WorldWideScience

Sample records for carrying spent nuclear

  1. Order of 12 June 1986 on protection and control of spent fuel and Category III nuclear material carried by rail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Order specifically regulates the transport of Category III spent fuel and nuclear materials within the meaning of the Decree of 12th May 1981 and supplements the regulations already in force applicable to transport of dangerous goods, including nuclear materials. The Order details the conditions to be complied with by the carrier, whether foreign or French, holder of a licence in accordance with the Act of 25th July 1980 on protection and control of nuclear materials. (NEA)

  2. Spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a country becomes self-sufficient in part of the nuclear cycle, as production of fuel that will be used in nuclear power plants for energy generation, it is necessary to pay attention for the best method of storing the spent fuel. Temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel is a necessary practice and is applied nowadays all over the world, so much in countries that have not been defined their plan for a definitive repository, as well for those that already put in practice such storage form. There are two main aspects that involve the spent fuels: one regarding the spent nuclear fuel storage intended to reprocessing and the other in which the spent fuel will be sent for final deposition when the definitive place is defined, correctly located, appropriately characterized as to several technical aspects, and licentiate. This last aspect can involve decades of studies because of the technical and normative definitions at a given country. In Brazil, the interest is linked with the storage of spent fuels that will not be reprocessed. This work analyses possible types of storage, the international panorama and a proposal for future construction of a spent nuclear fuel temporary storage place in the country. (author)

  3. Licensing procedures for a dedicated ship for carrying spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. Report from workshop held at GOSAOMNADZOR, Moscow 2 -3 July 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sneve, Margorzata K.; Bergman, Curt; Markarov, Valentin

    2001-07-01

    The report describes information exchange and discussion about the licensing principles and procedures for spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste transportation at sea. Russian health, environment and safety requirements for transportation of waste by ships. (Author)

  4. Licensing procedures for a dedicated ship for carrying spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. Report from workshop held at GOSAOMNADZOR, Moscow 2 -3 July 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes information exchange and discussion about the licensing principles and procedures for spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste transportation at sea. Russian health, environment and safety requirements for transportation of waste by ships. (Author)

  5. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste

  6. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste.

  7. The management strategy of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of management strategy of spent nuclear fuel has been carried out. Spent nuclear fuel is one of the by-products of nuclear power plant. The technical operations related to the management of spent fuel discharged from reactors are called the back-end fuel cycle. It can be largely divided into three option s : the once-through cycle, the closed cycle and the so-called ‟wait and see” policy. Whatever strategy is selected for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, Away-from-Reactor (AFR) storage facilities has to be constructed. For the once through cycle, the entire content of spent fuel is considered as waste, and is subject to be disposed of into a deep underground repository. In the closed cycle, however, can be divided into: (1) uranium and plutonium are recovered from spent fuel by reprocessing and recycled to manufacture mixed oxide (MOX) fuel rods, (2) waste transmutation in accelerator-driven subcritical reactors, (3) DUPIC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In CANDU) concept. In wait and see policy, which means first storing the spent fuel and deciding at a later stage on reprocessing or disposal. (author)

  8. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  9. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-10-25

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  10. Dissolution studies of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain quantitative data on the dissolution of high burnup spent nuclear fuel, dissolution study have been carried out at the Department of Chemistry, JAERI, from 1984 under the contract with STA entitled 'Reprocessing Test Study of High Burnup Fuel'. In this study PWR spent fuels of 8,400 to 36,100 MWd/t in averaged burnup were dissolved and the chemical composition and distribution of radioactive nuclides were measured for insoluble residue, cladding material (hull), off-gas and dissolved solution. With these analyses basic data concerning the dissolution and clarification process in the reprocessing plant were accumulated. (author)

  11. Dry spent nuclear fuel transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newport News Shipbuilding, (NNS), has been transferring spent nuclear fuel in a dry condition for over 25 years. It is because of this successful experience that NNS decided to venture into the design, construction and operation of a commercial dry fuel transfer project. NNS is developing a remote handling system for the dry transfer of spent nuclear fuel. The dry fuel transfer system is applicable to spent fuel pool-to-cask or cask-to-cask or both operations. It is designed to be compatible with existing storage cask technology as well as the developing multi-purpose canister design. The basis of NNS' design is simple. It must be capable of transferring all fuel designs, it must be capable of servicing 100 percent of the commercial nuclear plants, it must protect the public and nuclear operators, it must be operated cost efficiently and it must be transportable. Considering the basic design parameters, the following are more specific requirements included in the design: (a) Total weight of transfer cask less than 24 tons; (b) no requirement for permanent site modifications to support system utilization; (c) minimal radiation dose to operating personnel; (d) minimal generation of radioactive waste; (e) adaptability to any size and length fuel or cask; (f) portability of system allowing its efficient movement from site to site; (g) safe system; all possible ''off normal'' situations are being considered, and resultant safety systems are being engineered into NNS' design to mitigate problems. The primary focus of this presentation is to provide an overview of NNS' Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Transfer System. (author). 5 refs

  12. Spent nuclear fuel sampling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes a strategy for sampling the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored in the 105-K Basins (105-K East and 105-K West). This strategy will support decisions concerning the path forward SNF disposition efforts in the following areas: (1) SNF isolation activities such as repackaging/overpacking to a newly constructed staging facility; (2) conditioning processes for fuel stabilization; and (3) interim storage options. This strategy was developed without following the Data Quality Objective (DQO) methodology. It is, however, intended to augment the SNF project DQOS. The SNF sampling is derived by evaluating the current storage condition of the SNF and the factors that effected SNF corrosion/degradation

  13. Antineutrino monitoring of spent nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Brdar, Vedran; Huber, Patrick; Kopp, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Military and civilian applications of nuclear energy have left a significant amount of spent nuclear fuel over the past 70 years. Currently, in many countries world wide, the use of nuclear energy is on the rise. Therefore, the management of highly radioactive nuclear waste is a pressing issue. In this letter, we explore antineutrino detectors as a tool for monitoring and safeguarding nuclear waste material. We compute the flux and spectrum of antineutrinos emitted by spent nuclear fuel eleme...

  14. Spent nuclear fuel reprocessing modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term wide development of nuclear power requires new approaches towards the realization of nuclear fuel cycle, namely, closed nuclear fuel cycle (CNFC) with respect to fission materials. Plant nuclear fuel cycle (PNFC), which is in fact the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel unloaded from the reactor and the production of new nuclear fuel (NF) at the same place together with reactor plant, can be one variant of CNFC. Developing and projecting of PNFC is a complicated high-technology innovative process that requires modern information support. One of the components of this information support is developed by the authors. This component is the programme conducting calculations for various variants of process flow sheets for reprocessing SNF and production of NF. Central in this programme is the blocks library, where the blocks contain mathematical description of separate processes and operations. The calculating programme itself has such a structure that one can configure the complex of blocks and correlations between blocks, appropriate for any given flow sheet. For the ready sequence of operations balance calculations are made of all flows, i.e. expenses, element and substance makeup, heat emission and radiation rate are determined. The programme is open and the block library can be updated. This means that more complicated and detailed models of technological processes will be added to the library basing on the results of testing processes using real equipment, in test operating mode. The development of the model for the realization of technical-economic analysis of various variants of technologic PNFC schemes and the organization of 'operator's advisor' is expected. (authors)

  15. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEROY, P.G.

    2000-11-03

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities.

  17. Investigation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Pool Coolability

    OpenAIRE

    Nimander, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    The natural catastrophe at Fukushima Dai-ichi 2011 enlightened the nuclear community. This master thesis reveals the non-negligible risks regarding the short term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The thesis has also investigated the possibility of using natural circulation of air in a passive safety system to cool the spent nuclear fuel pools. The results where conclusive: The temperature difference between the heated air and ambient air is far too low for natural circulation of air to remove a...

  18. Spent nuclear fuel disposal liability insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis examines the social efficiency of nuclear power when the risks of accidental releases of spent fuel radionuclides from a spent fuel disposal facility are considered. The analysis consists of two major parts. First, a theoretical economic model of the use of nuclear power including the risks associated with releases of radionuclides from a disposal facility is developed. Second, the costs of nuclear power, including the risks associated with a radionuclide release, are empirically compared to the costs of fossil fuel-fired generation of electricity. Under the provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the federally owned and operated spent nuclear fuel disposal facility is not required to maintain a reserve fund to cover damages from an accidental radionuclide release. Thus, the risks of a harmful radionuclide release are not included in the spent nuclear fuel disposal fee charged to the electric utilities. Since the electric utilities do not pay the full, social costs of spent fuel disposal, they use nuclear fuel in excess of the social optimum. An insurance mechanism is proposed to internalize the risks associated with spent fueled disposal. Under this proposal, the Federal government is required to insure the disposal facility against any liabilities arising from accidental releases of spent fuel radionuclides

  19. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  20. Retrievability of spent nuclear fuel canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the designing process of the Finnish spent nuclear fuel repository, a preliminary study has been carried out to investigate how the canisters could technically be retrieved to the ground surface. Possibility of retrieving a canister has been investigated in different phases of the disposal project. Retrievability has not been a design goal for the spent fuel repository. However, design of the repository includes some features that may ease the retrieval of canisters in the future. Spent fuel elements are packaged in massive copper-iron canisters, which are mechanically strong and long-lived. The repository consists of excavated tunnels in hard rock which are supposed to be very long-lived making the removal of the tunnel backfilling technically possible also in the future. As long as the bentonite buffer has not been installed the canister can be returned to the ground surface using the same equipment as was used when the canister was brought down to the repository and lowered into the hole. In the encapsulation station the spent fuel elements can be packaged in the other canister or in the transport cask. After a deposition tunnel has been backfilled and closed, the retrieval consists of tearing down the concrete structure at the entry of the deposition tunnel, removal of the tunnel backfilling, removal of the bentonite from the disposal hole and lifting up of the canister. Various methods, e.g., flushing the bentonite with saline solutions, can be used to detach the canister from a hole with fully saturated bentonite. Recovery will be technically possible also after closing of the disposal facility. Backfilling of the shafts and tunnels will be removed and additional new structures and systems will have to be built in the repository. After that canisters can be transported to the ground surface as described above. In addition, handling of the canisters at the ground surface will require additional facilities. Canisters can be packaged in the

  1. Nondestructive measurements on spent fuel for the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondestructive measurements on spent fuel are being developed to meet safeguards and materials managment requirements at nuclear facilities. Spent-fuel measurement technology and its applications are reviewed

  2. Nuclear spent fuel management. Experience and options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel can be stored safely for long periods at relatively low cost, but some form of permanent disposal will eventually be necessary. This report examines the options for spent fuel management, explores the future prospects for each stage of the back-end of the fuel cycle and provides a thorough review of past experience and the technical status of the alternatives. Current policies and practices in twelve OECD countries are surveyed

  3. Integrated spent nuclear fuel database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Distributed Information Systems software Unit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has designed and developed an Integrated Spent Nuclear Fuel Database System (ISNFDS), which maintains a computerized inventory of all US Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Commercial SNF is not included in the ISNFDS unless it is owned or stored by DOE. The ISNFDS is an integrated, single data source containing accurate, traceable, and consistent data and provides extensive data for each fuel, extensive facility data for every facility, and numerous data reports and queries

  4. Long term wet spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting showed that there is continuing confidence in the use of wet storage for spent nuclear fuel and that long-term wet storage of fuel clad in zirconium alloys can be readily achieved. The importance of maintaining good water chemistry has been identified. The long-term wet storage behaviour of sensitized stainless steel clad fuel involves, as yet, some uncertainties. However, great reliance will be placed on long-term wet storage of spent fuel into the future. The following topics were treated to some extent: Oxidation of the external surface of fuel clad, rod consolidation, radiation protection, optimum methods of treating spent fuel storage water, physical radiation effects, and the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies of long-term wet storage conditions. A number of papers on national experience are included

  5. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology

  6. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-11-29

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology.

  7. Corrosion of spent nuclear fuel aluminium cladding in ordinary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion of aluminium alloy cladding of spent nuclear fuel elements in ordinary water is examined in the spent fuel storage pool of the RA research reactor at the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro. Experimental examinations are carried out within framework of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium-Clad Spent Fuel in Water', Phase II. Racks with coupons made of different aluminium alloys were exposed to water influence for period of six months to six years. The project comprises also activities on monitoring of the water chemistry and radioactivity in the storage pool. Visual and microscopic examinations of surfaces of aluminium coupons of the test racks have been done recently and results were presented in this paper confirming strong influence of water quality and exposition time to corrosion process. (author)

  8. Spent nuclear fuel project product specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document establishes the limits and controls for the significant parameters that could potentially affect the safety and/or quality of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) packaged for processing, transport, and storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in Multi-Canister Overpacks to be transported throughout the SNF Project

  9. Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Program user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this manual is to present procedures to execute the Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Model (SNFSM) program. This manual includes an overview of the model, operating environment, input and output specifications and user procedures. An example of the execution of the program is included to assist potential users

  10. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Technical Databook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Technical Databook is developed for use as a common authoritative source of fuel behavior and material parameters in support of the Hanford SNF Project. The Technical Databook will be revised as necessary to add parameters as their Databook submittals become available

  11. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Product Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-01-20

    This document establishes the limits and controls for the significant parameters that could potentially affect the safety and/or quality of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) packaged for processing, transport, and storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in Multi-Canister Overpacks to be transported throughout the SNF Project.

  12. Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Nuclear Power Plant Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of spent nuclear fuel from Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor had been studied to anticipate program of NPP operation in Indonesia. In this paper the quantity of generated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is predicted based on the national electrical demand, power grade and type of reactor. Data was estimated using Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) NPP type 1.000 MWe and the SNF management overview base on the experiences of some countries that have NPP. There are four strategy nuclear fuel cycle which can be developed i.e: direct disposal, reprocessing, DUPlC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In Candu) and wait and see. There are four alternative for SNF management i.e : storage at the reactor building (AR), away from reactor (AFR) using wet centralized storage, dry centralized storage AFR and prepare for reprocessing facility. For the Indonesian case, centralized facility of the wet type is recommended for PWR or BWR spent fuel. (author)

  13. Classification of spent nuclear fuel (SNF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E. R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high-priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. This document discusses the classification of spent nuclear fuels

  14. A present status for dry storage of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K. S.; Lee, J. C.; Park, H. Y.; Seo, K. S

    2003-04-01

    National policy for management of a spent nuclear fuel does not establish in Korea yet. A storage capacity of a storage pool that is to store the spent nuclear fuel will be exceeded an amount of accumulation from the first Woljin nuclear power plant in 2007. Therefore it is necessary that dry storage facility is secured to store safely the spent nuclear fuel on site of the nuclear power plant until national policy for a back-end spent nuclear fuel cycle is established. In order to store safely spent nuclear fuel, it is important that the present status and technology on dry storage of spent nuclear fuel is looked over. Therefore, the present status on dry storage of spent nuclear fuel was analyzed so as to develop dry storage system and choose a proper dry storage method domestic.

  15. Surrogate Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading encountered during road or rail shipment. ORNL has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve our understanding of the impacts of vibration loading on SNF integrity, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet nuclear industry and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the area of safety of SNF storage and transportation operations.

  16. Treatment strategies for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Spent nuclear fuel is one of the big hazards of our time. The increasing demand for energy in the fast growing countries, mainly in Asia shows that nuclear power is not a passed technology belonging to history. Nuclear power is still our future if we are to be able to produce energy in a relatively cheap and environmentally friendly manner. However, everything has a drawback. In this case there are manly two: the mining of uranium ore and how to deal with the spent nuclear fuel. Mining can nowadays be made with a minimum of environmental impact and uranium mining is not more dangerous that normal coal mining. Probably even less so since the control and regulations are rather strict. Nuclear waste on the other hand may pose a threat to humanity for hundreds of thousands of years. There are mainly two strategies how to deal with it at present. Either the spent fuel is treated as waste and buried deep in the bedrock. This is planned in, e.g. Sweden and Finland. The other option is to use the uranium and plutonium in the waste for continuous energy production while the other actinides as well as the fission and corrosion products are vitrified and stored in the bedrock. Recently an 'add on' has been planned for the reprocessing countries and that is the so called transmutation option. Using this technique, not only the long lived elements in the spent fuel can be burned for energy production but the waste may be considered safe after less than 100 years. Even this is a very long time but compared to the original 100 000 years it is a time that may be possible to understand. (authors)

  17. Spent nuclear fuel project integrated schedule plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrated Schedule Plan establishes the organizational responsibilities, rules for developing, maintain and status of the SNF integrated schedule, and an implementation plan for the integrated schedule. The mission of the SNFP on the Hanford site is to provide safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner which stages it to final disposition. This particularly involves K Basin fuel

  18. Management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme consists of the long-term and short-term programme, the continued bedrock investigations, the underground research laboratory, the decision-making procedure in the site selection process and information questions during the site selection process. The National Board for Spent Nuclear Fuel hereby subunits both the SKB's R and D Programme 86 and the Board's statement concerning the programme. Decisions in the matter have been made by the Board's executive committee. (DG)

  19. Antineutrino monitoring of spent nuclear fuel

    CERN Document Server

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Military and civilian applications of nuclear energy have left a significant amount of spent nuclear fuel over the past 70 years. Currently, in many countries world wide, the use of nuclear energy is on the rise. Therefore, the management of highly radioactive nuclear waste is a pressing issue. In this letter, we explore antineutrino detectors as a tool for monitoring and safeguarding nuclear waste material. We compute the flux and spectrum of antineutrinos emitted by spent nuclear fuel elements as a function of time, and we illustrate the usefulness of antineutrino detectors in several benchmark scenarios. In particular, we demonstrate how a measurement of the antineutrino flux can help to re-verify the contents of a dry storage cask in case the monitoring chain by conventional means gets disrupted. We then comment on the usefulness of antineutrino detectors at long-term storage facilities such as Yucca mountain. Finally, we put forward antineutrino detection as a tool in locating underground "hot spots" in ...

  20. Fission products in the spent nuclear fuel from czech nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power is expected to become a supply able to cover a significant part of the world energetic demand in future. But its big disadvantage, the risk of the spent nuclear fuel, has to be solved. The aim of this paper is to make simple estimates of the upper limits of amounts of the most dangerous spent fuel components and their compounds produced in Czech Republic until 2040. Our estimates are independent on particular type reactor (only on its power) and so they can be carried out for any nuclear fuel cycle. (Authors)

  1. Fission products in the spent nuclear fuel from Czech Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All spent fuel is under the 'green power pressure' at present considered as waste in most of the states that are operating nuclear power plants. Moreover, if they accept a frequent public demand not to transport these wastes abroad and not to accept foreign waste on their territory they come to the problem which is not soluble within a small nuclear economy and they come to a blind street inevitably leading to a technically false concept that all spent nuclear fuel is a waste which should be finally disposed of. It is shown, however that the radiotoxicity and appropriate risk of the spent nuclear fuel comes from two groups of isotopes which perform only about 3% of the spent fuel: fission products, transuranium elements. This suggests and idea of spent fuel separation. The real waste of separation would be only a small amount of the fission products. Simple estimates are made of the upper limits of amounts of the most dangerous spent fuel components and their compounds produced in Czech Republic until 2040. The estimates are independent on any particular type of reactor and so they can be carried out for any nuclear fuel cycle. (author)

  2. Status of storage and preparations for shipment of spent nuclear fuel from IRT-2000 nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of 28 years of operation of nuclear research reactor IRT-2000 some amount of spent nuclear fuel has been produced. At this moment 73 spent fuel assemblies are stored in the spent fuel storage pool, albeit without forced circulation. To solve the problem with the spent nuclear fuel shipping to its country of origin some activities in technical and administrative aspects are carried out. Visual inspection, dosimetry and gamma-spectrometry measurements have been performed with the aim to establish the physical state, possible corrosion on the cladding and residual activity of the spent nuclear fuel. Also some corrosion problems occurring due to prolonged non-adequate storage of spent fuel are discussed and a result from X-ray structure analysis and some photo are given in the paper. (author)

  3. Management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Board for Spent Nuclear Fuel, in submitting its statement of comment to the Government on the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company's (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, SKB) research programme, R and D Programme 86, has also put forward recommendations on the decision-making procedure and on the question of public information during the site selection process. In summary the Board proposes: * that the Government instruct the National Board for Spent Nuclear Fuel to issue certain directives concerning additions to and changes in R and D Programme 86, * that the Board's views on the decision-making procedure in the site selection process be taken into account in the Government's review of the so-called municipal veto in accordance with Chapter 4, Section 3 of the Act (1987:12) on the conservation of natural resources etc., NRL, * that the Board's views on the decision-making procedure and information questions during the site selection process serve as a basis for the continued work. Three appendices are added to the report: 1. Swedish review statements (SV), 2. International Reviews, 3. Report from the site selection group (SV)

  4. DOE SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DISPOSAL CONTAINER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (SNF DC) supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access mains, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container provides long term confinement of DOE SNF waste, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The DOE SNF Disposal Containers provide containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limit radionuclide release thereafter. The disposal containers maintain the waste in a designated configuration, withstand maximum handling and rockfall loads, limit the individual waste canister temperatures after emplacement. The disposal containers also limit the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resist corrosion in the expected repository environment, and provide complete or limited containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple disposal container designs may be needed to accommodate the expected range of DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel. The disposal container will include outer and inner barrier walls and outer and inner barrier lids. Exterior labels will identify the disposal container and contents. Differing metal barriers will support the design philosophy of defense in depth. The use of materials with different failure mechanisms prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The corrosion-resistant inner barrier and inner barrier lid will be constructed of a high-nickel alloy and the corrosion-allowance outer barrier and outer barrier lid will be made of carbon steel. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Containers interface with the emplacement drift environment by transferring heat from the waste to the external environment and by protecting

  5. DOE SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DISPOSAL CONTAINER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Habashi

    1998-06-26

    The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (SNF DC) supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access mains, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container provides long term confinement of DOE SNF waste, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The DOE SNF Disposal Containers provide containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limit radionuclide release thereafter. The disposal containers maintain the waste in a designated configuration, withstand maximum handling and rockfall loads, limit the individual waste canister temperatures after emplacement. The disposal containers also limit the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resist corrosion in the expected repository environment, and provide complete or limited containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple disposal container designs may be needed to accommodate the expected range of DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel. The disposal container will include outer and inner barrier walls and outer and inner barrier lids. Exterior labels will identify the disposal container and contents. Differing metal barriers will support the design philosophy of defense in depth. The use of materials with different failure mechanisms prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The corrosion-resistant inner barrier and inner barrier lid will be constructed of a high-nickel alloy and the corrosion-allowance outer barrier and outer barrier lid will be made of carbon steel. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Containers interface with the emplacement drift environment by transferring heat from the waste to the external environment and by protecting

  6. Spent nuclear fuel project - criteria document spent nuclear fuel final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criteria document provides the criteria and planning guidance for developing the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). This FSAR will support the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office decision to authorize the procurement, installation, installation acceptance testing, startup, and operation of the SNF Project facilities (K Basins, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, and Canister Storage Building)

  7. Nuclear Spent Fuel Management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive waste management policy is established by the Spanish Government through the Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Commerce. This policy is described in the Cabinet-approved General Radioactive Waste Plan. ENRESA is the Spanish organization in charge of radioactive waste and nuclear SFM and nuclear installations decommissioning. The priority goal in SFM is the construction of the centralized storage facility named Almacén Temporal Centralizado (ATC), whose generic design was approved by the safety authority, Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear. This facility is planned for some 6.700 tons of heavy metal. The ATC site selection process, based on a volunteer community’s scheme, has been launched by the Government in December 2009. After the selection of a site in a participative and transparent process, the site characterization and licensing activities will support the construction of the facility. Meanwhile, extension of the on-site storage capacity has been implemented at the seven nuclear power plants sites, including past reracking at all sites. More recent activities are: reracking performed at Cofrentes NPP; dual purpose casks re-licensing for higher burnup at Trillo NPP; transfer of the spent fuel inventory at Jose Cabrera NPP to a dry-storage system, to allow decommissioning operations; and licence application of a dry-storage installation at Ascó NPP, to provide the needed capacity until the ATC facility operation. For financing planning purposes, the long-term management of spent fuel is based on direct disposal. A final decision about major fuel management options is not made yet. To assist the decision makers a number of activities are under way, including basic designs of a geological disposal facility for clay and granite host rocks, together with associated performance assessment, and supported by a R&D programme, which also includes research projects in other options like advanced separation and transmutation. (author)

  8. Spent nuclear fuel management : Trends and back end scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All kinds of radioactive wastes including spent nuclear fuel have to be managed with special care to ensure public and environmental safety. Therefore any country including the nuclear energy option in its energy policy has to provide an appropriate program for the safe treatment and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel, which is an unavoidable product of nuclear power plants. Temporary storage is the essential step of all alternatives of spent fuel management and inevitable final step is the geological disposal. Therefore any national policy regarding spent fuel management must include short term and long term planning for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel including final disposal in geological repository. Available alternatives for the spent fuel management are (1) the closed fuel cycle, (2) the once-through fuel cycle, (3) deferral of a final decision. The resources that are available to the country concerned will be the limiting conditions for establishing a national policy and the choice of the one of the above stated alternatives. Nuclear infrastructure, personnel training availability and relative cost of spent fuel alternatives are the main resources to be considered. In this study, national policy considerations regarding spent nuclear fuel management will be discussed and a frame of the spent fuel management strategy for Turkey will be proposed for back-end of fuel cycle in nuclear scenario

  9. Analysis of storage conditions of the spent nuclear fuel on the dry storage platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of temperature measurements of air which cools storage containers of the spent nuclear fuel on the dry storage platform of the Zaporizhska NPP is carried out. Factors which influence a thermal condition of storage containers are defined, and their influence on results of temperature measurements is analyzed. Recommendations about improvement of system of the temperature control of storage containers of spent nuclear fuel are given.

  10. Overview of the United States spent nuclear fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of the end of the Cold War, the mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shifted from an emphasis on nuclear weapons development and production to an emphasis on the safe management and disposal of excess nuclear materials including spent nuclear fuel from both production and research reactors. Within the US, there are two groups managing spent nuclear fuel. Commercial nuclear power plants are managing their spent nuclear fuel at the individual reactor sites until the planned repository is opened. All other spent nuclear fuel, including research reactors, university reactors, naval reactors, and legacy material from the Cold War is managed by DOE. DOE's mission is to safely and efficiently manage its spent nuclear fuel and prepare it for disposal. This mission involves correcting existing vulnerabilities in spent fuel storage; moving spent fuel from wet basins to dry storage; processing at-risk spent fuel; and preparing spent fuel in road-ready condition for repository disposal. Most of DOE's spent nuclear fuel is stored in underwater basins (wet storage). Many of these basins are outdated, and spent fuel is to be removed and transferred to more modern basins or to new dry storage facilities. In 1995, DOE completed a complex-wide environmental impact analysis that resulted in spent fuel being sent to one of three principal DOE sites for interim storage (up to 40 years) prior to shipment to a repository. This regionalization by fuel type will allow for economies of scale yet minimize unnecessary transportation. This paper discusses the national SNF program, ultimate disposition of SNF, and the technical challenges that have yet to be resolved, namely, release rate testing, non-destructive assay, alternative treatments, drying, and chemical reactivity

  11. Onsite storage of spent nuclear fuel in metalic spent fuel storage casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virginia Electric and Power Company (Vepco) owns and operates two nuclear power stations within its system: the North Anna Power Station located in Louisa County, Virginia; and the Surry Power Station located in Surry County, Virginia. Each of these power stations has two pressurized water reactor operating units which share a common spent fuel pool. Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, Vepco is responsible for providing interim spent fuel storage until availability of the Federal Repository. Vepco has studied a number of options and has developed a program to provide the required onsite interim spent fuel storage. Options considered by Vepco included reracking, pin consolidation, dry storage and construction of a new spent fuel pool to provide the increased spent fuel storage capacity required. Vepco has selected reracking at North Anna combined with dry storage in metal spent fuel storage casks at Surrey to provide the required onsite spent fuel storage. A dry cask storage facility design and license application were developed and the license application was submitted to the NRC in October, 1982. The selection of the option to use dry cask storage of spent fuel at Surry represents the first attempt to license dry storage of spent nuclear fuel in the United States. This storage option is expected to provide an effective option for utilities without adequate storage space in their existing spent fuel pools

  12. Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [ORNL; Yan, Yong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to collect dynamic experimental data on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT), the hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The collected CIRFT data will be utilized to support ongoing spent fuel modeling activities, and support SNF transportation related licensing issues. Recent testing to understand the effects of hydride reorientation on SNF vibration integrity is also being evaluated. CIRFT results have provided insight into the fuel/clad system response to transportation related loads. The major findings of CIRFT on the HBU SNF are as follows: SNF system interface bonding plays an important role in SNF vibration performance, Fuel structure contributes to the SNF system stiffness, There are significant variations in stress and curvature of SNF systems during vibration cycles resulting from segment pellets and clad interaction, and SNF failure initiates at the pellet-pellet interface region and appears to be spontaneous. Because of the non-homogeneous composite structure of the SNF system, finite element analyses (FEA) are needed to translate the global moment-curvature measurement into local stress-strain profiles. The detailed mechanisms of the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interactions and the stress concentration effects at the pellet-pellet interface cannot be readily obtained directly from a CIRFT system measurement. Therefore, detailed FEA is used to understand the global test response, and that data will also be presented.

  13. Characterization plan for Hanford spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Hanford Site Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) was terminated in 1972. Since that time a significant quantity of N Reactor and Single-Pass Reactor SNF has been stored in the 100 Area K-East (KE) and K-West (KW) reactor basins. Approximately 80% of all US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned SNF resides at Hanford, the largest portion of which is in the water-filled KE and KW reactor basins. The basins were not designed for long-term storage of the SNF and it has become a priority to move the SNF to a more suitable location. As part of the project plan, SNF inventories will be chemically and physically characterized to provide information that will be used to resolve safety and technical issues for development of an environmentally benign and efficient extended interim storage and final disposition strategy for this defense production-reactor SNF

  14. Nevada commercial spent nuclear fuel transportation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to present an historic overview of commercial reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) shipments that have occurred in the state of Nevada, and to review the accident and incident experience for this type of shipments. Results show that between 1964 and 1990, 309 truck shipments covering approximately 40,000 miles moved through Nevada; this level of activity places Nevada tenth among the states in the number of truck shipments of SNF. For the same period, 15 rail shipments moving through the State covered approximately 6,500 miles, making Nevada 20th among the states in terms of number of rail shipments. None of these shipments had an accident or an incident associated with them. Because the data for Nevada are so limited, national data on SNF transportation and the safety of truck and rail transportation in general were also assessed

  15. Spent nuclear fuel project quality assurance program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacey, R.E.

    1997-05-09

    This main body of this document describes how the requirements of 10 CFR 830.120 are met by the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project through implementation of WHC-SP-1131. Appendix A describes how the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P are met by the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project through implementation of specific policies, manuals, and procedures.

  16. Alternative measuring approaches in gamma scanning on spent nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Sihm Kvenangen, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In the future, the demand for energy is predicted to grow and more countries plan to utilize nuclear energy as their source of electric energy. This gives rise to many important issues connected to nuclear energy, such as finding methods that can verify that the spent nuclear fuel has been handled safely and used in ordinary power producing cycles as stated by the operators. Gamma ray spectroscopy is one method used for identification and verification of spent nuclear fuel. In the specific ga...

  17. Nuclear criticality safety studies applicable to spent fuel shipping cask designs and spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criticality analyses of water-moderated and reflected arrays of LWR fresh and spent fuel assemblies were carried out in this study. The calculated results indicate that using the assumption of fresh fuel loading in spent fuel shipping cask design leads to assembly spacings which are about twice the spacings of spent fuel loadings. Some shipping cask walls of composite lead and water are more effective neutron reflectors than water of 30.48 cm

  18. Nuclear fuel burn-up credit for criticality safety justification of spent nuclear fuel storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn-up credit analysis of RBMK-1000 an WWER-1000 spent nuclear fuel accounting only for actinides is carried out and a method is proposed for actinide burn-up credit. Two burn-up credit approaches are analyzed, which consider a system without and with the distribution of isotopes along the height of the fuel assembly. Calculations are performed using SCALE and MCNP computer codes

  19. Site selection - location of the repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the localization work and SKB's choice of site for the repository. Furthermore, SKB's basis and rationale for the decisions taken during the work are reported. The document is Appendix PV of applications under the Nuclear Activities Act and the Environmental Code to both build and operate an encapsulation plant adjacent to the central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel in Oskarshamn, and to construct and operate a disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in Oesthammar municipality

  20. Nuclear waste: Monitored retrievable storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility would be to receive and prepare spent nuclear fuel from commercial reactors for disposal in a geologic repository. The Department of Energy has concluded that an MRS facility located in Tennessee would significantly improve the performance of the nuclear waste management system and has identified three sites that it considered the most favorable-the cancelled Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project site, a site on Oak Ridge Reservation, and the site of the Tennessee Valley Authority's cancelled nuclear power plant. This fact sheet described Tennessee's role in the development of the MRS, potential advantages and disadvantages of MRS, and state and local impacts of siting an MRS facility in Tennessee

  1. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project operational staffing plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project's current process flow concepts and knowledge from cognizant engineering and operational personnel, an initial assessment of the SNF Project radiological exposure and resource requirements was completed. A small project team completed a step by step analysis of fuel movement in the K Basins to the new interim storage location, the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This analysis looked at fuel retrieval, conditioning of the fuel, and transportation of the fuel. This plan describes the staffing structure for fuel processing, fuel movement, and the maintenance and operation (M ampersand O) staffing requirements of the facilities. This initial draft does not identify the support function resources required for M ampersand O, i.e., administrative and engineering (technical support). These will be included in future revisions to the plan. This plan looks at the resource requirements for the SNF subprojects, specifically, the operations of the facilities, balances resources where applicable, rotates crews where applicable, and attempts to use individuals in multi-task assignments. This plan does not apply to the construction phase of planned projects that affect staffing levels of K Basins

  2. Visual inspection of underwater spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are many challenges associated with visual inspection of spent nuclear fuel stored in water. Two of the biggest challenges are high radiation fields and the old adaga ''water and electricity don't mix''. Two and one half years ago underwater inspections in nuclear fuel storage facilities were started at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Systems have been operated around the clock for several months at a time. Camera systems have been exposed to radiation fields in excess of 10,000 grey per hour and have cumulative doses of several thousand grey. The video systems are crucial for fuel identification, repackaging, mechanical fastener verification, nondestructive examination probe placement and to examine the amount of corrosion to fuel cans and storage racks. Several camera systems fabricated from commercially available components are utilized in the underwater storage facilities. These include: the Rod camera, for steady pictures 7 meters deep in the water through a 1 centimeter crack in the floor; the Puppet camera, for close shots in buckets or rack ports; the Video Probe, for inspecting fuel cans in their storage position; and the Phantom II, submersible vehicle for visual information and parts retrieval. Waterproofing systems for filed deployment provides many learning opportunities. O-ring placement, pressurized housings, hermetically sealed connectors and silica gel contribute to successful visual inspections in water. Radiation effects were as expected, browning of the camera lens and fiber optics as well as the noise seen in the picture due to radiation bombarding the electronics inside the solid state camera. The waterproof housing provided excellent shielding for the camera system. The camera's orientation to the fuel and the amount of lighting also play an important part in reducing radiological degradation of the video picture. (author). 6 figs

  3. How Stuk Verifies Spent Nuclear Fuel And Why?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    in the beginning of each year on the basis of nuclear power plant operators' activity programmes. Exact timing of the inspection is then subject to discussions between STUK and operator. Typically, one SFAT campaign and one EFORK or GBUV campaign are held annually in both in Loviisa and in Olkiluoto. All measurement results are stored in the database called FISDAM (Finnish Safeguards Database of Measurements). FISDAM is run in Microsoft Access. FISDAM is a living, growing and developing database. New field entries will be added and new analysis tools written, when necessary. New measurement devices require most probably more fields to be added. Verification measurements will be continued and the database will be updated accordingly until the end of the phases of interim storing and final disposal. According to Nuclear Energy Decree STUK maintains a control system of nuclear materials. Accountancy data and continuity-of-knowledge are not enough for credible control system. In order to maintain knowledge one must create it first. Verification measurements carried out give assurance that spent fuel in the storage is physically in accordance with the nuclear material accountancy data. Measurement program has a deterrence effect and it motivates the operator to make a strong commitment to safeguards. FISDAM database will be valuable source of information at the stage of final disposal. It is expected, that at the time of final disposal, high percentage of assemblies has been verified at least once during long intermediate storage time

  4. Physical modeling of spent-nuclear-fuel container

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Liping

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A new physical simulation model was developed to simulate the casting process of the ductile iron heavy section spent-nuclear-fuel container. In this physical simulation model, a heating unit with DR24 Fe-Cr-Al heating wires was used to compensate the heat loss across the non-natural surfaces of the sample, and a precise and reliable casting temperature controlling/monitoring system was employed to ensure the thermal behavior of the simulated casting to be similar to the actual casting. Also, a mould system was designed, in which changeable mould materials can be used for both the outside and inside moulds for different applications. The casting test was carried out with the designed mould and the cooling curves of central and edge points at different isothermal planes of the casting were obtained. Results show that for most isothermal planes, the temperature control system can keep the temperature differences within 6 ℃ between the edge points and the corresponding center points, indicating that this new physical simulation model has high simulation accuracy, and the mould developed can be used for optimization of casting parameters of spent-nuclear-fuel container, such as composition of ductile iron, the pouring temperature, the selection of mould material and design of cooling system. In addition, to maintain the spheroidalization of the ductile iron, the force-chilling should be used for the current physical simulation to ensure the solidification of casting in less than 2 h.

  5. Near-field chemistry of the spent nuclear fuel repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factors affecting near-field chemistry of the spent nuclear fuel repository as well as the involved mutual interactions are described on the basis of literature. The most important processes in the near-field (spent-fuel, canister and bentonite) are presented. The related examples on near-field chemistry models shed light on the extensive problematics of near-field chemistry. (authors)

  6. DOE not planning to accept spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel K. Skinner, president of Commonwealth Edison Co. (ComEd), said open-quotes The federal government has a clear responsibility to begin accepting spent nuclear fuel in 1988,close quotes citing the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. Based in Chicago, ComEd operates 12 nuclear units, making it the nation's largest nuclear utility. open-quotes Since 1983, the consumers who use electricity produced at all nuclear power plants have been paying to fund federal management of spent nuclear fuel. Consumer payments and obligations, with interest, now total more than $10 billion. Electricity consumers have held up their side of the deal. The federal government must do the same,close quotes Skinner added. Skinner represented the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) before the committee. NEI is the Washington-based trade association of the nuclear energy industries. For more than 12 years, utility customers have been paying one-tenth of a cent per kWhr to fund a federal spent fuel management program under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Under this act, the federal government assumed responsibility for management of spent fuel from the nation's nuclear power plants. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned to manage the storage and disposal program. DOE committed to begin accepting spent fuel from nuclear power plants by January 31, 1988. DOE has spent almost $5 million studying a site in Nevada, but is about 12 years behind schedule and does not plan to accept spent fuel beginning in 1998. DOE has said a permanent storage site will not be ready until 2010. This poses a major problem for many of the nation's nuclear power plants which supply about 20% of the electricity in the US

  7. ICP-AES technique in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the glove box adaptation of a High Resolution Atomic Emission Spectrometer (HR-AES) for the determination of trace metallic elements in products of Reprocessing plant and various raw materials used for nuclear spent fuel reprocessing

  8. Impact of nuclear data uncertainties on calculated spent fuel nuclide inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI‑SF) project is nearing the final phase of developing several advanced nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments designed to measure spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purpose of improving nuclear safeguards. Current efforts are focusing on calibrating several of these instruments with spent fuel assemblies at two international spent fuel facilities. Modelling and simulation is expected to play an important role in predicting nuclide compositions, neutron and gamma source terms, and instrument responses in order to inform the instrument calibration procedures. As part of NGSI‑SF project, this work was carried out to assess the impacts of uncertainties in the nuclear data used in the calculations of spent fuel content, radiation emissions and instrument responses. Nuclear data is an essential part of nuclear fuel burnup and decay codes and nuclear transport codes. Such codes are routinely used for analysis of spent fuel and NDA safeguards instruments. Hence, the uncertainties existing in the nuclear data used in these codes affect the accuracies of such analysis. In addition, nuclear data uncertainties represent the limiting (smallest) uncertainties that can be expected from nuclear code predictions, and therefore define the highest attainable accuracy of the NDA instrument. This work studies the impacts of nuclear data uncertainties on calculated spent fuel nuclide inventories and the associated NDA instrument response. Recently developed methods within the SCALE code system are applied in this study. The Californium Interrogation with Prompt Neutron instrument was selected to illustrate the impact of these uncertainties on NDA instrument response.

  9. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from U.S. reactors 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges from US Reactors 1994 provides current statistical data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the US. This year's report provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities at these reactors. Detailed statistics on the data are presented in four chapters that highlight 1994 spent fuel discharges, storage capacities and inventories, canister and nonfuel component data, and assembly characteristics. Five appendices, a glossary, and bibliography are also included. 10 figs., 34 tabs

  10. Microbiology of spent nuclear fuel storage basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo Domingo, J W; Berry, C J; Summer, M; Fliermans, C B

    1998-12-01

    Microbiological studies of spent nuclear fuel storage basins at Savannah River Site (SRS) were performed as a preliminary step to elucidate the potential for microbial-influenced corrosion (MIC) in these facilities. Total direct counts and culturable counts performed during a 2-year period indicated microbial densities of 10(4) to 10(7) cells/ml in water samples and on submerged metal coupons collected from these basins. Bacterial communities present in the basin transformed between 15% and 89% of the compounds present in Biologtrade mark plates. Additionally, the presence of several biocorrosion-relevant microbial groups (i.e., sulfate-reducing bacteria and acid-producing bacteria) was detected with commercially available test kits. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectra analysis of osmium tetroxide-stained coupons demonstrated the development of microbial biofilm communities on some metal coupons submerged for 3 weeks in storage basins. After 12 months, coupons were fully covered by biofilms, with some deterioration of the coupon surface evident at the microscopical level. These results suggest that, despite the oligotrophic and radiological environment of the SRS storage basins and the active water deionization treatments commonly applied to prevent electrochemical corrosion in these facilities, these conditions do not prevent microbial colonization and survival. Such microbial densities and wide diversity of carbon source utilization reflect the ability of the microbial populations to adapt to these environments. The presumptive presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria and acid-producing bacteria and the development of biofilms on submerged coupons indicated that an environment for MIC of metal components in the storage basins may occur. However, to date, there has been no indication or evidence of MIC in the basins. Basin chemistry control and corrosion surveillance programs instituted several years ago have substantially abated all corrosion mechanisms

  11. Investigation of Thermal Processes at Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For good safety dry storage of the spent nuclear fuel of the Zaporizhska nuclear power plant (Ukraine) investigations of thermal processes are carried out. Researches were carried out by the solution of the conjugate problems of heat exchange. The free convection of ventilating air and helium into basket of storage, and radiative heat exchange in the container was considered. As a result temperature fields of the container and air in windless day and temperature fields of the spent fuel assemblies with identical and various energy-release inside the container of a storage are obtained. Results of investigations can be used for construction of safety nearstations dry storages in other atomic power plants of Ukraine or at open dry storages of the spent nuclear fuel in other countries. (author)

  12. Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on the storage of spent nuclear fuel. It covers all types of storage facilities and all types of spent fuel from nuclear power plants and research reactors. It takes into consideration the longer storage periods that have become necessary owing to delays in the development of disposal facilities and the decrease in reprocessing activities. It also considers developments associated with nuclear fuel, such as higher enrichment, mixed oxide fuels and higher burnup. The Safety Guide is not intended to cover the storage of spent fuel if this is part of the operation of a nuclear power plant or spent fuel reprocessing facility. Guidance is provided on all stages for spent fuel storage facilities, from planning through siting and design to operation and decommissioning, and in particular retrieval of spent fuel. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of human health and the environment; 3. Roles and responsibilities; 4. Management system; 5. Safety case and safety assessment; 6. General safety considerations for storage of spent fuel. Appendix I: Specific safety considerations for wet or dry storage of spent fuel; Appendix II: Conditions for specific types of fuel and additional considerations; Annex: I: Short term and long term storage; Annex II: Operational and safety considerations for wet and dry spent fuel storage facilities; Annex III: Examples of sections of operating procedures for a spent fuel storage facility; Annex IV: Site conditions, processes and events for consideration in a safety assessment (external human induced phenomena); Annex V: Site conditions, processes and events for consideration in a safety assessment (external natural phenomena); Annex VI: Site conditions, processes and events for consideration in a safety assessment (external human induced phenomena); Annex VII: Postulated initiating events for consideration in a safety assessment (internal phenomena).

  13. Patent Analysis for Pyroprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of foreign and domestic patents for pyroprocessing technology of spent nuclear fuels was carried out in this study. The current status of pyroprocessing technology development in such countries as Korea, USA, Japan and EU was analyzed by classifying the patents for 1975 through 2009 according to registration country, assignee, calendar year and technology area. The major assignees' activity indices were compared in order to find out whether there is any concentrated area of technical details. Technology competitiveness of the countries was also investigated from the information of patent citation number and family size. Furthermore, some essential unit technologies required for the commercialization of pyroprocessing were derived and examined in the aspect of the state of art as well as the trend of technology development.

  14. Spent nuclear fuel integrity during dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on spent fuel integrity is of interest in evaluating the impact of long-term dry storage on the behavior of spent fuel rods. Spent fuel used during cask performance tests at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) offers significant opportunities for confirmation of the benign nature of long-term dry storage. The cask performance tests conducted at INEEL between 1984 and 1991 included visual observation and ultrasonic examination of the condition of the cladding, fuel rods, and fuel assembly hardware before dry storage and consolidation of the fuel; and a qualitative determination of the effect of dry storage and fuel consolidation on fission gas release from the spent fuel rods. A variety of cover gases and cask orientations were used during the cask performance tests. Cover gases included vacuum, nitrogen, and helium. The nitrogen and helium backfills were sampled and analyzed to detect leaking spent fuel rods. At the conclusion of each performance test, periodic gas sampling was conducted on each cask as part of a cask surveillance and monitoring activity. A spent fuel behavior project (i.e., enhanced surveillance, monitoring, and gas-sampling activities) was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994 for intact fuel in a CASTOR V/21 cask and for consolidated fuel in a VSC-17 cask. The results of the on going gas sampling activities are reported in this paper. (author)

  15. Carry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koijen, Ralph S.J.; Moskowitz, Tobias J.; Heje Pedersen, Lasse;

    A security's expected return can be decomposed into its "carry" and its expected price appreciation, where carry can be measured in advance without an asset pricing model. We find that carry predicts returns both in the cross section and time series for a variety of different asset classes that...... include global equities, global bonds, currencies, commodities, US Treasuries, credit, and equity index options. This predictability underlies the strong returns to "carry trades" that go long high-carry and short low-carry securities, applied almost exclusively to currencies, but shown here to be a...... robust feature of many assets. We decompose carry returns into static and dynamic components and analyze the economic exposures. Despite unconditionally low correlations across asset classes, we find times when carry strategies across all asset classes do poorly, and show that these episodes coincide...

