WorldWideScience

Sample records for carrier-free medically relevant

  1. Preparation of carrier-free radioactive thallium for medical use

    Comar, D.; Crouzel, C.

    1975-01-01

    Radioactive thallium for medical use have been prepared by proton or deuteron bombardment of HgO or metallic Hg. The carrier free thallium is separated from mercury by ether extraction of the chloride. The yield of production for the isotopes 198m to 202 is given for different energies of protons and deuterons. The irradiated substances consisted of red mercury oxide containing less than 1 ppm iron, and high-purity (99.999%) metallic mercury. The red mercury oxide targets were irradiated with 15 MeV deuterons (M.R.C. cyclotron, Hammersmith Hospital-London and Saclay Van de Graff tandem) or 50 and 14 MeV protons (Grenoble Nuclear Physics Institute cyclotron and S.H.F.J. compact cyclotrons). The metallic mercury target was irradiated with 14, 16 and 20 MeV protons (S.H.F.J. compact cyclotron and Saclay variable-energy cyclotron). The particle current never exceeded 10 μA for irradiation times between 15 minutes and a few hours. (F.Gy.)

  2. Production of carrier-free phosphorus-33 at MURR

    Jia, W.; Ketring, A.R.; Schuh, J.; Lanigan, J.; Ma, D.; Manson, L.; Chanley, D.

    1996-01-01

    Phosphorus-33, a new radionuclide used in medical and biochemical research, is produced at the University of Missouri research reactor (MURR) in production quantities. Phosphorus-33 has a longer shelf life and lower dose rates than phosphorus-32. Recently, the MURR and New England Nuclear (NEN) jointly developed a method to recover carrier-free phosphorus-33 as well as the enriched sulfur target using a sublimation technique at reduced pressure

  3. Recovery of carrier-free gold-195

    Iofa, B.Z.; Ivanova, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is known that gold(III) is readily extracted from nitric acid solutions with ethers. The authors have studied extraction of trace amounts of gold(III) from nitric acid solutions with diethyl and diisopropyl ethers in the presence of significant excess of Pt(IV). Distribution coefficients of gold(III) were measured radiometrically using carrier-free gold-195 or spectrophotometrically in the presence of platinum(IV). Very high coefficients of gold separation from platinum may be achieved. Preliminary experiments have shown that zinc-65 was not extracted with ethers from nitric acid solutions. As an extraction system, the authors have chosen the system 10 M HNO 3 -diisopropyl ether. After model experiments, the authors have performed recovery of carrier-free gold-195 from a real platinum target irradiated with protons in a cyclotron

  4. Electromigration of carrier-free radionuclides. 15

    Roesch, F.; Reimann, T.; Buglanov, G.V.; Milanov, M.; Khalkin, V.A.; Dreyer, R.

    1988-01-01

    Using a special type of on line electromigration measurements of γ-emitting radionuclides in homogeneous electrolytes free of supporting materials the hydrolysis and the complex formations of carrier-free 249 Cf-Cf(III) with oxalate in diluted perchlorate electrolytes, T = 2.98.1(1) K, were studied. Stoichiometric hydrolysis constants of pβ 3 18.6(9) and pK 1 = 6.2(2) were calculated in μ = 0.10 electrolytes. For the formation of anionic hydrolysis products a limitation of pK 4 ≥ 13.9(3) was derived. The stoichiometric stability constants of the oxalato complexes are lgK 1 4.80(8) and lgK 2 = 3.55(11), μ = 0.01. (author)

  5. Electromigration of carrier-free radionuclides. 13

    Roesch, F.; Reimann, T.; Buglanov, G.V.; Milanov, M.; Khalkin, V.A.; Dreyer, R.

    1988-01-01

    Using a special type of on line electromigration measurements of γ-emitting radionuclides in homogeneous aqueous electrolytes free of supporting materials the electromigration behaviour of the carrier-free 241 Am-Am(III) in inert electrolytes, μ = 0.1 (ClO 4 - ), T = 298.1(1) K, was studied. Basing on experimental dependencies of the overall ion mobilities of 241 Am-Am(III) on pH between pH 5.5 and 12.9 the stoichiometric hydrolysis constants pβ 3 = 28.8(9) and pK 1 = 6.9(2) were obtained. For K 4 a limitation of pK 4 > 13.9(3) was possible, because no formation of anionic hydrolysis products in solutions pH 241 Am-Am(III) degrees in the range pH 5.5 - 3 from +6.85(15) up to +5.50(15) · 10 -4 cm 2 s -1 V -1 . Dependencies of this effect on overall ionic strength, inert electrolyte anion, and temperature of the electrolytes were studied in detail both in acidic and neutral solutions. (author)

  6. Relevance of protection quantities in medical exposures

    Pradhan, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) continues to classify the exposures to radiation in three categories; namely 1- occupational exposure, 2- public exposure, and 3- medical exposure. Protection quantities are primarily meant for the regulatory purpose in radiological protection for controlling and limiting stochastic risks in occupational and public exposures. These are based on two basic assumptions of 1- linear no-threshold dose-effect relationship (LNT) at low doses and 2- long-term additivity of low doses. Medical exposure are predominantly delivered to individuals (patients) undergoing diagnostic examinations, interventional procedures and radiation therapy but also include individual caring for or comforting patients incurring exposure and the volunteers of biomedical medical research programmes. Radiation protection is as relevant to occupational and public exposure as to medical exposures except that the dose limits set for the formers are not applicable to medical exposure but reference levels and dose constrains are recommended for diagnostic and interventional medical procedures. In medical institutions, both the occupational and medical exposure takes place. Since the doses in diagnostic examinations are low, it has been observed that not only the protection quantities are often used in such cases but these are extended to estimate the number of cancer deaths due to such practices. One of the striking features of the new ICRP recommendations has been to elaborate the concepts of the dosimetric quantities. The limitation of protection quantities ((Effective dose, E=Σ RT D TR .W T .W R and Equivalent Dose H T =Σ RT D TR .W R ) have been brought out and this has raised a great concern and initiated debates on the use of these quantities in medical exposures. Consequently, ICRP has set a task group to provide more details and the recommendations. It has, therefore, became important to draw the attention of medical physics community

  7. Labeling of indocyanine green with carrier-free iodine-123

    Ansari, A.N.; Lambrecht, R.M.; Redvanly, C.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    The method is described for labeling indocyanine green (ICG) with carrier-free iodine-123 by condensing xenon-123 on crystals of ICG followed by permitting decay of the 123 Xe a sufficient length of time to produce 123 I-electronically excited ions and atoms which subsequently label ICG. 4 claims, no drawings

  8. One-carrier free space charge motion under applied voltage

    Camargo, P.C.; Ferreira, G.F.L.

    1976-01-01

    The system of partial differential equations describing the one-carrier free space-charge motion under a given applied voltage is transformed into a system of two ordinary differential equations. The method is applied to find the external current injection [pt

  9. Unmet needs: relevance to medical technology innovation?

    McCarthy, Avril D; Sproson, Lise; Wells, Oliver; Tindale, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the role of unmet needs in the innovation of new medical technologies using the National Institute for Health Research Devices for Dignity (D4D) Healthcare Technology Co-operative as a case study. It defines an unmet need, providing a spectrum of classification and discusses the benefits and the challenges of identifying unmet need and its influence on the innovation process. The process by which D4D has captured and utilized unmet needs to drive technology innovation is discussed and examples given. It concludes by arguing that, despite the challenges, defining and reviewing unmet need is a fundamental factor in the success of medical technology innovation.

  10. Medical Readers' Theater: Relevance to Geriatrics Medical Education

    Shapiro, Johanna; Cho, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Medical Readers' Theater (MRT) is an innovative and simple way of helping medical students to reflect on difficult-to-discuss topics in geriatrics medical education, such as aging stereotypes, disability and loss of independence, sexuality, assisted living, relationships with adult children, and end-of-life issues. The authors describe a required…

  11. Preparation of carrier-free 67Cu by the 68Zn(γ,p) reaction

    Yagi, M.; Kondo, K.

    1978-01-01

    The preparation of pure, carrier-free 67 Cu using the 68 Zn(γ, p) reaction with an isotopically enriched 68 Zn(98.97%) target is described. The production rates of 67 Cu and contaminants were determined as a function of the maximum bremsstrahlung energies between 30 and 60 MeV. The chemical separation of the carrier-free 67 Cu and the recovery of the 68 Zn target were also studied. (author)

  12. Separation of carrier-free 181Re produced in 16O-irradiated thulium target

    Lahiri, Susanta; Mukhopadhyay, Krishnendu; Banerjee, Kakoli; Ramaswami, A.; Manohar, S.B.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy ion activation of natural Tm 2 O 3 with 90 MeV 16 O beam results in the formation of carrier-free short-lived 181 Ir and 181 Os which ultimately decay out to 181 Re in the matrix. The liquid cation exchanger, HDEHP, has effectively been utilized as an extractant for quantitative separation of bulk thulium target matrix from carrier-free rhenium radionuclide

  13. Biometrics in the Medical School Curriculum: Making the Necessary Relevant.

    Murphy, James R.

    1980-01-01

    Because a student is more likely to learn and retain course content perceived as relevant, an attempt was made to change medical students' perceptions of a biometrics course by introducing statistical methods as a means of solving problems in the interpretation of clinical lab data. Retrospective analysis of student course evaluations indicates a…

  14. Massive open online courses are relevant for postgraduate medical training

    Subhi, Yousif; Andresen, Kristoffer; Rolskov Bojsen, Signe

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The CanMEDS framework describes seven roles in postgraduate training, but training and courses relevant to these roles can be limited. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) - free online courses in which anyone can participate, anywhere - may improve course participation. This study...... investigates the relevance of MOOCs for postgraduate medical training within the CanMEDS framework. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We extracted a list of all courses posted by the two largest MOOC providers, Coursera and EdX, and reviewed all course descriptions and categorised each course into one of three categories...

  15. [work motivation -- assessment instruments and their relevance for medical care].

    Fiedler, Rolf G; Ranft, Andreas; Greitemann, Bernhard; Heuft, Gereon

    2005-11-01

    The relevance of work motivation for medical research and healthcare, in particular rehabilitation, is described. Four diagnostic instruments in the German language are introduced which can assess work motivation using a scale system: AVEM, JDS, LMI and FBTM. Their possible application and potential usage for the clinical area are discussed. Apart from the FBTM, none of these instruments can be directly used as a general instrument in a normal medical clinical setting. Finally, a current model for work motivation (compensatory model of work motivation and volition) is presented that contains basis concepts, which are judged as important for future research questions concerning the development of motivation diagnostic instruments.

  16. [Differences between generations: relevant for medical education in the Netherlands].

    Busari, Jamiu O; Scheele, Fedde

    2015-01-01

    Provision of care is increasingly being tailored to patients' wishes, which means that insight into the ideas, norms and values of the care-consumer are required. This approach is also beginning to filter through into medical education. We can differentiate generations on the basis of shared opinions, because groups with shared experiences usually share the same values. This is a useful line of approach if we wish to serve different generations of consumers better. At the moment there are four different generations influencing the setup and division of the healthcare services and relevant to medical education in the coming decades. Future education methods will have to be in line with the wishes of the generation from which new doctors come. In order to achieve better care for patients it is important to give 'thinking in generations' more attention in medical education.

  17. Tungsten-188/carrier-free rhenium-188 perrhenic acid generator system

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Lisic, E.C.; Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.

    1993-01-01

    A generator system for providing a carrier-free radioisotope in the form of an acid comprises a chromatography column in tandem fluid connection with an ion exchange column, the chromatography column containing a charge of a radioactive parent isotope. The chromatography column, charged with a parent isotope, is eluted with an alkali metal salt solution to generate the radioisotope in the form of an intermediate solution, which is passed through the ion-exchange column to convert the radioisotope to a carrier-free acid form

  18. The Hippocratic Oath and its Relevance to Medical Deontology

    Vlasta Močnik Drnovšek

    2008-07-01

    theory. The Hippocratic physician builds his medical theory on a close observation of the human body and natural phenomena in order to establish aetiological links between the causes of disease and the outcome of the treatment. In this respect we consider Hippocratic medicine the foundation of scientific medicine, as well as of medical and philosophical ethics, forensics, ecology, and other natural and social sciences and the humanities. Interdisciplinary and horizontal approaches to health and disease require medical knowledge, but equally important is the sociological, philosophical and other input. An attempt is therefore made to read the Oath as a very elementary expression of a complex and multilayered reflection on the duties of the medical profession, on the issues of health and disease, on man and his environment, on the complexity of life and nature. The Hippocratic Oath emphasises the role of the teacher and the need to gain the necessary knowledge and expertise in an educational process that establishes a linkage between technical and moral norms, binding the Hippocratic physician in the totality of his personal and professional life. There are various interpretations of the relevance of the Oath for medical ethics today, at a time of highly technical medicine, consumerism, market economy and prevalence of utilitarian ethics. When in doubt, however, the modern physician still turns to the Hippocratic Oath as a source of reflection and guidance. In the last decades there has been a revival of interest in medical oaths and codes of conduct. Modified versions of the Hippocratic Oath are used in medical schools to reconfirm the core values of the medical profession. Although Hippocratic morality reflects different times, the core ethical statements in the Hippocratic Oath have remained relevant for almost 2500 years. This long tradition of medical ethics reconfirms the need for preserving the idealistic foundations of medical practice and its humanistic

  19. Studies of the chemical behavior of carrier-free 68Ge. Pt. 1

    Mirzadeh, S.; Kahn, M.; Grant, P.M.; O'Brien, H.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The diagnostic utilization of the 68 Ge- 68 Ga system in nuclear medicine stimulated the development of a rapid and efficient method for the purification of carrier-free 68 Ge. A standard procedure for the separation of macroscopic quantities for germanium from numerous other elements involves the distillation of Ge(IV) from HCl solution. The applicability of this method for the purification of carrier-free 68 Ge was studied, and it was found that 68 Ge quantitatively and conveniently distills from azetropic HCl. The distillation of 68 Ge from LiCl-HClO 4 , HCl-LiCl, and HCl-HClO 4 systems was also investigated. (orig.) [de

  20. Synthesis of {sup 188}Re-DMSA complex using carrier-free {sup 188}Re

    Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Izumo, Mishiroku [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Islam, M S

    1997-03-01

    The synthesis of rhenium-DMSA labelled compound using carrier-free {sup 188}Re from the {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator has been carried out. Stannous chloride was used as the reducing agent for reduction of rhenium and ascorbic acid was used as an antioxidant in the reaction media. The dependence of the yield of Re-DMSA complex upon the concentration of reducing agent, pH, reaction time, anti-oxidant, carrier and temperature was investigated. Under optimum conditions, the yield of Re-DMSA complexes were more than 98% for the carrier-free as well as carrier-added {sup 188}Re. The stability of the Re-DMSA complexes at different pH and time were also investigated. It was found that the Re-DMSA complex was very stable and did not undergo any changes or decomposition with the changes of pH from its initial values even after 48 hours of pH change for carrier-free as well as carrier-added complexes. (author)

  1. Influence of zirconium ions on the sorption of carrier-free radiophosphate (32P)

    Friedmann, Ch.; Schoenfeld, T.

    1975-01-01

    In acid solutions the addition of zirconium ions largely affects the sorption of carrier-free radiophosphate on various materials. With some sorbents, such as diatomeceous earth, clay minerals or activated charcoal, the addition of small quantities of zirconium leads to a substantial increase of 32 P adsorption. On the other hand, important quantities of zirconium cause decrease of sorption. With alumina as an adsorbent, any addition of zirconium leads to reduced adsorption of radiophosphate. These phenomena are due to the formation of soluble zirconium-phosphate complex ions. (author)

  2. The method of determination of micro quantities of labeled iodide in carrier free Na125 solution

    Kholbaev, A.Kh.; Shilin, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    The method of determination of microquantities of labelled iodide in Na 125 carrier-free solution was elaborated. This method permits to increase the sensitivity and radiation protection of the determination of labeled iodide. It includes oxidation of iodide by iodate in diluted sulphuric acid with molar concentration 0,03-0,04 mole/l. The extraction of I 2 is made by toluene. The coloured solution is made and optical density is measured at λ=640 nm at the 10 mm optical path .(A.A.D.)

  3. Carrier-free separation of 228Th from BaSO4 (228Ra)

    Tomida, E.K.; Abrao, A.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure for the separation of 228 Th from BaSO 4 ( 228 Ra) is presented. Reasonably great amount of this material is stocked as a result of mesothorium decontamination of rare earth chlorides from the Brazilian industrial processing plant. Thorium-228 is selectively dissolved in nitric acid leaching of a 232 Th-free barium sulfate. Carrier-free 228 Th is obtained using a strong anion exchanger, thorium being retained as nitrato complex and eluted with 2,4M HCl [pt

  4. Carrier-free 8-azidoadenosine 5'-[γ-32P]triphosphate

    Sabbatini, G.P.; Holt, C. von

    1987-01-01

    The authors found 8-azidoadenosine 5'-diphosphate to be a phosphoryl acceptor in the enzymatic conversion of 1,3-diphosphoglyceric acid to 3-phosphoglycerate. This has allowed the synthesis in a single-step procedure carrier-free 8-azidoadenosine 5'-[γ- 32 P]triphosphate, requiring no further purification of the end product. The synthesized 8-azidoadenosine 5'-[γ- 32 P]triphosphate has been characterized and shown to meet all the criteria for a specific photoreactive ATP analogue. 14 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 table

  5. Adsorption and colloidal behaviour of carrier-free 7Be in aqueous solutions

    Benes, P.; Jiranek, V.

    1974-01-01

    The state of carrier-free 7 Be in aqueous nitrate solutions was studied by electrophoresis, centrifugation and dialysis. In solutions of pH 2+ cation. At pH > 4 hydrolysis of beryllium proceeds which results in the formation of BeOH + ions and Be(OH) 2 molecules. The larger part of these molecules is adsorbed on the surface of colloidal impurities present in the solution. The pseudocolloids thus formed are positively charged up to pH 11. In alkaline solutions (pH > 11), negatively charged pseudocolloids and anionic hydroxocomplexes of beryllium exist. Adsorption and desorption of carrier-free beryllium was studied on glass, plexiglass and polyethylene as a function of pH, age and ionic strength (NaNO 3 ) of the solution. It has been found that the adsorption begins at pH 3-5, passes through a maximum at pH 8-11 and decreases to a very low value at pH 14. Probable mechanismus of the adsorption were discussed. (orig.) [de

  6. Development and comparison of new high-efficiency dry powder inhalers for carrier-free formulations.

    Behara, Srinivas R B; Longest, P Worth; Farkas, Dale R; Hindle, Michael

    2014-02-01

    High-efficiency dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were developed and tested for use with carrier-free formulations across a range of different inhalation flow rates. Performance of a previously reported DPI was compared with two new designs in terms of emitted dose (ED) and aerosolization characteristics using in vitro experiments. The two new designs oriented the capsule chamber (CC) at different angles to the main flow passage, which contained a three-dimensional (3D) rod array for aerosol deaggregation. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of a previously developed deaggregation parameter, the nondimensional specific dissipation (NDSD), were used to explain device performance. Orienting the CC at 90° to the mouthpiece, the CC90 -3D inhaler provided the best performance with an ED = 73.4%, fine particle fractions (FPFs) less than 5 and 1 μm of 95.1% and 31.4%, respectively, and a mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) = 1.5 μm. For the carrier-free formulation, deaggregation was primarily influenced by capsule aperture position and the NDSD parameter. The new CC-3D inhalers reduced the percent difference in FPF and MMAD between low and high flows by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared with current commercial devices. In conclusion, the new CC-3D inhalers produced extremely high-quality aerosols with little sensitivity to flow rate and are expected to deliver approximately 95% of the ED to the lungs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. The relevance of basic sciences in undergraduate medical education.

    Lynch, C; Grant, T; McLoughlin, P; Last, J

    2016-02-01

    Evolving and changing undergraduate medical curricula raise concerns that there will no longer be a place for basic sciences. National and international trends show that 5-year programmes with a pre-requisite for school chemistry are growing more prevalent. National reports in Ireland show a decline in the availability of school chemistry and physics. This observational cohort study considers if the basic sciences of physics, chemistry and biology should be a prerequisite to entering medical school, be part of the core medical curriculum or if they have a place in the practice of medicine. Comparisons of means, correlation and linear regression analysis assessed the degree of association between predictors (school and university basic sciences) and outcomes (year and degree GPA) for entrants to a 6-year Irish medical programme between 2006 and 2009 (n = 352). We found no statistically significant difference in medical programme performance between students with/without prior basic science knowledge. The Irish school exit exam and its components were mainly weak predictors of performance (-0.043 ≥ r ≤ 0.396). Success in year one of medicine, which includes a basic science curriculum, was indicative of later success (0.194 ≥ r (2) ≤ 0.534). University basic sciences were found to be more predictive than school sciences in undergraduate medical performance in our institution. The increasing emphasis of basic sciences in medical practice and the declining availability of school sciences should mandate medical schools in Ireland to consider how removing basic sciences from the curriculum might impact on future applicants.

  8. The Hippocratic Oath and its Relevance to Medical Deontology

    Vlasta Močnik Drnovšek

    2008-01-01

    The text of the Hippocratic Oath is translated and interpreted in the light of the Hippocratic Corpus writings and the modern concepts of consumer protection, safety and quality of medical services, where one of the possible definitions of quality could be related to customer satisfaction and to the respect for human rights, among them the right to human dignity, to life, integrity, to the protection of personal data and respect for private life. In this broad and complex field of medicine an...

  9. Preparation of carrier-free 67Ga, by irradiation of natural zinc with protons

    Fernandes, L.; Silva, C.P.G. da; Barbosa, M.F. de.

    1983-02-01

    A method for the preparation of carrier-free 67 Ga is described. Natural zinc plates were irradiated with protons. After a decay period of four days, the irradiated targets were dissolved in concentrated hydrochloric acid and the solution percolated through a glass column containing a cationic resin. 67 Ga was eluted with 3,5 N HCl; the eluted solution was evaporated to dryness, taken up in 3,8% sodium citrate solution and sterilized. Sterility tests were carried out according to the requirements of the U.S. Pharmacopeia. Chemical purity of 67 Ga citrate was determined by spot tests and by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The radioactive purity was verified by gamma spectrometry. The product was endovenously injected into Wistar rats with experimental abcesses, and in a patient with adrenal neuroblastoma. The results shown a high accumulation of 67 Ga in soft tissue tumors. (Author) [pt

  10. Production of carrier-free 188Re in the past ten years in Taiwan

    Bor-Tsung Hsieh; Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan; Wan-Yu Lin; Tsai-Yueh Luo; Kai-Yuan Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Twenty clinical scale alumina-based 188 W/ 188 Re generators and carrier-free 188 Re has been produced at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER-Taiwan) for over ten years. 2845.6 GBq (76.9 Ci) of 188 Re-perrhenate solution has been eluted from generators during the past ten years. We have used the harvesting 188 Re solution for labeling radiopharmaceuticals, such as 188 Re-HEDP, 188 Re-MDP, 188 Re-microsphere, 188 Relipiodol, and 188 Re-sulfur colloid, etc. The average eluting yield of 188 Re is 78.6±5.8% that was investigated at 1115 harvesting times from 20 generators. Each generator can be used more than six months but the Millipore needs to be changed every two months for smooth harvesting and high yield of 188 Re solution. (author)

  11. Preparation of carrier-free Phosphorus-32 from 31P(n,γ )32P reaction

    Rafii, H.; Arbab Zavar, H.; Avaz Moghadam, S.

    1999-01-01

    The phosphorus-32 is a widely used radioisotope as as tracer or radioactive source in nuclear medicine, and in many other biotechnical applications. In this paper, preparation of carrier-free P-32 with a high specific activity was studied by 31 P(n, γ) 32 P reaction. The anhydrous KH 2 PO 4 , as a target material, was irradiated in Tehran Nuclear Research Reactor with a neutron flux of 2.5x10 13 n/cm 2 .sec. The P-32 produced as a result of Szilard-Chalmers effect was isolated from the target by a strong anion exchange resin, (Dowex - X 8). The quality control of the product shows a high chemical, and radiochemical purity (>98%) and the increase specific activity depends on the irradiation time

  12. Utilization of case presentations in medical microbiology to enhance relevance of basic science for medical students

    Chamberlain, Neal R.; Stuart, Melissa K.; Singh, Vineet K.; Sargentini, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Small-group case presentation exercises (CPs) were created to increase course relevance for medical students taking Medical Microbiology (MM) and Infectious Diseases (ID) Methods Each student received a unique paper case and had 10 minutes to review patient history, physical exam data, and laboratory data. Students then had three minutes to orally present their case and defend why they ruled in or out each of the answer choices provided, followed by an additional three minutes to answer questions. Results Exam scores differed significantly between students who received the traditional lecture-laboratory curriculum (Group I) and students who participated in the CPs (Group II). In MM, median unit exam and final exam scores for Group I students were 84.4% and 77.8%, compared to 86.0% and 82.2% for Group II students (P<0.018; P<0.001; Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test). Median unit and final ID exam scores for Group I students were 84.0% and 80.0%, compared to 88.0% and 86.7% for Group II students (P<0.001; P<0.001). Conclusion Students felt that the CPs improved their critical thinking and presentation skills and helped to prepare them as future physicians. PMID:22435014

  13. Utilization of case presentations in medical microbiology to enhance relevance of basic science for medical students.

    Chamberlain, Neal R; Stuart, Melissa K; Singh, Vineet K; Sargentini, Neil J

    2012-01-01

    Small-group case presentation exercises (CPs) were created to increase course relevance for medical students taking Medical Microbiology (MM) and Infectious Diseases (ID) METHODS: Each student received a unique paper case and had 10 minutes to review patient history, physical exam data, and laboratory data. Students then had three minutes to orally present their case and defend why they ruled in or out each of the answer choices provided, followed by an additional three minutes to answer questions. Exam scores differed significantly between students who received the traditional lecture-laboratory curriculum (Group I) and students who participated in the CPs (Group II). In MM, median unit exam and final exam scores for Group I students were 84.4% and 77.8%, compared to 86.0% and 82.2% for Group II students (P<0.018; P<0.001; Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test). Median unit and final ID exam scores for Group I students were 84.0% and 80.0%, compared to 88.0% and 86.7% for Group II students (P<0.001; P<0.001). Students felt that the CPs improved their critical thinking and presentation skills and helped to prepare them as future physicians.

  14. Utilization of case presentations in medical microbiology to enhance relevance of basic science for medical students

    Neal R. Chamberlain

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Small-group case presentation exercises (CPs were created to increase course relevance for medical students taking Medical Microbiology (MM and Infectious Diseases (ID Methods : Each student received a unique paper case and had 10 minutes to review patient history, physical exam data, and laboratory data. Students then had three minutes to orally present their case and defend why they ruled in or out each of the answer choices provided, followed by an additional three minutes to answer questions. Results : Exam scores differed significantly between students who received the traditional lecture-laboratory curriculum (Group I and students who participated in the CPs (Group II. In MM, median unit exam and final exam scores for Group I students were 84.4% and 77.8%, compared to 86.0% and 82.2% for Group II students (P < 0.018; P < 0.001; Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test. Median unit and final ID exam scores for Group I students were 84.0% and 80.0%, compared to 88.0% and 86.7% for Group II students (P < 0.001; P < 0.001. Conclusion : Students felt that the CPs improved their critical thinking and presentation skills and helped to prepare them as future physicians.

  15. Clinical relevance of and risk factors associated with medication administration time errors

    Teunissen, R.; Bos, J.; Pot, H.; Pluim, M.; Kramers, C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The clinical relevance of and risk factors associated with errors related to medication administration time were studied. METHODS: In this explorative study, 66 medication administration rounds were studied on two wards (surgery and neurology) of a hospital. Data on medication errors were

  16. Electrodeposition of carrier-free 57Co on rhodium as an approach to the preparation of Moessbauer sources

    Cieszykowska, Izabela; ZoLtowska, MaLgorzata; Mielcarski, MieczysLaw

    2011-01-01

    Electrodeposition of carrier-free 57 Co on a rhodium matrix as the first step of preparing Moessbauer sources was studied. To optimize the plating parameters, the influences of current density, volume and pH of the electrolyte solution, shape, thickness, and surface area of the rhodium cathode, mode of cathode pretreatment, concentration of 57 Co and duration of electrolysis were investigated.

  17. Carrier-free, functionalized pure drug nanorods as a novel cancer-targeted drug delivery platform

    Li Yanan; An Feifei; Zhang Xiaohong; Yang Yinlong; Liu Zhuang; Zhang Xiujuan

    2013-01-01

    A one-dimensional drug delivery system (1D DDS) is highly attractive since it has distinct advantages such as enhanced drug efficiency and better pharmacokinetics. However, drugs in 1D DDSs are all encapsulated in inert carriers, and problems such as low drug loading content and possible undesirable side effects caused by the carriers remain a serious challenge. In this paper, a novel, carrier-free, pure drug nanorod-based, tumor-targeted 1D DDS has been developed. Drugs are first prepared as nanorods and then surface functionalized to achieve excellent water dispersity and stability. The resulting drug nanorods show enhanced internalization rates mainly through energy-dependent endocytosis, with the shape-mediated nanorod (NR) diffusion process as a secondary pathway. The multiple endocytotic mechanisms lead to significantly improved drug efficiency of functionalized NRs with nearly ten times higher cytotoxicity than those of free molecules and unfunctionalized NRs. A targeted drug delivery system can be readily achieved through surface functionalization with targeting group linked amphipathic surfactant, which exhibits significantly enhanced drug efficacy and discriminates between cell lines with high selectivity. These results clearly show that this tumor-targeting DDS demonstrates high potential toward specific cancer cell lines. (paper)

  18. Catalytically-active inclusion bodies-Carrier-free protein immobilizates for application in biotechnology and biomedicine.

    Krauss, Ulrich; Jäger, Vera D; Diener, Martin; Pohl, Martina; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2017-09-20

    Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) consist of unfolded protein aggregates and represent inactive waste products often accumulating during heterologous overexpression of recombinant genes in Escherichia coli. This general misconception has been challenged in recent years by the discovery that IBs, apart from misfolded polypeptides, can also contain substantial amounts of active and thus correctly or native-like folded protein. The corresponding catalytically-active inclusion bodies (CatIBs) can be regarded as a biologically-active sub-micrometer sized biomaterial or naturally-produced carrier-free protein immobilizate. Fusion of polypeptide (protein) tags can induce CatIB formation paving the way towards the wider application of CatIBs in synthetic chemistry, biocatalysis and biomedicine. In the present review we summarize the history of CatIBs, present the molecular-biological tools that are available to induce CatIB formation, and highlight potential lines of application. In the second part findings regarding the formation, architecture, and structure of (Cat)IBs are summarized. Finally, an overview is presented about the available bioinformatic tools that potentially allow for the prediction of aggregation and thus (Cat)IB formation. This review aims at demonstrating the potential of CatIBs for biotechnology and hopefully contributes to a wider acceptance of this promising, yet not widely utilized, protein preparation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Carrier-free labelling of urokinase with fluorine-18 by preserving the biological activity

    Mueller-Platz, C.M.

    1982-03-01

    Fluorine-18 is particularly suitable for the regional location of clot formation using positron emission tomography. The radioisotope however cannot be directly incorporated in the urokinase as the enzyme is only stable in aqueous solution, F - sub(aq) is unreactive in protic solutions. 18 F-fluoroacetic acid was therefore selected as intermediate step for labelling urokinase. 18 F-fluoroacetic acid can be well activated by water-soluble [N-ethyl-N'-(dimethyl amino)propyl] carbodiimide and form a covalent bond as activated acid on the free amino groups of the urokinase. Different labelled preparations were thus investigated on the activity of the labelled enzyme. It could be shown in some cases that already after a slight drop of the total enzyme activity, all labelled urokinase molecules were biologically inactive. By changing the reaction conditions (pH value and reaction time) a method was found however in which not only was the enzyme activity of the preparation completely maintained but also that of the radiochemical yield corresponding radioactivity eluted with the bonding urokinase. The carrier-free labelling of urokinase starting with 18 F - was achieved with an overall radiochemical yield of 8 per cent for a synthesis time of 110 min. The method enables a sufficient amount of activity to be produced for the in-vivo application to the location of thrombus in patients. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Medical implication in the Bible and its relevance to modern medicine.

    Sun, Jun-Fang

    2013-11-01

    The Holy Bible, as the root of Western civilization, has imposed great influence in the fields far beyond religion. In this thesis, the author intended to reveal the medical implication in the Holy Bible and its relevance to the modern medical science by exploring the biblical medical information and comparing it with the current medical theory and practice. The conclusion of the exploration is surprising yet inspiring: the Holy Bible, as an ancient religious book, contains rich medical information around themes such as sexual relations, dietary guidelines, hygiene, etc., which is not at odds, but in harmony with the modern medicine.

  1. Using an Ishikawa diagram as a tool to assist memory and retrieval of relevant medical cases from the medical literature.

    Wong, Kam Cheong

    2011-03-29

    Studying medical cases is an effective way to enhance clinical reasoning skills and reinforce clinical knowledge. An Ishikawa diagram, also known as a cause-and-effect diagram or fishbone diagram, is often used in quality management in manufacturing industries.In this report, an Ishikawa diagram is used to demonstrate how to relate potential causes of a major presenting problem in a clinical setting. This tool can be used by teams in problem-based learning or in self-directed learning settings.An Ishikawa diagram annotated with references to relevant medical cases and literature can be continually updated and can assist memory and retrieval of relevant medical cases and literature. It could also be used to cultivate a lifelong learning habit in medical professionals.

  2. Using an Ishikawa diagram as a tool to assist memory and retrieval of relevant medical cases from the medical literature

    Wong Kam Cheong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studying medical cases is an effective way to enhance clinical reasoning skills and reinforce clinical knowledge. An Ishikawa diagram, also known as a cause-and-effect diagram or fishbone diagram, is often used in quality management in manufacturing industries. In this report, an Ishikawa diagram is used to demonstrate how to relate potential causes of a major presenting problem in a clinical setting. This tool can be used by teams in problem-based learning or in self-directed learning settings. An Ishikawa diagram annotated with references to relevant medical cases and literature can be continually updated and can assist memory and retrieval of relevant medical cases and literature. It could also be used to cultivate a lifelong learning habit in medical professionals.

  3. Automatic medical image annotation and keyword-based image retrieval using relevance feedback.

    Ko, Byoung Chul; Lee, JiHyeon; Nam, Jae-Yeal

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents novel multiple keywords annotation for medical images, keyword-based medical image retrieval, and relevance feedback method for image retrieval for enhancing image retrieval performance. For semantic keyword annotation, this study proposes a novel medical image classification method combining local wavelet-based center symmetric-local binary patterns with random forests. For keyword-based image retrieval, our retrieval system use the confidence score that is assigned to each annotated keyword by combining probabilities of random forests with predefined body relation graph. To overcome the limitation of keyword-based image retrieval, we combine our image retrieval system with relevance feedback mechanism based on visual feature and pattern classifier. Compared with other annotation and relevance feedback algorithms, the proposed method shows both improved annotation performance and accurate retrieval results.

  4. A radiochemical separation of spallogenic 88Zr in the carrier-free state for radioisotopic photoneutron sources

    Whipple, R.E.; Grant, P.M.; Daniels, R.J.; Daniels, W.R.; O'Brien, H.A.Jr.

    1976-01-01

    As the precursor of its 88 Y daughter, 88 Zr could be advantageously included in the active component of the 88 Y-Be photoneutron source for several reasons. The spallation of Mo targets with medium-energy protons at LAMPF procedure has been developed to separate radiozirconium from the target material and various spallogenic impurities. 88 Zr can consequently be obtained carrier-free and in quantitative yield. (author)

  5. An analysis of contextual information relevant to medical care unexpectedly volunteered to researchers by asthma patients.

    Black, Heather L; Priolo, Chantel; Gonzalez, Rodalyn; Geer, Sabrina; Adam, Bariituu; Apter, Andrea J

    2012-09-01

    To describe and categorize contextual information relevant to patients' medical care unexpectedly volunteered to research personnel as part of a patient advocate (PA) intervention to facilitate access health care, communication with medical personnel, and self-management of a chronic disease such as asthma. We adapted a patient navigator intervention, to overcome barriers to access and communication for adults with moderate or severe asthma. Informed by focus groups of patients and providers, our PAs facilitated preparation for a visit with an asthma provider, attended the visit, confirmed understanding, and assisted with post-visit activities. During meetings with researchers, either for PA activities or for data collection, participants frequently volunteered personal and medical information relevant for achieving successful self-management that was not routinely shared with medical personnel. For this project, researchers journaled information not captured by the structured questionnaires and protocol. Using a qualitative analysis, we describe (1) researchers' journals of these unique communications; (2) their relevance for accomplishing self-management; (3) PAs' formal activities including teach-back, advocacy, and facilitating appointment making; and (4) observations of patients' interactions with the clinical practices. In 83 journals, patients' social support (83%), health (68%), and deportment (69%) were described. PA assistance with navigating the medical system (59%), teach-back (46%), and observed interactions with patient and medical staff (76%) were also journaled. Implicit were ways patients and practices could overcome barriers to access and communication. These journals describe the importance of seeking contextual and medically relevant information from all patients and, especially, those with significant morbidities, prompting patients for barriers to access to health care, and confirming understanding of medical information.

  6. Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Ophthalmic Medications: Relevant Allergens and Alternative Testing Methods.

    Grey, Katherine R; Warshaw, Erin M

    Allergic contact dermatitis is an important cause of periorbital dermatitis. Topical ophthalmic agents are relevant sensitizers. Contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications can be challenging to diagnose and manage given the numerous possible offending agents, including both active and inactive ingredients. Furthermore, a substantial body of literature reports false-negative patch test results to ophthalmic agents. Subsequently, numerous alternative testing methods have been described. This review outlines the periorbital manifestations, causative agents, and alternative testing methods of allergic contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications.

  7. Relevance of the Flexner Report to contemporary medical education in South Asia.

    Amin, Zubair; Burdick, William P; Supe, Avinash; Singh, Tejinder

    2010-02-01

    A century after the publication of Medical Education in the United States and Canada: A Report to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (the Flexner Report), the quality of medical education in much of Asia is threatened by weak regulation, inadequate public funding, and explosive growth of private medical schools. Competition for students' fees and an ineffectual accreditation process have resulted in questionable admission practices, stagnant curricula, antiquated learning methods, and dubious assessment practices. The authors' purpose is to explore the relevance of Flexner's observations, as detailed in his report, to contemporary medical education in South Asia, to analyze the consequences of growth, and to recommend pragmatic changes. Major drivers for growth are the supply-demand mismatch for medical school positions, weak governmental regulation, private sector participation, and corruption. The consequences are urban-centric growth, shortage of qualified faculty, commercialization of postgraduate education, untenable assessment practices, emphasis on rote learning, and inadequate clinical exposure. Recommendations include strengthening accreditation standards and processes possibly by introducing regional or national student assessment, developing defensible student assessment systems, recognizing health profession education as a field of scholarship, and creating a tiered approach to faculty development in education. The relevance of Flexner's recommendations to the current status of medical education in South Asia is striking, in terms of both the progressive nature of his thinking in 1910 and the need to improve medical education in Asia today. In a highly connected world, the improvement of Asian medical education will have a global impact.

