs the surrounding fibers, and contracts or retracts depending on the strength of the binding and the ECM stiffness and pore size. This filopodium-ECM interaction is modeled as a stochastic process based on binding kinetics between integrins along the filopodial shaft and the ligands on the surrounding ECM fibers. This filopodia stochastic model is integrated into migratory dynamics of a whole cell in order to predict the cell invasion into 3D ECM in response to chemotaxis, haptotaxis, and durotaxis cues. Predicted average filopodia speed and that of the cell membrane advance agreed with experiments of 3D HUVEC migration at r(2 > 0.95 for diverse ECMs with different pore sizes and stiffness.