  16. Behavior of iodine in the dissolution of spent nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Tsutomu; Komatsu, Kazunori; Takahashi, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    The results of laboratory-scale experiments concerning the behavior of iodine in the dissolution of spent nuclear fuels, which were carried out at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, are summarized. Based on previous and new experimental results, the difference in quantity of residual iodine in the fuel solution between laboratory-scale experiments and reprocessing plants is discussed, Iodine in spent fuels is converted to the following four states: (1) oxidation into I{sub 2} by nitric acid, (2) oxidation into I{sub 2} by nitrous acid generated in the dissolution, (3) formation of a colloid of insoluble iodides such as AgI and PdI{sub 2}, and (4) deposition on insoluble residue. Nitrous acid controls the amount of colloid formed. As a result, up to 10% of iodine in spent fuels is retained in the fuel solution, up to 3% is deposited on insoluble residue, and the balance volatilizes to the off-gas, Contrary to earlier belief, when the dissolution is carried out in 3 to 4 M HNO{sub 3} at 100{degrees}C, the main iodine species in a fuel solution is a colloid, not iodate, Immediately after its formation, the colloid is unstable and decomposes partially in the hot nitric acid solution through the following reaction: AgI(s) + 2HNO{sub 3}(aq) = {1/2}I{sub 2}(aq) + AgNO{sub 3}(aq) + NO{sub 2}(g) + H{sub 2}O(1). For high concentrations of gaseous iodine, I{sub 2}(g), and NO{sub 2}, this reaction is reversed towards formation of the colloid (AgI). Since these concentrations are high near the liquid surface of a plant-scale dissolver, there is a possibility that the colloid is formed there through this reversal, Simulations performed in laboratory-scale experiments demonstrated this reversal, This phenomenon can be one reason the quantity of residual iodine in spent fuels is higher in reprocessing plants than in laboratory-scale experiments. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Product Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process for removal of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the K Basins has been divided into major sub-systems. The Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) removes fuel from the existing storage canisters, cleans it, and places it into baskets. The multi-canister overpack (MCO) loading system places the baskets into an MCO that has been pre-loaded in a cask. The cask, containing a loaded MCO, is then transferred to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility. After drying at the CVD Facility, the cask, and MCO, are transferred to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), where the MCO is removed from the cask, staged, inspected, sealed (by welding), and stored until a suitable permanent disposal option is implemented. The purpose of this document is to specify the process related characteristics of an MCO at the interface between major process systems. The characteristics are derived from the primary technical documents that form the basis for safety analysis and design calculations. This document translates the calculation assumptions into implementation requirements and describes the method of verifying that the requirement is achieved. These requirements are used to define validation test requirements and describe requirements that influence multiple sub-project safety analysis reports. This product specification establishes limits and controls for each significant process parameter at interfaces between major sub-systems that potentially affect the overall safety and/or quality of the SNF packaged for processing, transport, and interim dry storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in MCOs to be transported throughout the SNF Project. The description of the product specifications are organized in the document as follows: Section 2.0--Summary listing of product specifications at each major sub-system interface. Section 3.0--Summary description providing guidance as to how specifications are complied with by equipment design or processing within a major

  18. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Product Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-12-07

    The process for removal of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the K Basins has been divided into major sub-systems. The Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) removes fuel from the existing storage canisters, cleans it, and places it into baskets. The multi-canister overpack (MCO) loading system places the baskets into an MCO that has been pre-loaded in a cask. The cask, containing a loaded MCO, is then transferred to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility. After drying at the CVD Facility, the cask, and MCO, are transferred to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), where the MCO is removed from the cask, staged, inspected, sealed (by welding), and stored until a suitable permanent disposal option is implemented. The purpose of this document is to specify the process related characteristics of an MCO at the interface between major process systems. The characteristics are derived from the primary technical documents that form the basis for safety analysis and design calculations. This document translates the calculation assumptions into implementation requirements and describes the method of verifying that the requirement is achieved. These requirements are used to define validation test requirements and describe requirements that influence multiple sub-project safety analysis reports. This product specification establishes limits and controls for each significant process parameter at interfaces between major sub-systems that potentially affect the overall safety and/or quality of the SNF packaged for processing, transport, and interim dry storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in MCOs to be transported throughout the SNF Project. The description of the product specifications are organized in the document as follows: Section 2.0--Summary listing of product specifications at each major sub-system interface. Section 3.0--Summary description providing guidance as to how specifications are complied with by equipment design or processing within a major

  19. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Ambers, Scott

    2011-06-30

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of gamma rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. NRF promises the unique capability of directly quantifying a specific isotope without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as is required in other measurement techniques. We have analyzed the potential of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique for quantitative measurements of Pu isotopes in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Given the low concentrations of 239Pu in SNF and its small integrated NRF cross sections, the main challenge in achieving precise and accurate measurements lies in accruing sufficient counting statistics in a reasonable measurement time. Using analytical modeling, and simulations with the radiation transport code MCNPX that has been experimentally tested recently, the backscatter and transmission methods were quantitatively studied for differing photon sources and radiation detector types. Resonant photon count rates and measurement times were estimated for a range of photon source and detection parameters, which were used to determine photon source and gamma-ray detector requirements. The results indicate that systems based on a bremsstrahlung source and present detector technology are not practical for high-precision measurements of 239Pu in SNF. Measurements that achieve the desired uncertainties within hour-long measurements will either require stronger resonances, which may be expressed by other Pu isotopes, or require quasi-monoenergetic photon sources with intensities that are approximately two orders of magnitude higher than those currently being designed or proposed.This work is part of a larger effort sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to develop an integrated instrument, comprised of individual NDA techniques with complementary features, that is fully capable of

  20. Technical bases for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience base for water storage of spent nuclear fuel has evolved since 1943. The technology base includes licensing documentation, standards, technology studies, pool operator experience, and documentation from public hearings. That base reflects a technology which is largely successful and mundane. It projects probable satisfactory water storage of spent water reactor fuel for several decades. Interim dry storage of spent water reactor fuel is not yet licensed in the US, but a data base and documentation have developed. There do not appear to be technological barriers to interim dry storage, based on demonstrations with irradiated fuel. Water storage will continue to be a part of spent fuel management at reactors. Whether dry storage becomes a prominent interim fuel management option depends on licensing and economic considerations. National policies will strongly influence how long the spent fuel remains in interim storage and what its final disposition will be

  1. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel in geological repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium has been and still is produced in the world's many civil and military nuclear programs. Although the nuclear establishments of several countries, most noticeably, Japan, France, Greta Britain and Russia, are advocating the recycling of plutonium, there are also two nuclear waste disposition 'strategies' that involve the direct final disposal of plutonium in geological repositories: the direct final disposal of spent fuel or spent civil mixed oxide fuel when option to reprocess it has been rejected; and the final disposal of 'spent fuel standard' excess weapon plutonium when it has been 'anti-reprocessed' or burned as 'military mixed oxide fuel. It is important to understand that the magnitude of long-term safeguards concern of plutonium disposal in geological repositories depends very much on the future development of nuclear energy application. It might be decided to solve the global plutonium predicament by making global stocks of plutonium 'irretrievable', thus removing the needs for safeguards

  2. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Nuclear Fuel Data Survey, Form RW-859. This form is used to collect data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States, and the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors. These data are important to the design and operation of the equipment and facilities that DOE will use for the future acceptance, transportation, and disposal of spent fuels. The data collected and presented identifies trends in burnup, enrichment, and spent nuclear fuel discharged form commercial light-water reactor as of December 31, 1993. The document covers not only spent nuclear fuel discharges; but also site capacities and inventories; canisters and nonfuel components; and assembly type characteristics

  3. Enhancement of Public Understanding on Recycling Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation mass of spent nuclear fuel in Korea considerably goes on increasing year by year and it is anticipated that the cumulative mass reaches up to 30,000 tons by the year of 2030. For the present, Korea's spent nuclear fuels are temporary stored in pool and the insufficient storage space is solved by the construction of dry storage facility, installation of high density storage rack, and on-site transportation of spent nuclear fuel. However, the storage space would reach a saturation point by 2016 so that the storage will be no longer possible. Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST) in Korea announced future nuclear comprehensive road map on December, 2007 in order to expand the nuclear utilization and to promote the export industrialization of nuclear energy as one of national growth sources. Future nuclear comprehensive road map presents mutual connection between operating PWRs and Gen IV reactors including milestone and schedule of large sized reactor and SMR (small and medium sized reactor), high-level and low-level radioactive waste facilities, sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and pyroprocessing. In the past, Korea experienced the unsuccessful policy on radioactive waste through compulsory push, not by public deliberation. We learned that social conflict was not settled down by one-sided decision making of government and experts. Therefore, a public undertaking for the recycling of spent nuclear fuel needs public deliberation process to lead out the participation of the public and to draw public agreement

  4. Separator assembly for use in spent nuclear fuel shipping cask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucholz, James A.

    1983-01-01

    A separator assembly for use in a spent nuclear fuel shipping cask has a honeycomb-type wall structure defining parallel cavities for holding nuclear fuel assemblies. Tubes formed of an effective neutron-absorbing material are embedded in the wall structure around each of the cavities and provide neutron flux traps when filled with water.

  5. Damage in spent nuclear fuel defined by properties and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Spent Fuel Program Office (SFPO) has provided guidance in defining damaged fuel in Interim Staff Guidance, ISG-1. This guidance is similar to that developed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Neither of these documents gives the logic behind its definition of damaged fuel. The paper discusses the requirements placed on spent fuel for dry interim storage and transport and the ways in which service requirements drive the definition of damage for spent fuel. Examples are given to illustrate the methodology, which focuses on defining damaged fuel based on the properties that the fuel must exhibit to meet the requirements of storage and/or transport. (author)

  6. Public Opinion Surveys in Spent Nuclear Fuel Management

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilieva, E.

    2002-01-01

    Russia's plans to import foreign SNF for storage and reprocessing meet serious public opposition. As a start of taking into account public concerns, programs of public involvement can be designed and implemented. In the paper, approaches to decision-making on spent nuclear fuel management that differ in their commitment to public participation are discussed. The review of public opinion surveys in Russia that investigated public attitudes to spent fuel is given. Finally, the experience of sev...

  7. Spent nuclear fuel Canister Storage Building CDR Review Committee report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canister Storage Building (CSB) is a subproject under the Spent Nuclear Fuels Major System Acquisition. This subproject is necessary to design and construct a facility capable of providing dry storage of repackaged spent fuels received from K Basins. The CSB project completed a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) implementing current project requirements. A Design Review Committee was established to review the CDR. This document is the final report summarizing that review

  8. Separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica

    2016-11-15

    This review summarises the methods currently available to extract radioactive actinide elements from solutions of spent nuclear fuel. This separation of actinides reduces the hazards associated with spent nuclear fuel, such as its radiotoxicity, volume and the amount of time required for its' radioactivity to return to naturally occurring levels. Separation of actinides from environmental water systems is also briefly discussed. The actinide elements typically found in spent nuclear fuel include uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides (americium, neptunium and curium). Separation methods for uranium and plutonium are reasonably well established. On the other hand separation of the minor actinides from lanthanide fission products also present in spent nuclear fuel is an ongoing challenge and an area of active research. Several separation methods for selective removal of these actinides from spent nuclear fuel will be described. These separation methods include solvent extraction, which is the most commonly used method for radiochemical separations, as well as the less developed but promising use of adsorption and ion-exchange materials. PMID:27427893

  9. Retrievability of spent nuclear fuel canisters; Kaeytetyn ydinpolttoaineen loppusijoituskapseleiden palautettavuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saanio, T. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Raiko, H. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    As a part of the designing process of the Finnish spent nuclear fuel repository, a preliminary study has been carried out to investigate how the canisters could technically be retrieved to the ground surface. Possibility of retrieving a canister has been investigated in different phases of the disposal project. Retrievability has not been a design goal for the spent fuel repository. However, design of the repository includes some features that may ease the retrieval of canisters in the future. Spent fuel elements are packaged in massive copper-iron canisters, which are mechanically strong and long-lived. The repository consists of excavated tunnels in hard rock which are supposed to be very long-lived making the removal of the tunnel backfilling technically possible also in the future. As long as the bentonite buffer has not been installed the canister can be returned to the ground surface using the same equipment as was used when the canister was brought down to the repository and lowered into the hole. In the encapsulation station the spent fuel elements can be packaged in the other canister or in the transport cask. After a deposition tunnel has been backfilled and closed, the retrieval consists of tearing down the concrete structure at the entry of the deposition tunnel, removal of the tunnel backfilling, removal of the bentonite from the disposal hole and lifting up of the canister. Various methods, e.g., flushing the bentonite with saline solutions, can be used to detach the canister from a hole with fully saturated bentonite. Recovery will be technically possible also after closing of the disposal facility. Backfilling of the shafts and tunnels will be removed and additional new structures and systems will have to be built in the repository. After that canisters can be transported to the ground surface as described above. In addition, handling of the canisters at the ground surface will require additional facilities. Canisters can be packaged in the

  10. Demonstration of a transportable storage system for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultimate disposal of spent nuclear fuel is a major issue that continues to plague the nuclear industry and the Department of Energy (DOE). In an effort to resolve some of the outstanding issues that DOE and the nuclear industry currently face, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and DOE are currently developing a program to demonstrate the use of a transportable storage system to provide for the long-term storage and subsequent transport of spent nuclear fuel. In addition, the project will demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a dry cask-to-cask transfer system. Demonstrating the use of a transportable storage system supports Congress' goal of demonstrating a technology that can be used to minimize the handling of spent nuclear fuel throughout its end-of-life storage and disposal cycle. Designing a dry cask-to-cask transfer system and evaluating its technical and economic feasibility will be useful to DOE as they proceed with the design of the MRS. Also, demonstrating these technologies will provide a contribution to the nuclear industry, in general, as more and more utilities begin to seriously face the question of how they will ultimately disposition their own spent nuclear fuel

  11. China's spent nuclear fuel management: Current practices and future strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although China's nuclear power industry is relatively young and the management of its spent nuclear fuel is not yet a concern, China's commitment to nuclear energy and its rapid pace of development require detailed analyses of its future spent fuel management policies. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of China's fuel cycle program and its reprocessing policy, and to suggest strategies for managing its future fuel cycle program. The study is broken into four sections. The first reviews China's current nuclear fuel cycle program and facilities. The second discusses China's current spent fuel management methods and the storage capability of China's 13 operational nuclear power plants. The third estimates China's total accumulated spent fuel, its required spent fuel storage from present day until 2035, when China expects its first commercialized fast neutron reactors to be operational, and its likely demand for uranium resources. The fourth examines several spent fuel management scenarios for the present period up until 2035; the financial cost and proliferation risk of each scenario is evaluated. The study concludes that China can and should maintain a reprocessing operation to meet its R and D activities before its fast reactor program is further developed. - Highlights: → This study provides an overview of China's fuel cycle program and its reprocessing policy.→ This study suggests strategies for managing its future fuel cycle program.→ China will experience no pressure to lessen the burden of spent fuel storage in the next 30 years.→ China should maintain sufficient reprocessing operations to meet its demands for R and D activities.→ China should actively invest on R and D activities of both fuel cycling and fast reactor programs.

  12. Nuclear Waste Imaging and Spent Fuel Verification by Muon Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Jonkmans, G.; Anghel, V. N. P.; Jewett, C.; Thompson, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the use of cosmic ray muons to image the contents of shielded containers and detect high-Z special nuclear materials inside them. Cosmic ray muons are a naturally occurring form of radiation, are highly penetrating and exhibit large scattering angles on high Z materials. Specifically, we investigated how radiographic and tomographic techniques can be effective for non-invasive nuclear waste characterization and for nuclear material accountancy of spent fuel inside dry stor...

  13. Microbial biofilm growth on irradiated, spent nuclear fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fundamental criticism regarding the potential for microbial influenced corrosion in spent nuclear fuel cladding or storage containers concerns whether the required microorganisms can, in fact, survive radiation fields inherent in these materials. This study was performed to unequivocally answer this critique by addressing the potential for biofilm formation, the precursor to microbial-influenced corrosion, in radiation fields representative of spent nuclear fuel storage environments. This study involved the formation of a microbial biofilm on irradiated spent nuclear fuel cladding within a hot cell environment. This was accomplished by introducing 22 species of bacteria, in nutrient-rich media, to test vessels containing irradiated cladding sections and that was then surrounded by radioactive source material. The overall dose rate exceeded 2 Gy/h gamma/beta radiation with the total dose received by some of the bacteria reaching 5 x 103 Gy. This study provides evidence for the formation of biofilms on spent-fuel materials, and the implication of microbial influenced corrosion in the storage and permanent deposition of spent nuclear fuel in repository environments

  14. Regulation of spent nuclear fuel shipments: A state perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) sought to regulate rail shipments of spent nuclear fuel through the state, because federal regulations did not adequately protect the environmentally sensitive corridor along the route of the shipments. A state interagency working group identified five serious deficiencies in the overall federal regulatory scheme: 1) failure to consider the safety or environmental risks associated with selected routes; 2) absence of route-specific emergency response planning; 3) failure of the NRC to regulate the carrier of spent nuclear fuel or consider its safety record; 4) absence of requirements for determination of need for, or the propriety of, specific shipments of spent nuclear fuel; and 5) the lack of any opportunity for meaningful public participation with respect to the decision to transport spent nuclear fuel. The state is now proposing federal legislation which would require: 1) NRC determination of need prior to approval of offsite shipment of spent fuel by licensees; 2) NRC assessment of the potential environmental impacts of shipments along the proposed route, and a comparative evaluation of alternative modes and routes; and 3) NRC approval of a route-specific emergency response and mitigation plan, including local training and periodic exercises. Additionally, the proposed legislation would authorize States and Indian Tribes to establish regulatory programs providing for permits, inspection, contingency plans for monitoring, containment, cleanup and decontamination, surveillance, enforcement and reasonable fees

  15. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in the Finnish bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) studies Finnish bedrock for the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel from the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant. The study is in accordance with the decision in principle by Finnish government in 1983. The report is the summary of the preliminary site investigations carried out during the years 1987-1992. On the basis of these investigations a few areas will be selected for detailed site investigation. The characterization comprises five areas selected from the shortlist of potential candidate areas resulted in the earlier study during 1983-1985. Areas are located in different parts of Finland and they represent the main formations of the Finnish bedrock. Romuvaara area in Kuhmo and Veitsivaara area in Hyrynsalmi represent the Archean basement. Kivetty area in Konginkangas consists of mainly younger granitic rocks. Syyry in Sievi is located in transition area of Svecofennidic rocks and granitic rocks. Olkiluoto in Eurajoki represents migmatites in southern Finland. For the field investigations area-specific programs were planned and executed. The field investigations have comprised airborne survey by helicopter, geophysical surveys, geological mappings and samplings, deep and shallow core drillings, geophysical and hydrological borehole measurements and groundwater samplings

  16. Education - path towards solution regarding disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Education, not emotional reaction, is the path to take in the safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Education is needed at all levels: Elementary schools, secondary schools, two-year colleges, four-year colleges, graduate schools, and adult education. The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) should not be expected to tackle this problem alone. Assistance is needed from local communities, schools, and state and federal governments. However, OCRWM can lay the foundation for a comprehensive educational plan directed specifically at educating the public on the spent nuclear fuel issue and OCRWM can begin the implementation of this plan

  17. Nuclear Waste Imaging and Spent Fuel Verification by Muon Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Jonkmans, G; Jewett, C; Thompson, M

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the use of cosmic ray muons to image the contents of shielded containers and detect high-Z special nuclear materials inside them. Cosmic ray muons are a naturally occurring form of radiation, are highly penetrating and exhibit large scattering angles on high Z materials. Specifically, we investigated how radiographic and tomographic techniques can be effective for non-invasive nuclear waste characterization and for nuclear material accountancy of spent fuel inside dry storage containers. We show that the tracking of individual muons, as they enter and exit a structure, can potentially improve the accuracy and availability of data on nuclear waste and the contents of Dry Storage Containers (DSC) used for spent fuel storage at CANDU plants. This could be achieved in near real time, with the potential for unattended and remotely monitored operations. We show that the expected sensitivity, in the case of the DSC, exceeds the IAEA detection target for nuclear material accountancy.

  18. Nuclear reactor spent fuel valuation: procedure, applications, and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary approach that values nuclear reactor generated spent fuel is developed and applied in this report. There is no intent to assess the merits of reprocessing and recycling but rather to outline a procedure that may provide a basis for international negotiations on nation-to-nation spent fuel transfer. The valuation procedure described estimates the net present discounted value (PDV) of the benefit incurred when the reprocessed plutonium and uranium contained in the spent fuel are recycled, less the PDV of the stream of costs associated with transporting, storing, and reprocessing the spent fuel and fabricating, storing, and safeguarding the new mixed oxide fuel (MOX). The parameters that affect the net PDV most strongly are the discount rate, yellowcake prices, reprocessing costs, timing of recycle or disposal, and, to a lesser extent, enrichment costs

  19. Operational experiences of on-site transport of spent nuclear fuels in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1990 more than 800 PWR spent nuclear fuel assemblies has been on-site transported using two kinds of transport casks from one unit to nearby another unit in order to secure the storage capacity of spent nuclear fuel of the Kori nuclear power plant in Korea. The complete on-site transport system, which includes two transport casks, the related equipment and two transport vehicles, had been provided. Considerable amount of modification to the existing power plant equipment and facilities had been carried out. Two kinds of the KSC-4 cask and the CASTOR KN-12 cask were developed and licensed in accordance with the Korea and the IAEA's safe transport regulations. From 1990 to the first half of 2002 two KSC-4 casks were used and more than 420 spent nuclear fuels were transported. From the second half of 2002 two CASTOR KN-12 cask have been used to transport more than 400 spent nuclear fuels. About 180 spent nuclear fuels of Kori site are transported using the CASTOR KN-12 cask this year, and the KSC-4 casks are no longer used. The CASTOR KN-12 cask was designed to transport twelve spent nuclear fuel assemblies from pressure water reactors and to comply with the requirements of the Korea and the IAEA regulations for Type B(U)F package. PWR spent nuclear fuels with maximum initial enrichment of 5.0wt.%, maximum average burn-up of 50,000MWD/MTU and minimum cooling time of 7 years are loaded and subsequently transported under dry and wet conditions. The loaded weight of the cask with impact limiters is 85 tons. Two casks were fabricated in accordance with ASME B and PV code Section III Division 3. The related equipment to handle the cask and to perform on-site transport are cask lifting devices, cask lid handling tools, crane adapters, vacuum drying and helium back-filling equipment and cask cool-down equipment, spent nuclear fuel handling tool, decontamination equipment using high pressure water and transport vehicles. However, spent nuclear fuels of the Kori site has

  20. Alternative Measuring Approaches in Gamma Scanning on Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihm Kvenangen, Karen

    2007-06-15

    In the future, the demand for energy is predicted to grow and more countries plan to utilize nuclear energy as their source of electric energy. This gives rise to many important issues connected to nuclear energy, such as finding methods that can verify that the spent nuclear fuel has been handled safely and used in ordinary power producing cycles as stated by the operators. Gamma ray spectroscopy is one method used for identification and verification of spent nuclear fuel. In the specific gamma ray spectroscopy method called gamma scanning the gamma radiation from the fission products Cs-137, Cs-134 and Eu-154 are measured in a spent fuel assembly. From the results, conclusions can be drawn about the fuels characteristics. This degree project examines the possibilities of using alternative measuring approaches when using the gamma scanning method. The focus is on examining how to increase the quality of the measured data. How to decrease the measuring time as compared with the present measuring strategy, has also been investigated. The main part of the study comprises computer simulations of gamma scanning measurements. The simulations have been validated with actual measurements on spent nuclear fuel at the central interim storage, Clab. The results show that concerning the quality of the measuring data the conventional strategy is preferable, but with other starting positions and with a more optimized equipment. When focusing on the time aspect, the helical measuring strategy can be an option, but this needs further investigation.

  1. Alternative Measuring Approaches in Gamma Scanning on Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the future, the demand for energy is predicted to grow and more countries plan to utilize nuclear energy as their source of electric energy. This gives rise to many important issues connected to nuclear energy, such as finding methods that can verify that the spent nuclear fuel has been handled safely and used in ordinary power producing cycles as stated by the operators. Gamma ray spectroscopy is one method used for identification and verification of spent nuclear fuel. In the specific gamma ray spectroscopy method called gamma scanning the gamma radiation from the fission products Cs-137, Cs-134 and Eu-154 are measured in a spent fuel assembly. From the results, conclusions can be drawn about the fuels characteristics. This degree project examines the possibilities of using alternative measuring approaches when using the gamma scanning method. The focus is on examining how to increase the quality of the measured data. How to decrease the measuring time as compared with the present measuring strategy, has also been investigated. The main part of the study comprises computer simulations of gamma scanning measurements. The simulations have been validated with actual measurements on spent nuclear fuel at the central interim storage, Clab. The results show that concerning the quality of the measuring data the conventional strategy is preferable, but with other starting positions and with a more optimized equipment. When focusing on the time aspect, the helical measuring strategy can be an option, but this needs further investigation

  2. An overview on the nuclear spent fuel management in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sources of radioactive waste in Romania are users of radiation and radioactive materials in industry (including nuclear electricity generation), medicine, agriculture and research and also the processing of materials that are naturally radioactive, such as uranium ores. The different types of radioactive waste are classified into four categories of waste: excepted waste, low level waste, medium level waste and high level waste. A spent fuel management sub-programme as a part of the Radioactive Waste Management programme was initiated by the former Romanian Electricity Company (RENEL) in 1992. Within the frame of R and D of the Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme, the topics cover investigations, studies and research to identify the sites and the conceptual designs for a Spent Fuel Interim Storage Facility (SFISF) and also a Spent Fuel Disposal Facility (SFDF). Changes in the organization of the nuclear activities of RENEL, involving both responsibilities and financing aspects, led to interruption of the programme. The programme includes study of the main methods and the existing technologies for the design, operation and safety of an interim storage facility (including transport aspects). It also includes analysis of details on the site selection for this facility and for a spent fuel final disposal facility. The achievement of the spent fuel interim storage facility is proceeding. The results from the studies performed in the last years will permit us to prepare the feasibility study next year and the documentation required by our regulatory body for starting the process to obtain a license for a SFISF at Cernavoda. A second phase is the assessment of a long term strategy to select and adopt a proven disposal technology for spent fuel, corresponding with a selected site. The status of the work performed in the frame of this programme and also the situation of the spent fuel from research reactors are presented. (author)

  3. Dry refabrication technology development of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key technologies highly applicable to the development of advanced nuclear fuel cycle for the spent fuel recycling were developed using spent fuel and simulated spent fuel (SIMFUEL). In the frame work of dry process oxide products fabrication and the property characteristics of dry process products, hot cell experimental data for decladding, powdering and oxide product fabrication from low and high burnup spent fuel have been produced, basic technology for fabrication of spent fuel standard material has been developed, and remotely modulated welding equipment has been designed and fabricated. Also, fabrication technology of simulated dry process products was established and property models were developed based on reproducible property measurement data. In the development of head-end technology for dry refabrication of spent nuclear fuel and key technologies for volume reduction of head-end process waste which are essential in back-end fuel cycle field including pyro-processing, advanced head-end unit process technology development includes the establishment of experimental conditions for synthesis of porous fuel particles using a granulating furnace and for preparation of UO2 pellets, and fabrication and performance demonstration of engineering scale equipment for off-gas treatment of semi-volatile nuclides, and development of phosphate ceramic technology for immobilization of used filters. Radioactivation characterization and treatment equipment design of metal wastes from pretreatment process was conducted, and preliminary experiments of chlorination/electrorefining techniques for the treatment of hull wastes were performed. Based on the verification of the key technologies for head-end process via the hot-cell tests using spent nuclear fuel, pre-conceptual design for the head-end equipments was performed

  4. A GIS based methodology for nuclear reactor spent fuel disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article aims at studying the use of Geographical Information Systems for selecting a site for radioactive waste disposal of spent fuel generated by operation of Angra 1 and 2 nuclear power stations, in order to provide additional means for solving this problem in Brazil. This spent fuel continues to generate decay heat and radiation after its use in power stations. The disposal should be done in such a way as to isolate the nuclear spent fuel from people and the environment, protecting them from the heat and radioactivity for a long period of time. After elaboration of a database containing geological, hydrological, tectonic, weather, transport, conservation unit, amongst other information, one intends to combine these information, and make comparisons using preset criteria, in order to indicate the most adequate sites for disposal. (author)

  5. Conditioning spent fuels from research nuclear reactor in ceramic dies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of immobilizing nuclear wastes is a complex one and is vitally important in the nuclear fuels cycle. In the case of spent elements from research reactors, the presence of large amounts of aluminum makes the procedure more complex and, therefore, onerous. There are various alternatives proposed for processing these materials. Two methods were studied in the Nuclear Materials Division for obtaining, as a final product, a vitreous block that could be place definitively in a geological repository. The processes are briefly, as follows: 1.By mechanical and chemical processes eliminating all the exterior aluminum from the fuel plates and then placing the product which we will call 'meat' (with some additional treatment and mixing with the amount needed to produce a natural uranium compound or weakened by decreasing the isotope enrichment in U-235) in a vitreous matrix. 2.Mechanically eliminate the aluminum from the exterior frame (as shown below) by shearing and cutting off the sectors containing only the Al, but leaving the rest of the aluminum, a big part of which is still present (4511.03), then doing the same procedure as in the case above: mixing with a natural uranium compound or weakening and vitrifying this mixture. In both cases, the vitrification can be carried out by fusion as well as by sintering. Given that these methods imply a big increase in volume together with a big mass of uranium and an even bigger amount of glass we decided to study an alternative. The proposed process involves synthesizing the mixtures obtained from the pre-treatment of the fuel plates (as described later) with natural isotope uranium oxide in order to obtain a block with the appropriate properties for its final disposal in a deep geological repository (CW)

  6. ICC nearing decision on recyclability of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Interstate Commerce Commission said it will try to issue a final order this year in a decade-long case on whether spent nuclear and related components from the US Navy that were shipped to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory between 1978 and 1990 can be considered recyclable, thereby qualifying for reduced rail shipping rates

  7. Corrosion resistance of a copper canister for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents an evaluation of copper as canister material for spent nuclear fuel. The evaluation is made from the viewpoint of corrosion and applies to a concept of 1977. Supplementary corrosion studies have been performed. The report includes 9 appendices which deal with experimental data. (G.B.)

  8. Studies and research concerning BNFP. Nuclear spent fuel transportation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, there are a number of institutional problems associated with the shipment of spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear power plants: new and conflicting regulations, embargoing of certain routes, imposition of transport safeguards, physical security in-transit, and a lack of definition of when and where the fuel will be moved. This report presents a summary of these types and kinds of problems. It represents the results of evaluations performed relative to fuel receipt at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. Case studies were made which address existing reactor sites with near-term spent fuel transportation needs. Shipment by either highway, rail, water, or intermodal water-rail was considered. The report identifies the impact of new regulations and uncertainty caused by indeterminate regulatory policy and lack of action on spent fuel acceptance and storage. This stagnant situation has made it impossible for industry to determine realistic transportation scenarios for business planning and financial risk analysis. A current lack of private investment in nuclear transportation equipment is expected to further prolong the problems associated with nuclear spent fuel and waste disposition. These problems are expected to intensify in the 1980's and in certain cases will make continuing reactor plant operation difficult or impossible

  9. Try out of technology for dry container storage of spent nuclear fuel of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    integrity control after the long-term storage in the cooling pool, an inspection bench and bench for drying of spent fuel assembly rappers were developed. Calculation verification of nuclear and radiation safety of works performed at the bench was carried out as well as of strength characteristics of the bench components. Safety was verified under the condition of the severe environmental and human factor effect on the transport packaging with fuel. The technology for transport operations, drying and cladding integrity control was developed as well as design documentation for all bench components. A part of the bench components is fabricated. The created bench allows us to try out the dry container storage technology of spent nuclear fuel of the research reactors as a whole and meet all the safety requirements

  10. Railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents a detailed analysis of rail operations that are important for assessing the risk of transporting high-level nuclear waste. The major emphasis of the discussion is towards ''general freight'' shipments of radioactive material. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for selecting models and parameters that are appropriate for assessing the risk of rail transportation of nuclear waste

  11. Characterization of alloy particles extracted from spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, D.; Rondinella, V. V.; Fortner, J. A.; Kropf, A. J.; Eriksson, L.; Wronkiewicz, D. J.; Spahiu, K.

    2012-01-01

    We characterized, for the first time, submicro- and nanosized fission product-alloy particles that were extracted nondestructively from spent nuclear fuel, in terms of noble metal (Mo-Ru-Tc-Rh-Pd-Te) composition, atomic level homogeneity and lattice parameters. The evidences obtained in this work contribute to an improved understanding of the redox chemistry of radionuclides in nuclear waste repository environments and, in particular, of the catalytic properties of these unique metal alloy particles.

  12. Conditioning of spent nuclear fuel for permanent disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact, efficient method for conditioning spent nuclear fuel is under development. This method, known as pyrochemical processing, or pyroprocessing, provides a separation of fission products from the actinide elements present in spent fuel and further separates pure uranium from the transuranic elements. The process can facilitate the timely and environmentally-sound treatment of the highly diverse collection of spent fuel currently in the inventory of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The pyroprocess utilizes elevated-temperature processes to prepare spent fuel for fission product separation; that separation is accomplished by a molten salt electrorefining step that provides efficient (> 99.9%) separation of transuranics. The resultant waste forms from the pyroprocess are stable under envisioned repository environment conditions and highly leach-resistant. Treatment of any spent fuel type produces a set of common high-level waste forms, one a mineral and the other a metal alloy, that can be readily qualified for repository disposal and that avoid the substantial costs that would be associated with the qualification of the numerous spent fuel types included in the DOE inventory

  13. Program's method of VB to carry out nuclear data collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors expatiate Program's methods of VB to carry out nuclear data collection in the case of that VB can not directly call on hardware, and had to using C or assemble language to compile DLL function of call on hardware, and then, using by VB main routine to realize to call on and control I/O port in VB environment

  14. Air Shipment of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Romania to Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Lucian Biro; Alexander Buchelnikov

    2010-10-01

    Romania successfully completed the world’s first air shipment of spent nuclear fuel transported in Type B(U) casks under existing international laws and without shipment license special exceptions when the last Romanian highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel was transported to the Russian Federation in June 2009. This air shipment required the design, fabrication, and licensing of special 20 foot freight containers and cask tiedown supports to transport the eighteen TUK 19 shipping casks on a Russian commercial cargo aircraft. The new equipment was certified for transport by road, rail, water, and air to provide multi modal transport capabilities for shipping research reactor spent fuel. The equipment design, safety analyses, and fabrication were performed in the Russian Federation and transport licenses were issued by both the Russian and Romanian regulatory authorities. The spent fuel was transported by truck from the VVR S research reactor to the Bucharest airport, flown by commercial cargo aircraft to the airport at Yekaterinburg, Russia, and then transported by truck to the final destination in a secure nuclear facility at Chelyabinsk, Russia. This shipment of 23.7 kg of HEU was coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), as part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), in close cooperation with the Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation and the International Atomic Energy Agency, and was managed in Romania by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). This paper describes the planning, shipment preparations, equipment design, and license approvals that resulted in the safe and secure air shipment of this spent nuclear fuel.

  15. Introduction to the study of the treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An introduction is made to the study of the treatment of spent nuclear fuels. Main topics discussed are: basic information, volatilization processes, treatment of thorium based fuels (Thorex process), analytical chemistry of spent nuclear fuel and design of industrial facilities

  16. Chemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reprocessing of nuclear fuels from atomic power stations has a twofold goal. On the one hand it is serving for fuel supply by recovering the fissile materials which have not been consumed or which have been freshly generated in the reactor. On the other hand the radioactive waste products from nuclear power generation are pretreated for long-term safe disposal. The core element of the chemical processing is the PUREX Process, a counter-current solvent extraction procedure using tributyl phosphate (TBP) as the solvent for uranium and plutonium. The chemical basis and the technological performance of the process are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Criticality safety analysis of WWER-1000 spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear safety of spent nuclear fuel management is ensured by implementation of the basic safety functions: providing subcriticality, residual heat removal and retention of radioactive products within the physical barriers. To ensure subcriticality during both normal operation and design basis accidents the effective multiplication factor of neutrons Keff must be lower than 0.95. An evaluation of criticality of spent fuel facilities have been made by the modular code system SCALE. The basic calculations are performed with version 6.1 and are validated with version 6.0 of the code system. Spent fuel assemblies type TVSA are modeled as they are representative for WWER-1000 nuclear fuel and cover the characteristics of the earlier modifications of the fuel assemblies. The modeling of the spent fuel containers and equipment is in accordance with actual geometric dimensions and material composition. In all performed calculations, the results demonstrate that the criticality safety criteria are achieved and the effective multiplication factor Keff is lower than the regulatory requirements. (authors)

  18. Overview of the spent nuclear fuel project at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's mission at Hanford is to open-quotes Provide safe, economic and environmentally sound management of Hanford spent nuclear fuel in a manner which stages it to final disposition.close quotes The inventory of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Hanford Site covers a wide variety of fuel types (production reactor to space reactor) in many facilities (reactor fuel basins to hot cells) at locations all over the Site. The 2,129 metric tons of Hanford SNF represents about 80% of the total US Department of Energy (DOE) inventory. About 98.5% of the Hanford SNF is 2,100 metric tons of metallic uranium production reactor fuel currently stored in the 1950s vintage K Basins in the 100 Area. This fuel has been slowly corroding, generating sludge and contaminating the basin water. This condition, coupled with aging facilities with seismic vulnerabilities, has been identified by several groups, including stakeholders, as being one of the most urgent safety and environmental concerns at the Hanford Site. As a direct result of these concerns, the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project was recently formed to address spent fuel issues at Hanford. The Project has developed the K Basins Path Forward to remove fuel from the basins and place it in dry interim storage. Alternatives that addressed the requirements were developed and analyzed. The result is a two-phased approach allowing the early removal of fuel from the K Basins followed by its stabilization and interim storage consistent with the national program

  19. Regulation of spent nuclear fuel shipment: A state perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) sought to regulate rail shipments of spent nuclear fuel through the state, because federal regulations did not adequately protect the environmentally sensitive corridor along the route of the shipments. A state interagency working group identified five serious deficiencies in overall federal regulatory scheme: 1) failure to consider the safety or environmental risks associated with selected routes; 2) abscence of route-specific emergency response planning; 3) failure of the NRC to regulate the carrier of spent nuclear fuel or consider its safety record; 4) abscence of requirements for determination of need for, or the propriety of, specific shipments of spent nuclear fuel; and 5) the lack of any opportunity for meaningful public participation with respect to the decision to transport spent nuclear fuel. Pursuant to Wisconsin's hazardous substance statutes, the WDNR issues an order requiring the utility to file a spill prevention and mitigation plan or cease shipping through Wisconsin. A state trial court judge upheld the utility's challenge to Wisconsin's spill plan requirements, based on federal preemption of state authority. The state is now proposing federal legislation which would require: 1) NRC determination of need prior to approval of offsite shipment of spent fuel by the licensees; 2) NRC assessment of the potential environmental impacts of shipments along the proposed route, and comparative evaluation of alternative modes and routes; and 3) NRC approval of a route-specific emergency response and mitigation plan, including local training and periodic exercises. Additionally, the proposed legislation would authorize States and Indian Tribes to establish regulatory programs providing for permits, inspection, contingency plans for monitoring, containments, cleanup and decontamination, surveillance, enforcement and reasonable fees. 15 refs

  20. Dry Refabrication Technology Development of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key technical data on advanced nuclear fuel cycle technology development for the spent fuel recycling have been produced in this study. In the frame work of DUPIC, dry process oxide products fabrication, hot cell experimental data for decladding, powdering and oxide product fabrication from low and high burnup spent fuel have been produced, basic technology for fabrication of spent fuel standard material has been developed, and remote modulated welding equipment has been designed and fabricated. In the area of advanced pre-treatment process development, a rotary-type oxidizer and spherical particle fabrication process were developed by using SIMFUEL and off-gas treatment technology and zircalloy tube treatment technology were studied. In the area of the property characteristics of dry process products, fabrication technology of simulated dry process products was established and property models were developed based on reproducible property measurement data

  1. International tracking and monitoring of nuclear spent fuel transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cooperative monitoring project was recently initiated to track and monitor shipments of spent fuel from the Lucas Heights HiFAR Research Reactor, located near Sydney, Australia, to either the United States or France. Partners in the project are the US Department of Energy and the Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office. This project could satisfy a need to have near-real-time continuity of knowledge of a shipment of nuclear material. The benefits of demonstrating a fully operational and sustainable system are significant, because the envisioned system could significantly enhance global safety and security of nuclear material in the transport phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. (author)

  2. Physical Protection During Spent Nuclear Fuels Re-export of Three Indonesia Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Re-export of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) for three Indonesia research reactors was carried out to the United States of America (USA) on March 10 and 11, 2004 through Cigading and Tanjung Intan Ports. The main aspects of the re-export activity are physical protection during SNF transportation, coordination with other involved institutions and licensing for SNF and transportation. Spent nuclear fuels of Triga 2000 and RSG-GAS reactors were respectively re-exported to the USA through Cigading port, while SNFs of Kartini reactor were re-exported to the USA through Tanjung Intan port. Indeed, the 2004 re-export activity for SNFs of three Indonesia research reactors to the USA was carried out safely, even a week sooner than the first plan. (author)

  3. Discrimination of spent nuclear fuels in nuclear forensics through isotopic fingerprinting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Discrimination of spent fuel with forensic importance. • Isotopic fingerprinting method on the basis of U and/or Pu isotopic compositions. • Compositions from the OECD/NEA SFCOMPO databank with commercial nuclear reactors. • Method sensitive enough to resolve spent fuels from different reactors. • Dependence of discrimination on core position of fuel. - Abstract: Isotopic fingerprinting in nuclear forensics, developed through a simulation study to resolve spent nuclear fuels from different reactors, has been applied on real samples from fuels irradiated in nuclear reactors. The U and Pu isotopics of the real samples, used as fingerprints, have been retrieved from the OECD/NEA SFCOMPO databank comprising compositions of spent nuclear fuels from their Post-Irradiation Examination at the End of their Irradiation (EOI). The method has grouped together nuclear spent fuels from the same reactor, resolving distinctly those with similar 235U enrichment. Furthermore, spent fuel pins of the same enrichment, from different positions within a reactor core, are resolved. Differentiating of the spent fuels has been achieved, whether (U, Pu) or Pu are used as fingerprints

  4. Automated system for determining the burnup of spent nuclear fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokritskii V. A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors analyze their experience in application of semi-conductor detectors and development of a breadboard model of the monitoring system for spent nuclear fuel (SNF. Such system should use CdZnTe-detectors in which one-charging gathering conditions are realized. The proposed technique of real time SNF control during reloading technological operations is based on the obtained research results. Methods for determining the burnup of spent nuclear fuel based on measuring the characteristics of intrinsic radiation are covered in many papers, but those metods do not usually take into account that the nuclear fuel used during the operation has varying degrees of initial enrichment, or a new kind of fuel may be used. Besides, the known methods often do not fit well into the existing technology of fuel loading operations and are not suitable for operational control. Nuclear fuel monitoring (including burnup determination system in this research is based on the measurement of the spectrum of natural gamma-radiation of irradiated fuel assemblies (IFA, as from the point of view of minimizing the time spent, the measurement of IFA gamma spectra directly during fuel loading is optimal. It is the overload time that is regulated rather strictly, and burnup control operations should be coordinated with the schedule of the fuel loading. Therefore, the real time working capacity of the system should be chosen as the basic criterion when constructing the structure of such burnup control systems.

  5. Dry storage system for spent nuclear fuel DSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DSS is a Dry Storage System manufactured by INVAP for spent nuclear fuel. Spent fuel removed from the reactor of nuclear plants is usually stored in water pools where water acts as radiological shielding and as coolant. Pool water and pool building air require regular monitoring and maintenance. The DSS offers a more economical and safe alternative to store spent fuel which has had partial decay of its activity in the plant storage pool. The DSS alternative uses above ground concrete silos. With the DSS system spent fuel is loaded in steel baskets before fuel is removed from the storage pool of the power plant. Each basket holds several fuel bundles. Each basket is taken from the pool and dried in a shielded transfer cell. The basket loaded with dry fuel is then covered and seal welded. Each basket is transported inside a shielded container to its storage place in the concrete silo. The silo is a steel cylinder with capacity to store several baskets and surrounded by a thick reinforced concrete shielding. Baskets are housed inside the steel cylinder on top of each other. The silos are closed with a plug made of steel-lined reinforced concrete. When a silo is full the steel lining of the plug is seal welded to the steel cylinder. The system has been designed for a minimum of 50 years

  6. Long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a study on the storage of spent nuclear fuel, with particular reference to the options which would be available for long-term storage. Two reference programmes of nuclear power generation in the UK are defined and these are used as a basis for the projection of arisings of spent fuel and the storage capacity which might be needed. The characteristics of spent fuel which are relevant to long-term storage include the dimensions, materials and physical construction of the elements, their radioactive inventory and the associated decay heating as a function of time after removal from the reactor. Information on the behaviour of spent fuel in storage ponds is reviewed with particular reference to the corrosion of the cladding. The review indicates that, for long-term storage, both Magnox and AGR fuel would need to be packaged because of the high rate of cladding corrosion and the resulting radiological problems. The position on PWR fuel is less certain. Experience of dry storage is less extensive but it appears that the rate of corrosion of cladding is much lower than in water. Unit costs are discussed. Consideration is given to the radiological impact of fuel storage. (author)

  7. Corrosion of Spent Nuclear Fuel: The Long-Term Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Rodney C.

    2003-09-14

    The successful disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is one of the most serious challenges to the successful completion of the nuclear fuel cycle and the future of nuclear power generation. In the United States, 21 percent of the electricity is generated by 107 commercial nuclear power plants (NPP), each of which generates 20 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel annually. In 1996, the total accumulation of spent nuclear fuel was 33,700 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) stored at 70 sites around the country. The end-of-life projection for current nuclear power plants (NPP) is approximately 86,000 MTHM. In the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain over 95% of the radioactivity originates from spent nuclear fuel. World-wide in 1998, approximately 130,000 MTHM of SNF have accumulated, most of it located at 236 NPP in 36 countries. Annual production of SNF is approximately 10,000 MTHM, containing about 100 tons of ''reactor grade'' plutonium. Any reasonable increase in the proportion of energy production by NPP, i.e., as a substitute for hydrocarbon-based sources of energy, will significantly increase spent nuclear fuel production. Spent nuclear fuel is essentially UO{sub 2} with approximately 4-5 atomic percent actinides and fission product elements. A number of these elements have long half-lives hence, the long-term behavior of the UO{sub 2} is an essential concern in the evaluation of the safety and risk of a repository for spent nuclear fuel. One of the unique and scientifically most difficult aspects of the successful disposal of spent nuclear fuel is the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data (hours to years) to the long time periods (10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} years) as required by the performance objectives set in regulations, i.e. 10 CFR 60. The direct verification of these extrapolations or interpolations is not possible, but methods must be developed to demonstrate compliance with government regulations and to satisfy the

  8. Dry spent fuel storage facility at Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dry Spent Fuel Storage Facility (DSF) is financed by the Kozloduy International Decommissioning Support Fund (KIDSF) which is managed by European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). On behalf of the Employer, the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant, a Project Management Unit (KPMU) under lead of British Nuclear Group is managing the contract with a Joint Venture Consortium under lead of RWE NUKEM mbH. The scope of the contract includes design, manufacturing and construction, testing and commissioning of the new storage facility for 2800 VVER-440 spent fuel assemblies at the KNPP site (turn-key contract). The storage technology will be cask storage of CONSTOR type, a steel-concrete-steel container. The licensing process complies with the national Bulgarian regulations and international rules. (authors)

  9. Estimating Source Terms for Diverse Spent Nuclear Fuel Types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett Carlsen; Layne Pincock

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is responsible for developing a defensible methodology for determining the radionuclide inventory for the DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to be dispositioned at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. SNF owned by DOE includes diverse fuels from various experimental, research, and production reactors. These fuels currently reside at several DOE sites, universities, and foreign research reactor sites. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these fuels will require radiological source terms as inputs to safety analyses that support design and licensing of the necessary equipment and facilities. This paper summarizes the methodology developed for estimating radionuclide inventories associated with DOE-owned SNF. The results will support development of design and administrative controls to manage radiological risks and may later be used to demonstrate conformance with repository acceptance criteria.

  10. 77 FR 37937 - License Renewal Application for Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant Independent Spent Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ..., Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, U.S..., possession, storage and transfer of spent fuel, reactor-related Greater than Class C (GTCC) waste and other radioactive materials associated with spent fuel storage at the PINGP site-specific Independent Spent......

  11. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to identify issues and support documentation and identify and detail existing research on spent fuel dry storage; provide information to support potential R&D for the UKABWR (United Kingdom Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) Spent Fuel Interim Storage (SFIS) Pre-Construction Safety Report; and support development of answers to questions developed by the regulator. Where there are gaps or insufficient data, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has summarized the research planned to provide the necessary data along with the schedule for the research, if known. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from nuclear power plants has historically been stored on site (wet) in spent fuel pools pending ultimate disposition. Nuclear power users (countries, utilities, vendors) are developing a suite of options and set of supporting analyses that will enable future informed choices about how best to manage these materials. As part of that effort, they are beginning to lay the groundwork for implementing longer-term interim storage of the SNF and the Greater Than Class C (CTCC) waste (dry). Deploying dry storage will require a number of technical issues to be addressed. For the past 4-5 years, ORNL has been supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in identifying these key technical issues, managing the collection of data to be used in issue resolution, and identifying gaps in the needed data. During this effort, ORNL subject matter experts (SMEs) have become expert in understanding what information is publicly available and what gaps in data remain. To ensure the safety of the spent fuel under normal and frequent conditions of wet and subsequent dry storage, intact fuel must be shown to: 1.Maintain fuel cladding integrity; 2.Maintain its geometry for cooling, shielding, and subcriticality; 3.Maintain retrievability, and damaged fuel with pinhole or hairline cracks must be shown not to degrade further. Where PWR (pressurized water reactor) information is

  12. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mertyurek, Ugur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this report is to identify issues and support documentation and identify and detail existing research on spent fuel dry storage; provide information to support potential R&D for the UKABWR (United Kingdom Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) Spent Fuel Interim Storage (SFIS) Pre-Construction Safety Report; and support development of answers to questions developed by the regulator. Where there are gaps or insufficient data, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has summarized the research planned to provide the necessary data along with the schedule for the research, if known. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from nuclear power plants has historically been stored on site (wet) in spent fuel pools pending ultimate disposition. Nuclear power users (countries, utilities, vendors) are developing a suite of options and set of supporting analyses that will enable future informed choices about how best to manage these materials. As part of that effort, they are beginning to lay the groundwork for implementing longer-term interim storage of the SNF and the Greater Than Class C (CTCC) waste (dry). Deploying dry storage will require a number of technical issues to be addressed. For the past 4-5 years, ORNL has been supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in identifying these key technical issues, managing the collection of data to be used in issue resolution, and identifying gaps in the needed data. During this effort, ORNL subject matter experts (SMEs) have become expert in understanding what information is publicly available and what gaps in data remain. To ensure the safety of the spent fuel under normal and frequent conditions of wet and subsequent dry storage, intact fuel must be shown to: 1.Maintain fuel cladding integrity; 2.Maintain its geometry for cooling, shielding, and subcriticality; 3.Maintain retrievability, and damaged fuel with pinhole or hairline cracks must be shown not to degrade further. Where PWR (pressurized water reactor) information is

  13. Nonlinear flow effects on immersed spent nuclear racks

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Miguel; Antunes, J

    2004-01-01

    Fluid-coupling effects lead to a complex dynamical behavior of immersed spent fuel assembly storage racks. Predicting their responses under strong earthquakes is of prime importance for the safety of nuclear plant facilities. In the near-past we introduced a simplified linearized model for the vibrations of such systems, in which gap-averaged velocity and pressure fields were described analytically in terms of a single space-coordinate for each fluid inter-rack channel. Using such approach it...

  14. Review of Drying Methods for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Large, W.S.

    1999-10-21

    SRTC is developing technology for direct disposal of aluminum spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The development program includes analyses and tests to support design and safe operation of a facility for ''road ready'' dry storage of SNF-filled canisters. The current technology development plan includes review of available SNF drying methods and recommendation of a drying method for aluminum SNF.

  15. Dry store for spent fuel elements from nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the dry store for spent fuel elements from nuclear reactors which are enclosed in storage tubes and cooled with air, the storage tubes being arranged in shafts of a storage building, a loading device is provided underneath the shafts and in a cooling air shaft designed for transporting. The loading device therefore requires only a small lifting height and the chances of storage tubes falling from great heights are excluded. This invention is applicable in particular for intermediate stores. (orig./RW)

  16. Spent nuclear fuel canister storage building conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, C.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This Conceptual Design Report provides the technical basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project, Canister Storage Building, and as amended by letter (correspondence number 9555700, M.E. Witherspoon to E.B. Sellers, ``Technical Baseline and Updated Cost Estimate for the Canister Storage Building``, dated October 24, 1995), includes the project cost baseline and Criteria to be used as the basis for starting detailed design in fiscal year 1995.

  17. Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel disposal Container System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. E. Pettit

    2001-07-13

    The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers/waste packages are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred underground through the access drifts using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System provides long term confinement of the naval spent nuclear fuel (SNF) placed within the disposal containers, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval operations. The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time and limits radionuclide release thereafter. The waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum credible handling and rockfall loads, limits the waste form temperature after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Each naval SNF disposal container will hold a single naval SNF canister. There will be approximately 300 naval SNF canisters, composed of long and short canisters. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinder walls and lids. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify a disposal container and its contents. Different materials will be selected for the waste package inner and outer cylinders. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and the natural barrier will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel while the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lids will be made of high-nickel alloy.