  8. Concept of Operations Evaluation for Mitigating Space Flight-Relevant Medical Issues in a Planetary Habitat

    Barsten, Kristina; Hurst, Victor, IV; Scheuring, Richard; Baumann, David K.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Analogue environments assist the NASA Human Research Program (HRP) in developing capabilities to mitigate high risk issues to crew health and performance for space exploration. The Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) is an analogue habitat used to assess space-related products for planetary missions. The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) was tasked with developing planetary-relevant medical scenarios to evaluate the concept of operations for mitigating medical issues in such an environment. Methods: Two medical scenarios were conducted within the simulated planetary habitat with the crew executing two space flight-relevant procedures: Eye Examination with a corneal injury and Skin Laceration. Remote guidance for the crew was provided by a flight surgeon (FS) stationed at a console outside of the habitat. Audio and video data were collected to capture the communication between the crew and the FS, as well as the movements of the crew executing the procedures. Questionnaire data regarding procedure content and remote guidance performance also were collected from the crew immediately after the sessions. Results: Preliminary review of the audio, video, and questionnaire data from the two scenarios conducted within the HDU indicate that remote guidance techniques from an FS on console can help crew members within a planetary habitat mitigate planetary-relevant medical issues. The content and format of the procedures were considered concise and intuitive, respectively. Discussion: Overall, the preliminary data from the evaluation suggest that use of remote guidance techniques by a FS can help HDU crew execute space exploration-relevant medical procedures within a habitat relevant to planetary missions, however further evaluations will be needed to implement this strategy into the complete concept of operations for conducting general space medicine within similar environments

  9. Nutrition in Medicine: Medical Students׳ Satisfaction, Perceived Relevance and Preparedness for Practice

    Victor Mogre

    2018-03-01

    Discussion: Students were dissatisfied with their current education in nutrition, felt inadequately prepared to provide nutrition care and considered nutrition education to be highly relevant to their future practice. The findings of this study provide additional evidence that suggests changes in the current format and content of nutrition education in medical education.

  10. Relevance of medical reports in criminal investigations of cases of suspected child abuse.

    Janßen, Katharina; Greif, Dominik; Rothschild, Markus A; Banaschak, Sibylle

    2017-07-01

    If a case of physical child abuse is suspected in Germany, the general feeling is often that "it does not matter whether you make a report or not" because, generally, no conviction is made anyway. This study investigates the juridical analysis of complaint cases of physical child abuse [criminal complaint parag. 225 StGB (German penal code) with filial victim]. It focuses on the doctor's role and the impact of their practice in relation to a later conviction. It is based on the analysis of 302 files of the enquiry from 2004-2009 from the department of public prosecution in Cologne, Germany. Besides general epidemiological data on the reporting person, the affected child and the presumed offender, the documents were reassessed for the relevance of medical reports for successful convictions. Only 7% (n = 21) of 302 complaints led to a conviction. In 38.1% (n = 8) of those cases, a medical report was mentioned as a piece of evidence, and just in two cases a (legal) medical report was quoted and mentioned as relevant for the conviction. 50% of the complaint cases with legal medical expertise led to a trial. In contrast, only 30.2% with a common medical report and 7.3% without a report led to a trial. The results show how a medical report existed in only a few cases. In those cases, the rate of performed trials was higher than for those without a medical report, but the report played a minor part when reasoning a verdict.

  11. The relevance and role of homestays in medical education: a scoping study.

    Hughes, Bonnie Olivia; Moshabela, Mosa; Owen, Jenni; Gaede, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The community-based medical education curriculum is growing in popularity as a strategy to bring universal health coverage to underserved communities by providing medical students with hands-on training in primary health care. Accommodation and immersion of medical students within the community will become increasingly important to the success of community-based curricula. In the context of tourism, homestays, where local families host guests, have shown to provide an immersive accommodation experience. By exploring homestays in the educational context, this scoping study investigates their role in providing an immersive pedagogical experience for medical students. A scoping review was performed using the online databases ScienceDirect and the Duke University Library Database, which searches Academic Search Complete, JSTOR, LexisNexis Academic, Web of Science, Proquest, PubMed and WorldCat. Using the inclusion term 'homestays' and excluding the term 'tourism', 181 results were returned. AClose assessment using inclusion criteria narrowed this to 14 relevant articles. There is very little published research specific to the experience of medical students in community homestays, indicating a gap in the literature. However, the existing educational outcomes suggest homestays may have the potential to serve a significant role in medical education, especially as a component of decentralised or community-based programmes. The literature reveals that educational homestays influence language learning, cultural immersion, and the development of professional skills for health science careers. These outcomes relate to the level of engagement between students and hosts, including the catalytic role of community liaisons. Homestays offer a unique depth of experience that has the potential to enrich the education of participating students, and require further research, particularly in the context of distributed and decentralised training platforms for medical and health sciences

  12. Aerodynamic Factors Responsible for the Deaggregation of Carrier-Free Drug Powders to form Micrometer and Submicrometer Aerosols

    Longest, P. Worth; Son, Yoen-Ju; Holbrook, Landon; Hindle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to employ in vitro experiments combined with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to determine which aerodynamic factors were most responsible for deaggregating carrier-free powders to form micrometer and submicrometer aerosols from a capsule-based platform. Methods Eight airflow passages were evaluated for deaggregation of the aerosol including a standard constricted tube, impaction surface, 2D mesh, inward radial jets, and newly proposed 3D grids and rod arrays. CFD simulations were implemented to evaluate existing and new aerodynamic factors for deaggregation and in vitro experiments were used to evaluate performance of each inhaler. Results For the carrier-free formulation considered, turbulence was determined to be the primary deaggregation mechanism. A strong quantitative correlation was established between the mass median diameter (MMD) and newly proposed non-dimensional specific dissipation (NDSD) factor, which accounts for turbulent energy, inverse of the turbulent length scale, and exposure time. A 3D rod array design with unidirectional elements maximized NDSD and produced the best deaggregation with MMD<1μm. Conclusions The new NDSD parameter can be used to develop highly effective dry powder inhalers like the 3D rod array that can efficiently produce submicrometer aerosols for next-generation respiratory drug delivery applications. PMID:23471640

  13. Methodologic quality and relevance of references in pharmaceutical advertisements in a Canadian medical journal.

    Lexchin, J; Holbrook, A

    1994-07-01

    To evaluate the methodologic quality and relevance of references in pharmaceutical advertisements in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ). Analytic study. All 114 references cited in the first 22 distinct pharmaceutical advertisements in volume 146 of CMAJ. Mean methodologic quality score (modified from the 6-point scale used to assess articles in the American College of Physicians' Journal Club) and mean relevance score (based on a new 5-point scale) for all references in each advertisement. Twenty of the 22 companies responded, sending 78 (90%) of the 87 references requested. The mean methodologic quality score was 58% (95% confidence limits [CL] 51% and 65%) and the mean relevance score 76% (95% CL 72% and 80%). The two mean scores were statistically lower than the acceptable score of 80% (p e., other than reports of clinical trials). Half of the advertisements had a methodologic quality score of less than 65%, but only five had a relevance score of less than 65%. Although the relevance of most of the references was within minimal acceptable limits, the methodologic quality was often unacceptable. Because advertisements are an important part of pharmaceutical marketing and education, we suggest that companies develop written standards for their advertisements and monitor their advertisements for adherence to these standards. We also suggest that the Pharmaceutical Advertising Advisory Board develop more stringent guidelines for advertising and that it enforce these guidelines in a consistent, rigorous fashion.

  14. Structural characterisation of medically relevant protein assemblies by integrating mass spectrometry with computational modelling.

    Politis, Argyris; Schmidt, Carla

    2018-03-20

    Structural mass spectrometry with its various techniques is a powerful tool for the structural elucidation of medically relevant protein assemblies. It delivers information on the composition, stoichiometries, interactions and topologies of these assemblies. Most importantly it can deal with heterogeneous mixtures and assemblies which makes it universal among the conventional structural techniques. In this review we summarise recent advances and challenges in structural mass spectrometric techniques. We describe how the combination of the different mass spectrometry-based methods with computational strategies enable structural models at molecular levels of resolution. These models hold significant potential for helping us in characterizing the function of protein assemblies related to human health and disease. In this review we summarise the techniques of structural mass spectrometry often applied when studying protein-ligand complexes. We exemplify these techniques through recent examples from literature that helped in the understanding of medically relevant protein assemblies. We further provide a detailed introduction into various computational approaches that can be integrated with these mass spectrometric techniques. Last but not least we discuss case studies that integrated mass spectrometry and computational modelling approaches and yielded models of medically important protein assembly states such as fibrils and amyloids. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of load dependent creep behavior in medically relevant absorbable polymers.

    Dreher, Maureen L; Nagaraja, Srinidhi; Bui, Hieu; Hong, Danny

    2014-01-01

    While synthetic absorbable polymers have a substantial history of use in medical devices, their use is expanding and becoming more prevalent for devices where long term loading and structural support is required. In addition, there is evidence that current absorbable medical devices may experience permanent deformations, warping (out of plane twisting), and geometric changes in vivo. For clinical indications with long term loading or structural support requirements, understanding the material's viscoelastic properties becomes increasingly important whereas these properties have not been used historically as preclinical indications of performance or design considerations. In this study we measured the static creep, creep recovery and cyclic creep responses of common medically relevant absorbable materials (i.e., poly(l-lactide, PLLA) and poly(l-co-glycolide, PLGA) over a range of physiologically relevant loading magnitudes. The results indicate that both PLLA and PLGA exhibit creep behavior and failure at loads significantly less than the yield or ultimate properties of the material and that significant material specific responses to loading exist. In addition, we identified a strong correlation between the extent of creep in the material and its crystallinity. Results of the study provide new information on the creep behavior of PLLA and PLGA and support the use of viscoelastic properties of absorbable polymers as part of the material selection process. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Dual-force ISOMAP: a new relevance feedback method for medical image retrieval.

    Shen, Hualei; Tao, Dacheng; Ma, Dianfu

    2013-01-01

    With great potential for assisting radiological image interpretation and decision making, content-based image retrieval in the medical domain has become a hot topic in recent years. Many methods to enhance the performance of content-based medical image retrieval have been proposed, among which the relevance feedback (RF) scheme is one of the most promising. Given user feedback information, RF algorithms interactively learn a user's preferences to bridge the "semantic gap" between low-level computerized visual features and high-level human semantic perception and thus improve retrieval performance. However, most existing RF algorithms perform in the original high-dimensional feature space and ignore the manifold structure of the low-level visual features of images. In this paper, we propose a new method, termed dual-force ISOMAP (DFISOMAP), for content-based medical image retrieval. Under the assumption that medical images lie on a low-dimensional manifold embedded in a high-dimensional ambient space, DFISOMAP operates in the following three stages. First, the geometric structure of positive examples in the learned low-dimensional embedding is preserved according to the isometric feature mapping (ISOMAP) criterion. To precisely model the geometric structure, a reconstruction error constraint is also added. Second, the average distance between positive and negative examples is maximized to separate them; this margin maximization acts as a force that pushes negative examples far away from positive examples. Finally, the similarity propagation technique is utilized to provide negative examples with another force that will pull them back into the negative sample set. We evaluate the proposed method on a subset of the IRMA medical image dataset with a RF-based medical image retrieval framework. Experimental results show that DFISOMAP outperforms popular approaches for content-based medical image retrieval in terms of accuracy and stability.

  17. Clinically applied medical ethnography: relevance to cultural competence in patient care.

    Engebretson, Joan

    2011-06-01

    Medical anthropology provides an excellent resource for nursing research that is relevant to clinical nursing. By expanding the understanding of ethnographic research beyond ethnicity, nurses can conduct research that explores patient's constructions and explanatory models of health and healing and how they make meaning out of chronic conditions and negotiate daily life. These findings can have applicability to culturally competent care at both the organizational or systems level, as well as in the patient/provider encounter. Individual patient care can be improved by applying ethnographic research findings to build provider expertise and then using a cultural negotiation process for individualized patient care. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Relevance of the rationalist-intuitionist debate for ethics and professionalism in medical education.

    Leffel, G Michael; Oakes Mueller, Ross A; Curlin, Farr A; Yoon, John D

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread pedagogical efforts to modify discrete behaviors in developing physicians, the professionalism movement has generally shied away from essential questions such as what virtues characterize the good physician, and how are those virtues formed? Although there is widespread adoption of medical ethics curricula, there is still no consensus about the primary goals of ethics education. Two prevailing perspectives dominate the literature, constituting what is sometimes referred to as the "virtue/skill dichotomy". The first perspective argues that teaching ethics is a means of providing physicians with a skill set for analyzing and resolving ethical dilemmas. The second perspective suggests that teaching ethics is a means of creating virtuous physicians. The authors argue that this debate about medical ethics education mirrors the Rationalist-Intuitionist debate in contemporary moral psychology. In the following essay, the authors sketch the relevance of the Rationalist-Intuitionist debate to medical ethics and professionalism. They then outline a moral intuitionist model of virtuous caring that derives from but also extends the "social intuitionist model" of moral action and virtue. This moral intuitionist model suggests several practical implications specifically for medical character education but also for health science education in general. This approach proposes that character development is best accomplished by tuning-up (activating) moral intuitions, amplifying (intensifying) moral emotions related to intuitions, and strengthening (expanding) intuition-expressive, emotion-related moral virtues, more than by "learning" explicit ethical rules or principles.

  19. Factors relevant to medication non-adherence in kidney transplant: a systematic review.

    Belaiche, Stephanie; Décaudin, Bertrand; Dharancy, Sébastien; Noel, Christian; Odou, Pascal; Hazzan, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Background Medication non-adherence is a major issue after transplant that can lead to misdiagnosis, rejection, poor health affecting quality of life, graft loss or death. Several estimations of adherence and related factors have previously been described but conclusions leave doubt as to the most accurate assessment method. Aim of the review To identify the factors most relevant to medication non-adherence in kidney transplant in current clinical practice. Method This systematic review is registered in the PROSPERO data base and follows the Prisma checklist. Articles in English in three databases from January 2009 to December 2014 were analysed. A synthesis was made to target adherence assessment methods, their prevalence and significance. Results Thirty-seven studies were analysed rates of non-adherence fluctuating from 1.6 to 96%. Assessment methods varied from one study to another, although self-reports were mainly used. It appears that youth (≤50 years old), male, low social support, unemployment, low education, ≥3 months post graft, living donor, ≥6 comorbidities, ≥5 drugs/d, ≥2 intakes/d, negative beliefs, negative behavior, depression and anxiety were the factors significantly related to non-adherence. Conclusion As there are no established guidelines, consideration should be given to more than one approach to identify medication non-adherence although self-reports should remain the cornerstone of adherence assessment.

  20. Stepping Stone Mechanism: Carrier-Free Long-Range Magnetism Mediated by Magnetized Cation States in Quintuple Layer

    Chan, Chunkai; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yiou; Tse, Kinfai; Deng, Bei; Zhang, Jingzhao; Zhu, Junyi

    2018-01-01

    The long-range magnetism observed in group-V tellurides quintuple layers is the only working example of carrier-free dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS), whereas the physical mechanism is unclear, except the speculation on the band topology enhanced van Vleck paramagnetism. Based on DFT calculations, we find a stable long-range ferromagnetic order in a single quintuple layer of Cr-doped Bi2Te3 or Sb2Te3, with the dopant separation more than 9 Å. This configuration is the global energy minimum among all configurations. Different from the conventional super exchange theory, the magnetism is facilitated by the lone pair derived anti-bonding states near the cations. Such anti-bonding states work as stepping stones merged in the electron sea and conduct magnetism. Further, spin orbit coupling induced band inversion is found to be insignificant in the magnetism. Therefore, our findings directly dismiss the common misbelief that band topology is the only factor that enhances the magnetism. We further demonstrate that removal of the lone pair derived states destroys the long-range magnetism. This novel mechanism sheds light on the fundamental understanding of long-range magnetism and may lead to discoveries of new classes of DMS. Supported by Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) under Grant No 4053084, University Grants Committee of Hong Kong under Grant No 24300814, and the Start-up Funding of CUHK.

  1. Magnetic cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs): a novel concept towards carrier free immobilization of lignocellulolytic enzymes.

    Bhattacharya, Abhishek; Pletschke, Brett I

    2014-01-01

    The enzymatic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels has been identified as an excellent strategy to generate clean energy. However, the current process is cost-intensive as an effective immobilization approach to reuse the enzyme(s) has been a major challenge. The present study introduces the concept and application of novel magnetic cross-linked enzyme aggregates (mag-CLEAs). Both mag-CLEAs and calcium-mag-CLEAs (Ca-mag-CLEAs) exhibited a 1.35 fold higher xylanase activity compared to the free enzyme and retained more than 80.0% and 90.0% activity, respectively, after 136h of incubation at 50°C, compared to 50% activity retained by CLEAs. A 7.4 and 9.0 fold higher sugar release from lime-pretreated and NH4OH pre-treated sugar bagasse, respectively, was achieved with Ca-mag-CLEAs compared to the free enzymes. The present study promotes the successful application of mag-CLEAs and Ca-mag-CLEAs as carrier free immobilized enzymes for the effective hydrolysis of lignocellulolytic biomass and associated biofuel feedstocks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Carrier-free 194Ir from an 194Os/194Ir generator - a new candidate for radioimmunotherapy

    Mirzadeh, S.; Rice, D.E.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Iridium-194 (t 1/2 = 19.15 h) decays by beta-particle emission (E max = 2.236 MeV) and is a potential candidate for radioimmunotherapy. An important characteristic is availability of 194 Ir from decay of reactor-produced 194 Os (t 1/2 = 6y). We report the fabrication of the first 194 Os/ 194 Ir generator system using activated carbon. In addition, a novel gas thermochromatographic method was developed for the one step conversion of metallic Os to OsO 4 and subsequent separation and purification of OsO 4 . In this manner, the reactor irradiated enriched 192 Os target was converted to 194 OsO 4 , which was then converted to the K 2 OsCl 6 for generator loading. The yield and the elution profile of carrier-free 194 Ir, and 194 Os breakthrough were determined for a prototype generator which was evaluated over a 10-month period. (author)

  3. Gas chromatography of indium in macroscopic and carrier-free amounts using quartz and gold as stationary phases

    Serov, A.; Eichler, R.; Tuerler, A.; Wittwer, D.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. fuer Radiochemie und Umweltchemie; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. fuer Chemie und Biochemie; Dressler, R.; Piguet, D.; Voegele, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. fuer Radiochemie und Umweltchemie

    2011-07-01

    The chemical investigation of E113 is likely to become soon feasible. The determination of chemical properties of carrier-free amounts of the lighter homologues of element 113, especially indium and thallium, allows designing experimental set-ups and selecting experimental conditions suitable for performing these studies. Here, we present investigations of the interaction of indium species with quartz and gold surfaces. Deposition temperatures as well as enthalpies of adsorption were determined for indium T{sub dep} = 739 {+-} 20 C (-{delta}H{sub ads}(In) = 227 {+-} 10 kJ mol{sup -1}) and for indium hydroxide T{sub dep} = 250 {+-} 20 C (-{delta}H{sub ads}(InOH)= 124 {+-}10 kJ mol{sup -1}) respectively, on quartz. In case of adsorption of indium on a gold surface only a lower limit of the deposition temperature was established T{sub dep} > 980 C (-{delta}H{sub ads}(In) {>=} 315 {+-} 10 kJ mol{sup -1}). Investigations of macroscopic amounts of indium in thermosublimation experiments at similar experimental conditions were instrumental to establish a tentative speciation of the observed indium species. (orig.)

  4. Medically relevant assays with a simple smartphone and tablet based fluorescence detection system.

    Wargocki, Piotr; Deng, Wei; Anwer, Ayad G; Goldys, Ewa M

    2015-05-20

    Cell phones and smart phones can be reconfigured as biomedical sensor devices but this requires specialized add-ons. In this paper we present a simple cell phone-based portable bioassay platform, which can be used with fluorescent assays in solution. The system consists of a tablet, a polarizer, a smart phone (camera) and a box that provides dark readout conditions. The assay in a well plate is placed on the tablet screen acting as an excitation source. A polarizer on top of the well plate separates excitation light from assay fluorescence emission enabling assay readout with a smartphone camera. The assay result is obtained by analysing the intensity of image pixels in an appropriate colour channel. With this device we carried out two assays, for collagenase and trypsin using fluorescein as the detected fluorophore. The results of collagenase assay with the lowest measured concentration of 3.75 µg/mL and 0.938 µg in total in the sample were comparable to those obtained by a microplate reader. The lowest measured amount of trypsin was 930 pg, which is comparable to the low detection limit of 400 pg for this assay obtained in a microplate reader. The device is sensitive enough to be used in point-of-care medical diagnostics of clinically relevant conditions, including arthritis, cystic fibrosis and acute pancreatitis.

  5. Medically Relevant Assays with a Simple Smartphone and Tablet Based Fluorescence Detection System

    Piotr Wargocki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell phones and smart phones can be reconfigured as biomedical sensor devices but this requires specialized add-ons. In this paper we present a simple cell phone-based portable bioassay platform, which can be used with fluorescent assays in solution. The system consists of a tablet, a polarizer, a smart phone (camera and a box that provides dark readout conditions. The assay in a well plate is placed on the tablet screen acting as an excitation source. A polarizer on top of the well plate separates excitation light from assay fluorescence emission enabling assay readout with a smartphone camera. The assay result is obtained by analysing the intensity of image pixels in an appropriate colour channel. With this device we carried out two assays, for collagenase and trypsin using fluorescein as the detected fluorophore. The results of collagenase assay with the lowest measured concentration of 3.75 µg/mL and 0.938 µg in total in the sample were comparable to those obtained by a microplate reader. The lowest measured amount of trypsin was 930 pg, which is comparable to the low detection limit of 400 pg for this assay obtained in a microplate reader. The device is sensitive enough to be used in point-of-care medical diagnostics of clinically relevant conditions, including arthritis, cystic fibrosis and acute pancreatitis.

  6. Identification of medically relevant Nocardia species with an abbreviated battery of tests.

    Kiska, Deanna L; Hicks, Karen; Pettit, David J

    2002-04-01

    Identification of Nocardia to the species level is useful for predicting antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and defining the pathogenicity and geographic distribution of these organisms. We sought to develop an identification method which was accurate, timely, and employed tests which would be readily available in most clinical laboratories. We evaluated the API 20C AUX yeast identification system as well as several biochemical tests and Kirby-Bauer susceptibility patterns for the identification of 75 isolates encompassing the 8 medically relevant Nocardia species. There were few biochemical reactions that were sufficiently unique for species identification; of note, N. nova were positive for arylsulfatase, N. farcinica were positive for opacification of Middlebrook 7H11 agar, and N. brasiliensis and N. pseudobrasiliensis were the only species capable of liquefying gelatin. API 20C sugar assimilation patterns were unique for N. transvalensis, N. asteroides IV, and N. brevicatena. There was overlap among the assimilation patterns for the other species. Species-specific patterns of susceptibility to gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, and erythromycin were obtained for N. nova, N. farcinica, and N. brevicatena, while there was overlap among the susceptibility patterns for the other isolates. No single method could identify all Nocardia isolates to the species level; therefore, a combination of methods was necessary. An algorithm utilizing antibiotic susceptibility patterns, citrate utilization, acetamide utilization, and assimilation of inositol and adonitol accurately identified all isolates. The algorithm was expanded to include infrequent drug susceptibility patterns which have been reported in the literature but which were not seen in this study.

  7. Determination of Ultralow Level 129I/127I in Natural Samples by Separation of Microgram Carrier Free Iodine and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Detection

    Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Chen, Ning

    2010-01-01

    of 129I/127I, and a detection limit of this method for 129I is calculated to be 105 atoms. This will allow us to accurately determine 129I in prenuclear geological samples of low iodine concentration with 129I/127I of 10−12, such as loess, soil, coral, rock, sediment, and groundwater. Some samples......Separation of carrier free iodine from low iodine level samples and accurate measurement of ultralow level 129I in micrograms of iodine target are essential but a bottleneck in geological dating of terrestrial system and tracer research using naturally produced 129I. In this work, we present...... a carrier free method using coprecipitation of AgI with AgCl for preparing micrograms of iodine target, associated with combustion using a tube furnace for separating iodine from solid samples and anion exchange chromatography for preconcentrating iodine from a large volume of water. An accelerator mass...

  8. Solvent extraction of Au(III) for preparation of a carrier-free multitracer and an Au tracer from an Au target

    Weginwar, R.G.; Kobayashi, Y.; Ambe, S.; Liu, B.; Enomoto, S.; Ambe, F.

    1996-01-01

    Separation of Au(III) and various carrier-free radionuclides by solvent extraction was investigated using an Au target irradiated by an energetic heavy-ion beam. Percentage extraction of Au(III) and coextraction of the radionuclides were determined with varying parameters such as kinds of solvent, molarity of HCl or pH, and Au concentration. Under the conditions where Au(III) was effectively extracted, namely extraction with ethyl acetate or isobutyl methyl ketone from 3 mol*dm -3 HCl, carrier-free radionuclides of many elements were found to be more or less coextracted. Coextraction of radionuclides of some elements was found to increase with an increase in the concentration of Au(III). This finding is ascribed to the formation of strong association of the complex of these elements with chloroauric acid. In order to avoid serious loss of these elements by the extraction, lowering of the Au(III) concentration or the use of a masking agent such as sodium citrate is necessary. Gold(III) was shown to be effectively back extracted with a 0.1 mol*dm -3 aqueous solution of 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol. Thus, a radiochemical procedure has been established for preparing a carrier-free multitracer and an Au tracer with carrier form from an Au target irradiated with a heavy-ion beam. Both tracers are now used individually for chemical and biological experiments. (author). 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Systematic reviews in context: highlighting systematic reviews relevant to Africa in the Pan African Medical Journal.

    Wiysonge, Charles Shey; Kamadjeu, Raoul; Tsague, Landry

    2016-01-01

    contribute in enhancing the value of research in Africa, the Pan African Medical Journal will start a new regular column that will highlight priority systematic reviews relevant to the continent.

  10. The theoretical basis for practice-relevant medication use research: patient-centered/behavioral theories.

    Blalock, Susan J

    2011-12-01

    There is an urgent need for research to improve the quality of medication use among those who require pharmacotherapy. To describe how behavioral science theories can help to achieve this goal. We begin by describing what a theory is and the functions that theories serve. We then provide 8 guiding principles that are crucial for investigators to understand if they are to use theory appropriately. We conclude by discussing the need for a new model of patient medication self-management that incorporates information concerning factors operating at all levels of the ecological framework, ranging from patient-level to societal-level factors. The 8 guiding principles discussed are the following: (1) There is no single theory that is appropriate for guiding all medication use research; (2) Behavioral science theories are probabilistic, not deterministic; (3) When trying to influence a health behavior, the health behavior of interest must be defined precisely; (4) Many factors outside of patient control influence patient medication use; (5) Every patient is unique; (6) Patient motivation is a fundamental ingredient required to optimize medication use, especially when maintenance of long term behavior is the goal; (7) Health care providers can have a profound effect on patient medication use, and this effect can operate through several possible causal pathways; and (8) When planning an intervention to optimize medication use, it is important to develop a conceptual model that links intervention inputs to the ultimate outcomes that are desired. Medication use can be influenced by a wide variety of factors acting at different levels of the ecological model. The quality of research on medication use could be improved by development of an ecological model specific to medication self-management. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. New Developments in Insomnia Medications of Relevance to Mental Health Disorders.

    Krystal, Andrew D

    2015-12-01

    Many insomnia medications with high specificity have become available recently. They provide a window into the clinical effects of modulating specific brain systems and establish a new guiding principal for conceptualizing insomnia medications: "mechanism matters." A new paradigm for insomnia therapy in which specific drugs are selected to target the specific type of sleep difficulty for each patient includes administering specific treatments for patients with insomnia comorbid with particular psychiatric disorders. This article reviews insomnia medications and discusses the implications for optimizing the treatment of insomnia occurring comorbid with psychiatric conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Using an Ishikawa diagram as a tool to assist memory and retrieval of relevant medical cases from the medical literature

    Wong, Kam Cheong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Studying medical cases is an effective way to enhance clinical reasoning skills and reinforce clinical knowledge. An Ishikawa diagram, also known as a cause-and-effect diagram or fishbone diagram, is often used in quality management in manufacturing industries. In this report, an Ishikawa diagram is used to demonstrate how to relate potential causes of a major presenting problem in a clinical setting. This tool can be used by teams in problem-based learning or in self-directed learni...

  13. Production of carrier-free 28Mg and 24Na by 50-180 MeV protons on Si, P, S, Cl, Ar and K. Excitation functions and chemical separation

    Lundqvist, H.; Malmborg, P.

    1976-01-01

    This work investigates the possible use of high energy proton bomardment of silicon, phosphorous, sulphur, chlorine, argon or potassium for production of carrier-free 28 Mg. A chemical separation is essential in this preparation in order to get rid of the bulk of target material and contaminating radionuclides. A simple and efficient method to get carrier-free 28 Mg with neglectible amounts of radio-chemical impurities has been established. (Auth.)

  14. Production and use of carrier-free 18F in studies on the effect of trace amounts of fluoride on the metabolism of the oral cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    Psarros, N.; Duschner, H.

    1988-01-01

    The utilization of carrier-free ionic 18 F is a convenient method for studying the effects of very low extracellular fluoride concentrations on the metabolism of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. A method was developed for the preparation of carrier-free aqueous solutions of ionic 18 F with high specific activity (about 70 7 Bq/ml). Fluoride distribution and fluoride binding experiments show that submicromolar fluoride concentrations had a negative effect on the metabolism of Streptococcus mutans. (author) 10 refs

  15. Relevance of the Rationalist-Intuitionist Debate for Ethics and Professionalism in Medical Education

    Leffel, G. Michael; Mueller, Ross A. Oakes; Curlin, Farr A.; Yoon, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite widespread pedagogical efforts to modify discrete behaviors in developing physicians, the professionalism movement has generally shied away from essential questions such as what virtues characterize the good physician, and how are those virtues formed? Although there is widespread adoption of medical ethics curricula, there is still no…

  16. DEFINING THE RELEVANT OUTCOME MEASURES IN MEDICAL DEVICE ASSESSMENTS: AN ANALYSIS OF THE DEFINITION PROCESS IN HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT.

    Jacobs, Esther; Antoine, Sunya-Lee; Prediger, Barbara; Neugebauer, Edmund; Eikermann, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    Defining relevant outcome measures for clinical trials on medical devices (MD) is complex, as there is a large variety of potentially relevant outcomes. The chosen outcomes vary widely across clinical trials making the assessment in evidence syntheses very challenging. The objective is to provide an overview on the current common procedures of health technology assessment (HTA) institutions in defining outcome measures in MD trials. In 2012-14, the Web pages of 126 institutions involved in HTA were searched for methodological manuals written in English or German that describe methods for the predefinition process of outcome measures. Additionally, the institutions were contacted by email. Relevant information was extracted. All process steps were performed independently by two reviewers. Twenty-four manuals and ten responses from the email request were included in the analysis. Overall, 88.5 percent of the institutions describe the type of outcomes that should be considered in detail and 84.6 percent agree that the main focus should be on patient relevant outcomes. Specifically related to MD, information could be obtained in 26 percent of the included manuals and email responses. Eleven percent of the institutions report a particular consideration of MD related outcomes. This detailed analysis on common procedures of HTA institutions in the context of defining relevant outcome measures for the assessment of MD shows that standardized procedures for MD from the perspective of HTA institutions are not widespread. This leads to the question if a homogenous approach should be implemented in the field of HTA on MD.

  17. [How can we give quick yet relevant nutritional advice in our daily medical practice?].

    Girardin, S; Andrey, M; Ruiz, J

    2007-06-06

    Within our diabetology Unit CHUV-PMU, the dietetic consultation is an integral part of the patients' management, for the majority of diabetic patients. The general practitioner offers very different perspectives. What are the possible modalities of ambulatory dietetic counselling? Are the numerous existing standardized documents really relevant? We bring a critical analysis on such documents, the use of which often engenders a feeling of failure for the patients and the health professionals. We suggest an intervention guide so that the nutritional education work undertaken in an ambulatory consultation may then lead to dietetic management.

  18. Association of 239Pu with lysosomes in rat, Syrian hamster, and Chinese hamster liver as studied by carrier-free electrophoresis and electron microscopic autoradiography with 241Pu

    Seidel, A.; Krueger, E.W.; Wiener, M.; Hotz, G.; Balani, M.; Thies, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    The binding of injected monomeric plutonium in the liver of rats, Syrian hamsters, and Chinese hamsters (species which show profound differences in their ability to eliminate 239 Pu from the liver) was investigated by carrier-free electrophoresis using 239 Pu and electron microscopic autoradiography with 241 Pu. These studies are part of a program designed to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms of the clearance of transuranium elements from liver of different mammals and man. Between 4 and 9 days after nuclide injection, a clear correlation between the majority of the 239 Pu and lysosomal enzymes was observed when the mitochondrial-lysosomal (ML) fraction of the livers was analyzed by carrier-free electrophoresis. In the two hamster species, a second 239 Pu peak exists from the beginning and increases with time to comprise 50% of the total radioactivity at later times. During electron microscopic examination 4 days after 241 Pu injection, beta tracks were frequently observed over globular structures resembling dense bodies in Chinese hamster liver. They were also observed frequently over chromatin-rich portions of the cell nuclei. These results, together with those from previous density gradient studies, show that lysosomes are the primary deposition site for 239 Pu in the liver cytoplasm of these three rodent species. The hypothesis of a morphologic transformation of these lysosomes with time in hamster liver and of rapid bulk exocytosis of the lysosomes in rats are still possible explanations for the extreme differences in the elimination among the three species

  19. Neutralization of toxicological activities of medically-relevant Bothrops snake venoms and relevant toxins by two polyvalent bothropic antivenoms produced in Peru and Brazil.

    Estevao-Costa, Maria I; Gontijo, Silea S; Correia, Barbara L; Yarleque, Armando; Vivas-Ruiz, Dan; Rodrigues, Edith; Chávez-Olortegui, Carlos; Oliveira, Luciana S; Sanchez, Eladio F

    2016-11-01

    Snakebite envenoming is a neglected public pathology, affecting especially rural communities or isolated areas of tropical and subtropical Latin American countries. The parenteral administration of antivenom is the mainstay and the only validated treatment of snake bite envenoming. Here, we assess the efficacy of polyspecific anti-Bothrops serum (α-BS) produced in the Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS, Peru) and at the Fundação Ezequiel Dias (FUNED, Brazil), to neutralize the main toxic activities induced by five medically-relevant venoms of: Bothrops atrox, B. barnetti, and B. pictus from Peru, and the Brazilian B. jararaca and B. leucurus, all of them inhabiting different geographical locations. Protein electrophoretic patterns of these venoms showed significant differences in composition, number and intensity of bands. Another goal was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of lyophilized α-BS developed at INS to neutralize the detrimental effects of these venoms using in vivo and in vitro assays. The availability of lyophilized α-BS has relevant significance in its distribution to distant rural communities where the access to antivenom in health facilities is more difficult. Despite the fact that different antigen mixtures were used for immunization during antivenom production, our data showed high toxin-neutralizing activity of α-BS raised against Bothrops venoms. Moreover, the antivenom cross-reacted even against venoms not included in the immunization mixture. Furthermore, we have evaluated the efficacy of both α-BS to neutralize key toxic compounds belonging to the predominant protein families of Bothrops snakes. Most significantly, both α-BS cross-specifically neutralized the main toxicological activities e.g. lethality and hemorrhage induced by these venoms. Thus, our data indicate that both α-BS are equally effective to treat snake bite victims inflicted by Bothrops snakes particularly B. atrox, responsible for the largest numbers of human

  20. The omni-relevance of surgery: how medical specialization shapes orthopedic surgeons' treatment recommendations.

    Hudak, Pamela L; Clark, Shannon J; Raymond, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    This article examines treatment recommendations in orthopedic surgery consultations and shows how surgery is treated as "omni-relevant" within this activity, providing a context within which the broad range of treatment recommendations proposed by surgeons is offered. Using conversation analysis to analyse audiotaped encounters between orthopedic surgeons and patients, we highlight how surgeons treat surgery as having a special, privileged status relative to other treatment options by (1) invoking surgery (whether or not it is actually being recommended) and (2) presenting surgery as the "last best resort" (in relation to which other treatment options are calibrated, described and considered). This privileged status surfaces in the design and delivery of recommendations as a clear asymmetry: Recommendations for surgery are proposed early, in relatively simple and unmitigated form. In contrast, recommendations not for surgery tend to be delayed and involve significantly more interactional work in their delivery. Possible implications of these findings, including how surgeons' structuring of recommendations may shape patient expectations (whether for surgery or some alternative), and potentially influence the distribution of orthopedic surgery procedures arising from these consultations, are considered.

  1. [Ecological studies on mollusk populations of medical and veterinary relevance existing in La Coca farm].

    Wong Sarmiento, Lin; Vázquez Perera, Antonio A; Quesada Martínez, Maritza; Sánchez Noda, Jorge; Hevia Jiménez, Yosvania; Fuentes Leyva, Joaquín; Ramos Pérez, Ramón

    2010-01-01

    ecological studies were carried out on mollusk populations of medical and veterinary importance with emphasis on Fasciola hepatica intermediary hosts species. to determine the relative abundance of populations and the possible use of some species as biological control agents against F. hepatica intermediary hosts. a total of 13 freshwater bodies were sampled during March and November, 2008 using Capture by effort unit method to capture the mollusks thirteen mollusk species (12 gastropods and 1 bivalve) were found after sampling. The relative abundance of species varied in different types of habitat. The intermediary host species of fascioliasis were dominant in two sites. Fossaria cubensis was dominant in Canal de la Entrada despite the presence of Melanoides tuberculata. The specie Pseudosuccinea columella was more abundant in Los Mangos. In La Presa del Matadero y Las Palmas despite the presence of these species, the prevailing ones were Physa acuta and some planorbids. the sites where intermediary hosts of Fasciola hepatica predominated were identified through data on the distribution and relative abundance. In some sites Melanoides tuberculata was present and acted as a biological control agent but it did not in others. Therefore, an evaluation on using a different thiarid would be useful to control these species.

  2. Enhancing Public Access to Relevant and Valued Medical Information: Fresh Directions for RadiologyInfo.org.

    Rubin, Geoffrey D; Krishnaraj, Arun; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Rajendran, Ramji R; Fishman, Elliot K

    2017-05-01

    RadiologyInfo.org is a public information portal designed to support patient care and broaden public awareness of the essential role radiology plays in overall patient health care. Over the past 14 years, RadiologyInfo.org has evolved considerably to provide access to more than 220 mixed-media descriptions of tests, treatments, and diseases through a spectrum of mobile and desktop platforms, social media, and downloadable documents in both English and Spanish. In 2014, the RSNA-ACR Public Information Website Committee, which stewards RadiologyInfo.org, developed 3- to 5-year strategic and implementation plans for the website. The process was informed by RadiologyInfo.org user surveys, formal stakeholder interviews, focus groups, and usability testing. Metrics were established as key performance indicators to assess progress toward the stated goals of (1) optimizing content to enhance patient-centeredness, (2) enhancing reach and engagement, and (3) maintaining sustainability. Major changes resulting from this process include a complete redesign of the website, the replacement of text-rich PowerPoint presentations with conversational videos, and the development of an affiliate network. Over the past year, visits to RadiologyInfo.org have increased by 60.27% to 1,424,523 in August 2016 from 235 countries and territories. Twenty-two organizations have affiliated with RadiologyInfo.org with new organizations being added on a monthly basis. RadiologyInfo provides a tangible demonstration of how radiologists can engage directly with the global public to educate them on the value of radiology in their health care and to allay concerns and dispel misconceptions. Regular self-assessment and responsive planning will ensure its continued growth and relevance. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of carrier-added [99mTc] EDTMP and carrier-free preparations of [99mTc] EDTMP and [99mTc] DPD

    Krcal, A.; Kletter, K.; Dudczak, R.; Pirich, C.; Mitterhauser, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: High uptake of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in malignant bone lesions is a prerequisite for adequate bone scanning. Visual image analysis is impaired due to high soft-tissue activity with currently available [ 99m Tc]-EDTMP-kits. This study aimed to compare carrier-added [ 99m Tc]-EDTMP with carrier-free [ 99m Tc]-EDTMP and [ 99m Tc]-DPD preparations in clinical routine. 15 μg and 150 μg perrhenic acid respectively were added to [ 99m Tc]-pertechnetate (>6 GBq in 3 ml phys. saline). The solution was then transferred into a vial, containing 1 mg of EDTMP, 3.6 mg stannous(II)chloride and 10 mg ascorbic acid under inert conditions. Under vigorous stirring the reaction mixture was heated to 45 o C for 10 min. After cooling down to room temperature the labelling mixture was sterile filtrated (millipore 0.22 μm). Quality control was performed using radio-ITLC (Whatman SG; acetone or ethanol: R f perrhenate/pertechnetate 0.87, colloid/product 0.05; phys. saline: R f colloid 0.00, perrhenate/pertechnetate and product 0.9) allowing rapid and efficient assessment of the product. Carrier free [ 99m Tc]-EDTMP and [ 99m Tc]-DPD were prepared according to instructions of the manufacturer. Clinical studies were performed in 29 patients according to a routine bone scanning protocol by injecting 700-800 MBq of the respective tracer and whole body imaging 3 h thereafter. Radiochemical purity and radiochemical yield relied on various parameters such as concentration of carrier and reducing agent and reaction conditions (pH, reaction time, temperature). Means of the labelling yield were 22 % for the preparation using 150 μg of carrier (5 preparations), 80 % for the preparation using 15 μpg of carrier (10 preparations) and 91 % for the carrier free products (5 preparations). Radiochemical purity was >96 % in all experiments. Colloid was formed in very low amounts, and was completely removed by sterile filtration. In clinical studies quantitative analysis

  4. Existing reporting guidelines for clinical trials are not completely relevant for implantable medical devices: a systematic review.