  18. Spent nuclear fuel canister storage building conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Conceptual Design Report provides the technical basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project, Canister Storage Building, and as amended by letter (correspondence number 9555700, M.E. Witherspoon to E.B. Sellers, ''Technical Baseline and Updated Cost Estimate for the Canister Storage Building'', dated October 24, 1995), includes the project cost baseline and Criteria to be used as the basis for starting detailed design in fiscal year 1995

  19. The final disposal facility of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today the most serious problem in the area of nuclear power engineering is the management of spent nuclear fuel. Due to its very high radioactivity the nuclear waste must be isolated from the environment. The perspective solution of nuclear fuel cycle is the final disposal into geological formations. Today there is no disposal facility all over the world. There are only underground research laboratories in the well developed countries like the USA, France, Japan, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland and Belgium. From the economical point of view the most suitable appears to build a few international repositories. According to the political and social aspect each of the country prepare his own project of the deep repository. The status of those programmes in different countries is described. The development of methods for the long-term management of radioactive waste is necessity in all countries that have had nuclear programmes. (authors)

  20. Assessment of the risk of transporting spent nuclear fuel by truck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment includes the risks from release of spent fuel materials and radioactive cask cavity cooling water due to transportation accidents. The contribution to the risk of package misclosure and degradation during normal transport was also considered. The results of the risk assessment have been related to a time in the mid-1980's, when it is projected that nuclear plants with an electrical generating capacity of 100 GW will be operating in the U.S. For shipments from reactors to interim storage facilities, it is estimated that a truck carrying spent fuel will be involved in an accident that would not be severe enough to result in a release of spent fuel material about once in 1.1 years. It was estimated that an accident that could result in a small release of radioactive material (primarily contaminated cooling water) would occur once in about 40 years. The frequency of an accident resulting in one or more latent cancer fatalities from release of radioactive materials during a truck shipment of spent fuel to interim storage was estimated to be once in 41,000 years. No accidents were found that would result in acute fatalities from releases of radioactive material. The risk for spent fuel shipments from reactors to reprocessing plants was found to be about 20% less than the risk for shipments to interim storage. Although the average shipment distance for the reprocessing case is larger, the risk is somewhat lower because the shipping routes, on average, are through less populated sections of the country. The total risk from transporting 180-day cooled spent fuel by truck in the reference year is 4.5 x 10-5 fatalities. An individual in the population at risk would have one chance in 6 x 1011 of suffering a latent cancer fatality from a release of radioactive material from a truck carrying spent fuel in the reference year

  1. Assessment of the risk of transporting spent nuclear fuel by truck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, H.K.

    1978-11-01

    The assessment includes the risks from release of spent fuel materials and radioactive cask cavity cooling water due to transportation accidents. The contribution to the risk of package misclosure and degradation during normal transport was also considered. The results of the risk assessment have been related to a time in the mid-1980's, when it is projected that nuclear plants with an electrical generating capacity of 100 GW will be operating in the U.S. For shipments from reactors to interim storage facilities, it is estimated that a truck carrying spent fuel will be involved in an accident that would not be severe enough to result in a release of spent fuel material about once in 1.1 years. It was estimated that an accident that could result in a small release of radioactive material (primarily contaminated cooling water) would occur once in about 40 years. The frequency of an accident resulting in one or more latent cancer fatalities from release of radioactive materials during a truck shipment of spent fuel to interim storage was estimated to be once in 41,000 years. No accidents were found that would result in acute fatalities from releases of radioactive material. The risk for spent fuel shipments from reactors to reprocessing plants was found to be about 20% less than the risk for shipments to interim storage. Although the average shipment distance for the reprocessing case is larger, the risk is somewhat lower because the shipping routes, on average, are through less populated sections of the country. The total risk from transporting 180-day cooled spent fuel by truck in the reference year is 4.5 x 10/sup -5/ fatalities. An individual in the population at risk would have one chance in 6 x 10/sup 11/ of suffering a latent cancer fatality from a release of radioactive material from a truck carrying spent fuel in the reference year. (DLC)

  2. Standard guide for drying behavior of spent nuclear fuel

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide is organized to discuss the three major components of significance in the drying behavior of spent nuclear fuel: evaluating the need for drying, drying spent nuclear fuel, and confirmation of adequate dryness. 1.1.1 The guide addresses drying methods and their limitations in drying spent nuclear fuels that have been in storage at water pools. The guide discusses sources and forms of water that remain in SNF, its container, or both, after the drying process and discusses the importance and potential effects they may have on fuel integrity, and container materials. The effects of residual water are discussed mechanistically as a function of the container thermal and radiological environment to provide guidance on situations that may require extraordinary drying methods, specialized handling, or other treatments. 1.1.2 The basic issue in drying is to determine how dry the SNF must be in order to prevent issues with fuel retrievability, container pressurization, or container corrosion. Adequate d...

  3. Studies on spent nuclear fuel evolution during storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondinella, V.V.; Wiss, T.A.G.; Papaioannou, D.; Nasyrow, R. [European Commission Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Transuranium Elements

    2015-07-01

    Initially conceived to last only a few decades (40 years in Germany), extended storage periods have now to be considered for spent nuclear fuel due to the expanding timeline for the definition and implementation of the disposal in geologic repository. In some countries, extended storage may encompass a timeframe of the order of centuries. The safety assessment of extended storage requires predicting the behavior of the spent fuel assemblies and the package systems over a correspondingly long timescale, to ensure that the mechanical integrity and the required level of functionality of all components of the containment system are retained. Since no measurement of ''old'' fuel can cover the ageing time of interest, spent fuel characterization must be complemented by studies targeting specific mechanisms that may affect properties and behavior of spent fuel during extended storage. Tests conducted under accelerated ageing conditions and other relevant simulations are useful for this purpose. During storage, radioactive decay determines the overall conditions of spent fuel and generates heat that must be dissipated. Alpha-decay damage and helium accumulation are key processes affecting the evolution of properties and behavior of spent fuel. The radiation damage induced by a decay event during storage is significantly lower than that caused by a fission during in-pile operation: however, the duration of the storage is much longer and the temperature levels are different. Another factor potentially affecting the mechanical integrity of spent fuel rods during storage and handling / transportation is the behavior of hydrogen present in the cladding. At the Institute for Transuranium Elements, part of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, spent fuel alterations as a function of time and activity are monitored at different scales, from the microstructural level (defects and lattice parameter swelling) up to macroscopic properties such as

  4. Bombs grade 'spent' nuclear material removed from Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Spent nuclear fuel containing enough uranium to produce 2.5 nuclear weapons has been safely returned to Russia from Uzbekistan in a classified mission completed on 19 April 2006. It is the first time that fuel used in a nuclear research reactor - referred to as 'spent' - has been repatriated to Russia since the break-up of the Soviet Union. Under tight security, 63 kilograms of spent highly enriched uranium (HEU) was transported to Mayak in Russia, in four separate shipments. IAEA safeguards inspectors monitored and verified the packing of the fuel for transport over the course of 16 days. The secret operation, six years in the planning, was a joint undertaking of the IAEA, the United States, Uzbekistan, Russia and Kazakhstan as part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The aim of the GTRI is to identify, secure and recover high-risk vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials around the world. 'There was particular concern about the Uzbek spent fuel given its significant quantity and that it was no longer 'self protecting', 'the IAEA's Crosscutting Co-ordinator for Research Reactors, Mr. Pablo Adelfang, said. 'This means that the fuel has lost its high radioactivity. In other words, it would no longer injure anyone who handled it and would not deter potential thieves,' Mr. Adelfang said. 'The shipment is an important step to reduce stockpiles of high-risk, vulnerable nuclear materials. Russia, the US, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan should be applauded for their successful cooperation. It will contribute to the security of both Uzbekistan and the international community,' he added. In Russia, the fuel will be processed so that it can not be used for atomic bombs. Russia originally supplied the nuclear fuel to Uzbekistan for use in its 10 megawatt research reactor. Located at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of Uzbekistan, 30 km from Tashkent, the reactor is currently used for research and to produce isotopes for medical purposes. The IAEA is

  5. Consequence assessment of attacking nuclear spent fuel pool by terrorist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of spent fuel pool and spent fuel assemblies are described in this paper for a typical 1000 MW PWR nuclear power station as an example. Based on the analysis of sabotage-induced cases and release source term of spent fuel pool, consequences are calculated by using MACCS system. The results show that in the three cases of 1) Zircaloy fire propagates throughout entire spent fuel inventory in the pool, 2) Zircaloy fire involves only the last fuel batch to be discharged, and 3) there are gap releases from 3 last discharged fuel batches, the radiuses of areas in which there are the danger of acute death are about 6 km, 3 km and 0 km, respectively; the radiuses of areas in which effective dose is larger than 50 mSv are about 80 km, 34 km and 9 km, respectively; the radiuses of areas in which avertable dose of shelter is larger than 10 mSv are about 100 km, 48 km and 11 km, respectively. (authors)

  6. Anticipating Potential Waste Acceptance Criteria for Defense Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P.; Lord, M.E.; Stockman, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Waste Management Center; McCurley, R.D. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Engineering Research Institute

    1997-12-31

    The Office of Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and disposal of DOE owned defense spent nuclear fuel and high level waste (DSNF/DHLW). A desirable option, direct disposal of the waste in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, depends on the final waste acceptance criteria, which will be set by DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). However, evolving regulations make it difficult to determine what the final acceptance criteria will be. A method of anticipating waste acceptance criteria is to gain an understanding of the DOE owned waste types and their behavior in a disposal system through a performance assessment and contrast such behavior with characteristics of commercial spent fuel. Preliminary results from such an analysis indicate that releases of 99Tc and 237Np from commercial spent fuel exceed those of the DSNF/DHLW; thus, if commercial spent fuel can meet the waste acceptance criteria, then DSNF can also meet the criteria. In large part, these results are caused by the small percentage of total activity of the DSNF in the repository (1.5%) and regulatory mass (4%), and also because commercial fuel cladding was assumed to provide no protection.

  7. 75 FR 60147 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... COMMISSION Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Notice of... Branch, Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and... Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) Technical Specifications (TS) be revised as follows: 1....

  8. Nondestructive assay of Pu in spent fuel using nuclear resonance fluorescence with monochromatic gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have proposed a nondestructive assay for Pu-239 in spent fuel assembly using nuclear resonance fluorescence with energy tunable monochromatic gamma-rays generated by Compton scattering of laser photons and high energy electrons. To demonstrate this method, we carried out nuclear experiments using available laser Compton scattering gamma-rays. We measured NRF gamma-rays of Pb-208 concealed in an iron box with a thickness of 15 mm using LCS gamma-rays at National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology. We also measured NRF gamma-rays of U-238 using LCS gamma-rays at Duke University. (author)

  9. Consortium NCS/GNS: Disposal of spent nuclear fuel from the DKFZ (Heidelberg, Germany)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before the decommissioning of the TRIGA HD II reactor of the 'Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum' in Heidelberg (DKFZ) the spent nuclear fuel (126 TRIGA- F/A) had to be discharged from the reactor and shipped in 2001 to the United States. The Consortium NCS/GNS together with the DKFZ carried out this task including the following essential details: Implementation of structural measures inside the reactor building. Development and fabrication of loading units for the FIA. Development and fabrication of a transfer system for the loading units. Obtaining new German and US certifications for the casks. Loading of the casks. Shipment of the casks from DKFZ to the United States by road and sea. The successful completion of this task once again proved the operational experience of the Consortium NCS/GNS which will be useful for further worldwide shipments of spent nuclear fuel from research reactors. e.g. shipments from Europe, South America and Australia to the United States and France. (author)

  10. Seismic Response Analysis of Spent Nuclear Fuel Metal Storage Cask considering Soil- Structure Interaction Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeg, Chang-Yeal; Lee, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Dae-Ki [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, In-Su; Song, Won-Tae; Jin, Han-Uk; Kim, Jong-Soo [KONES, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Maintaining of the structure safety for the metal storage cask is important to store spent nuclear fuel under a seismic events. Sliding and overturning behavior must be estimated because the metal cask systems are to be installed as free standing structures on reinforced concrete pads. This behavior can cause a serious problem in the integrity of spent nuclear fuel by the impact between neighboring casks. Also, soil condition should be considered since the cask's behavior is strongly affected by the characteristics of the base soil condition. In this study, the seismic response analysis was carried out in order to evaluate the behavior of the metal storage cask under earthquake envelopment considering Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) effects.

  11. Compact spent fuel storage at the Atucha I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this report is to verify the possibility to increase the available storage of irradiated fuel assemblies, placed in the spent fuel pools of the Atucha I nuclear power plant. There is intends the realization of structural modifications in the storage bracket-suspension beam (single and double) for the upper and lower level of the four spent fuel pools. With these modifications that increase the storage capacity 25%, would arrive until the year 2014, it dates dear for the limit of the commercial operation of nuclear power plant. The increase of the capacity in function of the permissible stress for the supports of the bracket-suspension beam. They should be carried out 5000 re-accommodations of irradiated fuel assemblies. The task would demand approximately 3 years. (author)

  12. Spent nuclear fuel for disposal in the KBS-3 repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, Per; Moren, Lena; Wiborgh, Maria

    2010-12-15

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input to the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site as well as to the operational safety report, SR-Operation. The report presents the spent fuel to be deposited, and the requirements on the handling and selection of fuel assemblies for encapsulation that follows from that it shall be deposited in the KBS-3 repository. An overview of the handling and a simulation of the encapsulation and the resulting canisters to be deposited are presented. Finally, the initial state of the encapsulated spent nuclear fuel is given. The initial state comprises the radionuclide inventory and other data required for the assessment of the long-term safety

  13. Spent nuclear fuel for disposal in the KBS-3 repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input to the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site as well as to the operational safety report, SR-Operation. The report presents the spent fuel to be deposited, and the requirements on the handling and selection of fuel assemblies for encapsulation that follows from that it shall be deposited in the KBS-3 repository. An overview of the handling and a simulation of the encapsulation and the resulting canisters to be deposited are presented. Finally, the initial state of the encapsulated spent nuclear fuel is given. The initial state comprises the radionuclide inventory and other data required for the assessment of the long-term safety

  14. SACSESS – the EURATOM FP7 project on actinide separation from spent nuclear fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourg Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of actinides by their separation from spent nuclear fuel, followed by transmutation in fast neutron reactors of Generation IV, is considered the most promising strategy for nuclear waste management. Closing the fuel cycle and burning long-lived actinides allows optimizing the use of natural resources and minimizing the long-term hazard of high-level nuclear waste. Moreover, improving the safety and sustainability of nuclear power worldwide. This paper presents the activities striving to meet these challenges, carried out under the Euratom FP7 collaborative project SACSESS (Safety of Actinide Separation Processes. Emphasis is put on the safety issues of fuel reprocessing and waste storage. Two types of actinide separation processes, hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical, are considered, as well as related aspects of material studies, process modeling and the radiolytic stability of solvent extraction systems. Education and training of young researchers in nuclear chemistry is of particular importance for further development of this field.

  15. Nondestructive Spent Fuel Assay Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantifying the isotopic composition of spent fuel is an important challenge and essential for many nuclear safeguards applications, such as independent verification of the Pu content declared by a regulated facility, shipper/receiver measurements, and quantifying isotopic input masses at a reprocessing facility. As part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, NA-241 has recently funded a multilab/university collaboration to investigate a variety of nondestructive methods for determining the elemental Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies. Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is one of the methods being investigated. First modeling studies have been performed to investigate the feasibility of assaying a single fuel pin using a bremsstrahlung photon source. MCNPX modeling results indicate that NRF signals are significantly more intense than the background due to scattered interrogation photons even for isotopes with concentrations below 1percent. However, the studies revealed that the dominant contribution to the background is elastic scattering, which is currently not simulated by MCNPX. Critical to this effort, we have added existing NRF data to the MCNPX photonuclear data files and are now able to incorporate NRF physics into MCNPX simulations. Addition of the non-resonant elastic scattering data to MCNPX is in progress. Assaying fuel assemblies with NRF poses additional challenges: photon penetration through the assembly is small and the spent fuel radioactive decay and neutron activity lead to significantly higher backgrounds. First modeling studies to evaluate the efficacy of NRF for assaying assemblies have been initiated using the spent fuel assembly library created at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  16. Spent fuel reprocessing: A vital link in Indian nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of the three stage Indian nuclear energy program is inter-linked with the establishment of an efficient closed fuel cycle approach with recycling of both fissile and fertile components of the spent fuel to appropriate reactor systems. The Indian reprocessing journey was started way back in 1964 with the commissioning of a plant based on PUREX technology to reprocess aluminum clad natural uranium spent fuel from the research reactor CIRUS. After achieving the basic skills, a power reactor reprocessing facility was built to reprocess spent fuel from power reactors. Adequate design and operating experience was gained from these two plants for mastering the reprocessing technology. The first plant, being the maiden venture, based on indigenous technology had to undergo many modifications during its operation and finally needed refurbishment for continued operation. Decommissioning and decontamination of this plant was carried out meticulously to allow unrestricted access to the cells for fresh installation. A third plant was built for power reactor spent fuel reprocessing to serve as a design standard for future plants with the involvement of industry. Over the years, spent fuel reprocessing based on PUREX technology has reached a matured status and can be safely deployed to meet the additional reprocessing requirements to cater to the expanding nuclear energy program. Side by side with the developments in the spent natural uranium fuel reprocessing, irradiated thoria reprocessing is also perused to develop THOREX into a robust process. The additional challenges in this domain are being addressed to evolve appropriate technological solutions. Advancements in the field of science and technology are being absorbed to meet the challenges of higher recovery combined with reduced exposure and environmental discharges

  17. Cost estimations for deep disposal of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the Act on the Financing of Future Expenses for Spent Nuclear Fuel etc. (Financing Act), the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) must submit, every year, to the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI), a cost estimate for the management of spent nuclear fuel and for the decommissioning and dismantling of the nuclear power plants. After SKI has examined and evaluated the cost estimates, SKI must submit a proposal to the Government concerning the fee which should be paid by the nuclear power companies per kWh of generated electricity. According to the Financing Act, the reactor owners must pledge collateral in the event that the accumulated fees should be found to be insufficient as a result of early closure of reactors or as a result of underestimating the future expenses of managing the spent nuclear fuel and of decommissioning and dismantling the reactors. The future total expenses resulting from the Financing Act are estimated at about SEK 48 billion at the January 1998 price level. Of this amount, the cost of the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in SKB's programme is expected to amount to about SEK 12 billion. SKB's estimate comprises the cost of siting, construction and operation of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, based on the KBS-3 concept, and a rock cavern for other long-lived waste which SKB plans to locate next to the spent fuel repository. The cost estimate also includes the dismantling and closure of the facility once all of the fuel and the long-lived waste are deposited. The calculations are based on all of the fuel, which will be generated through the operation of the 12 Swedish reactors during a period of 25 years and for every additional year of operation. At the beginning of 1998, SKI commissioned BERGAB to evaluate the cost estimate for the deep disposal of the spent nuclear fuel. The task was divided into two stages, namely a study which was submitted in June 1998 concerning the technical feasibility of

  18. Spent nuclear fuel management. Moving toward a century of spent fuel management: A view from the halfway mark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A half-century ago, President Eisenhower in his 1953 'Atoms for Peace' speech, offered nuclear technology to other nations as part of a broad nuclear arms control initiative. In the years that followed, the nuclear power generation capabilities of many nations has helped economic development and contributed to the prosperity of the modern world. The growth of nuclear power, while providing many benefits, has also contributed to an increasing global challenge over safe and secure spent fuel management. Over 40 countries have invested in nuclear energy, developing over 400 nuclear power reactors. Nuclear power supplies approximately 16% of the global electricity needs. With the finite resources and challenges of fossil fuels, nuclear power will undoubtedly become more prevalent in the future, both in the U.S. and abroad. We must address this inevitability with new paradigms for managing a global nuclear future. Over the past fifty years, the world has come to better understand the strong interplay between all elements of the nuclear fuel cycle, global economics, and global security. In the modern world, the nuclear fuel cycle can no longer be managed as a simple sequence of technological, economic and political challenges. Rather it must be seen, and managed, as a system of strongly interrelated challenges. Spent fuel management, as one element of the nuclear fuel system, cannot be relegated to the back-end of the fuel cycle as only a disposal or storage issue. There exists a wealth of success and experience with spent fuel management over the past fifty years. We must forge this experience with a global systems perspective, to reshape the governing of all aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle, including spent fuel management. This session will examine the collective experience of spent fuel management enterprises, seeking to shape the development of new management paradigms for the next fifty years. (author)

  19. Progress on the Hanford K basins spent nuclear fuel project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper highlights progress made during the last year toward removing the Department of Energy's (DOE) approximately, 2,100 metric tons of metallic spent nuclear fuel from the two outdated K Basins at the Hanford Site and placing it in safe, economical interim dry storage. In the past year, the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project has engaged in an evolutionary process involving the customer, regulatory bodies, and the public that has resulted in a quicker, cheaper, and safer strategy for accomplishing that goal. Development and implementation of the Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Fuel is as much a case study of modern project and business management within the regulatory system as it is a technical achievement. A year ago, the SNF Project developed the K Basins Path Forward that, beginning in December 1998, would move the spent nuclear fuel currently stored in the K Basins to a new Staging and Storage Facility by December 2000. The second stage of this $960 million two-stage plan would complete the project by conditioning the metallic fuel and placing it in interim dry storage by 2006. In accepting this plan, the DOE established goals that the fuel removal schedule be accelerated by a year, that fuel conditioning be closely coupled with fuel removal, and that the cost be reduced by at least $300 million. The SNF Project conducted coordinated engineering and technology studies over a three-month period that established the technical framework needed to design and construct facilities, and implement processes compatible with these goals. The result was the Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Fuel. This strategy accomplishes the goals set forth by the DOE by beginning fuel removal a year earlier in December 1997, completing it by December 1999, beginning conditioning within six months of starting fuel removal, and accomplishes it for $340 million less than the previous Path Forward plan

  20. Updating the Regulatory Framework for Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is renewed domestic interest in establishing spent nuclear fuel recycle in the U.S. after about a 30 year hiatus. Introduction of safe, proliferation-resistant, and economical civilian nuclear fuel cycles, especially the reprocessing step, in the U.S. poses numerous technical, social, and regulatory challenges. Initially, fuel recycle activities are expected to focus on light water reactor fuels, but it is anticipated that recycle of fuel from advanced reactors such as liquid-metal-cooled reactors and gas-cooled reactors will follow. Proposed reprocessing technologies include processes for removing heat-producing and high-risk fission products and actinides from waste streams prior to disposal. Proposed reprocessing processes and operations raise a range of issues identified in this paper that would require new and revised regulations to effectively and efficiently ensure their safety. The NRC prepared a report (NUREG-1909) documenting the background, status, and potential future issues concerning recycle of spent nuclear fuel that is summarized in this paper. In response to the issues, the NRC Commissioners, and other stakeholders, the NRC staff has conducted two analyses to identify and prioritize regulatory gaps for spent fuel reprocessing facilities and held public meetings to obtain stakeholder input. The NRC staff is now working on a revised regulatory framework for reprocessing facilities with a goal of completing the revisions by FY 2012. This paper summarizes the contents of NUREG-1909 and the activities of the NRC staff to update the regulatory framework in to address the issues that have been identified. (author)

  1. Challenges in spent nuclear fuel final disposal:conceptual design models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mukhtar Ahmed RANA

    2008-01-01

    The disposal of spent nuclear fuel is a long-standing issue in nuclear technology. Mainly, UO2 and metallic U are used as a fuel in nuclear reactors. Spent nuclear fuel contains fission products and transuranium elements, which would remain radioactive for 104 to 108 years. In this brief communication, essential concepts and engineering elements related to high-level nuclear waste disposal are described. Conceptual design models are described and discussed considering the long-time scale activity of spent nuclear fuel or high level waste. Notions of physical and chemical barriers to contain nuclear waste are highlightened. Concerns regarding integrity, self-irradiation induced decomposition and thermal effects of decay heat on the spent nuclear fuel are also discussed. The question of retrievability of spent nuclear fuel after disposal is considered.

  2. Corrosion of Spent Nuclear Fuel: The Long-Term Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel, essentially U2, accounts for over 95% of the total radioactivity of all of the radioactive wastes in the United States that require disposal, disposition or remediation. The UO2 in SNF is not stable under oxiding conditions and may also be altered under reducing conditions. The alteration of SNF results in the formation of new uranium phases that can cause the release or retardation of actinide and fission product radionuclides. Over the long term, and depending on the extent to which the secondary uranium phases incorporate fission products and actinides, these alteration phases become the near-field source term

  3. Dosimetry at an interim storage for spent nuclear fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Králík, M; Kulich, V; Studeny, J; Pokorny, P

    2007-01-01

    The Czech nuclear power plant Dukovany started its operation in 1985. All fuel spent from 1985 up to the end of 2005 is stored at a dry interim storage, which was designed for 60 CASTOR-440/84 casks. Each of these casks can accommodate 84 fuel assemblies from VVER 440 reactors. Neutron-photon mixed fields around the casks were characterized in terms of ambient dose equivalent measured by standard area dosemeters. Except this, neutron spectra were measured by means of a Bonner sphere spectrometer, and the measured spectra were used to derive the corresponding ambient dose equivalent due to neutrons. PMID:17526479

  4. Corrosion of Spent Nuclear Fuel: The Long-Term Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodney C. Ewing

    2004-10-07

    Spent nuclear fuel, essentially U{sub 2}, accounts for over 95% of the total radioactivity of all of the radioactive wastes in the United States that require disposal, disposition or remediation. The UO{sub 2} in SNF is not stable under oxiding conditions and may also be altered under reducing conditions. The alteration of SNF results in the formation of new uranium phases that can cause the release or retardation of actinide and fission product radionuclides. Over the long term, and depending on the extent to which the secondary uranium phases incorporate fission products and actinides, these alteration phases become the near-field source term.

  5. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR DOE SPENT NUCLEAR DISPOSAL CONTAINER SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel disposal container system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333PY ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998)

  6. Method for reprocessing and separating spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuels, including actinide fuels, volatile and non-volatile fission products, are reprocessed and separated in a molten metal solvent housed in a separation vessel made of a carbon-containing material. A first catalyst, which promotes the solubility and permeability of carbon in the metal solvent, is included. By increasing the solubility and permeability of the carbon in the solvent, the rate at which actinide oxides are reduced (carbothermic reduction) is greatly increased. A second catalyst, included to increase the affinity for nitrogen in the metal solvent, is added to increase the rate at which actinide nitrides form after carbothermic reduction is complete

  7. TVO's new encapsulation method for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy has developed a new encapsulation method for spent nuclear fuel s.c. cold process. Instead of casting (400 deg C) molten lead the new canister is filled with cold granulated material like quartz sand, lead shots or glassa beads. The new canister concept ACPC (Advanced Cold Process Canister) consists of the outer oxygen free copper canister and of the inner steel canister. The function of the steel canister is merely to give mechanical strength. The copper canister acts as corrosion protection guaranteeing practically lifetime of millions of years for the ACPC concept

  8. Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis of spent organic ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent IX resins from nuclear power reactors are highly active solid wastes generated during operations of nuclear reactors. Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis of these resins can lead to high volume reduction of these wastes. Low temperature pyrolysis of transition metal ion loaded IX resins in presence of nitrogen was carried out in order to optimize catalyst composition to achieve maximum weight reduction. Thermo gravimetric analysis of the pyrolysis residues was carried out in presence of air in order to compare the oxidative characteristics of transition metal oxide catalysts. Copper along with iron, chromium and nickel present in the spent IX resins gave the most efficient catalyst combination for catalytic and oxidative pyrolysis of the residues. During low temperature catalytic pyrolysis, 137Cesium volatility was estimated to be around 0.01% from cationic resins and around 0.1% from anionic resins. During oxidative pyrolysis at 700 degC, nearly 10 to 40% of 137Cesium was found to be released to off gases depending upon type of resin and catalyst loaded on to it. The oxidation of pyrolytic residues at 700 degC gave weight reduction of 15% for cationic resins and 93% for anionic resins. Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis is attractive for reducing weight and volume of spent cationic resins from PHWRs and VVERs. (author)

  9. Why is a dry storage for spent nuclear fuel waste more appropriate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays high activity level nuclear waste has been gradually confined in dry shelters, differently than occurred in the previous years. This kind of storages is spreading everywhere. A well evident case is the storage for irradiated fuel elements in commercial nuclear reactors, also known as spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The interim storage, up to 20 years ago, was exclusively carried out through cooling water pools in which the spent fuel has been stored. Such kind of storage was used during the service life of the reactor and sometimes longer. If the nuclear installation had to be decommissioned another storage solution had to be found. At the present time, after a preliminary cooling of the SNF elements inside the water pool, the elements can be stored in dry installations. This kind of storage does not need complex radiation monitoring resulting in favourable construction and maintenance economy of both nuclear storage plants since the volume of the cooling water pools can be smaller. Among several types of existing dry storages, the convection vaults, concrete modules and double purpose casks can be evidenced. These casks can be used as multi-use devices for high activity level materials, i.e. can serve as an interim storage, used for transporting purposes and used as definitive packages for final deposition if so planned. This paper aims to present the advantages of a dry storage in comparison with the wet one (cooling water pools) for high activity level nuclear waste, including the SNF. (author)

  10. Impact evaluation of sea salt aerosol given to nuclear spent fuel intermediate storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear spent fuel intermediate storage facility is planned to be located in the Sea of Japan coast area for the reasons of nuclear spent fuel transportation. Therefore, there is the risk of structure corrosion by an environmental pollution factor e.g. sea salt aerosol. This study is the corrosion risk evaluation of nuclear spent fuel storage facility by measuring the amount of sea salt aerosol coming. This study develops the new method to improve of the conventional JIS method. (author)

  11. Spent nuclear fuel policies in historical perspective: An international comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to explain why the world's nuclear power countries differ from each other with respect to their spent nuclear fuel (SNF) policies. The emergence and evolution of three principal SNF approaches are analyzed: direct disposal, reprocessing and SNF export. Five broad explanatory factors are identified and discussed in relation to the observed differences in policy outcomes: military ambitions and non-proliferation, technological culture, political culture and civil society, geological conditions, and energy policy. SNF policy outcomes can generally be seen to result from a complex interaction between these broad factors, but it is also possible to discern a number of important patterns. To the extent that the five factors may undergo far-reaching changes in the future, the historical experience of how they have shaped SNF policies also give a hint of possible future directions in SNF policymaking around the world

  12. Training implementation matrix, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EATON, G.L.

    2000-06-08

    This Training Implementation Matrix (TIM) describes how the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.20A, Personnel Selection, Qualification, and Training Requirements for Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. The TIM defines the application of the selection, qualification, and training requirements in DOE Order 5480.20A at the SNFP. The TIM also describes the organization, planning, and administration of the SNFP training and qualification program(s) for which DOE Order 5480.20A applies. Also included is suitable justification for exceptions taken to any requirements contained in DOE Order 5480.20A. The goal of the SNFP training and qualification program is to ensure employees are capable of performing their jobs safely and efficiently.

  13. Training implementation matrix. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Training Implementation Matrix (TIM) describes how the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.20A, Personnel Selection, Qualification, and Training Requirements for Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. The TIM defines the application of the selection, qualification, and training requirements in DOE Order 5480.20A at the SNFP. The TIM also describes the organization, planning, and administration of the SNFP training and qualification program(s) for which DOE Order 5480.20A applies. Also included is suitable justification for exceptions taken to any requirements contained in DOE Order 5480.20A. The goal of the SNFP training and qualification program is to ensure employees are capable of performing their jobs safely and efficiently

  14. Transport Considerations in Spent Nuclear Fuel. Annex XVI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three fuel cycle options are the once through cycle where spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is regarded as waste destined for final disposal, the open cycle in which the fuel is stored on an interim basis and the closed cycle where the SNF is reprocessed and recycled, recovering the uranium and plutonium for further use. In each case the interfaces between the various stages in SNF management options all involve packaging and transport; namely from short term storage to longer term storage (until the fuel cycle option has been determined), from storage to reprocessing and from storage to conditioning for disposal. Packaging and transport are essential components of the management of the wastes associated with any of these options. Effective packaging and transport are therefore vital to keeping the nuclear fuel cycle flowing

  15. K-Basin spent nuclear fuel characterization data report 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrefah, J.; Gray, W.J.; Ketner, G.L.; Marschman, S.C.; Pyecha, T.D.; Thornton, T.A.

    1996-03-01

    An Integrated Process Strategy has been developed to package, condition, transport, and store in an interim storage facility the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) currently residing in the K-Basins at Hanford. Information required to support the development of the condition process and to support the safety analyses must be obtained from characterization testing activities conducted on fuel samples from the Basins. Some of the information obtained in the testing was reported in PNL-10778, K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Characterization Data Report (Abrefah et al. 1995). That report focused on the physical, dimensional, metallographic examinations of the first K-West (KW) Basin SNF element to be examined in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL) hot cells; it also described some of the initial SNF conditioning tests. This second of the series of data reports covers the subsequent series of SNF tests on the first fuel element. These tests included optical microscopy analyses, conditioning (drying and oxidation) tests, ignition tests, and hydrogen content tests.

  16. Thermal hydraulic feasibility assessment for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of scoping analyses have been completed investigating the thermal-hydraulic performance and feasibility of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Integrated Process Strategy (IPS). The SNFP was established to develop engineered solutions for the expedited removal, stabilization, and storage of spent nuclear fuel from the K Basins at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The subject efforts focused on independently investigating, quantifying, and establishing the governing heat production and removal mechanisms for each of the IPS operations and configurations, obtaining preliminary results for comparison with and verification of other analyses, and providing technology-based recommendations for consideration and incorporation into the design bases for the SNFP. The goal was to develop a series fo thermal-hydraulic models that could respond to all process and safety-related issues that may arise pertaining to the SNFP. A series of sensitivity analyses were also performed to help identify those parameters that have the greatest impact on energy transfer and hence, temperature control. It is anticipated that the subject thermal-hydraulic models will form the basis for a series of advanced and more detailed models that will more accurately reflect the thermal performance of the IPS and alleviate the necessity for some of the more conservative assumptions and oversimplifications, as well as form the basis for the final process and safety analyses

  17. Spent nuclear fuel recycling with plasma reduction and etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Ho

    2012-06-05

    A method of extracting uranium from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) particles is disclosed. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (containing oxides of uranium, oxides of fission products (FP) and oxides of transuranic (TRU) elements (including plutonium)) are subjected to a hydrogen plasma and a fluorine plasma. The hydrogen plasma reduces the uranium and plutonium oxides from their oxide state. The fluorine plasma etches the SNF metals to form UF6 and PuF4. During subjection of the SNF particles to the fluorine plasma, the temperature is maintained in the range of 1200-2000 deg K to: a) allow any PuF6 (gas) that is formed to decompose back to PuF4 (solid), and b) to maintain stability of the UF6. Uranium (in the form of gaseous UF6) is easily extracted and separated from the plutonium (in the form of solid PuF4). The use of plasmas instead of high temperature reactors or flames mitigates the high temperature corrosive atmosphere and the production of PuF6 (as a final product). Use of plasmas provide faster reaction rates, greater control over the individual electron and ion temperatures, and allow the use of CF4 or NF3 as the fluorine sources instead of F2 or HF.

  18. K-Basin spent nuclear fuel characterization data report 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Integrated Process Strategy has been developed to package, condition, transport, and store in an interim storage facility the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) currently residing in the K-Basins at Hanford. Information required to support the development of the condition process and to support the safety analyses must be obtained from characterization testing activities conducted on fuel samples from the Basins. Some of the information obtained in the testing was reported in PNL-10778, K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Characterization Data Report (Abrefah et al. 1995). That report focused on the physical, dimensional, metallographic examinations of the first K-West (KW) Basin SNF element to be examined in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL) hot cells; it also described some of the initial SNF conditioning tests. This second of the series of data reports covers the subsequent series of SNF tests on the first fuel element. These tests included optical microscopy analyses, conditioning (drying and oxidation) tests, ignition tests, and hydrogen content tests

  19. Safety aspects of spent nuclear fuel interim storage installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays safety and security of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) interim storage installations are very important, due to a great concentration of fission products, actinides and activation products. In this kind of storage it is necessary to consider the physical security. Nuclear installations have become more vulnerable. New types of accidents must be considered in the design of these installations, which in the early days were not considered like: fissile material stolen, terrorists' acts and war conflicts, and traditional accidents concerning the transport of the spent fuel from the reactor to the storage location, earthquakes occurrence, airplanes crash, etc. Studies related to airplane falling had showed that a collision of big commercials airplanes at velocity of 800 km/h against SNF storage and specially designed concrete casks, do not result in serious structural injury to the casks, and not even radionuclides liberation to the environment. However, it was demonstrated that attacks with modern military ammunitions, against metallic casks, are calamitous. The casks could not support a direct impact of this ammo and the released radioactive materials can expose the workers and public as well the local environment to harmful radiation. This paper deals about the main basic aspects of a dry SNF storage installation, that must be physically well protected, getting barriers that difficult the access of unauthorized persons or vehicles, as well as, must structurally resist to incidents or accidents caused by unauthorized intrusion. (author)

  20. Cost and risk tradeoff for routing nuclear spent fuel movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the transportation industry, much effort has been devoted to finding the least cost routes for shipping goods from their production sites to the market areas. In addition to cost, the decision maker must take the risk of an incident into consideration for transportation routing involving hazardous materials. The transportation of spent nuclear fuel from reactor sites to repositories is an example. Given suitable network information, existing routing methods can readily determine least cost or least risk routes for any shipment. These two solutions, however, represent the extremes of a large number of alternatives with different combinations of risk and cost. In the selection of routes and also in the evaluation of alternative storage sites it is not enough to know which is the lease cost or lowest risk. Intelligent decision-marking requires knowledge of how much it will cost to lower risk by a certain amount. The objective of this study is to develop an automated system to evaluate the tradeoff between transportation cost and potential population at risk under different nuclear spent fuel transportation strategies

  1. Spent fuel management options and nuclear fuel supplies in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel management pathway adopted has a direct bearing on the supply of nuclear fuel. Compared to direct disposal, reprocessing is able to reduce the consumption of uranium, thus making nuclear power a quasi-indigenous source of power. The breeder technology was developed to make use of as many fuel constituents of natural uranium as possible, especially Pu-239. When used in mixed oxide fuel assemblies, plutonium can be burnt even in light water reactors. On the basis of three different scenarios for the development of the installed nuclear generating capacity, the annual uranium requirement up to 2030 is simulated in a computer model. The parameters influencing the calculation are the time, final storage, reprocessing, the use of mixed oxide fuel, and a higher fuel burnup. The service life of a nuclear power plant is assumed to be 35 years throughout. All steps of the nuclear fuel cycle are modeled, from purchasing the natural uranium to final storage. In each of the three scenarios, the model calculations arrive at clearly lower prices of natural uranium, of approx. US Dollar 65/kg of U, than actually prevailed in the second half of the seventies, i.e. more than US Dollar 190/kg of U. (orig.)

  2. 76 FR 22935 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... Class C (GTCC) waste and other radioactive materials associated with spent fuel storage at the CCNPP... granted, the renewed license will authorize the applicant to continue to store spent fuel in a dry cask... COMMISSION Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Notice...

  3. 78 FR 61401 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Big Rock Point; Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Big Rock Point; Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation..., Inc. (ENO) on June 20, 2012, for the Big Rock Point (BRP) Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation... Regulatory Evaluation In the Final Rule for Storage of Spent Fuel in NRC-Approved Storage Casks at...

  4. Disposal of spent fuel from German nuclear power plants - 16028

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'direct disposal of spent fuel' as a part of the current German reference concept was developed as an alternative to spent fuel reprocessing and vitrified HLW disposal. The technical facilities necessary for the implementation of this part of the reference concept, the so called POLLUXR concept, i.e. interim storage buildings for casks containing spent fuel, a pilot conditioning facility, and a special cask 'POLLUX' for final disposal have been built. With view to a geological salt formation all handling procedures for the direct disposal of spent fuel were tested aboveground in full-scale test facilities. To optimise the reference concept, all operational steps have been reviewed for possible improvements. The two additional concepts for the direct disposal of SF are the BSK 3 concept and the DIREGT concept. Both concepts rely on borehole emplacement technology, vertical boreholes for the BSK 3 concept und horizontal boreholes for the DIREGT concept. Supported by the EU and the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi), DBE TECHNOLOGY built an aboveground full-scale test facility to simulate all relevant handling procedures for the BSK 3 disposal concept. GNS (Company for Nuclear Service), representing the German utilities, provided the main components and its know-how concerning cask design and manufacturing. The test program was concluded recently after more than 1.000 emplacement operations had been performed successfully. The BSK 3 emplacement system in total comprises an emplacement device, a borehole lock, a transport cart, a transfer cask which will shuttle between the aboveground conditioning facility and the underground repository, and the BSK 3 canister itself, designed to contain the fuel rods of three PWR-fuel assemblies with a total of about 1.6 tHM. The BSK 3 concept simplifies the operation of the repository because the handling procedures and techniques can also be applied for the disposal of reprocessing residues. In addition

  5. Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States [CIS]). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future

  6. Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States [CIS]). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

  7. Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

  8. Spent nuclear fuel storage: Legal, technical and political considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1982, Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), assigning responsibility to the Department of Energy (DOE) for the development and implementation of a comprehensive national nuclear waste management program. The NWPA makes clear that the generators and owners of commercially-generated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) have the primary responsibility to provide for, and pay the costs of, the interim storage of such SNF until it is accepted by the DOE under the provisions of the NWPA. The shift in responsibility was expected to begin in 1998, the date specified in the NWPA and the DOE's contracts with the utilities, at which time the NWPA anticipated commencement of operations of a geologic repository and/or a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS). Unfortunately, despite a mid-course correction to the NWPA mandated by Congress in 1987 in an effort to streamline and accelerate the program, DOE is way behind schedule. DOE's last published program schedule indicates the commencement of repository operations in 2010, a date many feel is overly optimistic. In repeated statements during the early 1990s, DOE sought to reassure utility companies and their regulatory commissions that it could still commence SNF acceptance in 1998 for storage at an MRS if such a facility were sited through a voluntary process by the end of 1992. That date has now come and gone. Although DOE is still nominally seeking a voluntary MRS host jurisdiction, the prospects for MRS operation by 1998 are dim. Putting aside for the moment the question of DOE's ability to bring the repository on line, the immediate problem facing domestic utilities is the need to augment their onsite SNF storage capacity. In addition to providing a brief overview of the Federal independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) licensing process, the author provides some insight of what the real issues are in ISFSI licensing

  9. System evaluation model for selecting spent nuclear fuel storage concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    President Reagan has challenged the nuclear community to develop a safe and economical system to handle spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear power generating stations and high level radioactive wastes from fuel reprocessing facilities. This paper will illustrate a management system approach used to identify and evaluate monitored, retrievable fuel storage concepts that fulfill ten key criteria for meeting the functional requirements and system objectives of the National Nuclear Waste Management Program. These selection criteria include: health and safety, schedule, costs, socio-economic factors and environmental factors. An MRS (Monitored Retrievable Storage) System is designed to safety store spent fuel assemblies and high level waste in a dry, passively cooled environment for an indefinite period of time up to 100 years. Forth-five feasible MRS design concepts utilizing 20 basic storage methods were initially screened and reduced to 15 concepts with 7 methods. A system evaluation model was developed to evaluate the ability of each of the remaining 15 alternative concepts to meet the selection criteria. This model allows the ranking of each system according to MRS needs and life-cycle costs. The methodology used to establish the selection criteria, develop a weight of importance for each criterion and assess the relative merit of each MRS system will be described. The impact of cost relative to technical criteria will be discussed along with experience in obtaining relative merit data and its application in the model. This system evaluation model is universally applicable when many concepts in various stages of design and cost development need to be evaluated. It provides a structured approach which allows the evaluators to make a rational, well-founded selection

  10. Some global aspects regarding nuclear spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The globalization means the worldwide extension of certain aspects of social or economic processes, structural or environmental changes, or concerning working methodologies, technical activity, industrial production, etc. At present the emergence of global aspects is more frequently observed, being determined by the rapid development of computerized systems and of transfer of information, by the development of big transnational companies and due to the increasing international co-operation. Some of the manifested global aspects could be beneficial for the development of the human society, other could be not. It is necessary to perform an adequate analysis from this view point and to promote appropriate measures to enhance the positive global aspects and to mitigate the negative global aspects. These measures can have a good efficiency only if they are pursued at global level, but for this it is necessary to build an adequate international coordinating body, having the corresponding instruments for action. The global aspects identified in the field of nuclear power may be divided into two categories, namely: - related to the main features of nuclear power; - regarding the specific features of some subdivisions of the field, as for example, spent fuel management. In the paper both categories are discussed. The influence of the global aspects on the development of nuclear power and particularly on the back end activities of the fuel cycle, is also presented. At the same time, some possible actions for enhancing nuclear power development are proposed

  11. IAEA nuclear fuel cycle databases: Relevance to spent nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Reliable statistical data on spent fuel management would be essential for the global nuclear community, e.g. for approaches related to international cooperation, as well as for the needs of individual countries. Compilation of data on large amounts of spent fuel located at various nuclear facilities around the world is a challenge. It is not a trivial exercise to collect and compile spent fuel inventory data as they are subject to dynamic change. Spent fuel inventory data are important to various national and international spent fuel management activities, especially for planning and regulatory activities. Recently, security issues became an additional factor to be considered in the information management associated with spent fuel or radioactive waste. The specific need for spent fuel inventory data varies depending on the ultimate purpose: International Level - compilation on a gross tonnage (in heavy metal basis) mainly for statistical purposes and global trend analysis both for use by IAEA and at the request of Member States; National Level - compilation for industry and regulatory purposes on either a gross tonnage or individual assembly basis to assist in planning and public awareness; and Operator Level - the origination and maintenance of detailed data on individual assemblies by the utility for operational needs or to meet regulatory requirements. There is, in general, a global trend towards greater transparency of information with the general public which may require more information to be made public on spent fuel management, including data on inventories or transportation. With the increase in the commercialisation of the nuclear industry, the trend is away from national governments operating nuclear facilities, including spent fuel management. This results in the spread of information on spent fuel as it is not concentrated at government level, but is instead held by various organizations . Spent fuel information may also have to be

  12. Damage in spent nuclear fuel defined by properties and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The properties of light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods and assemblies are altered in service due to irradiation. Some of these alterations render the fuel unsuitable for emplacement in casks used for storage or transportation without special handling. Title 10 (Energy) of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations Part 72 (storage) and Part 71 (transportation) establish direct requirements for the behavior expected of spent fuel. In particular, retrievability and prevention of gross breaches are required in storage and no reconfiguration of the fuel is allowed during normal transport. In addition, in the process of meeting other regulations related to criticality, shielding, and containment, the cask designers may need to place additional requirements on the behavior of the fuel. The definition of damaged fuel might be based on the ability of the fuel to perform in a manner such that the direct regulatory requirements and the onus placed on the fuel by the cask designer are met. Fuels that have alterations that do not permit it to perform its required safety function, without special handling, should be regarded as damaged. Since the requirements placed on the fuel may vary during phases of the fuel cycle, the potential exists for independent definitions to co-exist for interim dry storage, transport, and final disposal in a geologic repository. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (USNRC) Spent Fuel Program Office (SFPO) has provided guidance in defining damaged fuel in Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) -1. This guidance is similar to that being developed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Neither of these documents provides the logic behind the definition of damaged fuel. This paper will discuss the requirements placed on the fuel for dry interim storage and transportation and the ways that these requirements drive the definition of damaged spent fuel. Examples will be given illustrating the methodology. (author)

  13. Survey of experience with dry storage of spent nuclear fuel and update of wet storage experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel storage is an important part of spent fuel management. At present about 45,000 t of spent water reactor fuel have been discharged worldwide. Only a small fraction of this fuel (approximately 7%) has been reprocessed. The amount of spent fuel arisings will increase significantly in the next 15 years. Estimates indicate that up to the year 2000 about 200,000 t HM of spent fuel could be accumulated. In view of the large quantities of spent fuel discharged from nuclear power plants and future expected discharges, many countries are involved in the construction of facilities for the storage of spent fuel and in the development of effective methods for spent fuel surveillance and monitoring to ensure that reliable and safe operation of storage facilities is achievable until the time when the final disposal of spent fuel or high level wastes is feasible. The first demonstrations of final disposal are not expected before the years 2000-2020. This is why the long term storage of spent fuel and HLW is a vital problem for all countries with nuclear power programmes. The present survey contains data on dry storage and recent information on wet storage, transportation, rod consolidation, etc. The main aim is to provide spent fuel management policy making organizations, designers, scientists and spent fuel storage facility operators with the latest information on spent fuel storage technology under dry and wet conditions and on innovations in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise

  15. DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has produced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for many years as part of its various missions and programs. The historical process for managing this SNF was to reprocess it whereby valuable material such as uranium or plutonium was chemically separated from the wastes. These fuels were not intended for long-term storage. As the need for uranium and plutonium decreased, it became necessary to store the SNF for extended lengths of time. This necessity resulted from a 1992 DOE decision to discontinue reprocessing SNF to recover strategic materials (although limited processing of SNF to meet repository acceptance criteria remains under consideration, no plutonium or uranium extraction for other uses is planned). Both the facilities used for storage, and the fuel itself, began experiencing aging from this extended storage. New efforts are now necessary to assure suitable fuel and facility management until long-term decisions for spent fuel disposition are made and implemented. The Program Plan consists of 14 sections as follows: Sections 2--6 describe objectives, management, the work plan, the work breakdown structure, and the responsibility assignment matrix. Sections 7--9 describe the program summary schedules, site logic diagram, SNF Program resource and support requirements. Sections 10--14 present various supplemental management requirements and quality assurance guidelines

  16. Performance assessment of DOE spent nuclear fuel and surplus plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is under consideration by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a potential site for the disposal of the nation's radioactive wastes in a geologic repository. The wastes consist of commercial spent fuel, DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF), high level waste (HLW), and surplus plutonium. The DOE was mandated by Congress in the fiscal 1997 Energy and Water Appropriations Act to complete a viability assessment (VA) of the repository in September of 1998. The assessment consists of a preliminary design concept for the critical elements of the repository, a total system performance assessment (TSPA), a plan and cost estimate for completion of the license application, and an estimate of the cost to construct and operate the repository. This paper presents the results of the sensitivity analyses that were conducted to examine the behavior of DOE SNF and plutonium waste forms in the environment of the base case repository that was modeled for the TSPA-VA. Fifteen categories of DOE SNF and two Plutonium waste forms were examined and their contribution to radiation dose to humans was evaluated

  17. DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel strategic plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for safely and efficiently managing DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and SNF returned to the US from foreign research reactors (FRR). The fuel will be treated where necessary, packaged suitable for repository disposal where practicable, and placed in interim dry storage. These actions will remove remaining vulnerabilities, make as much spent fuel as possible ready for ultimate disposition, and substantially reduce the cost of continued storage. The goal is to complete these actions in 10 years. This SNF Strategic Plan updates the mission, vision, objectives, and strategies for the management of DOE-owned SNF articulated by the SNF Strategic Plan issued in December 1994. The plan describes the remaining issues facing the EM SNF Program, lays out strategies for addressing these issues, and identifies success criteria by which program progress is measured. The objectives and strategies in this plan are consistent with the following Em principles described by the Assistance Secretary in his June 1996 initiative to establish a 10-year time horizon for achieving most program objectives: eliminate and manage the most serious risks; reduce mortgage and support costs to free up funds for further risk reduction; protect worker health and safety; reduce generation of wastes; create a collaborative relationship between DOE and its regulators and stakeholders; focus technology development on cost and risk reduction; and strengthen management and financial control

  18. Instrumentation for measuring the burnup of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many different methods or procedures have been developed to measure reactivity of fissil materials. Few of these, however, have been designed specifically for light water reactor fuel or have actually been used to measure the reactivity of spent fuel. The methods that have been used to make measurements of related systems are the 252Cf source-driven noise analysis method, a noise analysis method using natural neutron sources, subcritical assembly measurements, and pulsed neutron techniques. Several different approaches to directly measuring burnup have been developed by various organizations. The experimental work on actual spent nuclear fuel utilizing reactivity measurement techniques is insufficient to provide conclusive evidence of the applicability of these techniques for verifying fuel burnup. The work with burnup meters indicates, however, that good correlations can be obtained with any of the systems. A burnup meter's primary function would be a secondary assurance that the administrative records are not grossly in error. Reactivity measurements provide information relating to the reactivity of the fuel only under the conditions measured. Criticality prevention design requirements will necessitate that casks accommodate a minimum burnup level for a given initial enrichment (i.e., a maximum reactivity). Direct measurement of the burnup will enable an easy determination of whether a particular fuel assembly can be shipped in a specific cask with a minimum number of additional correlations

  19. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array.

  20. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array

  1. DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel strategic plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for safely and efficiently managing DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and SNF returned to the US from foreign research reactors (FRR). The fuel will be treated where necessary, packaged suitable for repository disposal where practicable, and placed in interim dry storage. These actions will remove remaining vulnerabilities, make as much spent fuel as possible ready for ultimate disposition, and substantially reduce the cost of continued storage. The goal is to complete these actions in 10 years. This SNF Strategic Plan updates the mission, vision, objectives, and strategies for the management of DOE-owned SNF articulated by the SNF Strategic Plan issued in December 1994. The plan describes the remaining issues facing the EM SNF Program, lays out strategies for addressing these issues, and identifies success criteria by which program progress is measured. The objectives and strategies in this plan are consistent with the following Em principles described by the Assistance Secretary in his June 1996 initiative to establish a 10-year time horizon for achieving most program objectives: eliminate and manage the most serious risks; reduce mortgage and support costs to free up funds for further risk reduction; protect worker health and safety; reduce generation of wastes; create a collaborative relationship between DOE and its regulators and stakeholders; focus technology development on cost and risk reduction; and strengthen management and financial control.

  2. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew D. Hinds

    2001-10-17

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise.

  3. Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Norway: Status and Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) in Norway has arisen from irradiation of fuel in the JEEP I and JEEP II reactors at Kjeller, and in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) in Halden. In total there are some 16 tonnes of SNF, all of which is currently stored on-site, in either wet or dry storage facilities. The greater part of the SNF, 12 tonnes, consists of aluminium-clad fuel, of which 10 tonnes is metallic uranium fuel and the remainder oxide (UO2). Such fuel presents significant challenges with respect to long-term storage and disposal. Current policy is that existing spent fuel will, as far as possible considering its suitability for later direct disposal, be stored until final disposal is possible. Several committees have advised the Government of Norway on, among others, policy issues, storage methods and localisation of a storage facility. Both experts and stakeholders have participated in these committees. This paper presents an overview of the spent fuel in Norway and a description of current storage arrangements. The prospects for long-term storage are then described, including a summary of recommendations made to government, the reactions of various stakeholders to these recommendations, the current status, and the proposed next steps. A recommended policy is to construct a new storage facility for the fuel to be stored for a period of at least 50 years. In the meantime a national final disposal facility should be constructed and taken into operation. It has been recommended that the aluminium-clad fuel be reprocessed in an overseas commercial facility to produce a stable waste form for storage and disposal. This recommendation is controversial, and a decision has not yet been taken on whether to pursue this option. An analysis of available storage concepts for the more modern fuel types resulted in the recommendation to use dual-purpose casks. In addition, it was recommended to construct a future storage facility in a rock hall instead of a free

  4. Reduction of uranium in disposal conditions of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This literature study is a summary of publications, in which the reduction of uranium by iron has been investigated in anaerobic groundwater conditions or in aqueous solution in general. The basics of the reduction phenomena and the oxidation states, complexes and solubilities of uranium and iron in groundwaters are discussed as an introduction to the subject, as well as, the Finnish disposal concept of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel itself mainly (∼96 %) consists of a sparingly soluble uranium(IV) dioxide, UO2(s), which is stable phase in the anticipated reducing disposal conditions. If spent fuel gets in contact with groundwater, oxidizing conditions might be induced by the radiolysis of water, or by the intrusion of oxidizing glacial melting water. Under these conditions, the oxidation and dissolution of uranium dioxide to more soluble U(VI) species could occur. This could lead to the mobilization of uranium and other components of spent fuel matrix including fission products and transuranium elements. The reduction of uranium back to oxidation state U(IV) can be considered as a favourable immobilization mechanism in a long-term, leading to precipitation due to the low solubility of U(IV) species. The cast iron insert of the disposal canister and its anaerobic corrosion products are the most important reductants under disposal conditions, but dissolved ferrous iron may also function as reductant. Other iron sources in the buffer or near-field rock, are also considered as possible reductants. The reduction of uranium is a very challenging phenomenon to investigate. The experimental studies need e.g. well-controlled anoxic conditions and measurements of oxidation states. Reduction and other simultaneous phenomena are difficult to distinghuish. The groundwater conditions (pH, Eh and ions) influence on the prevailing complexes of U and Fe and on forming corrosion products of iron and, thus they determine also the redox chemistry. The partial reduction of

  5. SSI's standpoints regarding the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report gives an overview of the opinions and statements expressed by the SSI concerning the methodology and the site selection criteria suggested for disposal of spent nuclear fuels in Sweden. The review covers the period from the mid-seventies to 1998

  6. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Operations Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report Annex B--Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1999, (Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements), Rev. 4. and the CVDF Final Design Report. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence and references to the CVDF System Design Descriptions (SDDs). This manual has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved

  8. Railroad infrastructure adequacy for safe transportation of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the railroad industry's concerns on the movement of spent nuclear fuel including the magnitude of thermal and mechanical forces in train accidents, emergency response capability, railroad's liability for non-breach-of-cask accidents, and the importance of using dedicated trains to improve public perception of these movements; summarize the current status of the condition of the American railroads' equipment, facilities, track structure, and right-of-way; outline the continuing efforts of the railroad industry to improve customer service and profitability through downsizing and shifting of branch lines to more customer-oriented and efficient short-line carriers; and discuss potential problems of government subsidization of private railroads to enable upgrading of tracks and structures to handle rights-of-way in the future

  9. Encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel in ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international situation with regard to deposition of spent nuclear fuel is surveyed, with emphasis on encapsulation in ceramic materials. The feasibility and advantages of ceramic containers, thermodynamic stable in groundwater, are discussed as well as the possibility to ensure that stability for longevity by engineered measures. The design prerequisite are summarized and suggestions are made for a conceptual design, comprising rutile containers with stacks of coiled fuel pins. A novel technique is suggested for the homogeneous sealing of rutile containers at low temperatures. acceptable also for the fuel pin package. Key points are given for research, demonstration and verifications of the design foundations and for future improvements. Of which a few ideas are exemplified. (author)

  10. Storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel in dry for Mexican nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article the relevant aspects of the spent fuel storage and the questions that should be taken in consideration for the possible future facilities of this type in the country are approached. A brief description is proposed about the characteristics of the storage systems in dry, the incorporate regulations to the present Nuclear Regulator Standard, the planning process of an installation, besides the approaches considered once resolved the use of these systems; as the modifications to the system, the authorization periods for the storage, the type of materials to store and the consequent environmental impact to their installation. At the present time the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) considers the possible generation of two authorization types for these facilities: Specific, directed to establish a new nuclear installation with the authorization of receiving, to transfer and to possess spent fuel and other materials for their storage; and General, focused to those holders that have an operation license of a reactor that allows them the storage of the nuclear fuel and other materials that they possess. Both authorizations should be valued according to the necessities that are presented. In general, this installation type represents a viable solution for the administration of the spent fuel and other materials that require of a temporary solution previous to its final disposal. Its use in the nuclear industry has been increased in the last years demonstrating to be appropriate and feasible without having a significant impact to the health, public safety and the environment. Mexico has two main nuclear facilities, the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde of the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) and the facilities of the TRIGA Reactor of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) that will require in a future to use this type of disposition installation of the spent fuel and generated wastes. (Author)

  11. 77 FR 65417 - Northern States Power Company (Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant Independent Spent Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Northern States Power Company (Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation); Notice of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Reconstitution Pursuant to 10 CFR...

  12. Managing Ageing in Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel pools (SFP) that are outside containment system without redundancy whose failure could release radioactive material that exceed allowable limit. If SFP have to continue to operate for long term after power plant shutdown it is essential to develop an ageing management program within the general life management program of the nuclear power plant. This work refers to the Atucha I nuclear power plant (NPP) SFPs. The fuel assembly (FA) of Atucha NPPs is 6 meter long and encompasses 36 Zircaloy-4 cladded fuel rods. For these spent fuel assemblies (SFA) there are two storage buildings located adjacent to the reactor building. One of the alternatives considered at the end of Atucha I operation is to transfer all SFAs to dry storage, another one is to continue the operation of the SFPs and to transfer to dry storage just a selected amount of SFAs. For the selection of the dry technology it should be kept in mind the characteristics of the Aturcha SFA, in particular, its length and burnup which differs according to the discharge date because of the use of natural uranium (NU) or slightly enriched uranium (SEU). Therefore, the fundamental point here is to keep in mind that it is the effect of ageing due to time and use that cause net changes in the characteristics of a System, Structure and Component (SSC). We employ formal processes to systematically identify and evaluate the Critical Systems, Structures and Components (CSSCs) in the facilities. A Technology Watch Programme is being established to ensure that degradation mechanisms, which could impact on facilities life, are promptly investigated so that mitigating programmes can be designed. With this methodology we analyse the following components of the pools, concrete wall stability, integrity of concrete structure, pool lining, and integrity of metal structure, pipe failures, degradation in storage racks and SFA degradation. (author)

  13. Radiation induced corrosion of copper for spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long term safety of repositories for radioactive waste is one of the main concerns for countries utilizing nuclear power. The integrity of engineered and natural barriers in such repositories must be carefully evaluated in order to minimize the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. One of the most developed concepts of long term storage of spent nuclear fuel is the Swedish KBS-3 method. According to this method, the spent fuel will be sealed inside copper canisters surrounded by bentonite clay and placed 500 m down in stable bedrock. Despite the importance of the process of radiation induced corrosion of copper, relatively few studies have been reported. In this work the effect of the total gamma dose on radiation induced corrosion of copper in anoxic pure water has been studied experimentally. Copper samples submerged in water were exposed to a series of total doses using three different dose rates. Unirradiated samples were used as reference samples throughout. The copper surfaces were examined qualitatively using IRAS and XPS and quantitatively using cathodic reduction. The concentration of copper in solution after irradiation was measured using ICP-AES. The influence of aqueous radiation chemistry on the corrosion process was evaluated based on numerical simulations. The experiments show that the dissolution as well as the oxide layer thickness increase upon radiation. Interestingly, the evaluation using numerical simulations indicates that aqueous radiation chemistry is not the only process driving the corrosion of copper in these systems. - Highlights: • Copper cubes were exposed to gamma radiation in anoxic pure water. • The dissolution of copper increases with increasing absorbed total dose. • The oxide layer formed consists mainly of cuprite. • Numerical simulations of the irradiation experiments were performed. • There is a large discrepancy between numerical simulations and experimental results

  14. Managing spent nuclear fuel: What is the purpose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel may be considered a resource for further production of electricity or as a source of materials for nuclear weapon production. It may also be seen as a toxic waste that may be misused for radiological terrorism or the production of nuclear explosives. Different assessments of the relative importance of different perspective may lead to very different waste management strategies. Very different perspectives may also lead to agreement on early stages of waste management while disagreement will be revealed at later stages. In order to facilitate a transparent decision making process the purpose of waste management must be made clear. From the defined purpose, the relevance of facts, arguments and counter arguments can be assessed. Having a clearly defined purpose will also show the what needs there are to define the distribution of economic liabilities for possible costs among different actors. The economic, social and ideological stake-holders involved in the decision making process are unlikely to reach consensus. However, making the clarification's suggested above will serve the purpose of revealing the rational interests behind what presently is interpreted as real - or imagined - hidden agendas of the actors in the process

  15. Advantages on dry interim storage for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanato, L.S. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo, Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2468, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rzyski, B.M. [IPEN/ CNEN-SP, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. e-mail: romanato@ctmsp.mar.mil.br

    2006-07-01

    When the nuclear fuel lose its ability to efficiently create energy it is removed from the core reactor and moved to a storage unit waiting for a final destination. Generally, the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) remains inside concrete basins with water within the reactors facility for the radioactive activity decay. Water cools the generated heat and shields radioactivity emissions. After some period of time in water basins the SNF can be sent to a definitive deposition in a geological repository and handled as radioactive waste or to reprocessing installations, or still wait for a future solution. Meanwhile, SNF remains stored for a period of time in dry or wet installations, depending on the method adopted by the nuclear power plant or other plans of the country. In many SNF wet storage sites the capacity can be fulfilled very quickly. If so, additional area or other alternative storage system should be given. There are many options to provide capacity increase in the wet storage area, but dry storages are worldwide preferred since it reduces corrosion concerns. In the wet storage the temperature and water purity should be constantly controlled whereas in the dry storage the SNF stands protected in specially designed canisters. Dry interim storages are practical and approved in many countries especially that have the 'wait and see' philosophy (wait to see new technologies development). This paper shows the advantages of dry interim storages sites in comparison with the wet ones and the nowadays problems as terrorism. (Author)

  16. Final disposal of high levels waste and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foreign and international activities on the final disposal of high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel have been reviewed. A considerable research effort is devoted to development of acceptable disposal options. The different technical concepts presently under study are described in the report. Numerous studies have been made in many countries of the potential risks to future generations from radioactive wastes in underground disposal repositories. In the report the safety assessment studies and existing performance criteria for geological disposal are briefly discussed. The studies that are being made in Canada, the United States, France and Switzerland are the most interesting for Sweden as these countries also are considering disposal into crystalline rocks. The overall time-tables in different countries for realisation of the final disposal are rather similar. Normally actual large-scale disposal operations for high-level wastes are not foreseen until after year 2000. In the United States the Congress recently passed the important Nuclear Waste Policy Act. It gives a rather firm timetable for site-selection and construction of nuclear waste disposal facilities. According to this act the first repository for disposal of commercial high-level waste must be in operation not later than in January 1998. (Author)

  17. 78 FR 66858 - Waste Confidence-Continued Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... storage of spent nuclear fuel beyond a reactor's licensed life for operation and prior to ultimate... generically addresses the environmental impacts of continued storage of spent nuclear fuel beyond the licensed... fuel beyond a reactor's licensed life for operation and prior to ultimate disposal. (78 FR 56776)....

  18. An overview of burnup credit application in spent nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status of burnup credit application has been overviewed for spent nuclear fuel management. It was revealed that the use of burnup credit is practically limited to spent nuclear fuel storage, for which selected actinides-only are taken into account

  19. Determination of plutonium’s isotopic composition in PWR spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article the isotopic composition of the plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel at discharge is analysed. The composition is analysed as a function of burn-up of a light water reactor using once-through cycle. The results are obtained using two different software products. Key words: pressurized water reactors, plutonium, spent nuclear fuel

  20. Repository for spent nuclear fuel. Plant description layout D - Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the final repository for spent nuclear fuel, SFK, which is located at Forsmark, in Oesthammar. The bedrock at the site is part of a so-called tectonic lens, in which the rock composition is relatively homogeneous and less deformed than outside the lens. The bedrock consists mainly of granite with high quartz content and good thermal conductivity. The central parts above ground are grouped in an operations area, located at the Soederviken on the south side of the intake duct for cooling water for nuclear power plant. Operating area is divided into an internal, secured portion, where the canisters of fuel are handled and there are links to the underground part, and a outer part, where the buffer, backfill and sealing used in the repository's barriers are produced. The above-ground part of the plant and also include storage of excavated rock, ventilation stations, and supplies of bentonite. The underground portion consists of a central area and a storage area. Caverns of the central area contain features for the underground operation. It communicates with the internal operating range above ground via a spiral ramp and several shafts. The ramp used to transport capsules of spent fuel and other heavy or bulky transport. The shafts are used to transport rock, buffer, backfill and staff, as well as for ventilation. The largest part of the space below ground is the repository where the canisters with the spent fuel are disposed. The capsules are deposited in vertical holes in the tunnels. When the deposit in a tunnel is complete, the tunnel is re-filled. The two main activities underground is rock work and disposal work, which are conducted separately from each other. Rock works covers all steps required to excavate tunnels and drill deposition holes, as well as to make temporary installations in the tunnels. To the landfill works count, besides the deposit of the capsule, the placement of the bentonite buffer in the deposition hole and backfilling

  1. Evironmental assessment factors relating to reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is in two parts. Part I presents the criteria and evaluation factors, based primarily on US experience, which may be used to carry out an environmental assessment of spent fuel reprocessing. The concept of As Low as is Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is introduced in limiting radiation exposure. The factors influencing both occupational and general public radiation exposure are reviewed. Part II provides information on occupational and general public radiation exposure in relation to reprocessing taken from various sources including UNSCEAR and GESMO. Some information is provided in relation to potential accidents at reprocessing or MOX fuel refabrication plants. The magnitude of the services, energy, land use and non-radiological effluents for the reference design of reprocessing plant are also presented

  2. Constor steel concrete sandwich cask concept for transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spent nuclear fuel transport and storage sandwich cask concept has been developed together with the Russian company CKTI. Special consideration was given to an economical and effective way of manufacturing by using conventional mechanical engineering technologies and common materials. The main objective of this development was to fabricate these casks in countries not having highly specialized industries. Nevertheless, this sandwich cask concept fulfills both the internationally valid IAEA criteria for transportation and the German criteria for long-term intermediate storage. The basic cask concept has been designed for adaptation to different spent fuel specifications as well as handling conditions in the NPP. Recently, adaptations have been made for spent fuel from the RBMK and VVER reactors, and also for BWR spent fuel. The analyses of nuclear and thermal behaviour as well as of strength according to IAEA examination requirements (9-m-drop, 1-m-pin drop, 800 deg. C-fire test) and of the behaviour during accident scenarios at the storage site (drop, fire, gas cloud explosion, side impact) were carried out by means of recognized calculation methods and programmes. In a special experimental programme, the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of heavy concrete were examined and the reference values required for safety analyses were determined. The results of the safety analysis after drop tests according to IAEA-regulations as well as after 1 m-drops at the storage site were confirmed by means of a test programme using a scale model. The fabrication technology has been tested with help of a half scale cask model. The model has been prefabricated in Russia and completed in Germany. It has been shown that the CONSTOR cask can be fabricated in an effective and economic way. (authors)

  3. Data module development for spent nuclear fuel transportation risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1986, in compliance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued environmental assessments (EAs) of the potential repository sites for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive wastes. A major concern expressed in the public comments on the EAs was the need for a route-specific risk analysis. One approach to this concern was presented in 1987 by DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) at a workshop on models for OCRWM transportation risk analysis in Salt Lake City, Utah. The DOE decided that analytical capabilities for a route-specific risk analysis should be maintained at the state level, thus requiring state-specific accident and agricultural output data. The DOE also decided that such an analysis warranted development of a more reliable data base for a number of key input parameters for transportation risk assessment. Such a data base would be compiled in a format acceptable for input into the existing transportation risk code RADTRAN. Seven data modules have been developed on the basis of these considerations. A system module was also developed for integrating the data modules and serves as a preprocessor of the RADTRAN input data file. The relationship of the modules to the RADTRAN input is shown

  4. Spent nuclear fuels project characterization data quality objectives strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strategy is presented for implementation of the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process to the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) characterization activities. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are teaming in the characterization of the SNF on the Hanford Site and are committed to the DQO process outlined in this strategy. The SNFP characterization activities will collect and evaluate the required data to support project initiatives and decisions related to interim safe storage and the path forward for disposal. The DQO process is the basis for the activity specific SNF characterization requirements, termed the SNF Characterization DQO for that specific activity, which will be issued by the WHC or PNL organization responsible for the specific activity. The Characterization Plan prepared by PNL defines safety, remediation, and disposal issues. The ongoing Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) requirement and plans and the fuel storage and disposition options studies provide the need and direction for the activity specific DQO process. The hierarchy of characterization and DQO related documentation requirements is presented in this strategy. The management of the DQO process and the means of documenting the DQO process are described as well as the tailoring of the DQO process to the specific need of the SNFP characterization activities. This strategy will assure stakeholder and project management that the proper data was collected and evaluated to support programmatic decisions

  5. Estimated consequences from severe spent nuclear fuel transportation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RISKIND software package is used to estimate radiological consequences of severe accident scenarios involving the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. Radiological risks are estimated for both a collective population and a maximally exposed individual based on representative truck and rail cask designs described in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) modal study. The estimate of collective population risk considers all possible environmental pathways, including acute and long-term exposures, and is presented in terms of the 50-y committed effective dose equivalent. Radiological risks to a maximally exposed individual from acute exposure are estimated and presented in terms of the first year and 50-y committed effective dose equivalent. Consequences are estimated for accidents occurring in rural and urban population areas. The modeled pathways include inhalation during initial passing of the radioactive cloud, external exposure from a reduction of the cask shielding, long-term external exposure. from ground deposition, and ingestion from contaminated food (rural only). The major pathways and contributing radionuclides are identified, and the effects of possible mitigative actions are discussed. The cask accident responses and the radionuclide release fractions are modeled as described in the NRC modal study. Estimates of severe accident probabilities are presented for both truck and rail modes of transport. The assumptions made in this study tend to be conservative; however, a set of multiplicative factors are identified that can be applied to estimate more realistic conditions

  6. Transporting spent nuclear fuel: A framework for decision-making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study explores whether a consensual decision-making approach could be effective for resolving disputes involving the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. Interviews with the key parties to the dispute, a questionnaire, and a review of recorded testimony comprise the source materials. Using this information, the parties' underlying objectives were identified, along with the specific issues in dispute. The objectives of each of the parties were combined into a composite objectives hierarchy, and performance measures were defined for evaluating the consequences of transportation-system alternatives. Measurable multiattribute value functions were assessed for: state, local, and Indian Tribal officials; electric utilities; environmental and public interest groups; the transportation industry; the US Department of Transportation and Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and the US Department of Energy. A computer model was developed to provide estimates of health and safety and economic impacts of the alternatives. Transportation-system alternatives were developed, and evaluated using the value functions. Some efficient alternatives were identified that each party might prefer to its best alternative to a negotiated agreement. The demonstration of the possible existence of preferred alternatives suggests that it may be possible to make agreements that are to the advantage of all parties. Some transportation-system designs are developed that could be used as a concrete starting point for actual negotiations

  7. Multi-Detector Analysis System for Spent Nuclear Fuel Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reber, Edward Lawrence; Aryaeinejad, Rahmat; Cole, Jerald Donald; Drigert, Mark William; Jewell, James Keith; Egger, Ann Elizabeth; Cordes, Gail Adele

    1999-09-01

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Non-Destructive Analysis (NDA) program at INEEL is developing a system to characterize SNF for fissile mass, radiation source term, and fissile isotopic content. The system is based on the integration of the Fission Assay Tomography System (FATS) and the Gamma-Neutron Analysis Technique (GNAT) developed under programs supported by the DOE Office of Non-proliferation and National Security. Both FATS and GNAT were developed as separate systems to provide information on the location of special nuclear material in weapons configuration (FATS role), and to measure isotopic ratios of fissile material to determine if the material was from a weapon (GNAT role). FATS is capable of not only determining the presence and location of fissile material but also the quantity of fissile material present to within 50%. GNAT determines the ratios of the fissile and fissionable material by coincidence methods that allow the two prompt (immediately) produced fission fragments to be identified. Therefore, from the combination of FATS and GNAT, MDAS is able to measure the fissile material, radiation source term, and fissile isotopics content.

  8. Applying fast calorimetry on a spent nuclear fuel calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liljenfeldt, Henrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management (Sweden); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    Recently at Los Alamos National Laboratory, sophisticated prediction algorithms have been considered for the use of calorimetry for treaty verification. These algorithms aim to predict the equilibrium temperature based on early data and therefore be able to shorten the measurement time while maintaining good accuracy. The algorithms have been implemented in MATLAB and applied on existing equilibrium measurements from a spent nuclear fuel calorimeter located at the Swedish nuclear fuel interim storage facility. The results show significant improvements in measurement time in the order of 15 to 50 compared to equilibrium measurements, but cannot predict the heat accurately in less time than the currently used temperature increase method can. This Is both due to uncertainties in the calibration of the method as well as identified design features of the calorimeter that limits the usefulness of equilibrium type measurements. The conclusions of these findings are discussed, and suggestions of both improvements of the current calorimeter as well as what to keep in mind in a new design are given.

  9. Spent nuclear fuel transportation: Public issues and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The court-ordered shipping of 750 spent nuclear fuel assemblies from West Valley, New York back to their utility owners has generated considerable public and media interest. This paper discusses the specific concerns of the general public over the West Valley shipments, the issues raised by opposition groups, the interests of public officials and emergency preparedness teams as well as the media coverage generated. An analysis is performed on the effectiveness of the West Valley and utility public information programs utilized in addressing these issues, concerns and interests. Emphasis is placed on communications which work to facilitate the shipments and generate fuel transport acceptance. Information programs are discussed which increase preparedness for nuclear shipments by emergency response teams and build public confidence in their safety. The paper also examines communications which could have further enhanced the shipping campaigns to date. Finally, plans are discussed for media preparation with interview training and press conferences. Emphasis is placed on materials provided for the media which has served to generate more favorable print and air time

  10. Applying fast calorimetry on a spent nuclear fuel calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently at Los Alamos National Laboratory, sophisticated prediction algorithms have been considered for the use of calorimetry for treaty verification. These algorithms aim to predict the equilibrium temperature based on early data and therefore be able to shorten the measurement time while maintaining good accuracy. The algorithms have been implemented in MATLAB and applied on existing equilibrium measurements from a spent nuclear fuel calorimeter located at the Swedish nuclear fuel interim storage facility. The results show significant improvements in measurement time in the order of 15 to 50 compared to equilibrium measurements, but cannot predict the heat accurately in less time than the currently used temperature increase method can. This Is both due to uncertainties in the calibration of the method as well as identified design features of the calorimeter that limits the usefulness of equilibrium type measurements. The conclusions of these findings are discussed, and suggestions of both improvements of the current calorimeter as well as what to keep in mind in a new design are given.

  11. Cermet Spent Nuclear Fuel Casks and Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multipurpose transport, aging, and disposal casks are needed for the management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Self-shielded cermet casks can out-perform current SNF casks because of the superior properties of cermets, which consist of encapsulated hard ceramic particulates dispersed in a continuous ductile metal matrix to produce a strong high-integrity, high-thermal conductivity cask. A multi-year, multinational development and testing program has been developing cermet SNF casks made of steel, depleted uranium dioxide, and other materials. Because cermets are the traditional material of construction for armor, cermet casks can provide superior protection against assault. For disposal, cermet waste packages (WPs) with appropriate metals and ceramics can buffer the local geochemical environment to (1) slow degradation of SNF, (2) reduce water flow though the degraded WP, (3) sorb neptunium and other radionuclides that determine the ultimate radiation dose to the public from the repository, and (4) contribute to long-term nuclear criticality control. Finally, new cermet cask fabrication methods have been partly developed to manufacture the casks with the appropriate properties. The results of this work are summarized with references to the detailed reports. (authors)

  12. Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear reactors and nuclear spent fuel interim storage in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors visited Germany in April 2013 to investigate state of reactor decommissioning and dismantling and interim storage of spent fuels reflecting nuclear power phaseout policy after the Fukushima accident. They visited interim storage facilities of radioactive wastes (ZLN, Zwischenlanger Nord) and central active workshop (ZAW, Zentrale Aktive Werkstatt) at Greifswald, and interim storage facilities of spent fuels at Philippsburg. CASTOR (Cask for Storage and Transport of Radioactive Material) was used for interim storage of spent fuels and high-level wastes for 40 years. Amount of wastes produced by decommissioning and dismantling was estimated 1800 ktons consisting of 1200 ktons non-radioactive and 600 ktons radioactive wastes, 500 ktons of which could be decontaminated less than clearance level and 100 ktons of which were obliged to be stored as radioactive wastes. New geological repository site for high level radioactive wastes should be found and developed. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Thermal analysis of spent nuclear fuel shipping cas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) thermal analysis was performed for the TN-24P cask. For the analysis, ANSYS Fluent as a CFD tool was selected since it has the proper finite volume methods to realistically simulate the thermal behavior of shipping casks. For the analysis, spent fuels discharged from pressurized water reactors (PWRs) were modeled. In the model, there are 24 PWR spent fuel assemblies loaded in the TN-24P cask. The fuel design is assumed to be similar to standard Westinghouse 15x15 rod design. Total heat (decay) generated in the cask was estimated to be 20.6 kW. To input the axial power profile required to calculate the heat flux, a User Defined Function was generated. Fuel storage space (canister) is filled with Helium gas to cool spent nuclear fuel. In the cask, heat transfer occurs through the heat conduction by helium and basket, natural circulation driven by gravity, and thermal radiation in the complex geometry. In the canister region, laminar flow model with Boussinesq approximation is used to simulate the natural circulation. The helium domain was assumed symmetric in the model. For thermal radiation, the Discrete Ordinates (DO) model was chosen in the presented study due to its accuracy and capability of parallel processing. In typical vertical TN-24P dry storage cask system consist of two nested cask. Between inner and outer cask is in the air. Air inlet section is at the bottom side of cask and outlet ventilation is at top of cask. At this region, turbulence regime occurs and turbulence is modeled by using k-epsilon model. The analysis include small scaled and full scaled model. In small scale model, geometry is defined rectangular to make mesh generation easy and to validate the analysis tools using the experimental data. In the full-scale simulation, the results of analysis and experimental data for peak clad temperature (PCT) were compared. Key Words: TN-24P dry storage cask, CFD, thermal analysis, PCT, air blockage

  14. Issues related to EM management of DOE spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a summary of the important issues involved in managing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). Issues related to civilian SNF activities are not discussed. DOE-owned SNF is stored primarily at the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and West Valley Demonstration Project. Smaller quantities of SNF are stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There is a wide variety of fuel types, including both low and high enrichment fuels from weapons production, DOE reactors, research and development programs, naval programs, and universities. Most fuel is stored in pools associated with reactor or reprocessing facilities. Smaller quantities are in dry storage. Physical conditions of the fuel range from excellent to poor or severely damaged. An issue is defined as an important question that must be answered or decision that must be made on a topic or subject relevant to achieving the complimentary objectives of (a) storing SNF in compliance with applicable regulations and orders until it can be disposed, and (b) safely disposing of DOE's SNF. The purpose of this document is to define the issues; no recommendations are made on resolutions. As DOE's national SNF management program is implemented, a system of issues identification, documentation, tracking, and resolution will be implemented. This document is an initial effort at issues identification. The first section of this document is an overview of issues that are common to several or all DOE facilities that manage SNF. The common issues are organized according to specific aspects of spent fuel management. This is followed by discussions of management issues that apply specifically to individual DOE facilities. The last section provides literature references

  15. Issues related to EM management of DOE spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, D.G. [EG& G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Abashian, M.S.; Chakraborti, S.; Roberson, K.; Meloin, J.M. [IT Corp. (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This document is a summary of the important issues involved in managing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). Issues related to civilian SNF activities are not discussed. DOE-owned SNF is stored primarily at the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and West Valley Demonstration Project. Smaller quantities of SNF are stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There is a wide variety of fuel types, including both low and high enrichment fuels from weapons production, DOE reactors, research and development programs, naval programs, and universities. Most fuel is stored in pools associated with reactor or reprocessing facilities. Smaller quantities are in dry storage. Physical conditions of the fuel range from excellent to poor or severely damaged. An issue is defined as an important question that must be answered or decision that must be made on a topic or subject relevant to achieving the complimentary objectives of (a) storing SNF in compliance with applicable regulations and orders until it can be disposed, and (b) safely disposing of DOE`s SNF. The purpose of this document is to define the issues; no recommendations are made on resolutions. As DOE`s national SNF management program is implemented, a system of issues identification, documentation, tracking, and resolution will be implemented. This document is an initial effort at issues identification. The first section of this document is an overview of issues that are common to several or all DOE facilities that manage SNF. The common issues are organized according to specific aspects of spent fuel management. This is followed by discussions of management issues that apply specifically to individual DOE facilities. The last section provides literature references.

  16. Managing Spent Nuclear Fuel at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Hill; Denzel L. Fillmore

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a large inventory of diverse types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This legacy derives from the history of the INL as the National Reactor Testing Station, and from its mission to recover HEU from SNF and to test and examine SNF after irradiation. The INL also has a large diversity of SNF storage facilities, some 50 years old. SNF at INL has many forms—from intact assemblies down to metallurgical mounts, and some fuel has been wet stored for over 40 years. SNF is stored bare or in metal cans under water, or dry in vaults, caissons or casks. Inspection shows varying corrosion and degradation of the SNF and its storage cans. SNF has been stored in 10 different facilities: 5 pools, one cask storage pad, one vault, two generations of caisson facilities, and one modular Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The pools range in age from 40 years old to the most modern in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The near-term objective is to move SNF from older pools to interim dry storage, allowing shutdown and decommissioning of the older facilities. This move involves drying methods that are dependent on fuel type. The long-term objective is to have INL SNF in safe dry storage and ready to be shipped to the National Repository. The unique features of the INL SNF requires special treatments and packaging to meet the proposed repository acceptance criteria and SNF will be repackaged in standardized canisters for shipment and disposal in the National Repository. Disposal will use the standardized canisters that can be co-disposed with High Level Waste glass logs to limit the total fissile material in a repository waste package. The DOE standardized canister also simplifies the repository handling of the multitude of DOE SNF sizes and shapes.

  17. Spent nuclear fuel removal program at the West Valley Demonstration Project: Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent nuclear fuel removal program at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) consisted of removing the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies from the storage pool in the plant, loading them in shielded casks, and preparing the casks for transportation. So far, four fuel removal campaigns have been completed with the return of 625 spent nuclear fuel assemblies to their four utility owners. A fifth campaign, which is not yet completed, will transfer the remaining 125 fuel assemblies to a government site in Idaho. A spent fuel rod consolidation demonstration has been completed, and the storage canisters and their racks are being removed from the fuel receiving and storage pool to make way for installation of the size reduction equipment. A brief history of the West Valley reprocessing plant and the events leading to the storage and ownership of the spent nuclear fuel assemblies and their subsequent removal from West Valley are also recorded as background information. 3 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs

  18. 76 FR 81542 - In the Matter of ZIONSOLUTIONS, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station; Independent Spent Fuel Storage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of ZIONSOLUTIONS, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station; Independent Spent Fuel Storage..., Licensing and Inspection Directorate, Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation, Office of Nuclear... providing notice, in the matter of Zion Nuclear ] Power Station Independent Spent Fuel Storage...

  19. Policies, strategies and systems for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report an up-to-date account is made of the status of different principles, strategies and systems for the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. As large scale use of nuclear power for the production of electricity began in the 1960s and 1970s, studies of various principles and strategies for the management of the spent nuclear fuel were initialised. In particular in the USA, comprehensive studies were conducted of all strategies described in this report

  20. A robotized surface workstation for manipulation, filling and closing of packaging containers for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Options for the handling of spent nuclear fuel are described and a packaging cask for an underground repository is presented as also a robotic surface workplace for the repository. The potential for the closing the nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. Currently, a team of Czech experts is developing a project of fully robotic technology for manipulation and storage of packaging casks for spent nuclear fuel in host rock of underground repository.

  1. A robotized surface workstation for manipulation, filling and closing of packaging containers for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartos, Pavel [FITE a.s., Ostrava-Marianske Hory (Czech Republic); Haladova, Petra [Robotsystem, LLC/Moravian Research, LLC, Ostrava-Moravska (Czech Republic); Otcenasek, Petr

    2016-01-15

    Options for the handling of spent nuclear fuel are described and a packaging cask for an underground repository is presented as also a robotic surface workplace for the repository. The potential for the closing the nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. Currently, a team of Czech experts is developing a project of fully robotic technology for manipulation and storage of packaging casks for spent nuclear fuel in host rock of underground repository.

  2. Nuclear spent fuel management scenarios. Status and assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strategy for management of spent nuclear fuel from the Swedish nuclear power programme is interim storage for cooling and decay for about 30 years followed by direct disposal of the fuel in a geologic repository. In various contexts it is of interest to compare this strategy with other strategies that might be available in the future as a result of ongoing research and development. In particular partitioning and transmutation is one such strategy that is subject to considerable R and D-efforts within the European Union and in other countries with large nuclear programmes. To facilitate such comparisons for the Swedish situation, with a planned phase out of the nuclear power programme, SKB has asked the team at Royal Inst. of Technology to describe and explore some scenarios that might be applied to the Swedish programme. The results of this study are presented in this report. The following scenarios were studied by the help of a specially developed computer programme: Phase out by 2025 with direct disposal. Burning plutonium and minor actinides as MOX in BWR. Burning plutonium and minor actinides as MOX in PWR. Burning plutonium and minor actinides in ADS. Combined LWR-MOX plus ADS. For the different scenarios nuclide inventories, waste amounts, costs, additional electricity production etc have been assessed. As a general conclusion it was found that BWR is more efficient for burning plutonium in MOX fuel than PWR. The difference is approximately 10%. Furthermore the BWR produces about 10% less americium inventory. An ADS reactor park can theoretically in an ideal case burn (transmute) 99% of the transuranium isotopes. The duration of such a scenario heavily depends on the interim time needed for cooling the spent fuel before reprocessing. Assuming 10 years for cooling of nuclear fuel from ADS, the duration will be at least 200 years under optimistic technical assumptions. The development and use of advanced pyro-processing with an interim cooling time of only

  3. Nuclear spent fuel management scenarios. Status and assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufek, J.; Arzhanov, V.; Gudowski, W. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics

    2006-06-15

    The strategy for management of spent nuclear fuel from the Swedish nuclear power programme is interim storage for cooling and decay for about 30 years followed by direct disposal of the fuel in a geologic repository. In various contexts it is of interest to compare this strategy with other strategies that might be available in the future as a result of ongoing research and development. In particular partitioning and transmutation is one such strategy that is subject to considerable R and D-efforts within the European Union and in other countries with large nuclear programmes. To facilitate such comparisons for the Swedish situation, with a planned phase out of the nuclear power programme, SKB has asked the team at Royal Inst. of Technology to describe and explore some scenarios that might be applied to the Swedish programme. The results of this study are presented in this report. The following scenarios were studied by the help of a specially developed computer programme: Phase out by 2025 with direct disposal. Burning plutonium and minor actinides as MOX in BWR. Burning plutonium and minor actinides as MOX in PWR. Burning plutonium and minor actinides in ADS. Combined LWR-MOX plus ADS. For the different scenarios nuclide inventories, waste amounts, costs, additional electricity production etc have been assessed. As a general conclusion it was found that BWR is more efficient for burning plutonium in MOX fuel than PWR. The difference is approximately 10%. Furthermore the BWR produces about 10% less americium inventory. An ADS reactor park can theoretically in an ideal case burn (transmute) 99% of the transuranium isotopes. The duration of such a scenario heavily depends on the interim time needed for cooling the spent fuel before reprocessing. Assuming 10 years for cooling of nuclear fuel from ADS, the duration will be at least 200 years under optimistic technical assumptions. The development and use of advanced pyro-processing with an interim cooling time of only

  4. Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

  5. Fission product partitioning in aerosol release from simulated spent nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Di Lemma, F.G.; Colle, J.Y.; Rasmussen, G.; Konings, R J M

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols created by the vaporization of simulated spent nuclear fuel (simfuel) were produced by laser heating techniques and characterised by a wide range of post-analyses. In particular attention has been focused on determining the fission product behaviour in the aerosols, in order to improve the evaluation of the source term and consequently the risk associated with release from spent fuel sabotage or accidents. Different simulated spent fuels were tested with burn-up up to 8 at. %. The re...

  6. On-site interim storage of spent nuclear fuel: Emerging public issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failure to consummate plans for a permanent repository or above- ground interim Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility for spent nuclear fuel has spurred innovative efforts to ensure at-reactor storage in an environmentally safe and secure manner. This article examines the institutional and socioeconomic impacts of Dry Cask Storage Technology (DCST)-an approach to spent fuel management that is emerging as the preferred method of on-site interim spent fuel storage by utilities that exhaust existing storage capacity

  7. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D, Part B: Naval spent nuclear fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This volume contains the following attachments: transportation of Naval spent nuclear fuel; description of Naval spent nuclear receipt and handling at the Expended Core Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; comparison of storage in new water pools versus dry container storage; description of storage of Naval spent nuclear fuel at servicing locations; description of receipt, handling, and examination of Naval spent nuclear fuel at alternate DOE facilities; analysis of normal operations and accident conditions; and comparison of the Naval spent nuclear fuel storage environmental assessment and this environmental impact statement.

  8. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in the Finnish bedrock. Technical research and development in the period 1993-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planning activity relating to the disposal of spent fuel from the Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) and Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) nuclear power plants in Finland is targeted at selection of the site for final disposal in the year 2000, with final disposal actually beginning in 2020. The report describes the research and development work carried out in the years 1993-1996, the current revised concept for final disposal technology and the research and development programme for the period 1997-2000. (refs.)

  9. The Shipment of Russian-Origin Highly Enriched Uranium Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel from Belarus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikorin, S.N.; Polazau, S.A.; Hryharovich, T.K. [Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research ' Sosny' , Academik Krasin Street, Minsk (Belarus); Bolshinsky, I. [Idaho National Laboratory, N. Fremont Avenue Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States); Thomas, J.E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina (United States)

    2011-07-01

    In October 2010, the Global Threat Reduction Initiative and the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research - 'Sosny' of the National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Belarus completed a shipment that returned 43 kilograms of Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation. The spent fuel was legacy material, discharged from the two decommissioned reactors, the Pamir-630D mobile reactor and the IRT-M research reactor. This shipment marked the complete removal of all HEU spent nuclear fuel from Belarus. This paper discusses the planning, preparations, and coordination required to complete this important international shipment successfully. (author)

  10. The Shipment of Russian-Origin Highly Enriched Uranium Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel from Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October 2010, the Global Threat Reduction Initiative and the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research - 'Sosny' of the National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Belarus completed a shipment that returned 43 kilograms of Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation. The spent fuel was legacy material, discharged from the two decommissioned reactors, the Pamir-630D mobile reactor and the IRT-M research reactor. This shipment marked the complete removal of all HEU spent nuclear fuel from Belarus. This paper discusses the planning, preparations, and coordination required to complete this important international shipment successfully. (author)

  11. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel - basis for site selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International organizations, e.g. IAEA, have published several recommendations and guides for the safe disposal of radioactive waste. There are three major groups of issues affecting the site selection process, i.e. geological, environmental and socioeconomic. The first step of the site selection process is an inventory of potential host rock formations. After that, potential study areas are screened to identify sites for detailed investigations, prior to geological conditions and overall suitability for the safe disposal. This kind of stepwise site selection procedure has been used in Finland and in Sweden. A similar approach has been proposed in Canada, too. In accordance with the amendment to the Nuclear Energy Act, that entered into force in the beginning of 1995, Imatran Voima Oy has to make preparations for the final disposal of spent fuel in the Finnish bedrock. Relating to the possible site selection, the following geological factors, as internationally recommended and used in the Nordic countries, should be taken into account: topography, stability of bedrock, brokenness and fracturing of bedrock, size of bedrock block, rock type, predictability and natural resources. The bedrock of the Loviisa NPP site is a part of the Vyborg rapakivi massif. As a whole the rapakivi granite area forms a potential target area, although other rock types or areas cannot be excluded from possible site selection studies. (25 refs., 7 figs.)

  12. Irradiation of Microbes from Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Pool Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckenridge, C.R.; Watkins, C.S.; Bruhn, D.F.; Roberto, F.F.; Tsang, M.N.; Pinhero, P.J. [INEEL (US); Brey, R.F. [ISU (US); Wright, R.N.; Windes, W.F.

    1999-09-03

    Microbes have been isolated and identified from spent nuclear fuel storage pools at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Included among these are Corynebacterium aquaticum, Pseudomonas putida, Comamonas acidovorans, Gluconobacter cerinus, Micrococcus diversus, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, and two strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). We examined the sensitivity of these microbes to a variety of total exposures of radiation generated by a 6-MeV linear accelerator (LINAC). The advantage of using a LINAC is that it provides a relatively quick screen of radiation tolerance. In the first set of experiments, we exposed each of the aforementioned microbes along with four additional microbes, pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococcus luteus, Escherchia coli, and Deinococcus radiodurans to exposures of 5 x 10{sup 3} and 6 x 10{sup 4} rad. All microbial specimens withstood the lower exposure with little or no reduction in cell population. Upon exposing the microbes to the larger dose of 6 x 10{sup 4} rad, we observed two distinct groupings: microbes that demonstrate resistance to radiation, and microbes that display intolerance through a dramatic reduction from their initial population. Microbes in the radiation tolerant grouping were exposed to 1.1 x 10{sup 5} rad to examine the extent of their resistance. We observe a correlation between radiation resistance and gram stain. The gram-positive species we examined seem to demonstrate a greater radiation resistance.

  13. Safety Tests of Concrete Storage Cask for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In preparation for the timely installation of interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (SF), KORAD is developing domestic models of SF storage systems and the concrete storage cask is one of them. A concrete cask consists of a metallic canister which confines SF with welded closure and a concrete overpack which provides radiation shielding and physical protection to the canister. The safety requirements for a SF storage cask is well established in US and summarized in regulatory guides such as NUREG-1536. KAERI has been performing tests of the concrete cask to demonstrate its safety and compliance to the regulatory requirements with high priority stipulated in NUREG-1536. The test program includes the structural performance tests under tip-over and earthquake and decay heat removal test under normal, off-normal and accident conditions. In this paper, brief introduction to the structural tests and their results are provided. Safety tests to demonstrate the safety of KORAD21C concrete storage cask were successfully performed. The structural integrity during tip-over and earthquake were demonstrated with scale model tests and the results are analyzed in comparison with safety analysis results

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Design Verification and Validation Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides a description of design verification and validation activities implemented by the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. During the execution of early design verification, a management assessment (Bergman, 1999) and external assessments on configuration management (Augustenburg, 1999) and testing (Loscoe, 2000) were conducted and identified potential uncertainties in the verification process. This led the SNF Chief Engineer to implement corrective actions to improve process and design products. This included Design Verification Reports (DVRs) for each subproject, validation assessments for testing, and verification of the safety function of systems and components identified in the Safety Equipment List to ensure that the design outputs were compliant with the SNF Technical Requirements. Although some activities are still in progress, the results of the DVR and associated validation assessments indicate that Project requirements for design verification are being effectively implemented. These results have been documented in subproject-specific technical documents (Table 2). Identified punch-list items are being dispositioned by the Project. As these remaining items are closed, the technical reports (Table 2) will be revised and reissued to document the results of this work

  15. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Design Verification and Validation Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OLGUIN, L.J.

    2000-09-25

    This document provides a description of design verification and validation activities implemented by the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. During the execution of early design verification, a management assessment (Bergman, 1999) and external assessments on configuration management (Augustenburg, 1999) and testing (Loscoe, 2000) were conducted and identified potential uncertainties in the verification process. This led the SNF Chief Engineer to implement corrective actions to improve process and design products. This included Design Verification Reports (DVRs) for each subproject, validation assessments for testing, and verification of the safety function of systems and components identified in the Safety Equipment List to ensure that the design outputs were compliant with the SNF Technical Requirements. Although some activities are still in progress, the results of the DVR and associated validation assessments indicate that Project requirements for design verification are being effectively implemented. These results have been documented in subproject-specific technical documents (Table 2). Identified punch-list items are being dispositioned by the Project. As these remaining items are closed, the technical reports (Table 2) will be revised and reissued to document the results of this work.

  16. Uncanistered Spent Nuclear fuel Disposal Container System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. E. Pettit

    2001-07-13

    The Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded with intact uncanistered assemblies and/or individually canistered SNF assemblies and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access drifts, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container provides long-term confinement of the commercial SNF placed inside, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual SNF assembly temperatures after emplacement, limits the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident.

  17. An approach to optimizing spent nuclear fuel transportation logistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been assigned responsibility for managing the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Because of the large quantity of SNF to be moved from the reactors in which it is generated, the DOE is planning a new generation of transport casks designed specifically for the characteristics of the SNF to be transported. Choosing the age and burnup values for which to design the transportation cask would be relatively simple if all the SNF to be transported in a new generation of casks were expected to have the same age and burnup characteristics. It is desirable to maximize cask capacity, which leads to fewer cask trips and thus to less cost and less public risk. One could design multiple casks, each tailored to a specific portion of the SNF, and reduce the total number of trips needed to transport a fixed quantity of SNF. However, the additional administrative, design, and certification costs could outweigh any savings accruing from reduced trips. a significant part of ongoing transportation systems analysis in the U.S. is devoted to the design issues described above. This paper outlines some of the approaches currently under consideration

  18. Nondestructive evaluation of monolithic transportation casks for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When spent fuel from nuclear reactors must be transported by rail or truck, Federal regulations require that it be enclosed in shipping casks that satisfy a number of stringent requirements. One configuration that is under consideration for such casks consists of monolithic metal cylinders approximately 17 ft. (5 m) long, 8 ft. (2.5 m) in diameter, with 14-in. (35-cm) thick walls. The casks are to be fabricated by casting or forging with one integrally closed end. The materials being considered for this application are austenitic steel, ferritic steel, and nodular cast iron. The thick walls are needed in order to absorb most of the radiation emitted by the contents. In addition, the casks must be capable of withstanding severe transportation accidents without a breach of the cask walls that would permit the escape of any radiation. The National Bureau of Standards conducted a study to evaluate the inspectability of the casks. The study showed that current NDE technology is adequate for inspecting the casks, provided that the inspection personnel are well trained in their respective methods, and that they are experienced with the equipment and their specific techniques, and have been properly qualified in this application. The capabilities of many NDE techniques were evaluated in the study. These techniques were based upon all of the principal NDE methods in use today, including ultrasonics, acoustic emission, radiology, liquid penetrants, magnetic particles, eddy currents, and visual inspection

  19. High Burn-Up Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Rob L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) approach to successfully demonstrate the controllable fatigue fracture on high burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a normal vibration mode. CIRFT enables examination of the underlying mechanisms of SNF system dynamic performance. Due to the inhomogeneous composite structure of the SNF system, the detailed mechanisms of the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interactions and the stress concentration effects at the pellet-pellet interface cannot be readily obtained from a CIRFT system measurement. Therefore, finite element analyses (FEAs) are used to translate the global moment-curvature measurement into local stress-strain profiles for further investigation. The major findings of CIRFT on the HBU SNF are as follows: SNF system interface bonding plays an important role in SNF vibration performance. Fuel structure contributes to SNF system stiffness. There are significant variations in stress and curvature of SNF systems during vibration cycles resulting from segment pellets and clad interactions. SNF failure initiates at the pellet-pellet interface region and appears to be spontaneous.