    Motte, Anne-France; Diallo, Stéphanie; van den Brink, Hélène; Châteauvieux, Constance; Serrano, Carole; Naud, Carole; Steelandt, Julie; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Aubry, Pierre; Cour, Florence; Pellerin, Olivier; Pineau, Judith; Prognon, Patrice; Borget, Isabelle; Bonan, Brigitte; Martelli, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine relevant items for reporting clinical trials on implantable medical devices (IMDs) and to identify reporting guidelines which include these items. A panel of experts identified the most relevant items for evaluating IMDs from an initial list based on reference papers. We then conducted a systematic review of articles indexed in MEDLINE. We retrieved reporting guidelines from the EQUATOR network's library for health research reporting. Finally, we screened these reporting guidelines to find those using our set of reporting items. Seven relevant reporting items were selected that related to four topics: randomization, learning curve, surgical setting, and device information. A total of 348 reporting guidelines were identified, among which 26 met our inclusion criteria. However, none of the 26 reporting guidelines presented all seven items together. The most frequently reported item was timing of randomization (65%). On the contrary, device information and learning curve effects were poorly specified. To our knowledge, this study is the first to identify specific items related to IMDs in reporting guidelines for clinical trials. We have shown that no existing reporting guideline is totally suitable for these devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Two-stage supported liquid membrane method for the separation of carrier-free {sup 90}Y from {sup 90}Sr using KSM-17 and CMPO as carriers

    Dhami, P S; Naik, P W; Dudwadkar, N L; Kannan, R; Achuthan, P V; Dakshinamoorthy, A; Jambunathan, U; Munshi, S K; Dey, P K [Fuel Reprocessing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Pandey, Usha; Venkatesh, Meera [Radiopharmaceuticals Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2007-07-01

    A two stage supported liquid membrane system is developed for the separation of carrier free {sup 90}Y from {sup 90}Sr for therapeutic applications. The feed containing {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y in nitric acid solution at pH 2 is placed in the feed compartment and transported across a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane containing 2-ethyhexyl2ethylhexyl phosphonic acid to a 4M HNO{sub 3} receiver phase. This is then transported across another polytetrafluoroethylene membrane containing octyl phenyl N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl methylphosphene oxide to another receiving phase, 1 M acetic acid. This has been implemented on simultaneous and sequential modes with very good yield. The second stage will act as a barrier for {sup 90}Sr, and will improve the product purity. (author)

  6. A review of data on laboratory colonies of bed bugs (Cimicidae, an insect of emerging medical relevance

    Cannet Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cimicidae are hematophagous Heteroptera, feeding on human blood, that have been the subject of significant medical investigation. In particular, they have been colonized under laboratory conditions to study their medical relevance. Laboratory colonization of these bugs is a multifactorial phenomenon. Our goal was to conduct a comparative literature review to classify the published data, demonstrating preferred bed bug colony conditions. We show that physical factors including temperature, relative humidity and photoperiod, and physiological factors such as type and frequency of blood meals play important roles in laboratory colonies. Any change in these factors produces changes in life-cycle duration. Temperature and blood meal are the most important factors, with a marked impact on the life-cycle of laboratory populations, depending on the species. A wide range of temperatures (15–34 °C and relative humidity (46–75% with an average of 25 °C and 59% were found for these colonies. Two widely used blood sources for the colonies were rabbits and humans.

  7. Cholesterol-Containing Nuclease-Resistant siRNA Accumulates in Tumors in a Carrier-free Mode and Silences MDR1 Gene

    Ivan V. Chernikov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical modifications are an effective way to improve the therapeutic properties of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, making them more resistant to degradation in serum and ensuring their delivery to target cells and tissues. Here, we studied the carrier-free biodistribution and biological activity of a nuclease-resistant anti-MDR1 cholesterol-siRNA conjugate in healthy and tumor-bearing severe combined immune deficiency (SCID mice. The attachment of cholesterol to siRNA provided its efficient accumulation in the liver and in tumors, and reduced its retention in the kidneys after intravenous and intraperitoneal injection. The major part of cholesterol-siRNA after intramuscular and subcutaneous injections remained in the injection place. Confocal microscopy data demonstrated that cholesterol-siRNA spread deep in the tissue and was present in the cytoplasm of almost all the liver and tumor cells. The reduction of P-glycoprotein level in human KB-8-5 xenograft overexpressing the MDR1 gene by 60% was observed at days 5–6 after injection. Then, its initial level recovered by the eighth day. The data showed that, regardless of the mode of administration (intravenous, intraperitoneal, or peritumoral, cholesterol-siMDR efficiently reduced the P-glycoprotein level in tumors. The designed anti-MDR1 conjugate has potential as an adjuvant therapeutic for the reversal of multiple drug resistance of cancer cells.

  8. Speciation analysis of 129I in seawater by carrier-free AgI-AgCl coprecipitation and accelerator mass spectrometric measurement

    Luo, Maoyi; Hou, Xiaolin; He, Chaohui

    2013-01-01

    A rapid and simple method was developed for speciation analysis of 129I in seawater by selective coprecipitation of carrier-free iodide and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement of 129I. Iodide was separated from seawater and other species of iodine by coprecipitation of AgI with Ag2SO3......, AgCl, and AgBr by addition of only 100 mg/L Ag+ and 0.3 mmol/L NaHSO3 at pH 4.2-5.5. The separation efficiency of iodide was more than 95%, and crossover between 129IO3- and 129I- fractions is less than 3%. Iodate and total inorganic iodine were converted to iodide by use of NaHSO3 at pH 1......-2 and then separated by the same method as for iodide. Ag2SO3 in the coprecipitate was removed by washing with 3 mol/L HNO3 and the excess AgCl and AgBr was removed by use of diluted NH3, and finally a 1-3 mg precipitate was obtained for AMS measurement of 129I. The recovery of iodine species in the entire procedure...

  9. Effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and relevant pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients.

    Chen, Ying; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Falls among the elderly are an issue internationally and a public health problem that brings substantial economic and quality-of-life burdens to individuals and society. Falls prevention is an important measure of nursing quality and patient safety. Numerous studies have evaluated the association of medication use with fall risk in elderly patients. However, an up-to-date review has not been available to summarize the multifaceted pharmaceutical concerns in the prevention of medication-related falls. Relevant literature was identified by performing searches in PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library, covering the period until February 2014. We included studies that described an association between medications and falls, and effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. Fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs) include central nervous system-acting agents, cough preparations, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-Alzheimer's agents, antiplatelet agents, calcium antagonists, diuretics, α-blockers, digoxin, hypoglycemic drugs, neurotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, nasal preparations, and antiglaucoma ophthalmic preparations. The degree of medication-related fall risk was dependent on one or some of the following factors: drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties (eg, elimination half-life, metabolic pathway, genetic polymorphism, risk rating of medications despite belonging to the same therapeutic class) and/or characteristics of medication use (eg, number of medications and drug-drug interactions, dose strength, duration of medication use and time since stopping, medication change, prescribing appropriateness, and medication adherence). Pharmacological interventions, including withdrawal of FRIDs, pharmacist-conducted clinical medication

  10. Effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and relevant pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients

    Chen, Ying; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Background Falls among the elderly are an issue internationally and a public health problem that brings substantial economic and quality-of-life burdens to individuals and society. Falls prevention is an important measure of nursing quality and patient safety. Numerous studies have evaluated the association of medication use with fall risk in elderly patients. However, an up-to-date review has not been available to summarize the multifaceted pharmaceutical concerns in the prevention of medication-related falls. Materials and methods Relevant literature was identified by performing searches in PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library, covering the period until February 2014. We included studies that described an association between medications and falls, and effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. Results Fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs) include central nervous system-acting agents, cough preparations, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-Alzheimer’s agents, antiplatelet agents, calcium antagonists, diuretics, α-blockers, digoxin, hypoglycemic drugs, neurotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, nasal preparations, and antiglaucoma ophthalmic preparations. The degree of medication-related fall risk was dependent on one or some of the following factors: drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties (eg, elimination half-life, metabolic pathway, genetic polymorphism, risk rating of medications despite belonging to the same therapeutic class) and/or characteristics of medication use (eg, number of medications and drug–drug interactions, dose strength, duration of medication use and time since stopping, medication change, prescribing appropriateness, and medication adherence). Pharmacological interventions, including withdrawal of

  11. Statement on access to relevant medical and other health records and relevant legal records for forensic medical evaluations of alleged torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment

    Alempijevic, D.; Beriashvili, R.; Beynon, J.

    2013-01-01

    In some jurisdictions attempts have been made to limit or deny access to medical records for victims of torture seeking remedy or reparations or for individuals who have been accused of crimes based on confessions allegedly extracted under torture. The following article describes the importance o...

  12. Effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and relevant pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients

    Chen Y

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ying Chen,1 Ling-Ling Zhu,2 Quan Zhou3 1Liaison Office of Geriatric VIP Patients, 2First Geriatric VIP Ward, Division of Nursing, 3Department of Pharmacy, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: Falls among the elderly are an issue internationally and a public health problem that brings substantial economic and quality-of-life burdens to individuals and society. Falls prevention is an important measure of nursing quality and patient safety. Numerous studies have evaluated the association of medication use with fall risk in elderly patients. However, an up-to-date review has not been available to summarize the multifaceted pharmaceutical concerns in the prevention of medication-related falls. Materials and methods: Relevant literature was identified by performing searches in PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library, covering the period until February 2014. We included studies that described an association between medications and falls, and effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. Results: Fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs include central nervous system-acting agents, cough preparations, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-Alzheimer’s agents, antiplatelet agents, calcium antagonists, diuretics, α-blockers, digoxin, hypoglycemic drugs, neurotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, nasal preparations, and antiglaucoma ophthalmic preparations. The degree of medication-related fall risk was dependent on one or some of the following factors: drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties (eg, elimination half-life, metabolic pathway, genetic polymorphism, risk rating of medications despite belonging to the same therapeutic class and

  13. Clinical relevance of the gap between pre-marketing trials and medical practice : the case of the cardiovascular drugs

    Wieringa, N F; Denig, P; de Graeff, P A; Vos, R

    OBJECTIVES/BACKGROUND: The external validity of trial results of new cardiovascular drugs is limited, because the short-term studies are performed with relatively small, highly selected populations. Using qualitative methods, we examined the clinical relevance of under-representation of subgroups of

  14. Application of qualitative response models in a relevance study of older adults' health depreciation and medical care demand.

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Chen, Yu-Chi; Chen, Ching-Yu; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Tang, Yih-Jing; Yang, Shu-Hui; Lin, Jwu-Rong

    2017-04-01

    The effect of health depreciation in older people on medical care demand is not well understood. We tried to assess the medical care demand with length of hospitalization and their impact on profits as a result of health depreciation. All participants who underwent comprehensive geriatric assessment were from a prospective cohort study at a tertiary hospital. A total of 1191 cases between September 2008 to October 2012 were investigated. Three sets of qualitative response models were constructed to estimate the impact of older adults' health depreciation on multidisciplinary geriatric care services. Furthermore, we analyzed the factors affecting the composite end-point of rehospitalization within 14 days, re-admission to the emergency department within 3 days and patient death. Greater health depreciation in elderly patients was positively correlated with greater medical care demand. Three major components were defined as health depreciation: elderly adaptation function, geriatric syndromes and multiple chronic diseases. On admission, the better the basic living functions, the shorter the length of hospitalization (coefficient = -0.35, P age and length of hospitalization. However, factors that correlated with relatively good outcome were functional improvement after medical care services and level of disease education. An optimal allocation system for selection of cases into multidisciplinary geriatric care is required because of limited resources. Outcomes will improve with health promotion and preventive care services. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 645-652. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Medical Student Dissection of CadaversImproves Performance on Practical Exams, but not Dissection-Relevant Questions in the NBME Gross Anatomy and Embryology Final Exam

    Leslie Sargent Jones

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available We have examined whether cadaver dissection by first year medical students (MIs affected their performance in two test measures: the NBME Gross Anatomy and Embryology Subject Exam (dissection-relevant questions only, and practical exams given at the end of each major section within the course. The dissections for the entire course were divided into 18 regional dissection units and each student was assigned to dissect one third of the regional units; the other two-thirds of the material was learned from the partner-prosected cadavers. Performance for each student on the exams was then assessed as a function of the regions those students actually dissected. While the results indicated a small performance advantage for MIs answering questions on material they had dissected on the NBME Subject Exam questions relevant to dissection (78-88% of total exam, the results were not statistically significant. However, a similar, small performance advantage on the course practical exams was highly significant.

  16. Prevalence of Depression in Medical Students at the Lebanese University and Exploring its Correlation With Facebook Relevance: A Questionnaire Study.

    Naja, Wadih J; Kansoun, Alaa H; Haddad, Ramzi S

    2016-05-31

    The prevalence of major depression is particularly high in medical students, affecting around one-third of this population. Moreover, online social media, in particular Facebook, is becoming an intrinsic part in the life of a growing proportion of individuals worldwide. Our primary objective is to identify the prevalence of depression in medical students at the Lebanese University Faculty of Medicine, a unique state university in Lebanon, its correlation with the utilization of the interactive features of Facebook, and the way students may resort to these features. Students of the Lebanese University Faculty of Medicine were assessed for (1) depression and (2) Facebook activity. To screen for major depression, we used the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scale. To test for Facebook activity, we developed the Facebook Resorting Questionnaire (FbRQ), which measures the degree to which students resort to Facebook. A total of 365 out of 480 students (76.0%) participated in the survey. A total of 25 students were excluded, hence 340 students were included in the final analysis. Current depression was reported in 117 students out of 340 (34.4%) and t tests showed female predominance. Moreover, PHQ-9 score multiple regression analysis showed that feeling depressed is explained 63.5% of the time by specific independent variables studied from the PHQ-9 and the FbRQ. Depression varied significantly among the different academic years (PFacebook had a positive and significant relationship (P=.003) and the different FbRQ categories had significant differences in resorting-to-Facebook power. The like, add friend, and check-in features students used when resorting to Facebook were significantly associated with depression. This study showed that depression was highly prevalent among students of the Faculty of Medicine at the Lebanese University. Moreover, Facebook may be a promising, helpful, psychological tool for optimizing the management of depression. Our study brought

  17. Massless radioactivity: a medical must?

    Wolterbeek, H.Th

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The authoritative body in the field of nomenclature for radiochemistry is the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). The concepts of specific activity, radioactivity concentration, carrier, carrier-free, and no-carrier-added have been) and are also recently discussed as to their correctness, relevance, clarity and consistency. Here, specific activity (sa) is suggested as to be defined as the activity (a) of a specified radioisotope in an amount of substance divided by the mass (m) of the total number of atoms (sa=a/m). Qaim, in a recent review of the future of medical radionuclides, justly argues that both yield, radionuclide purity and specific activity should be increased: here, again, however, the term specific activity deserves attention. What should be the goal in increasing specific activity? Up to as near as possible to massless? Approaching massless in terms of the smallest achievable m value? Taking the radionuclide n X, in physics specific activity is defined as both activity and mass related to n X, in radiochemistry specific activity is defined as the activity of n X related to the mass of all X, but in nuclear medicine most interest is in what IUPAC calls activity concentration, that is, the activity of n X in relation to the mass or volume of the material in which n X is present. This means that, apparently, nuclear medicine asks for high activity concentration of n X in non-isotopic carriers. Does this always imply the highest possible n X specific activity? The presentation focuses on this issue: examples are given that show both the absence of any need for the highest possible specific activity (e.g. 99 Mo, 166 Ho) and the need for 'as-near-as-possible to massless' (e.g. 99m Tc, 177 Lu, α-particles), in all cases in dependence of the radionuclide's position in the production chain and its eventual application in nuclear diagnostics or - therapy

  18. Electromigration of carrier-free radionuclides

    Roesch, F.; Chan Kim Hung, M.; Milanov, M.; Khalkin, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Stoichiometric stability constants of thallium (I) sulphate complex (Tl(SO 4 )) - have been determined by measurements of 201 Tl-Tl(I) ion mobility at 298.1(1) K in solutions of Na 2 SO 4 -Na(H)ClO 4 , μ=0.1, pH ∼ 4 and Na 2 SO 4 0.1 ≤ μ ≤ 0.48, pH 2-2.5. Thermodynamic stability constant of this complex anion of beta 1 =15.7(1.0) lxmol -1 ha s been calculated on the basis of experimental data

  19. Destaques éticos nos periódicos nacionais das áreas médicas Ethics relevance in Brazilian medical journals

    José Tavares-Neto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os destaques éticos existentes nas instruções aos autores de periódicos nacionais citados conjuntamente pelas quatro áreas médicas da CAPES e qualificados nível "A" nacional ou "I" internacional. MÉTODOS: As instruções aos autores de 20 revistas nacionais foram estudadas e 36 tipos de preocupações éticas foram identificados, permitindo a seguinte categorização: I - Ética na pesquisa com seres humanos; II - Integridade científica; III - Política editorial. RESULTADOS: Os resultados mostraram que na categoria I a instrução mais freqüente (50% é a exigência de aprovação da pesquisa por um CEP institucional, seguida da indicação no corpo do artigo referir-se a esta aprovação (35%, e a apresentação de cópia do parecer do CEP (30%. Todavia, nenhum periódico adverte sobre a importância do CEP ser credenciado pela CONEP. Na categoria II, 55% dos periódicos exigem declaração de conflitos de interesse e 40% deles interrogam sobre qual tipo de interesse; todavia, todos (100% os periódicos são omissos quanto à verificação de conflitos de interesse entre autores e revisores assim como prevenção de fraudes, plágios e fabricação de dados. Finalmente, na categoria III, 65% dos periódicos exigem que os direitos autorais sejam-lhes cedidos e os demais 35% nada dizem sobre o assunto. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados são discutidos em relação à situação atual do Brasil em relação à ética da pesquisa em seres humanos e à prevenção de desonestidade científica.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the Brazilian journals cited by the four CAPES medical areas, qualified as "A" national or "I" international, regarding the relevance given to ethics in the instructions for authors. METHODS: The instructions for authors of twenty Brazilian journals were studied and 36 types of ethical concerns were identified allowing the following categorization: I - Ethics in human research; II - Scientific integrity; III

  20. The Impact of Ambient Air Pollution on Daily Hospital Visits for Various Respiratory Diseases and the Relevant Medical Expenditures in Shanghai, China

    Hao Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The evidence concerning the acute effects of ambient air pollution on various respiratory diseases was limited in China, and the attributable medical expenditures were largely unknown. From 2013 to 2015, we collected data on the daily visits to the emergency- and outpatient-department for five main respiratory diseases and their medical expenditures in Shanghai, China. We used the overdispersed generalized additive model together with distributed lag models to fit the associations of criteria air pollutants with hospital visits, and used the linear models to fit the associations with medical expenditures. Generally, we observed significant increments in emergency visits (8.81–17.26% and corresponding expenditures (0.33–25.81% for pediatric respiratory diseases, upper respiratory infection (URI, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD for an interquartile range increase of air pollutant concentrations over four lag days. As a comparison, there were significant but smaller increments in outpatient visits (1.36–4.52% and expenditures (1.38–3.18% for pediatric respiratory diseases and upper respiratory infection (URI. No meaningful changes were observed for asthma and lower respiratory infection. Our study suggested that short-term exposure to outdoor air pollution may induce the occurrences or exacerbation of pediatric respiratory diseases, URI, and COPD, leading to considerable medical expenditures upon the patients.

  1. The Impact of Ambient Air Pollution on Daily Hospital Visits for Various Respiratory Diseases and the Relevant Medical Expenditures in Shanghai, China.

    Zhang, Hao; Niu, Yue; Yao, Yili; Chen, Renjie; Zhou, Xianghong; Kan, Haidong

    2018-02-28

    The evidence concerning the acute effects of ambient air pollution on various respiratory diseases was limited in China, and the attributable medical expenditures were largely unknown. From 2013 to 2015, we collected data on the daily visits to the emergency- and outpatient-department for five main respiratory diseases and their medical expenditures in Shanghai, China. We used the overdispersed generalized additive model together with distributed lag models to fit the associations of criteria air pollutants with hospital visits, and used the linear models to fit the associations with medical expenditures. Generally, we observed significant increments in emergency visits (8.81-17.26%) and corresponding expenditures (0.33-25.81%) for pediatric respiratory diseases, upper respiratory infection (URI), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) for an interquartile range increase of air pollutant concentrations over four lag days. As a comparison, there were significant but smaller increments in outpatient visits (1.36-4.52%) and expenditures (1.38-3.18%) for pediatric respiratory diseases and upper respiratory infection (URI). No meaningful changes were observed for asthma and lower respiratory infection. Our study suggested that short-term exposure to outdoor air pollution may induce the occurrences or exacerbation of pediatric respiratory diseases, URI, and COPD, leading to considerable medical expenditures upon the patients.

  2. The more it changes; the more it remains the same: a Foucauldian analysis of Canadian policy documents relevant to student selection for medical school.

    Razack, Saleem; Lessard, David; Hodges, Brian D; Maguire, Mary H; Steinert, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Calls to increase the demographic representativeness of medical classes to better reflect the diversity of society are part of a growing international trend. Despite this, entry into medical school remains highly competitive and exclusive of marginalized groups. To address these questions, we conducted a Foucauldian discourse analysis of 15 publically available policy documents from the websites of Canadian medical education regulatory bodies, using the concepts of "excellence" (institutional or in an applicant), "diversity," and "equity" to frame the analysis. In most documents, there were appeals to broaden definitions of institutional excellence to include concerns for greater social accountability. Equity concerns tended to be represented as needing to be dealt with by people in positions of authority in order to counter a "hidden curriculum." Diversity was represented as an object of value, situated within a discontinuous history. As a rhetorical strategy, documents invoked complex societal shifts to promote change toward a more humanistic medical education system and profession. "Social accountability" was reified as an all-encompassing solution to most issues of representation. Although the policy documents proclaimed rootedness in an ethos of improving the societal responsiveness of the medical profession, our analysis takes a more critical stance towards the discourses identified. On the basis of our research findings, we question whether these calls may contribute to the maintenance of the specific power relations they seek to address. These conclusions lead us to consider the possibility that the discourses represented in the documents might be reframed to take into account issues of power distribution and its productive and reproductive features. A reframing of discourses could potentially generate greater inclusiveness in policy development processes, and afford disadvantaged and marginalized groups more participatory roles in the discussion.

  3. Medical cyclotron: why, where, how

    Scheer, Kurt; Comar, Dominique; Kellershohn, Claude

    1976-01-01

    Cyclotrons for medical purposes are particularly useful for the production of radioactive isotopes of elements normally constituting organic matter ( 15 O, 13 N, 11 C). The short half-life and positron emission of those elements are of great interest in medical diagnosis. Many others carrier-free radioisotopes can be produced by cyclotrons. Three categories of cyclotrons are mentioned. Desk top cyclotron only adapted to the production of short-lived radioisotopes in a hospital; low energy and average energy cyclotrons which require well-entrained personnel for their operation and are best adapted to the production of radioelements on a regional or even national scale. Examples relative to the interest of short-lived radioisotopes in lung and brain investigations and tumor detection are given

  4. Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine (SHARC-FM): Creating a national consensus on relevant and practical training for medical students.

    Keegan, David A; Scott, Ian; Sylvester, Michael; Tan, Amy; Horrey, Kathleen; Weston, W Wayne

    2017-04-01

    In 2006, leaders of undergraduate family medicine education programs faced a series of increasing curriculum mandates in the context of limited time and financial resources. Additionally, it became apparent that a hidden curriculum against family medicine as a career choice was active in medical schools. The Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine was developed by the Canadian Undergraduate Family Medicine Education Directors and supported by the College of Family Physicians of Canada as a national collaborative project to support medical student training in family medicine clerkship. Its key objective is to enable education leaders to meet their educational mandates, while at the same time countering the hidden curriculum and providing a route to scholarship. The Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine is an open-access, shared, national curriculum ( www.sharcfm.ca ). It contains 23 core clinical topics (determined through a modified Delphi process) with demonstrable objectives for each. It also includes low- and medium-fidelity virtual patient cases, point-of-care learning resources (clinical cards), and assessment tools, all aligned with the core topics. French translation of the resources is ongoing. The core topics, objectives, and educational resources have been adopted by medical schools across Canada, according to their needs. The lessons learned from mounting this multi-institutional collaborative project will help others develop their own collaborative curricula. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  5. A comparative analysis of moral principles and behavioral norms in eight ethical codes relevant to health sciences librarianship, medical informatics, and the health professions.

    Byrd, Gary D; Winkelstein, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Based on the authors' shared interest in the interprofessional challenges surrounding health information management, this study explores the degree to which librarians, informatics professionals, and core health professionals in medicine, nursing, and public health share common ethical behavior norms grounded in moral principles. Using the "Principlism" framework from a widely cited textbook of biomedical ethics, the authors analyze the statements in the ethical codes for associations of librarians (Medical Library Association [MLA], American Library Association, and Special Libraries Association), informatics professionals (American Medical Informatics Association [AMIA] and American Health Information Management Association), and core health professionals (American Medical Association, American Nurses Association, and American Public Health Association). This analysis focuses on whether and how the statements in these eight codes specify core moral norms (Autonomy, Beneficence, Non-Maleficence, and Justice), core behavioral norms (Veracity, Privacy, Confidentiality, and Fidelity), and other norms that are empirically derived from the code statements. These eight ethical codes share a large number of common behavioral norms based most frequently on the principle of Beneficence, then on Autonomy and Justice, but rarely on Non-Maleficence. The MLA and AMIA codes share the largest number of common behavioral norms, and these two associations also share many norms with the other six associations. The shared core of behavioral norms among these professions, all grounded in core moral principles, point to many opportunities for building effective interprofessional communication and collaboration regarding the development, management, and use of health information resources and technologies.

  6. Medically relevant ElectroNeedle technology development.

    Schmidt, Carrie Frances; Thomas, Michael Loren; McClain, Jaime L.; Harper, Jason C.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.

    2008-11-01

    ElectroNeedles technology was developed as part of an earlier Grand Challenge effort on Bio-Micro Fuel Cell project. During this earlier work, the fabrication of the ElectroNeedles was accomplished along with proof-of-concept work on several electrochemically active analytes such as glucose, quinone and ferricyanide. Additionally, earlier work demonstrated technology potential in the field of immunosensors by specifically detecting Troponin, a cardiac biomarker. The current work focused upon fabrication process reproducibility of the ElectroNeedles and then using the devices to sensitively detect p-cresol, a biomarker for kidney failure or nephrotoxicity. Valuable lessons were learned regarding fabrication assurance and quality. The detection of p-cresol was accomplished by electrochemistry as well as using fluorescence to benchmark ElectroNeedles performance. Results from these studies will serve as a guide for the future fabrication processes involving ElectroNeedles as well as provide the groundwork necessary to expand technology applications. One paper has been accepted for publication acknowledging LDRD funding (K. E. Achyuthan et al, Comb. Chem. & HTS, 2008). We are exploring the scope for a second paper describing the applications potential of this technology.

  7. Physician empathy: Definition, outcome-relevance and its measurement in patient care and medical education [Ärztliche Empathie: Definition, Outcome-Relevanz und Messung in der Patientenversorgung und medizinischen Ausbildung

    Neumann, Melanie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: The present study gives a brief introduction into FurthermoreThe latter topic will be explored in detail as we conducted a pilot study on the German versions of two self-assessment instruments of empathy, which are mostly used in medical education research, namely the “Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy, Student Version” (JSPE-S and the “Interpersonal Reactivity Index” (IRI.Methods: We first present an overview of the current empirical and theoretical literature on the definition and outcome-relevance of PE. Additionally, we conducted basic psychometric analyses of the German versions of the JSPE-S and the IRI. Data for this analyses is based on a cross-sectional pilot-survey in N=44 medical students and N=63 students of other disciplines from the University of Cologne. Results: PE includes the of the patient as well as verbal and non-verbal , which should result in a helpful therapeutic action of the physician. Patients’ health outcomes in different healthcare settings can be improved considerably from a high quality empathic encounter with their clinician. Basic psychometric results of the German JSPE-S and IRI measures show first promising results.Conclusion: PE as an essential and outcome-relevant element in the patient-physician relationship requires more consideration in the education of medical students and, thus, in medical education research. The German versions of the JSPE-S and IRI measures seem to be promising means to evaluate these education aims and to conduct medical education research on empathy.[german] Ziel: Die vorliegende Studie gibt einen kurzen Überblick Des Weiteren werden Letzteres Thema wird ausführlich behandelt, da eine Pilotstudie zur Testung zwei deutscher Versionen von Selbsteinschätzungsinstrumenten durchgeführt wurde, die derzeit am häufigsten in der internationalen Medizinischen Ausbildungsforschung genutzt werden. Dazu gehören die “Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy

  8. Why relevance theory is relevant for lexicography

    Bothma, Theo; Tarp, Sven

    2014-01-01

    This article starts by providing a brief summary of relevance theory in information science in relation to the function theory of lexicography, explaining the different types of relevance, viz. objective system relevance and the subjective types of relevance, i.e. topical, cognitive, situational...... that is very important for lexicography as well as for information science, viz. functional relevance. Since all lexicographic work is ultimately aimed at satisfying users’ information needs, the article then discusses why the lexicographer should take note of all these types of relevance when planning a new...... dictionary project, identifying new tasks and responsibilities of the modern lexicographer. The article furthermore discusses how relevance theory impacts on teaching dictionary culture and reference skills. By integrating insights from lexicography and information science, the article contributes to new...

  9. Medical Identity

    Musaeus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine philosophical stances underpinning medical identity and assess the conceptual relationship between physician, medical practice and culture. Argument: Medical identity is about the ideals and moral positions that physicians take when justifying themselves. Medical identity...... hedonistic versus sentimentalist approaches to medical identity. The sociocultural philosophical analysis of medical identity can shed light on what it means conceptually for a physician to harbor beliefs associated with him/her being taken to be an autonomous professional. It is important because it touches...... on the meaning of being a compassionate, good and skilled physician, making its relevance to person-centered medicine self-evident. Conclusion: Medical identity should be analyzed with reference to literature, philosophy and medical practice in order for the physician to exercise a reflective position...

  10. Deep learning relevance

    Lioma, Christina; Larsen, Birger; Petersen, Casper

    2016-01-01

    train a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) on existing relevant information to that query. We then use the RNN to "deep learn" a single, synthetic, and we assume, relevant document for that query. We design a crowdsourcing experiment to assess how relevant the "deep learned" document is, compared...... to existing relevant documents. Users are shown a query and four wordclouds (of three existing relevant documents and our deep learned synthetic document). The synthetic document is ranked on average most relevant of all....

  11. Investigation of activation cross section data of alpha particle induced nuclear reaction on molybdenum up to 40 MeV: Review of production routes of medically relevant {sup 97,103}Ru

    Tárkányi, F. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Hermanne, A., E-mail: aherman@vub.ac.be [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Ditrói, F.; Takács, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Ignatyuk, A. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    The main goals of this investigations were to expand and consolidate reliable activation cross-section data for the {sup nat}Mo(α,x) reactions in connection with production of medically relevant {sup 97,103}Ru and the use of the {sup nat}Mo(α,x){sup 97}Ru reaction for monitoring beam parameters. The excitation functions for formation of the gamma-emitting radionuclides {sup 94}Ru, {sup 95}Ru, {sup 97}Ru, {sup 103}Ru, {sup 93m}Tc, {sup 93g}Tc(m+), {sup 94m}Tc, {sup 94g}Tc, {sup 95m}Tc, {sup 95g}Tc, {sup 96g}Tc(m+), {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 93m}Mo, {sup 99}Mo(cum), {sup 90}Nb(m+) and {sup 88}Zr were measured up to 40 MeV alpha-particle energy by using the stacked foil technique and activation method. Data of our earlier similar experiments were re-evaluated and resulted in corrections on the reported results. Our experimental data were compared with critically analyzed literature data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE 3.1 (Rivoli) and TALYS codes (TENDL-2011 and TENDL-2015 on-line libraries). Nuclear data for different production routes of {sup 97}Ru and {sup 103}Ru are compiled and reviewed.

  12. [Medical technology and medical education].

    von Mallek, D; Biersack, H-J; Mull, R; Wilhelm, K; Heinz, B; Mellert, F

    2010-08-01

    The education of medical professionals is divided into medical studies, postgraduate training leading to the qualification as a specialist, and continuing professional development. During education, all scientific knowledge and practical skills are to be acquired, which enable the physician to practice responsibly in a specialized medical area. In the present article, relevant curricula are analyzed regarding the consideration of medical device-related topics, as the clinical application of medical technology has reached a central position in modern patient care. Due to the enormous scientific and technical progress, this area has become as important as pharmacotherapy. Our evaluation shows that medical device-related topics are currently underrepresented in the course of medical education and training and should be given greater consideration in all areas of medical education. Possible solutions are presented.

  13. Medical and Health Physics Quarterly Report October, November, andDecember, 1950

    Health and Biology

    1951-02-27

    A considerable volume of work was accomplished during the past three months in the tracer program, experiments being conducted with At{sup 211}, carrier-free Bi{sup 206}, carrier-free Mn{sup 52}, carrier-free Mo{sup 93,99}, Np{sup 237}, Ta{sup 182} of a fair degree of specific activity, carrier-free Sc{sup 46}, and high specific activity Tm{sup 170}.

  14. Medical negligence.

    Rosen, M.

    1992-01-01

    The progress made in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine has resulted in an increase in the number of malpractice suits brought against medical practitioners. To constitute negligence it must be shown that the conduct of the accused did not measure up to the standard of care the law required of him in the particular circumstances and that he acted with guilt and therefore can be blamed for the deed. This paper describes medical practitioner negligence and reviews relevant cases.

  15. One-carrier free space charge motion under applied voltage

    de ALMEIDA, L E.C.; FERREIRA, G F.L. [SAO PAULO UNIV., SAO CARLOS (BRAZIL). INSTITUTO DE FISICA E QUIMICA

    1975-12-01

    It is shown how to transform the system of partial differential equations, describing the free one-carrier space charge motion in solid dielectrics under a given applied voltage and while the charge distribution touches only one of the electrodes, into a first order ordinary differential equation from whose solution all the interesting quantities may be easily derived. It was found that some charge distributions can display current reversal.

  16. Analysis of carrier-free radioisotopes by paper chromatography

    Ishibashi, M; Shigemetsu, T; Ishida, T

    1954-01-01

    Rf values of Ru-Rh, Zr, Nb, Y, Ce-Pr, I, Ca, and Sr, are listed. Zr and Nb were separable only when they were developed with mandelic acid of pH 5.2 and 7.9. Elements of the Ce group seemed to be separated when developed with acetylacetone-BuOH.

  17. Making Deferred Taxes Relevant

    Brouwer, Arjan; Naarding, Ewout

    2018-01-01

    We analyse the conceptual problems in current accounting for deferred taxes and provide solutions derived from the literature in order to make International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) deferred tax numbers value-relevant. In our view, the empirical results concerning the value relevance of

  18. Parsimonious relevance models

    Meij, E.; Weerkamp, W.; Balog, K.; de Rijke, M.; Myang, S.-H.; Oard, D.W.; Sebastiani, F.; Chua, T.-S.; Leong, M.-K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for applying parsimonious language models to re-estimate the term probabilities assigned by relevance models. We apply our method to six topic sets from test collections in five different genres. Our parsimonious relevance models (i) improve retrieval effectiveness in terms of

  19. Culturally Relevant Cyberbullying Prevention

    Phillips, Gregory John

    2017-01-01

    In this action research study, I, along with a student intervention committee of 14 members, developed a cyberbullying intervention for a large urban high school on the west coast. This high school contained a predominantly African American student population. I aimed to discover culturally relevant cyberbullying prevention strategies for African American students. The intervention committee selected video safety messages featuring African American actors as the most culturally relevant cyber...

  20. The Limits to Relevance

    Averill, M.; Briggle, A.

    2006-12-01

    Science policy and knowledge production lately have taken a pragmatic turn. Funding agencies increasingly are requiring scientists to explain the relevance of their work to society. This stems in part from mounting critiques of the "linear model" of knowledge production in which scientists operating according to their own interests or disciplinary standards are presumed to automatically produce knowledge that is of relevance outside of their narrow communities. Many contend that funded scientific research should be linked more directly to societal goals, which implies a shift in the kind of research that will be funded. While both authors support the concept of useful science, we question the exact meaning of "relevance" and the wisdom of allowing it to control research agendas. We hope to contribute to the conversation by thinking more critically about the meaning and limits of the term "relevance" and the trade-offs implicit in a narrow utilitarian approach. The paper will consider which interests tend to be privileged by an emphasis on relevance and address issues such as whose goals ought to be pursued and why, and who gets to decide. We will consider how relevance, narrowly construed, may actually limit the ultimate utility of scientific research. The paper also will reflect on the worthiness of research goals themselves and their relationship to a broader view of what it means to be human and to live in society. Just as there is more to being human than the pragmatic demands of daily life, there is more at issue with knowledge production than finding the most efficient ways to satisfy consumer preferences or fix near-term policy problems. We will conclude by calling for a balanced approach to funding research that addresses society's most pressing needs but also supports innovative research with less immediately apparent application.

  1. Relevant Subspace Clustering

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Günnemann, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Subspace clustering aims at detecting clusters in any subspace projection of a high dimensional space. As the number of possible subspace projections is exponential in the number of dimensions, the result is often tremendously large. Recent approaches fail to reduce results to relevant subspace...... clusters. Their results are typically highly redundant, i.e. many clusters are detected multiple times in several projections. In this work, we propose a novel model for relevant subspace clustering (RESCU). We present a global optimization which detects the most interesting non-redundant subspace clusters...... achieves top clustering quality while competing approaches show greatly varying performance....