  20. Microbial sampling of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microbial sampling program was initiated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to ascertain the effect of microbial activity on the corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored in wet and dry conditions. In the newest fuel storage pool at the INEEL (CPP-666) pitting corrosion has been observed on aluminum corrosion coupons that can not be explained by the excellent water chemistry. Pitting corrosion of the aluminum-clad SNF and corrosion coupons has been observed in the older fuel storage pool (CPP-603). Therefore a microbial assessment of the bulk water, and basin surfaces of both fuel pools was conducted. The results of this microbial enumeration show that a viable and active microbial population does exist in planktonic form. Sampling of aluminum corrosion coupons placed next to stored fuel elements show that microbial attachment has occurred and a biofilm has formed. The sampling program was then extended to the surfaces of wet and dry stored fuel elements. Viable cells or spores were found on the surfaces of the ATR fuel elements that were stored under wet and dry conditions. This paper discusses the methodology of sampling the surfaces of SNF stored under wet conditions for the presence of microorganisms and the types of organisms found

  1. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis

  2. Refinishing contamination floors in Spent Nuclear Fuels storage basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The floors of the K Basins at the Hanford Site are refinished to make decontamination easier if spills occur as the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is being unloaded from the basins for shipment to dry storage. Without removing the contaminated existing coating, the basin floors are to be coated with an epoxy coating material selected on the basis of the results of field tests of several paint products. The floor refinishing activities must be reviewed by a management review board to ensure that work can be performed in a controlled manner. Major documents prepared for management board review include a report on maintaining radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable, a waste management plan, and reports on hazard classification and unreviewed safety questions. To protect personnel working in the radiation zone, Operational Health Physics prescribed the required minimum protective methods and devices in the radiological work permit. Also, industrial hygiene safety must be analyzed to establish respirator requirements for persons working in the basins. The procedure and requirements for the refinishing work are detailed in a work package approved by all safety engineers. After the refinishing work is completed, waste materials generated from the refinishing work must be disposed of according to the waste management plan

  3. Hanford K basins spent nuclear fuel project update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty one hundred metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) are currently stored in the Hanford Site K Basins near the Columbia River. The deteriorating conditions of the fuel and the basins provide engineering and management challenges to assure safe current and future storage. DE and S Hanford, Inc., part of the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. lead team on the Project Hanford Management Contract, is constructing facilities and systems to move the fuel from current pool storage to a dry interim storage facility away from the Columbia River, and to treat and dispose of K Basins sludge, debris and water. The process starts in K Basins where fuel elements will be removed from existing canisters, washed, and separated from sludge and scrap fuel pieces. Fuel elements will be placed in baskets and loaded into Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and into transportation casks. The MCO and cask will be transported to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, where free water within the MCO will be removed under vacuum at slightly elevated temperatures. The MCOs will be sealed and transported via the transport cask to the Canister Storage Building

  4. Fission Product Release from Spent Nuclear Fuel During Melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Melt-Dilute process consolidates aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel by melting the fuel assemblies and diluting the 235U content with depleted uranium to lower the enrichment. During the process, radioactive fission products whose boiling points are near the proposed 850 degrees C melting temperature can be released. This paper presents a review of fission product release data from uranium-aluminum alloy fuel developed from Severe Accident studies. In addition, scoping calculations using the ORIGEN-S computer code were made to estimate the radioactive inventories in typical research reactor fuel as a function of burnup, initial enrichment, and reactor operating history and shutdown time.Ten elements were identified from the inventory with boiling points below or near the 850 degrees C reference melting temperature. The isotopes 137Cs and 85Kr were considered most important. This review serves as basic data to the design and development of a furnace off-gas system for containment of the volatile species

  5. Irradiation of Microbes from Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Pool Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbes have been isolated and identified from spent nuclear fuel storage pools at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Included among these are Corynebacterium aquaticum, Pseudomonas putida, Comamonas acidovorans, Gluconobacter cerinus, Micrococcus diversus, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, and two strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). We examined the sensitivity of these microbes to a variety of total exposures of radiation generated by a 6-MeV linear accelerator (LINAC). The advantage of using a LINAC is that it provides a relatively quick screen of radiation tolerance. In the first set of experiments, we exposed each of the aforementioned microbes along with four additional microbes, pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococcus luteus, Escherchia coli, and Deinococcus radiodurans to exposures of 5 x 103 and 6 x 104 rad. All microbial specimens withstood the lower exposure with little or no reduction in cell population. Upon exposing the microbes to the larger dose of 6 x 104 rad, we observed two distinct groupings: microbes that demonstrate resistance to radiation, and microbes that display intolerance through a dramatic reduction from their initial population. Microbes in the radiation tolerant grouping were exposed to 1.1 x 105 rad to examine the extent of their resistance. We observe a correlation between radiation resistance and gram stain. The gram-positive species we examined seem to demonstrate a greater radiation resistance

  6. Direct Investigations of the Immobilization of Radionuclides in the Alteration Products of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C. Burns; Robert J. Finch; David J. Wronkiewicz

    2004-12-27

    Safe disposal of the nation's nuclear waste in a geological repository involves unique scientific and engineering challenges owing to the very long-lived radioactivity of the waste. The repository must retain a variety of radionuclides that have vastly different chemical characters for several thousand years. Most of the radioactivity that will be housed in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain will be associated with spent nuclear fuel, much of which is derived from commercial reactors. DOE is custodian of approximately 8000 tons of spent nuclear fuel that is also intended for eventual disposal in a geological repository. Unlike the spent fuel from commercial reactors, the DOE fuel is diverse in composition with more than 250 varieties. Safe disposal of spent fuel requires a detailed knowledge of its long-term behavior under repository conditions, as well as the fate of radionuclides released from the spent fuel as waste containers are breached.

  7. Direct Investigations of the Immobilization of Radionuclides in the Alteration Products of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safe disposal of the nation's nuclear waste in a geological repository involves unique scientific and engineering challenges owing to the very long-lived radioactivity of the waste. The repository must retain a variety of radionuclides that have vastly different chemical characters for several thousand years. Most of the radioactivity that will be housed in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain will be associated with spent nuclear fuel, much of which is derived from commercial reactors. DOE is custodian of approximately 8000 tons of spent nuclear fuel that is also intended for eventual disposal in a geological repository. Unlike the spent fuel from commercial reactors, the DOE fuel is diverse in composition with more than 250 varieties. Safe disposal of spent fuel requires a detailed knowledge of its long-term behavior under repository conditions, as well as the fate of radionuclides released from the spent fuel as waste containers are breached

  8. INEL integrated spent nuclear fuel consolidation task team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes a draft plan and schedule to consolidate spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and special nuclear material (SNW) from aging storage facilities throughout the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in a safe, cost-effective, and expedient manner. A fully integrated and resource-loaded schedule was developed to achieve consolidation as soon as possible. All of the INEL SNF and SNM management task, projects, and related activities from fiscal year 1994 to the end of the consolidation period are logic-tied and integrated with each other. The schedule and plan are presented to initiate discussion of their implementation, which is expected to generate alternate concepts that can be evaluated using the methodology described in this report. Three perturbations to consolidating SNF as soon as possible are also explored. If the schedule is executed as proposed, the new and on-going consolidation activities will require about 6 years to complete and about $25.3M of additional funding. Reduced annual operating costs are expected to recover the additional investment in about 6.4 years. The total consolidation program as proposed will cost about $66.8M and require about 6 years to recover via reduced operating costs from retired SNF/SNM storage facilities. Detailed schedules and cost estimates for the Test Reactor Area Materials Test Reactor canal transfers are included as an example of the level of detail that is typical of the entire schedule (see Appendix D). The remaining work packages for each of the INEL SNF consolidation transfers are summarized in this document. Detailed cost and resource information is available upon request for any of the SNF consolidation transfers

  9. INEL integrated spent nuclear fuel consolidation task team report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, R.N.; Clark, J.H.; Chipman, N.A. [and others

    1994-09-12

    This document describes a draft plan and schedule to consolidate spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and special nuclear material (SNW) from aging storage facilities throughout the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in a safe, cost-effective, and expedient manner. A fully integrated and resource-loaded schedule was developed to achieve consolidation as soon as possible. All of the INEL SNF and SNM management task, projects, and related activities from fiscal year 1994 to the end of the consolidation period are logic-tied and integrated with each other. The schedule and plan are presented to initiate discussion of their implementation, which is expected to generate alternate concepts that can be evaluated using the methodology described in this report. Three perturbations to consolidating SNF as soon as possible are also explored. If the schedule is executed as proposed, the new and on-going consolidation activities will require about 6 years to complete and about $25.3M of additional funding. Reduced annual operating costs are expected to recover the additional investment in about 6.4 years. The total consolidation program as proposed will cost about $66.8M and require about 6 years to recover via reduced operating costs from retired SNF/SNM storage facilities. Detailed schedules and cost estimates for the Test Reactor Area Materials Test Reactor canal transfers are included as an example of the level of detail that is typical of the entire schedule (see Appendix D). The remaining work packages for each of the INEL SNF consolidation transfers are summarized in this document. Detailed cost and resource information is available upon request for any of the SNF consolidation transfers.

  10. Pyrochemical recovery of easily reducible species from spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the reprocessing of spent fuel is to separate noble metals and other easily reducible species, actinides and lanthanides. A thermodynamic and bibliographical study allowed us to elaborate a process which realises these separations in several steps. The experimental validation of the steps concerning the extraction of noble metals and easily reducible species required to imagine an apparatus which is conformed to the study of the two steps in question: the reduction by a gas of fission product oxides and the extraction of the metallic particles, obtained by reduction, by digestion in a liquid metal. Experiments on digestion, carried on molybdenum and ruthenium particles, allowed us to conclude that the transfer of metallic particles from a molten salt into a liquid metal is ruled by phenomena of complex wettability between the metallic particle, the molten salt, the liquid metal and the gas. The transfer from the salt to the metal is a chain of two steps: emersion of the particles from the salt to go into the gas, and then transfer from the gas into the metal. Kinetics are limited by the transfer through the metal surface. Kinetics study withdrew the experimental parameters and the metals properties which influence the digestion rate. A model on the transfer into a liquid metal of a particle trapped at the fluid/metal interface ratified the experimental conclusions and informed on the stirring influence. All the results allow us to think that the extraction of noble metals and easily reducible species are feasible in this way. (author)

  11. RADIOLYTIC AND THERMAL PROCESSES RELEVANT TO DRY STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousands of tons of metallic uranium spent-nuclear-fuel (SNF) remain in water storage across the Department of Energy complex. For example, the Hanford Site K-Basins hold 2300 metric tons of spent fuel, much of it severely corroded. Similar situations exist elsewhere in the DOE ...

  12. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Secretary of Energy's memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability

  13. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's package performance study for spent nuclear fuel transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently planning to conduct confirmatory analyses and testing of the performance of Type B spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages during severe accidents. Current plans call for full-scale rail impact and thermal tests, with pre-test predictions, of a truck cask design (∼50 ton) and a rail cask design (∼140 ton), in late 2004-2005. A public participatory process is being used to design and conduct this project, with a principle objective of increasing public confidence. (author)

  14. Geological Disposal Options for the Radioactive Wastes from a Recycling Process of Spent Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. Y.; Choi, H. J.; Lee, M. S.; Jeong, J. T.; Choi, J. W.; Kim, S. K.; Cho, D. K.; Kuk, D. H.; Cha, J. H

    2008-10-15

    The electricity from the nuclear power plants is around 40 % of total required electricity in Korea and according to the energy development plan, the proportion will be raised about 60 % in near future. To implement this plan, the most important factor is the back-end fuel cycle, namely the safe management of the spent fuel or high level radioactive wastes from the nuclear power plants. Various researches are being carried out to manage the spent fuel effectively in the world. In our country, as one of the management alternatives which is more effective and non-proliferation, pyro-processing method is being developed actively to retrieve reusable uranium and TRU, and to reduce the volume of high level waste from a Nuclear power plant. This is a new dry recycling process. In this report, the amount of various wastes and their characteristics are estimated in a Pyro-process. Based on these information, the geological disposal alternatives are developed. According to the amount and the characteristics of each waste, the concepts of waste packages and the disposal container are developed. And also from the characteristics of the radioactivity and the heat generation, multi-layer of the depth is considered to dispose these wastes. The proposed various alternatives in this report can be used as input data for design of the deep geological disposal system. And they will be improved through the application of the real site data and safety assessment in the future. After then, the final disposal concept will be selected with various assessment and the optimization will be carried out.

  15. Environmental Impact Statement. March 2011. Interim storage, encapsulation and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) shall be prepared and submitted along with applications for permissibility and a licence under the Environmental Code and a licence under the Nuclear Activities Act for new nuclear facilities. This Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared by Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, SKB) to be included in the licence applications for continued operation of Clab (central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel) in Simpevarp in Oskarshamn Municipality and construction and operation of facilities for encapsulation (integrated with Clab) and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark in Oesthammar Municipality

  16. Environmental Impact Statement. March 2011. Interim storage, encapsulation and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) shall be prepared and submitted along with applications for permissibility and a licence under the Environmental Code and a licence under the Nuclear Activities Act for new nuclear facilities. This Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared by Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, SKB) to be included in the licence applications for continued operation of Clab (central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel) in Simpevarp in Oskarshamn Municipality and construction and operation of facilities for encapsulation (integrated with Clab) and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark in Oesthammar Municipality

  17. SOURCE OF BURNUP VALUES FOR COMMERCIAL SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste packages are loaded with commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that satisfies the minimum burnup requirements of a criticality loading curve. The burnup value assigned by the originating nuclear utility to each SNF assembly (assigned burnup) is used to load waste packages in compliance with a criticality loading curve. The burnup provided by a nuclear utility has uncertainties, so conservative calculation methods are used to characterize those uncertainties for incorporation into the criticality loading curves. Procedural safety controls ensure that the correct assembly is loaded into each waste package to prevent a misload that could create a condition affecting the safety margins. Probabilistic analyses show that procedural safety controls can minimize the chance of a misload but can not completely eliminate the possibility. Physical measurements of burnup with instrumentation in the surface facility are not necessary due to the conservative calculation methods used to produce the criticality loading curves. The reactor records assigned burnup of a commercial SNF assembly contains about two percent uncertainty, which is increased to five-percent to ensure conservatism. This five-percent uncertainty is accommodated by adjusting the criticality loading curve. Also, the record keeping methods of nuclear utilities are not uniform and the level of detail required by the NRC has varied over the last several decades. Thus, some SNF assemblies may have assigned burnups that are averages for a batch of assemblies with similar characteristics. Utilities typically have access to more detailed core-follow records that allow the batch average burnup to be changed to an assembly specific burnup. Alternatively, an additional safety margin is incorporated into the criticality loading curve to accommodate SNF assemblies with batch average burnups or greater uncertainties due to the methodology used by the nuclear utility. The utility records provide the assembly identifier

  18. FINAL REPORT (PART 1). RADIOLYTIC AND THERMAL PROCESSES RELEVANT TO DRY STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The scientific and engineering demands of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management tasks are enormous. For example, several thousand metric tons of metallic uranium spent nuclear fuel (SNF) remain in water storage awaiting disposition. Of this...

  19. Safety aspects of spent nuclear fuel shipment from 'Vinca' Institute to the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main safety aspects were analyzed and possible radiation impact on the personnel, population and environment during spent nuclear fuel preparation for shipment to the Russian Federation was estimated. Basic safety principals in elaborating repackaging technology are specified. (author)

  20. Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Emory D.; Delcul, Guillermo D.; Hunt, Rodney D.; Johnson, Jared A.; Spencer, Barry B.

    2014-06-10

    A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

  1. Review of the KBS II plan for handling and final storage of unreprocessed spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish utilities programme for disposal of spent nuclear fuel elements (KBS II) is summarized. Comments and criticism to the programme are given by experts from several foreign or international institutions. (L.E.)

  2. Investigations of possibilities to dispose of spent nuclear fuel in Lithuania: a model case. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate that in Lithuania there exist adequate competences in the area of direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel and that in principle it is possible to implement direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Lithuania in a safe way. The objective is not to indicate that direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel will take place in Lithuania. What option to use for the eventual disposal of the Lithuanian spent nuclear fuel is to a large extent a political decision, and this report will be an important input to such a decision once it will have to be taken. A summary volume contains a foreword, executive summary, introduction and conclusions

  3. Preoperational Environmental Survey for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document represents the report for environmental sampling of soil, vegetation, litter, cryptograms, and small mammals at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities located in 100 K and 200 East Areas in support of the preoperational environmental survey

  4. Preoperational Environmental Survey for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MITCHELL, R.M.

    2000-10-12

    This document represents the report for environmental sampling of soil, vegetation, litter, cryptograms, and small mammals at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities located in 100 K and 200 East Areas in support of the preoperational environmental survey.

  5. Preoperational Environmental Survey for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MITCHELL, R.M.

    2000-09-28

    This document represents the report for environmental sampling of soil, vegetation, litter, cryptograms, and small mammals at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities located in 100 K and 200 East Areas in support of the preoperational environmental survey.

  6. Shipment of Spent Nuclear Fuel from WWR-K Research Reactor, Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WWR-K, the largest nuclear research facility of the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the National Nuclear Centre of the Republic of Kazakhstan (INP NNC RK) is a multipurpose pool type research reactor in operation since 1967. The reactor was shut down from 1988 until 1997, for safety enhancement and modernization of the reactor core. Before shutting down the reactor, shipment of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to the Russian Federation was a routine operation, however with the disintegration of the former Soviet Union in 1991, this procedure was suspended, and INP NNC RK was compelled to solve the problem of the SNF independently. Since there is no SNF reprocessing facility in Kazakhstan, and considering that by that time the priority was to implement the modifications to increase the safety of the WWR-K reactor, a decision was taken to simply collect the spent fuel assemblies and keep them in one of the 2 pools available for storage of the SNF. The capacity of the pools is 500 fuel assemblies, a number close to be reached after the reactor resumed operation in 1998. Considering the necessity to find an alternative solution for the SNF, contacts were made and in 2003 an IAEA special mission visited INP NNC RK, with the purpose to start negotiations in order to resume the shipping operations of the SNF to the Russian Federation. The negotiations involving The Russian Federation, United States of America, Republic of Kazakhstan and IAEA proceeded successfully, the final contract was signed in 2006, and on December 2008 the first train carrying the SNF left Kazakhstan in direction to The Russian Federation. In total 4 trips were needed to transport 278 SNF assemblies, representing about 74 Kg of Highly Enriched Uranium. The last trip was made in May 2009. (author)

  7. Threats and benefits updated information on local opinions regarding the spent nuclear fuel repository in Finland - 16128

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the paper is to provide updated information on local opinion regarding the siting of a spent nuclear fuel repository in Finland. The main question is how the residents of the municipality perceive the threats and benefits of the repository. In accordance with the Decision in Principle by the Council of State passed in 2000, the Olkiluoto area in Municipality of Eurajoki was chosen as the location for the repository to accommodate spent nuclear fuel produced in Finland. Updated information on local opinions is needed as the siting process is approaching the next phase, the application for a construction license by 2012. The nuclear waste management company Posiva, owned by the utilities Teollisuuden Voima and Fortum Power and Heat, has also applied for a new Decision in Principle (DiP) for expansion of the repository. The data provided in this paper is based on a survey carried out in June 2008. The respondents were selected from the residents of the municipality of Eurajoki and the neighbouring municipalities using stratified random sampling (N=3000). The response rate of the survey was 20% (N=606). The paper is part of a joint research project between the University of Jyvaeskylae and the University of Tampere. The research project 'Follow-up research regarding socio-economic effects and communication of final disposal facility of spent nuclear fuel in Eurajoki and its neighbouring municipalities' is funded by the Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Waste Management (KYT2010). (authors)

  8. Status of dry storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent-fuel storage has been identified as the key element of spent-fuel management. Over 45,000 t of spent water reactor fuel has been discharged worldwide, of which only ∼7% has been reprocessed. Estimates by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) indicate that the amount of spent fuel being generated will increase significantly. About 200,000 t of heavy metal of spent fuel could be accumulated by the year 2000. Many countries are involved in the development of new ways, including dry storage, for handling and storing the spent fuel. These new technologies require new reviews and perhaps new approaches for domestic and international safeguards. The IAEA has been involved in surveying worldwide experience related to the storage of spent fuel. This paper summarizes the efforts of an international working group to survey the experience with dry storage and related innovations that might have an impact on safeguarding procedures in the future

  9. MANAGING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL WASTES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) has a large inventory of diverse types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This legacy is in part due to the history of the INL as the National Reactor Testing Station, in part to its mission to recover highly enriched uranium from SNF and in part to it's mission to test and examine SNF after irradiation. The INL also has a large diversity of SNF storage facility, some dating back 50 years in the site history. The success of the INL SNF program is measured by its ability to: (1) achieve safe existing storage, (2) continue to receive SNF from other locations, both foreign and domestic, (3) repackage SNF from wet storage to interim dry storage, and (4) prepare the SNF for dispositioning in a federal repository. Because of the diversity in the SNF and the facilities at the INL, the INL is addressing almost very condition that may exist in the SNF world. Many of solutions developed by the INL are applicable to other SNF storage sites as they develop their management strategy. The SNF being managed by the INL are in a variety of conditions, from intact assemblies to individual rods or plates to powders, rubble, and metallurgical mounts. Some of the fuel has been in wet storage for over forty years. The fuel is stored bare, or in metal cans and either wet under water or dry in vaults, caissons or casks. Inspections have shown varying degrees of corrosion and degradation of the fuel and the storage cans. Some of the fuel has been recanned under water, and the conditions of the fuel inside the second or third can are unknown. The fuel has been stored in one of 10 different facilities: five wet pools and one casks storage pad, one vault, two generations of caisson facilities, and one modular Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The wet pools range from forty years old to the most modern pool in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The near-term objective is moving the fuel in the older wet storage facilities to

  10. MANAGING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL WASTES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Thomas J

    2005-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) has a large inventory of diverse types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This legacy is in part due to the history of the INL as the National Reactor Testing Station, in part to its mission to recover highly enriched uranium from SNF and in part to it’s mission to test and examine SNF after irradiation. The INL also has a large diversity of SNF storage facility, some dating back 50 years in the site history. The success of the INL SNF program is measured by its ability to: 1) achieve safe existing storage, 2) continue to receive SNF from other locations, both foreign and domestic, 3) repackage SNF from wet storage to interim dry storage, and 4) prepare the SNF for dispositioning in a federal repository. Because of the diversity in the SNF and the facilities at the INL, the INL is addressing almost very condition that may exist in the SNF world. Many of solutions developed by the INL are applicable to other SNF storage sites as they develop their management strategy. The SNF being managed by the INL are in a variety of conditions, from intact assemblies to individual rods or plates to powders, rubble, and metallurgical mounts. Some of the fuel has been in wet storage for over forty years. The fuel is stored bare, or in metal cans and either wet under water or dry in vaults, caissons or casks. Inspections have shown varying degrees of corrosion and degradation of the fuel and the storage cans. Some of the fuel has been recanned under water, and the conditions of the fuel inside the second or third can are unknown. The fuel has been stored in one of 10 different facilities: five wet pools and one casks storage pad, one vault, two generations of caisson facilities, and one modular Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The wet pools range from forty years old to the most modern pool in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The near-term objective is moving the fuel in the older wet storage facilities to

  11. Development of spent fuel remote handling technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Sup; Park, B. S.; Park, Y. S.; Oh, S. C.; Kim, S. H.; Cho, M. W.; Hong, D. H

    1997-12-01

    Since the nation`s policy on spent fuel management is not finalized, the technical items commonly required for safe management and recycling of spent fuel - remote technologies of transportation, inspection, maintenance, and disassembly of spent fuel - are selected and pursued. In this regards, the following R and D activities are carried out : collision free transportation of spent fuel assembly, mechanical disassembly of spent nuclear fuel and graphical simulation of fuel handling / disassembly process. (author). 36 refs., 16 tabs., 77 figs

  12. Development of spent fuel remote handling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the nation's policy on spent fuel management is not finalized, the technical items commonly required for safe management and recycling of spent fuel - remote technologies of transportation, inspection, maintenance, and disassembly of spent fuel - are selected and pursued. In this regards, the following R and D activities are carried out : collision free transportation of spent fuel assembly, mechanical disassembly of spent nuclear fuel and graphical simulation of fuel handling / disassembly process. (author). 36 refs., 16 tabs., 77 figs

  13. Recovery of actinides from spent nuclear fuel by pyrochemical reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) strategy is based on reduction of the long-term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel by recovery and recycling of plutonium and minor actinides, i.e. Np, Am and Cm. Regardless if transmutation of actinides is conceived by a heterogeneous accelerator driven system, fast reactor concept or as integrated waste burning with a homogenous recycling of all actinides, the reprocessed fuels used are likely to be significantly different from the commercial fuels of today. Because of the fuel type and the high burn-up reached, traditional hydrometallurgical reprocessing such as used today might not be the most adequate method. The main reasons are the low solubility of some fuel materials in acidic aqueous solutions and the limited radiation stability of the organic solvents used in extraction processes. Therefore, pyrochemical separation techniques are under development worldwide, usually based on electrochemical methods, reductive extraction in a high temperature molten salt solvent or fluoride volatility techniques. The pyrochemical reprocessing developed in ITU is based on electrorefining of metallic fuel in molten LiCl-KCl using solid aluminium cathodes. This is followed by a chlorination process for the recovery of actinides from formed actinide-aluminium alloys, and exhaustive electrolysis is proposed for the clean-up of salt from the remaining actinides. In this paper, the main achievements in the electrorefining process are summarised together with results of the most recent experimental studies on characterisation of actinides-aluminium intermetallic compounds. U, Np and Pu alloys were investigated by electrochemical techniques using solid aluminium electrodes and the alloys formed by electrodeposition of the individual actinides were analysed by XRD and SEM-EDX. Some thermodynamic properties were determined from the measurements (standard electrode potentials, Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy of formation) as well as

  14. Deployment evaluation methodology for the electrometallurgical treatment of DOE-EM spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part of the Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory may require some type of treatment to meet acceptance criteria at various disposition sites. The current focus for much of this spent nuclear fuel is the electrometallurgical treatment process under development at Argonne National Laboratory. Potential flowsheets for this treatment process are presented. Deployment of the process for the treatment of the spent nuclear fuel requires evaluation to determine the spent nuclear fuel program need for treatment and compatibility of the spent nuclear fuel with the process. The evaluation of need includes considerations of cost, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule to treat a proposed fuel. A siting evaluation methodology has been developed to account for these variables. A work breakdown structure is proposed to gather life-cycle cost information to allow evaluation of alternative siting strategies on a similar basis. The evaluation methodology, while created specifically for the electrometallurgical evaluation, has been written such that it could be applied to any potential treatment process that is a disposition option for spent nuclear fuel. Future work to complete the evaluation of the process for electrometallurgical treatment is discussed

  15. Government/industry development of a spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is currently engaged in a cooperative program with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to develop a spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS). The system will enable the transfer of individual spent nuclear fuel assemblies between a conventional top loading cask and multi-purpose canister in a shielded overpack, or accommodate spent nuclear fuel transfers between two conventional casks. The DTS has several significant applications and could benefit the Federal waste management system and utilities in number of ways. It has the potential to: permit shutdown reactor sites to decommission pools; provide capability at interim storage facilities to transfer assemblies from small transportation casks to sealed canisters; provide capability at reactor sites with limited crane capacity to transfer assemblies into large packages to facilitate on-site storage in larger capacity casks; allow recovery operations at shutdown reactor sites with independent spent nuclear fuel storage installations; provide a means for utilities that can presently handle only a truck cask to utilize a rail cask; allow transfers of spent nuclear fuel from existing utility dual purpose systems into alternative systems if required, without returning to the reactor storage pool; and support existing and future DOE spent nuclear fuel management activities. The project is managed by a Technical Management Committee consisting of DOE and EPRI representatives and includes a member from Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. (authors)

  16. Ministerial ordinance on the establishment of a reserve fund for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ministerial ordinance provides for a reserve fund for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, according to the Electricity Enterprises Act. The Government designates an electricity enterprise that must deposit a reserve fund for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. The electricity enterprise concerned must deposit a certain sum of money as a reserve fund which is the payment left over from spent fuel reprocessing at the end of a fiscal year minus the same at the end of the preceding year less a certain sum, when the former exceeds the latter. Then, concerning the remainder of the reserve fund in the preceding year, a certain sum must be subtracted from this reserve fund. (Mori, K.)

  17. Application of ALARA principles to shipment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The public exposure from spent fuel shipment is very low. In view of this low exposure and the perfect safety record for spent fuel shipment, existing systems can be considered satisfactory. On the other hand, occupational exposure reduction merits consideration and technology improvement to decrease dose should concentrate on this exposure. Practices that affect the age of spent fuel in shipment and the number of times the fuel must be shipped prior to disposal have the largest impact. A policy to encourage a 5-year spent fuel cooling period prior to shipment coupled with appropriate cask redesign to accommodate larger loads would be consistent with ALARA and economic principles. And finally, bypassing high population density areas will not in general reduce shipment dose

  18. Foreign materials in a deep repository for spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of foreign substances introduced into a spent-fuel repository are reviewed. Possible impacts on processes and barrier-functions are examined, and the following areas are identified: Corrosion of the spent-fuel canister through the presence of sulfur and substances that favor microbial growth; impacts on the bentonite properties through the presence of cations as calcium, potassium and iron; radionuclide transport through the presence of complex-formers and surface-active substances

  19. An integrated methodology to evaluate a spent nuclear fuel storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study introduced a methodology that can be applied for development of a dry storage system for spent nuclear fuels. It consisted of several design activities that includes development of a simplified program to analyze the amount of spent nuclear fuels from reflecting the practical situation in spent nuclear fuel management and a simplified program to evaluate the cost of 4 types of representing storage system to choose the most competitive option considering economic factor. As verification of the implementation of the reference module to practical purpose, a simplified thermal analysis code was suggested that can see fulfillment of limitation of temperature in long term storage and oxidation analysis. From the thermal related results, the reference module can accommodate full range of PHWR spent nuclear fuels and significant portion of PWR ones too. From the results, the reference storage system can be concluded that has fulfilled the important requirements in terms of long term integrity and radiological safety. Also for the purpose of solving scattered radiation along with deep penetration problems in cooling storage system, small but efficient design alternation was suggested together with its efficiency that can reduce scattered radiation by 1/3 from the original design. Along with the countermeasure for the shielding problem, in consideration of PWR spent nuclear fuels, simplified criticality analysis methodology retaining conservativeness was proposed. The results show the reference module is efficient low enrichment PWR spent nuclear fuel and even relatively high enrichment fuels too if burnup credit is taken. As conclusive remark, the methodology is simple but efficient to plan a concept design of convective cooling type of spent nuclear fuels storage. It can be also concluded that the methodology derived in this study and the reference module has feasibility in practical implementation to mitigate the current complex situation in spent fuel

  20. Uncanistered Spent Nuclear fuel Disposal Container System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-12

    The Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded with intact uncanistered assemblies and/or individually canistered SNF assemblies and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access drifts, and emplaced in the emplacement drifts. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container provides long-term confinement of the commercial SNF placed inside, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual SNF assembly temperatures after emplacement, limits the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) disposal container designs are needed to accommodate the expected range of spent fuel assemblies and provide long-term confinement of the commercial SNF. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinder walls, outer cylinder lids (two on the top, one on the bottom), inner cylinder lids (one on the top, one on the bottom), and an internal metallic basket structure. Exterior labels will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the cladding, Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and natural barrier, will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different

  1. Comparative analysis of radiation characteristics from various types of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryuchkov, E.F.; Opalovsky, V.A.; Tikhomirov, G.V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University) (Russian Federation)

    2003-07-01

    At the present time, in purposes of the most effective utilization of nuclear materials, new advanced fuel cycles are under development. These cycles imply application of uranium-plutonium, uranium-thorium and some other types of nuclear fuel. However, it is obvious that the parameters of new nuclear fuel (NF) types will be quite different from those for traditional NF types. These differences can affect significantly the conditions for storage, transportation and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). So, it is necessary to carry out a comparative analysis of radiation characteristics for various NF types at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). The present paper addresses radiation properties of the following NF types: UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2}-PaO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2}. Numerical studies have been carried out to determine radiation properties of these NF types at the following NFC stages: radiation properties of NF directly before and after irradiation in the reactor core, after different cooling time, radiation properties of uranium and plutonium fractions after chemical separation, radiation properties of NF re-fabricated for recycle, radiation properties of NF after the second and third recycles. The computer code package SCALE is used for evaluating the radiation properties of different SNF types. Finally, the following major conclusions can be made: 1) Correct description of SNF radiation and dosimetric properties requires available benchmark data on contents of heavy nuclides in SNF; 2) ThO{sub 2}-PaO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} fuel demonstrates an important feature: internal transmutation of minor actinides provided the ultra-high fuel burn-up is achieved.

  2. Comparative analysis of radiation characteristics from various types of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time, in purposes of the most effective utilization of nuclear materials, new advanced fuel cycles are under development. These cycles imply application of uranium-plutonium, uranium-thorium and some other types of nuclear fuel. However, it is obvious that the parameters of new nuclear fuel (NF) types will be quite different from those for traditional NF types. These differences can affect significantly the conditions for storage, transportation and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). So, it is necessary to carry out a comparative analysis of radiation characteristics for various NF types at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). The present paper addresses radiation properties of the following NF types: UO2, UO2-PuO2, ThO2-PaO2-UO2. Numerical studies have been carried out to determine radiation properties of these NF types at the following NFC stages: radiation properties of NF directly before and after irradiation in the reactor core, after different cooling time, radiation properties of uranium and plutonium fractions after chemical separation, radiation properties of NF re-fabricated for recycle, radiation properties of NF after the second and third recycles. The computer code package SCALE is used for evaluating the radiation properties of different SNF types. Finally, the following major conclusions can be made: 1) Correct description of SNF radiation and dosimetric properties requires available benchmark data on contents of heavy nuclides in SNF; 2) ThO2-PaO2-UO2 fuel demonstrates an important feature: internal transmutation of minor actinides provided the ultra-high fuel burn-up is achieved

  3. SR 97: post-closure safety for KBS 3 deep repository for spent nuclear fuel - overview -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In preparation for coming site investigations for siting of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKB has carried out the long-term safety assessment SR 97, requested by the Swedish Government. The repository is of the KBS-3 type, where the fuel is placed in isolating copper canisters with a high-strength cast iron insert. The canisters are surrounded by bentonite clay in individual deposition holes at a depth of 500 m in granitic bedrock. Geological data are taken from three sites in Sweden to shed light on different conditions in Swedish granitic bedrock. The future evolution of the repository system is analyzed in the form of five scenarios. The first is a base scenario where the repository is postulated to be built entirely according to specifications and where present-day conditions in the surroundings, including climate, persist. The four other scenarios show the evolution if the repository contains a few initially defective canisters, in the event of climate change, in the event of earthquakes, and in the event of future inadvertent human intrusion. The principal conclusion of the assessment is that the prospects of building a safe deep repository for spent nuclear fuel in Swedish granitic bedrock are very good. The results of the assessment also serve as a basis for formulating requirements and preferences regarding the bedrock in site investigations, for designing a program for site investigations, for formulating functional requirements on the repository's barriers, and for prioritization of research. Copyright (2001) Material Research Society

  4. Advantages of dry hardened cask storage over wet storage for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanato, Luiz Sergio, E-mail: romanato@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. da Qualidade

    2011-07-01

    Pools are generally used to store and maintain spent nuclear fuel assemblies for cooling, after removed from reactors. After three to five years stored in the pools, spent fuel can be reprocessed or sent to a final disposition in a geological repository and handled as radioactive waste or sent to another site waiting for future solution. Spent fuel can be stored in dry or wet installations, depending on the method adopted by the nuclear plant. If this storage were exclusively wet, at the installation decommissioning in the future, another solution for storage will need to be found. Today, after a preliminary cooling, the spent fuel assemblies can be removed from the pool and sent to dry hardened storage installations. This kind of storage does not need complex radiation monitoring and it is safer than wet storage. Brazil has two nuclear reactors in operation, a third reactor is under construction and they use wet spent fuel storage . Dry hardened casks use metal or both metal and concrete for radiation shielding and they are safe, especially during an earthquake. An earthquake struck Japan on March 11, 2011 damaging Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The occurrence of earthquakes in Brazil is very small but dry casks can resist to other events, including terrorist acts, better than pools. This paper shows the advantages of dry hardened cask storage in comparison with the wet storage (water pools) for spent nuclear fuel. (author)

  5. SKB 91. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Importance of the bedrock for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel has been assessed in this report. The spent fuel is assumed to be encapsulated in a copper canister and deposited at a depth of 600 m in the bedrock. The primary purpose has been to shed light on the importance of the geological features of the site for the safety of a final repository. The assessment shows that the encapsulated fuel will, in all likelihood, be kept isolated from the groundwater for millions of years. This is considerably longer than the more than 100 000 years that are required in order for the toxicity of the waste to have declined to a level equivalent to that of rich uranium ores. However, in order to be able to study the role of the rock as a barrier to the dispersal of radioactive materials, calculations have been carried out under the assumption that waste canisters leak. The results show that the safety of a carefully designed repository is only affected to a small extent by the ability of the rock to retain the escaping radionuclides. The primary role of the rock is to provide stable mechanical and chemical conditions in the repository over a long period of time so that the function of the engineered barriers is not jeopardized. (187 refs.) (au)

  6. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Interfacial Bonding Efficiency Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF, also known as “used nuclear fuel” [UNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. Additional CIRFT testing was conducted on three HBR rods; two specimens failed, and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 × 107 cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR SNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the SNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, eleven SNF rod segments from the Limerick BWR were tested using the ORNL CIRFT equipment; one test under static conditions and ten tests under dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at a maximum curvature of 4.0 m-1. The specimen did not show any sign of failure during three repeated loading cycles to a similar maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitudes varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of

  7. Development of Nuclear Spent Fuel Onsite Transportation Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea is one of the densest population country (3rd among countries with population above 10 million), thus the overland transportation is more risky. We expect that the spent fuels will be transported to the interim storage or reprocess/disposal facility and they are assumed to be near one of power plant sites. Eventually, spent fuel transportation in Korea will be divided by two parts, the one is overland transportation and the other one is maritime transportation. This study deals with part of whole transportation, that is, overland transportation. The overland transportation is none other than onsite (from plant to wharf) transportation. To assess its safety, we use Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) method. It calculates risk of the transportation that is a product of accident probability and consequence and analyze them probabilistically. Total risk is sum of the products along accident sequences. Accident sequences are found only if the scenario is developed. USNRC has been assessed overland spent fuel transportation and the latest research is NUREG 2125. They used PSA method to calculate overland transportation risk. It is well organized and detailed, however, it concentrates on plant-storage transportation not on onsite transportation and uses American domestic statistical data. Mills et al. conducted event tree analysis for highway truck accident, Volpe conducted event tree analysis for rail accident and loss of lead shielding with fire accident. Spent fuel of the power plant need to be transported in near future. The overland transportation of the spent fuel expected to be onsite transportation

  8. Recent progress of analytical methods of spent nuclear fuel (Review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical methods for the spent nuclear fuel (SF) have been greatly innovated recently. This methodological innovation is mainly caused by rapid and remarkable progress of induced coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) which is utilized for the isotopic analysis of actinoid elements (U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm) and fission product elements in the SF samples. The quantity of the objective element as well as the volume of the sample solution needed for the ICP-MS measurement are, in principle, much less than required for the measurement by other analytical methods. Because of its highly sensitive characteristic, the ICP-MS becomes the most powerful method for the analysis of radioactive samples such as SF. The utilization of the analytical method based on the ICP-MS makes it possible to reduce the radiation dose of the operator and to minimize the amount of the radioactive wastes generated from the analytical work. For the precise and accurate isotopic analysis of the objective element in the SF sample by mass spectrometry, the interfering element having isobars needs to be separated prior to the measurement. The separation method has also made remarkable progress in recent years. Most of the advancement of the separation method involves the improvement of the conventional method such as ion-chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography or extraction chromatography so that the separation method conforms to the detection using advanced ICP-MS. Furthermore, the application of such new method as the capillary electrophoresis chromatography to the separation of the element in the SF is examined. Ultimately, the analytical system with the chromatographic separation process combined on-line with the ICP-MS detection is considered to be the most suitable and has been developed and employed to the sensitive, precise and rapid analysis of the many isotopes of various elements in the SF. In Institute of Transuranium (EU) and Argonne National Laboratory (USA), the analyses

  9. Condition of research reactor spent nuclear fuel in wet storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The condition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in wet storage at ten Soviet-designed research reactors has been assessed in the light of international experience in order to identify any associated safety issues. These reactors use Al-clad UO2-Al or U-Al alloy dispersion fuels of ≥20% enrichment that were fabricated in Russia; the reactors have been in operation since 1955-70. Although originally sent for reprocessing, much of the SNF generated over the last 25-30 years has been stored in fuel storage pools (FSPs) of variable water quality. The external condition of wet-stored SNF assemblies from the reactors surveyed varied from significant failure due to galvanic corrosion that was driven by poor water quality, through gradual pitting caused by slightly impure water, to a stable condition of no observable change in the oxidized Al alloy surface of the irradiated fuel. SNF stability in wet storage seems to depend on three factors: Al being the sole metal in the FSP (to avoid galvanic action); good water chemistry to suppress attack of the oxide layer by aggressive ions like Cl-, and gentle handling to limit physical damage to the oxide layer. If one of these factors is not satisfied, SNF degradation will take place; if more than one factor is not satisfied, failure of the Al cladding may occur. In general, however, even SNF failure in wet storage does not appear to raise significant safety concerns. A possible exception is where galvanic corrosion combined with poor water quality has caused massive fuel failure, as at the RA reactor in Belgrade. A potential safety problem was identified at reactors where unalloyed Al liners had been used in the FSPs. Unlike SNF that develops a protective oxide layer in-reactor, these Al liners were unprotected and prone to significant corrosion during an ill-defined early period of poor water quality. The risk of losing water from FSPs due to liner failure should be evaluated for all research reactors. Where the risk of FSP failure

  10. Seismic stability of unanchored spent nuclear fuel storage casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic soil-structure interaction analyses were performed to examine the effects of a potential earthquake on the stability of unanchored cylindrical spent nuclear fuel casks for an above-ground storage installation. The casks would be placed on a cluster of reinforced concrete pads founded on a deep sequence of clays and silts underlain by sandstones. The analyses focused on evaluating the geometric stability of the casks during an earthquake with respect to a design concept that a cask should not tip over, slide off the storage pad, or collide with another cask. The analyses were performed using LS-DYNA with a three-dimensional explicit finite element model representing the site soil and a fully loaded storage pad. Three statistically independent acceleration time histories were applied simultaneously at the base of the model to generate a free-field ground motion time history representing the design-basis earthquake. Sensitivity studies were performed to examine the effects of the interface conditions between the storage pad and the surrounding soil, and between the base of the storage casks and the top surface of the pad. The results indicate that ground motion from the design-basis earthquake would not cause any cask to tip over, slide off the pad, or collide with another cask. The contact conditions at the cask-to-pad and pad-to-soil interfaces have a strong effect on potential cask motions during an earthquake. If the cask-base friction coefficient is small, the casks may slide, but would not experience any significant rocking. If the cask-base friction is large enough to permit a significant transfer of earthquake lateral motions across the cask-to-pad interface, a design with bonded pad-to-soil interfaces would produce larger cask motions than a design with frictional pad-to-soil interfaces. Furthermore, a cask strage design in which the cask motions are essentially isolated from the motions of the pad-soil system, which can be accomplished if the cask

  11. Spent nuclear fuel project high-level information management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Main, G.C.

    1996-09-13

    This document presents the results of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Information Management Planning Project (IMPP), a short-term project that identified information management (IM) issues and opportunities within the SNFP and outlined a high-level plan to address them. This high-level plan for the SNMFP IM focuses on specific examples from within the SNFP. The plan`s recommendations can be characterized in several ways. Some recommendations address specific challenges that the SNFP faces. Others form the basis for making smooth transitions in several important IM areas. Still others identify areas where further study and planning are indicated. The team`s knowledge of developments in the IM industry and at the Hanford Site were crucial in deciding where to recommend that the SNFP act and where they should wait for Site plans to be made. Because of the fast pace of the SNFP and demands on SNFP staff, input and interaction were primarily between the IMPP team and members of the SNFP Information Management Steering Committee (IMSC). Key input to the IMPP came from a workshop where IMSC members and their delegates developed a set of draft IM principles. These principles, described in Section 2, became the foundation for the recommendations found in the transition plan outlined in Section 5. Availability of SNFP staff was limited, so project documents were used as a basis for much of the work. The team, realizing that the status of the project and the environment are continually changing, tried to keep abreast of major developments since those documents were generated. To the extent possible, the information contained in this document is current as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. Programs and organizations on the Hanford Site as a whole are trying to maximize their return on IM investments. They are coordinating IM activities and trying to leverage existing capabilities. However, the SNFP cannot just rely on Sitewide activities to meet its IM requirements

  12. Condition of research reactor spent nuclear fuels in wet storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The condition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in wet storage at ten Soviet-designed research reactors has been assessed in the light of international experience in order to identify any associated safety issues. These reactors use Al-clad UO2-Al or U-Al alloy dispersion fuels of ≥20% enrichment that were fabricated in Russia; the reactors have been in operation since 1955-70. Although originally sent for reprocessing, much of the SNF generated over the last 25-30 years has been stored in fuel storage pools (FSPs) of variable water quality. The external condition of wet-stored SNF assemblies from the reactors surveyed varied from significant failure due to galvanic corrosion that was driven by poor water quality, through gradual pitting caused by slightly impure water, to a stable condition of no observable change in the oxidized Al alloy surface of the irradiated fuel. SNF stability in wet storage seems to depend on three factors: Al being the sole metal in the FSP (to avoid galvanic action); good water chemistry to suppress attack of the oxide layer by aggressive ions like Cl-, and gentle handling to limit physical damage to the oxide layer. If one of these factors is not satisfied, SNF degradation will take place; if more than one factor is not satisfied, failure of the Al cladding may occur. In general, however, even SNF failure in wet storage does not appear to raise significant safety concerns. A possible exception is where galvanic corrosion combined with poor water quality has caused massive fuel failure, as at the RA reactor in Belgrade. A potential safety problem was identified at reactors where unalloyed Al liners had been used in the FSPs. Unlike SNF that develops a protective oxide layer in-reactor, these Al liners were unprotected and prone to significant corrosion during an ill-defined early period of poor water quality. The risk of losing water from FSPs due to liner failure should be evaluated for all research reactors. Where the risk of

  13. MTR radiological database for SRS spent nuclear fuel facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A database for radiological characterization of incoming Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel has been developed for application to the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) and L-Basin spent fuel storage facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This database provides a quick quantitative check to determine if SRS bound spent fuel is radiologically bounded by the Reference Fuel Assembly used in the L-Basin and RBOF authorization bases. The developed database considers pertinent characteristics of domestic and foreign research reactor fuel including exposure, fuel enrichment, irradiation time, cooling time, and fuel-to-moderator ratio. The supplied tables replace the time-consuming studies associated with authorization of SRS bound spent fuel with simple hand calculations. Additionally, the comprehensive database provides the means to overcome resource limitations, since a series of simple, yet conservative, hand calculations can now be performed in a timely manner and replace computational and technical staff requirements

  14. Evaluation of uranyl nitrate crystallization for spent nuclear fuel separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work in Germany and Japan has indicated that crystallization of uranyl nitrate at low temperatures from nitric acid solution could be a useful process for removing most of the uranium from spent LWR fuel after the fuel is dissolved in nitric acid. The crystallization process potentially could reduce the cost of LWR fuel partitioning because it provides a selective and compact process for removing most of the uranium which is about 96% of the LWR spent fuel mass. Subsequent separation processes would only need to handle the smaller volume of remaining actinides and the fission products. We are evaluating an approach to separating uranyl nitrate that uses a continuous adiabatic reduced-pressure crystallizer to concentrate and cool a nitric acid solution from dissolution of spent fuel. Initial work to define the process flowsheet and obtain data on optimum crystallization conditions and the purity of the uranium product will be presented. (authors)

  15. Handling of final storage of unreprocessed spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the various facilities incorporated in the proposed handling chain for spent fuel from the power stations to the final repository are discribed. Thus the geological conditions which are essential for a final repository is discussed as well as the buffer and canister materials and how they contribute towards a long-term isolation of the spent fuel. Furthermore one chapter deals with leaching of the deposited fuel in the event that the canister is penetrated as well as the transport mechanisms which determine the migration of the radioactive substances through the buffer material. The dispersal processes in the geosphere and the biosphere are also described together with the transfer mechanisms to the ecological systems as well as radiation doses. Finally a summary is given of the safety analysis of the proposed method for the handling and final storage of the spent fuel. (E.R.)

  16. SACSESS – the EURATOM FP7 project on actinide separation from spent nuclear fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Bourg Stéphane; Geist Andreas; Narbutt Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of actinides by their separation from spent nuclear fuel, followed by transmutation in fast neutron reactors of Generation IV, is considered the most promising strategy for nuclear waste management. Closing the fuel cycle and burning long-lived actinides allows optimizing the use of natural resources and minimizing the long-term hazard of high-level nuclear waste. Moreover, improving the safety and sustainability of nuclear power worldwide. This paper presents the activities strivin...

  17. Use of axial burnup distribution profile in the nuclear safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel storage for WWER reactors in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear safety analysis of spent fuel storages taking into account fuel burnup should allow for burnup distribution along the height of the assembly. We propose a method based on an analysis of the axial burnup profiles of spent fuel assemblies. This method can be used in nuclear safety justification of spent fuel management and storage systems

  18. State fund of decommissioning of nuclear installations and handling of spent nuclear fuels and nuclear wastes (Slovak Republic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    State Fund for Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations and Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuels and Nuclear Wastes was established by the Act 254/1994 of the National Council of the Slovak Republic as a special-purpose fund which concentrates financial resources intended for decommissioning of nuclear installations and for handling of spent nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes. The Act was amended in 2000, 2001 and 2002. The Fund is legal entity and independent from operator of nuclear installations Slovak Power Facilities Inc. The Fund is headed by Director, who is appointed and recalled by Minister of Economy of the Slovak Republic. Sources of the Fund are generated from: a) contributions by nuclear installation operators; b) penalties imposed by Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic upon natural persons and legal entities pursuant to separate regulation; c) bank credits; d) interest on Fund deposits in banks; e) grants from State Budget; f) other sources as provided by special regulation. Fund resources may be used for the following purposes: a) decommissioning of nuclear installations; b) handling of spent nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes after the termination of nuclear installation operation; c) handling of radioactive wastes whose originator is not known, including occasionally seized radioactive wastes and radioactive materials stemming from criminal activities whose originator is not known, as confirmed by Police Corps investigator or Ministry of Health of the Slovak Republic; d) purchase of land for the establishment of nuclear fuel and nuclear waste repositories; e) research and development in the areas of decommissioning of nuclear installations and handling of nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes after the termination of the operation of nuclear installations; f) selection of localities, geological survey, preparation, design, construction, commissioning, operation and closure of repositories of spent nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes

  19. Analysis of Spent Nuclear Fuel Imaging Using Multiple Coulomb Scattering of Cosmic Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzidakis, Stylianos; Tsoukalas, Lefteri H

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic ray muons passing through matter lose energy from inelastic collisions with electrons and are deflected from nuclei due to multiple Coulomb scattering. The strong dependence of scattering on atomic number Z and the recent developments on position sensitive muon detectors indicate that multiple Coulomb scattering could be an excellent candidate for spent nuclear fuel imaging. Muons present significant advantages over existing monitoring and imaging techniques and can play a central role in monitoring nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel stored in dense well shielded containers. The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the applicability of multiple Coulomb scattering for imaging of spent nuclear fuel dry casks stored within vertical and horizontal commercial storage dry casks. Calculations of muon scattering were performed for various scenarios, including vertical and horizontal fully loaded dry casks, half loaded dry casks, dry casks with one row of fuel assemblies missing, dry casks with one fu...

  20. Development of Integrated Analyzing and Training Simulator for Spent Nuclear Fuel Pool, CAREPooL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yongdeog [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The Comprehensive Analyzer of Real Estimation for spent fuel POOL (CAREPOOL) has been developed for evaluating temperature and criticality of a spent nuclear fuel pool (SFP) during the normal and accident conditions. The CAREPOOL provides four main functions- management of spent nuclear fuel, decay heat Transactions of the Korean Nuclear Society Spring Meeting Jeju, Korea, May 7-8, 2015 calculation by ORIGEN-S code, estimation of the time to boil/fuel uncovering by thermal-hydraulics calculations, criticality evaluation by Helios code. All of these are integrated into the GUI based CAREPOOL system. The CAREPOOL would be very beneficial to nuclear power plant operator and trainee who have responsibility for the SFP operation.

  1. Site selection - siting of the final repository for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-03-15

    SKB has selected Forsmark as the site for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The site selection is the end result of an extensive siting process that began in the early 1990s. The strategy and plan for the work was based on experience from investigations and development work over a period of more than ten years prior to then. This document describes the siting work and SKB's choice of site for the final repository. It also presents the information on which the choice was based and the reasons for the decisions made along the way. The document comprises Appendix PV to applications under the Nuclear Activities Act and the Environmental Code for licences to build and operate an encapsulation plant adjacent to the central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel in Oskarshamn, and to build and operate a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark in Oesthammar Municipality

  2. Site selection - siting of the final repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKB has selected Forsmark as the site for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The site selection is the end result of an extensive siting process that began in the early 1990s. The strategy and plan for the work was based on experience from investigations and development work over a period of more than ten years prior to then. This document describes the siting work and SKB's choice of site for the final repository. It also presents the information on which the choice was based and the reasons for the decisions made along the way. The document comprises Appendix PV to applications under the Nuclear Activities Act and the Environmental Code for licences to build and operate an encapsulation plant adjacent to the central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel in Oskarshamn, and to build and operate a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark in Oesthammar Municipality

  3. RUSSIAN-ORIGIN HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL SHIPMENT FROM BULGARIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly Cummins; Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Tihomir Apostolov; Ivaylo Dimitrov

    2009-07-01

    In July 2008, the Global Threat Reduction Initiative and the IRT 2000 research reactor in Sofia, Bulgaria, operated by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped 6.4 kilograms of Russian origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to the Russian Federation. The shipment, which resulted in the removal of all HEU from Bulgaria, was conducted by truck, barge, and rail modes of transport across two transit countries before reaching the final destination at the Production Association Mayak facility in Chelyabinsk, Russia. This paper describes the work, equipment, organizations, and approvals that were required to complete the spent fuel shipment and provides lessons learned that might assist other research reactor operators with their own spent nuclear fuel shipments.

  4. Development of Integrated Analyzing and Training Simulator for Spent Nuclear Fuel Pool, CAREPooL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Comprehensive Analyzer of Real Estimation for spent fuel POOL (CAREPOOL) has been developed for evaluating temperature and criticality of a spent nuclear fuel pool (SFP) during the normal and accident conditions. The CAREPOOL provides four main functions- management of spent nuclear fuel, decay heat Transactions of the Korean Nuclear Society Spring Meeting Jeju, Korea, May 7-8, 2015 calculation by ORIGEN-S code, estimation of the time to boil/fuel uncovering by thermal-hydraulics calculations, criticality evaluation by Helios code. All of these are integrated into the GUI based CAREPOOL system. The CAREPOOL would be very beneficial to nuclear power plant operator and trainee who have responsibility for the SFP operation

  5. Evaluation of Radiation Impacts of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage (SNFS-2) of Chernobyl NPP - 13495

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation effects are estimated for the operation of a new dry storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (SNFS-2) of Chernobyl NPP RBMK reactors. It is shown that radiation exposure during normal operation, design and beyond design basis accidents are minor and meet the criteria for safe use of radiation and nuclear facilities in Ukraine. (authors)

  6. Separator assembly for use in spent-nuclear-fuel shipping cask. [Patent application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1981-04-24

    A separator assembly for use in a spent-nuclear-fuel shipping cask has a honeycomb-type wall structure defining parallel cavities for holding nuclear fuel assemblies. Tubes formed of an effective neutron-absorbing material are embedded in the wall structure around each of the cavities and provide neutron flux traps when filled with water.

  7. Federal interim storage fee study for civilian spent nuclear fuel: a technical and economical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the study conducted by the Department of Energy (the Department) regarding payment charges for the federal interim storage (FIS) of spent fuel and presents the details of the study results. It describes the selection of a methodology for calculating a FIS fee schedule, sets forth the estimates of cost for construction and operation of FIS facilities, provides a range of estimates for the fee for FIS services, and identifies special contractual considerations associated with providing FIS services to authorized users. The fee is structured for a range of spent fuel capacities because of uncertainties regarding the schedule of availability and amount of spent fuel that may require and qualify for FIS. The results set forth in the report were used as a basis for development of the report entitled Payment Charges for Federal Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Civilian Nuclear Power Plants in the United States, dated July 1983

  8. Plan for spent fuel waste form testing for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of spent fuel waste form testing is to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from failed disposal containers holding spent fuel, under conditions appropriate to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project tuff repository. The information gathered in the activities discussed in this document will be used: to assess the performance of the waste package and engineered barrier system (EBS) with respect to the containment and release rate requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as the basis for the spent fuel waste form source term in repository-scale performance assessment modeling to calculate the cumulative releases to the accessible environment over 10,000 years to determine compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency, and as the basis for the spent fuel waste form source term in repository-scale performance assessment modeling to calculate cumulative releases over 100,000 years as required by the site evaluation process specified in the DOE siting guidelines. 34 refs

  9. A Study On The Initial Characteristics Of Domestic Spent Nuclear Fuels For Long Term DRY Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last three decades, South Korean nuclear power plants have discharged about 5,950 tons of spent fuel and the maximum burn-up reached 55 GWd/MTU in 2002. This study was performed to support the development of Korean dry spent fuel storage alternatives. First, we chose V5H-17 Χ 17 and KSFA-16 Χ 16 as representative domestic spent fuels, considering current accumulation and the future generation of the spent fuels. Examination reveals that their average burn-ups have already increased from 33 to 51 GWd/MTU and from 34.8 to 48.5 GWd/MTU, respectively. Evaluation of the fuel characteristics shows that at the average burn-up of 42 GWd/MTU, the oxide thickness, hydrogen content, and hoop stress ranged from 30 ∼ 60 μm, 250 ∼ 500 ppm, and 50 ∼ 75 MPa, respectively. But when burn-up exceeds 55 GWd/MTU, those characteristics can increase up to 100 μm, 800 ppm, and 120 MPa, respectively, depending on the power history. These results demonstrate that most Korean spent nuclear fuels are expected to remain within safe bounds during long-term dry storage, however, the excessive hoop stress and hydrogen concentration may trigger the degradation of the spent fuel integrity early during the long-term dry storage in the case of high burn-up spent fuels exceeding 45 GWd/MTU

  10. International conference on management of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains 48 extended synopses of the International Conference on Management of Spent Fuel from Nuclear Power Reactors. The major topics covered related to national programmes in spent fuel management as well as regional trends, technology and safety/security aspects of wet and dry storage, licensing and regulation, quality assurance, design control, operating experience, R and D, and special aspects of spent fuel storage including in-service inspection, robotics, heat removal, and other engineering considerations. Each of the extended synopses was indexed separately

  11. Preliminary design and analysis on nuclear fuel cycle for fission-fusion hybrid spent fuel burner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wet-processing-based fuel cycle and a dry-processing were designed for a fission-fusion hybrid spent fuel burner (FDS-SFB). Mass flow of SFB was preliminarily analyzed. The feasibility analysis of initial loaded fuel inventory, recycle fuel fabrication and spent fuel reprocessing were preliminarily evaluated. The results of mass flow of FDS-SFB demonstrated that the initial loaded fuel inventory, recycle fuel fabrication and spent fuel reprocessing of nuclear fuel cycle of FDS-SFB is preliminarily feasible. (authors)

  12. Conceptual design report for the ICPP spent nuclear fuel dry storage project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The conceptual design is presented for a facility to transfer spent nuclear fuel from shipping casks to dry storage containers, and to safely store those containers at ICPP at INEL. The spent fuels to be handled at the new facility are identified and overall design and operating criteria established. Physical configuration of the facility and the systems used to handle the SNF are described. Detailed cost estimate for design and construction of the facility is presented.

  13. Worker exposure for at-reactor management of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological impact on workers associated with spent nuclear fuel dry storage operations at reactor sites is discussed. The resulting doses to workers exposed to external radiation include the dose during dry storage system loading, unloading and handling activities, the dose associated with independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) operations, maintenance and surveillance activities, and the dose associated with additional ISFSI construction. Comprehensive dose estimates are reported based on previous radiation surveys. (authors)

  14. Intermediate storage and some issues concerning the final storage of spent nuclear fuel at Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major objective of 'Nuclearelectrica' National Society (SNN) is to implement nuclear power projects with respect to the sustainable development concept. Examples are given regarding spent fuel and radioactive waste management. Managing the spent fuel according with the concept of sustainable development is demonstrated by the SNN's policy and target objectives of the associated strategy. Spent fuel management strategy is implemented through an optimized staged process. One of the most important stages was completed by commissioning the first unit of the Dry Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility at Cernavoda NPP site. The dry storage facility is based on the MACSTOR technology , the best proved design of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and consists of concrete modules, each of them having a 12,000 spent fuel bundles capacity. The designed lifetime of the facility is, at least, 50 years and the present site can accommodate the spent fuel generated by two units during 30 years of operation. Spent fuel storage is the last and the most important stage of disposal. In Romania, by the Government's Ordinance 11/2003 approved by the Law 320/2003 there were assigned the responsibilities within the national waste management system. The newly established National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management will have a fundamental task, being responsible for the end stage of fuel cycle by selecting for the spent fuel disposal an appropriate repository site accepted by the public and a safe and efficient technology with a reasonable acceptable environmental impact. (author)

  15. MANAGEMENT OF RESEARCH AND TEST REACTOR ALUMINUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL - A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-07-11

    The Department of Energy's Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program is responsible for the receipt and storage of aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel or used fuel until ultimate disposition. Aluminum research reactor used fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the U.S. and stored at DOE-EM storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper assesses the technologies and the options for safe transportation/receipt and interim storage of aluminum research reactor spent fuel and reviews the comprehensive strategy for its management. The U.S. Department of Energy uses the Appendix A, Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Criteria, to identify the physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of spent nuclear fuel to be returned to the United States under the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The fuel is further evaluated for acceptance through assessments of the fuel at the foreign sites that include corrosion damage and handleability. Transport involves use of commercial shipping casks with defined leakage rates that can provide containment of the fuel, some of which are breached. Options for safe storage include wet storage and dry storage. Both options must fully address potential degradation of the aluminum during the storage period. This paper focuses on the various options for safe transport and storage with respect to technology maturity and application.

  16. Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-04-14

    The proposed DOE action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to implement appropriate processes for the safe and efficient management of spent nuclear fuel and targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken County, South Carolina, including placing these materials in forms suitable for ultimate disposition. Options to treat, package, and store this material are discussed. The material included in this EIS consists of approximately 68 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of spent nuclear fuel 20 MTHM of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at SRS, as much as 28 MTHM of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel from foreign and domestic research reactors to be shipped to SRS through 2035, and 20 MTHM of stainless-steel or zirconium-clad spent nuclear fuel and some Americium/Curium Targets stored at SRS. Alternatives considered in this EIS encompass a range of new packaging, new processing, and conventional processing technologies, as well as the No Action Alternative. A preferred alternative is identified in which DOE would prepare about 97% by volume (about 60% by mass) of the aluminum-based fuel for disposition using a melt and dilute treatment process. The remaining 3% by volume (about 40% by mass) would be managed using chemical separation. Impacts are assessed primarily in the areas of water resources, air resources, public and worker health, waste management, socioeconomic, and cumulative impacts.

  17. Egyptian Proposed Strategy of Spent Fuel Management from Nuclear Power Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a proposed policy and strategy of the Arab Republic of Egypt towards the management of spent fuel from the nuclear power reactors. The proposed Egyptian strategy supports the free international trade of nuclear materials and services and adheres to Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and other institutional frameworks aimed at promoting the peaceful use of nuclear power in all countries. Considering the spent fuel is a main part of nuclear fuel cycle, therefore the Nuclear Power Plants Authority (NPPA) is responsible for the assurance, safety, secured and stable supply of all services and materials of nuclear fuel cycle within a long term contracts. Egypt has taken the decision to adopt an open fuel cycle for the first nuclear power plant, i.e. no reprocessing of spent fuel. NPPA would develop at an early stage a conceptual plan describing all important steps leading to the final disposal of spent fuel and radioactive waste in Egypt utilizing fully the national and international experience and the capabilities of international cooperation. (author)

  18. AIR SHIPMENT OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL FROM ROMANIA AND LIBYA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 2009 Romania successfully completed the world's first air shipment of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel transported in Type B(U) casks under existing international laws and without special exceptions for the air transport licenses. Special 20-foot ISO shipping containers and cask tiedown supports were designed to transport Russian TUK 19 shipping casks for the Romanian air shipment and the equipment was certified for all modes of transport, including road, rail, water, and air. In December 2009 Libya successfully used this same equipment for a second air shipment of HEU spent nuclear fuel. Both spent fuel shipments were transported by truck from the originating nuclear facilities to nearby commercial airports, were flown by commercial cargo aircraft to a commercial airport in Yekaterinburg, Russia, and then transported by truck to their final destinations at the Production Association Mayak facility in Chelyabinsk, Russia. Both air shipments were performed under the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) as part of the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Romania air shipment of 23.7 kg of HEU spent fuel from the VVR S research reactor was the last of three HEU fresh and spent fuel shipments under RRRFR that resulted in Romania becoming the 3rd RRRFR participating country to remove all HEU. Libya had previously completed two RRRFR shipments of HEU fresh fuel so the 5.2 kg of HEU spent fuel air shipped from the IRT 1 research reactor in December made Libya the 4th RRRFR participating country to remove all HEU. This paper describes the equipment, preparations, and license approvals required to safely and securely complete these two air shipments of spent nuclear fuel.

  19. AIR SHIPMENT OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL FROM ROMANIA AND LIBYA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Landers; Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Stanley Moses

    2010-07-01

    In June 2009 Romania successfully completed the world’s first air shipment of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel transported in Type B(U) casks under existing international laws and without special exceptions for the air transport licenses. Special 20-foot ISO shipping containers and cask tiedown supports were designed to transport Russian TUK 19 shipping casks for the Romanian air shipment and the equipment was certified for all modes of transport, including road, rail, water, and air. In December 2009 Libya successfully used this same equipment for a second air shipment of HEU spent nuclear fuel. Both spent fuel shipments were transported by truck from the originating nuclear facilities to nearby commercial airports, were flown by commercial cargo aircraft to a commercial airport in Yekaterinburg, Russia, and then transported by truck to their final destinations at the Production Association Mayak facility in Chelyabinsk, Russia. Both air shipments were performed under the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) as part of the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Romania air shipment of 23.7 kg of HEU spent fuel from the VVR S research reactor was the last of three HEU fresh and spent fuel shipments under RRRFR that resulted in Romania becoming the 3rd RRRFR participating country to remove all HEU. Libya had previously completed two RRRFR shipments of HEU fresh fuel so the 5.2 kg of HEU spent fuel air shipped from the IRT 1 research reactor in December made Libya the 4th RRRFR participating country to remove all HEU. This paper describes the equipment, preparations, and license approvals required to safely and securely complete these two air shipments of spent nuclear fuel.

  20. {sup 14}C Removal Technology for the Treatment of Spent Resin from Nuclear Power Plants : A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young-Ku; An, Seunggeon; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Cho, Jun Ho [SunKwang Atomic Energy Safety Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hwan Seo; Ahn, Hong Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In general, the spent resins are moved out of the service columns as a slurry type and then stored in in-station resin storage tanks. Especially, spent ion-exchange resins contaminated with C-14 radioisotope which has long half-life of 5,730 years influences the strategy for the disposal of spent. It is recommended that disposal concentration limit of spent rein loaded with C-14 is 8 Ci/m{sup 3} according to US 10 CFR 61.8. Therefore, the removal of {sup 14}C from spent resin and its concentration to solid sorbents become a desirable feature which can be disposed of as conventional low level waste. Acid stripping and thermal stripping methods are under development for the removal of C-14 from spent resins. This paper describes the results from a program undertaken to analyze C-14 in the spent resins produced from the nuclear operations of Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant. Total 72 resin samples were sampled from the in-station storage tank at Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1. In first, adsorption characteristics of inactive HCO{sub 3} - ion and other ions in stripping solution on IRN-150 mixed resin was evaluated. Based on these results, detailed experiments for removal of HCO{sub 3} - ion adsorbed on IRN-150 by alkaline stripping solution such as Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and NaNO{sub 3} was carried out. This experiment includes removal characteristics of HCO{sub 3} - ion from mixed resin and gasification of HCO{sub 3} - ion to CO{sub 2} using acid solution. Spent resins were sampled from in-station resin storage tank 2 at Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1. Commercially available grain samplers were referred for resin sampling. Resin samples were collected from both man-hole (68 samples) and test-hole (4 samples). The maximum dose rate, in contact with the resin sampler, was about 8mR/h and the tritium level in the room was about 2.9 DAC. Each resin sample was oxidized with sample oxidizer (Perkin Elmer, M307). The average concentration of C-14 in the cation/anion mixed

  1. The Changing Landscape for Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel: International Perspectives from the OECD/NEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of safe and sustainable management of spent nuclear fuel is evident. While it comprises only a small amount by volume of the waste from nuclear power plants, it contains most of the radioactivity in national waste inventories. Its properties mean that special management is needed both in the near term as well as far into the future. The challenges are growing as greater volumes of spent nuclear fuel are foreseen to be stored for longer periods of time. Furthermore, SF is at the heart of debates over nuclear power. At the last conference, nuclear power appeared poised to make a resurgence worldwide in response to, among other factors, desires for greater energy security and concerns over global warming. These factors have become even more prominent over the intervening years. Nuclear power is being expanded and extended in countries where it already exists. In addition, ‘newcomer’ States seeking sustainable and secure energy solutions are pursuing nuclear power. The proper management of radioactive waste — and especially of spent nuclear fuel — features prominently in debates on expansions of nuclear power. Thus, the topic is crucial in itself and also related to the further expansion of nuclear power

  2. Safety analysis of disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel from the Olkiluoto NPP (TVO I and II) is planned to be disposed of in a repository to be constructed at a depth of about 500 meters in the crystalline bedrock. The thesis is dealing with the safety analysis of the disposal. The main topics presented in the thesis are: (1) The amount of radioactive properties of the spent fuel, (2) The canister design and the planned disposal concept, (3) The results of the preliminary site investigations, (4) Discussion of the multi-barrier principle, (5) The general principles and methodology of the TVO-92 safety analysis, (6) Groundwater flow analysis, (7) Durability and behaviour of the canister, (8) Biosphere analysis and reference scenario, and (9) The sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. (246 refs., 75 figs., 44 tabs.)

  3. Hot isostatic pressing of ceramic waste from spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a process to immobilize waste salt containing fission products, uranium, and transuranic elements as chlorides in a glass-bonded ceramic waste form. This salt was generated in the electrorefining operation used in electrometallurgical treatment of spent Experimental Breeder Reactor-II fuel. The ceramic waste process culminated with a hot isostatic pressing operation. This paper reviews the installation and operation of a hot isostatic press in a radioactive environment. Processing conditions for the hot isostatic press are presented for non-irradiated material and irradiated material. Sufficient testing was performed to demonstrate that a hot isostatic press could be used as the final step of the processing of ceramic waste for the electrometallurgical spent fuel treatment process

  4. Risk of transporting spent nuclear fuel by truck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk methodology used to evaluate the risk in shipping spent fuel includes: 1) a description of the spent fuel transport system, 2) identification of potential release sequences, 3) evaluation of the probabilities and consequences of the releases, and 4) calculation and assessment of the risk. The system description includes projected industry characteristics, amounts to be shipped, shipping package descriptions, material characteristics, transport mode, transport routes used and weather and population distribution information. Release sequences are identified by fault tree analysis tehniques. Releases are evaluated using package failure data, normal transport and transport accident environment data and mathematical models for material dispersion and resultant health effects. This information is combined to calculate the shipping system risk which is compared to other known risks. The data may be further analyzed to determine the primary contributors to the risk and identify possible methods for reducing the risk, if the current risk level is judged by society to be unacceptable

  5. Recycling of nuclear spent fuel with AIROX processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines the concept of recycling light water reactor (LWR) fuel through use of a dry-processing technique known as the AIROX (Atomics International Reduction Oxidation) process. In this concept, the volatiles and the cladding from spent LWR fuel are separated from the fuel by the AIROX process. The fuel is then reenriched and made into new fuel pins with new cladding. The feasibility of the concept is studied from a technical and high level waste minimization perspective

  6. Track 9: fuel cycle, spent fuel, decommissioning, and waste management. Dry storage of commercial spent nuclear fuel. Panel Discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Currently, dry storage of spent nuclear fuel is a mature technology with a firm technical basis when the burnup of fuel is 45 GWd/tonne U for up to 100-yr duration. A technical basis for the safe extension of dry storage to the higher burnups and longer times needs to be established. In particular, the expected behavior of cask and fuel materials must be established. Experts from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the American Society for Testing and Materials, utilities storing fuel, the Electric Power Research Institute, and national laboratories will discuss the current status of that database, what data need to be obtained, what programs are in place to obtain data to augment the basis, and the results of those programs. (authors)

  7. Quantifying the passive gamma signal from spent nuclear fuel in support of determining the plutonium content in spent nuclear fuel with nondestructive assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of safeguarding nuclear material is to deter diversions of significant quantities of nuclear materials by timely monitoring and detection. There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium in spent fuel (SF), by means of nondestructive assay (NDA), in order to meet this goal. These motivations include the following: strengthening the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies ability to safeguard nuclear facilities, shipper/receiver difference, input accountability at reprocessing facilities and burnup credit at repositories. Many NDA techniques exist for measuring signatures from SF; however, no single NDA technique can, in isolation, quantify elemental plutonium in SF. A study has been undertaken to determine the best integrated combination of 13 NDA techniques for characterizing Pu mass in spent fuel. This paper focuses on the development of a passive gamma measurement system in support the spent fuel assay system. Gamma ray detection for fresh nuclear fuel focuses on gamma ray emissions that directly coincide with the actinides of interest to the assay. For example, the 186-keV gamma ray is generally used for 235U assay and the 384-keV complex is generally used for assaying plutonium. In spent nuclear fuel, these signatures cannot be detected as the Compton continuum created from the fission products dominates the signal in this energy range. For SF, the measured gamma signatures from key fission products (134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu) are used to ascertain burnup, cooling time, and fissile content information. In this paper the Monte Carlo modeling set-up for a passive gamma spent fuel assay system will be described. The set-up of the system includes a germanium detector and an ion chamber and will be used to gain passive gamma information that will be integrated into a system for determining Pu in SF. The passive gamma signal will be determined from a library of ∼ 100 assemblies that have been created to examine the capability

  8. Equivalent thermal conductivity of the storage basket with spent nuclear fuel of VVER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to limitation of computation resources and/or computation time many thermal problems require to use simplified geometrical models with equivalent thermal properties. A new method for definition of equivalent thermal conductivity of spent nuclear fuel storage casks is proposed. It is based on solving the inverse heat conduction problem. For the proposed method two approaches for equivalent thermal conductivity definition were considered. In the first approach a simplified model in conjugate formulation is used, in the second approach a simplified model of solid body which allows an analytical solution is used. For safety ensuring during all time of spent nuclear fuel storage the equivalent thermal conductivity was calculated for different storage years. The calculated equivalent thermal conductivities can be used in thermal researches for dry spent nuclear fuel storage safety.

  9. Fresh and spent nuclear fuel repatriation from the IRT-2000 research reactor facility, Sofia, Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IRT-2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned. (author)

  10. Fresh and Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation from the IRT-2000 Research Reactor Facility, Sofia, Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IRT 2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned

  11. Fresh and Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation from the IRT-2000 Research Reactor Facility, Sofia, Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. J. Allen; T. G. Apostolov; I. S. Dimitrov

    2009-03-01

    The IRT 2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned.

  12. Actinides and fissions products in the spent nuclear fuel from slovak NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five nuclear units with reactor WWER-440 are in this time in operation in Slovakia - four units in Bohunice and one in Mochovce sites. Start-up of another unit can be expected in Mochovce soon. Spent nuclear fuel was considered as a waste with final disposal in deep repository. Characterization and evaluation of burned-up is now under process of changes in connection with development of Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology systems. Applicability of transmutation technology in particular nuclear economy depends on the amount and composition of burned fuel assemblies. This study deals with evaluation of Slovak WWER-440 spent fuel composition based on ORIGEN calculation. The paper provides calculation results of WWER-440 (1.6%, 2.4%, 3.6%, 3.82% enrichment) spent fuel inventory. Amounts and activities of important nuclides are tabled. (Authors)

  13. Equivalent thermal conductivity of the storage basket with spent nuclear fuel of VVER-1000 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alyokhina, Svitlana [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv (Ukraine). A.M. Pidgorny Institute for Mechanical Engineering Problems; Kostikov, Andriy [V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National Univ., Kharkiv (Ukraine). Dept. of Thermal Physics and Molecular Physics

    2014-12-15

    Due to limitation of computation resources and/or computation time many thermal problems require to use simplified geometrical models with equivalent thermal properties. A new method for definition of equivalent thermal conductivity of spent nuclear fuel storage casks is proposed. It is based on solving the inverse heat conduction problem. For the proposed method two approaches for equivalent thermal conductivity definition were considered. In the first approach a simplified model in conjugate formulation is used, in the second approach a simplified model of solid body which allows an analytical solution is used. For safety ensuring during all time of spent nuclear fuel storage the equivalent thermal conductivity was calculated for different storage years. The calculated equivalent thermal conductivities can be used in thermal researches for dry spent nuclear fuel storage safety.

  14. Evolution of spent nuclear fuel in dry storage conditions for millennia and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant amounts of spent uranium dioxide nuclear fuel are accumulating worldwide from decades of commercial nuclear power production. While such spent fuel is intended to be reprocessed or disposed in geologic repositories, out-of-reactor radiation damage from alpha decay can be detrimental to its structural stability. Here we report on an experimental study in which radiation damage in plutonium dioxide, uranium dioxide samples doped with short-lived alpha-emitters and urano-thorianite minerals have been characterized by XRD, transmission electron microscopy, thermal desorption spectrometry and hardness measurements to assess the long-term stability of spent nuclear fuel to substantial alpha-decay doses. Defect accumulation is predicted to result in swelling of the atomic structure and decrease in fracture toughness; whereas, the accumulation of helium will produce bubbles that result in much larger gaseous-induced swelling that substantially increases the stresses in the constrained spent fuel. Based on these results, the radiation-ageing of highly-aged spent nuclear fuel over more than 10,000 years is predicted

  15. Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste handling, storage and disposal in the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are discussed in detail: Concept of the ultimate stages of spent fuel management in the Slovak Republic; Spent fuel and radioactive waste management strategy; and Spent nuclear fuel interim storage facility. The legal framework and government decisions are described. Slovakia’s policy is in line with the 1988 Joint Convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on the safety of radioactive waste management. The strategy for the future is such that spent nuclear fuel should be reprocessed and radioactive waste should be disposed of in a deep geological repository. (orig.)

  16. All the Spent Nuclear Wastes to Low and Intermediate Level Wastes: PyroGreen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear wastes are inevitable issues to use nuclear power as a sustainable energy. Therefore, every country has their fuel cycles which are best for their environmental and/or political circumstances for the use of nuclear energy. These days agreements are made that spent nuclear fuels should be recycled to minimize waste volume and its toxicity all around the world. Republic of Korea also has a plan to recycle the spent nuclear fuels by using Gen-IV concept burner reactors and pyro-process plants. Not many options of national nuclear strategies are exist because Korea has too many people for its limited land space. KAERI already has been proposing a national fuel cycle concept called 'KIEP-21' that encompasses all the requirements of the advanced nuclear fuel cycle such as reduction of volume, toxicity, HLW heat load and so on. Authors suggest non-national fuel cycle concept called 'PyroGreen' for the sustainable nuclear energy system. PyroGreen is also comprised of transmutation reactor and pyro-process plant such as typical advanced fuel cycle system. However, to make all the spent nuclear fuels to low and intermediate level wastes several strategies are provided. Radioactive nuclear wastes are classified into HLW and LILW considering its heat load, concentration, and its migration capabilities into environments. If the concentration limit is satisfied heat load limit is not important. However, migration of radioactive elements from disposed waste forms is not negligible. Therefore, PyroGreen considers deep geological disposal of nuclear wastes to mitigate the effect of concentration limits based on the human intrusion scenario. Ceramic waste forms which has extremely low leach rate of loaded elements can be used as a waste form to solve the migration issues and decrease exclusion area of disposal site. To decrease waste toxicity, decontamination factor of TRUs through whole pyro-process should be as high as possible. To maximize the decontamination factor

  17. Spent Nuclear Fuel Cask and Storage Monitoring with 4He Scintillation Fast Neutron Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With this increasing quantity of spent nuclear fuel being stored at nuclear plants across S. Korea, the demand exists for building a long-term disposal facility. However, the Korean government first requires a detailed plan for the monitoring and certification of spent fuel. Several techniques have been developed and applied for the purpose of spent fuel monitoring, including the digital Cerenkov viewing device (DCVD), spent fuel attribute tester (SFAT), and FORK detector. Conventional gamma measurement methods, however, suffer from a lack of nuclear data and interfering background radiation. To date, the primary method of neutron detection for spent fuel monitoring has been through the use of thermal neutron detectors such as 3He and BF3 proportional counters. Unfolding the neutron spectrum becomes extremely complicated. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties, a new fast neutron measurement system is currently being developed at the University of Florida. This system is based on the 4He scintillation detector invented by Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd. These detectors are a relatively new technological development and take advantage of the high 4He cross-section for elastic scattering at fast neutron energies, particularly the resonance around 1 MeV. This novel 4He scintillation neutron detector is characterized by its low electron density, leading to excellent gamma rejection. This detector also has a fast response time on the order of nanoseconds and most importantly, preserves some neutron energy information since no moderator is required. Additionally, these detectors rely on naturally abundant 4He as the fill gas. This study proposes a new technique using the neutron spectroscopy features of 4He scintillation detectors to maintain accountability of spent fuel in storage. This research will support spent fuel safeguards and the detection of fissile material, in order to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. This study conducted a

  18. Spent Nuclear Fuel Cask and Storage Monitoring with {sup 4}He Scintillation Fast Neutron Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hee jun; Kelley, Ryan P; Jordan, Kelly A [Univ. of Florida, Florida (United States); Lee, Wanno [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong Hyun [Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    With this increasing quantity of spent nuclear fuel being stored at nuclear plants across S. Korea, the demand exists for building a long-term disposal facility. However, the Korean government first requires a detailed plan for the monitoring and certification of spent fuel. Several techniques have been developed and applied for the purpose of spent fuel monitoring, including the digital Cerenkov viewing device (DCVD), spent fuel attribute tester (SFAT), and FORK detector. Conventional gamma measurement methods, however, suffer from a lack of nuclear data and interfering background radiation. To date, the primary method of neutron detection for spent fuel monitoring has been through the use of thermal neutron detectors such as {sup 3}He and BF{sub 3} proportional counters. Unfolding the neutron spectrum becomes extremely complicated. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties, a new fast neutron measurement system is currently being developed at the University of Florida. This system is based on the {sup 4}He scintillation detector invented by Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd. These detectors are a relatively new technological development and take advantage of the high {sup 4}He cross-section for elastic scattering at fast neutron energies, particularly the resonance around 1 MeV. This novel {sup 4}He scintillation neutron detector is characterized by its low electron density, leading to excellent gamma rejection. This detector also has a fast response time on the order of nanoseconds and most importantly, preserves some neutron energy information since no moderator is required. Additionally, these detectors rely on naturally abundant {sup 4}He as the fill gas. This study proposes a new technique using the neutron spectroscopy features of {sup 4}He scintillation detectors to maintain accountability of spent fuel in storage. This research will support spent fuel safeguards and the detection of fissile material, in order to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation

  19. Progress of the United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State (DOS), adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. To date, the Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Acceptance Program has completed 23 shipments. Almost 5000 spent fuel assemblies from eligible research reactors throughout the world have been accepted into the United States under this program. Over the past year, another cross-country shipment of fuel was accomplished, as well as two additional shipments in the fourth quarter of calendar year 2001. These shipments attracted considerable safeguards oversight since they occurred post September 11. Recent guidance from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) pertaining to security and safeguards issues deals directly with the transport of nuclear material. Since the Acceptance Program has consistently applied above regulatory safety enhancements in transport of spent nuclear fuel, this guidance did not adversely effect the Program. As the Program draws closer to its termination date, an increased number of requests for program extension are received. Currently, there are no plans to extend the policy beyond its current expiration date; therefore, eligible reactor operators interested in participating in this program are strongly encouraged to evaluate their inventory and plan for future shipments as soon as possible. (author)

  20. Spent fuel management strategy for future nuclear power plants operation in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The demand for electricity in Indonesia increases by the years. This increase goes along with the rate of economic development, the rate of population growth and the rapid development in the industrial sector. To fulfill this demand for electricity, it is becoming more difficult to depend on the existing resources which are now getting limited. It is, therefore, very important. that steps should be taken to seek outer resources as alternatives. Based on the thought that a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is technically safe, reliable, clean and environmentally-oriented, relatively economical, and supported by our being prepared in respect to the human resources and the infrastructures, including the results of the feasibility studies for NPP development completed in 1996, the option of nuclear power could well be the right solution. Intensive effort have long been undertaken by BATAN for the introduction of NPPs in Indonesia. The candidate sites, which have long been thoroughly investigated and selected, are located at the Muria Peninsula in Central Java. It is planned that the selected candidate site will accommodate several NPPs with a total power generation of about 7,000 MWe. Indonesia shall choose an open fuel cycle strategy until couple decades after the first NPP operation. Each NPP to be capable of providing 3-5 years of spent fuel storage pool at the NPP building. It is planned that the spent fuels will be stored for further 40-50 years in centralized storage facility at the NPP site. After that, spent-fuels will be stored in long term storage facility, eventually, arrangement must be made for deed geological disposal. According to the result of NPP feasibility studies, for achieving 7,000 MWe power generation there are three cases of scenario among many combination of 600 MWe and 900 MWe class NPPs: - Case I gives the power combination of 600 MWe x 2 Units x 6 Stages. - Case 2 gives the combination of following power: 600 MWe x 2 Units x 3 Stages 900

  1. Total Spent Nuclear Fuel Back-End Costs For Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discussions are going on different acceptable scenarios for Ignalina NPP decommissioning. To choose the optimum alternative it is necessary to know the spent nuclear fuel back-end costs for Ignalina NPP. This paper deals with an analysis of such results for different decommissioning scenarios. The costs are estimated for the main three components: NPP decommissioning and short-lived waste treatment costs, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and long-lived waste (LLW) storage costs, SNF and LLW disposal costs. Also, the annual flow of these costs is shown The estimated data are compared with the available data on Ignalina NPP and Sweden. (author)

  2. Chemical Reactivity Testing for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program. Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsom, H.C.

    1999-01-24

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) summarizes requirements used by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (LMES) Development Division at Y-12 for conducting chemical reactivity testing of Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel, sponsored by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). The requirements are based on the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 (Statement of Work for Laboratory Determination of Uranium Hydride Oxidation Reaction Kinetics.) This QAPjP will utilize the quality assurance program at Y-12, QA-101PD, revision 1, and existing implementing procedures for the most part in meeting the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 requirements, exceptions will be noted.

  3. Nuclear nonproliferation: Concerns with US delays in accepting foregin research reactors' spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One key US nonproliferation goal is to discourage use of highly enriched uranium fuel (HEU), which can be used to make nuclear bombs, in civilian nuclear programs worldwide. DOE's Off-Site Fuels Policy for taking back spent HEU from foreign research reactors was allowed to expire due to environmental reasons. This report provides information on the effects of delays in renewing the Off-Site Fuels Policy on US nonproliferation goals and programs (specifically the reduced enrichment program), DOE's efforts to renew the fuels policy, and the price to be charged to the operators of foreign reactors for DOE's activities in taking back spent fuel

  4. Projections of spent fuel to be discharged by the U.S. nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculated properties of spent fuel projected to be discharged and accumulated by the U.S. nuclear power industry through the year 2031 A.D. are presented. The projections are based on installed nuclear capacities of 380 and 543 GW(e) in the year 2000 and 2030, respectively. They include compilations of the grams of the elements, curies of radioactivity, thermal decay power, photon and neutron emission rates, and radiotoxicities of the assemblies that are accumulated at a Spent Unreprocessed Fuel Facility (SURFF), allowing for delays of 5 and 10 years before shipment to SURFF

  5. Nuclear nonproliferation: Concerns with US delays in accepting foregin research reactors` spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-25

    One key US nonproliferation goal is to discourage use of highly enriched uranium fuel (HEU), which can be used to make nuclear bombs, in civilian nuclear programs worldwide. DOE`s Off-Site Fuels Policy for taking back spent HEU from foreign research reactors was allowed to expire due to environmental reasons. This report provides information on the effects of delays in renewing the Off-Site Fuels Policy on US nonproliferation goals and programs (specifically the reduced enrichment program), DOE`s efforts to renew the fuels policy, and the price to be charged to the operators of foreign reactors for DOE`s activities in taking back spent fuel.

  6. The Public Sphere and the Conflict-Structure in Spent Nuclear Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Social Acceptance is important to decide policy of spent nuclear fuel management. The idea of a public sphere as a receptacle of dynamic process is the core in this discussion. The purpose of this study is to examine the concept, participants, the conflict-structure and agreeable conditions of a public sphere. A public sphere means in this paper, mechanism and systems that various stakeholders' and public's participation with spontaneous will can affect decision-making process. For good designing and implementing a public sphere, it is necessary to analysis and cope with political, foreign and security, economic, sociocultural environments, the law and systems around spent nuclear fuel management.

  7. Chemical Reactivity Testing for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program. Quality Assurance Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) summarizes requirements used by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (LMES) Development Division at Y-12 for conducting chemical reactivity testing of Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel, sponsored by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). The requirements are based on the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 (Statement of Work for Laboratory Determination of Uranium Hydride Oxidation Reaction Kinetics.) This QAPjP will utilize the quality assurance program at Y-12, QA-101PD, revision 1, and existing implementing procedures for the most part in meeting the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 requirements, exceptions will be noted

  8. A study of the probabilistic risk assessment to the dry storage system of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the large power supply in the energy market since 1960s, the nuclear power planets have been consistently constructed throughout the world in order to maintain and supply sufficient fundamental power generation. Up to now, most of the planets have been operated to a point where the spent fuel pool has reached its design capacity volume. To prevent the plant from shutdown due to the spent fuel pool exceeding the design capacity, the dry cask storage can provides a solution for both the spent fuel pool capacity and the mid-term storage method for the spent fuel bundles at nuclear power planet. Currently, the dry cask storage system and relevant operating procedures have also gradually been deployed and consistently developed in order to facilitate the dry storage for the spent fuel bundles. In other words, spent fuel bundles dry storage and its safety has become an important issue and will directly affect the smooth operation of the plants once the spent fuel pool reaches its design capacity. Plants in the United States, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards (NMSS), the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) and Spent Fuel Project Office (NMSS) have jointly developed a pilot methodology for probabilistic risk assessments. Adopting quantitative and qualitative evaluating methods to the subject BWR plants based on the handling, transfer and storage three phases. Obtaining the annual risk for one cask in terms of the individual probability of a prompt fatality within 1.6 km and a latent cancer fatality within 16 km can provide useful risk information for the subject BWR plant. This pilot study used NUREG-1864 ,'A Pilot Probabilistic Risk Assessment of a Dry Cask Storage System at a Nuclear Power Planet', related generic data and built prototype models for risk assessments in Taiwan Nuclear Power Plants. This pilot study investigated the handling, transfer and storage three phases to establish its risk evaluating

  9. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document has been prepared to assist research reactor operators possessing spent fuel containing enriched uranium of United States origin to prepare part of the documentation necessary to ship this fuel to the United States. Data are included on the nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate, and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies. Isotopic masses of U, Np, Pu and Am that are present in spent research reactor fuel are estimated for MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assembly types. The isotopic masses of each fuel assembly type are given as functions of U-235 burnup in the spent fuel, and of initial U-235 enrichment and U-235 mass in the fuel assembly. Photon dose rates of spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are estimated for fuel assemblies with up to 80% U-235 burnup and specific power densities between 0.089 and 2.857 MW/kg[sup 235]U, and for fission product decay times of up to 20 years. Thermal decay heat loads are estimated for spent fuel based upon the fuel assembly irradiation history (average assembly power vs. elapsed time) and the spent fuel cooling time

  10. PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) for spent fuel decommissioning of the Fugen Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fugen Nuclear Power Station will be permanently shutdown in 2003 and immediate fuel unloading and fuel transportation is necessary. The spent fuel pool should be stored safely because the spent fuels are kept in the spent fuel pool. Loss of cooling in the spent fuel pool can lead to a serious condition. This paper is to calculate the risk of the spent fuel pool especially probability calculation of consequence during decommissioning. In this case, fuel uncovery is as end state. Calculation is based on NUREG-1738. Analysis has been done for 4 initiating events that are loss of cooling, internal fire, loss of offsite power (LOPA) and loss of inventory. Initiating even frequency is adopted from Fugen condition and NUREG. More, calculation data is taken from the living PSA of Fugen and NUREG. Results of analysis showed that the spent fuel pool of Fugen is safe enough because the fuel uncovery probability is 4.438E-08 per year. Moreover, the spent fuel pool cooling system of the Fugen NPS has high reliability because the failure probability is 7.435E-04 per year and will become 2.794E-06 per year if RHR (residual heat removal) system is included. Therefore, RHR system can be considered in the accident management during decommissioning. On the other hand, the maintenance cost increases by keeping the RHR system during decommissioning. (author)

  11. Spent nuclear fuel storage -- Performance tests and demonstrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of heat transfer and shielding performance tests and demonstrations conducted from 1983 through 1992 by or in cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Commercial Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The performance tests consisted of 6 to 14 runs involving one or two loadings, usually three backfill environments (helium, nitrogen, and vacuum backfills), and one or two storage system orientations. A description of the test plan, spent fuel load patterns, results from temperature and dose rate measurements, and fuel integrity evaluations are contained within the report

  12. Thermal analysis of cold vacuum drying of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepho, M.G.

    1998-07-20

    The thermal analysis examined transient thermal and chemical behavior of the Multi canister Overpack (MCO) container for a broad range of cases that represent the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) processes. The cases were defined to consider both normal and off-normal operations at the CVD Facility for an MCO with Mark IV N, Reactor spent fuel in four fuel baskets and one scrap basket. This analysis provides the basis for the MCO thermal behavior at the CVD Facility for its Phase 2 Safety Analysis Report (revision 4).

  13. Thermal analysis of cold vacuum drying of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal analysis examined transient thermal and chemical behavior of the Multi canister Overpack (MCO) container for a broad range of cases that represent the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) processes. The cases were defined to consider both normal and off-normal operations at the CVD Facility for an MCO with Mark IV N, Reactor spent fuel in four fuel baskets and one scrap basket. This analysis provides the basis for the MCO thermal behavior at the CVD Facility for its Phase 2 Safety Analysis Report (revision 4)

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Safety Basis Implementation Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Safety Basis Implementation is to ensure that implementation of activities is accomplished in order to support readiness to move spent fuel from K West Basin. Activities may be performed directly by the Safety Basis Implementation Team or they may be performed by other organizations and tracked by the Team. This strategy will focus on five key elements, (1) Administration of Safety Basis Implementation (general items), (2) Implementing documents, (3) Implementing equipment (including verification of operability), (4) Training, (5) SNF Project Technical Requirements (STRS) database system

  15. Thermal hydraulic and neutronic analysis of dry cask storage systems for spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interim spent fuel storage systems must provide for the safe receipt, handling, retrieval and storage of spent nuclear fuel before reprocessing or disposal. In the context of achieving these objectives, the following features of the design were taken into consideration for metal shielded type storage systems; to maintain fuel subcritical, to remove spent fuel residual heat, to provide for radiation protection. These features in the design of a dry cask storage system were analyzed by employing COBRA-SFS and SCALE4.4 (ORIGEN, XSDOSE, CSAS6 ) codes for normal operation of the system under study. In accordance with safety assurance limits of International Atomic Energy Authority (IAEA), appropriate designs for Dry Cask Storage Systems (DCSS) were reached for 33000, 45000, and 55000 MWd/t burnup values and 5 and 10 years of cooling periods for spent fuel to be stored (Table 1)

  16. U.S. spent nuclear fuel acceptance policy 2006 and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edlow, J.; Brown, K. R. [Edlow International Company, Washington D.C., 20009 (United States)

    2002-07-01

    In 1992, a large group of research reactor operators joined with Edlow International Company (EIC) forming the Edlow Group and promote the interests of members before the U.S. government and to enhance the negotiating leverage of each member. The goal was to convince the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to resume acceptance of foreign research reactor spent fuel after a three-year suspension. Approximately four years later in May of 1996, largely due to the efforts of the Edlow Group, DOE, in consultation with the Department of State (DOS), issued a new research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance policy. After five years of successful spent fuel shipments, new issues have surfaced which led of the Edlow Group to represent the interests of the foreign research reactor community before the DOE. This paper discusses the new spent research reactor fuel issues, and proposes utilizing a reactivated Edlow Group to address these concerns. (author)

  17. U.S. spent nuclear fuel acceptance policy 2006 and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1992, a large group of research reactor operators joined with Edlow International Company (EIC) forming the Edlow Group and promote the interests of members before the U.S. government and to enhance the negotiating leverage of each member. The goal was to convince the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to resume acceptance of foreign research reactor spent fuel after a three-year suspension. Approximately four years later in May of 1996, largely due to the efforts of the Edlow Group, DOE, in consultation with the Department of State (DOS), issued a new research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance policy. After five years of successful spent fuel shipments, new issues have surfaced which led of the Edlow Group to represent the interests of the foreign research reactor community before the DOE. This paper discusses the new spent research reactor fuel issues, and proposes utilizing a reactivated Edlow Group to address these concerns. (author)

  18. Standard guide for characterization of spent nuclear fuel in support of geologic repository disposal

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides guidance for the types and extent of testing that would be involved in characterizing the physical and chemical nature of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in support of its interim storage, transport, and disposal in a geologic repository. This guide applies primarily to commercial light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and spent fuel from weapons production, although the individual tests/analyses may be used as applicable to other spent fuels such as those from research and test reactors. The testing is designed to provide information that supports the design, safety analysis, and performance assessment of a geologic repository for the ultimate disposal of the SNF. 1.2 The testing described includes characterization of such physical attributes as physical appearance, weight, density, shape/geometry, degree, and type of SNF cladding damage. The testing described also includes the measurement/examination of such chemical attributes as radionuclide content, microstructure, and corrosion product c...

  19. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix C, Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Mangement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decision making processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this two-volume Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Volume 1 supports broad programmatic decisions that will have applicability across the DOE complex and describes in detail the purpose and need for this DOE action. Volume 2 is specific to actions at the INEL. This document, which limits its discussion to the Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel management program, supports Volume 1 of the EIS. Following the introduction, Chapter 2 contains background information related to the SRS and the framework of environmental regulations pertinent to spent nuclear fuel management. Chapter 3 identifies spent nuclear fuel management alternatives that DOE could implement at the SRS, and summarizes their potential environmental consequences. Chapter 4 describes the existing environmental resources of the SRS that spent nuclear fuel activities could affect. Chapter 5 analyzes in detail the environmental consequences of each spent nuclear fuel management alternative and describes cumulative impacts. The chapter also contains information on unavoidable adverse impacts, commitment of resources, short-term use of the environment and mitigation measures.

  20. Shipping of spent nuclear fuel to Central and Eastern Europe, and other nuclear waste deals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its reply to a written question in Parliament, the German federal government puts emphasis on the fact that all agreements concerning industrial or economic cooperation in the nuclear sector, concluded between the GDR and the Soviet Union, have been declared to be terminated in 1991. Hence the government declares that there are no international treaties any more that might serve as a vehicle for performing spent fuel shipments to Russia or any other state of the CIS. The German federal government further states to be prepared to contribute its share to the multinational assistance programme adopted in 1992 at the World Economic Summit Conference for the purpose of enhancing the safety of Soviet-design nuclear power plant. A number of projects, the government states, are in preparation with the competent institutions in the CIS, as e.g. projects for reactor safety analysis, improvement of reactor operating safety, safer nuclear fuel supply and waste management, and installation of a system for environmental radioactivity monitoring. (orig./HSCH)

  1. German Spent Nuclear Fuel Legacy: Characteristics and High-Level Waste Management Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schwenk-Ferrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Germany is phasing-out the utilization of nuclear energy until 2022. Currently, nine light water reactors of originally nineteen are still connected to the grid. All power plants generate high-level nuclear waste like spent uranium or mixed uranium-plutonium dioxide fuel which has to be properly managed. Moreover, vitrified high-level waste containing minor actinides, fission products, and traces of plutonium reprocessing loses produced by reprocessing facilities has to be disposed of. In the paper, the assessments of German spent fuel legacy (heavy metal content and the nuclide composition of this inventory have been done. The methodology used applies advanced nuclear fuel cycle simulation techniques in order to reproduce the operation of the German nuclear power plants from 1969 till 2022. NFCSim code developed by LANL was adopted for this purpose. It was estimated that ~10,300 tonnes of unreprocessed nuclear spent fuel will be generated until the shut-down of the ultimate German reactor. This inventory will contain ~131 tonnes of plutonium, ~21 tonnes of minor actinides, and 440 tonnes of fission products. Apart from this, ca.215 tonnes of vitrified HLW will be present. As fission products and transuranium elements remain radioactive from 104 to 106 years, the characteristics of spent fuel legacy over this period are estimated, and their impacts on decay storage and final repository are discussed.