  2. Is Information Still Relevant?

    Ma, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

  3. Clinical Relevance of Adipokines

    Matthias Blüher

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity has increased dramatically during recent decades. Obesity increases the risk for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and may therefore contribute to premature death. With increasing fat mass, secretion of adipose tissue derived bioactive molecules (adipokines changes towards a pro-inflammatory, diabetogenic and atherogenic pattern. Adipokines are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, energy expenditure, activity, endothelial function, hemostasis, blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, energy metabolism in insulin sensitive tissues, adipogenesis, fat distribution and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, adipokines are clinically relevant as biomarkers for fat distribution, adipose tissue function, liver fat content, insulin sensitivity, chronic inflammation and have the potential for future pharmacological treatment strategies for obesity and its related diseases. This review focuses on the clinical relevance of selected adipokines as markers or predictors of obesity related diseases and as potential therapeutic tools or targets in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Information Needs/Relevance

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    2009-01-01

    A user's interaction with a DL is often initiated as the result of the user experiencing an information need of some kind. Aspects of that experience and how it might affect the user's interactions with the DL are discussed in this module. In addition, users continuously make decisions about and evaluations of the materials retrieved from a DL, relative to their information needs. Relevance judgments, and their relationship to the user's information needs, are discussed in this module. Draft

  5. Smoking status and self-reported race affect the frequency of clinically relevant oncogenic alterations in non-small-cell lung cancers at a United States-based academic medical practice.

    Yamaguchi, Norihiro; Vanderlaan, Paul A; Folch, Erik; Boucher, David H; Canepa, Hannah M; Kent, Michael S; Gangadharan, Sidharta P; Majid, Adnan; Kocher, Olivier N; Goldstein, Michael A; Huberman, Mark S; Costa, Daniel B

    2013-10-01

    The identification of somatic genomic aberrations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is part of evidence-based practice guidelines for care of patients with NSCLC. We sought to establish the frequency and correlates with these changes in routine patient-tumor sample pairs. Clinicopathologic data and tumor genotype were retrospectively compiled and analyzed from an overall cohort of 381 patient-tumor samples. Of these patients, 75.9% self-reported White race, 13.1% Asian, 6.5% Black, 27.8% were never-smokers, 54.9% former-smokers and 17.3% current-smokers. The frequency of EGFR mutations was 23.9% (86/359), KRAS mutations 34.2% (71/207) and ALK FISH positivity 9.1% (23/252) in tumor samples, and almost all had mutually exclusive results for these oncogenes. In tumors from White, Black and Asian patients, the frequencies of EGFR mutations were 18.4%, 18.2% and 62%, respectively; of ALK FISH positivity 7.81%, 0% and 14.8%, respectively; and of KRAS mutations 41.6%, 20% and 0%. These patterns changed significant with increasing pack-year history of smoking. In White patients, the frequencies of EGFR mutations and ALK FISH positivity decreased with increasing pack-year cohorts; while the frequencies of KRAS mutations increased. Interestingly, in Asian patients the frequencies of EGFR mutations were similar in never smokers and in the cohorts with less than 45pack-year histories of smoking and only decreased in the 45pack-year plus cohort. The frequencies of somatic EGFR, KRAS, and ALK gene abnormalities using routine lung cancer tissue samples from our United States-based academic medical practice reflect the diverse ethnicity (with a higher frequency of EGFR mutations in Asian patients) and smoking patterns (with an inverse correlation between EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement) of our tested population. These results may help other medical practices appreciate the expected results from introduction of routine tumor genotyping techniques into their day-to-day care

  6. [Relevant public health enteropathogens].

    Riveros, Maribel; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea remains the third leading cause of death in children under five years, despite recent advances in the management and prevention of this disease. It is caused by multiple pathogens, however, the prevalence of each varies by age group, geographical area and the scenario where cases (community vs hospital) are recorded. The most relevant pathogens in public health are those associated with the highest burden of disease, severity, complications and mortality. In our country, norovirus, Campylobacter and diarrheagenic E. coli are the most prevalent pathogens at the community level in children. In this paper we review the local epidemiology and potential areas of development in five selected pathogens: rotavirus, norovirus, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), Shigella and Salmonella. Of these, rotavirus is the most important in the pediatric population and the main agent responsible for child mortality from diarrhea. The introduction of rotavirus vaccination in Peru will have a significant impact on disease burden and mortality from diarrhea. However, surveillance studies are needed to determine the impact of vaccination and changes in the epidemiology of diarrhea in Peru following the introduction of new vaccines, as well as antibiotic resistance surveillance of clinical relevant bacteria.

  7. Clinical relevance of molecular diagnostics in gastrointestinal (GI) cancer: European Society of Digestive Oncology (ESDO) expert discussion and recommendations from the 17th European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO)/World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, Barcelona.

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Wyrwicz, Lucjan; Guller, Ulrich; Wasan, Harpreet S; Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara; Gruenberger, Thomas; Ducreux, Michel; Carneiro, Fatima; Van Cutsem, Eric; Seufferlein, Thomas; Schmiegel, Wolff

    2017-11-01

    In the epoch of precision medicine and personalised oncology, which aims to deliver the right treatment to the right patient, molecular genetic biomarkers are a topic of growing interest. The aim of this expert discussion and position paper is to review the current status of various molecular tests for gastrointestinal (GI) cancers and especially considering their significance for the clinical routine use. Opinion leaders and experts from diverse nationalities selected on scientific merit were asked to answer to a prepared set of questions about the current status of molecular diagnostics in different GI cancers. All answers were then discussed during a plenary session and reported here in providing a well-balanced reflection of both clinical expertise and updated evidence-based medicine. Preselected molecular genetic biomarkers that are described and disputed in the current medical literature in different GI cancers were debated, and recommendations for clinical routine practice were made whenever possible. Furthermore, the preanalytical variations were commented and proposals for quality controls of biospecimens were made. The current article summarises the recommendations of the expert committee regarding prognostic and predictive molecular genetic biomarkers in different entities of GI cancers. The briefly and comprehensively formulated guidelines should assist clinicians in the process of decision making in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Other relevant biological papers

    Shimizu, M.

    1989-01-01

    A considerable number of CRESP-relevant papers concerning deep-sea biology and radioecology have been published. It is the purpose of this study to call attention to them. They fall into three general categories. The first is papers of general interest. They are mentioned only briefly, and include text references to the global bibliography at the end of the volume. The second are papers that are not only mentioned and referenced, but for various reasons are described in abstract form. The last is a list of papers compiled by H.S.J. Roe specifically for this volume. They are listed in bibliographic form, and are also included in the global bibliography at the end of the volume

  9. Metaphysics and medical ethics.

    Parkin, C

    1995-01-01

    I take issue with Frank Leavitt's sketch of a pragmatic criterion for the relevance of metaphysics to medical ethics. I argue that appeal to the potential for confusion generated by metaphysical subtlety establishes a need for better communication rather than shows philosophical insight beside the point. I demonstrate that the proposed Criterion of Relevance has absurd consequences, and I claim that the relevance of philosophical doctrines, whether ethical or metaphysical, is best accounted for in terms of improved understanding. PMID:7608933

  10. Nigerian Medical Journal

    The Nigerian Medical Journal publishes original articles, reviews, memoranda, reports, case reports, reports of meetings as supplements, letters to the Editor, Association New, book reviews as well as any news of medical relevance. Topics published are of interest to clinicians, researchers, resident doctors, epidemiologists ...

  11. User perspectives on relevance criteria

    Maglaughlin, Kelly L.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    , partially relevant, or not relevant to their information need; and explained their decisions in an interview. Analysis revealed 29 criteria, discussed positively and negatively, that were used by the participants when selecting passages that contributed or detracted from a document's relevance......This study investigates the use of criteria to assess relevant, partially relevant, and not-relevant documents. Study participants identified passages within 20 document representations that they used to make relevance judgments; judged each document representation as a whole to be relevant...... matter, thought catalyst), full text (e.g., audience, novelty, type, possible content, utility), journal/publisher (e.g., novelty, main focus, perceived quality), and personal (e.g., competition, time requirements). Results further indicate that multiple criteria are used when making relevant, partially...

  12. Production of Thallium 201 for medical applications

    Braghirolli, A.M.S.

    1981-12-01

    With the purpose of producing high purity carrier-free 201 Tl, for medical use, a production and separation method was developed using the CV-28 Cyclotron of the Nuclear Engineering Institute in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 201 Pb was produced by 24 MeV proton bombardment of natural Tl and allowed to decay to 201 Tl. In the separation process the target is dissolved in HNO 3 , the 201 Pb produced is separated by Fe(OH) 3 coprecipitation, and the Fe is latter separated by anion exchange. The 201 Pb is permited to decay during 32 hrs. 201 Tl is then separated from remaining Pb by anion exchange. The chemical separation is done in a remote processing cell using manipulators, tongs, electric and pneumatic systems. The thick target yield of 201 Pb is 1.7 mCi/μAhr. At the moment the production is restricted to 4 mCi of 201 Tl for each irradiation. (Author) [pt

  13. Intelligent medical information filtering.

    Quintana, Y

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an intelligent information filtering system to assist users to be notified of updates to new and relevant medical information. Among the major problems users face is the large volume of medical information that is generated each day, and the need to filter and retrieve relevant information. The Internet has dramatically increased the amount of electronically accessible medical information and reduced the cost and time needed to publish. The opportunity of the Internet for the medical profession and consumers is to have more information to make decisions and this could potentially lead to better medical decisions and outcomes. However, without the assistance from professional medical librarians, retrieving new and relevant information from databases and the Internet remains a challenge. Many physicians do not have access to the services of a medical librarian. Most physicians indicate on surveys that they do not prefer to retrieve the literature themselves, or visit libraries because of the lack of recent materials, poor organisation and indexing of materials, lack of appropriate and available material, and lack of time. The information filtering system described in this paper records the online web browsing behaviour of each user and creates a user profile of the index terms found on the web pages visited by the user. A relevance-ranking algorithm then matches the user profiles to the index terms of new health care web pages that are added each day. The system creates customised summaries of new information for each user. A user can then connect to the web site to read the new information. Relevance feedback buttons on each page ask the user to rate the usefulness of the page to their immediate information needs. Errors in relevance ranking are reduced in this system by having both the user profile and medical information represented in the same representation language using a controlled vocabulary. This system also updates the user profiles

  14. [Individual medical relevance of headaches. Comorbidities and quality of life].

    Haag, G

    2014-08-01

    In a multitude of cases, very frequent primary headaches lead to a clear deterioration in quality of life. Particularly in patients with chronic migraine, chronic tension headache, and cluster headache, quality of life is limited. This contradicts the preconception still encountered today that headaches are not a serious illness. Comorbidities with somatic and above all mental disorders are also very frequently observed in headache patients. In the foreground are the cardiovascular diseases of arterial hypertension, stroke, and coronary heart disease, as well as the mental disorders of depression, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorders, and sleep disorders. When such comorbidities are present, the quality of life of the sufferers is significantly reduced. Therefore, headache disorders should be taken seriously and sufferers should be provided with a consistent therapy. In cases of severe types of headache and in the presence of comorbidities, it is imperative that therapy is also prophylactic and multimodal in nature.

  15. Medical Support Issues of Relevance to Military Operations

    Lewis, Brian

    1998-01-01

    Military medicine is often a hotly debated topic among a majority who believe that its primary mission is peacetime healthcare for an enormous dependent, retired, and active duty beneficiary population...

  16. Classification of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms in Non-Medical Environments

    Bowers, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    .... He named them Staphylococcus aureus because of their golden color. S. aureus remains one of the most important pathogens in clinical settings largely due to the rapidity of its evolutionary response to treatment...

  17. Clinical relevance of pharmacist intervention in an emergency department.

    Pérez-Moreno, Maria Antonia; Rodríguez-Camacho, Juan Manuel; Calderón-Hernanz, Beatriz; Comas-Díaz, Bernardino; Tarradas-Torras, Jordi

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical relevance of pharmacist intervention on patient care in emergencies, to determine the severity of detected errors. Second, to analyse the most frequent types of interventions and type of drugs involved and to evaluate the clinical pharmacist's activity. A 6-month observational prospective study of pharmacist intervention in the Emergency Department (ED) at a 400-bed hospital in Spain was performed to record interventions carried out by the clinical pharmacists. We determined whether the intervention occurred in the process of medication reconciliation or another activity, and whether the drug involved belonged to the High-Alert Medications Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) list. To evaluate the severity of the errors detected and clinical relevance of the pharmacist intervention, a modified assessment scale of Overhage and Lukes was used. Relationship between clinical relevance of pharmacist intervention and the severity of medication errors was assessed using ORs and Spearman's correlation coefficient. During the observation period, pharmacists reviewed the pharmacotherapy history and medication orders of 2984 patients. A total of 991 interventions were recorded in 557 patients; 67.2% of the errors were detected during medication reconciliation. Medication errors were considered severe in 57.2% of cases and 64.9% of pharmacist intervention were considered relevant. About 10.9% of the drugs involved are in the High-Alert Medications ISMP list. The severity of the medication error and the clinical significance of the pharmacist intervention were correlated (Spearman's ρ=0.728/pclinical pharmacists identified and intervened on a high number of severe medication errors. This suggests that emergency services will benefit from pharmacist-provided drug therapy services. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Professional identity in medical students: pedagogical challenges to medical education.

    Wilson, Ian; Cowin, Leanne S; Johnson, Maree; Young, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Professional identity, or how a doctor thinks of himself or herself as a doctor, is considered to be as critical to medical education as the acquisition of skills and knowledge relevant to patient care. This article examines contemporary literature on the development of professional identity within medicine. Relevant theories of identity construction are explored and their application to medical education and pedagogical approaches to enhancing students' professional identity are proposed. The influence of communities of practice, role models, and narrative reflection within curricula are examined. Medical education needs to be responsive to changes in professional identity being generated from factors within medical student experiences and within contemporary society.

  19. Profiles of Dialogue for Relevance

    Douglas Walton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses argument diagrams, argumentation schemes, and some tools from formal argumentation systems developed in artificial intelligence to build a graph-theoretic model of relevance shown to be applicable (with some extensions as a practical method for helping a third party judge issues of relevance or irrelevance of an argument in real examples. Examples used to illustrate how the method works are drawn from disputes about relevance in natural language discourse, including a criminal trial and a parliamentary debate.

  20. Functional dyspepsia: Are psychosocial factors of relevance?

    Sandra Barry; Timothy G Dinan

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Functional Dyspepsia (FD) remains unclear, appears diverse and is thus inadequately understood. Akin to other functional gastrointestinal disorders, research has demonstrated an association between this common diagnosis and psychosocial factors and psychiatric morbidity. Conceptualising the relevance of these factors within the syndrome of FD requires application of the biopsychosocial model of disease.Using this paradigm, dysregulation of the reciprocal communication between the brain and the gut is central to symptom generation, interpretation and exacerbation.Appreciation and understanding of the neurobiological correlates of various psychological states is also relevant.The view that psychosocial factors exert their influence in FD predominantly through motivation of health care seeking also persists. This appears too one-dimensional an assertion in light of the evidence available supporting a more intrinsic aetiological link. Evolving understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and the heterogeneous nature of the syndrome will facilitate effective management.Co-morbid psychiatric illness warrants treatment with conventional therapies. Acknowledging the relevance of psychosocial variables in FD, the degree of which is subject to variation, has implications for assessment and management. Available evidence suggests psychological therapies may benefit FD patients particularly those with chronic symptoms. The rationale for use of psychotropic medications in FD is apparent but the evidence base to support the use of antidepressant pharmacotherapy is to date limited.

  1. Relevance theory: pragmatics and cognition.

    Wearing, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    Relevance Theory is a cognitively oriented theory of pragmatics, i.e., a theory of language use. It builds on the seminal work of H.P. Grice(1) to develop a pragmatic theory which is at once philosophically sensitive and empirically plausible (in both psychological and evolutionary terms). This entry reviews the central commitments and chief contributions of Relevance Theory, including its Gricean commitment to the centrality of intention-reading and inference in communication; the cognitively grounded notion of relevance which provides the mechanism for explaining pragmatic interpretation as an intention-driven, inferential process; and several key applications of the theory (lexical pragmatics, metaphor and irony, procedural meaning). Relevance Theory is an important contribution to our understanding of the pragmatics of communication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Clinical relevance in anesthesia journals

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Møller, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles.......The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles....

  3. East African Medical Journal

    The East African Medical Journal is intended for publication of papers on ... research on problems relevant to East Africa and other African countries will receive special ... Analysis of survival patterns of TB‐HIV co‐infected patients in relation to ...

  4. Learning medical history in Oslo: training for medical practice.

    Larsen, O

    1999-03-01

    The teaching in medical history at the University of Oslo, Norway, is given as an integrated part of the student training for practical work in health care and community health. I summarize here the underlying argumentation and the teaching experiences, concluding that this is felt as an effective way to convey relevant medical historical knowledge and skills to the future doctors.

  5. Pertinencia de la pedagogía para docentes de la salud, en 25 años de la universidad médica de Camagüey Relevancy of the Pedagogic Science for professors: what has been done in Camagüey Medical University for 25 year

    Mercedes Hernández González

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo tiene como objetivo analizar el comportamiento de la preparación pedagógica de los profesores del Instituto Superior de Ciencias Médicas “Carlos J. Finlay” a los 25 años de su fundación. Se ha constatado que los profesionales de la salud carecen de preparación pedagógica cuando inician su función docente, la realizan empíricamente. En trabajo efectuado en el año 1986, por el Departamento Docente Metodológico, los docentes eran del criterio que los conocimientos pedagógicos no eran necesarios, criterio que se ha modificado favorablemente, 1 157 profesores han recibido preparación pedagógica básica, que redunda en la calidad del proceso formativo y sienta las bases para otras vías de preparación pedagógica. Esta preparación ha sido una constante ocupación del grupo de metodólogos de la Vice Rectoría Docente, los cuales han utilizado todas las vías posibles, lo que favorece la universalización de las ciencias médicas con la pertinencia necesaria y el impacto que de hecho tiene en la sociedad contemporánea.The work has as objective to analyze the behavior of the pedagogic preparation of the professors from the Medical Science Institute of Camaguey in the 25 years of its foundation. It has been verified that the professionals of the health lack pedagogic preparation when they begin their teaching function they carry it out empirically. In a work made in the year 1986 for the methodological Educational Department, the teachers thought that the pedagogic knowledge were not necesary. This criterion has been modified favorably , 1157 professors have received basic pedagogic preparation redounding to the quality of the formative process and it establishes the bases for other ways of pedagogical preparation. This preparation has been a constant concern of the methodological group of the teaching vice presidency who have used all the possible roads, what favors the universalization of the medical sciences with the

  6. Shippingport: A relevant decommissioning project

    Crimi, F.P.

    1988-01-01

    Because of Shippingport's low electrical power rating (72 MWe), there has been some misunderstanding on the relevancy of the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) to a modern 1175 MWe commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) power station. This paper provides a comparison of the major components of the reactor plant of the 72 MWe Shippingport Atomic Power Station and an 1175 MWe nuclear plant and the relevancy of the Shippingport decommissioning as a demonstration project for the nuclear industry. For the purpose of this comparison, Portland General Electric Company's 1175 MWe Trojan Nuclear Plant at Rainier, Oregon, has been used as the reference nuclear power plant. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. Abortion - medical

    Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion ... A medical, or nonsurgical, abortion can be done within 7 weeks from the first day of the woman's last ...

  8. Relevance of human anatomy in daily clinical practice.

    Arráez-Aybar, Luis-Alfonso; Sánchez-Montesinos, Indalecio; Mirapeix, Rosa-M; Mompeo-Corredera, Blanca; Sañudo-Tejero, Jose-Ramón

    2010-12-20

    the aim of this study has been to evaluate the relevance of gross human anatomy in daily clinical practice and to compare it to that of other basic sciences (biochemistry, bioethics, cytohistology, microbiology, pharmacology, physiology, psychology). a total of 1250 questionnaires were distributed among 38 different medical speciality professionals. Answers were analyzed taking into account speciality (medical, surgery and others), professional status (training physician or staff member) and professional experience. the response rate was 42.9% (n=536). Gross human anatomy was considered the most relevant basic discipline for surgical specialists, while pharmacology and physiology were most relevant for medical specialists. Knowledge of anatomy was also considered fundamental for understanding neurological or musculoskeletal disorders. In undergraduate programmes, the most important focuses in teaching anatomy were radiological, topographical and functional anatomy followed by systematic anatomy. In daily medical practice anatomy was considered basic for physical examination, symptom interpretation and interpretation of radiological images. When professional status or professional experience was considered, small variations were shown and there were no significant differences related to gender or community. our results underline the relevance of basic sciences (gross anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology) in daily professional activity. Evidence-based studies such as ours, lend greater credibility and objectivity to the role of gross anatomy in the undergraduate training of health professionals and should help to establish a more appropriate curriculum for future professionals. 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Medical supervision of radiation workers

    Santani, S.B.; Nandakumar, A.N.; Subramanian, G.

    1982-01-01

    The basic elements of an occupational medical supervision programme for radiation workers are very much the same as those relevant to other professions with some additional special features. This paper cites examples from literature and recommends measures such as spot checks and continuance of medical supervision even after a radiation worker leaves this profession. (author)

  10. [Information technology in medical education].

    Ramić, A

    1999-01-01

    The role of information technology in educational models of under-graduate and post-graduate medical education is growing in 1980's influenced by PC's break-in in medical practice and creating relevant data basis, and, particularly, in 1990's by integration of information technology on international level, development of international network, Internet, Telemedicin, etc. The development of new educational information technology is evident, proving that information in transfer of medical knowledge, medical informatics and communication systems represent the base of medical practice, medical education and research in medical sciences. In relation to the traditional approaches in concept, contents and techniques of medical education, new models of education in training of health professionals, using new information technology, offer a number of benefits, such as: decentralization and access to relevant data sources, collecting and updating of data, multidisciplinary approach in solving problems and effective decision-making, and affirmation of team work within medical and non-medical disciplines. Without regard to the dynamics of change and progressive reform orientation within health sector, the development of modern medical education is inevitable for all systems a in which information technology and available data basis, as a base of effective and scientifically based medical education of health care providers, give guarantees for efficient health care and improvement of health of population.

  11. Dramatic lives and relevant becomings

    Henriksen, Ann-Karina; Miller, Jody

    2012-01-01

    of marginality into positions of relevance. The analysis builds on empirical data from Copenhagen, Denmark, gained through ethnographic fieldwork with the participation of 20 female informants aged 13–22. The theoretical contribution proposes viewing conflicts as multi-linear, multi-causal and non...

  12. Regularization in Matrix Relevance Learning

    Schneider, Petra; Bunte, Kerstin; Stiekema, Han; Hammer, Barbara; Villmann, Thomas; Biehl, Michael

    A In this paper, we present a regularization technique to extend recently proposed matrix learning schemes in learning vector quantization (LVQ). These learning algorithms extend the concept of adaptive distance measures in LVQ to the use of relevance matrices. In general, metric learning can

  13. Relevancia de la anatomía humana en el ejercicio de la medicina de asistencia primaria y en el estudio de las asignaturas de segundo ciclo de la licenciatura en medicina Relevance of Gross Human Anatomy in health primary care and in clinical disciplines of medical studies

    Blanca Mompeó

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue conocer la relevancia y la necesidad que de conocimientos en Anatomía macroscópica tenían los médicos de asistencia primaria y los alumnos del segundo ciclo de la licenciatura en Medicina. También nos interesó saber cual era su opinión sobre esta disciplina del curriculum médico. Para ello, médicos de asistencia primaria de los Centros de Salud de la provincia de las Palmas y alumnos de 6º curso de la Licenciatura en Medicina de la U.L.P.G.C., cumplimentaron un cuestionario en el que se valoraron los aspectos referidos. Ambos grupos consideraron que la Anatomía era fundamental para la exploración física y para la interpretación de técnicas de imagen. Los conocimientos más necesarios a la hora de su aplicación a la práctica y al estudio de las asignaturas clínicas fueron los de sistema nervioso y aparato locomotor. Modificarían la docencia que recibieron, incrementando el número de clases prácticas y dándole un mayor enfoque clínico. Los tres objetivos fundamentales de aprendizaje propuestos por los profesionales en ejercicio fueron: 1. Conocer las estructuras anatómicas y relaciones entre ellas 2. Reconocer estructuras anatómicas mediante técnicas de imagen y 3. Ser capaz de describir las bases anatómicas de la patología.The aim of this work was to highlight the relevance and necessity about gross anatomy knowledge had on family physicians and clinical-courses medical students. We also wanted to know their suggestions about the discipline Human Anatomy in Medical studies. To obtain our objective, physicians of Health Centres in Las Palmas and last-year medical students of U.L.P.G.C. were asked to fill a questionnaire. In this questionnaire the referred items were considered. The data obtained showed that both groups thought that Gross Anatomy was fundamental in the physical exploration and the image techniques interpretation. They considered that anatomical knowledge more necessary for

  14. Varied Search Protocols Lead to Clinically Relevant Results. A review of: Patel, Manesh R., Connie M. Schardt, Linda L. Sanders, and Sheri A. Keitz. “Randomized Trial for Answers to Clinical Questions: Evaluating a Pre‐Appraised Versus a MEDLINE Search Protocol.” Journal of the Medical Library Association 94.4 (2006: 382‐6.

    Marcy L. Brown

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine the success rate of electronic resources for answering clinical questions by comparing speed, validity, and applicability of two different protocols for searching the medical literature.Design – Randomized trial with results judged by blinded panel.Setting – Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, United States ofAmerica.Subjects – Thirty‐two 2nd and 3rd year internal medicine residents on an eight week general medicine rotation at the Duke University Medical Center.Methods – Two search protocols were developed:Protocol A: Participants searched MEDLINE first, and then searched pre‐appraised resources if needed.Protocol B: Participants searched pre‐appraised resources first, which included UpToDate, ACP JournalClub, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and DARE. The residents then searched MEDLINE if an answer could not be found in the 66 initial group of pre‐appraised resources. Residents were randomised by computer-assisted block order into four blocks of eight residents each. Two blocks were assigned to Protocol A, and two to Protocol B. Each day, residents developed at least one clinical question related to caring for patients. The questions were transcribed onto pocket-sized cards, with the answer sought later using the assigned protocol. If answers weren’t found using either protocol, searches were permitted in other available resources. When an article that answered a question was found, the resident recorded basic information about the question and the answer as well as the time required to find the answer (less than five minutes; between five and ten minutes; or more than ten minutes. Residents were to select answers that were “methodologically sound and clinically important” (384. Ten faculty members formally trained in evidence‐based medicine (EBM reviewed a subset of therapy‐related questions and answers. The reviewers, who were blinded to the search protocols

  15. Extractive Summarisation of Medical Documents

    Abeed Sarker; Diego Molla; Cecile Paris

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) practice requires practitioners to extract evidence from published medical research when answering clinical queries. Due to the time-consuming nature of this practice, there is a strong motivation for systems that can automatically summarise medical documents and help practitioners find relevant information. Aim The aim of this work is to propose an automatic query-focused, extractive summarisation approach that selects informative sentences from medic...

  16. The Improved Relevance Voxel Machine

    Ganz, Melanie; Sabuncu, Mert; Van Leemput, Koen

    The concept of sparse Bayesian learning has received much attention in the machine learning literature as a means of achieving parsimonious representations of features used in regression and classification. It is an important family of algorithms for sparse signal recovery and compressed sensing....... Hence in its current form it is reminiscent of a greedy forward feature selection algorithm. In this report, we aim to solve the problems of the original RVoxM algorithm in the spirit of [7] (FastRVM).We call the new algorithm Improved Relevance Voxel Machine (IRVoxM). Our contributions...... and enables basis selection from overcomplete dictionaries. One of the trailblazers of Bayesian learning is MacKay who already worked on the topic in his PhD thesis in 1992 [1]. Later on Tipping and Bishop developed the concept of sparse Bayesian learning [2, 3] and Tipping published the Relevance Vector...

  17. Medical tourism.

    Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Medical tourism is a burgeoning industry in our region. It involves patients travelling outside of their home country for medical treatment. This article provides an outline of the current research around medical tourism, especially its impact on Australians. Patients are increasingly seeking a variety of medical treatments abroad, particularly those involving cosmetic surgery and dental treatment, often in countries in South-East Asia. Adverse events may occur during medical treatment abroad, which raises medico-legal and insurance issues, as well as concerns regarding follow-up of patients. General practitioners need to be prepared to offer advice, including travel health advice, to patients seeking medical treatment abroad.

  18. Microdosing: Concept, application and relevance

    Tushar Tewari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of microdose pharmacokinetic studies as an essential tool in drug development is still to catch on. While this approach promises potential cost savings and a quantum leap in efficiencies of the drug development process, major hurdles still need to be overcome before the technique becomes commonplace and part of routine practice. Clear regulations in Europe and the USA have had an enabling effect. The lack of enabling provisions for microdosing studies in Indian regulation, despite low risk and manifest relevance for the local drug development industry, is inconsistent with the country′s aspirations to be among the leaders in pharmaceutical research.

  19. Medical Management

    ... org Close Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Medical Management Although there’s no cure for CMT, there are ... individualized physical therapy program. For more on medical management of CMT, see Surgery Sometimes, Bracing Often, Caution ...

  20. [Medical negligence].

    Zipper, St G

    2016-06-01

    Medical negligence is a matter of growing public interest. This review outlines various aspects of medical negligence: epidemiology, taxonomy, and the risks, causes, psychology, management and prevention of errors.

  1. Medical Illustration

    ... as medical books, journals, magazines, pharma or biotech marketing, films, online video, exhibits, posters, wall charts, educational ... of the health career profession with strong communication skills, medical illustrators work closely with clients to interpret ...

  2. Justice and medical ethics.

    Gillon, R

    1985-07-20

    Justice, in the sense of fair adjudication between conflicting claims, is held to be relevant to a wide range of issues in medical ethics. Several differing concepts of justice are briefly described, including Aristotle's formal principle of justice, libertarian theories, utilitarian theories, Marxist theories, the theory of John Rawls, and the view--held, for example, by W.D. Ross--that justice is essentially a matter of reward for individual merit.

  3. Other relevant numerical modelling papers

    Chartier, M.

    1989-01-01

    The ocean modelling is a rapidly evolving science and a large number of results have been published. Several categories of papers are of particular interest for this review: the papers published by the international atomic institutions, such as the NEA (for the CRESP or Subseabed Programs), the IAEA (for example the Safety Series, the Technical Report Series or the TECDOC), and the ICRP, and the papers concerned by more fundamental research, which are published in specific scientific literature. This paper aims to list some of the most relevant publications for the CRESP purposes. It means by no way to be exhaustive, but informative on the incontestable progress recently achieved in that field. One should note that some of these papers are so recent that their final version has not yet been published

  4. Industrial relevance of thermophilic Archaea.

    Egorova, Ksenia; Antranikian, Garabed

    2005-12-01

    The dramatic increase of newly isolated extremophilic microorganisms, analysis of their genomes and investigations of their enzymes by academic and industrial laboratories demonstrate the great potential of extremophiles in industrial (white) biotechnology. Enzymes derived from extremophiles (extremozymes) are superior to the traditional catalysts because they can perform industrial processes even under harsh conditions, under which conventional proteins are completely denatured. In particular, enzymes from thermophilic and hyperthermophilic Archaea have industrial relevance. Despite intensive investigations, our knowledge of the structure-function relationships of their enzymes is still limited. Information concerning the molecular properties of their enzymes and genes has to be obtained to be able to understand the mechanisms that are responsible for catalytic activity and stability at the boiling point of water.

  5. The Relevance of Hegel's Logic

    John W Burbidge

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hegel defines his Logic as the science that thinks about thinking.nbsp; But when we interpret that work as outlining what happens when we reason we are vulnerable to Fregersquo;s charge of psychologism.nbsp; I use Hegelrsquo;s tripartite distinction among understanding, dialectical and speculative reason as operations of pure thought to suggest how thinking can work with objective concepts.nbsp; In the last analysis, however, our ability to move from the subjective contingency of representations and ideas to the pure concepts we think develops from mechanical memory, which separates sign from sense so hat we can focus simply on the latter.nbsp; By becoming aware of the connections that underlie our thinking processes we may be able to both move beyond the abstractions of symbolic logic and clarify what informal logicians call relevance.

  6. Medical x-ray

    Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Gui Ah Auu; Husaini Salleh; Idris Besar; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Shaharuddin Mohd; Siti Najila Mohd Janib; Mohamed Ali Abdul Khader; Mahalatchimi Dave; Mohd Fazly Abdul Rahim; Ng Chee Moon; Ram Piari; Teoh Hoon Heng; Lee Peter

    2004-01-01

    This book describes the fundamental subject about medical radiography. It is a multidisciplinary field that requires cross professional input from scientists, engineers and medical doctors. However, it is presented in simple language to suit different levels of readers from x-ray operators and radiographers to physists, general practitioners and radiology specialists.The book is written in accordance to the requirements of the standard syllabus approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia for the training of medical x-ray operator and general practitioners. In general, the content is not only designed to provide relevant and essential subject for related professionals in medical radiological services such as x-ray operator, radiographer and radiologists, but also to address those in associated radiological services including nurses, medical technologists and physicists.The book is organized and arranged sequentially into 3 parts for easy reference: Radiation safety; X-ray equipment and associated facilities; Radiography practices. With proper grasping of all these parts, the radiological services could be provided with confident and the highest professional standard. Thus, medical imaging with highest quality that can provide useful diagnostic information at minimum doses and at cost effective could be assured

  7. Refusal to medical interventions.

    Palacios, G; Herreros, B; Pacho, E

    2014-10-01

    Refusal to medical interventions is the not acceptance, voluntary and free, of an indicated medical intervention. What the physician should do in case of refusal? It is understandable that the rejection of a validated medical intervention is difficult to accept by the responsible physician when raises the conflict protection of life versus freedom of choice. Therefore it is important to follow some steps to incorporate the most relevant aspects of the conflict. These steps include: 1) Give complete information to patients, informing on possible alternatives, 2) determine whether the patient can decide (age, competency and level of capacity), 3) to ascertain whether the decision is free, 4) analyze the decision with the patient, 5) to persuade, 6) if the patient kept in the rejection decision, consider conscientious objection, 7) take the decision based on the named criteria, 8) finally, if the rejection is accepted, offer available alternatives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Medical decision making and medical education: challenges and opportunities.

    Schwartz, Alan

    2011-01-01

    The Flexner Report highlighted the importance of teaching medical students to reason about uncertainty. The science of medical decision making seeks to explain how medical judgments and decisions ought ideally to be made, how they are actually made in practice, and how they can be improved, given the constraints of medical practice. The field considers both clinical decisions by or for individual patients and societal decisions designed to benefit the public. Despite the relevance of decision making to medical practice, it currently receives little formal attention in the U.S. medical school curriculum. This article suggests three roles for medical decision making in medical education. First, basic decision science would be a valuable prerequisite to medical training. Second, several decision-related competencies would be important outcomes of medical education; these include the physician's own decision skills, the ability to guide patients in shared decisions, and knowledge of health policy decisions at the societal level. Finally, decision making could serve as a unifying principle in the design of the medical curriculum, integrating other curricular content around the need to create physicians who are competent and caring decision makers.

  9. Top studies relevant to primary care practice.

    Perry, Danielle; Kolber, Michael R; Korownyk, Christina; Lindblad, Adrienne J; Ramji, Jamil; Ton, Joey; Allan, G Michael

    2018-04-01

    To summarize 10 high-quality studies from 2017 that have strong relevance to primary care practice. Study selection involved routine literature surveillance by a group of primary care health professionals. This included screening abstracts of important journals and Evidence Alerts, as well as searching the American College of Physicians Journal Club. Topics of the 2017 articles include whether treating subclinical hypothyroidism improves outcomes or symptoms; whether evolocumab reduces cardiovascular disease as well as low-density lipoprotein levels; whether lifestyle interventions reduce medication use in patients with diabetes; whether vitamin D prevents cardiovascular disease, cancer, or upper respiratory tract infections; whether canagliflozin reduces clinical events in patients with diabetes; how corticosteroid injections affect knee osteoarthritis; whether drained abscesses benefit from antibiotic treatment; whether patients with diabetes benefit from bariatric surgery; whether exenatide reduces clinical events in patients with diabetes; and whether tympanostomy tubes affect outcomes in recurrent acute otitis media or chronic otitis media. We provide brief summaries, context where needed, and final recommendations for 10 studies with potential effects on primary care. We also briefly review 5 "runner-up" studies. Research from 2017 produced several high-quality studies in diabetes management. These have demonstrated benefit for alternative therapies and offered evidence not previously available. This year's selection of studies also provided information on a variety of conditions and therapies that are, or might become, more common in primary care settings. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  10. Perspective: Organizational professionalism: relevant competencies and behaviors.

    Egener, Barry; McDonald, Walter; Rosof, Bernard; Gullen, David

    2012-05-01

    The professionalism behaviors of physicians have been extensively discussed and defined; however, the professionalism behaviors of health care organizations have not been systemically categorized or described. Defining organizational professionalism is important because the behaviors of a health care organization may substantially impact the behaviors of physicians and others within the organization as well as other institutions and the larger community. In this article, the authors discuss the following competencies of organizational professionalism, derived from ethical values: service, respect, fairness, integrity, accountability, mindfulness, and self-motivation. How nonprofit health care organizations can translate these competencies into behaviors is described. For example, incorporating metrics of population health into assessments of corporate success may increase collaboration among regional health care organizations while also benefiting the community. The unique responsibilities of leadership to model these competencies, promote them in the community, and develop relevant organizational strategies are clarified. These obligations elevate the importance of the executive leadership's capacity for self-reflection and the governing boards' responsibility for mapping operational activities to organizational mission. Lastly, the authors consider how medical organizations are currently addressing professionalism challenges. In an environment made turbulent by regulatory change and financial constraints, achieving proficiency in professionalism competencies can assist nonprofit health care organizations to promote population health and the well-being of their workforces.

  11. Vygotsky's Crisis: Argument, context, relevance.

    Hyman, Ludmila

    2012-06-01

    Vygotsky's The Historical Significance of the Crisis in Psychology (1926-1927) is an important text in the history and philosophy of psychology that has only become available to scholars in 1982 in Russian, and in 1997 in English. The goal of this paper is to introduce Vygotsky's conception of psychology to a wider audience. I argue that Vygotsky's argument about the "crisis" in psychology and its resolution can be fully understood only in the context of his social and political thinking. Vygotsky shared the enthusiasm, widespread among Russian leftist intelligentsia in the 1920s, that Soviet society had launched an unprecedented social experiment: The socialist revolution opened the way for establishing social conditions that would let the individual flourish. For Vygotsky, this meant that "a new man" of the future would become "the first and only species in biology that would create itself." He envisioned psychology as a science that would serve this humanist teleology. I propose that The Crisis is relevant today insofar as it helps us define a fundamental problem: How can we systematically account for the development of knowledge in psychology? I evaluate how Vygotsky addresses this problem as a historian of the crisis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central 40 Ca + 40 Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80≤t≤300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables

  13. Medical education... meet Michel Foucault.

    Hodges, Brian D; Martimianakis, Maria A; McNaughton, Nancy; Whitehead, Cynthia

    2014-06-01

    There have been repeated calls for the greater use of conceptual frameworks and of theory in medical education. Although it is familiar to few medical educators, Michel Foucault's work is a helpful theoretical and methodological source. This article explores what it means to use a 'Foucauldian approach', presents a sample of Foucault's historical-genealogical studies that are relevant to medical education, and introduces the work of four researchers currently undertaking Foucauldian-inspired medical education research. Although they are not without controversy, Foucauldian approaches are employed by an increasing number of scholars and are helpful in shedding light on what it is possible to think, say and be in medical education. Our hope in sharing this Foucauldian work and perspective is that we might stimulate a dialogue that is forward-looking and optimistic about the possibilities for change in medical education. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Medical marijuana.

    Marmor, J B

    1998-01-01

    Although many clinical studies suggest the medical utility of marijuana for some conditions, the scientific evidence is weak. Many patients in California are self-medicating with marijuana, and physicians need data to assess the risks and benefits. The only reasonable solution to this problem is to encourage research on the medical effects of marijuana. The current regulatory system should be modified to remove barriers to clinical research with marijuana. The NIH panel has identified several...