  2. Decommissioning of the Spent Fuel Pool at the A1 Nuclear Power Plant, Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel pool of A1 nuclear power plant long term storage facility was used for temporary storage of spent fuel after its removal from the reactor and cooling in the short term storage facility. The dimensions of the pool were 12 m × 7 m × 9 m (width × length × depth) and the bottom was at the −3.75 m level. Stainless steel plates with a thickness in the range of 3–5 mm covered the concrete walls and bottom of the pool, and the volume of water in the pool was 560 m3. Fuel assemblies were stored in casks filled with heat transfer media — chrompik:2 or dowtherm3. During storage, some fuel fission and corrosion products were released to chrompik or dowtherm, and, during handling of fuel and storage casks, these were released into the pool water. As a result, coolant media (chrompik, dowtherm and pool water) and all surfaces inside the spent fuel pool were significantly contaminated. Even after the transfer of all spent fuel to the Russian Federation (completed in 1999), the spent fuel pool contained a significant inventory of radioactivity in different forms. To this day, it continues to be one of the major technical problems for the A1 nuclear power plant decommissioning process. The risk of leakage of radioactive substances into the surrounding space inside the reactor building constantly increases, owing to the expiration of the service life of the facility and lower protection by its physical barriers. The radiological situation in the spent fuel pool and the inaccessibility of some pieces of equipment do not allow completion of physical characterization. These aspects were taken into account by the regulators, who require the emptying of the spent fuel pool and its decontamination by the end of 2018. Retrieval of radioactive waste from the spent fuel pool calls for the development and deployment of unique and technically complex equipment and implementation of non-standard technological processes

  3. MACSTOR trademark: Dry spent fuel storage for the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safe storage of spent fuel has long been an area of critical concern for the nuclear power industry. As fuel pools fill up and re-racking possibilities become exhausted, power plant operators will find that they must ship spent fuel assemblies off-site or develop new on-site storage options. Many utility companies are turning to dry storage for their spent fuel assemblies. The MACSTOR (Modular Air-cooled Canister STORage) concept was developed with this in mind. Derived from AECL's successful vertical loading, concrete silo program for storing CANDU nuclear spent fuel, MACSTOR was developed for light water reactor spent fuel and was subjected to full scale thermal testing. The MACSTOR Module is a monolithic, shielded concrete vault structure than can accommodate up to 24 spent fuel canisters. Each canister holds 12 PWR or 32 PWR previously cooled spent fuel assemblies with burn-up rates as high as 45,000 MWD/MTU. The structure is passively cooled by natural convection through an array of inlet and outlet gratings and galleries serving a central plenum where the (vertically) stored canisters are located. The canisters are continuously monitored by means of a pressure monitoring system developed by TNI. The MACSTOR system includes the storage module(s), an overhead gantry system for cask handling, a transfer cask for moving fuel from wet to dry storage and a cask transporter. The canister and transfer cask designs are based on Transnuclear transport cask designs and proven hot cell transfer cask technology, adapted to requirements for on-site spent fuel storage. This Modular Air Cooled System has a number of inherent advantages: efficient use of construction materials and site space; cooling is virtually impossible to impede; has the ability to monitor fuel confinement boundary integrity during storage; the fuel canisters may be used for both storage and transport and canisters utilize a flanged, ASME-III closure system that allows for easy inspection

  4. Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

  5. Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site

  6. Status of spent nuclear fuel management in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States produces approximately 20% of its electricity in nuclear power reactors, currently generating, approximately 2,000 metric tons of uranium (tU) of spent nuclear fuel annually. Over the past half century, the country has amassed 33,000 tU of commercial spent nuclear fuel that is being stored at 119 operating and shutdown reactors located on 73 sites around the nation. The cumulative discharge of the spent fuel from reactors is estimated to total approximately 87,000 tU by 2035. Many sites have reracked the spent fuel in their storage pool to maximize pool capacity, and a number of reactor sites have been forced to add dry storage to accommodate the growing inventory of fuel in storage. In addition, research and defense programme reactors have produced spent fuel that is being stored in pools at Federal sites. Much of this fuel will be transferred to dry storage in the coming years. Under current plans, the commercial and federally owned fuel will remain in storage at the existing sites until the United States Department of Energy (DOE) begins receipt at a federal receiving facility. (author)

  7. Transportation of failed or damaged foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messick, C.E. [U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Site (United States); Mustin, T.P. [U.S. Department of Energy (United States); Massey, C.D. [Sandia National Laboratorier (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Since resuming the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance Program in 1996, the Program has had to deal with difficult issues associated with the transportation of failed or damaged spent fuel. In several instances, problems with failed or damaged fuel have prevented the acceptance of the fuel at considerable cost to both the Department of Energy (DOE) and research reactor operators. In response to the problems faced by the Acceptance Program, DOE has undertaken significant steps to better define the spent fuel acceptance criteria. DOE has worked closely with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address failed or damaged research reactor spent fuel and to identify cask certificate issues which must be resolved by cask owners and foreign regulatory authorities. The specific issues associated with the transport of Materials Testing Reactor (MTR)-type FRR SNF will be discussed. The information presented will include U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory issues, cask certificate issues, technical constraints, and lessons learned. Specific information will also be provided on the latest efforts to revise DOE's Appendix B, Transport Package (Cask) Acceptance Criteria. The information presented in this paper will be important to foreign research reactor operators, shippers, and cask vendors, so that appropriate amendments to the Certificate of Compliance for spent fuel casks can be submitted in a timely manner to facilitate the safe and scheduled transport of FRR SNF.

  8. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

  9. The State of the WWER Nuclear Spent Fuel Management in Ukraine and Trends on the Optimal Choice of Spent Fuel Management Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper gives an overview of the operational state of the away from reactor interim spent fuel storage facility at the Zaporizhzhya NPP site, commissioned according to the dry storage cask technology that is developed by the US company Sierra Nuclear Corporation. The trends of the SFM at the WWER nuclear units were noted, which are caused by the advanced nuclear fuel implementation in order to improve the nuclear fuel utilization. (author)

  10. SFCOMPO: A database for isotopic composition of nuclear spent fuel; current status and future development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic composition of the nuclear fuel, after the irradiation in a power reactor, is one of the most important characteristics of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). It is the basis for the evaluation of several properties of SNF, including decay heat, radiation dose, and the multiplication factor of any configuration containing the spent fuel. Since the determination of this isotopic composition is usually carried out using calculation tools, the validation of these tools is an important aspect to be taken into consideration. Several experiments involving Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) of SNF have been conducted in different countries to obtain experimental data for the isotopic composition of SNF. These experimental data can be used for the validation of the calculation tools. Based on this background, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) developed SFCOMPO, a database system for the compilation of the isotopic composition of SNF. The database was available for consultation on the Internet. After this initial phase, and given the suitable framework of the NEA for the collection of additional data from member countries, it was agreed that the NEA would maintain and further develop SFCOMPO. This involves both the compilation and the dissemination of the data. Since autumn 2002, this database has been operated on the NEA web server (http://www.nea.fr/html/ science/wpncs/sfcompo/). Table 1 summarizes the content of the SFCOMPO database. Measured isotopic composition data from 14 reactors (7 PWRs and 7 BWRs), operated in 4 countries, are contained in the database. The composition of 246 samples is described, including 30 samples from UO2- Gd2O3 fuel. The database gives the composition of U, Pu, Am, Cm and several fission products (Nd, Cs, Sr). These data were collected from the open literature. In view of the importance of these data, the NEA plans to further develop the SFCOMPO database. The aim is to give more details on the operating conditions under

  11. Cosmic ray muon computed tomography of spent nuclear fuel in dry storage casks

    CERN Document Server

    Poulson, D; Guardincerri, E; Morris, C L; Bacon, J D; Plaud-Ramos, K; Morley, D; Hecht, A

    2016-01-01

    Radiography with cosmic ray muon scattering has proven to be a successful method of imaging nuclear material through heavy shielding. Of particular interest is monitoring dry storage casks for diversion of plutonium contained in spent reactor fuel. Using muon tracking detectors that surround a cylindrical cask, cosmic ray muon scattering can be simultaneously measured from all azimuthal angles, giving complete tomographic coverage of the cask interior. This paper describes the first application of filtered back projection algorithms, typically used in medical imaging, to cosmic ray muon imaging. The specific application to monitoring spent nuclear fuel in dry storage casks is investigated via GEANT4 simulations. With a cylindrical muon tracking detector surrounding a typical spent fuel cask, the cask contents can be confirmed with high confidence in less than two days exposure. Similar results can be obtained by moving a smaller detector to view the cask from multiple angles.

  12. The evolving image and role of the regulator for implementing repositories for nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A country introducing nuclear power in their energy strategy has a life long obligation. The obligation is not mainly a question of energy production. It is an obligation to maintain safety during the phase of construction, energy production and decommissioning as well as to take care of all the waste streams from nuclear installations. I believe that one of the most controversial siting projects in the society is a waste repository for spent nuclear fuel. Competence, available funds and a clear responsibility between the stakeholders as well as the trust of the public is indispensable to obtain a good result. The Swedish programme for managing nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel has been in progress for more than 25 years. The pre-licensing process of a repository for spent nuclear fuel is much alike a pre-licensing process for the first nuclear power plant in a country. You need a clear political will, you have to involve the nuclear regulator without jeopardizing his integrity and you need the money to perform research and make the investments. The enthusiasm of politicians and industry may however differ between these two projects. (author)

  13. A study for collaborative management for nuclear spent fuel control. Seeking for nuclear non-proliferation in East Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the rapid increase of power generation with nuclear fuel in East Asia area, the management and control of nuclear spent fuel from nuclear reactors has become an essential and urgent issue in this area. This study focused on the possibility of forming an intergovernmental collaborative management system for nuclear spent fuel with an emphasize on nuclear non-proliferation among East Asian countries, i.e. China, Korea, Taiwan and Japan who own and operate nuclear power plants. First, we studied the present situation for nuclear spent fuel, including the storage measures, the future fore- cast on the accumulation and the government measures to deal with these spent fuel. Then, based upon first step studies, we examined the pros and cons when the collaborative management is realized particularly from the viewpoint of prevention of nuclear proliferation. Further, we estimated possible means for management and control of nuclear spent fuel, including its system size and cost. Finally, we extracted some technological tasks to be solved and political issues to be discussed. Our findings are as follows. 1. The total amount of the power generation in three East Asian counties (China, Korea and Taiwan) is about 17 million KW presently. This will be tripled to 51 million KW by the year 2010. When Japan's ability is added it is 62 million KW currently and 121 million by 2010. 2. The nuclear spent fuel in Taiwan and Korea will be saturated for their storage capacity. On the other hand, Japan will start to operate her reprocessing plant in Aomori prefecture in 2003 and her new storage capability is completed in 1999. Also in China, a reprocessing pilot plant is under construction and its operation is scheduled in 2001. 3. As their national policy, China and Japan does reprocess from spent fuel but Korea and Taiwan don't. Instead, they take non-reprocessing and direct geological disposal. 4. If the collaborative management of nuclear wastes is realized Multi

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Acceptance Criteria for Light Water Reactor Spent Fuel Storage System [OCRWM PER REV2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-12-20

    As part of the decommissioning of the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells there is a need to remove commercial Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presently stored in these hot cells. To enable fuel removal from the hot cells, the commercial LWR SNF will be packaged and shipped to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) in a manner that satisfies site requirements for SNF interim storage. This document identifies the criteria that the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cell Clean-out Project must satisfy for acceptance of the LWR SNF by the SNF Project at the 200 Area ISA. In addition to the acceptance criteria identified herein, acceptance is contingent on adherence to applicable Project Hanford Management Contract requirements and procedures in place at the time of work execution.

  15. Transuranium element recovering method for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuels are dissolved in nitric acid, the obtained dissolution liquid is oxidized by electrolysis, and nitric acid of transuranium elements are precipitated together with nitric acid of uranium elements from the dissolution solution and recovered. Namely, the transuranium elements are oxidized to an atomic value level at which nitric acid can be precipitated by an oxidizing catalyst, and cooled to precipitate nitric acid of transuranium elements together with nitric acid of transuranium elements, accordingly, it is not necessary to use a solvent which has been used so far upon recovering transuranium elements. Since no solvent waste is generated, a recovery method taking the circumstance into consideration can be provided. Further, nitric acid of uranium elements and nitric acid of transuranium elements precipitated and recovered together are dissolved in nitric acid again, cooled and only uranium elements are precipitated selectively, and recovered by filtration. The amount of wastes can be reduced to thereby enabling to mitigate control for processing. (N.H.)

  16. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides current statistical data on every fuel assembly irradiated in commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States. It also provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the nuclear and electric industries and the general public. It uses data from the mandatory, ''Nuclear Fuel Data'' survey, Form RW-859 for 1992 and historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on previous Form RW-859 surveys. The report was prepared by the EIA under a Memorandum of Understanding with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

  17. Radiochemical analysis of nuclear fuel burn-up and spent fuel key nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destructive radiochemical analysis of spent nuclear fuels is an important tool to determine burn-up with high accuracy and to better understand the process of depletion and formation of actinides and fission products during irradiation as a result of fission and successive neutron capture. The resulting isotope inventories and nuclear databases that are created, are of high importance to evaluate the performance of nuclear fuels in a reactor, to evaluate computer codes applied for a safe transport, storage and disposal/reprocessing of spent fuels and to safeguard fissile material. The objective is to provide chemical and radiochemical analyses procedures for an accurate determination of isotopic compositions and concentrations of actinides and fission products in different types of industrial (UO2, MOX) and experimental nuclear fuels (UAlx, U3Si2, UMo, ...). For a burn-up determination program typically 21 actinides and fission products are analyzed. For an extended characterization program this can increase to up to approximately 50 isotopes

  18. The South African experience in spent fuel management at the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station - Perspectives from the National Nuclear Regulator (NNR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Units 1 and 2 at the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station (KNPS), near Cape Town in South Africa, were put into commercial service in 1984 and 1985 respectively. Initially it was intended that spent fuel assemblies would be stored in the spent fuel pools at the power station for a maximum period of four years where after they would be transferred to a dry storage facility which would be created at a safe site, unidentified at the time. By 1986 an appropriate dry storage facility system had not yet been identified, and as the exhaustion of the installed capacity of the pools (285 cells per pool) was approaching, the initial racks were replaced in 1988 with high density racking with a capacity of 728 cells per pool. In 1990 an order for four Castor type X/28 F licensed for dual transport/storage casks was placed by Eskom (the South African Electricity Utility and Operator of the KNPS), in anticipation that transportation from the Koeberg spent fuel pools, to the remote dry storage site would take place. The casks could also function as a contingency storage capacity for 112 spent fuel assemblies. In 1995 Eskom began a feasibility study to establish an optimum storage facility. Ultimately two storage options were identified: Dry storage in casks; and High density storage in the spent fuel pool (spent fuel pool reracking) - Super high density racks were considered to accommodate the storage requirements at Koeberg for 40 years. Eskom finally concluded that wet storage was the most viable option to consider. However due to delays in the spent fuel pool reracking project Eskom had to develop a contingency plan, which involved the use of the dry storage casks referred to above. These casks could provide enough storage space to delay the need for high density storage racks by one fuel cycle on each unit. The safety case, presented by Eskom for the use of the casks as an interim spent fuel storage measure for three years, was approved by the NNR in February 2000 and

  19. Hazards Analysis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel L-Experimental Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Hazard Analysis (HA) is to identify and assess potential hazards associated with the operations of the Spent Nuclear Fuels (SNF) Treatment and Storage Facility LEF. Additionally, this HA will be used for identifying and assessing potential hazards and specifying functional attributes of SSCs for the LEF project

  20. Memorandum of Understanding Completion and Acceptance of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is written to provide clear direction with respect to roles, responsibilities, obligations, and expectations of each organization identified. It functions as an agreement between the Operations, Construction Projects and Startup Organizations within the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project

  1. Neutron spectrometry at the interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel

    CERN Document Server

    Králik, M; Studeny, J

    2002-01-01

    Dosimetric characteristics of neutron and photon components of mixed fields around casks for spent nuclear fuel have been determined at various places at the dry interim storage facility. The results obtained with metrological grade instruments were compared with data provided by usual survey meters for both neutrons and photons.

  2. Quality Assurance Program Plan for Project W-379: Spent Nuclear Fuels Canister Storage Building Projec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Spent Nuclear Fuels (SNF) Canister Storage Building (CSB) Project. The purpose of this QAPP is to control project activities ensuring achievement of the project mission in a safe, consistent and reliable manner

  3. Fission product partitioning in aerosol release from simulated spent nuclear fuel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lemma, F.G.; Colle, J.Y.; Rasmussen, G.; Konings, R.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosols created by the vaporization of simulated spent nuclear fuel (simfuel) were produced by laser heating techniques and characterised by a wide range of post-analyses. In particular attention has been focused on determining the fission product behaviour in the aerosols, in order to improve the

  4. Characterization program management plan for Hanford K basin spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program management plan for characterization of the K Basin spent nuclear fuel was revised to incorporate corrective actions in response to SNF Project QA surveillance 1K-FY-99-060. This revision of the SNF Characterization PMP replaces Duke Eng

  5. Status of DOE efforts to renew acceptance of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Head, C.R.

    1997-08-01

    This presentation summarizes the efforts being made by the Department of Energy to renew acceptance of spent nuclear fuel shipments from foreign research reactors. The author reviews the actions undertaken in this process in a fairly chronological manner, through the present time, as well as the development of an environmental impact statement to support the proposed actions.

  6. Foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel inventories containing HEU and LEU of US-origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides estimates of the quantities and types of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing HEU and LEU of US-origin that are anticipated during the period beginning in January 1996 and extending for 10-15 years

  7. Basis for Functional Performance Requirements for a Spent Nuclear Fuel Treatment and Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy has selected the Savannah River Site (SRS) as the location to consolidate and store aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (Al-SNF) from domestic and foreign research reactors. This report presents the technical basis for the functional performance requirements

  8. Spent-fuel-storage studies at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. Studies and research concerning BNFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of various studies and demonstrations related to advanced spent-fuel-storage techniques which were performed at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) in 1982. The demonstrations evaluated various technical aspects of fuel disassembly and canning and dry-storage techniques. The supporting studies examined thermal limitations and criticality concerns

  9. SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL NUMBER DENSITIES FOR MULTI-PURPOSE CANISTER CRITICALITY CALCULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to calculate the number densities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to be used in criticality evaluations of the Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) waste packages. The objective of this analysis is to provide material number density information which will be referenced by future MPC criticality design analyses, such as for those supporting the Conceptual Design Report

  10. Resonance self-indication as a method for estimating fissile elements in spent nuclear assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integral version of the neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA) has been developed in order to solve the problem of estimating fissile elements in spent nuclear fuel. Two variants of the integral neutron resonance transmission analysis (the resonance self-indication (the average transmission by fission) and the average full transmission) have been described

  11. Corrosion experiments on stainless steels used in dry storage canisters of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Adams, J.P.; Faw, E.M.; Anderson, P.A.

    1996-09-01

    Nonradioactive (cold) experiments have been set up in the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP)-1634, and radioactive (hot) experiments have been set up in the Irradiated Fuel Storage Facility (IFSF) at ICPP. The objective of these experiments is to provide information on the interactions (corrosion) between the spent nuclear fuel currently stored at the ICPP and the dry storage canisters and containment materials in which this spent fuel will be stored for the next several decades. This information will be used to help select canister materials that will retain structural integrity over this period within economic, criticality, and other constraints. The two purposes for Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs) are for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel and for shipment to a final geological repository. Information on how corrosion products, sediments, and degraded spent nuclear fuel may corrode DPCs will be required before the DPCs will be allowed to be shipped out of the State of Idaho. The information will also be required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to support the licensing of DPCs. Stainless steels 304L and 316L are the most likely materials for dry interim storage canisters. Welded stainless steel coupons are used to represent the canisters in both hot and cold experiments.

  12. Corrosion experiments on stainless steels used in dry storage canisters of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonradioactive (cold) experiments have been set up in the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP)-1634, and radioactive (hot) experiments have been set up in the Irradiated Fuel Storage Facility (IFSF) at ICPP. The objective of these experiments is to provide information on the interactions (corrosion) between the spent nuclear fuel currently stored at the ICPP and the dry storage canisters and containment materials in which this spent fuel will be stored for the next several decades. This information will be used to help select canister materials that will retain structural integrity over this period within economic, criticality, and other constraints. The two purposes for Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs) are for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel and for shipment to a final geological repository. Information on how corrosion products, sediments, and degraded spent nuclear fuel may corrode DPCs will be required before the DPCs will be allowed to be shipped out of the State of Idaho. The information will also be required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to support the licensing of DPCs. Stainless steels 304L and 316L are the most likely materials for dry interim storage canisters. Welded stainless steel coupons are used to represent the canisters in both hot and cold experiments

  13. The construction and operation experience of the interim spent fuel storage facility at the Zaporizhzhya nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six nuclear power units of the Zaporizhzhya NPP (ZNPP), which had been put into operation from 1984 to 1995, have no performance capabilities to extend their at-reactor (AR) spent fuel (SF) pools. Without SF removal [for reprocessing or away-from-reactor (AFR) interim spent fuel storage] SF pools are overburdened with nuclear SF assemblies in 5 (with compact reracking - in 9) years of their operation. In 1993 after triennial blocking of spent fuel removal due to erroneous interpretation of the Russian Radwaste Low the Zaporizhzhya NPP management undertook active measures with respect to the construction of on-site interim spent fuel storage facility (ISFSF). In 1994 the official decision was made to build the ISFSF on the basis of a ventilated storage cask (VSC-24) system, which was developed by US Sierra Nuclear Corporation (SNC) and licensed by US NRC. This year the Zaporizhzhya NPP signed a contract agreement with the engineering company 'Duke Engineering and Services' (DE and S) to perform the design of the storage containers for the WWER-1000 spent fuel, the technology transfer and the service support of the ISFSF construction. The designing of the remaining components was carried out by Kharkov Design Institute 'Energoproject', which performed functions of the general designer for the Zaporizhzhya NPP. The project implementation came across a great number of various difficulties. The most complicated ones arose with some licensing issues of technology. The creation difficulties of the ZNPP's ISFSF can be grouped into five areas: - Occurrence of the most safety-significant issues related to the project quality after weld cracking events in ventilated storage cask systems (VSC-24) at Palisades (March 1995) and Arkansas Nuclear One (December 1996) as well as ignition of hydrogen gas occurred while a worker was welding a closure lid at Palisades (May 1996); - Lack of data on WWER-1000 spent fuel behavior during long-term storage in the dry environment and dry

  14. Safeguards for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Methods and technologies for the Olkiluoto site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final disposal of the nuclear material shall introduce new safeguards concerns which have not been addressed previously in IAEA safeguards approaches for spent fuel. The encapsulation plant to be built at the site will be the final opportunity for verification of spent fuel assemblies prior to their transfer to the geological repository. Moreover, additional safety and safeguards measures are considered for the underground repository. Integrated safeguards verification systems will also concentrate on environmental monitoring to observe unannounced activities related to possible diversion schemes at the repository site. The final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in geological formation will begin in Finland within 10 years. After the geological site investigations and according to legal decision made in 2001, the final repository of the spent nuclear fuel shall be located at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki. The next phase of site investigations contains the construction of an underground facility, called ONKALO, for rock characterisation purposes. The excavation of the ONKALO is scheduled to start in 2004. Later on, the ONKALO may form a part of the final repository. The plans to construct the underground facility for nuclear material signify that the first safeguards measures, e.g. baseline mapping of the site area, need to take prior to the excavation phase. In order to support the development and implementation of the regulatory control of the final disposal programme, STUK established an independent expert group, LOSKA. The group should support the STUK in the development of the technical safeguards requirements, in the implementation of the safeguards and in the evaluation of the plans of the facility operator. This publication includes four background reports produced by this group. The first of these 'NDA verification of spent fuel, monitoring of disposal canisters, interaction of the safeguards and safety issues in the final disposal' describes the new

  15. Radiation Effects on Materials Used in Geological Repositories for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Mats Jonsson

    2012-01-01

    Safe long-term storage of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants is one of the main concerns for the nuclear industry as well as for governments in countries relying on electricity produced by nuclear power. A repository for spent nuclear fuel must be safe for extremely long time periods (at least 100 000 years). In order to ascertain the long-term safety of a repository, extensive safety analysis must be performed. One of the critical issues in a safety analysis is the long-term integri...

  16. Literature on fabrication of tungsten for application in pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edstrom, C.M.; Phillips, A.G.; Johnson, L.D.; Corle, R.R.

    1980-10-11

    The pyrochemical processing of nuclear fuels requires crucibles, stirrers, and transfer tubing that will withstand the temperature and the chemical attack from molten salts and metals used in the process. This report summarizes the literature that pertains to fabrication (joining, chemical vapor deposition, plasma spraying, forming, and spinning) is the main theme. This report also summarizes a sampling of literature on molbdenum and the work previously performed at Argonne National Laboratory on other container materials used for pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels.

  17. German Spent Nuclear Fuel Legacy: Characteristics and High-Level Waste Management Issues

    OpenAIRE

    SCHWENK-FERRERO A.

    2013-01-01

    Germany is phasing-out the utilization of nuclear energy until 2022. Currently, nine light water reactors of originally nineteen are still connected to the grid. All power plants generate high-level nuclear waste like spent uranium or mixed uranium-plutonium dioxide fuel which has to be properly managed. Moreover, vitrified high-level waste containing minor actinides, fission products, and traces of plutonium reprocessing loses produced by reprocessing facilities has to be disposed of. In the...

  18. Literature on fabrication of tungsten for application in pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pyrochemical processing of nuclear fuels requires crucibles, stirrers, and transfer tubing that will withstand the temperature and the chemical attack from molten salts and metals used in the process. This report summarizes the literature that pertains to fabrication (joining, chemical vapor deposition, plasma spraying, forming, and spinning) is the main theme. This report also summarizes a sampling of literature on molbdenum and the work previously performed at Argonne National Laboratory on other container materials used for pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels

  19. An automated software for analysis of experimental data on decay heat from spent nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Llerena Herrera, Isbel

    2012-01-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has developed a method for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. This technique requires accurate measurement of the residual decay heat of every assembly. For this purpose, depletion codes as well as calorimetric and gamma-ray spectroscopy experimental methods have been developed and evaluated. In this work a prototype analysis tool has been developed to automate the analysis of both calorimetric and gamma-ray spectroscopy measureme...

  20. SFCOMPO: A new database of isotopic compositions of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The numerous applications of nuclear fuel depletion simulations impact all areas related to nuclear safety. They are at the basis of, inter alia, spent fuel criticality safety analyses, reactor physics calculations, burn-up credit methodologies, decay heat thermal analyses, radiation shielding, reprocessing, waste management, deep geological repository safety studies and safeguards. Experimentally determined nuclide compositions of well-characterised spent nuclear fuel (SNF) samples are used to validate the accuracy of depletion code predictions for a given burn-up. At the same time, the measured nuclide composition of the sample is used to determine the burn-up of the fuel. It is therefore essential to have a reliable and well-qualified database of measured nuclide concentrations and relevant reactor operational data that can be used as experimental benchmark data for depletion codes and associated nuclear data. The Spent Fuel Isotopic Composition Database (SFCOMPO) has been hosted by the NEA since 2001. In 2012, a collaborative effort led by the NEA Data Bank and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the United States, under the guidance of the NEA Expert Group on Assay Data of Spent Nuclear Fuel (EGADSNF) of the Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety (WPNCS), has resulted in the creation of an enhanced relational database structure and a significant expansion of the SFCOMPO database, which now contains experimental assay data for a wider selection of international reactor designs. The new database was released online in 2014. This new SFCOMPO database aims to provide access to open experimental SNF assay data to ensure their preservation and to facilitate their qualification as evaluated assay data suitable for the validation of methodologies used to predict the composition of irradiated nuclear fuel. Having a centralised, internationally reviewed database that makes these data openly available for a large selection of international reactor designs is of

  1. Criticality safety aspects of spent fuel arrays from emerging nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerging nuclear fuel cycles: fuels with Pu or minor actinides (MA) for their self-generated recycling or transmutation in PWR or FR → reduction of radiotoxicity of HLW. The aim of work is to assess criticality (k∞) of arrays of spent nuclear fuels from these emerging fuel cycles. Procedures: Calculations of - k∞ using MCNP5 based on fresh and spent fuel compositions (infinite arrays), - spent fuel compositions using ORIGEN. Fuels considered: - commercial PWR-UO2 (R1) and -MOX (R2), [45 GWd/t] and fast reactor [100 GWd/t] (R3), - PWR self-generated Pu recycling (S1) and MA recycling (S2), FR self-generated MA recycling (S3), FR with 2% 237Np for transmutation purposes (T). Results: k∞ based on fresh and spent fuel compositions is shown. Fuels are clustered in two distinct families: - fast reactor fuels, - thermal reactor fuels; k∞ decreases when calculated on the basis of actinide and fission product inventory. In conclusions: - Emerging fuels considered resemble their corresponding commercial fuels; - k∞ decreases in all cases when calculated on the basis of spent fuel compositions (reactivity worth ∼-20%Δk/k), hence improving the effectiveness of packaging. (author)

  2. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Appendix B: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to assist its management in making two decisions. The first decision, which is programmatic, is to determine the management program for DOE spent nuclear fuel. The second decision is on the future direction of environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1 of the EIS, which supports the programmatic decision, considers the effects of spent nuclear fuel management on the quality of the human and natural environment for planning years 1995 through 2035. DOE has derived the information and analysis results in Volume 1 from several site-specific appendixes. Volume 2 of the EIS, which supports the INEL-specific decision, describes environmental impacts for various environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management alternatives for planning years 1995 through 2005. This Appendix B to Volume 1 considers the impacts on the INEL environment of the implementation of various DOE-wide spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is a joint Navy/DOE program, is responsible for spent naval nuclear fuel examination at the INEL. For this appendix, naval fuel that has been examined at the Naval Reactors Facility and turned over to DOE for storage is termed naval-type fuel. This appendix evaluates the management of DOE spent nuclear fuel including naval-type fuel.

  3. The regulatory approach for spent nuclear storage and conditioning facility: The Hanford example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearings held before the House Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources in March 1994, requested that officials of federal agencies and other experts explore options for providing regulatory oversight of the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and operations. On January, 25, 1995, the DOE, supported by the White House Office of Environmental Quality and the Office of Management and Budget, formally initiated an Advisory Committee on External Regulation of DOE Nuclear Safety. In concert with this initiative and public opinion, the DOE Richland Operations Office has initiated the K Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Project -- Regulatory Policy. The DOE has established a program to move the spent nuclear fuel presently stored in the K Basins to a new storage facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. New facilities will be designed and constructed for safe conditioning and interim storage of the fuel. In implementing this Policy, DOE endeavors to achieve in these new facilities ''nuclear safety equivalency'' to comparable US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facilities. The DOE has established this Policy to take a proactive approach to better align its facilities to the requirements of the NRC, anticipating the future possibility of external regulation. The Policy, supplemented by other DOE rules and directives, form the foundation of an enhanced regulatory, program that will be implemented through the DOE K Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (the Project)

  4. Thermochemical Study on the Sulfurization of Fission Products in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamic behavior of the sulfurization of Nd, and Eu element, which are contained in spent nuclear fuel as fission products was investigated through collection and properties analysis of thermodynamic data in sulfurization of uranium oxides, thermodynamic properties analysis for the oxidation and reduction of fission products, and test and analysis for sulfurization characteristics of Nd and Eu oxide. And also, analysis on thermodynamic data, such as M-O-S phase stability diagram and changes of Gibbs free energy for sulfurization of uranium and Nd2O3 and Eu2O3 were carried out. Nd2O3 and Eu2O3 are sulfurized into Nd2O2S and Eu2O2S or NdySx and EuySx at a range of 400 to 450 .deg. C, while uranium oxides, such as UO2 and U3O8 remain unreacted up to 450 .deg. C Formation of UOS at 500 .deg. C is initiated by sulfurization of uranium oxides. Hence, reaction temperature for the sulfurization of the Nd2O3 and Eu2O3 was selected as a 450 .deg. C

  5. Cement matrix for immobilisation of spent anionic resins in borate form arising from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In water cooled reactors boron is added as boric acid to control nuclear reactor power levels. The boric acid concentration in coolant/moderator water, is controlled by using strongly basic anionic resins in borate (H2BO3-) form. The spent anionic resins in borate form contain 131Iodine, 99Technitium and 137Cesium activities. Direct immobilisation of anionic resins in borate form in Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and Slag Cement was investigated using vermiculite, bentonite, calcium oxide and silica as admixtures. The cumulative fraction of 137Cesium leached and 137Cesium leach rate for slag cement matrix were 0.029 and 0.00064 g.cm2.d-1 respectively for 95 days of leaching. The volume reduction factor achieved by direct immobilisation of anionic resins in borate form was 0.48. Immobilisation of pyrolysis residues from these resins in OPC matrix was also studied. Leaching of matrix blocks was carried out for 180 days in DM water to optimise the matrix formulation. The cumulative fraction of 137Cesium leached and 137Cesium leach rate were 0.076 and 0.00054 respectively for 180 days leaching. The volume reduction factor achieved by immobilisation of pyrolysis residues was 2.4. OPC is non compatible to cationic resins loaded with alkali in absence of specific admixtures. Hence cationic resins loaded with alkali and anionic resins in borate form can not be immobilised together. (author)

  6. Analysis of raft foundations for spent fuel pool in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foundation rafts are analysed as a plate on elastic foundation with the representation of the foundation media using the Winkler idealisation i.e. series of linear uncoupled springs. The elastic constant of the Winkler springs is derived using the sub-grade modulus. However, the Winkler approach has limitations due to incompatibility of the deflections at raft-soil interface. The deflection of the raft at the point of contact and the deformation of the foundation media at this point of contact are incompatible in this approach. This particularly influences flexible rafts and further if the foundation media is soil. This paper discusses the analysis of raft, in general, and the analysis of the foundation raft for a Spent Fuel pool facility using 'variable k approach' where deformations at a node and influencing nodes are computed using Boussinesq's theory. The limitations stated above are overcome in this approach. Some studies on the sensitivity of parameters were carried out in the form of variation of moduli of elasticity of concrete and deformation modulus of soil. Analysis is also performed with conventional method using 'Winkler' soil springs. It is concluded that the Winkler model does not correctly predict the behaviour of the mat both qualitatively and quantitatively and could lead to underestimation of soil pressures leading to unconservative design. The approach involving soil structure interaction like the one presented here is hence recommended for important structures like those involved in Nuclear facilities. (authors)

  7. Determination of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel using high resolution X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of Pu is an essential aspect of safeguards operations at nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. A novel analysis technique called hiRX (high resolution X-ray) has been developed for the direct measurement of Pu in spent nuclear fuel dissolver solutions. hiRX is based on monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF), which provides enhanced sensitivity and specificity compared with conventional XRF techniques. A breadboard setup of the hiRX instrument was calibrated using spiked surrogate spent fuel (SSF) standards prepared as dried residues. Samples of actual spent fuel were utilized to evaluate the performance of the hiRX. The direct detection of just 39 ng of Pu is demonstrated. Initial quantitative results, with error of 4–27% and precision of 2% relative standard deviation (RSD), were obtained for spent fuel samples. The limit of detection for Pu (100 s) within an excitation spot of 200 μm diameter was 375 pg. This study demonstrates the potential for the hiRX technique to be utilized for the rapid, accurate, and precise determination of Pu. The results highlight the analytical capability of hiRX for other applications requiring sensitive and selective nondestructive analyses. - Highlights: • Description of high resolution X-ray (hiRX) instrument, based on monochromatic WDXRF • Calibration performed by mapping Pu in dried residues of spiked surrogate spent fuel • Direct, nondestructive determination of Pu in spent nuclear fuel samples • Detection limit of 375 pg Pu in 200 μm excitation spot, 100 s

  8. Determination of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel using high resolution X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, Kathryn G., E-mail: kmcintosh@lanl.gov; Reilly, Sean D.; Havrilla, George J.

    2015-08-01

    Characterization of Pu is an essential aspect of safeguards operations at nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. A novel analysis technique called hiRX (high resolution X-ray) has been developed for the direct measurement of Pu in spent nuclear fuel dissolver solutions. hiRX is based on monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF), which provides enhanced sensitivity and specificity compared with conventional XRF techniques. A breadboard setup of the hiRX instrument was calibrated using spiked surrogate spent fuel (SSF) standards prepared as dried residues. Samples of actual spent fuel were utilized to evaluate the performance of the hiRX. The direct detection of just 39 ng of Pu is demonstrated. Initial quantitative results, with error of 4–27% and precision of 2% relative standard deviation (RSD), were obtained for spent fuel samples. The limit of detection for Pu (100 s) within an excitation spot of 200 μm diameter was 375 pg. This study demonstrates the potential for the hiRX technique to be utilized for the rapid, accurate, and precise determination of Pu. The results highlight the analytical capability of hiRX for other applications requiring sensitive and selective nondestructive analyses. - Highlights: • Description of high resolution X-ray (hiRX) instrument, based on monochromatic WDXRF • Calibration performed by mapping Pu in dried residues of spiked surrogate spent fuel • Direct, nondestructive determination of Pu in spent nuclear fuel samples • Detection limit of 375 pg Pu in 200 μm excitation spot, 100 s.

  9. Experimental determination and chemical modelling of radiolytic processes at the spent fuel/water interface. Experiments carried out in carbonate solutions in absence and presence of chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Jordi; Cera, Esther; Grive, Mireia; Duro, Lara [Enviros Spain SL (Spain); Eriksen, Trygve [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry

    2003-01-01

    We report on the recent experimental and modelling results of a research programme that started in 1995. The aim has been to understand the kinetic and thermodynamic processes that control the radiolytic generation of oxidants and reductants at the spent fuel water interface and their consequences for spent fuel matrix stability and radionuclide release. This has been done by carrying out well-controlled dissolution experiments of PWR Ringhals spent fuel fragments in an initially anoxic closed system and by using different solution compositions. Experimental series started with several tests carried out with deionised water as solvent, in a second phase experiments were conducted with 10 mM bicarbonate solutions. New experimental series were set up during the last two years by using the same bicarbonate content in solutions with varying NaCl concentrations in order to ascertain the role of this ligand on the radiolytic products and its consequence for radionuclide release. The selected NaCl concentrations are in the range of 0.1 to 10 mM. Experimental data shows that uranium dissolution at early contact times is controlled by the oxidation of the UO{sub 2} matrix. This process controls the co-dissolution of most of the analysed radionuclides, including Sr, Mo, Tc, Np and surprisingly enough, Cs. In the overall the release rates for U and the matrix associated radionuclides are in the range of 10{sup -6} moles/day with a clear decreasing trend with exposure time and after 2 years the initial release rates have decreased down to 3x10{sup -8} moles/day. The solubility of the released actinides appears to be limited by the formation of An(IV) hydroxide phases, although Np concentrations in solution did not reach solubility levels during the time intervals of the present tests. No secondary solid phase appears to control the solubility of the rest of the elements.

  10. Experimental determination and chemical modelling of radiolytic processes at the spent fuel/water interface. Experiments carried out in carbonate solutions in absence and presence of chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the recent experimental and modelling results of a research programme that started in 1995. The aim has been to understand the kinetic and thermodynamic processes that control the radiolytic generation of oxidants and reductants at the spent fuel water interface and their consequences for spent fuel matrix stability and radionuclide release. This has been done by carrying out well-controlled dissolution experiments of PWR Ringhals spent fuel fragments in an initially anoxic closed system and by using different solution compositions. Experimental series started with several tests carried out with deionised water as solvent, in a second phase experiments were conducted with 10 mM bicarbonate solutions. New experimental series were set up during the last two years by using the same bicarbonate content in solutions with varying NaCl concentrations in order to ascertain the role of this ligand on the radiolytic products and its consequence for radionuclide release. The selected NaCl concentrations are in the range of 0.1 to 10 mM. Experimental data shows that uranium dissolution at early contact times is controlled by the oxidation of the UO2 matrix. This process controls the co-dissolution of most of the analysed radionuclides, including Sr, Mo, Tc, Np and surprisingly enough, Cs. In the overall the release rates for U and the matrix associated radionuclides are in the range of 10-6 moles/day with a clear decreasing trend with exposure time and after 2 years the initial release rates have decreased down to 3x10-8 moles/day. The solubility of the released actinides appears to be limited by the formation of An(IV) hydroxide phases, although Np concentrations in solution did not reach solubility levels during the time intervals of the present tests. No secondary solid phase appears to control the solubility of the rest of the elements

  11. Shipping and storage cask data for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a compilation of data on casks used for the storage and/or transport of commercially generated spent fuel in the US based on publicly available information. In using the information contained in the following data sheets, it should be understood that the data have been assembled from published information, which in some instances was not internally consistent. Moreover, it was sometimes necessary to calculate or infer the values of some attributes from available information. Nor was there always a uniform method of reporting the values of some attributes; for example, an outside surface dose of the loaded cask was sometimes reported to be the maximum acceptable by NRC, while in other cases the maximum actual dose rate expected was reported, and in still other cases the expected average dose rate was reported. A summary comparison of the principal attributes of storage and transportable storage casks is provided and a similar comparison for shipping casks is also shown. References to source data are provided on the individual data sheets for each cask

  12. Storage facilities of spent nuclear fuel in dry for Mexican nuclear facilities; Instalaciones de almacenamiento de combustible nuclear gastado en seco para instalaciones nucleares mexicanas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmeron V, J. A.; Camargo C, R.; Nunez C, A.; Mendoza F, J. E.; Sanchez J, J., E-mail: juan.salmeron@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose Ma. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In this article the relevant aspects of the spent fuel storage and the questions that should be taken in consideration for the possible future facilities of this type in the country are approached. A brief description is proposed about the characteristics of the storage systems in dry, the incorporate regulations to the present Nuclear Regulator Standard, the planning process of an installation, besides the approaches considered once resolved the use of these systems; as the modifications to the system, the authorization periods for the storage, the type of materials to store and the consequent environmental impact to their installation. At the present time the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) considers the possible generation of two authorization types for these facilities: Specific, directed to establish a new nuclear installation with the authorization of receiving, to transfer and to possess spent fuel and other materials for their storage; and General, focused to those holders that have an operation license of a reactor that allows them the storage of the nuclear fuel and other materials that they possess. Both authorizations should be valued according to the necessities that are presented. In general, this installation type represents a viable solution for the administration of the spent fuel and other materials that require of a temporary solution previous to its final disposal. Its use in the nuclear industry has been increased in the last years demonstrating to be appropriate and feasible without having a significant impact to the health, public safety and the environment. Mexico has two main nuclear facilities, the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde of the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) and the facilities of the TRIGA Reactor of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) that will require in a future to use this type of disposition installation of the spent fuel and generated wastes. (Author)

  13. Carrying an anti-nuclear-power badge in the teaching profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carrying of an anti-nuclear-power badge by a teacher during school hours violates the order to practice reticence in political activities. At the beginning of 1977 some teachers, the plaintiff as well, carried anti-nuclear-power badges, i.e. a round badge with a stylized red sun on a yellow background with the inscription 'Nuclear power - No, thank you'. Following a general direction by the educational authorities, the headmistress forbade plaintiff on 4.11.77 to visibly carry this badge during lessons. This protest having been without success, action was brought with partial success at the Administrative and Higher Administrative Court. The Federal Administrative Court dismissed the case. (orig./HSCH)

  14. Safety Aspects and Economic Impacts of Spent Fuel Management Policies in PWR Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the decision to introduce nuclear power for electricity generation in Egypt, the assessment of different nuclear fuel cycle strategies is of great importance. In this context, safety and economic aspects of nuclear fuel cycle options are topics of global importance relevant to the development of nuclear technology. As a part of nuclear fuel cycle evaluation studies in the department of nuclear fuel cycle safety, NCNSRC-AEA, this paper evaluates the safety and economic aspects of PWR nuclear fuel cycle options. The once through or direct spent fuel disposal and the ''self-generated recycle'' fuel cycle concepts have been considered in this assessment. Effect of increasing reactor fuel irradiation level on nuclear fuel cycle requirements as well as its impact on the radioactive waste volumes arising have been estimated. The results showed a remarkable decrease in uranium requirements, while radioactive waste volumes increased. Fuel-reprocessing costs have been estimated as functions of the spent fuel disposal costs and the natural uranium prices to determine the justifiable fuel reprocessing costs. Environmental safety aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle with the two options have been evaluated and discussed. (author)

  15. Separation of the rare-earth fission product poisons from spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, Jerry D.; Sterbentz, James W.

    2016-08-30

    A method for the separation of the rare-earth fission product poisons comprising providing a spent nuclear fuel. The spent nuclear fuel comprises UO.sub.2 and rare-earth oxides, preferably Sm, Gd, Nd, Eu oxides, with other elements depending on the fuel composition. Preferably, the provided nuclear fuel is a powder, preferably formed by crushing the nuclear fuel or using one or more oxidation-reduction cycles. A compound comprising Th or Zr, preferably metal, is provided. The provided nuclear fuel is mixed with the Th or Zr, thereby creating a mixture. The mixture is then heated to a temperature sufficient to reduce the UO.sub.2 in the nuclear fuel, preferably to at least to 850.degree. C. for Th and up to 600.degree. C. for Zr. Rare-earth metals are then extracted to form the heated mixture thereby producing a treated nuclear fuel. The treated nuclear fuel comprises the provided nuclear fuel having a significant reduction in rare-earths.

  16. Relativistic nuclear technology (RNT) for energy production and utilization of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The results of first experiments on physical justification of RNT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider an essentially new scheme of the electro-nuclear method - nuclear relativistic technologies (RNT). This is based on the formation and use of an extremely hard neutron spectrum inside deep subcritical active core. It is shown that the development and application of RNT may be promising for solving the problem of utilization of spent nuclear fuel and the global challenges of energy. The results of the first experiments carried out at JINR indicate a validity of the basic principles of RNT, in particular, doubling the gain of the power of the deuteron beam, irradiating the massive (315 kg) uranium target, with increasing the beam energy from 1 to 4 GeV

  17. Research on advanced aqueous reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel: literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the partitioning and transmutation strategy is to reduce the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel to the level of natural uranium in a short period of time (about 1000 years) and thus the required containment period of radioactive material in a repository. Furthermore, it aims to reduce the volume of waste requiring deep geological disposal and hence the associated space requirements and costs. Several aqueous as well as pyrochemical separation processes have been developed for the partitioning of the long-lived radionuclides from the remaining of the spent fuel. This report aims to describe and compare advanced aqueous reprocessing methods.

  18. Research on advanced aqueous reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel: literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hecke, K.; Goethals, P.

    2006-07-15

    The goal of the partitioning and transmutation strategy is to reduce the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel to the level of natural uranium in a short period of time (about 1000 years) and thus the required containment period of radioactive material in a repository. Furthermore, it aims to reduce the volume of waste requiring deep geological disposal and hence the associated space requirements and costs. Several aqueous as well as pyrochemical separation processes have been developed for the partitioning of the long-lived radionuclides from the remaining of the spent fuel. This report aims to describe and compare advanced aqueous reprocessing methods.

  19. Temporary storage in dry of the spent nuclear fuel in the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To guarantee the continuity in the operation of the two nuclear reactors of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) is an activity of high priority of the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) in Mexico. At the present time, the CFE is working in the storage project in dry of the spent fuel with the purpose of to liberate space of the pools and to have the enlarged capacity of storage of the spent fuel that is discharged of the reactors. This work presents the storage option in dry of the spent fuel, considering that the original capacity of the spent fuel pools of the NPP-L V was of 1242 spaces each one and that in 1991, through a modification of the original design, the storage capacity was increased to 3177 spaces by pool. At present, the cells occupied by unit are of 2165 (68%) for the Unit-I and 1839 (58%) for the Unit-2, however, in 2017 and 2022 the capacity to discharge the complete core will be limited by what is required of a retirement option of spent fuel assemblies to liberate spaces. (author)

  20. Garigliano Nuclear Power Plant, Italy: Decontamination and Rearranging of Reactor Canal and Spent Fuel Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garigliano nuclear power plant was a 506 MW(th), first generation, dual cycle BWR. It started operation in 1964 and finally shut down in 1978, following the discovery of serious damage to a secondary steam generator. This section describes decontamination activities carried out in 1991–1993 in preparation for safe enclosure of Garigliano reactor building.1 Activities were carried out after completion of spent fuel transport off-site (1985–1987). A schematic of the spent fuel pool and adjacent areas is provided. Decontamination activities included the following: (a) Agitation and resuspension of pool sediments using water jets and water filtration. (b) Lowering of water level and parallel decontamination of pool walls with high pressure water jets of approximately 700 kg/cm2. (c) Removal, decontamination and interim storage on gangways of equipment located on the pool south-east wall. (d) Removal, decontamination and storage of the fuel transport container platform. (e) Removal of four fuel racks to their pool wall bearings, decontamination and transfer to the fresh fuel room. (f) Decontamination of the vessel head platform, removal from the reactor canal, brushing and coating to allow preservation and fixing of loose contamination. Eventually, this component was placed back in the reactor canal. (g) Construction in the reactor canal of an interim structure supporting fuel racks. At the completion of the work, this structure was dismounted, decontaminated and removed. (h) Removal of fuel racks (five at a time) to their pool wall bearings, decontamination and interim storage in the reactor canal. (i) Gradual lowering of the pool water level to some 50 cm from the pool floor and parallel decontamination of fixed structures and walls. (j) Discovery by visual inspection and radiological checks, of activated components on the floor of the pool. Retrieval of all this material, segmentation as needed, temporary storage in containers and later transfer to the high

  1. Synthesis report on the relevant diffusion coefficients of fission products and helium in spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document corresponds to the deliverable D2 of the Work Package 1 of the 'Spent Fuel Stability under repository conditions' (SFS) European project. It constitutes a synthesis report on relevant diffusion coefficients of fission products and helium in spent nuclear fuels at high and low temperatures. Coefficients corresponding to thermally activated diffusion were reviewed from literature data for O, U (self-diffusion coefficients), fission gases and other fission products. Data showed that thermal diffusion was irrelevant at temperatures expected in repository conditions. The occurrence of diffusion enhanced by alpha self-irradiation was studied through different theoretical approaches. A 'best estimate' value of the alpha self-irradiation diffusion coefficient, D (m2.s-1), is proposed. It is extrapolated from enhanced diffusion under irradiation observed in reactor and would be proportional to the volume alpha activity in the spent nuclear fuel, Av (Bq.m-3) as: D/Av ≅ 2.10-41 (m5)The migration of stable Pb in Oklo's uraninites was studied in order to validate the proposed diffusion coefficient. The obtained value is one order of magnitude higher than the theoretical proposed value. As for He behaviour in spent nuclear fuel, a few data are today available in open literature. The document will be completed as soon as new experimental results are available. (authors)

  2. A study on Japanese experience to secure the interim storage facility for nuclear spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Min [Hannyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    The Japanese Government selected Mutsu, Aomori Prefecture as a provisional spent-fuel repository site. This comes as a result of the prefecture's five-year campaign to host the site since 2000. Korea stores spent nuclear fuel within sites of nuclear power plants, and expects the storage capacity to reach its limit by the year 2016. This compels Korea to learn the cases of Japan. Having successfully hosted Gyeongju as a site for low-to-intermediate-level nuclear waste repository, Korea has already learned the potential process of hosting spent fuel storage site. The striking difference between the two countries in the process of hosting the site is that the Korean government had to offer the local city a large amount of subsidy for hosting through competitive citizens' referendum among candidate cities while it was the leadership of the local municipality that enabled the controversial decision in Japan. It is also a distinguishable characteristics of Japan that not a huge subsidy is provided to the local host city. I hope this study offers an idea to Korea's future effort to select a spent-fuel host site.