  15. Statistical significance versus clinical relevance.

    van Rijn, Marieke H C; Bech, Anneke; Bouyer, Jean; van den Brand, Jan A J G

    2017-04-01

    In March this year, the American Statistical Association (ASA) posted a statement on the correct use of P-values, in response to a growing concern that the P-value is commonly misused and misinterpreted. We aim to translate these warnings given by the ASA into a language more easily understood by clinicians and researchers without a deep background in statistics. Moreover, we intend to illustrate the limitations of P-values, even when used and interpreted correctly, and bring more attention to the clinical relevance of study findings using two recently reported studies as examples. We argue that P-values are often misinterpreted. A common mistake is saying that P < 0.05 means that the null hypothesis is false, and P ≥0.05 means that the null hypothesis is true. The correct interpretation of a P-value of 0.05 is that if the null hypothesis were indeed true, a similar or more extreme result would occur 5% of the times upon repeating the study in a similar sample. In other words, the P-value informs about the likelihood of the data given the null hypothesis and not the other way around. A possible alternative related to the P-value is the confidence interval (CI). It provides more information on the magnitude of an effect and the imprecision with which that effect was estimated. However, there is no magic bullet to replace P-values and stop erroneous interpretation of scientific results. Scientists and readers alike should make themselves familiar with the correct, nuanced interpretation of statistical tests, P-values and CIs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  16. Identifying factors affecting destination choice of medical tourists: a ...

    medical tourism”, has emerged as a new source of competitive advantage all over the world. The present study seeks to identify the factors that affect destination choice of medical tourists. Methods: We systematically searched relevant databases ...

  17. Medical Data Architecture Project Status

    Krihak, M.; Middour, C.; Gurram, M.; Wolfe, S.; Marker, N.; Winther, S.; Ronzano, K.; Bolles, D.; Toscano, W.; Shaw, T.

    2018-01-01

    The Medical Data Architecture (MDA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk to minimize or reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes and decrements in performance due to in-flight medical capabilities on human exploration missions. To mitigate this risk, the ExMC MDA project addresses the technical limitations identified in ExMC Gap Med 07: We do not have the capability to comprehensively process medically-relevant information to support medical operations during exploration missions. This gap identifies that the current in-flight medical data management includes a combination of data collection and distribution methods that are minimally integrated with on-board medical devices and systems. Furthermore, there are a variety of data sources and methods of data collection. For an exploration mission, the seamless management of such data will enable a more medically autonomous crew than the current paradigm. The medical system requirements are being developed in parallel with the exploration mission architecture and vehicle design. ExMC has recognized that in order to make informed decisions about a medical data architecture framework, current methods for medical data management must not only be understood, but an architecture must also be identified that provides the crew with actionable insight to medical conditions. This medical data architecture will provide the necessary functionality to address the challenges of executing a self-contained medical system that approaches crew health care delivery without assistance from ground support. Hence, the products supported by current prototype development will directly inform exploration medical system requirements.

  18. Does relevance matter in academic policy research?

    Dredge, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    A reflection on whether relevance matters in tourism policy research. A debate among tourism scholars.......A reflection on whether relevance matters in tourism policy research. A debate among tourism scholars....

  19. Medical Terminology.

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    This document is one of a series of student workbooks developed for workplace skill development courses or workshops by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey) and its partners. Designed to help employees of medical establishments learn medical terminology, this course provides information on basic word structure, body parts, suffixes and…

  20. Using the MMPI 168 with Medical Inpatients

    Erickson, Richard C.; Freeman, Charles

    1976-01-01

    Explores the potential utility of the MMPI 168 with two inpatient medical populations. Correlations and clinically relevant comparisons suggest that the MMPI 168 predicted the standard MMPI with a high degree accuracy. (Editor/RK)

  1. Science and the struggle for relevance

    Hessels, L.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304832863

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with struggles for relevance of university researchers, their efforts to make their work correspond with ruling standards of relevance and to influence these standards. Its general research question is: How to understand changes in the struggle for relevance of Dutch academic

  2. The Personal Relevance of the Social Studies.

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    Conceptualizes a personal-relevance framework derived from Ronald L. VanSickle's five areas of life integrated with four general motivating goals from Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and Richard and Patricia Schmuck's social motivation theory. Illustrates ways to apply the personal relevance framework to make social studies more relevant to…

  3. The Development of Relevance in Information Retrieval

    Mu-hsuan Huang

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to investigate the notion of relevance in information retrieval. It discusses various definitions for relevance from historical viewpoints and the characteristics of relevance judgments. Also, it introduces empirical results of important related researches.[Article content in Chinese

  4. Automated Medical Literature Retrieval

    David Hawking

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The constantly growing publication rate of medical research articles puts increasing pressure on medical specialists who need to be aware of the recent developments in their field. The currently used literature retrieval systems allow researchers to find specific papers; however the search task is still repetitive and time-consuming. Aims In this paper we describe a system that retrieves medical publications by automatically generating queries based on data from an electronic patient record. This allows the doctor to focus on medical issues and provide an improved service to the patient, with higher confidence that it is underpinned by current research. Method Our research prototype automatically generates query terms based on the patient record and adds weight factors for each term. Currently the patient’s age is taken into account with a fuzzy logic derived weight, and terms describing blood-related anomalies are derived from recent blood test results. Conditionally selected homonyms are used for query expansion. The query retrieves matching records from a local index of PubMed publications and displays results in descending relevance for the given patient. Recent publications are clearly highlighted for instant recognition by the researcher. Results Nine medical specialists from the Royal Adelaide Hospital evaluated the system and submitted pre-trial and post-trial questionnaires. Throughout the study we received positive feedback as doctors felt the support provided by the prototype was useful, and which they would like to use in their daily routine. Conclusion By supporting the time-consuming task of query formulation and iterative modification as well as by presenting the search results in order of relevance for the specific patient, literature retrieval becomes part of the daily workflow of busy professionals.

  5. Medical marijuana: medical necessity versus political agenda.

    Clark, Peter A; Capuzzi, Kevin; Fick, Cameron

    2011-12-01

    Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as an illegal Schedule I drug which has no accepted medical use. However, recent studies have shown that medical marijuana is effective in controlling chronic non-cancer pain, alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, treating wasting syndrome associated with AIDS, and controlling muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis. These studies state that the alleviating benefits of marijuana outweigh the negative effects of the drug, and recommend that marijuana be administered to patients who have failed to respond to other therapies. Despite supporting evidence, the DEA refuses to reclassify marijuana as a Schedule II drug, which would allow physicians to prescribe marijuana to suffering patients. The use of medical marijuana has continued to gain support among states, and is currently legal in 16 states and the District of Columbia. This is in stark contrast to the federal government's stance of zero-tolerance, which has led to a heated legal debate in the United States. After reviewing relevant scientific data and grounding the issue in ethical principles like beneficence and nonmaleficence, there is a strong argument for allowing physicians to prescribe marijuana. Patients have a right to all beneficial treatments and to deny them this right violates their basic human rights.

  6. Medical marijuana: Medical necessity versus political agenda

    Clark, Peter A.; Capuzzi, Kevin; Fick, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Summary Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as an illegal Schedule I drug which has no accepted medical use. However, recent studies have shown that medical marijuana is effective in controlling chronic non-cancer pain, alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, treating wasting syndrome associated with AIDS, and controlling muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis. These studies state that the alleviating benefits of marijuana outweigh the negative effects of the drug, and recommend that marijuana be administered to patients who have failed to respond to other therapies. Despite supporting evidence, the DEA refuses to reclassify marijuana as a Schedule II drug, which would allow physicians to prescribe marijuana to suffering patients. The use of medical marijuana has continued to gain support among states, and is currently legal in 16 states and the District of Columbia. This is in stark contrast to the federal government’s stance of zero-tolerance, which has led to a heated legal debate in the United States. After reviewing relevant scientific data and grounding the issue in ethical principles like beneficence and nonmaleficence, there is a strong argument for allowing physicians to prescribe marijuana. Patients have a right to all beneficial treatments and to deny them this right violates their basic human rights. PMID:22129912

  7. Reaction of aromatic diazonium salts with carrier-free radioiodine and astatine, evidence for complex formation

    Meyer, G.J.; Roessler, K.; Stoecklin, G.

    1979-01-01

    Systematic studies of the astatodiazoniation reaction and a comparison with iododediazoniation under comparable conditions are reported. The yields for all astatohalobenzenes and -toluenes were nearly constant and unaffected by the nature of the diazonium compound, its isomeric form, and the number of isomers used at the same time. Only astatofluorobenzenes were obtained at higher yields. An electron-transfer mechanism is proposed for dediazoniation at these low halide concentration levels. At sufficient thermal excitation levels the electron transfer leads to the dissociation of nitrogen, while the phenyl and halogen radicals recombine. The isomer distribution found for some of the derivatives from dediazoniation may also be due to steric effects

  8. The solvent extraction of carrier-free 90Y from 90Sr with crown ethers

    Chuang, J.T.; Lo, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    A simple solvent extraction method has been developed for the separation of 90 Y from 90 Sr. Crown ether dissolved in chloroform was used as a selective reagent and organic picrate anion was chosen as a counter ion. The effect of various factors on the extraction equilibrium constant of strontium log K ex = 9.15 was obtained from the study of the distribution coefficient versus to crown ether concentration. The separation method was simple, resulted high purity (>99.9%) and quantitative yield, and took less than half an hour. (author) 27 refs.; 4 figs.; 4 tabs

  9. Synthesis of carrier-free tritium-labeled queen bee pheromone

    Webster, F.X.; Prestwich, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    A short synthesis of [4,5- 3 H 2 ] (E)-9-oxo-2-decenoic acid (ODA), a high-specific-activity tritium-containing isotopomer of the queen bee pheromone, is described. Catalytic tritiation of the ketal of ethyl 9-oxo-4-decenoate introduces tritium into two positions, one of which is completely unactivated. Subsequent transformation by selenation, oxidation, and hydrolysis affords the labeled 9-ODA at >60 Ci/mmol. The material is suitable for biochemical studies of binding and catabolism in ovarian, antennal, and other target tissues

  10. Production of high quality sodium iodide preparations labelled with carrier free iodine-125

    Abdukayumov, M.N.; Chistyakov, P.G.; Shilin, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Work is related to the problem of high-quality Sodium Iodide preparation production and to the choice of the peptids iodination methods with the purpose of control test developing to determine the Biological activity of the above mentioned preparation

  11. Dibenzodiazepines (clozapine) and analogues were labelled with carrier-free carbon-11 and fluorine-18

    Bender, D.

    1993-12-01

    Pharmacologically active dibenzodiazepines were labelled with carbon-11 and fluorine-18, in particular the atypical neuroleptic clozapine (8-Cl-11-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-5H-dibenzo[b,e]-[1,4]-diazepine) for pharmakokinetic studies with positron emission tomography (PET). (orig./EF)

  12. Studies of the chemical behavior of carrier-free 68Ge. Pt. 2

    Mirzadeh, S.; Kahn, M.

    1986-01-01

    A determination of the 68 Ge distribution constant from the distillation of the azeotropic HCl was made. A simple correlation between the distribution constants of the 68 Ge and HCl was observed which can be expressed as D'sub(Ge)=k[D'sub(HCl)]sup(n). (orig.)

  13. Multitracer study on distribution of carrier-free radioactive isotopes in organs of rats

    Enomoto, Sh.; Ambe, Sh.; Ambe, F.; Yanaga, M.

    1996-01-01

    Multitracer, a new tracer technique developed by us, can analyze metabolism and behavior of different elements in the living bodies simultaneously. We were able to reproduce completely the result on the behavior of various elements obtained by individual experiments of our precursors only by a single run of this technique. At the same time, we could also show the behavior and interaction of many other trace elements which past researchers did not pay attention to. For example, our results on the behavior of rare-earth elements suggested that there is a correlation between their uptakes and ion radii. We also discovered that affinities of platinum and iridium for their binding proteins were changed, the latter being increased, in the case of zinc deficiency. In this article, we discuss the usefulness of the multitracer technique in the studies of trace elements in living bodies. (author). 15 refs., 2 figs

  14. Nostalgia's place among self-relevant emotions.

    van Tilburg, Wijnand A P; Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine

    2017-07-24

    How is nostalgia positioned among self-relevant emotions? We tested, in six studies, which self-relevant emotions are perceived as most similar versus least similar to nostalgia, and what underlies these similarities/differences. We used multidimensional scaling to chart the perceived similarities/differences among self-relevant emotions, resulting in two-dimensional models. The results were revealing. Nostalgia is positioned among self-relevant emotions characterised by positive valence, an approach orientation, and low arousal. Nostalgia most resembles pride and self-compassion, and least resembles embarrassment and shame. Our research pioneered the integration of nostalgia among self-relevant emotions.

  15. Cardiac Medications

    ... cholesterol from circulating in the blood. Watch an animation of how statins work. Reason for Medication Used ... Kindle Fire Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  16. Medication Guide

    ... Size Small Text Medium Text Large Text Contrast Dark on Light Light on Dark Donate Search Menu Donate What is Glaucoma? Care ... Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Where the Money Goes Have ...

  17. Medical Cyclotrons

    Friesel, D. L.; Antaya, T. A.

    Particle accelerators were initially developed to address specific scientific research goals, yet they were used for practical applications, particularly medical applications, within a few years of their invention. The cyclotron's potential for producing beams for cancer therapy and medical radioisotope production was realized with the early Lawrence cyclotrons and has continued with their more technically advanced successors — synchrocyclotrons, sector-focused cyclotrons and superconducting cyclotrons. While a variety of other accelerator technologies were developed to achieve today's high energy particles, this article will chronicle the development of one type of accelerator — the cyclotron, and its medical applications. These medical and industrial applications eventually led to the commercial manufacture of both small and large cyclotrons and facilities specifically designed for applications other than scientific research.

  18. Medical imaging

    Loshkajian, A.

    2000-01-01

    This didactical book presents the medical imaging techniques: radiography, scanner, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Examples are given for the most common pathologies in all domains of medicine. (J.S.)

  19. Medical Imaging.

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  20. Medical education.

    Krishnan, P

    1992-01-01

    In theory, the Medical Council of India (MCI) determines the standards and qualifications of medical schools. It also sanctions curricula and ensures standards. Yet no standards exist on the mode of selection in medical schools, duration of study, course content, student stipends or period of internship. It takes 4.5 years to finish medical school. Students undergo preclinical, paraclinical, and clinical training. Most courses are in English which tends to favor the urban elite. Students cannot always communicate with patients in local languages. Textbooks often provide medical examples unrelated to India. Pedagogy consists mainly of lectures and rote learning predominates. Curricula tend not to provide courses in community health. Students pick up on the elitist attitudes of the faculty. For example, faculty do not put much emphasis on community health, individual health, equity in health care delivery, and teamwork. Further the education system is not patient oriented, but hospital or disease oriented. Faculty should train students in creating sanitation programs, knowing local nutritious foods, and in making community diagnoses. Yet they tend to be practitioners 1st then educators. Further faculty are not paid well and are not always invited to take part in improving curriculum, so morale is often low. Moreover experience in health planning and management issues is not required for administrators. In addition, medical schools are not well equipped with learning aids, libraries, or teaching staff. Tax revenues finance medical education. 75% of graduating physicians set up a private practice. Further many physicians go to urban areas. 34-57% emigrate to other countries. The problems of medical education will not be solved until the political and economic system becomes more responsive to the health needs of the people.

  1. Medical tourism

    Abbas Ghanbari; Khadijeh Zirak Moradlu; Morteza Ramazani

    2014-01-01

    Medical tourism is considered as one of the tourism dimensions and it can contribute to the stabilized and dynamic development of a country's economy. Since it is cost-effective industry, most developing countries have focused on this industry and they are planning to develop this industry. Not only does Zanjan province, as the central region in medicine services, enjoy different kinds of variety and acceptable medical specialties but also it has historical, natural, and religious tourism pot...

  2. Medical Applications

    Biscari, C.; Falbo, L.

    2016-01-01

    The use of accelerators for medical applications has evolved from initial experimentation to turn-key devices commonly operating in hospitals. New applications are continuously being developed around the world, and the hadrontherapy facilities of the newest generation are placed at the frontier between industrial production and advanced R&D. An introduction to the different medical application accelerators is followed by a description of the hadrontherapy facilities, with special emphasis on ...

  3. Medical radiation

    1992-01-01

    This leaflet in the At-a-Glance Series describes the medical use of X-rays, how X-rays help in diagnosis, radiation protection of the patient, staff protection, how radioactive materials in nuclear medicine examinations help in diagnosis and the use of radiation in radiotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging, a diagnostic technique involving no ionizing radiation, is also briefly examined. The role of the NRPB in the medical use of radiation is outlined. (UK)

  4. Electives during Medical Internship

    Al-Sultan, Ali I.; Parashar, Shyam K; Al-Ghamdi, Abulmohsin A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of study was to find out the reasons for selecting elective rotations during a rotating medical internship.One hundred and seventy-eight medical interns in the College of Medicine, King Faisal University,Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the period March 2001 to August 2002 completed a questionnaire for their selection reasons with responses on a scale of 1-5.The study comprised 60% males and 98.3% Saudis. The most frequently chosen elective is Dermatology 28.1% ,radiology 20.8%, anesthesia 9.6% and otorhinolaryngology (ear, nose and throat [ENT]) 9%. Significantly, more males (89.2%) chose radiology rotation and more females (75%) chose ENT rotation.The leading reasons to choose an elective rotations are;1, to gain broad medical training and education,2, to assist in choice of future speciality and,3, being relevant to future speciality .The mean score for ENT and dermatology is higher than radiology and anesthesia for the response to participate in medical practice in different institute , while dermatology is higher than anesthesia for response to help for getting aceptance for job in the same instituteand radiology is higher than ENT and anesthesia for the response i t has infrequent or no night duties . The reason chosen reflect the educational value of electives and their important role in choosing future career. Dermatology and radiology rotations are most popular electives ,with additional and though different reasons. (author)

  5. Investigations of the chemical states of carrier-free phosphorus-32 as extracted into water from pile-irradiated sulphur; Recherches sur les etats chimiques du phosphore-32 sans entraineur obtenu par extraction aqueuse a partir de soufre irradie dans un reacteur; Issledovanie khimicheskogo sostoyaniya svobodnogo ot nositelya fosfora-32 pri izvlechenii ego v vodu iz obluchennoj v yadernom reaktore sery; Estudio de los estados quimicos del fosforo-32 libre de portador que se obtiene por extraccion acuosa del azufre irradiado en un reactor

    Dahl, J B; Birkelund, O R [Institutt for Atomenergi, Kjeller, Lillestrom (Norway)

    1962-01-15

    One of the methods of producing carrier free phosphorus-32 today is by extraction into water from pile-irradiated sulphur. The present work gives information concerning the chemical states of P{sup 32} in aqueous solutions at different steps of the routine production-process. The variation in the chemical state of P{sup 32} compounds in the final product has also been examined as a function of storage time. P{sup 32} bound as orthophosphate was found to be the main component. During the chemical processing, the amount of orthophosphate increased from about 70% at the beginning of the extraction to about 98 % in the final carrier-free P{sup 32} product. The residual amount consisted of a mixture of pyro-, tri-, tetra-, and other long-chain polyphosphates (number of P {>=} 5). No metaphosphates (ring-formed) were found in the solutions during production and storage. The results indicate that the polyphosphorus compounds were formed in the target material during irradiation. Special attention was paid to the adsorption of carrier-free P{sup 32} compounds to glassware under the existing experimental conditions. (author) [French] L'une des methodes employee a l'heure actuelle pour obtenir du phosphore-32 sans entraineur consiste a l'extraire dans l'eau a partir de soufre irradie dans un reacteur. Les auteurs donnent des indications sur l'etat chimique du phosphore-32 dans des solutions aqueuses, a differentes etapes du processus de preparation courant. Us examinent aussi les changements de l'etat chimique des composes du phosphore-32 dans le produit final en fonction de la duree de stockage. On a constate que le {sup 32}P combine sous forme d'orthophosphate etait le principal composant. Au cours du traitement chimique, la teneur en orthophosphate est passee d'environ 70% au debut de l'extraction a environ 98% lors de l'obtention du produit final sans entraineur. Le reste etait constitue d'un melange de pyro-, tri-, tetra- et autres polyphosphates a chaine longue (P

  6. Discovering relevance knowledge in data: a growing cell structures approach.

    Azuaje, F; Dubitzky, W; Black, N; Adamson, K

    2000-01-01

    Both information retrieval and case-based reasoning systems rely on effective and efficient selection of relevant data. Typically, relevance in such systems is approximated by similarity or indexing models. However, the definition of what makes data items similar or how they should be indexed is often nontrivial and time-consuming. Based on growing cell structure artificial neural networks, this paper presents a method that automatically constructs a case retrieval model from existing data. Within the case-based reasoning (CBR) framework, the method is evaluated for two medical prognosis tasks, namely, colorectal cancer survival and coronary heart disease risk prognosis. The results of the experiments suggest that the proposed method is effective and robust. To gain a deeper insight and understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the proposed model, a detailed empirical analysis of the models structural and behavioral properties is also provided.

  7. Relevance: An Interdisciplinary and Information Science Perspective

    Howard Greisdorf

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Although relevance has represented a key concept in the field of information science for evaluating information retrieval effectiveness, the broader context established by interdisciplinary frameworks could provide greater depth and breadth to on-going research in the field. This work provides an overview of the nature of relevance in the field of information science with a cursory view of how cross-disciplinary approaches to relevance could represent avenues for further investigation into the evaluative characteristics of relevance as a means for enhanced understanding of human information behavior.

  8. Medical tourism

    Abbas Ghanbari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Medical tourism is considered as one of the tourism dimensions and it can contribute to the stabilized and dynamic development of a country's economy. Since it is cost-effective industry, most developing countries have focused on this industry and they are planning to develop this industry. Not only does Zanjan province, as the central region in medicine services, enjoy different kinds of variety and acceptable medical specialties but also it has historical, natural, and religious tourism potentials. In this survey, the researcher investigated the existing potentials of Zanjan province based on descriptive - analytical tourism in offering and providing medical services and accommodation. The survey reports that offered services in tourism were not acceptable and satisfactory.

  9. Medical Applications

    Biscari, C.

    2014-12-19

    The use of accelerators for medical applications has evolved from initial experimentation to turn-key devices commonly operating in hospitals. New applications are continuously being developed around the world, and the hadrontherapy facilities of the newest generation are placed at the frontier between industrial production and advanced R&D. An introduction to the different medical application accelerators is followed by a description of the hadrontherapy facilities, with special emphasis on CNAO, and the report closes with a brief outlook on the future of this field.

  10. Medical Applications

    Biscari, C; Falbo, L

    2014-01-01

    The use of accelerators for medical applications has evolved from initial experimentation to turn-key devices commonly operating in hospitals. New applications are continuously being developed around the world, and the hadrontherapy facilities of the newest generation are placed at the frontier between industrial production and advanced R&D. An introduction to the different medical application accelerators is followed by a description of the hadrontherapy facilities, with special emphasis on CNAO, and the report closes with a brief outlook on the future of this field

  11. Medical emplotment

    Mønsted, Troels Sune

    ’. Theoretically the project departs from Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Participatory Design and is informed by Medical Informatics, Design Research and Science and Technology Studies. Methodically the project is founded on collaborative prototyping, ethnographic studies, and design interventions...... philosophy and building on theory on narrative reasoning, the dissertation offers the notions of emplotment and re-emplotment to describe how physicians marshal information from various sources, including the medical record, the patient and coSummary to form a narrative, when making sense of patients...

  12. Rationalising prescribing: Evidence, marketing and practice-relevant knowledge.

    Wadmann, Sarah; Bang, Lia E

    2015-06-01

    Initiatives in the name of 'rational pharmacotherapy' have been launched to alter what is seen as 'inappropriate' prescribing practices of physicians. Based on observations and interviews with 20 general practitioners (GPs) in 2009-2011, we explored how attempts to rationalise prescribing interact with chronic care management in Denmark. We demonstrate how attempts to rationalise prescribing by informing GPs about drug effects, adverse effects and price do not satisfy GPs' knowledge needs. We argue that, for GPs, 'rational' prescribing cannot be understood in separation from the processes that enable patients to use medication. Therefore, GPs do much more to obtain knowledge about medications than seek advice on 'rational pharmacotherapy'. For instance, GPs also seek opportunities to acquaint themselves with the material objects of medication and medical devices. We conceptualise the knowledge needs of GPs as a need for practice-relevant knowledge and argue that industry sales representatives are granted opportunity to access general practice because they understand this need of GPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The relevance of Heidegger's philosophy of technology for biomedical ethics.

    Svenaeus, Fredrik

    2013-02-01

    Heidegger's thoughts on modern technology have received much attention in many disciplines and fields, but, with a few exceptions, the influence has been sparse in biomedical ethics. The reason for this might be that Heidegger's position has been misinterpreted as being generally hostile towards modern science and technology, and the fact that Heidegger himself never subjected medical technologies to scrutiny but was concerned rather with industrial technology and information technology. In this paper, Heidegger's philosophy of modern technology is introduced and then brought to bear on medical technology. Its main relevance for biomedical ethics is found to be that the field needs to focus upon epistemological and ontological questions in the philosophy of medicine related to the structure and goal of medical practice. Heidegger's philosophy can help us to see how the scientific attitude in medicine must always be balanced by and integrated into a phenomenological way of understanding the life-world concerns of patients. The difference between the scientific and the phenomenological method in medicine is articulated by Heidegger as two different ways of studying the human body: as biological organism and as lived body. Medicine needs to acknowledge the priority of the lived body in addressing health as a way of being-in-the-world and not as the absence of disease only. A critical development of Heidegger's position can provide us with a criterion for distinguishing the uses of medical technologies that are compatible with such an endeavor from the technological projects that are not.

  14. Does relevance matter in academic policy research

    Dredge, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    A reflection on whether relevance matters in tourism policy research, and if so, to whom/what should it matter......A reflection on whether relevance matters in tourism policy research, and if so, to whom/what should it matter...

  15. Inoculating Relevance Feedback Against Poison Pills

    Dehghani, Mostafa; Azarbonyad, Hosein; Kamps, Jaap; Hiemstra, Djoerd; Marx, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Relevance Feedback is a common approach for enriching queries, given a set of explicitly or implicitly judged documents to improve the performance of the retrieval. Although it has been shown that on average, the overall performance of retrieval will be improved after relevance feedback, for some

  16. Relevant cost information for order acceptance decisions

    Wouters, M.J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Some economic considerations for order acceptance decisions are discussed. The relevant economic considerations for order acceptance are widely discussed in the literature: only those costs are relevant which would be avoidable by not accepting the order incremental costs plus opportunity costs .

  17. Android Smartphone Relevance to Military Weather Applications

    2011-10-01

    lithium -ion battery that may be replaced by the user (unlike Apple iPod Touch devices), thus spare batteries can be carried. If there is only sporadic...Android Smartphone Relevance to Military Weather Applications by David Sauter ARL-TR-5793 October 2011...Android Smartphone Relevance to Military Weather Applications David Sauter Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL

  18. Using small XML elements to support relevance

    G. Ramirez Camps (Georgina); T.H.W. Westerveld (Thijs); A.P. de Vries (Arjen)

    2006-01-01

    htmlabstractSmall XML elements are often estimated relevant by the retrieval model but they are not desirable retrieval units. This paper presents a generic model that exploits the information obtained from small elements. We identify relationships between small and relevant elements and use this

  19. Translation as secondary communication. The relevance theory ...

    Ernst-August Gutt started one of the greatest translation debates of the past ten years when he suggested that relevance theory holds the key to providing a unified account of translation. The bulk of the debate has been between practitioners of functional equivalence and advocates of a relevance theoretic approach to ...

  20. Intelligent distributed medical image management

    Garcia, Hong-Mei C.; Yun, David Y.

    1995-05-01

    The rapid advancements in high performance global communication have accelerated cooperative image-based medical services to a new frontier. Traditional image-based medical services such as radiology and diagnostic consultation can now fully utilize multimedia technologies in order to provide novel services, including remote cooperative medical triage, distributed virtual simulation of operations, as well as cross-country collaborative medical research and training. Fast (efficient) and easy (flexible) retrieval of relevant images remains a critical requirement for the provision of remote medical services. This paper describes the database system requirements, identifies technological building blocks for meeting the requirements, and presents a system architecture for our target image database system, MISSION-DBS, which has been designed to fulfill the goals of Project MISSION (medical imaging support via satellite integrated optical network) -- an experimental high performance gigabit satellite communication network with access to remote supercomputing power, medical image databases, and 3D visualization capabilities in addition to medical expertise anywhere and anytime around the country. The MISSION-DBS design employs a synergistic fusion of techniques in distributed databases (DDB) and artificial intelligence (AI) for storing, migrating, accessing, and exploring images. The efficient storage and retrieval of voluminous image information is achieved by integrating DDB modeling and AI techniques for image processing while the flexible retrieval mechanisms are accomplished by combining attribute- based and content-based retrievals.

  1. Evolutionary relevance facilitates visual information processing.

    Jackson, Russell E; Calvillo, Dusti P

    2013-11-03

    Visual search of the environment is a fundamental human behavior that perceptual load affects powerfully. Previously investigated means for overcoming the inhibitions of high perceptual load, however, generalize poorly to real-world human behavior. We hypothesized that humans would process evolutionarily relevant stimuli more efficiently than evolutionarily novel stimuli, and evolutionary relevance would mitigate the repercussions of high perceptual load during visual search. Animacy is a significant component to evolutionary relevance of visual stimuli because perceiving animate entities is time-sensitive in ways that pose significant evolutionary consequences. Participants completing a visual search task located evolutionarily relevant and animate objects fastest and with the least impact of high perceptual load. Evolutionarily novel and inanimate objects were located slowest and with the highest impact of perceptual load. Evolutionary relevance may importantly affect everyday visual information processing.

  2. Evolutionary Relevance Facilitates Visual Information Processing

    Russell E. Jackson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Visual search of the environment is a fundamental human behavior that perceptual load affects powerfully. Previously investigated means for overcoming the inhibitions of high perceptual load, however, generalize poorly to real-world human behavior. We hypothesized that humans would process evolutionarily relevant stimuli more efficiently than evolutionarily novel stimuli, and evolutionary relevance would mitigate the repercussions of high perceptual load during visual search. Animacy is a significant component to evolutionary relevance of visual stimuli because perceiving animate entities is time-sensitive in ways that pose significant evolutionary consequences. Participants completing a visual search task located evolutionarily relevant and animate objects fastest and with the least impact of high perceptual load. Evolutionarily novel and inanimate objects were located slowest and with the highest impact of perceptual load. Evolutionary relevance may importantly affect everyday visual information processing.

  3. Medical negligence

    Enrique

    19. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • August 2004. Abstract. The progress made in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine has resulted in an increase in the number of malprac- tice suits brought against medical practitioners. To constitute negligence it must be shown that the conduct of the accused did not measure up to the.

  4. Medical Devices

    Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Mahieu, H.F.; Geertsema, A.A.; Hermann, I.F.; van Horn, J.R.; Hummel, J. Marjan; van Loon, J.P.; Mihaylov, D.; van der Plaats, A.; Schraffordt Koops, H.; Schutte, H.K.; Veth, R.P.H.; de Vries, M.P.; Rakhorst, G.; Shi, Donglu

    2004-01-01

    The development of new medical devices is a very time-consuming and costly process. Besides the time between the initial idea and the time that manufacturing and testing of prototypes takes place, the time needed for the development of production facilities, production of test series, marketing,

  5. Medical Malpractice

    Grembi, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    MM first came to the attention of policy makers primarily in the USA where, from the 1970s, healthcare providers denounced problems in getting insurance for medical liability, pointing out to a crisis in the MM insurance market (Sage WM (2003) Understanding the first malpractice crisis of the 21th...

  6. Medical marijuana

    ... different amounts of cannabinoids. This sometimes makes the effects of medical marijuana hard to predict or control. The effects also ... wasting syndrome) Severe muscle spasms Multiple sclerosis Side Effects ... physical symptoms from using marijuana include: A fast or irregular heartbeat Dizziness Slow ...

  7. [Medical geography].

    Hauri, D

    2007-10-17

    Hippocrates already noted that geographical factors such as climate, relief, geology but also settlement patterns had influenced the distribution of diseases. The task of medical geography is to investigate the associations between geographical factors and diseases. Thereby, geographic techniques and concepts are applied on health problems. Of particular importance is the mapping of diseases whose causes are environmental-related. In addition, epidemiological, ecological but also social scientific studies play an important part in the investigation of the associations between geographical factors and diseases. In order to understand the associations between the spatial distribution of diseases and environmental exposures, geographic information systems as well as statistical analyses have recently become more important. Some authors regard medical geography merely as supporting discipline of medicine. Nevertheless, as men and environment future and as they play an important part in the diffusion of diseases being regarded as defeated, medical geography will play an important part concerning medical questions. Especially travel medicine will rely on geographic knowledge, if a patient has to be consulted who plans to travel to an unknown country of which knowledge on the geographical distribution and ecology of diseases will be necessary.

  8. Botany in Edinburgh's Medical Curriculum.

    Wilson, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    In the early 18th century, at the founding of Edinburgh University Medical School, the study of botany was regarded as an essential component of medical training. Botanical teaching began as basic instruction in the recognition of medical plants, considered a vital aspect of a physician's Materia Medica studies. Over the next hundred years growing importance was given to the study of botany as a science, its popularity peaking under John Hutton Balfour's tenure as Professor (1845-1879). The relevance of botanical study later declined in the undergraduate medical curriculum until its cessation in 1961 .This paper considers the history of botanical studies in Edinburgh, including the reasons for its introduction and its changing importance over time.

  9. Evolutionary medicine: update on the relevance to family practice.

    Naugler, Christopher T

    2008-09-01

    To review the relevance of evolutionary medicine to family practice and family physician training. Articles were located through a MEDLINE search, using the key words evolution, Darwin, and adaptation. Most references presented level III evidence (expert opinion), while a minority provided level II evidence (epidemiologic studies). Evolutionary medicine deals with the interplay of biology and the environment in the understanding of human disease. Yet medical schools have virtually ignored the need for family physicians to have more than a cursory knowledge of this topic. A review of the main trends in this field most relevant to family practice revealed that a basic knowledge of evolutionary medicine might help in explaining the causation of diseases to patients. Evolutionary medicine has also proven key to explaining the reasons for the development of antibiotic resistance and has the potential to explain cancer pathogenesis. As an organizing principle, this field also has potential in the teaching of family medicine. Evolutionary medicine should be studied further and incorporated into medical training and practice. Its practical utility will be proven through the generation of testable hypotheses and their application in relation to disease causation and possible prevention.

  10. Mobile medical image retrieval

    Duc, Samuel; Depeursinge, Adrien; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2011-03-01

    Images are an integral part of medical practice for diagnosis, treatment planning and teaching. Image retrieval has gained in importance mainly as a research domain over the past 20 years. Both textual and visual retrieval of images are essential. In the process of mobile devices becoming reliable and having a functionality equaling that of formerly desktop clients, mobile computing has gained ground and many applications have been explored. This creates a new field of mobile information search & access and in this context images can play an important role as they often allow understanding complex scenarios much quicker and easier than free text. Mobile information retrieval in general has skyrocketed over the past year with many new applications and tools being developed and all sorts of interfaces being adapted to mobile clients. This article describes constraints of an information retrieval system including visual and textual information retrieval from the medical literature of BioMedCentral and of the RSNA journals Radiology and Radiographics. Solutions for mobile data access with an example on an iPhone in a web-based environment are presented as iPhones are frequently used and the operating system is bound to become the most frequent smartphone operating system in 2011. A web-based scenario was chosen to allow for a use by other smart phone platforms such as Android as well. Constraints of small screens and navigation with touch screens are taken into account in the development of the application. A hybrid choice had to be taken to allow for taking pictures with the cell phone camera and upload them for visual similarity search as most producers of smart phones block this functionality to web applications. Mobile information access and in particular access to images can be surprisingly efficient and effective on smaller screens. Images can be read on screen much faster and relevance of documents can be identified quickly through the use of images contained in

  11. Astrophysical relevance of γ transition energies

    Rauscher, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The relevant γ energy range is explicitly identified where additional γ strength must be located to have an impact on astrophysically relevant reactions. It is shown that folding the energy dependences of the transmission coefficients and the level density leads to maximal contributions for γ energies of 2≤E γ ≤4 unless quantum selection rules allow isolated states to contribute. Under this condition, electric dipole transitions dominate. These findings allow us to more accurately judge the relevance of modifications of the γ strength for astrophysics

  12. Neutrophil programming dynamics and its disease relevance.

    Ran, Taojing; Geng, Shuo; Li, Liwu

    2017-11-01

    Neutrophils are traditionally considered as first responders to infection and provide antimicrobial host defense. However, recent advances indicate that neutrophils are also critically involved in the modulation of host immune environments by dynamically adopting distinct functional states. Functionally diverse neutrophil subsets are increasingly recognized as critical components mediating host pathophysiology. Despite its emerging significance, molecular mechanisms as well as functional relevance of dynamically programmed neutrophils remain to be better defined. The increasing complexity of neutrophil functions may require integrative studies that address programming dynamics of neutrophils and their pathophysiological relevance. This review aims to provide an update on the emerging topics of neutrophil programming dynamics as well as their functional relevance in diseases.

  13. Medical imaging

    Townsend, David W

    1996-01-01

    Since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology almost 25 years ago, non-invasive imaging has become firmly established as an essential tool in the diagnosis of disease. Fully three-dimensional imaging of internal organs is now possible, b and for studies which explore the functional status of the body. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function are available, and scanners which combine anatomical and functional imaging in a single device are under development. Such techniques have been made possible through r ecent technological and mathematical advances. This series of lectures will review both the physical basis of medical imaging techniques using X-rays, gamma and positron emitting radiosiotopes, and nuclear magnetic resonance, and the mathematical methods used to reconstruct three-dimentional distributions from projection data. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simple radiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo biochemistry. They ...

  14. Medical imaging

    Elliott, Alex

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic medical imaging is a fundamental part of the practice of modern medicine and is responsible for the expenditure of considerable amounts of capital and revenue monies in healthcare systems around the world. Much research and development work is carried out, both by commercial companies and the academic community. This paper reviews briefly each of the major diagnostic medical imaging techniques-X-ray (planar and CT), ultrasound, nuclear medicine (planar, SPECT and PET) and magnetic resonance. The technical challenges facing each are highlighted, with some of the most recent developments. In terms of the future, interventional/peri-operative imaging, the advancement of molecular medicine and gene therapy are identified as potential areas of expansion

  15. Medication Errors - A Review

    Vinay BC; Nikhitha MK; Patel Sunil B

    2015-01-01

    In this present review article, regarding medication errors its definition, medication error problem, types of medication errors, common causes of medication errors, monitoring medication errors, consequences of medication errors, prevention of medication error and managing medication errors have been explained neatly and legibly with proper tables which is easy to understand.

  16. Datamining on distributed medical databases

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak

    2004-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis focuses on clustering techniques for Knowledge Discovery in Databases. Various data mining tasks relevant for medical applications are described and discussed. A general framework which combines data projection and data mining and interpretation is presented. An overview...... is available. If data is unlabeled, then it is possible to generate keywords (in case of textual data) or key-patterns, as an informative representation of the obtained clusters. The methods are applied on simple artificial data sets, as well as collections of textual and medical data. In Danish: Denne ph...

  17. The foundation of the concept of relevance

    Hjørland, Birger

    2010-01-01

    that what was regarded as the most fundamental view by Saracevic in 1975 has not since been considered (with very few exceptions). Other views, which are based on less fruitful assumptions, have dominated the discourse on relevance in information retrieval and information science. Many authors have...... reexamined the concept of relevance in information science, but have neglected the subject knowledge view, hence basic theoretical assumptions seem not to have been properly addressed. It is as urgent now as it was in 1975 seriously to consider “the subject knowledge view” of relevance (which may also...... be termed “the epistemological view”). The concept of relevance, like other basic concepts, is influenced by overall approaches to information science, such as the cognitive view and the domain-analytic view. There is today a trend toward a social paradigm for information science. This paper offers...

  18. Exploring Educational Quality and Relevance through Integrating ...

    Exploring Educational Quality and Relevance through Integrating Environmental and Social Issues in Science Education. ... However, the new contextualised concept of learning and teaching was applied only to one of them. A post-test was ...

  19. Has Financial Statement Information become Less Relevant?

    Thinggaard, Frank; Damkier, Jesper

    This paper presents insights into the question of whether accounting information based on the EU’s Accounting Directives has become less value-relevant to investors over time. The study is based on a research design first used by Francis and Schipper (1999), where value-relevance is measured......? The sample is based on non-financial companies listed on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange in the period 1984-2002. Our analyses show that all the applied accounting measures are value-relevant as investment strategies based on the information earn positive market-adjusted returns in our sample period....... The results provide some indication of a decline in the value-relevance of earnings information in the 1984-2001 period, and mixed, but not statistically reliable, evidence for accounting measures where book value information and asset values are also extracted from financial statements. The results seem...

  20. First Approval of Improved Medical Device Conditional on Use-Result Survey in Japan - Regulatory Review of Polymer-Free Drug-Coated BioFreedom Coronary Stent.

    Konishi, Akihide; Ho, Mami; Shirai, Yuko; Shirato, Haruki

    2018-05-25

    A prospective randomized clinical trial showed that the BioFreedom stent (Biosensors International), which is a polymer-free and carrier-free drug-coated stent, was significantly superior to a bare-metal stent (BMS) in patients at high bleeding risk who were receiving a 1-month course of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). However, the stent thrombosis rate (2.01% for BioFreedom vs. 2.20% for BMS) was 4-6-fold higher than that of approved drug-eluting stents based on real-world data in Japan. Furthermore, the frequency of stent thrombosis at more than 1 month with the BioFreedom stent was slightly higher than that at less than 1 month. This result suggested that it would not be acceptable to stop DAPT universally at 1 month. Thus, the target patients for the BioFreedom stent are unspecified patients at high bleeding risk needing to continue DAPT for as long as necessary in Japan. Therefore, based on the pre- and post-marketing balance of medical devices regulations, regulatory approval was given for unspecified patients conditionally upon real-world data collection of 2,000 patients with a Use-Results Survey, instead of conducting additional pre-marketing clinical trial(s). The Use-Results Survey System is part of a strategy to expedite patients' access to innovative medical devices and to accelerate the development of medical devices.

  1. Medical Malpractice Phenomena: Signals for Changing Medical and Health Care Values

    Brødsgaard, I.; Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Excellent discussion of the economic factors such as medical malpractice and corporate medicine that have begun to interfere with the doctor-patient relationship and why this relationship is so essential in order to prevent medical malpractice. Issues of quality assurance are relevant to the doctor-patient...... relationship and the quality of health care....

  2. A national medical cyclotron facility: report to the Minister of Health by the Medical Cyclotron Committee

    1985-01-01

    Research and training in nuclear medicine in Australia are both limited by the lack of a medical cyclotron facility. The Committee recommends the establishment of a national medical cyclotron to provide a supply of short-lived radioisotopes for research in relevant fields of medicine, and for diagnostic use in nuclear medicine

  3. Development of clinically relevant implantable pressure sensors: perspectives and challenges.

    Clausen, Ingelin; Glott, Thomas

    2014-09-22

    This review describes different aspects to consider when developing implantable pressure sensor systems. Measurement of pressure is in general highly important in clinical practice and medical research. Due to the small size, light weight and low energy consumption Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology represents new possibilities for monitoring of physiological parameters inside the human body. Development of clinical relevant sensors requires close collaboration between technological experts and medical clinicians.  Site of operation, size restrictions, patient safety, and required measurement range and resolution, are only some conditions that must be taken into account. An implantable device has to operate under very hostile conditions. Long-term in vivo pressure measurements are particularly demanding because the pressure sensitive part of the sensor must be in direct or indirect physical contact with the medium for which we want to detect the pressure. New sensor packaging concepts are demanded and must be developed through combined effort between scientists in MEMS technology, material science, and biology. Before launching a new medical device on the market, clinical studies must be performed. Regulatory documents and international standards set the premises for how such studies shall be conducted and reported.

  4. The medical humanities and the perils of curricular integration.

    Chiavaroli, Neville; Ellwood, Constance

    2012-12-01

    The advent of integration as a feature of contemporary medical curricula can be seen as an advantage for the medical humanities in that it provides a clear implementation strategy for the inclusion of medical humanities content and/or perspectives, while also making its relevance to medical education more apparent. This paper discusses an example of integration of humanities content into a graduate medical course, raises questions about the desirability of an exclusively integrated approach, and argues for the value of retaining a discrete and coherent disciplinary presence for the medical humanities in medical curricula.

  5. New conducted electrical weapons: Electrical safety relative to relevant standards.

    Panescu, Dorin; Nerheim, Max; Kroll, Mark W; Brave, Michael A

    2017-07-01

    We have previously published about TASER ® conducted electrical weapons (CEW) compliance with international standards. CEWs deliver electrical pulses that can inhibit a person's neuromuscular control or temporarily incapacitate. An eXperimental Rotating-Field (XRF) waveform CEW and the X2 CEW are new 2-shot electrical weapon models designed to target a precise amount of delivered charge per pulse. They both can deploy 1 or 2 dart pairs, delivered by 2 separate cartridges. Additionally, the XRF controls delivery of incapacitating pulses over 4 field vectors, in a rotating sequence. As in our previous study, we were motivated by the need to understand the cardiac safety profile of these new CEWs. The goal of this paper is to analyze the nominal electrical outputs of TASER XRF and X2 CEWs in reference to provisions of all relevant international standards that specify safety requirements for electrical medical devices and electrical fences. Although these standards do not specifically mention CEWs, they are the closest electrical safety standards and hence give very relevant guidance. The outputs of several TASER XRF and X2 CEWs were measured under normal operating conditions. The measurements were compared against manufacturer specifications. CEWs electrical output parameters were reviewed against relevant safety requirements of UL 69, IEC 60335-2-76 Ed 2.1, IEC 60479-1, IEC 60479-2, AS/NZS 60479.1, AS/NZS 60479.2, IEC 60601-1 and BS EN 60601-1. Our study confirmed that the nominal electrical outputs of TASER XRF and X2 CEWs lie within safety bounds specified by relevant standards.

  6. Medical robotics

    Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    In this book, we present medical robotics, its evolution over the last 30 years in terms of architecture, design and control, and the main scientific and clinical contributions to the field. For more than two decades, robots have been part of hospitals and have progressively become a common tool for the clinician. Because this domain has now reached a certain level of maturity it seems important and useful to provide a state of the scientific, technological and clinical achievements and still open issues. This book describes the short history of the domain, its specificity and constraints, and

  7. Inferring relevance in a changing world

    Robert C Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement learning models of human and animal learning usually concentrate on how we learn the relationship between different stimuli or actions and rewards. However, in real world situations stimuli are ill-defined. On the one hand, our immediate environment is extremely multi-dimensional. On the other hand, in every decision-making scenario only a few aspects of the environment are relevant for obtaining reward, while most are irrelevant. Thus a key question is how do we learn these relevant dimensions, that is, how do we learn what to learn about? We investigated this process of representation learning experimentally, using a task in which one stimulus dimension was relevant for determining reward at each point in time. As in real life situations, in our task the relevant dimension can change without warning, adding ever-present uncertainty engendered by a constantly changing environment. We show that human performance on this task is better described by a suboptimal strategy based on selective attention and serial hypothesis testing rather than a normative strategy based on probabilistic inference. From this, we conjecture that the problem of inferring relevance in general scenarios is too computationally demanding for the brain to solve optimally. As a result the brain utilizes approximations, employing these even in simplified scenarios in which optimal representation learning is tractable, such as the one in our experiment.

  8. Medical robotics.

    Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Baroni, Guido; Casolo, Federico; De Momi, Elena; Gini, Giuseppina; Matteucci, Matteo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) and mechatronics play a basic role in medical robotics and computer-aided therapy. In the last three decades, in fact, ICT technology has strongly entered the health-care field, bringing in new techniques to support therapy and rehabilitation. In this frame, medical robotics is an expansion of the service and professional robotics as well as other technologies, as surgical navigation has been introduced especially in minimally invasive surgery. Localization systems also provide treatments in radiotherapy and radiosurgery with high precision. Virtual or augmented reality plays a role for both surgical training and planning and for safe rehabilitation in the first stage of the recovery from neurological diseases. Also, in the chronic phase of motor diseases, robotics helps with special assistive devices and prostheses. Although, in the past, the actual need and advantage of navigation, localization, and robotics in surgery and therapy has been in doubt, today, the availability of better hardware (e.g., microrobots) and more sophisticated algorithms(e.g., machine learning and other cognitive approaches)has largely increased the field of applications of these technologies,making it more likely that, in the near future, their presence will be dramatically increased, taking advantage of the generational change of the end users and the increasing request of quality in health-care delivery and management.

  9. Twelve Tips for teaching medical professionalism at all levels of medical education.

    Al-Eraky, Mohamed Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Review of studies published in medical education journals over the last decade reveals that teaching medical professionalism is essential, yet challenging. According to a recent Best Evidence in Medical Education (BEME) guide, there is no consensus on a theoretical or practical model to integrate the teaching of professionalism into medical education. The aim of this article is to outline a practical manual for teaching professionalism at all levels of medical education. Drawing from research literature and author's experience, Twelve Tips are listed and organised in four clusters with relevance to (1) the context, (2) the teachers, (3) the curriculum, and (4) the networking. With a better understanding of the guiding educational principles for teaching medical professionalism, medical educators will be able to teach one of the most challenging constructs in medical education.

  10. Medical revolution in Argentina.

    Ballarin, V L; Isoardi, R A

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the major Argentineans contributors, medical physicists and scientists, in medical imaging and the development of medical imaging in Argentina. The following are presented: history of medical imaging in Argentina: the pioneers; medical imaging and medical revolution; nuclear medicine imaging; ultrasound imaging; and mathematics, physics, and electronics in medical image research: a multidisciplinary endeavor.

  11. Passage relevance models for genomics search

    Frieder Ophir

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a passage relevance model for integrating syntactic and semantic evidence of biomedical concepts and topics using a probabilistic graphical model. Component models of topics, concepts, terms, and document are represented as potential functions within a Markov Random Field. The probability of a passage being relevant to a biologist's information need is represented as the joint distribution across all potential functions. Relevance model feedback of top ranked passages is used to improve distributional estimates of query concepts and topics in context, and a dimensional indexing strategy is used for efficient aggregation of concept and term statistics. By integrating multiple sources of evidence including dependencies between topics, concepts, and terms, we seek to improve genomics literature passage retrieval precision. Using this model, we are able to demonstrate statistically significant improvements in retrieval precision using a large genomics literature corpus.

  12. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... July 2017 Print Jump to Topic Medications for IBS Laxatives Anticholinergic/Antispasmodic Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, ...

  13. Smoking cessation medications

    Smoking cessation - medications; Smokeless tobacco - medications; Medications for stopping tobacco ... Smoking cessation medicines can: Help with the craving for tobacco. Help you with withdrawal symptoms. Keep you ...

  14. Identity theory and personality theory: mutual relevance.

    Stryker, Sheldon

    2007-12-01

    Some personality psychologists have found a structural symbolic interactionist frame and identity theory relevant to their work. This frame and theory, developed in sociology, are first reviewed. Emphasized in the review are a multiple identity conception of self, identities as internalized expectations derived from roles embedded in organized networks of social interaction, and a view of social structures as facilitators in bringing people into networks or constraints in keeping them out, subsequently, attention turns to a discussion of the mutual relevance of structural symbolic interactionism/identity theory and personality theory, looking to extensions of the current literature on these topics.

  15. Medical humanities in the undergraduate medical curriculum.

    Supe, Avinash

    2012-01-01

    The medical humanities have been introduced in medical curricula over the past 30 years in the western world. Having medical humanities in a medical school curriculum can nurture positive attitudes in the regular work of a clinician and contribute equally to personality development. Though substantial evidence in favour of a medical humanities curriculum may be lacking, the feedback is positive. It is recommended that medical humanities be introduced into the curriculum of every medical school with the purpose of improving the quality of healthcare, and the attitudes of medical graduates.

  16. Use of the analytic hierarchy process to prioritize patient-relevant endpoints of antidepressant treatment

    van Manen, Jeanette Gabrielle; Hummel, J. Marjan; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Volz, F.; Gerber, A.; Danner, M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In deciding about coverage of new medical technology, multiple clinical outcomes are used to support reimbursement claims. Neither the real world value nor the relevance of these outcome measures for patients is systematically assessed. Hence, there is growing interest in the use of

  17. Clinical relevance of routinely measured vital signs in hospitalized patients: a systematic review

    Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Verweij, Lotte; Lucas, Cees; Ludikhuize, Jeroen; Goslings, J. Carel; Legemate, Dink A.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-01-01

    Conflicting evidence exists on the effectiveness of routinely measured vital signs on the early detection of increased probability of adverse events. To assess the clinical relevance of routinely measured vital signs in medically and surgically hospitalized patients through a systematic review.

  18. Medical telesensors

    Ferrell, Trinidad L.; Crilly, P. B.; Smith, S. F.; Wintenberg, Alan L.; Britton, Charles L., Jr.; Morrison, Gilbert W.; Ericson, M. N.; Hedden, D.; Bouldin, Donald W.; Passian, A.; Downey, Todd R.; Wig, A. G.; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    1998-05-01

    Medical telesensors are self-contained integrated circuits for measuring and transmitting vital signs over a distance of approximately 1-2 meters. The circuits are unhoused and contain a sensor, signal processing and modulation electronics, a spread-spectrum transmitter, an antenna and a thin-film battery. We report on a body-temperature telesensor, which is sufficiently small to be placed on a tympanic membrane in a child's ear. We also report on a pulse-oximeter telesensor and a micropack receiver/long- range transmitter unit, which receives form a telesensor array and analyzes and re-transmits the vital signs over a longer range. Signal analytics are presented for the pulse oximeter, which is currently in the form of a finger ring. A multichip module is presented as the basic signal-analysis component. The module contains a microprocessor, a field=programmable gate array, memory elements and other components necessary for determining trauma and reporting signals.

  19. [MEDICAL CANNABIS].

    Naftali, Timna

    2016-02-01

    The cannabis plant has been known to humanity for centuries as a remedy for pain, diarrhea and inflammation. Current research is inspecting the use of cannabis for many diseases, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, dystonia, and chronic pain. In inflammatory conditions cannabinoids improve pain in rheumatoid arthritis and:pain and diarrhea in Crohn's disease. Despite their therapeutic potential, cannabinoids are not free of side effects including psychosis, anxiety, paranoia, dependence and abuse. Controlled clinical studies investigating the therapeutic potential of cannabis are few and small, whereas pressure for expanding cannabis use is increasing. Currently, as long as cannabis is classified as an illicit drug and until further controlled studies are performed, the use of medical cannabis should be limited to patients who failed conventional better established treatment.

  20. [Marketing as a tool in the medical institution management].

    Petrova, N G; Balokhina, S A

    2009-01-01

    The contemporary social economic conditions dictate the necessity to change tactics and strategy of functioning of medical institutions of different property forms. Marketing, alongside with management is to become a leading concept of administration of medical institutions. It should be a framework for systematic collection, registration and analysis of data relevant to the medical services market. The issues of the implementation of marketing concept in the practical everyday activities of commercial medical organization providing cosmetology services to population of metropolis.

  1. Bible Translation And Relevance Theory | Deist | Stellenbosch ...

    Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics Plus. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22 (1992) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Bible Translation And Relevance Theory. F Deist ...

  2. Relevant Scatterers Characterization in SAR Images

    Chaabouni, Houda; Datcu, Mihai

    2006-11-01

    Recognizing scenes in a single look meter resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, requires the capability to identify relevant signal signatures in condition of variable image acquisition geometry, arbitrary objects poses and configurations. Among the methods to detect relevant scatterers in SAR images, we can mention the internal coherence. The SAR spectrum splitted in azimuth generates a series of images which preserve high coherence only for particular object scattering. The detection of relevant scatterers can be done by correlation study or Independent Component Analysis (ICA) methods. The present article deals with the state of the art for SAR internal correlation analysis and proposes further extensions using elements of inference based on information theory applied to complex valued signals. The set of azimuth looks images is analyzed using mutual information measures and an equivalent channel capacity is derived. The localization of the "target" requires analysis in a small image window, thus resulting in imprecise estimation of the second order statistics of the signal. For a better precision, a Hausdorff measure is introduced. The method is applied to detect and characterize relevant objects in urban areas.

  3. Seeking Relevance: American Political Science and America

    Maranto, Robert; Woessner, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors talk about the relevance of American political science and America. Political science has enormous strengths in its highly talented practitioners and sophisticated methods. However, its disconnection from its host society, while not so severe as for fields like English and sociology, nonetheless poses an existential…

  4. Is Enterprise Education Relevant to Social Enterprise?

    Bridge, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Both enterprise education and social enterprise have become fashionable but what, if any, should be the connections between them? The purpose of this paper is to explore those connections and to reflect on what relevance the two concepts might have for each other. Design/methodology/approach: Both enterprise education and social…

  5. The Relevant Physical Trace in Criminal Investigation

    Durdica Hazard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A criminal investigation requires the forensic scientist to search and to interpret vestiges of a criminal act that happened in the past. The forensic scientist is one of the many stakeholders who take part in the information quest within the criminal justice system. She reads the investigation scene in search of physical traces that should enable her to tell the story of the offense/crime that allegedly occurred. The challenge for any investigator is to detect and recognize relevant physical traces in order to provide clues for investigation and intelligence purposes, and that will constitute sound and relevant evidence for the court. This article shows how important it is to consider the relevancy of physical traces from the beginning of the investigation and what might influence the evaluation process. The exchange and management of information between the investigation stakeholders are important. Relevancy is a dimension that needs to be understood from the standpoints of law enforcement personnel and forensic scientists with the aim of strengthening investigation and ultimately the overall judicial process.

  6. Interpersonal communication: It's relevance to nursing practice ...

    This paper is aimed at highlighting how essential interpersonal communication is necessary for establishing rapport, understanding the needs of the patients and planning effective intervention for meeting holistic health care. To be continually relevant, Nurses have to improve on their communication skills to meet the ...

  7. Inferring feature relevances from metric learning

    Schulz, Alexander; Mokbel, Bassam; Biehl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Powerful metric learning algorithms have been proposed in the last years which do not only greatly enhance the accuracy of distance-based classifiers and nearest neighbor database retrieval, but which also enable the interpretability of these operations by assigning explicit relevance weights...

  8. The Relevance of Causal Social Construction

    Marques Teresa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Social constructionist claims are surprising and interesting when they entail that presumably natural kinds are in fact socially constructed. The claims are interesting because of their theoretical and political importance. Authors like Díaz-León argue that constitutive social construction is more relevant for achieving social justice than causal social construction. This paper challenges this claim. Assuming there are socially salient groups that are discriminated against, the paper presents a dilemma: if there were no constitutively constructed social kinds, the causes of the discrimination of existing social groups would have to be addressed, and understanding causal social construction would be relevant to achieve social justice. On the other hand, not all possible constitutively socially constructed kinds are actual social kinds. If an existing social group is constitutively constructed as a social kind K, the fact that it actually exists as a K has social causes. Again, causal social construction is relevant. The paper argues that (i for any actual social kind X, if X is constitutively socially constructed as K, then it is also causally socially constructed; and (ii causal social construction is at least as relevant as constitutive social construction for concerns of social justice. For illustration, I draw upon two phenomena that are presumed to contribute towards the discrimination of women: (i the poor performance effects of stereotype threat, and (ii the silencing effects of gendered language use.

  9. The economic lot size and relevant costs

    Corbeij, M.H.; Jansen, R.A.; Grübström, R.W.; Hinterhuber, H.H.; Lundquist, J.

    1993-01-01

    In many accounting textbooks it is strongly argued that decisions should always be evaluated on relevant costs; that is variable costs and opportunity costs. Surprisingly, when it comes to Economic Order Quantities or Lot Sizes, some textbooks appear to be less straightforward. The question whether

  10. Bootstrapping Visual Categorization with Relevant Negatives

    Li, X.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Worring, M.; Koelma, D.; Smeulders, A.W.M.

    Learning classifiers for many visual concepts are important for image categorization and retrieval. As a classifier tends to misclassify negative examples which are visually similar to positive ones, inclusion of such misclassified and thus relevant negatives should be stressed during learning.

  11. Why ritual plant use has ethnopharmacological relevance

    Quiroz, Diana; Sosef, Marc; Andel, Van Tinde

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Although ritual plant use is now recognised both for its socio-cultural importance and for its contribution to nature conservation, its potential pharmacological effects remain overlooked. Aim of the study Our objective was to see whether ritual plant use could have

  12. Bradford's Law and Its Relevance to Researchers

    Shenton, Andrew K.; Hay-Gibson, Naomi V.

    2009-01-01

    Bradford's Law has been the subject of much discussion and analysis in library and information science since its formulation in the 1930s and remains frequently debated to this day. It has been applied to various practices within the discipline, especially with regard to collection development, but its relevance to researchers and the potential it…

  13. The relevance of cosmopolitanism for moral education

    Merry, M.S.; de Ruyter, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we defend a moral conception of cosmopolitanism and its relevance for moral education. Our moral conception of cosmopolitanism presumes that persons possess an inherent dignity in the Kantian sense and therefore they should be recognised as ends-in-themselves. We argue that

  14. Ranking Music Data by Relevance and Importance

    Ruxanda, Maria Magdalena; Nanopoulos, Alexandros; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2008-01-01

    Due to the rapidly increasing availability of audio files on the Web, it is relevant to augment search engines with advanced audio search functionality. In this context, the ranking of the retrieved music is an important issue. This paper proposes a music ranking method capable of flexibly fusing...

  15. Fast multi-output relevance vector regression

    Ha, Youngmin

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to decrease the time complexity of multi-output relevance vector regression from O(VM^3) to O(V^3+M^3), where V is the number of output dimensions, M is the number of basis functions, and V

  16. Pragmatic inferences and self-relevant judgments

    Puente-Diaz, Rogelio; Cavazos Arroyo, Judith; Brem, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Three studies examined the influence of type of scale on self-relevant judgments and the moderating role of age, prevention, focus, and need for cogni- tion. Participants were randomly assigned to a bipolar or a unipolar scale condition in all three studies. Results from study 1 with a representa...

  17. Making Chemistry Relevant to the Engineering Major

    Basu-Dutt, Sharmistha; Slappey, Charles; Bartley, Julie K.

    2010-01-01

    As part of a campus-wide, externally funded project to increase performance in, enthusiasm for, and retention within STEM disciplines, we developed an interdisciplinary, team-taught first-year seminar course. The construction and delivery of this course was designed to show the relevance of selected general chemistry topics such as matter and…

  18. Contingent Attentional Capture by Conceptually Relevant Images

    Wyble, Brad; Folk, Charles; Potter, Mary C.

    2013-01-01

    Attentional capture is an unintentional shift of visuospatial attention to the location of a distractor that is either highly salient, or relevant to the current task set. The latter situation is referred to as contingent capture, in that the effect is contingent on a match between characteristics of the stimuli and the task-defined…

  19. The Relevance Aura of Bibliographic Records.

    Brooks, Terrence A.

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes relevance assessments of topical descriptors for bibliographic records for two dimensions: (1) a vertical conceptual hierarchy of broad to narrow descriptors, and (2) a horizontal linkage of related terms. The data were analyzed for a semantic distance and semantic direction effect as postulated by the Semantic Distance Model. (Author/LRW)

  20. The Relevance of Cosmopolitanism for Moral Education

    Merry, Michael S.; de Ruyter, Doret J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we defend a moral conception of cosmopolitanism and its relevance for moral education. Our moral conception of cosmopolitanism presumes that persons possess an inherent dignity in the Kantian sense and therefore they should be recognised as ends-in-themselves. We argue that cosmopolitan ideals can inspire moral educators to awaken…

  1. Developing independent investigators for clinical research relevant for Africa

    Manabe, Yukari C

    2011-12-29

    Abstract Sustainable research capacity building requires training individuals at multiple levels within a supportive institutional infrastructure to develop a critical mass of independent researchers. At many African medical institutions, a PhD is important for academic promotion and is, therefore, an important focal area for capacity building programs. We examine the training at the Infectious Diseases Institute (IDI) as a model for in-country training based on systems capacity building and attention to the academic environment. PhD training in Africa should provide a strong research foundation for individuals to perform independent, original research and to mentor others. Training the next generation of researchers within excellent indigenous academic centers of excellence with strong institutional infrastructure will empower trainees to ask regionally relevant research questions that will benefit Africans.

  2. Differences of smoking knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors between medical and non-medical students.

    Han, Min-Yan; Chen, Wei-Qing; Wen, Xiao-Zhong; Liang, Cai-Hua; Ling, Wen-Hua

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies in the world reported inconsistent results about the relationship of medical professional education with medical students' smoking behaviors, and no similar research had been published in China. This paper aims to explore whether the differences of smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors existed between medical and non-medical undergraduate students. Eight thousand one hundred thirty-eight undergraduate students sampled from a university in Guangzhou were investigated with a self-administered structured questionnaire about their smoking-related knowledge, attitude and behaviors, and other relevant factors. General linear model and multinomial logistic regression were conducted to test the differences in smoking-related knowledge, attitude, and behaviors between medical and non-medical students while controlling for potential confounding variables. There was no difference in smoking-related knowledge scores between medical and non-medical freshmen, but medical sophomores and juniors had higher scores of smoking-related knowledge than their non-medical counterparts. The medical sophomores had higher mean score of attitudes towards smoking than non-medical ones. Before entering university, the difference in the prevalence of experimental and regular smoking between medical and non-medical college students was not significant. After entering university, in contrast, the overall prevalence of regular smoking was significantly higher among male non-medical college students than among male medical students. Stratified by current academic year, this difference was significant only among male sophomores. Medical students have higher smoking-related knowledge, stronger anti-smoking attitude, and lower prevalence of regular smoking than non-medical college students of similar age, which may be associated with medical professional education.

  3. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and ... Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation ...

  4. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications ... Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral ...

  5. The Medical Home

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español The Medical Home KidsHealth / For Parents / The Medical Home What's in ... for your child. What Does the Term "Medical Home" Mean? A medical home isn't a place ...

  6. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation ...

  7. Medical Information & Technology: Rapidly Expanding Vast Horizons

    Sahni, Anil K.

    2012-12-01

    During ÑMedical Council Of India?, Platinum Jubilee Year (1933-2008) Celebrations, In Year 2008, Several Scientific Meeting/Seminar/Symposium, On Various Topics Of Contemporary Importance And Relevance In The Field Of ÑMedical Education And Ethics?, Were Organized, By Different Medical Colleges At Various Local, State, National Levels. The Present Discussion, Is An Comprehensive Summary Of Various Different Aspects of ìMedical Information Communication Technologyî, Especially UseFul For The Audience Stratum Group Of Those Amateur Medical & Paramedical Staff, With No Previous Work Experience Knowledge Of Computronics Applications. Outlining The, i.Administration Applications: Medical Records Etc, ii. Clinical Applications: Pros pective Scope Of TeleMedicine Applicabilities Etc iii. Other Applications: Efforts To Augment Improvement Of Medical Education, Medical Presentations, Medical Education And Research Etc. ÑMedical Trancription? & Related Recent Study Fields e.g ÑModern Pharmaceuticals?,ÑBio-Engineering?, ÑBio-Mechanics?, ÑBio-Technology? Etc., Along With Important Aspects Of Computers-General Considerations, Computer Ergonomics Assembled To Summarize, The AwareNess Regarding Basic Fundamentals Of Medical Computronics & Its Practically SuccessFul Utilities.

  8. Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Projects

    Wu, Jimmy; Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David

    2010-01-01

    During missions to the Moon or Mars, the crew will need medical capabilities to diagnose and treat disease as well as for maintaining their health. The Exploration Medical Capability Element develops medical technologies, medical informatics, and clinical capabilities for different levels of care during space missions. The work done by team members in this Element is leading edge technology, procedure, and pharmacological development. They develop data systems that protect patient's private medical information, aid in the diagnosis of medical conditions, and act as a repository of relevant NASA life sciences experimental studies. To minimize the medical risks to crew health the physicians and scientists in this Element develop models to quantify the probability of medical events occurring during a mission. They define procedures to treat an ill or injured crew member who does not have access to an emergency room and who must be cared for in a microgravity environment where both liquids and solids behave differently than on Earth. To support the development of these medical capabilities, the Element manages the development of medical technologies that prevent, monitor, diagnose, and treat an ill or injured crewmember. The Exploration Medical Capability Element collaborates with the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), the Department of Defense, other Government-funded agencies, academic institutions, and industry.

  9. Qualities of the medical school dean: insights from the literature.

    Rich, Eugene C; Magrane, Diane; Kirch, Darrell G

    2008-05-01

    To review the literature and resources for professional development of medical school executives in order to identify the characteristics proposed as relevant to medical school deanship. In 2006, the authors conducted a PubMed search using the key words leadership, dean, medical school, and academic medical center to identify relevant publications since 1995. Articles were excluded that that did not address the roles and responsibilities of the North American medical school dean. Articles gleaned through review of materials from relevant executive development programs and interviews with leaders involved in these programs were added. Both management skills (e.g., institutional assessment, strategic planning, financial stewardship, recruitment and retention of talent) and leadership skills (e.g., visioning, maximizing values, building constituency) are commonly cited as important deans of contemporary medical schools. Key content knowledge (e.g., academic medical center governance, expectations of clinicians and scientists, process of medical education) and certain attitudes (e.g., commitment to the success of others, appreciation of institutional culture) are also noted to be valuable qualities for medical school deans. The literature review identifies a number of areas of knowledge and skill consistently affirmed by scholars as important to success for medical school deans. These characteristics can provide a basic foundation for needs assessment and professional development activities of academic medical executives preparing for and entering medical school deanships, and they can also provide insight to those charged with selecting their next dean.

  10. Medical Data Architecture Project Status

    Krihak, M.; Middour, C.; Lindsey, A.; Marker, N.; Wolfe, S.; Winther, S.; Ronzano, K.; Bolles, D.; Toscano, W.; Shaw, T.

    2017-01-01

    The Medical Data Architecture (MDA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk to minimize or reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes and decrements in performance due to in-flight medical capabilities on human exploration missions. To mitigate this risk, the ExMC MDA project addresses the technical limitations identified in ExMC Gap Med 07: We do not have the capability to comprehensively process medically-relevant information to support medical operations during exploration missions. This gap identifies that the current International Space Station (ISS) medical data management includes a combination of data collection and distribution methods that are minimally integrated with on-board medical devices and systems. Furthermore, there are variety of data sources and methods of data collection. For an exploration mission, the seamless management of such data will enable an increasingly autonomous crew than the current ISS paradigm. The MDA will develop capabilities that support automated data collection, and the necessary functionality and challenges in executing a self-contained medical system that approaches crew health care delivery without assistance from ground support. To attain this goal, the first year of the MDA project focused on reducing technical risk, developing documentation and instituting iterative development processes that established the basis for the first version of MDA software (or Test Bed 1). Test Bed 1 is based on a nominal operations scenario authored by the ExMC Element Scientist. This narrative was decomposed into a Concept of Operations that formed the basis for Test Bed 1 requirements. These requirements were successfully vetted through the MDA Test Bed 1 System Requirements Review, which permitted the MDA project to begin software code development and component integration. This paper highlights the MDA objectives, development processes, and accomplishments, and identifies the fiscal year 2017 milestones and

  11. Motivating medical students to learn teamwork skills.

    Aarnio, Matti; Nieminen, Juha; Pyörälä, Eeva; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari

    2010-01-01

    This study examined teaching teamwork skills to first-year medical students. Teamwork skills focused on verbal communication in PBL-tutorial sessions and in healthcare teams. The aim was to find out how to teach teamwork skills to first-year medical students and how to motivate them to learn these skills. Three consecutive classes of first-year medical students (N = 342) participated in teamwork skills module in the years 2006, 2007 and 2008. After the first year, the introduction to the topic was revised in order to be more motivating to medical students. After each module data were collected with a feedback questionnaire containing numerical and open questions. By analyzing the students' numerical answers and the content of students' open answers regarding the module, we examined how the revised introduction affected students' perceptions of the usefulness of the module. Medical students' feedback in the years 1 (n = 81), 2 (n = 99) and 3 (n = 95) showed that the students found the module in the second and third years significantly more useful than in the first year. These results support earlier findings that clearly stated clinical relevance motivates medical students. When introducing multidisciplinary subjects to medical students, it is important to think through the clinical relevance of the topic and how it is introduced to medical students.

  12. Polanyi's tacit knowing and the relevance of epistemology to clinical medicine.

    Henry, Stephen G

    2010-04-01

    Most clinicians take for granted a simple, reductionist understanding of medical knowledge that is at odds with how they actually practice medicine; routine medical decisions incorporate more complicated kinds of information than most standard accounts of medical reasoning suggest. A better understanding of the structure and function of knowledge in medicine can lead to practical improvements in clinical medicine. This understanding requires some familiarity with epistemology, the study of knowledge and its structure, in medicine. Michael Polanyi's theory of tacit knowing is advanced as the basis for developing a more accurate understanding of medical knowledge. Tacit knowing, which explores the taken-for-granted background knowledge that underlies all human knowing, is explained in detail with a focus on its relevance for clinical medicine. The implications of recognizing tacit knowing in medicine and medical decisions are discussed. These include the ability to explain the importance of the clinical encounter in medical practice, mechanisms for analysing patient and doctor as persons, and the need for humility given the uncertainty that the tacit dimension injects into all medical decisions. This more robust medical epistemology allows clinicians to better articulate the nature and importance of patient-centred care, to avoid pitfalls inherent in reductionist approaches to medical knowledge, and to think more clearly about the relationships between medicine and health care at the individual and population levels.

  13. Medical muddle.

    Gartrell, Nanette

    2014-01-01

    Nanette Gartrell, MD, is a psychiatrist and researcher whose investigations have documented the mental health and psychological well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people over the past four decades. Nanette is the principal investigator of an ongoing longitudinal study of lesbian families in which the children were conceived by donor insemination. Now in its 27th year, this project has been cited internationally in the debates over equality in marriage, foster care, and adoption. Previously on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and the University of California, San Francisco, Nanette is currently a Visiting Distinguished Scholar at the Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law. In 2013, Nanette received the Association of Women Psychiatrists Presidential Commendation Award for "selfless and enduring vision, leadership, wisdom, and mentorship in the fields of women's mental health, ethics, and gender research." At the age of 63, Nanette experienced a 3 ½ month period of intractable, incapacitating dizziness for which there was never a clear diagnosis.

  14. MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISH

    Jože Drinovec

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to restrictions imposed on a clinical freedom, interest for professionalism in healthcare has been getting bigger not only in medicine literature and various mass media but also in teaching and organisation of healthcare. Professionalism stands not only for a medicine’s contract with society, recognition of a physician status, privilege and monopoly but also for a genuine physician’s commitment to professional responsibilities.Analysis. In 2002 European and American associations approved a document on medical professionalism in the new millenium, so-called Physician Charter. This document includes fundamental principles of professionalism such as altruism, patient autonomy and social justice. In particular, it analyses a physician’s professional competency, honesty with patients, patient confidentiality, appropriate relations with patients, improvements regarding a healthcare quality, healthcare access, just distribution of finite funds, commitment to scientific knowledge, trust maintenance by managing conflicts of interest and a professional responsibility.Conclusions. Physician’s professionalism means philosophycal and sociological analysis of his/her profession and its position in a society. It includes a concern for improvements of his/ her own scientific knowledge, skills, a genuine ethic interest for an individual patient bearing in mind principles of equality and justice in society. Whether performing an organisational and public work or participating in professional health organizations, physician’s interest for a patient must prevail.

  15. Assessing Children with Traumatic Brain Injuries: Integrating Educational and Medical Issues.

    Shaw, Steven R.; Yingst, Christine A.

    1992-01-01

    This overview of traumatic brain injuries discusses (1) incidence and prevalence; (2) characteristics; (3) the recovery process; and (4) educational/medical assessment, including premorbid functioning, current functioning, educationally relevant medical issues, and amount and type of family support. (JDD)

  16. Medical Data Architecture (MDA) Project Status

    Krihak, M.; Middour, C.; Gurram, M.; Wolfe, S.; Marker, N.; Winther, S.; Ronzano, K.; Bolles, D.; Toscano, W.; Shaw, T.

    2018-01-01

    The Medical Data Architecture (MDA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk to minimize or reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes and decrements in performance due to in-flight medical capabilities on human exploration missions. To mitigate this risk, the ExMC MDA project addresses the technical limitations identified in ExMC Gap Med 07: We do not have the capability to comprehensively process medically-relevant information to support medical operations during exploration missions. This gap identifies that the current in-flight medical data management includes a combination of data collection and distribution methods that are minimally integrated with on-board medical devices and systems. Furthermore, there are a variety of data sources and methods of data collection. For an exploration mission, the seamless management of such data will enable a more medically autonomous crew than the current paradigm. The medical system requirements are being developed in parallel with the exploration mission architecture and vehicle design. ExMC has recognized that in order to make informed decisions about a medical data architecture framework, current methods for medical data management must not only be understood, but an architecture must also be identified that provides the crew with actionable insight to medical conditions. This medical data architecture will provide the necessary functionality to address the challenges of executing a self-contained medical system that approaches crew health care delivery without assistance from ground support. Hence, the products supported by current prototype development will directly inform exploration medical system requirements.