  3. Utilization of spent PWR fuel-advanced nuclear fuel cycle of PWR/CANDU synergism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Xiao-Dong; XIE Zhong-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    High neutron economy, on line refueling and channel design result in the unsurpassed fuel cycle flexibility and variety for CANDU reactors. According to the Chinese national conditions that China has both PWR and CANDU reactors and the closed cycle policy of reprocessing the spent PWR fuel is adopted, one of the advanced nuclear fuel cycles of PWR/CANDU synergism using the reprocessed uranium of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactor is proposed, which will save the uranium resource (~22.5%), increase the energy output (~41%), decrease the quantity of spent fuels to be disposed (~2/3) and lower the cost of nuclear power. Because of the inherent flexibility of nuclear fuel cycle in CANDU reactor, and the low radiation level of recycled uranium(RU), which is acceptable for CANDU reactor fuel fabrication, the transition from the natural uranium to the RU can be completed without major modification of the reactor core structure and operation mode. It can be implemented in Qinshan Phase Ⅲ CANDU reactors with little or no requirement of big investment in new design. It can be expected that the reuse of recycled uranium of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactor is a feasible and desirable strategy in China.

  4. Transportation of failed or damaged foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since initiating the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance Program in 1996, the Program has had to deal with difficult issues associated with the transportation of failed or damaged spent fuel. In several instances, problems with failed or damaged fuel have prevented the acceptance of the fuel at considerable cost to both the Department of Energy and research reactor operators. In response to the problems faced by the Acceptance Program, DOE has undertaken significant steps to better define the spent fuel acceptance criteria. DOE has worked closely with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address failed or damaged research reactor spent fuel causing a degradation of the fuel assembly exposing fuel meat and to identify cask certificate issues which must be resolved by cask owners and foreign regulatory authorities. The specific issues and implementation challenges associated with the transport of MTR type FRR SNF will be discussed. The information presented will include U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory issues, cask certificate issues, technical constraints, implementation status, and lessons learned. Specific information will also be provided on the latest efforts to revise DOE's Appendix B, Transport Package (Cask) Acceptance Criteria. The information presented in this paper will be of interest to foreign research reactor operators, shippers, and cask vendors in evaluating the condition of their fuel to ensure it can be transported in accordance with appropriate cask certificate requirements. (author)

  5. A study on Japanese experience to secure the interim storage facility for nuclear spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japanese Government selected Mutsu, Aomori Prefecture as a provisional spent-fuel repository site. This comes as a result of the prefecture's five-year campaign to host the site since 2000. Korea stores spent nuclear fuel within sites of nuclear power plants, and expects the storage capacity to reach its limit by the year 2016. This compels Korea to learn the cases of Japan. Having successfully hosted Gyeongju as a site for low-to-intermediate-level nuclear waste repository, Korea has already learned the potential process of hosting spent fuel storage site. The striking difference between the two countries in the process of hosting the site is that the Korean government had to offer the local city a large amount of subsidy for hosting through competitive citizens' referendum among candidate cities while it was the leadership of the local municipality that enabled the controversial decision in Japan. It is also a distinguishable characteristics of Japan that not a huge subsidy is provided to the local host city. I hope this study offers an idea to Korea's future effort to select a spent-fuel host site

  6. A Comparative Study on the Economics of Reprocessing and Direct Disposal of Nuclear Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle choices and costs are important in considering energy policies, fuel diversity, security of supply and associated social and environmental impacts. Particularly, the nuclear spent fuel is very important in view of high activity and the need of long term management. This study focuses on the comparison of reprocessing and direct disposal of nuclear spent fuel in terms of cost, safety and public acceptability. The results of the study show that the direct disposal is about 7% more economical than the reprocessing. In terms of safety, the results show that the risk of vitrified HLW (High-Level radioactive Waste) is less than directly disposed spent fuel. For the public acceptability, both of the methods are not well understood and therefore they are not accepted. In conclusion, it is necessary to guarantee the safety of the both spent fuel processing methods through continuous development of associated technology and to have a fuel cycle policy which should consider not only the economics but also social and environmental impacts

  7. A new OECD/NEA database of nuclide compositions of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SFCOMPO database of nuclide compositions of spent nuclear fuel is hosted by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency since 2001. Since 2011, a collaborative effort led by the OECD/NEA Data Bank and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, under the guidance of the NEA Expert Group on Assay Data of Spent Nuclear Fuel, has resulted in the creation of a new enhanced relational database structure and a significant expansion of SFCOMPO, now containing experimental assay data for a wide selection of international reactor designs. This paper aims at describing the new SFCOMPO Database developed at NEA in terms of functionalities, contents and foreseen developments. This new database is expected for public release in 2014. (author)

  8. Introduction of KRMC's R and D Program for Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant had been managed by Korean Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP). Due to the concern about waste management by the waste generator, the Radioactive Waste Management Act was promulgated in March, 2008. The enacted law envisaged that establishment of an independent organization for the check and balance through the separation of waste management from waste generator. Driven by the law, the Korean Radioactive Waste Management Corporation (KRMC) was established on January 2, 2009 as an independent government agency for the safer and more efficient management of radioactive waste generated from Korea. It will be in charge of construction of low and intermediate radioactive waste disposal facility and its operation, spent nuclear fuel management and research related above activities. Radioactive Waste R and D Center, a research division of KRMC, will focus on the research related spent nuclear fuel interim storage, transportation and disposal under national R and D road-map. Although the road-map has been fixed yet, it will be completed until March of this year. Through this paper, we hope to have a chance to introduce KRMC's detailed research plan based on the national R and D road-map and to extend an international relationship for research collaboration in spent nuclear fuel management. (authors)

  9. Air Shipment of Highly Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romania safely air shipped 23.7 kilograms of Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel from the VVR-S research reactor at Magurele, Romania, to the Russian Federation in June 2009. This was the world's first air shipment of spent nuclear fuel transported in a Type B(U) cask under existing international laws without special exceptions for the air transport licenses. This shipment was coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), in cooperation with the Romania National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), and the Russian Federation State Corporation Rosatom. The shipment was transported by truck to and from the respective commercial airports in Romania and the Russian Federation and stored at a secure nuclear facility in Russia where it will be converted into low enriched uranium. With this shipment, Romania became the 3. country under the RRRFR program and the 14. country under the GTRI program to remove all HEU. This paper describes the work, equipment, and approvals that were required to complete this spent fuel air shipment. (authors)

  10. Moving into the 21st century - The United States' Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1996, when the United States Department of Energy and the Department of State jointly adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel, twelve shipments totaling 2,985 MTR and TRIGA spent nuclear fuel assemblies from research reactors around the world have been accepted into the United States. These shipments have contained approximately 1.7 metric tons of HEU and 0.6 metric tons of LEU. Foreign research reactor operators played a significant role in this success. A new milestone in the acceptance program occurred during the summer of 1999 with the arrival of TRIGA spent nuclear fuel from Europe through the Charleston Naval Weapons Station via the Savannah River Site to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This shipment consisted of five casks of TRIGA spent nuclear fuel from research reactors in Germany, Italy, Slovenia, and Romania. These casks were transported by truck approximately 2,400 miles across the United States (one cask packaged in an ISO container per truck). Drawing upon lessons learned in previous shipments, significant technical, legal, and political challenges were addressed to complete this cross-country shipment. Other program activities since the last RERTR meeting have included: formulation of a methodology to determine the quantity of spent nuclear fuel in a damaged condition that may be transported in a particular cask (containment analysis for transportation casks); publication of clarification of the fee policy; and continued planning for the outyears of the acceptance policy including review of reactors and eligible material quantities. The United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program continues to demonstrate success due to the continuing commitment between the United States and the research reactor community to make this program work. We strongly encourage all eligible research reactors to decide as soon as possible to

  11. Radiological protection regulation during spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management in the Western Branch of the Federal State Unitary Enterprise 'SevRAO'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The site of temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste, situated at Andreeva Bay in Northwest Russia, was developed in the 1960s, and it has carried out receipt and storage of fresh and spent nuclear fuel, and solid and liquid radioactive waste generated during the operation of nuclear submarines and nuclear-powered icebreakers. The site is now operated as the western branch of the Federal State Unitary Enterprise, SevRAO. In the course of operation over several decades, the containment barriers in the Spent Nuclear Fuel and Radioactive Waste storage facilities partially lost their containment effectiveness, so workshop facilities and parts of the site became contaminated with radioactive substances. This paper describes work being undertaken to provide an updated regulatory basis for the protection of workers during especially hazardous remediation activities, necessary because of the unusual radiation conditions at the site. It describes the results of recent survey work carried out by the Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Centre, within a programme of regulatory cooperation between the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Federal Medical-Biological Agency of Russia. The survey work and subsequent analyses have contributed to the development of special regulations setting out radiological protection requirements for operations planned at the site. Within these requirements, and taking account of a variety of other factors, a continuing need arises for the implementation of optimisation of remediation at Andreeva Bay.

  12. The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute's regulations concerning the final management of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste - with background and comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents and comments on the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute's Regulations concerning the Protection of Human Health and the Environment in connection with the Final Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel or Nuclear Waste, SSI FS 1998: 1

  13. Thermal optimization of the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal optimisation for the Teollisuuden Voima Oy's (TVO) and Imatran Voima Oy's (IVO) nuclear fuel waste disposal from the current 4 nuclear power units has been studied in this calculation report. A procedure for loading different aged nuclear fuel in canisters in such way, that the decay power per canister is minimized at the stage when the canister is disposed. The length of the disposing period is assumed to be 20 - 25 years starting immediately after the planned usage period of the current plants in 2020. The disposal of the canisters has been optimised in such way, that the maximum temperature in the interface of the canister mantle and the bentonite buffer keeps always below the set limit, +100 deg C. In this optimisation the minimum distance between the two neighbouring canisters is calculated. In the assessment the TVO's BWR-fuel, the IVO's VVER 440 fuel, the three repository site candidates (Olkiluoto, Kivetty and Romuvaara), and two different size copper/steel canisters containing 9 or 11 bundles of fuel waste have been separately investigated and assessed. (orig.) (11 refs.)

  14. Incentives for the allowance of ''burnup credit'' in the design of spent nuclear fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis has been completed which indicates that the consideration of spent fuel histories ('burnup credit') in the criticality design of spent fuel shipping casks could result in significant public risk benefits and cost savings in the transport of spent nuclear fuel. Capacities of casks could be increased considerably in some cases. These capacity increases result in lower public and occupational exposures to ionizing radiation due to the reduced number of shipments necessary to transport a given amount of fuel. Additional safety benefits result from reduced non-radiological risks to both public and occupational sectors. In addition, economic benefits result from lower in-transit shipping costs, reduced transportation fleet capital costs, and fewer cask handling requirements at both shipping and receiving facilities

  15. Incentives for the allowance of burnup credit in the design of spent nuclear fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis has been completed which indicates that the consideration of spent fuel histories ('burnup credit') in the criticality design of spent fuel shipping casks could result in considerable public risk benefits and cost savings in the transport of spent nuclear fuel. Capacities of casks could be increased considerably in some cases. These capacity increases result in lower public and occupational exposures to ionizing radiation due to the reduced number of shipments necessary to transport a given amount of fuel. Additional safety benefits result from reduced non-radiological risks to both public and occupational sectors. In addition, economic benefits result from lower in-transit shipping costs, reduced transportation fleet capital costs, and fewer cask handling requirements at both shipping and receiving facilities

  16. Current state of knowledge of water radiolysis effects on spent nuclear fuel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Literature data on the effect of water radiolysis products on spent-fuel oxidation and dissolution are reviewed. Effects of gamma radiolysis, alpha radiolysis, and dissolved O2 or H2O2 in unirradiated solutions are discussed separately. Also, the effect of carbonate in gamma-irradiated solutions and radiolysis effects on leaching of spent fuel are reviewed. In addition, a kinetic model for calculating the corrosion rates of UO2 in solutions undergoing radiolysis is discussed. The model gives good agreement between calculated and measured corrosion rates in the case of gamma radiolysis and in unirradiated solutions containing dissolved oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. However, the model fails to predict the results of alpha radiolysis. In a recent study , it was shown that the model gave good agreement with measured corrosion rates of spent fuel exposed in deionized water. The applications of radiolysis studies for geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel are discussed. (author)

  17. Studies and research concerning BNFP: spent fuel dry storage studies at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual designs are presented utilizing the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant for the dry interim storage of spent light water reactor fuel. Studies were conducted to determine feasible approaches to storing spent fuel by methods other than wet pool storage. Fuel that has had an opportunity to cool for several years, or more, after discharge from a reactor is especially adaptable to dry storage since its thermal load is greatly reduced compared to the thermal load immediately following discharge. A thermal analysis was performed to help in determining the feasibility of various spent fuel dry storage concepts. Methods to reject the heat from dry storage are briefly discussed, which include both active and passive cooling systems. The storage modes reviewed include above and below ground caisson-type storage facilities and numerous variations of vault, or hot cell-type, storage facilities

  18. Application of system analysis to the solution of economic problems of spent nuclear fuels in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In terms of unit capacity of spent fuel reprocessing plants and timing of their introduction, the problem of optimizing the fuel reprocessing industry has been investigated for the given growth rates of nuclear electricity generating capacities and with a special reference to Poland. The summary of two approaches to solve the problem is presented. The first one utilizes the Bellman dynamic programming method and determines the optimal timing scheme of putting reprocessing plants into operation with an account of a possibility for a part of the spent fuel to be reprocessed abroad. The second approach utilized the static optimization method. It is pointed out that partial reprocessing of spent fuel abroad may save a significant part of the total reprocessing costs especially for small economics like Poland

  19. Nuclear material control and accountancy in a spent fuel storage ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel storage ponds of a large reprocessing plant La Hague in France are under safeguards by means of a wide range of techniques currently used. These techniques include the nuclear material accountancy an containment/surveillance (C/S). Nondestructive assay, design information verification, and authentication of equipment provided by the operator are also implemented. Specific C/S equipment including video surveillance and unattended radiation monitoring have been developed and implemented in a spent fuel pond of La Hague. These C/S systems named EMOSS and CONSULHA with high degree of reliability and conclusiveness provide the opportunity to improve the efficiency of safeguards, particularly as related to spent fuel storage areas where the accountancy is verified by item counting

  20. Postulated accident scenarios for the on-site transport of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Once a spent fuel container is loaded with spent fuel it typically travels on-site to a processing building for permanent lid attachment. During on-site transport a lid clamp is utilized to ensure the container lid remains in place. The safe on-site transport of spent nuclear fuel must rely on the structural integrity of the transport container and system of transport. Regard for on-site traffic and safe, efficient travel routes are important and manageable with well thought-out planning. Non-manageable incidences, such as flying debris from tornado force winds or postulated blasts in proximity to the transport container, that may result in high velocity impact and shock loading on the transport system must be considered. This paper consists of simulations that consider these types of postulated accident scenarios using detailed nonlinear finite element techniques

  1. Analysis of the transportation logistics for spent nuclear fuel in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the back-end fuel cycle, transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from nuclear power plants (NPPs) to a fuel storage facility is very important in establishing a nuclear fuel cycle. In Korea, the accumulated amount of SNF in the NPP pools is troublesome since the temporary storage facilities at these NPP pools are expected to be full of SNF within ten years. Therefore, Korea cannot help but plan for the construction of an interim storage facility to solve this problem in the near future. Especially, a decision on several factors, such as where the interim storage facility should be located, how many casks a transport ship can carry at a time and how many casks are initially required, affect the configuration of the transportation system. In order to analyze the various possible candidate scenarios, we assumed four cases for the interim storage facility location, three cases for the load capacity that a transport ship can carry and two cases for the total amount of casks used for transportation. First, this study considered the currently accumulated amount of SNF in Korea, and the amount of SNF generated from NPPs until all NPPs are shut down. Then, how much SNF per year must be transported from theNPPs to an interim storage facility was calculated during an assumed transportation period. Second, 24 candidate transportation scenarios were constructed by a combination of the decision factors. To construct viable yearly transportation schedules for the selected 24 scenarios, we created a spreadsheet program named TranScenario, which was developed by using MS EXCEL. TranScenario can help schedulers input shipping routes and allocate transportation casks. Also,TranScenario provides information on the cask distribution in the NPPs and in the interim storage facility automatically, by displaying it in real time according to the shipping routes, cask types and cask numbers that the user generates. Once a yearly transportation schedule is established, Tran

  2. Burnup credit application in criticality analysis of storage casks with spent RBMK-1500 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear criticality safety analysis of two types of the casks CASTOR RBMK-1500 and CONSTOR RBMK-1500 was performed using the SCALE 4.3 computer code system. These casks are planned for an interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel at Ignalina nuclear power plant. Effective neutron multiplication factor keff was calculated for different density of the water inside the casks for unfavorable operational cases and for assumed hypothetical accident conditions when fuel in the system is fresh and fuel is depleted (i.e. burnup credit taken into account). Results show that for all cases effective neutron multiplication factor keff is less then allowable value 0.95. (author)

  3. Modelling the inventory and impact assessment of partitioning and transmutation approaches to spent nuclear fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoggett-Jones, C. E-mail: craig@stams.strath.ac.uk; Robbins, C.; Gettinby, G.; Blythe, S

    2002-03-01

    An inventory modelling and impact assessment system to investigate the potential effects of partitioning and transmutation is proposed. It is founded on a mass based inventory analysis using the principles of basic nuclear physics and the international standards for assessing radiological health effects. It is specific to the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle and is applied to four alternative spent fuel management strategies. The system accounts for the dynamic nature of post-irradiation scenarios and is being used to develop software for use within the nuclear power industry. Four example waste-disposal options are considered using the method. Impact assessments and parameter sensitivity analyses are presented.

  4. Modelling the inventory and impact assessment of partitioning and transmutation approaches to spent nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inventory modelling and impact assessment system to investigate the potential effects of partitioning and transmutation is proposed. It is founded on a mass based inventory analysis using the principles of basic nuclear physics and the international standards for assessing radiological health effects. It is specific to the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle and is applied to four alternative spent fuel management strategies. The system accounts for the dynamic nature of post-irradiation scenarios and is being used to develop software for use within the nuclear power industry. Four example waste-disposal options are considered using the method. Impact assessments and parameter sensitivity analyses are presented

  5. Advanced techniques for storage and disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electricity generation using fossil fuel at comparatively low costs forces nuclear energy to explore all economic potentials. The cost advantage of direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel compared to reprocessing gives reason enough to follow that path more and more. The present paper describes components and facilities for long-term storage as well as packaging strategies, developed and implemented under the responsibility of the German utilities operating nuclear power plants. A proposal is made to complement or even to replace the POLLUX cask concept by a system using BSK 3 fuel rod containers together with LB 21 storage casks. (author)

  6. Building on success. The foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second year of implementation of the research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program was marked by significant challenges and achievements. In July 1998, the Department of Energy completed by significant challenges and achievements. In July 1998, the Department of Energy completed its first shipment of spent fuel from Asia via the Concord Naval Weapons Station in California to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental (INEEL). This shipment, which consisted of three casks of spent nuclear fuel from two research reactors in the Republic of Korea, presented significant technical, legal, and political challenges in the United States and abroad. Lessons learned will be used in the planning and execution of our next significant milestone, a shipment of TRIGA spent fuel from research reactors in Europe to INEEL, scheduled for the summer of 1999. This shipment will include transit across the United States for over 2,000 miles. Other challenges and advances include: clarification of the fee policy to address changes in the economic status of countries during the life of the program; resolution of issues associated with cask certification and the specific types and conditions of spent fuel proposed for transport; revisions to standard contract language in order to more clearly address unique shipping situations; and priorization and scheduling of shipments to most effectively implement the program. As of this meeting, eight shipments, consisting of nearly 2,000 spent fuel assemblies from fifteen countries, have been successfully completed. With the continued cooperation of the international research reactor community, we are committed to building on this success in the remaining years of the program. (author)

  7. Proposed nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel: Appendix A, environmental justice analysis. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is Appendix A to a draft Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. This appendix addresses environmental justice for the acceptance of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States. Analyses of environmental justice concerns are provided in three areas: (1) potential ports of entry, (2) potential transportation routes from candidate ports of entry to interim management sites, and (3) areas surrounding potential interim management sites. These analyses lead to the conclusion that the alternatives analyzed in this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) would result in no disproportionate adverse effects on minority populations or low-income communities surrounding the candidate ports, transport routes, or interim management sites

  8. The State of the Art of the Decladding Method for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our country's energy consumption is increasing day after day even though it relies on imports for more than 95 percent of its energy needs. In this circumstances, the atomic energy is a promising alternative to solve the problem of an energy security and an environmental preservation simultaneously. However, nuclear power produces spent fuel which is a highly radioactive waste. For a reliable and effective management of the spent fuel, the ACP(Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process) is being developed at the KAERI. As a first state equipment of the ACP, a decladding machine is used to separate spent fuel rod into the UO2 pellets and hulls. This technical report aims to analyze existing decladding methods, and then, find a suitable decladding mechanism for the ACP. Many studies on the decladding of spent fuel can be categorized two approaches: chemical approach and mechanical one. In this report, we concentrated on the mechanical decladding approach. We developed engineering scale decladding device(20 kgHM/batch) and evaluated the performance through the verification experiments. We expect that this technical report helps in developing a scale-up equipment and technology

  9. Extraction process of fission products from spent nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Process for extracting fission products contained in irradiated nuclear fuel elements consisting in bringing these elements into contact with water after having treated them mechanically to remove their cladding and/or cut them up, then separate these treated elements from the aqueous solution and recuperating at least one of the fission products concerned from this by concentrating it by distillation so as to obtain a concentrate containing these fission products and then processing this concentrate in order to ensure a long term storage of these fission products

  10. Spent fuel storage in the storage pools of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pools for storing spent fuel elements in the reactor buildings of nuclear power plants allow the afterheat of fuel unloaded from the reactor for good to decay to a level at which the fuel then can be shipped in special casks. Consequently, these storage pools were designed in Germany in the past so as to accommodate the volume of fuel elements unloaded over approximately two to ten years of operation, depending on the power plant in question before the fuel had to be shipped off. As a consequence of the omnibus law amending the German Atomic Energy Act, which permits direct disposal of spent fuel elements as a legally equivalent alternative to reprocessing, the operators of nuclear power plants have had an opportunity to reassess the nuclear fuel cycle. If the direct disposal option is to be used, this necessitates long-term interim storage of the fuel. This can be achieved, on the one hand, in the storage pools of nuclear power plants and, on the other hand, in separate fuel stores in which the fuel elements can be kept in combined shipping and storage casks. If such relatively sophisticated storage casks are to be loaded economically in nuclear power plants, the afterheat generated by the fuel elements should have decayed as far as possible, as heat removal and radiation dose rate on the surface of the cask are limiting factors. There is yet another aspect, namely the trends towards higher discharge burnups and towards using nuclear recycle fuel. Both measures increase the decay heat produced by spent fuel. In countries where long-term interium storage has been practiced for a long time already (e.g. Spain, Korea), Siemens in the past few years equipped the storage pools of nuclear power plants with compact fuel stores which make optimum use of the storage pools. These innovative two-region stores are being used already in ten of these nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  11. Reduced fertility after the crash of a U.S. bomber carrying nuclear weapons?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, K

    1995-01-01

    A register-based study was performed to elucidate whether workers employed on the Thule air base in the clean-up period after the crash of a U.S. B-52 bomber carrying nuclear bombs had reduced fertility, as measured by the numbers of liveborn children. The highest birth rates were among 25-34-year...

  12. Integrated data base report - 1994: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Except for transuranic wastes, inventories of these materials are reported as of December 31, 1994. Transuranic waste inventories are reported as of December 31, 1993. All spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions

  13. Integrated data base report - 1994: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Except for transuranic wastes, inventories of these materials are reported as of December 31, 1994. Transuranic waste inventories are reported as of December 31, 1993. All spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions.

  14. Safety evaluation for bolting design of a transportable storage canister of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is to perform safety evaluation for bolting design of a transportable storage canister of spent nuclear fuels in a nuclear power plant. To develop the related techniques for inter unit transfer of the spent nuclear fuels, a seamless metal canister design with reopening function is adopted. The canister with bolting flange needs to maintain its seamless and structural integrity under normal operation and postulated accident conditions. For bolting design, the requirements on material and structural strength are completely examined by following ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes. All calculations in this work are performed by using the commercial finite element analysis software, ANSYS. With different sensitivity analysis results of numerical finite element models, the maximum and minimum operation value of bolting preload torque can be thus obtained. Moreover, during the inter unit transfer and operation of spent nuclear fuels, fatigue of the bolt is addressed and no leakage occurs as the canister keeps closure with lids subject to the accident condition is also verified. The structural functions and safety of a transportable storage canister with new bolting design can be shown.

  15. Safety case for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto - Synthesis 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TURVA-2012 is Posiva's safety case in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR 2012) and application for a construction licence for a spent nuclear fuel repository. Consistent with the Government Decisions-in- Principle, this foresees a repository developed in bedrock at the Olkiluoto site according to the KBS-3 method, designed to accept spent nuclear fuel from the lifetime operations of the Olkiluoto and Loviisa reactors. Synthesis 2012 presents a synthesis of Posiva Oy's Safety Case 'TURVA-2012' portfolio. It summarises the design basis for the repository at the Olkiluoto site, the assessment methodology and key results of performance and safety assessments. It brings together all the lines of argument for safety, evaluation of compliance with the regulatory requirements, and statement of confidence in long-term safety and Posiva's safety analyses. The TURVA-2012 safety case demonstrates that the proposed repository design provides a safe solution for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, and that the performance and safety assessments are fully consistent with all the legal and regulatory requirements related to long-term safety as set out in Government Decree 736/2008 and in guidance from the nuclear regulator - the STUK. Moreover, Posiva considers that the level of confidence in the demonstration of safety is appropriate and sufficient to submit the construction licence application to the authorities. The assessment of long-term safety includes uncertainties, but these do not affect the basic conclusions on the long-term safety of the repository. (orig.)

  16. The experience of shipping spent nuclear fuel from Uzbekistan to the Russian Federation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuldashev, B.; Salikhbaev, U. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Ulugbek (Uzbekistan); Bolshinsky, I. [Research Reactor Fuel Return Program, INL, Washington, DC (United States); Thomas, J. [Research Reactor Fuel Return Program, SRS, Washington, DC (United States); Tyazhkorob, V. [Production Association Mayak (Russian Federation); Golyapo, Y. [KATEP-AE, Lisa Chaikina 4 (Kazakhstan)

    2007-07-01

    In April 2006 the last of four shipments of spent nuclear fuel left the Institute of Nuclear Physics outside of Tashkent, Uzbekistan and traveled to the Mayak site in the Russian Federation. The shipment marked the completion of the first campaign under the National Nuclear Security Administration's Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program to return highly enriched spent nuclear fuel to its country of origin. In total, 252 spent fuel assemblies containing over 63 kg of highly enriched uranium were returned. The project proved to be an excellent example of cooperation as four countries, Uzbekistan, Russia, Kazakhstan and the United States, were involved in its planning and implementation. This paper will describe the shipment process from planning to completion with emphasis placed on the critical activities. Specifically the paper will discuss: the activities performed to prepare for the shipments; the roles and responsibilities of each country; the shipment details; the lessons learned; and the future plans of the Institute and the RRRFR program. (authors)

  17. The experience of shipping spent nuclear fuel from Uzbekistan to the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 2006 the last of four shipments of spent nuclear fuel left the Institute of Nuclear Physics outside of Tashkent, Uzbekistan and traveled to the Mayak site in the Russian Federation. The shipment marked the completion of the first campaign under the National Nuclear Security Administration's Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program to return highly enriched spent nuclear fuel to its country of origin. In total, 252 spent fuel assemblies containing over 63 kg of highly enriched uranium were returned. The project proved to be an excellent example of cooperation as four countries, Uzbekistan, Russia, Kazakhstan and the United States, were involved in its planning and implementation. This paper describes the shipment process from planning to completion with emphasis placed on the critical activities. Specifically the paper will discuss: the activities performed to prepare for the shipments; the roles and responsibilities of each country; the shipment details; the lessons learned; and the future plans of the Institute and the RRRFR program. (author)

  18. The experience of shipping spent nuclear fuel from Uzbekistan to the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 2006 the last of four shipments of spent nuclear fuel left the Institute of Nuclear Physics outside of Tashkent, Uzbekistan and traveled to the Mayak site in the Russian Federation. The shipment marked the completion of the first campaign under the National Nuclear Security Administration's Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program to return highly enriched spent nuclear fuel to its country of origin. In total, 252 spent fuel assemblies containing over 63 kg of highly enriched uranium were returned. The project proved to be an excellent example of cooperation as four countries, Uzbekistan, Russia, Kazakhstan and the United States, were involved in its planning and implementation. This paper will describe the shipment process from planning to completion with emphasis placed on the critical activities. Specifically the paper will discuss: the activities performed to prepare for the shipments; the roles and responsibilities of each country; the shipment details; the lessons learned; and the future plans of the Institute and the RRRFR program. (authors)

  19. Reactor Physics Modeling Of Spent Nuclear Research Reactor Fuel For SNM Attribution And Nuclear Forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear research reactors are the least safeguarded type of reactor; in some cases this may be attributed to low risk and in most cases it is due to difficulty from dynamic operation. Research reactors vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power and burnup providing a significant challenge to any standardized safeguard system. If a whole fuel assembly was interdicted, based on geometry and other traditional forensics work, one could identify the material's origin fairly accurately. If the material has been dispersed or reprocessed, in-depth reactor physics models may be used to help with the identification. Should there be a need to attribute research reactor fuel material, the Savannah River National Laboratory would perform radiochemical analysis of samples of the material as well as other non-destructive measurements. In depth reactor physics modeling would then be performed to compare to these measured results in an attempt to associate the measured results with various reactor parameters. Several reactor physics codes are being used and considered for this purpose, including: MONTEBURNS/ORIGEN/MCNP5, CINDER/MCNPX and WIMS. In attempt to identify reactor characteristics, such as time since shutdown, burnup, or power, various isotopes are used. Complexities arise when the inherent assumptions embedded in different reactor physics codes handle the isotopes differently and may quantify them to different levels of accuracy. A technical approach to modeling spent research reactor fuel begins at the assembly level upon acquiring detailed information of the reactor to be modeled. A single assembly is run using periodic boundary conditions to simulate an infinite lattice which may be repeatedly burned to produce input fuel isotopic vectors of various burnups for a core level model. A core level model will then be constructed using the assembly level results as inputs for the specific fuel shuffling pattern in an attempt to establish an equilibrium cycle. The

  20. Implementation of burnup and control rod credit for storage of spent nuclear fuel in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary analysis of the regulations in force in Ukraine concerning nuclear safety of spent nuclear fuel management systems shows that some regulatory requirements in force are too conservative in view of current international practice. The extent of conservatism can be determined and reduced, if necessary, only using calculated studies for analyzing the criticality of spent nuclear fuel management systems. Such activity is consistent with the requirements posed by state-of-the-art production requirements. However, this can be only based on improving our level of understanding the processes occurring in nuclear dangerous systems and improving our capabilities as regards accuracy, correctness, and reliability in numerical modeling these processes. This work was intended to demonstrate that the excessive conservatism laid previously into the requirements on nuclear safety in Ukraine due to insufficient development of means for modeling processes in nuclear fuel can be considerably decreased through using more real modeling fuel systems. If such modeling is performed with the use of state-of-the-art software and computers, based on more complete understanding the processes in fuel systems, then removal of the excessive conservatism does will not reduce the safety of nuclear dangerous systems. (author)

  1. Dry Storage Demonstration for High-Burnup Spent Nuclear Fuel-Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initially, casks for dry storage of spent fuel were licensed for assembly-average burnup of about 35 GWd/MTU. Over the last two decades, the discharge burnup of fuel has increased steadily and now exceeds 45 GWd/MTU. With spent fuel burnups approaching the licensing limits (peak rod burnup of 62 GWd/MTU for pressurized water reactor fuel) and some lead test assemblies being burned beyond this limit, a need for a confirmatory dry storage demonstration program was first identified after the publication in May 1999 of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC) Interim Staff Guidance 11 (ISG-11). With the publication in July 2002 of the second revision of ISG-11, the desirability for such a program further increased to obtain confirmatory data about the potential changes in cladding mechanical properties induced by dry storage, which would have implications to the transportation, handling, and disposal of high-burnup spent fuel. While dry storage licenses have kept pace with reactor discharge burnups, transportation licenses have not and are considered on a case by case basis. Therefore, this feasibility study was performed to examine the options available for conducting a confirmatory experimental program supporting the dry storage, transportation, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel with burnups well in excess of 45 GWd/MTU

  2. Analysis of the risk of transporting spent nuclear fuel by train

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, H.K.

    1981-09-01

    This report uses risk analyses to analyze the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel for commercial rail shipping systems. The rail systems analyzed are those expected to be used in the United States when the total electricity-generating capacity by nuclear reactors is 100 GW in the late 1980s. Risk as used in this report is the product of the probability of a release of material to the environment and the consequences resulting from the release. The analysis includes risks in terms of expected fatalities from release of radioactive materials due to transportation accidents involving PWR spent fuel shipped in rail casks. The expected total risk from such shipments is 1.3 x 10/sup -4/ fatalities per year. Risk spectrums are developed for shipments of spent fuel that are 180 days and 4 years out-of-reactor. The risk from transporting spent fuel by train is much less (by 2 to 4 orders of magnitude) than the risk to society from other man-caused events such as dam failure.

  3. Factors affecting the differences in reactivity and dissolution rates between UO2 and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strategies for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel are being investigated by the U.S. Department of Energy at the Yucca Mountain site and by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in plutonic rock formations in the Canadian Shield. Uranium dioxide is the primary constituent of spent nuclear fuel and dissolution of the matrix is regarded as a necessary step for the release of radionuclides to repository groundwaters. In order to develop models to describe the dissolution of the U02 fuel matrix and subsequent release of radionuclides, it is necessary to understand both chemical and oxidative dissolution processes and how they can be affected by parameters such as groundwater composition, pH, temperature, surface area, radiolysis and redox potential. This report summarizes both published and on-going dissolution studies of U02 and both LWR and CANDU spent fuels being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in the U.S. and at AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories in Canada. The studies include both dissolution tests and electrochemical experiments to measure uranium dissolution rates. The report focuses on identifying differences in reactivity towards aqueous dissolution between U02 and spent fuel samples as well as estimating bounding values for uranium dissolution rates. This review also outlines the basic tenets for the development of a dissolution model that is based on electrochemical principles. (author). 49 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs

  4. Slag cement matrix for immobilisation of spent organic ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent IX resins from nuclear power reactors are highly active solid wastes generated during operations of water cooled nuclear power plants. Direct immobilisation of spent IX resins in slag cement matrix was investigated. Slag cement matrix formulations were optimised for mixed, K+ and borate resins by evaluating leaching characteristics, porosity, hydraulic conductivity etc. The 137cesium leaching characteristics of slag cement matrices developed in this study gave the average leach rates of the order of 10-4 g/cm2/d and leachability indices of 8.4 to 9.6. The 137cesium behaviour was in accordance with the porosity and hydraulic conductivity of matrix. The laboratory study revealed that these tests can be effectively used to shortlist cement matrix formulations for long term 137cesium leach tests. The results showed that slag cement matrix can be satisfactorily used to immobilise spent resins arising from PHWR and PWR/VVER type reactors. The selected formulations were successfully deployed to prepare full size (200 litre) slag cement matrix block incorporating 100 litres of mixed IX resins. The compressive strengths of core drilled samples were 64 to 118 kg/cm2 which satisfactorily meet the safety requirements. The study has shown that the slag cement matrix has potential to replace the polymer matrix making treatment of spent IX resins cost effective. (author)

  5. Design of a Prototype Differential Die-Away Instrument Proposed for Swedish Spent Nuclear Fuel Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinik, Tomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Grape, Sophie; Jansson, Peter; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Goodsell, Alison V.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2016-06-01

    As part of the United States (US) Department of Energy's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI-SF) project, the traditional Differential Die-Away (DDA) method that was originally developed for waste drum assay has been investigated and modified to provide a novel application to characterize or verify spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Following the promising, yet largely theoretical and simulation based, research of physics aspects of the DDA technique applied to SNF assay during the early stages of the NGSI-SF project, the most recent effort has been focused on the practical aspects of developing the first fully functional and deployable DDA prototype instrument for spent fuel. As a result of the collaboration among US research institutions and Sweden, the opportunity to test the newly proposed instrument's performance with commercial grade SNF at the Swedish Interim Storage Facility (Clab) emerged. Therefore the design of this instrument prototype has to accommodate the requirements of the Swedish regulator as well as specific engineering constrains given by the unique industrial environment. Within this paper, we identify key components of the DDA based instrument and we present methodology for evaluation and the results of a selection of the most relevant design parameters in order to optimize the performance for a given application, i.e. test-deployment, including assay of 50 preselected spent nuclear fuel assemblies of both pressurized (PWR) as well as boiling (BWR) water reactor type.

  6. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self assessment was conducted of those Hanford facilities that are utilized to store Reactor Irradiated Nuclear Material, (RINM). The objective of the assessment is to identify the Hanford inventories of RINM and the ES ampersand H concerns associated with such storage. The assessment was performed as proscribed by the Project Plan issued by the DOE Spent Fuel Working Group. The Project Plan is the plan of execution intended to complete the Secretary's request for information relevant to the inventories and vulnerabilities of DOE storage of spent nuclear fuel. The Hanford RINM inventory, the facilities involved and the nature of the fuel stored are summarized. This table succinctly reveals the variety of the Hanford facilities involved, the variety of the types of RINM involved, and the wide range of the quantities of material involved in Hanford's RINM storage circumstances. ES ampersand H concerns are defined as those circumstances that have the potential, now or in the future, to lead to a criticality event, to a worker radiation exposure event, to an environmental release event, or to public announcements of such circumstances and the sensationalized reporting of the inherent risks

  7. Spent Fuel Challenges Facing Small and New Nuclear Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to ensure that the radioactive wastes in any country are managed safely, it is necessary to have an established legislative and regulatory framework and also to create the necessary organizations for implementation and for oversight of waste management operations and facility development. Guidance on these issues is given in the Joint Convention and a number of other IAEA documents. The IAEA, and also the EC, have in addition published key overarching strategic advisory documents for new nuclear programmes. These tend to imply that all nuclear programmes, however large or small, should be pressing ahead urgently towards early implementation of geological repositories. In practice, however, in small programmes there are neither economic nor technical drivers for early implementation of deep geological repositories; constructing simpler facilities for the disposal of the larger volume of low-level waste has higher priority. Nevertheless, in all countries political decisions have to be taken and policies set in place to ensure that geological disposal will implemented without unjustified delay. This paper distils out a set of key messages for small programmes. Amongst the most critical are the following. Even if disposal is far off, planning and organization should begin at the initiation of the programme; this can help with technical and economic optimization and (importantly) also with public and political acceptance. Important lessons can be learned from advanced programmes — but these must be adapted to allow for the different boundary conditions of new and small programmes. The key differences relate to the timescales involved, and the resources available. There is a range of waste management and waste disposal options open to new programmes. It is not necessary to choose definitive solutions at the outset; options can be kept open, but a minimum level of engagement is required for all open options. (author)

  8. Which comparative costs between phasing out nuclear within 20 years and carrying on nuclear energy like in the DGEC scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author proposes a comparison between two scenarios by 2031: phasing out nuclear or carrying on according to the DGEC scenario. According to the last one, nuclear power plants are progressively replaced by EPRs. The author analyses, assesses and compares the electricity production, transportation, distribution, and saving costs, and then the different investments to be made (in electricity production, for electricity saving, for the grid)

  9. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finnish bedrock - Kivetty site report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva Oy is studying the Finnish bedrock for the geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The study is based on the site selection research programme started originally in 1983. The programme is in accordance with the decision in principle by the Council of State in 1983 and aims at the selection of one site in 2000. Four sites, Haestholmen in Loviisa, Kivetty in Aeaenekoski, Olkiluoto in Eurajoki and Romuvaara in Kuhmo, have been studied in detail. This report summarises the results of the site investigations carried out at Kivetty. The bedrock of Kivetty belongs to the large Svecofennian granitoid complex of central Finland, about 1880 million years in age. The most common rock type is porphyritic granodiorite, which is cut by younger medium-grained granodiorite and porphyritic or even-grained granite. Minor bodies of gabbro, older than the porphyritic granodiorite, are also present. The granitoids show evidence of two deformation phases. Altogether 29 bedrock 'structures' (R-structures) have been modelled at the investigation site, most of them representing steeply dipping fracture zones. The rock mass between the fracture zones represents what is termed 'intact rock', which is typically hard, unweathered and sparsely fractured. The R-structures are generally hydraulically more conductive than the intact rock and their mean transmissivity is 1.3-10-6 m2/s. The corresponding mean of the hydraulic conductivity values for the intact rock, measured using a 2 m packer interval is 4*10-11 m2/s, if a lognormal distribution for all measured values is assumed. A clear decrease in hydraulic conductivity with depth has been found for the intact rock, and there seems to be a parallel decrease in the transmissivity of structures. In addition, the hydraulically conductive fractures seem to be more frequent and their transmissivities higher in the uppermost 100 - 200 m of the bedrock than at greater depths. The groundwater of Kivetty is classified as fresh water and the

  10. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finnish bedrock - Romuvaara site report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anttila, P. [Fortum Engineering Oy (Finland); Ahokas, H. [Fintact Oy (Finland); Front, K. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland)] [and others

    1999-06-01

    Posiva Oy is studying the Finnish bedrock for the geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The study is based on the site selection research programme started originally in 1983. The programme is in accordance with the decision in principle by the Council of State in 1983 and aims at the selection of one site in 2000. Four sites, Haestholmen in Loviisa, Kivetty in Aeaenekoski, Olkiluoto in Eurajoki and Romuvaara in Kuhmo, have been studied in detail. This report summarises the results of the site investigations carried out at Romuvaara. The bedrock of Romuvaara belongs to the Archean basement complex, whose oldest parts date back over 2800 million years. The bedrock consists mainly of migmatitic banded gneisses (tonalite, leucotonalite and mica gneiss), which are cut by granodiorite and metadiabase dykes. The rocks, excluding the metadiabase, have undergone a polyphase Archaean deformation. Altogether 31 bedrock structures (R-structures) have been modelled at the investigation site, most of them representing steeply dipping fracture zones. The rock mass between the fracture zones represents what is termed `intact rock`, which is typically hard, unweathered and sparsely fractured. The R-structures are generally hydraulically more conductive than the intact rock and their mean transmissivity is 1.6 x 10{sup -7} m{sup 2}/s. The corresponding mean of the hydraulic conductivity values for the intact rock measured using a 2 m packer interval is 8 x 10{sup -12} m/s, if a lognormal distribution for all measured values is assumed. A clear decrease in hydraulic conductivity with depth has been found, for both the R-structures and the intact rock. In addition, the hydraulically conductive fractures seem to be more frequent and their transmissivities higher in the uppermost 100 - 200 m of the bedrock than at greater depths. The groundwater of Romuvaara is classified as fresh water and the Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) and chloride contents increase with depth. The chemically

  11. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finnish bedrock - Romuvaara site report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva Oy is studying the Finnish bedrock for the geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The study is based on the site selection research programme started originally in 1983. The programme is in accordance with the decision in principle by the Council of State in 1983 and aims at the selection of one site in 2000. Four sites, Haestholmen in Loviisa, Kivetty in Aeaenekoski, Olkiluoto in Eurajoki and Romuvaara in Kuhmo, have been studied in detail. This report summarises the results of the site investigations carried out at Romuvaara. The bedrock of Romuvaara belongs to the Archean basement complex, whose oldest parts date back over 2800 million years. The bedrock consists mainly of migmatitic banded gneisses (tonalite, leucotonalite and mica gneiss), which are cut by granodiorite and metadiabase dykes. The rocks, excluding the metadiabase, have undergone a polyphase Archaean deformation. Altogether 31 bedrock structures (R-structures) have been modelled at the investigation site, most of them representing steeply dipping fracture zones. The rock mass between the fracture zones represents what is termed 'intact rock', which is typically hard, unweathered and sparsely fractured. The R-structures are generally hydraulically more conductive than the intact rock and their mean transmissivity is 1.6 x 10-7 m2/s. The corresponding mean of the hydraulic conductivity values for the intact rock measured using a 2 m packer interval is 8 x 10-12 m/s, if a lognormal distribution for all measured values is assumed. A clear decrease in hydraulic conductivity with depth has been found, for both the R-structures and the intact rock. In addition, the hydraulically conductive fractures seem to be more frequent and their transmissivities higher in the uppermost 100 - 200 m of the bedrock than at greater depths. The groundwater of Romuvaara is classified as fresh water and the Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) and chloride contents increase with depth. The chemically most evolved

  12. Rock quality designation of the hydraulic properties in the near field of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality assurance of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel requires detailed information on the characteristics of the rock, backfill, canisters and the waste itself. Furthermore, and of fundamental importance, is the knowledge of the behaviour of the integrated system of the waste and the different barriers. The in-situ characteristics of the rock must therefore be assessed and their influence on and interactions with the remaining barriers must be predicted and verified. A rock quality designation process of the hydraulic properties in the near-field is out-lined both for the KBS-3 system as well as for the WP-cave system. The process, once updated and approved, will be included in a Quality Assurance Program for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. Some of the available methods for the near-field designation process are presented as well as techniques that need further development or are not developed at all. Finally, a presentation is given of a generic designation process of the KBS-3 and WP-cave repository systems in the previously investigated area in Central Sweden, where the final repository for reactor waste, SFR, is located. Geological and hydrogeological data are here at hand and it is therefore possible to carry out a simulation of how the designation process would be accomplished. (authors) (72 figs., 12 tabs., 43 refs.)

  13. SR 97: Post-closure safety for a KBS 3 type deep repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to coming site investigations for siting of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, SKB has carried out the long-term safety assessment SR 97, requested by the Swedish Government. The repository is of the KBS-3 type, where the fuel is placed in isolating copper canisters with a high-strength cast iron insert. The canisters are surrounded by bentonite clay in individual deposition holes at a depth of 500 m in granitic bedrock. The future evolution of the repository system is analysed in the form of five scenarios. The first is a base scenario where the repository is postulated to be built entirely according to specifications and where present-day conditions in the surroundings, including climate, persist. The four other scenarios show the evolution if the repository contains a few initially defective canisters, in the event of climate change, in the event of earthquakes, and in the event of future inadvertent human intrusion. The principal conclusion of the assessment is that the prospects of building a safe deep repository for spent nuclear fuel in Swedish granitic bedrock are very good. (author)

  14. Chemical reactivity testing for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) summarizes requirements used by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (LMES) Development Division at Y-12 for conducting chemical reactivity testing of Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel, sponsored by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). The requirements are based on the NSNFP Statement of work PRO-007 (Statement of Work for Laboratory Determination of Uranium Hydride Oxidation Reaction Kinetics.) This QAPjP will utilize the quality assurance program at Y-12, Y60-101PD, Quality Program Description, and existing implementing procedures for the most part in meeting the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 requirements, exceptions will be noted. The project consists of conducting three separate series of related experiments, ''Passivation of Uranium Hydride Powder With Oxygen and Water'', ''Passivation of Uranium Hydride Powder with Surface Characterization'', and ''Electrochemical Measure of Uranium Hydride Corrosion Rate''

  15. Report on the spent fuel management of the Loviisa nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the report such amendments to the relevant laws, regulations and administrative decisions are drafted as would permit Finland to achieve the goal set by the Council of State in its energy policy statement to the Parliament in the autumn 1993, i.e. that Finland would, in future, have to assume the responsibility for all nuclear wastes produced in its own territory. Also was studied what effects the new practice would have on the waste management safety and on the economy of the nation and the companies involved. the changed operational policy would in practice be limited to concern the Loviisa NPP whose spent nuclear fuel has so far been reexported to Russia, the town of Chelyabinsk for reprocessing. Termination of this practice would entail a need to dispose of all spent fuel permanently in Finnish bedrock. (1 fig., 2 tabs.)

  16. Intact and Degraded Component Criticality Calculations of N Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this calculation is to perform intact and degraded mode criticality evaluations of the Department of Energy's (DOE) N Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel codisposed in a 2-Defense High-Level Waste (2-DHLW)/2-Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Waste Package (WP) and emplaced in a monitored geologic repository (MGR) (see Attachment I). The scope of this calculation is limited to the determination of the effective neutron multiplication factor (keff) for both intact and degraded mode internal configurations of the codisposal waste package. This calculation will support the analysis that will be performed to demonstrate the technical viability for disposing of U-metal (N Reactor) spent nuclear fuel in the potential MGR

  17. Safety aspects of receipt and storage of spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, A.S.; Andes, T.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The Savannah River Site receives and stores aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel from research reactors world-wide in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's take back policy for U.S. origin enriched uranium. For over 35 years the Savannah River Site has supported this policy in a safe and deliberate manner. Facilities dedicated to this mission include the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels and L-Basin. Current inventories are about 6,500 aluminum-based research reactor assemblies and about 700 stainless steel or zirconium clad prototype power reactor assemblies. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe the processes that the Savannah River Site employs to safely receive, handle, and store spent nuclear fuel. (author)

  18. Molten tin reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements. [Patent application; continuous process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1980-12-19

    A method and apparatus for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is described. Within a containment vessel, a solid plug of tin and nitride precipitates supports a circulating bath of liquid tin therein. Spent nuclear fuel is immersed in the liquid tin under an atmosphere of nitrogen, resulting in the formation of nitride precipitates. The layer of liquid tin and nitride precipitates which interfaces the plug is solidified and integrated with the plug. Part of the plug is melted, removing nitride precipitates from the containment vessel, while a portion of the plug remains solidified to support te liquid tin and nitride precipitates remaining in the containment vessel. The process is practiced numerous times until substantially all of the precipitated nitrides are removed from the containment vessel.

  19. Capabilities of a DT tokamak fusion neutron source for driving a spent nuclear fuel transmutation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capabilities of a DT fusion neutron source for driving a spent nuclear fuel transmutation reactor are characterized by identifying limits on transmutation rates that would be imposed by tokamak physics and engineering limitations on fusion neutron source performance. The need for spent nuclear fuel transmutation and the need for a neutron source to drive subcritical fission transmutation reactors are reviewed. The likely parameter ranges for tokamak neutron sources that could produce an interesting transmutation rate of 100s to 1000s of kg/FPY (where FPY stands for full power year) are identified (Pfus ∼ 10-100 MW, βN ∼ 2-3, Qp ∼ 2-5, R ∼ 3-5 m, I ∼ 6-10 MA). The electrical and thermal power characteristics of transmutation reactors driven by fusion and accelerator spallation neutron sources are compared. The status of fusion development vis-a-vis a neutron source is reviewed. (author)

  20. Capabilities of a DT tokamak fusion neutron source for driving a spent nuclear fuel transmutation reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, W. M.

    2001-02-01

    The capabilities of a DT fusion neutron source for driving a spent nuclear fuel transmutation reactor are characterized by identifying limits on transmutation rates that would be imposed by tokamak physics and engineering limitations on fusion neutron source performance. The need for spent nuclear fuel transmutation and the need for a neutron source to drive subcritical fission transmutation reactors are reviewed. The likely parameter ranges for tokamak neutron sources that could produce an interesting transmutation rate of 100s to 1000s of kg/FPY (where FPY stands for full power year) are identified (Pfus approx 10-100 MW, βN approx 2-3, Qp approx 2-5, R approx 3-5 m, I approx 6-10 MA). The electrical and thermal power characteristics of transmutation reactors driven by fusion and accelerator spallation neutron sources are compared. The status of fusion development vis-à-vis a neutron source is reviewed.