  17. Depression in medical students: current insights

    Moir F

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Fiona Moir,1 Jill Yielder,2 Jasmine Sanson,3 Yan Chen4 1Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 2Medical Programme Directorate, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 3Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 4Centre for Medical and Health Sciences Education, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand Abstract: Medical students are exposed to multiple factors during their academic and clinical study that have been shown to contribute to high levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. The purpose of this article was to explore the issue of depression in the medical student population, including prevalence, causes, and key issues, along with suggestions for early identification and support from one medical school in New Zealand. After establishing that the prevalence of depression is higher for medical students than the general population, the key issues explored include assessment used in the program, characteristics of the student population (such as Type A personality and perfectionism, resilience, selection procedures, students’ motivation, and the nature of the clinical environment. This review includes several recommendations to improve students’ psychological health such as positioning well-being within an overarching comprehensive workplace wellness model and integrating peer and faculty-led support into the day-to-day running of the institution. It also highlights the advantages of the addition of a well-being curriculum, as skills to prevent and manage distress and depression are relevant in supporting the competencies required by medical practitioners. It concludes that medical schools need wide-ranging strategies to address the complexities associated with the particular student

  18. There’s an App for That? Highlighting the Difficulty in Finding Clinically Relevant Smartphone Applications

    Warren Wiechmann, MD, MBA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of personal mobile devices in the medical field has grown quickly, and a large proportion of physicians use their mobile devices as an immediate resource for clinical decisionmaking, prescription information and other medical information. The iTunes App Store (Apple, Inc. contains approximately 20,000 apps in its “Medical” category, providing a robust repository of resources for clinicians; however, this represents only 2% of the entire App Store. The App Store does not have strict criteria for identifying content specific to practicing physicians, making the identification of clinically relevant content difficult. The objective of this study is to quantify the characteristics of existing medical applications in the iTunes App Store that could be used by emergency physicians, residents, or medical students. Methods: We found applications related to emergency medicine (EM by searching the iTunes App Store for 21 terms representing core content areas of EM, such as “emergency medicine,” “critical care,” “orthopedics,” and “procedures.” Two physicians independently reviewed descriptions of these applications in the App Store and categorized each as the following: Clinically Relevant, Book/ Published Source, Non-English, Study Tools, or Not Relevant. A third physician reviewer resolved disagreements about categorization. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results: We found a total of 7,699 apps from the 21 search terms, of which 17.8% were clinical, 9.6% were based on a book or published source, 1.6% were non-English, 0.7% were clinically relevant patient education resources, and 4.8% were study tools. Most significantly, 64.9% were considered not relevant to medical professionals. Clinically relevant apps make up approximately 6.9% of the App Store’s “Medical” Category and 0.1% of the overall App Store. Conclusion: Clinically relevant apps represent only a small percentage (6.9% of the total App

  19. Tomographic diagnosis and relevant aspects of otosclerosis

    Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Gomes, Natalia Delage; Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Villela, Caroline Laurita Batista Couto; Moreira, Wanderval; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira

    2013-01-01

    A literature review and pictorial essay were developed to discuss the importance of knowing the main findings and locations of otosclerosis at multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The authors performed a retrospective review of cases of otosclerosis diagnosed in their institution by means of high resolution multidetector computed tomography. Otosclerosis corresponds to otic capsule dysplasia characterized by metabolic derangement of its endochondral layer. Such condition constitutes a relevant cause of sensorineural hearing loss, affecting about 7% to 10% of the general population. The diagnosis is usually clinical, but imaging methods play a significant role in the anatomical detailing, differential diagnosis, surgical planning and evaluation of postoperative complications. Among such methods, the relevance of MDCT is highlighted. Radiologists should be familiar with the MDCT findings of otosclerosis, as well as with the temporal bone anatomy to assist in the appropriate clinical management of this disease. (author)

  20. Tomographic diagnosis and relevant aspects of otosclerosis

    Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Gomes, Natalia Delage; Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Villela, Caroline Laurita Batista Couto; Moreira, Wanderval; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira, E-mail: jugaiotti@gmail.com [Hospital Mater Dei-Mater Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    A literature review and pictorial essay were developed to discuss the importance of knowing the main findings and locations of otosclerosis at multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The authors performed a retrospective review of cases of otosclerosis diagnosed in their institution by means of high resolution multidetector computed tomography. Otosclerosis corresponds to otic capsule dysplasia characterized by metabolic derangement of its endochondral layer. Such condition constitutes a relevant cause of sensorineural hearing loss, affecting about 7% to 10% of the general population. The diagnosis is usually clinical, but imaging methods play a significant role in the anatomical detailing, differential diagnosis, surgical planning and evaluation of postoperative complications. Among such methods, the relevance of MDCT is highlighted. Radiologists should be familiar with the MDCT findings of otosclerosis, as well as with the temporal bone anatomy to assist in the appropriate clinical management of this disease. (author)

  1. EOG feature relevance determination for microsleep detection

    Golz Martin; Wollner Sebastian; Sommer David; Schnieder Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Automatic relevance determination (ARD) was applied to two-channel EOG recordings for microsleep event (MSE) recognition. 10 s immediately before MSE and also before counterexamples of fatigued, but attentive driving were analysed. Two type of signal features were extracted: the maximum cross correlation (MaxCC) and logarithmic power spectral densities (PSD) averaged in spectral bands of 0.5 Hz width ranging between 0 and 8 Hz. Generalised learn-ing vector quantisation (GRLVQ) was used as ARD...

  2. Is QCD relevant to nuclear physics

    Thomas, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    A review is given of recent work on baryon structure in a number of QCD-motivated models. After establishing a prima facie case that the quark model should be relevant in a consistent description of the nucleus over a wide range of momentum transfer, the author looks for experimental confirmation. The discussion includes the search for exotic states, for a six quark component of the deuteron, and an up to date report on the interpretation of the EMC effect. (Auth.)

  3. Trade Off Relevance Dan Reliability: Isu Ifrs

    Mahmudah, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    Financial reports containing qualitative characteristic that are useful for usernya.For a long time believed to be the existence of trade off between characteristic of qualitative relevance and reliability. Trade off due to the fact that the use of the method of measurement historical cost and fair value. Trade off occur because of the interests of for the purpose of the preparation of reports on finance. Accountability for the purpose of the measurement of the cost of historical still reliab...

  4. Hydrogen interaction with fusion-relevant materials

    Caorlin, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is an outline of the work carried out at JRC Ispra in the Tritium-materials Interaction Laboratory, on the interaction of gaseous hydrogen with several materials of interest in the field of fusion technology. Experimental work is reported and a concise review of relevant theoretical and numerical supporting activity is given as well. A period of about seven years is covered since 1982. Current work and possible future extensions are also briefly mentioned. 11 figs., 18 refs

  5. Nanostructure symmetry: Relevance for physics and computing

    Dupertuis, Marc-André; Oberli, D. Y.; Karlsson, K. F.; Dalessi, S.; Gallinet, B.; Svendsen, G.

    2014-01-01

    We review the research done in recent years in our group on the effects of nanostructure symmetry, and outline its relevance both for nanostructure physics and for computations of their electronic and optical properties. The exemples of C3v and C2v quantum dots are used. A number of surprises and non-trivial aspects are outlined, and a few symmetry-based tools for computing and analysis are shortly presented

  6. Nanostructure symmetry: Relevance for physics and computing

    Dupertuis, Marc-André; Oberli, D. Y. [Laboratory for Physics of Nanostructure, EPF Lausanne (Switzerland); Karlsson, K. F. [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University (Sweden); Dalessi, S. [Computational Biology Group, Department of Medical Genetics, University of Lausanne (Switzerland); Gallinet, B. [Nanophotonics and Metrology Laboratory, EPF Lausanne (Switzerland); Svendsen, G. [Dept. of Electronics and Telecom., Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2014-03-31

    We review the research done in recent years in our group on the effects of nanostructure symmetry, and outline its relevance both for nanostructure physics and for computations of their electronic and optical properties. The exemples of C3v and C2v quantum dots are used. A number of surprises and non-trivial aspects are outlined, and a few symmetry-based tools for computing and analysis are shortly presented.

  7. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Nitrifying Biofilm Relevant ...

    Recently, biological monochloramine removal (i.e., cometabolism) by a pure culture ammonia–oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, and a nitrifying mixed–culture have been shown to increase monochloramine demand. Although important, these previous suspended culture batch kinetic experiments were not representative of drinking water distribution systems where bacteria grow predominantly as biofilm attached to pipe walls or sediments and physiological differences may exist between suspension and biofilm growth. Therefore, the current research was an important next step in extending the previous results to investigate monochloramine cometabolism by biofilm grown in annular reactors under drinking water relevant conditions. Estimated monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism was a significant loss mechanism (25–40% of the observed monochloramine loss). These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in drinking water relevant nitrifying biofilm; thus, cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in distribution systems. Investigate whether or not nitrifying biofilm can biologically transform monochloramine under drinking water relevant conditions.

  8. Selection of relevant dietary indicators for health.

    Steingrímsdóttir, L; Ovesen, L; Moreiras, O; Jacob, S

    2002-05-01

    To define a set of dietary components that are relevant determinants for health in Europe. The selected components are intended to serve as nutrition indicators for health in the European Health Monitoring Programme and, as such, must be limited in number, relevant to health in Europe and practical for all involved countries with respect to data gathering and comparability of data. Major nutrition factors were determined by reviewing relevant epidemiological and clinical literature in nutrition and health as well as referring to reports from international expert groups, including the report from the project Nutrition and Diet for Healthy Lifestyles in Europe. The selection of factors was also based on the relative ease and cost involved for participating countries to obtain comparable and valid data. The selected factors include foods or food groups as well as individual nutrients. Biomarkers are suggested for selected nutrients that pose the greatest difficulty in obtaining valid and comparable data from dietary studies. The following list of diet indicators for health monitoring in Europe was agreed upon by the EFCOSUM group in 2001, in order of priority: vegetables, fruit, bread, fish, saturated fatty acids as percentage of energy (%E), total fat as %E, and ethanol in grams per day. Biomarkers were suggested for the following nutrients: folate, vitamin D, iron, iodine and sodium. Energy has to be assessed in order to calculate %E from total fat and saturated fatty acids.

  9. The value relevance of environmental emissions

    Melinda Lydia Nelwan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether environmental performance has value relevance by investigating the relations between environmental emissions and stock prices for the U.S. public companies. The previous studies argued that the conjectured relations between accounting performance measures and environmental performance do not have a strong theoretical basis, and the modeling of relations between market per-formance measures and environmental performance do not adequately consider the relevance of accounting performance to market value. Therefore, this study examines whether publicly reported environmental emissions provide incremental information to accounting earnings in pricing companies stocks. It is done among the complete set of industries covered by Toxics Release Inventory (TRI reporting for the period 2007 to 2010. Using Ohlson model but modified to include different types of emis-sions, it is found that ground emissions (underground injection and land emissions are value relevant but other emission types (air and water and transferred-out emis-sions appear to not provide incremental information in the valuation model. The result in this study raise concerns that different types of emissions are assessed differently by the market, confirming that studies should not aggregate such measures.

  10. EOG feature relevance determination for microsleep detection

    Golz Martin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Automatic relevance determination (ARD was applied to two-channel EOG recordings for microsleep event (MSE recognition. 10 s immediately before MSE and also before counterexamples of fatigued, but attentive driving were analysed. Two type of signal features were extracted: the maximum cross correlation (MaxCC and logarithmic power spectral densities (PSD averaged in spectral bands of 0.5 Hz width ranging between 0 and 8 Hz. Generalised learn-ing vector quantisation (GRLVQ was used as ARD method to show the potential of feature reduction. This is compared to support-vector machines (SVM, in which the feature reduction plays a much smaller role. Cross validation yielded mean normalised relevancies of PSD features in the range of 1.6 – 4.9 % and 1.9 – 10.4 % for horizontal and vertical EOG, respectively. MaxCC relevancies were 0.002 – 0.006 % and 0.002 – 0.06 %, respectively. This shows that PSD features of vertical EOG are indispensable, whereas MaxCC can be neglected. Mean classification accuracies were estimated at 86.6±b 1.3 % and 92.3±b 0.2 % for GRLVQ and SVM, respectively. GRLVQ permits objective feature reduction by inclusion of all processing stages, but is not as accurate as SVM.

  11. EOG feature relevance determination for microsleep detection

    Golz Martin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Automatic relevance determination (ARD was applied to two-channel EOG recordings for microsleep event (MSE recognition. 10 s immediately before MSE and also before counterexamples of fatigued, but attentive driving were analysed. Two type of signal features were extracted: the maximum cross correlation (MaxCC and logarithmic power spectral densities (PSD averaged in spectral bands of 0.5 Hz width ranging between 0 and 8 Hz. Generalised learn-ing vector quantisation (GRLVQ was used as ARD method to show the potential of feature reduction. This is compared to support-vector machines (SVM, in which the feature reduction plays a much smaller role. Cross validation yielded mean normalised relevancies of PSD features in the range of 1.6 - 4.9 % and 1.9 - 10.4 % for horizontal and vertical EOG, respectively. MaxCC relevancies were 0.002 - 0.006 % and 0.002 - 0.06 %, respectively. This shows that PSD features of vertical EOG are indispensable, whereas MaxCC can be neglected. Mean classification accuracies were estimated at 86.6±b 1.3 % and 92.3±b 0.2 % for GRLVQ and SVM, respec-tively. GRLVQ permits objective feature reduction by inclu-sion of all processing stages, but is not as accurate as SVM.

  12. Valerian: No Evidence for Clinically Relevant Interactions

    Olaf Kelber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent popular publications as well as in widely used information websites directed to cancer patients, valerian is claimed to have a potential of adverse interactions with anticancer drugs. This questions its use as a safe replacement for, for example, benzodiazepines. A review on the interaction potential of preparations from valerian root (Valeriana officinalis L. root was therefore conducted. A data base search and search in a clinical drug interaction data base were conducted. Thereafter, a systematic assessment of publications was performed. Seven in vitro studies on six CYP 450 isoenzymes, on p-glycoprotein, and on two UGT isoenzymes were identified. However, the methodological assessment of these studies did not support their suitability for the prediction of clinically relevant interactions. In addition, clinical studies on various valerian preparations did not reveal any relevant interaction potential concerning CYP 1A2, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4. Available animal and human pharmacodynamic studies did not verify any interaction potential. The interaction potential of valerian preparations therefore seems to be low and thereby without clinical relevance. We conclude that there is no specific evidence questioning their safety, also in cancer patients.

  13. Basic concepts of medical genetics, formal genetics, Part 1

    Mohammad Saad Zaghloul Salem

    2013-11-15

    Nov 15, 2013 ... maps of gene loci based on information gathered, formerly, ... represented as figure or text interface data. Relevant ... The Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics ... prophylactic management and genetic counseling. 17.

  14. Development of a medical staff recruitment system for teaching ...

    Development of a medical staff recruitment system for teaching hospitals in Nigeria. ... Nigeria, were visited and relevant information was collated through personal ... The design and development of the system employs 3-tier web architecture.

  15. Medical records and radiation exposure cards

    Vigan, C.

    1975-01-01

    Some ideas concerning medical records at the Ispra Centre are exposed. The approved medical practitioner has two main tasks: he must gather enough relevant information to decide on the worker's suitability and also to determine his physical condition, normal or otherwise, and he must record it with enough detail to permit comparison with findings at later examinations. for the purposes of medical records, clinical examinations and complementary investigations, a large proportion of the measurements are of course made on the critical organs. The problems of the container or physical medium receiving the information to be recorded is considered. The possibilities offered by computer techniques are discussed

  16. Cognitive Medical Multiagent Systems

    Barna Iantovics

    2010-01-01

    The development of efficient and flexible agent-based medical diagnosis systems represents a recent research direction. Medical multiagent systems may improve the efficiency of traditionally developed medical computational systems, like the medical expert systems. In our previous researches, a novel cooperative medical diagnosis multiagent system called CMDS (Contract Net Based Medical Diagnosis System) was proposed. CMDS system can solve flexibly a large variety of medical diagnosis problems...

  17. Scientific Skills as Core Competences in Medical Education: What do medical students think?

    Ribeiro, Laura; Severo, Milton; Pereira, Margarida; Amélia Ferreira, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Background: Scientific excellence is one of the most fundamental underpinnings of medical education and its relevance is unquestionable. To be involved in research activities enhances students' critical thinking and problem-solving capacities, which are mandatory competences for new achievements in patient care and consequently to the improvement of clinical practice. Purposes: This work aimed to study the relevance given by Portuguese medical students to a core of scientific skills, and their judgment about their own ability to execute those skills. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on students attending the first, fourth and sixth years of medical course in the same period. An assessment istrument, exploring the importance given by Portuguese medical students to scientific skills in high school, to clinical practice and to their own ability to execute them, was designed, adapted and applied specifically to this study. Results: Students' perceptions were associated with gender, academic year, previous participation in research activities, positive and negative attitudes toward science, research integration into the curriculum and motivation to undertake research. The viewpoint of medical students about the relevance of scientific skills overall, and the ability to execute them, was independently associated with motivation to be enrolled in research. Conclusions: These findings have meaningful implications in medical education regarding the inclusion of a structural research program in the medical curriculum. Students should be aware that clinical practice would greatly benefit from the enrollment in research activities. By developing a solid scientific literacy future physicians will be able to apply new knowledge in patient care.

  18. The impact of positive, negative and topical relevance feedback

    Kaptein, Rianne; Kamps, Jaap; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2008-01-01

    This document contains a description of experiments for the 2008 Relevance Feedback track. We experiment with different amounts of feedback, including negative relevance feedback. Feedback is implemented using massive weighted query expansion. Parsimonious query expansion using only relevant

  19. Radiation microbiology relevant to radiation processing

    Tallentire, A.

    1979-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the following headings: typical background studies involving laboratory models (measurement of radiation responses of different organisms, alone or on or in products; isolation of radiation resistant organisms from products and product environments; measurement of levels of preirradiation microbial contamination ('bioburden')); supplementary studies involving naturally occurring microbial contaminants (unit medical products; microbiological quality assurance; products in bulk; animal diet study). (U.K.)

  20. Relevance of Neuroinflammation and Encephalitis in Autism

    Janet eKern

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many studies indicate that children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD diagnosis have brain pathology suggestive of ongoing neuroinflammation or encephalitis in different regions of their brains. Evidence of neuroinflammation or encephalitis in ASD includes: microglial and astrocytic activation, a unique and elevated proinflammatory profile of cytokines, and aberrant expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells. A conservative estimate based on the research suggests that at least 69% of individuals with an ASD diagnosis have microglial activation or neuroinflammation. Encephalitis, which is defined as inflammation of the brain, is medical diagnosis code G04.90 in the International Classification of Disease, 10th revision; however, children with an ASD diagnosis are not generally assessed for a possible medical diagnosis of encephalitis. This is unfortunate because if a child with ASD has neuroinflammation, then treating the underlying brain inflammation could lead to improved outcomes. The purpose of this review of the literature is to examine the evidence of neuroinflammation/encephalitis in those with an ASD diagnosis and to address how a medical diagnosis of encephalitis, when appropriate, could benefit these children by driving more immediate and targeted treatments.

  1. Impact of a novel teaching method based on feedback, activity, individuality and relevance on students’ learning

    Brooks, William S.; Laskar, Simone N.; Benjamin, Miles W.; Chan, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examines the perceived impact of a novel clinical teaching method based on FAIR principles (feedback, activity, individuality and relevance) on students’ learning on clinical placement. Methods This was a qualitative research study. Participants were third year and final year medical students attached to one UK vascular firm over a four-year period (N=108). Students were asked to write a reflective essay on how FAIRness approach differs from previous clinical placement, and its advantages and disadvantages. Essays were thematically analysed and globally rated (positive, negative or neutral) by two independent researchers. Results Over 90% of essays reported positive experiences of feedback, activity, individuality and relevance model.  The model provided multifaceted feedback; active participation; longitudinal improvement; relevance to stage of learning and future goals; structured teaching; professional development; safe learning environment; consultant involvement in teaching. Students perceived preparation for tutorials to be time intensive for tutors/students; a lack of teaching on medical sciences and direct observation of performance; more than once weekly sessions would be beneficial; some issues with peer and public feedback, relevance to upcoming exam and large group sizes. Students described negative experiences of “standard” clinical teaching. Conclusions Progressive teaching programmes based on the FAIRness principles, feedback, activity, individuality and relevance, could be used as a model to improve current undergraduate clinical teaching. PMID:26995588

  2. Impact of a novel teaching method based on feedback, activity, individuality and relevance on students' learning.

    Edafe, Ovie; Brooks, William S; Laskar, Simone N; Benjamin, Miles W; Chan, Philip

    2016-03-20

    This study examines the perceived impact of a novel clinical teaching method based on FAIR principles (feedback, activity, individuality and relevance) on students' learning on clinical placement. This was a qualitative research study. Participants were third year and final year medical students attached to one UK vascular firm over a four-year period (N=108). Students were asked to write a reflective essay on how FAIRness approach differs from previous clinical placement, and its advantages and disadvantages. Essays were thematically analysed and globally rated (positive, negative or neutral) by two independent researchers. Over 90% of essays reported positive experiences of feedback, activity, individuality and relevance model. The model provided multifaceted feedback; active participation; longitudinal improvement; relevance to stage of learning and future goals; structured teaching; professional development; safe learning environment; consultant involvement in teaching. Students perceived preparation for tutorials to be time intensive for tutors/students; a lack of teaching on medical sciences and direct observation of performance; more than once weekly sessions would be beneficial; some issues with peer and public feedback, relevance to upcoming exam and large group sizes. Students described negative experiences of "standard" clinical teaching. Progressive teaching programmes based on the FAIRness principles, feedback, activity, individuality and relevance, could be used as a model to improve current undergraduate clinical teaching.

  3. Identifying Relevant Studies in Software Engineering

    Zhang, He; Ali Babar, Muhammad; Tell, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Context: Systematic literature review (SLR) has become an important research methodology in software engineering since the introduction of evidence-based software engineering (EBSE) in 2004. One critical step in applying this methodology is to design and execute appropriate and effective search....... Objective: The main objective of the research reported in this paper is to improve the search step of undertaking SLRs in software engineering (SE) by devising and evaluating systematic and practical approaches to identifying relevant studies in SE. Method: We have systematically selected and analytically...

  4. Happiness: origins, forms, and technical relevance.

    Akhtar, Salman

    2010-09-01

    By critically reviewing Freud's views on happiness, and also those of Helene Deutsch, Bertram Lewin, Melanie Klein, and Heinz Kohut, the author evolves a complex and multilayered perspective on the phenomenon. He categorizes happiness into four related and occasionally overlapping varieties: pleasure-based happiness (elation), assertion-based happiness (joy), merger-based happiness (ecstasy), and fulfillment-based happiness (contentment). After entering some caveats and drawing from his clinical experience, the author then demonstrates the relevance of these ideas to the conduct of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis.

  5. Relevance of physics to the pharmacy major.

    McCall, Richard P

    2007-08-15

    To offer a physics course that is relevant to pharmacy students, yet still contains many of the fundamental principles of physics. The course was modified over a period of several years to include activities and examples that were related to other courses in the curriculum. Course evaluations were given to assess student attitudes about the importance of physics in the pharmacy curriculum. Students' attitudes have changed over time to appreciate the role that physics plays in their studies. Students gained confidence in their ability to learn in other courses.

  6. Medical humanities: a resident doctor's perspective.

    Pauranik, Anvita

    2012-01-01

    The barrage of competitive examinations, overwork, sleep deprivation, and the pressure of expectations all combine to destroy the dreams that resident doctors have when they start medical school. The empathy they had before entering this field fades away, and they eventually become insensitive to their patients. Medical humanities may be the means to halt this trend. Sensitising young minds, using the arts, literature, history and lessons on social issues, may bring about a paradigm shift in these doctors' outlook towards their patients. However, for the humanities to be integrated into medical education, the current curriculum must be modified and made more clinically and socially relevant. Further, the humanities cannot be taught in lecture halls; they need to be integrated into all aspects of medical school. For this, the medical school faculty should be sensitised to, and trained in, humanities education.

  7. [Medical education and communication in primary pain treatment: clinical relevance and pedagogic challenge].

    Nobis, H-G; Pielsticker, A

    2013-06-01

    The term education can be understood here as informing the patient about the symptoms of the disease and the treatment. Patients with chronic pain require comprehensible information from the physician and beyond that esteem, encouragement and participation in decision-making processes. A successful patient-physician interaction is a quality ensuring element of the first degree. Imparting information in this context is of special importance which is not only derived from legal and ethical obligations but also from the scientifically proven therapeutic efficacy. A successful communication and relaying of information promotes motivation (compliance) and therapeutic effectiveness from both parties. Comprehensible explanations on biopsychosocial pain, interdisciplinary diagnostics and multimodal pain therapy reduce misunderstandings, false expectations and premature termination of therapy. The explanation of the biopsychosocial pain model opens for the patient a holistic view of the phenomenon of chronic pain and promotes self-help strategies. The question as to how and what should be imparted is not only a question of temporal resources but also represents a pedagogic challenge. The contents and experience imparted in the education are only substantially effective if they lead to a feeling of being personally affected due to being close to real life and plausibility and if the resulting multimodal treatment options can be implemented in the daily routine. The communicative duties of a physician are demanding and require practical training as can be reflected and practiced in the form of train-the-trainer seminars, workshops and Balint groups. It has been proven that competence in counselling techniques also has a positive effect on the experience of the physician in his profession. Pain patients can profit from information flyers, internet and interactive computer-based consulting systems if they fulfil basic standards, including topicality, neutrality, biopsychosocial understanding of disease and preventive information.

  8. Selecting Relevant Information for Medical Decision Support with Application in Cardiology

    Kalina, Jan; Seidl, L.; Grünfeldová, H.; Slovák, Dalibor; Zvárová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2013), s. 2-6 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : decision support system * web-service * information extraction * high dimension * gene expressions Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/img/ejbi/2013/1/Kalina_en.pdf

  9. Nanoscale surface modifications of medically relevant metals: state-of-the art and perspectives

    Variola, Fabio; Brunski, John B.; Orsini, Giovanna; Tambasco de Oliveira, Paulo; Wazen, Rima; Nanci, Antonio

    2011-02-01

    Evidence that nanoscale surface properties stimulate and guide various molecular and biological processes at the implant/tissue interface is fostering a new trend in designing implantable metals. Cutting-edge expertise and techniques drawn from widely separated fields, such as nanotechnology, materials engineering and biology, have been advantageously exploited to nanoengineer surfaces in ways that control and direct these processes in predictable manners. In this review, we present and discuss the state-of-the-art of nanotechnology-based approaches currently adopted to modify the surface of metals used for orthopedic and dental applications, and also briefly consider their use in the cardiovascular field. The effects of nanoengineered surfaces on various in vitro molecular and cellular events are firstly discussed. This review also provides an overview of in vivo and clinical studies with nanostructured metallic implants, and addresses the potential influence of nanotopography on biomechanical events at interfaces. Ultimately, the objective of this work is to give the readership a comprehensive picture of the current advances, future developments and challenges in the application of the infinitesimally small to biomedical surface science. We believe that an integrated understanding of the in vitro and particularly of the in vivo behavior is mandatory for the proper exploitation of nanostructured implantable metals and, indeed, of all biomaterials.

  10. A medically relevant capsular polysaccharide in Acinetobacter baumannii is a potential vaccine candidate.

    Yang, Feng-Ling; Lou, Tze-Chi; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Wu, Wan-Ling; Chern, Jeffy; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Chen, Shui-Tsung; Zou, Wei; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2017-03-07

    Concerns of Acinetobacter baumannii infection have increased due to the emergence of multi-drug resistance. In the present study, we determined the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) structure of A. baumannii SK44, a clinical isolate from Taiwan, to consist of pentasaccharide repeats. We found that CPS-induced antibody provided 55% protection against challenge in an animal model. The CPS-specific antibody reacted with the surface components of about 62% clinical isolates (342/554 strains) from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies by dot-immunoassay. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of positive strains showed the antibody covered different clonalites of A. baumannii clinical isolates. Meanwhile, using the CPS antibody as a probe, we found a number of outer membrane proteins bound to the antibody, including OmpA/motB, TonB-dependent receptor, and Omp38, indicating their association with CPS. These results might lead to the use of the capsular polysaccharide as a vaccine to prevent A. baumannii infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Medically Relevant Assays with a Simple Smartphone and Tablet Based Fluorescence Detection System

    Wargocki, Piotr; Deng, Wei; Anwer, Ayad G.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell phones and smart phones can be reconfigured as biomedical sensor devices but this requires specialized add-ons. In this paper we present a simple cell phone-based portable bioassay platform, which can be used with fluorescent assays in solution. The system consists of a tablet, a polarizer, a smart phone (camera) and a box that provides dark readout conditions. The assay in a well plate is placed on the tablet screen acting as an excitation source. A polarizer on top of the well plate s...

  12. Evaluation of the new Vitek 2 ANC card for identification of medically relevant anaerobic bacteria.

    Mory, Francine; Alauzet, Corentine; Matuszeswski, Céline; Riegel, Philippe; Lozniewski, Alain

    2009-06-01

    Of 261 anaerobic clinical isolates tested with the new Vitek 2 ANC card, 257 (98.5%) were correctly identified at the genus level. Among the 251 strains for which identification at the species level is possible with regard to the ANC database, 217 (86.5%) were correctly identified at the species level. Two strains (0.8%) were not identified, and eight were misidentified (3.1%). Of the 21 strains (8.1%) with low-level discrimination results, 14 were correctly identified at the species level by using the recommended additional tests. This system is a satisfactory new automated tool for the rapid identification of most anaerobic bacteria isolated in clinical laboratories.

  13. Raman spectroscopy for the microbiological characterization and identification of medically relevant bacteria

    Hamasha, Khozima Mahmoud

    The detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria has become more important than ever due to the increase of potential bioterrorism threats and the high mortality rate of bacterial infections worldwide. Raman spectroscopy has recently gained popularity as an attractive robust approach for the molecular characterization, rapid identification, and accurate classification of a wide range of bacteria. In this dissertation, Raman spectroscopy utilizing advanced statistical techniques was used to identify and discriminate between different pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacterial strains of E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacterial species by probing the molecular compositions of the cells. The five-carbon sugar xylitol, which cannot be metabolized by the oral and nasopharyngeal bacteria, had been recognized by clinicians as a preventive agents for dental caries and many studies have demonstrated that xylitol causes a reduction in otitis media (chronic inner ear infections) and other nasopharyngeal infections. Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the uptake and metabolic activity of xylitol in pathogenic (viridans group Streptococcus) and nonpathogenic (E. coli) bacteria by taking their Raman spectra before xylitol exposure and after growing with xylitol and quantifying the significant differences in the molecular vibrational modes due to this exposure. The results of this study showed significant stable spectral changes in the S. viridians bacteria induced by xylitol and those changes were not the same as in some E. coli strains. Finally, Raman spectroscopy experiments were conducted to provide important information about the function of a certain protein (wag31) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using a relative non-pathogenic bacterium called Mycobacterium smegmatis. Raman spectra of conditional mutants of bacteria expressing three different phosphorylation forms of wag31 were collected and analyzed. The results show that that the phosphorylation of wag31 causes significant differences in the molecular structure, namely the quantity of amino acids associated with peptidoglycan precursor proteins and lipid II as observed in the Raman spectra of these cells. Raman spectra were also acquired from the isolated cell envelope fraction of the cells expressing different forms of wag31 and the results showed that a significant number of the molecular vibrational differences observed in the cells were also observed in the cell envelope fraction, indicating that these differences are localized in the cell envelope.

  14. Prevalence of Spirometra mansoni in dogs, cats, and frogs and its medical relevance in Guangzhou, China

    Qing Hong

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: A high sparganum infection rate was observed in the wild frogs sold in agricultural product markets in Guangzhou. The infection was also serious in cats and dogs in Guangdong Province. With lifestyles and eating habits resulting in sparganum infection, it is necessary to focus on market management and community education in order to prevent the transmission of this disease in Guangzhou.

  15. Awareness of academic use of smartphones and medical apps among medical students in a private medical college?

    Shah, Jehanzaib; Haq, Usman; Bashir, Ali; Shah, Syed Aslam

    2016-02-01

    To assess the awareness of medical apps and academic use of smartphones among medical students. The questionnaire-based descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in January 2015 and comprised medical students of the Rawal Institute of Health Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan. The self-designed questionnaire was reviewed by a panel of expert for content reliability and validity. Questionnaires were distributed in the classrooms and were filled by the students anonymously. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Among the 569 medical students in the study, 545 (95.8%) had smartphones and 24(4.2%) were using simple cell phones. Overall, 226(41.46%) of the smart phone users were using some medical apps. Besides, 137(24.08%) were aware of the medical apps but were not using them. Also, 391(71.7%) students were not using any type of medical text eBooks through their phone, and only 154(28.3%) had relevant text eBooks in their phones. Medical college students were using smartphones mostly as a means of telecommunication rather than a gadget for improving medical knowledge.

  16. Metrological Reliability of Medical Devices

    Costa Monteiro, E.; Leon, L. F.

    2015-02-01

    The prominent development of health technologies of the 20th century triggered demands for metrological reliability of physiological measurements comprising physical, chemical and biological quantities, essential to ensure accurate and comparable results of clinical measurements. In the present work, aspects concerning metrological reliability in premarket and postmarket assessments of medical devices are discussed, pointing out challenges to be overcome. In addition, considering the social relevance of the biomeasurements results, Biometrological Principles to be pursued by research and innovation aimed at biomedical applications are proposed, along with the analysis of their contributions to guarantee the innovative health technologies compliance with the main ethical pillars of Bioethics.

  17. Other relevant papers in physical oceanography

    Nyffeler, F.

    1989-01-01

    During the past few years, significant progress has occurred in the field of physical oceanography partly as a consequence of developing cooperation and international participation in well-coordinated ocean research programmes. Although these programs were not designed specifically to address CRESP problems, many have proved to be directly relevant to CRESP objectives. For example, MODE, POLYMODE, and Tourbillon were intensive site-specific experiments that included studies of dispersion processes throughout the water column. NOAMP and GME were also site specific, involved the entire water column, and even stressed near-bottom and suspended-sediment processes. Others, (e.g., WOCE) are larger in scope and include extensive observations of the general circulation of entire ocean basins. As a whole, they contribute immensely to improving the data base for exchange and transport processes and thereby for the verification and validation of both regional-scale and general-circulation ocean models. That, in turn, is directly relevant to radiological assessments. Selected papers deriving from experiments such as these are discussed and referenced below

  18. [Terbinafine : Relevant drug interactions and their management].

    Dürrbeck, A; Nenoff, P

    2016-09-01

    The allylamine terbinafine is the probably most frequently prescribed systemic antifungal agent in Germany for the treatment of dermatomycoses and onychomycoses. According to the German drug law, terbinafine is approved for patients who are 18 years and older; however, this antifungal agent is increasingly used off-label for treatment of onychomycoses and tinea capitis in children. Terbinafine is associated with only a few interactions with other drugs, which is why terbinafine can generally be used without problems in older and multimorbid patients. Nevertheless, some potential interactions of terbinafine with certain drug substances are known, including substances of the group of antidepressants/antipsychotics and some cardiovascular drugs. Decisive for the relevance of interactions is-along with the therapeutic index of the substrate and the possible alternative degradation pathways-the genetically determined type of metabolism. When combining terbinafine with tricyclic antidepressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin/noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors, the clinical response and potential side effects must be monitored. Problematic is the use of terbinafine with simultaneous treatment with tamoxifen. The administration of potent CYP2D6 inhibitors leads to a diminished efficacy of tamoxifen because one of its most important active metabolites-endoxifen-is not sufficiently available. Therefore, combination of tamoxifen and terbinafine should be avoided. In conclusion, the number of substances which are able to cause clinically relevant interactions in case of simultaneously administration with terbinafine is clear and should be manageable in the dermatological office with adequate monitoring.

  19. Relevance of randomised controlled trials in oncology.

    Tannock, Ian F; Amir, Eitan; Booth, Christopher M; Niraula, Saroj; Ocana, Alberto; Seruga, Bostjan; Templeton, Arnoud J; Vera-Badillo, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    Well-designed randomised controlled trials (RCTs) can prevent bias in the comparison of treatments and provide a sound basis for changes in clinical practice. However, the design and reporting of many RCTs can render their results of little relevance to clinical practice. In this Personal View, we discuss the limitations of RCT data and suggest some ways to improve the clinical relevance of RCTs in the everyday management of patients with cancer. RCTs should ask questions of clinical rather than commercial interest, avoid non-validated surrogate endpoints in registration trials, and have entry criteria that allow inclusion of all patients who are fit to receive treatment. Furthermore, RCTs should be reported with complete accounting of frequency and management of toxicities, and with strict guidelines to ensure freedom from bias. Premature reporting of results should be avoided. The bar for clinical benefit should be raised for drug registration, which should require publication and review of mature data from RCTs, post-marketing health outcome studies, and value-based pricing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Euthanasia is not medical treatment.

    Boudreau, J Donald; Somerville, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    The public assumes that if euthanasia and assisted suicide were to be legalized they would be carried out by physicians. In furthering critical analysis, we supplement the discourse in the ethics and palliative care literature with that from medical education and evolving jurisprudence. Both proponents and opponents agree that the values of respect for human life and for individuals' autonomy are relevant to the debate. Advocates of euthanasia and assisted suicide give priority to the right to personal autonomy and avoid discussions of harmful impacts of these practices on medicine, law and society. Opponents give priority to respect for life and identify such harmful effects. These both require euthanasia to remain legally prohibited. Proposals are emerging that if society legalizes euthanasia it should not be mandated to physicians. The impact of characterizing euthanasia as 'medical treatment' on physicians' professional identity and on the institutions of medicine and law should be examined in jurisdictions where assisted suicide and euthanasia have been de-criminalized.

  1. Developments in medical imaging techniques

    Kramer, Cornelis

    1979-01-01

    A review of the developments in medical imaging in the past 25 years shows a strong increase in the number of physical methods which have become available for obtaining images of diagnostic value. It is shown that despite this proliferation of methods the equipment used for obtaining the images can be based on a common structure. Also the resulting images can be characterized by a few relevant parameters which indicate their information content. On the basis of this common architecture a study is made of the potential capabilities of the large number of medical imaging techniques available now and in the future. Also the requirements and possibilities for handling the images obtained and for controlling the diagnostic systems are investigated [fr

  2. Psychiatry in American Medical Education: The Case of Harvard's Medical School, 1900-1945.

    Abraham, Tara H

    2018-01-01

    As American psychiatrists moved from the asylum to the private clinic during the early twentieth century, psychiatry acquired a growing presence within medical school curricula. This shift in disciplinary status took place at a time when medical education itself was experiencing a period of reform. By examining medical school registers at Harvard University, records from the Dean's office of Harvard's medical school, and oral histories, this paper examines the rise in prominence of psychiatry in medical education. Three builders of Harvard psychiatry - Elmer E. Southard, C. Macfie Campbell, and Harry C. Solomon - simultaneously sought to mark territory for psychiatry and its relevance. In doing so, they capitalized on three related elements: the fluidity that existed between psychiatry and neurology, the new venues whereby medical students gained training in psychiatry, and the broader role of patrons, professional associations, and certification boards, which sought to expand psychiatry's influence in the social and cultural life of twentieth-century America.

  3. How to become a competent medical writer?

    Suhasini Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical writing involves writing scientific documents of different types which include regulatory and research-related documents, disease or drug-related educational and promotional literature, publication articles like journal manuscripts and abstracts, content for healthcare websites, health-related magazines or news articles. The scientific information in these documents needs to be presented to suit the level of understanding of the target audience, namely, patients or general public, physicians or the regulators. Medical writers require an understanding of the medical concepts and terminology, knowledge of relevant guidelines as regards the structure and contents of specific documents, and good writing skills. They also need to be familiar with searching medical literature, understanding and presenting research data, the document review process, and editing and publishing requirements. Many resources are now available for medical writers to get the required training in the science and art of medical writing, and upgrade their knowledge and skills on an ongoing basis. The demand for medical writing is growing steadily in pharmaceutical and healthcare communication market. Medical writers can work independently or be employed as full time professionals. Life sciences graduates can consider medical writing as a valuable career option.

  4. Implantable Medical Devices

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Implantable Medical Devices Updated:Sep 16,2016 For Rhythm Control ... a Heart Attack Introduction Medications Surgical Procedures Implantable Medical Devices • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack ...

  5. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will be able to find. Medical identification products can help ensure proper treatment in an ...

  6. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    ... Asthma Associated Conditions Asthma & Pregnancy Asthma & Pregnancy: Medications Asthma & Pregnancy: Medications Make an Appointment Refer a Patient ... make sure you are using it correctly. Other Asthma Related Medication Treatment Annual influenza vaccine (flu shot) ...

  7. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS ... Antibiotics Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral ...

  8. Medication/Drug Allergy

    ... Training Home Conditions Medication/Drug Allergy Medication/Drug Allergy Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask a ... risk for adverse reactions to medications. Facts about Allergies The tendency to develop allergies may be inherited. ...

  9. Expert Involvement and Adherence to Medical Evidence in Medical Mobile Phone Apps: A Systematic Review.

    Subhi, Yousif; Bube, Sarah Hjartbro; Rolskov Bojsen, Signe; Skou Thomsen, Ann Sofia; Konge, Lars

    2015-07-27

    Both clinicians and patients use medical mobile phone apps. Anyone can publish medical apps, which leads to contents with variable quality that may have a serious impact on human lives. We herein provide an overview of the prevalence of expert involvement in app development and whether or not app contents adhere to current medical evidence. To systematically review studies evaluating expert involvement or adherence of app content to medical evidence in medical mobile phone apps. We systematically searched 3 databases (PubMed, The Cochrane Library, and EMBASE), and included studies evaluating expert involvement or adherence of app content to medical evidence in medical mobile phone apps. Two authors performed data extraction independently. Qualitative analysis of the included studies was performed. Based on inclusion criteria, 52 studies were included in this review. These studies assessed a total of 6520 apps. Studies dealt with a variety of medical specialties and topics. As much as 28 studies assessed expert involvement, which was found in 9-67% of the assessed apps. Thirty studies (including 6 studies that also assessed expert involvement) assessed adherence of app content to current medical evidence. Thirteen studies found that 10-87% of the assessed apps adhered fully to the compared evidence (published studies, recommendations, and guidelines). Seventeen studies found that none of the assessed apps (n=2237) adhered fully to the compared evidence. Most medical mobile phone apps lack expert involvement and do not adhere to relevant medical evidence.

  10. Extractive Summarisation of Medical Documents

    Abeed Sarker

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Evidence Based Medicine (EBM practice requires practitioners to extract evidence from published medical research when answering clinical queries. Due to the time-consuming nature of this practice, there is a strong motivation for systems that can automatically summarise medical documents and help practitioners find relevant information. Aim The aim of this work is to propose an automatic query-focused, extractive summarisation approach that selects informative sentences from medical documents. MethodWe use a corpus that is specifically designed for summarisation in the EBM domain. We use approximately half the corpus for deriving important statistics associated with the best possible extractive summaries. We take into account factors such as sentence position, length, sentence content, and the type of the query posed. Using the statistics from the first set, we evaluate our approach on a separate set. Evaluation of the qualities of the generated summaries is performed automatically using ROUGE, which is a popular tool for evaluating automatic summaries. Results Our summarisation approach outperforms all baselines (best baseline score: 0.1594; our score 0.1653. Further improvements are achieved when query types are taken into account. Conclusion The quality of extractive summarisation in the medical domain can be significantly improved by incorporating domain knowledge and statistics derived from a specialised corpus. Such techniques can therefore be applied for content selection in end-to-end summarisation systems.

  11. Nuclear data for medical applications

    Capote, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear science plays an increasingly important role in medical applications, in particular the need for radioisotopes in both cancer therapy and diagnostic techniques is very well established. Over the previous thirty years, many laboratories have reported a significant body of experimental data relevant to medical radionuclide production, and international data centres have compiled most of these data. However, till late 90s no systematic effort had been devoted to their standardization and assembly. These needs are being addressed through three IAEA Coordinated Research Projects on Nuclear Data for the Production of Radionuclides that started in 1999. Monitor cross sections to be used in charged particle measurements have been also evaluated (see http://www-nds.iaea.org/medical/monitor reactions.html). A review of IAEA recommended cross sections for the production of medical radioisotopes will be presented. Theoretical modelling of nuclear reactions will be discussed both for nuclear data evaluation and validation. The role of the Recommended Input Parameter Library (RIPL) in defining the input for production codes like EMPIRE and TALYS will be highlighted. (author)

  12. Evidence based medical imaging (EBMI)

    Smith, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Background: The evidence based paradigm was first described about a decade ago. Previous authors have described a framework for the application of evidence based medicine which can be readily adapted to medical imaging practice. Purpose: This paper promotes the application of the evidence based framework in both the justification of the choice of examination type and the optimisation of the imaging technique used. Methods: The framework includes five integrated steps: framing a concise clinical question; searching for evidence to answer that question; critically appraising the evidence; applying the evidence in clinical practice; and, evaluating the use of revised practices. Results: This paper illustrates the use of the evidence based framework in medical imaging (that is, evidence based medical imaging) using the examples of two clinically relevant case studies. In doing so, a range of information technology and other resources available to medical imaging practitioners are identified with the intention of encouraging the application of the evidence based paradigm in radiography and radiology. Conclusion: There is a perceived need for radiographers and radiologists to make greater use of valid research evidence from the literature to inform their clinical practice and thus provide better quality services

  13. Medical Error and Moral Luck.

    Hubbeling, Dieneke

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses the concept of moral luck. Moral luck is discussed in the context of medical error, especially an error of omission that occurs frequently, but only rarely has adverse consequences. As an example, a failure to compare the label on a syringe with the drug chart results in the wrong medication being administered and the patient dies. However, this error may have previously occurred many times with no tragic consequences. Discussions on moral luck can highlight conflicting intuitions. Should perpetrators receive a harsher punishment because of an adverse outcome, or should they be dealt with in the same way as colleagues who have acted similarly, but with no adverse effects? An additional element to the discussion, specifically with medical errors, is that according to the evidence currently available, punishing individual practitioners does not seem to be effective in preventing future errors. The following discussion, using relevant philosophical and empirical evidence, posits a possible solution for the moral luck conundrum in the context of medical error: namely, making a distinction between the duty to make amends and assigning blame. Blame should be assigned on the basis of actual behavior, while the duty to make amends is dependent on the outcome.

  14. 78 FR 5558 - Medical Review Board Public Meeting

    2013-01-25

    ... fatigue-related research concerning bus and motorcoach drivers to identify relevant scientific and medical... ``medical standards for operators of commercial motor vehicles that will ensure that the physical condition... of the MRB is open to the public. Oral comments on the topic from the public will be heard during the...

  15. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  16. Proactive Support of Internet Browsing when Searching for Relevant Health Information.

    Rurik, Clas; Zowalla, Richard; Wiesner, Martin; Pfeifer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Many people use the Internet as one of the primary sources of health information. This is due to the high volume and easy access of freely available information regarding diseases, diagnoses and treatments. However, users may find it difficult to retrieve information which is easily understandable and does not require a deep medical background. In this paper, we present a new kind of Web browser add-on, in order to proactively support users when searching for relevant health information. Our add-on not only visualizes the understandability of displayed medical text but also provides further recommendations of Web pages which hold similar content but are potentially easier to comprehend.

  17. Biclustering methods: biological relevance and application in gene expression analysis.

    Ali Oghabian

    Full Text Available DNA microarray technologies are used extensively to profile the expression levels of thousands of genes under various conditions, yielding extremely large data-matrices. Thus, analyzing this information and extracting biologically relevant knowledge becomes a considerable challenge. A classical approach for tackling this challenge is to use clustering (also known as one-way clustering methods where genes (or respectively samples are grouped together based on the similarity of their expression profiles across the set of all samples (or respectively genes. An alternative approach is to develop biclustering methods to identify local patterns in the data. These methods extract subgroups of genes that are co-expressed across only a subset of samples and may feature important biological or medical implications. In this study we evaluate 13 biclustering and 2 clustering (k-means and hierarchical methods. We use several approaches to compare their performance on two real gene expression data sets. For this purpose we apply four evaluation measures in our analysis: (1 we examine how well the considered (biclustering methods differentiate various sample types; (2 we evaluate how well the groups of genes discovered by the (biclustering methods are annotated with similar Gene Ontology categories; (3 we evaluate the capability of the methods to differentiate genes that are known to be specific to the particular sample types we study and (4 we compare the running time of the algorithms. In the end, we conclude that as long as the samples are well defined and annotated, the contamination of the samples is limited, and the samples are well replicated, biclustering methods such as Plaid and SAMBA are useful for discovering relevant subsets of genes and samples.

  18. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation Techniques for IBS Take Part in Online ...

  19. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation Techniques for ...

  20. Cognitive Medical Multiagent Systems

    Barna Iantovics

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of efficient and flexible agent-based medical diagnosis systems represents a recent research direction. Medical multiagent systems may improve the efficiency of traditionally developed medical computational systems, like the medical expert systems. In our previous researches, a novel cooperative medical diagnosis multiagent system called CMDS (Contract Net Based Medical Diagnosis System was proposed. CMDS system can solve flexibly a large variety of medical diagnosis problems. This paper analyses the increased intelligence of the CMDS system, which motivates its use for different medical problem’s solving.

  1. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Anthony J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. Last modified on February 23, ...

  2. Medical marijuana for cancer.

    Kramer, Joan L

    2015-03-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Marijuana has been used for centuries, and interest in its medicinal properties has been increasing in recent years. Investigations into these medicinal properties has led to the development of cannabinoid pharmaceuticals such as dronabinol, nabilone, and nabiximols. Dronabinol is best studied in the treatment of nausea secondary to cancer chemotherapy and anorexia associated with weight loss in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for those indications. Nabilone has been best studied for the treatment of nausea secondary to cancer chemotherapy. There are also limited studies of these drugs for other conditions. Nabiximols is only available in the United States through clinical trials, but is used in Canada and the United Kingdom for the treatment of spasticity secondary to multiple sclerosis and pain. Studies of marijuana have concentrated on nausea, appetite, and pain. This article will review the literature regarding the medical use of marijuana and these cannabinoid pharmaceuticals (with emphasis on indications relevant to oncology), as well as available information regarding adverse effects of marijuana use. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  3. Slang 'on board'. A moral analysis of medical jargon.

    McCrary, S; Christensen, R C

    1993-01-01

    Medical jargon is commonly used by health-care professionals. The use of such jargon is sometimes criticized as insensitive or callous. Rather than generalize, we identify four basic types of medical jargon and discuss their relevant moral distinctions. Our characterizations of jargon include medical acronyms, euphemisms, and initiatory and derogatory language. Physicians should be aware of the ways in which they use medical slang. Jargon can serve useful purposes but its moral status is often dependent on the function it serves and the context in which it is used. Jargon that is clearly derogatory can reflect negatively on the moral character of the medical profession and should be avoided when possible.

  4. Constitutional relevance of atomic energy law

    Lettow, S.

    1980-01-01

    In a decision publicized on December 20, 1979 the German Federal Constitutional Court rejected a claim of unconstitutionality in connection with the licensing procedure of the Muelheim-Kaerlich Nuclear Power Station currently under construction. This constitutes confirmation, by the 1st Department of the Court, of a decision in 1978 by the 2nd Department about the Kalkar fast breeder power plant, in which the peaceful utilization of nuclear energy had been found to be constitutional. However, the new decision by the Federal Constitutional Court particularly emphasizes the constitutional relevance of the rules of procedure under the Atomic Energy Act and their function with respect to the protection of civil rights. (orig.) [de

  5. Mirror neurons and their clinical relevance.

    Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Fabbri-Destro, Maddalena; Cattaneo, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    One of the most exciting events in neurosciences over the past few years has been the discovery of a mechanism that unifies action perception and action execution. The essence of this 'mirror' mechanism is as follows: whenever individuals observe an action being done by someone else, a set of neurons that code for that action is activated in the observers' motor system. Since the observers are aware of the outcome of their motor acts, they also understand what the other individual is doing without the need for intermediate cognitive mediation. In this Review, after discussing the most pertinent data concerning the mirror mechanism, we examine the clinical relevance of this mechanism. We first discuss the relationship between mirror mechanism impairment and some core symptoms of autism. We then outline the theoretical principles of neurorehabilitation strategies based on the mirror mechanism. We conclude by examining the relationship between the mirror mechanism and some features of the environmental dependency syndromes.

  6. The Integrin Receptor in Biologically Relevant Bilayers

    Kalli, Antreas C.; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2017-01-01

    /talin complex was inserted in biologically relevant bilayers that resemble the cell plasma membrane containing zwitterionic and charged phospholipids, cholesterol and sphingolipids to study the dynamics of the integrin receptor and its effect on bilayer structure and dynamics. The results of this study...... demonstrate the dynamic nature of the integrin receptor and suggest that the presence of the integrin receptor alters the lipid organization between the two leaflets of the bilayer. In particular, our results suggest elevated density of cholesterol and of phosphatidylserine lipids around the integrin....../talin complex and a slowing down of lipids in an annulus of ~30 Å around the protein due to interactions between the lipids and the integrin/talin F2–F3 complex. This may in part regulate the interactions of integrins with other related proteins or integrin clustering thus facilitating signal transduction...

  7. PREDICTING RELEVANT EMPTY SPOTS IN SOCIAL INTERACTION

    Yoshiharu MAENO; Yukio OHSAWA

    2008-01-01

    An empty spot refers to an empty hard-to-fill space which can be found in the records of the social interaction, and is the clue to the persons in the underlying social network who do not appear in the records. This contribution addresses a problem to predict relevant empty spots in social interaction. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous networks are studied as a model underlying the social interaction. A heuristic predictor function method is presented as a new method to address the problem. Simulation experiment is demonstrated over a homogeneous network. A test data set in the form of market baskets is generated from the simulated communication. Precision to predict the empty spots is calculated to demonstrate the performance of the presented method.

  8. Mathematical Properties Relevant to Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    be directly measured. In this chapter, the mathematical foundation of global (as opposed to regional) geomagnetic field modeling is reviewed, and the spatial modeling of the field in spherical coordinates is focussed. Time can be dealt with as an independent variable and is not explicitly considered......Geomagnetic field modeling consists in converting large numbers of magnetic observations into a linear combination of elementary mathematical functions that best describes those observations.The set of numerical coefficients defining this linear combination is then what one refers.......The relevant elementary mathematical functions are introduced, their properties are reviewed, and how they can be used to describe the magnetic field in a source-free (such as the Earth’s neutral atmosphere) or source-dense (such as the ionosphere) environment is explained. Completeness and uniqueness...

  9. Mathematical Properties Relevant to Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    be directly measured. In this chapter, the mathematical foundation of global (as opposed to regional) geomagnetic field modeling is reviewed, and the spatial modeling of the field in spherical coordinates is focused. Time can be dealt with as an independent variable and is not explicitly considered......Geomagnetic field modeling consists in converting large numbers of magnetic observations into a linear combination of elementary mathematical functions that best describes those observations. The set of numerical coefficients defining this linear combination is then what one refers....... The relevant elementary mathematical functions are introduced, their properties are reviewed, and how they can be used to describe the magnetic field in a source-free (such as the Earth’s neutral atmosphere) or source-dense (such as the ionosphere) environment is explained. Completeness and uniqueness...

  10. Towards increased policy relevance in energy modeling

    Worrell, Ernst; Ramesohl, Stephan; Boyd, Gale

    2003-07-29

    Historically, most energy models were reasonably equipped to assess the impact of a subsidy or change in taxation, but are often insufficient to assess the impact of more innovative policy instruments. We evaluate the models used to assess future energy use, focusing on industrial energy use. We explore approaches to engineering-economic analysis that could help improve the realism and policy relevance of engineering-economic modeling frameworks. We also explore solutions to strengthen the policy usefulness of engineering-economic analysis that can be built from a framework of multi-disciplinary cooperation. We focus on the so-called ''engineering-economic'' (or ''bottom-up'') models, as they include the amount of detail that is commonly needed to model policy scenarios. We identify research priorities for the modeling framework, technology representation in models, policy evaluation and modeling of decision-making behavior.

  11. Climate-relevant monitorings in Germany

    Metternich, P.

    1993-01-01

    This catalogue contains so-called meta-data; i.e. information on data. For each measuring programme or set of data, users find the address (postal address, telephone, fax-number) of the respective contact person at the beginning of the entry. The catalogue has three parts: Part A is a compilation of monitoring programmes using conventional methods adopted on the ground. Part B contains research programmes or sets of data from the field of remote sensing. In part C, data sets from time series of climate-relevant parameters are described. Section A was additionally structured according so the compartments of the climate system: Atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, biosphere. (orig./KW) [de

  12. Bacteriophage lambda: early pioneer and still relevant

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetic research on bacteriophage lambda carried out during its golden age from the mid 1950's to mid 1980's was critically important in the attainment of our current understanding of the sophisticated and complex mechanisms by which the expression of genes is controlled, of DNA virus assembly and of the molecular nature of lysogeny. The development of molecular cloning techniques, ironically instigated largely by phage lambda researchers, allowed many phage workers to switch their efforts to other biological systems. Nonetheless, since that time the ongoing study of lambda and its relatives have continued to give important new insights. In this review we give some relevant early history and describe recent developments in understanding the molecular biology of lambda's life cycle. PMID:25742714

  13. Reach and Relevance of Prison Research

    Hilde Tubex

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution I reflect on the changes in the penal landscape and how they impact on prison research. I do this from my experiences as a prison researcher in a variety of roles, in both Europe and Australia. The growing dominance of managerialism has impacted on both corrective services and universities, in ways that have changed the relationship between current prison practices and academically oriented research. Therefore, academics have to question how their contemporary prison research can bridge the emerging gap: how they can not only produce research that adheres to the roots of criminology and provides a base for a rational penal policy, but also how they can develop strategies to get recognition of and funding for this broader contextual work which, although it might not produce results that are immediately identifiable, can be of relevance in indirect ways and in the longer term.

  14. Ecological principles relevant to nuclear war

    Hutchinson, T.C.; Cropper, W.P. Jr.; Grover, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    The ecological principles outlined are very basic ones; the authors anticipate a readership trained in a broad range of disciplines, including those unfamiliar with the academic discipline of ecology. The authors include substantial discussion on ecophysiology (i.e., the responses of organisms to their environment) because this is relevant to the new understanding of the potential climatic consequences of nuclear war. In particular, the physiological sensitivity of organisms to reduced levels of light and temperature are a key part of the analysis of the potential ecological effects and agricultural effects of nuclear war. Much of the ecological analysis has been organized around major biological units called biomes. The authors describe the biome concept and discuss some of the environmental-climatic factors that are believed to control biome distribution. Emphasis is given to plants because of their controlling influence on ecosystem functions through their role as primary producers. Future reports are needed to address more fully the potential effects on animals. Much more research needs to be done on both plant and animal responses to the types of perturbations possible for the aftermath of a nuclear war. Another important element for analysis of the potential ecological consequences of nuclear war concerns recovery processes. As the post-nuclear war environmental extremes ameliorate, ecological communities in devastated regions would begin to reorganize. It is not possible to predict the course of such a succession precisely, but some principles concerning post-perturbation replacement (such as seed banks and germination), relevant successional patterns, and organism strategies are discussed

  15. Thermochemical data for environmentally-relevant elements

    Markich, S.J.; Brown, P.L.

    1999-01-01

    This study provides an extensive stability constant (log K) database suitable for calculating the speciation of selected environmentally-relevant elements (H, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, U, Al Pb, Zn, Cu and cd) in an aqueous system, where a model fulvic acid (comprising aspartic, citric, malonic, salicylic and tricarballylic acids) is used to simulate metal binding by dissolved organic material Stability constants for inorganic metal complexes and minerals were selected primarily from critical literature complications and/or reviews. In contrast, few critically evaluated data were available for metal complexes with aspartic, citric, malonic, salicylic and tricarballylic acids. Consequently, data from original research articles were carefully evaluated and compiled as part of the study, following defined selection criteria. to meet the objective of compiling a comprehensive and reliable database of stability constants, all relevant equilibria and species, ranging from simple binary metal complexes to more complex ternary and even quaternary, metal complexes were included where possible in addition to the selection of stability constants from empirical sources, estimates of stability constants were performed when this could be done reliably, based on the unified theory of metal ion complexation and/or linear tree energy relationships The stability constants are given as common logarithms (logo) in the form required by the HARPHRQ geochemical code and refer to the standard state, i.e 298.15 K (25 deg C), 10 5 Pa (1 atm) and, for all species, infinite dilution (ionic strength = 0 mol L -1 ). In addition to the compilation of stability constant data, an overview is given of geochemical speciation modelling in aqueous systems and available conceptual models of metal binding by humic substances. (authors)

  16. MEDICAL ERROR: CIVIL AND LEGAL ASPECT.

    Buletsa, S; Drozd, O; Yunin, O; Mohilevskyi, L

    2018-03-01

    The scientific article is focused on the research of the notion of medical error, medical and legal aspects of this notion have been considered. The necessity of the legislative consolidation of the notion of «medical error» and criteria of its legal estimation have been grounded. In the process of writing a scientific article, we used the empirical method, general scientific and comparative legal methods. A comparison of the concept of medical error in civil and legal aspects was made from the point of view of Ukrainian, European and American scientists. It has been marked that the problem of medical errors is known since ancient times and in the whole world, in fact without regard to the level of development of medicine, there is no country, where doctors never make errors. According to the statistics, medical errors in the world are included in the first five reasons of death rate. At the same time the grant of medical services practically concerns all people. As a man and his life, health in Ukraine are acknowledged by a higher social value, medical services must be of high-quality and effective. The grant of not quality medical services causes harm to the health, and sometimes the lives of people; it may result in injury or even death. The right to the health protection is one of the fundamental human rights assured by the Constitution of Ukraine; therefore the issue of medical errors and liability for them is extremely relevant. The authors make conclusions, that the definition of the notion of «medical error» must get the legal consolidation. Besides, the legal estimation of medical errors must be based on the single principles enshrined in the legislation and confirmed by judicial practice.

  17. [The relevance of clinical risk management].

    Gulino, Matteo; Vergallo, Gianluca Montanari; Frati, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Medical activity includes a risk of possible injury or complications for the patients, that should drive the Health Care Institutions to introduce and/ or improve clinical Risk management instruments. Although Italy is still lacking a National project of Clinical Risk Management, a number of efforts have been made by different Italian Regions to introduce instruments of risk management. In addition, most of National Health Care Institutions include actually a Department specifically in charge to manage the clinical risk. Despite the practical difficulties, the results obtained until now suggest that the risk management may represent a useful instrument to contribute to the reduction of errors in clinical conduct. Indeed, the introduction of adequate instruments of prevention and management of clinical risk may help to ameliorate the quality of health care Institution services.

  18. Functionally relevant microsatellites in sugarcane unigenes

    Singh Nagendra K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unigene sequences constitute a rich source of functionally relevant microsatellites. The present study was undertaken to mine the microsatellites in the available unigene sequences of sugarcane for understanding their constitution in the expressed genic component of its complex polyploid/aneuploid genome, assessing their functional significance in silico, determining the extent of allelic diversity at the microsatellite loci and for evaluating their utility in large-scale genotyping applications in sugarcane. Results The average frequency of perfect microsatellite was 1/10.9 kb, while it was 1/44.3 kb for the long and hypervariable class I repeats. GC-rich trinucleotides coding for alanine and the GA-rich dinucleotides were the most abundant microsatellite classes. Out of 15,594 unigenes mined in the study, 767 contained microsatellite repeats and for 672 of these putative functions were determined in silico. The microsatellite repeats were found in the functional domains of proteins encoded by 364 unigenes. Its significance was assessed by establishing the structure-function relationship for the beta-amylase and protein kinase encoding unigenes having repeats in the catalytic domains. A total of 726 allelic variants (7.42 alleles per locus with different repeat lengths were captured precisely for a set of 47 fluorescent dye labeled primers in 36 sugarcane genotypes and five cereal species using the automated fragment analysis system, which suggested the utility of designed primers for rapid, large-scale and high-throughput genotyping applications in sugarcane. Pair-wise similarity ranging from 0.33 to 0.84 with an average of 0.40 revealed a broad genetic base of the Indian varieties in respect of functionally relevant regions of the large and complex sugarcane genome. Conclusion Microsatellite repeats were present in 4.92% of sugarcane unigenes, for most (87.6% of which functions were determined in silico. High level of

  19. Port Harcourt Medical Journal

    Port Harcourt Medical Journal's objectives are to disseminate medical information from the College of Health Sciences, University of Port Harcourt and the rest of the national and international medical community; act as a medium for the articulation of research and findings from same as well as proceedings of medical ...

  20. Primary medical care in Irish prisons.

    Barry, Joe M; Darker, Catherine D; Thomas, David E; Allwright, Shane P A; O'Dowd, Tom

    2010-03-22

    An industrial dispute between prison doctors and the Irish Prison Service (IPS) took place in 2004. Part of the resolution of that dispute was that an independent review of prison medical and support services be carried out by a University Department of Primary Care. The review took place in 2008 and we report here on the principal findings of that review. This study utilised a mixed methods approach. An independent expert medical evaluator (one of the authors, DT) inspected the medical facilities, equipment and relevant custodial areas in eleven of the fourteen prisons within the IPS. Semistructured interviews took place with personnel who had operational responsibility for delivery of prison medical care. Prison doctors completed a questionnaire to elicit issues such as allocation of clinician's time, nurse and administrative support and resources available. There was wide variation in the standard of medical facilities and infrastructure provided across the IPS. The range of medical equipment available was generally below that of the equivalent general practice scheme in the community. There is inequality within the system with regard to the ratio of doctor-contracted time relative to the size of the prison population. There is limited administrative support, with the majority of prisons not having a medical secretary. There are few psychiatric or counselling sessions available. People in prison have a wide range of medical care needs and there is evidence to suggest that these needs are being met inconsistently in Irish prisons.

  1. Primary medical care in Irish prisons

    Allwright Shane PA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An industrial dispute between prison doctors and the Irish Prison Service (IPS took place in 2004. Part of the resolution of that dispute was that an independent review of prison medical and support services be carried out by a University Department of Primary Care. The review took place in 2008 and we report here on the principal findings of that review. Methods This study utilised a mixed methods approach. An independent expert medical evaluator (one of the authors, DT inspected the medical facilities, equipment and relevant custodial areas in eleven of the fourteen prisons within the IPS. Semistructured interviews took place with personnel who had operational responsibility for delivery of prison medical care. Prison doctors completed a questionnaire to elicit issues such as allocation of clinician's time, nurse and administrative support and resources available. Results There was wide variation in the standard of medical facilities and infrastructure provided across the IPS. The range of medical equipment available was generally below that of the equivalent general practice scheme in the community. There is inequality within the system with regard to the ratio of doctor-contracted time relative to the size of the prison population. There is limited administrative support, with the majority of prisons not having a medical secretary. There are few psychiatric or counselling sessions available. Conclusions People in prison have a wide range of medical care needs and there is evidence to suggest that these needs are being met inconsistently in Irish prisons.

  2. A principled and cosmopolitan neuroethics: considerations for international relevance.

    Shook, John R; Giordano, James

    2014-01-03

    Neuroethics applies cognitive neuroscience for prescribing alterations to conceptions of self and society, and for prescriptively judging the ethical applications of neurotechnologies. Plentiful normative premises are available to ground such prescriptivity, however prescriptive neuroethics may remain fragmented by social conventions, cultural ideologies, and ethical theories. Herein we offer that an objectively principled neuroethics for international relevance requires a new meta-ethics: understanding how morality works, and how humans manage and improve morality, as objectively based on the brain and social sciences. This new meta-ethics will simultaneously equip neuroethics for evaluating and revising older cultural ideologies and ethical theories, and direct neuroethics towards scientifically valid views of encultured humans intelligently managing moralities. Bypassing absolutism, cultural essentialisms, and unrealistic ethical philosophies, neuroethics arrives at a small set of principles about proper human flourishing that are more culturally inclusive and cosmopolitan in spirit. This cosmopolitanism in turn suggests augmentations to traditional medical ethics in the form of four principled guidelines for international consideration: empowerment, non-obsolescence, self-creativity, and citizenship.

  3. A principled and cosmopolitan neuroethics: considerations for international relevance

    2014-01-01

    Neuroethics applies cognitive neuroscience for prescribing alterations to conceptions of self and society, and for prescriptively judging the ethical applications of neurotechnologies. Plentiful normative premises are available to ground such prescriptivity, however prescriptive neuroethics may remain fragmented by social conventions, cultural ideologies, and ethical theories. Herein we offer that an objectively principled neuroethics for international relevance requires a new meta-ethics: understanding how morality works, and how humans manage and improve morality, as objectively based on the brain and social sciences. This new meta-ethics will simultaneously equip neuroethics for evaluating and revising older cultural ideologies and ethical theories, and direct neuroethics towards scientifically valid views of encultured humans intelligently managing moralities. Bypassing absolutism, cultural essentialisms, and unrealistic ethical philosophies, neuroethics arrives at a small set of principles about proper human flourishing that are more culturally inclusive and cosmopolitan in spirit. This cosmopolitanism in turn suggests augmentations to traditional medical ethics in the form of four principled guidelines for international consideration: empowerment, non-obsolescence, self-creativity, and citizenship. PMID:24387102

  4. STS-3 medical report

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The medical operations report for STS-3, which includes a review of the health of the crew before, during, and immediately after the third Shuttle orbital flight is presented. Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical 'kit' carried in flight, tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results, hematology and immunology analyses, medical microbiology, food and nutrition, potable water, shuttle toxicology, radiological health, and cabin acoustic noise. Environmental effects of shuttle launch and landing medical information management, and management, planning, and implementation of the medical program are also dicussed.

  5. Machine medical ethics

    Pontier, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    The essays in this book, written by researchers from both humanities and sciences, describe various theoretical and experimental approaches to adding medical ethics to a machine in medical settings. Medical machines are in close proximity with human beings, and getting closer: with patients who are in vulnerable states of health, who have disabilities of various kinds, with the very young or very old, and with medical professionals. In such contexts, machines are undertaking important medical tasks that require emotional sensitivity, knowledge of medical codes, human dignity, and privacy. As machine technology advances, ethical concerns become more urgent: should medical machines be programmed to follow a code of medical ethics? What theory or theories should constrain medical machine conduct? What design features are required? Should machines share responsibility with humans for the ethical consequences of medical actions? How ought clinical relationships involving machines to be modeled? Is a capacity for e...

  6. Medicalization, markets and consumers.

    Conrad, Peter; Leiter, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of changes in the medical marketplace on medicalization in U.S. society. Using four cases (Viagra, Paxil, human growth hormone and in vitro fertilization), we focus on two aspects of the changing medical marketplace: the role of direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs and the emergence of private medical markets. We demonstrate how consumers and pharmaceutical corporations contribute to medicalization, with physicians, insurance coverage, and changes in regulatory practices playing facilitating roles. In some cases, insurers attempt to counteract medicalization by restricting access. We distinguish mediated and private medical markets, each characterized by differing relationships with corporations, insurers, consumers, and physicians. In the changing medical environment, with medical markets as intervening factors, corporations and insurers are becoming more significant determinants in the medicalization process.

  7. Early onset depression: the relevance of anxiety.

    Parker, G; Wilhelm, K; Asghari, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine risk factors that may differentiate early onset from late onset depression. A non-clinical cohort that had been assessed from 1978 to 1993 at 5 yearly intervals and that had a high prevalence rate of lifetime depression took part in the study. We established an appropriate age cut-off to distinguish early onset (i.e. before 26 years) of major and of minor depression, and examined the relevance of a number of possible determinants of early onset depression assessed over the life of the study. Despite several dimensional measures of depression, self-esteem and personality being considered, they generally failed (when assessed early in the study) to discriminate subsequent early onset depression, with the exception of low masculinity scores being a weak predictor of major and/or minor depression. Early onset depression was strongly predicted, however, by a lifetime episode of a major anxiety disorder, with generalised anxiety being a somewhat stronger and more consistent predictor than panic disorder, agoraphobia and minor anxiety disorders (ie social phobia, simple phobia). The possibility that anxiety may act as a key predispositional factor to early onset depression and to a greater number of depressive episodes is important in that clinical assessment and treatment of any existing anxiety disorder may be a more efficient and useful strategy than focussing primarily on the depressive disorder.

  8. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    Danbo Yang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(L-g-glutamylglutamine-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX. PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic.

  9. Ligand Exchange Kinetics of Environmentally Relevant Metals

    Panasci, Adele Frances [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The interactions of ground water with minerals and contaminants are of broad interest for geochemists but are not well understood. Experiments on the molecular scale can determine reaction parameters (i.e. rates of ligand exchange, activation entropy, activation entropy, and activation volume) that can be used in computations to gain insight into reactions that occur in natural groundwaters. Experiments to determine the rate of isotopic ligand exchange for three environmentally relevant metals, rhodium (Rh), iron (Fe), and neptunium (Np), are described. Many environmental transformations of metals (e.g. reduction) in soil occur at trivalent centers, Fe(III) in particular. Contaminant ions absorb to mineral surfaces via ligand exchange, and the reversal of this reaction can be dangerous, releasing contaminants into the environment. Ferric iron is difficult to study spectroscopically because most of its complexes are paramagnetic and are generally reactive toward ligand exchange; therefore, Rh(III), which is diamagnetic and less reactive, was used to study substitution reactions that are analogous to those that occur on mineral oxide surfaces. Studies on both Np(V) and Np(VI) are important in their own right, as 237Np is a radioactive transuranic element with a half-life of 2 million years.

  10. Relevance of extracellular DNA in rhizosphere

    Pietramellara, Giacomo; Ascher, Judith; Baraniya, Divyashri; Arfaioli, Paola; Ceccherini, Maria Teresa; Hawes, Martha

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising areas for future development is the manipulation of the rhizosphere to produce sustainable and efficient agriculture production systems. Using Omics approaches, to define the distinctive features of eDNA systems and structures, will facilitate progress in rhizo-enforcement and biocontrol studies. The relevance of these studies results clear when we consider the plethora of ecological functions in which eDNA is involved. This fraction can be actively extruded by living cells or discharged during cellular lysis and may exert a key role in the stability and variability of the soil bacterial genome, resulting also a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for plants due to the root's capacity to directly uptake short DNA fragments. The adhesive properties of the DNA molecule confer to eDNA the capacity to inhibit or kill pathogenic bacteria by cation limitation induction, and to facilitate formation of biofilm and extracellular traps (ETs), that may protect microorganisms inhabiting biofilm and plant roots against pathogens and allelopathic substances. The ETs are actively extruded by root border cells when they are dispersed in the rhizosphere, conferring to plants the capacity to extend an endogenous pathogen defence system outside the organism. Moreover, eDNA could be involved in rhizoremediation in heavy metal polluted soil acting as a bioflotation reagent.

  11. Relevance of tidal heating on large TNOs

    Saxena, Prabal; Renaud, Joe P.; Henning, Wade G.; Jutzi, Martin; Hurford, Terry

    2018-03-01

    We examine the relevance of tidal heating for large Trans-Neptunian Objects, with a focus on its potential to melt and maintain layers of subsurface liquid water. Depending on their past orbital evolution, tidal heating may be an important part of the heat budget for a number of discovered and hypothetical TNO systems and may enable formation of, and increased access to, subsurface liquid water. Tidal heating induced by the process of despinning is found to be particularly able to compete with heating due to radionuclide decay in a number of different scenarios. In cases where radiogenic heating alone may establish subsurface conditions for liquid water, we focus on the extent by which tidal activity lifts the depth of such conditions closer to the surface. While it is common for strong tidal heating and long lived tides to be mutually exclusive, we find this is not always the case, and highlight when these two traits occur together. We find cases where TNO systems experience tidal heating that is a significant proportion of, or greater than radiogenic heating for periods ranging from100‧s of millions to a billion years. For subsurface oceans that contain a small antifreeze component, tidal heating due to very high initial spin states may enable liquid water to be preserved right up to the present day. Of particular interest is the Eris-Dysnomia system, which in those cases may exhibit extant cryovolcanism.

  12. Extracellular vesicles: fundamentals and clinical relevance

    Wael Nassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All types of cells of eukaryotic organisms produce and release small nanovesicles into their extracellular environment. Early studies have described these vesicles as ′garbage bags′ only to remove obsolete cellular molecules. Valadi and colleagues, in 2007, were the first to discover the capability of circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs to horizontally transfer functioning gene information between cells. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodeling, chemoresistance, genetic exchange, and signaling pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer. EVs represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, signaling proteins, and RNAs. They contribute to physiology and pathology, and they have a myriad of potential clinical applications in health and disease. Moreover, vesicles can pass the blood-brain barrier and may perhaps even be considered as naturally occurring liposomes. These cell-derived EVs not only represent a central mediator of the disease microenvironment, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for disease biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and disease monitoring. In this review, we′ll be addressing the characteristics of different types of extracellular EVs, as well as their clinical relevance and potential as diagnostic markers, and also define therapeutic options.

  13. Human error theory: relevance to nurse management.

    Armitage, Gerry

    2009-03-01

    Describe, discuss and critically appraise human error theory and consider its relevance for nurse managers. Healthcare errors are a persistent threat to patient safety. Effective risk management and clinical governance depends on understanding the nature of error. This paper draws upon a wide literature from published works, largely from the field of cognitive psychology and human factors. Although the content of this paper is pertinent to any healthcare professional; it is written primarily for nurse managers. Error is inevitable. Causation is often attributed to individuals, yet causation in complex environments such as healthcare is predominantly multi-factorial. Individual performance is affected by the tendency to develop prepacked solutions and attention deficits, which can in turn be related to local conditions and systems or latent failures. Blame is often inappropriate. Defences should be constructed in the light of these considerations and to promote error wisdom and organizational resilience. Managing and learning from error is seen as a priority in the British National Health Service (NHS), this can be better achieved with an understanding of the roots, nature and consequences of error. Such an understanding can provide a helpful framework for a range of risk management activities.

  14. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    Yang, Danbo; Yu, Lei; Van, Sang

    2010-01-01

    The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(l-γ-glutamylglutamine)-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX). PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic

  15. Accreditation - Its relevance for laboratories measuring radionuclides

    Palsson, S E [Icelandic Radiation Protection Inst. (Iceland)

    2001-11-01

    Accreditation is an internationally recognised way for laboratories to demonstrate their competence. Obtaining and maintaining accreditation is, however, a costly and time-consuming procedure. The benefits of accreditation also depend on the role of the laboratory. Accreditation may be of limited relevance for a research laboratory, but essential for a laboratory associated with a national authority and e.g. issuing certificates. This report describes work done within the NKSBOK-1.1 sub-project on introducing accreditation to Nordic laboratories measuring radionuclides. Initially the focus was on the new standard ISO/IEC 17025, which was just in a draft form at the time, but which provides now a new framework for accreditation of laboratories. Later the focus was widened to include a general introduction to accreditation and providing through seminars a forum for exchanging views on the experience laboratories have had in this field. Copies of overheads from the last such seminar are included in the appendix to this report. (au)

  16. Media and mental illness: Relevance to India

    S K Padhy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Media has a complex interrelationship with mental illnesses. This narrative review takes a look at the various ways in which media and mental illnesses interact. Relevant scientific literature and electronic databases were searched, including Pubmed and GoogleScholar, to identify studies, viewpoints and recommendations using keywords related to media and mental illnesses. This review discusses both the positive and the negative portrayals of mental illnesses through the media. The portrayal of mental health professionals and psychiatric treatment is also discussed. The theories explaining the relationship of how media influences the attitudes and behavior are discussed. Media has also been suggested to be a risk factor for the genesis or exacerbation of mental illnesses like eating disorders and substance use disorders. The potential use of media to understand the psychopathology and plight of those with psychiatric disorders is referred to. The manner in which media can be used as a tool for change to reduce the stigma surrounding mental illnesses is explored.

  17. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  18. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    Yang, Danbo [Biomedical Engineering and Technology Institute, Institutes for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai, 200062 (China); Yu, Lei, E-mail: yu-lei@gg.nitto.co.jp [Biomedical Engineering and Technology Institute, Institutes for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai, 200062 (China); Biomedical Group, Nitto Denko Technical Corporation, 501 Via Del Monte, Oceanside, CA 92058 (United States); Van, Sang [Biomedical Group, Nitto Denko Technical Corporation, 501 Via Del Monte, Oceanside, CA 92058 (United States)

    2010-12-23

    The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(l-γ-glutamylglutamine)-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX). PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic.

  19. Scientific Skills as Core Competences in Medical Education: What Do Medical Students Think?

    Ribeiro, Laura; Severo, Milton; Pereira, Margarida; Ferreira, Maria Amélia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scientific excellence is one of the most fundamental underpinnings of medical education and its relevance is unquestionable. To be involved in research activities enhances students' critical thinking and problem-solving capacities, which are mandatory competences for new achievements in patient care and consequently to the improvement…

  20. Ethics in the marketing of medical services.

    Latham, Stephen R

    2004-09-01

    This paper deals with the ethics of marketing medical services by physicians, medical groups, hospitals and other mainstream medical caregivers in the United States. It does not deal with pharmaceutical marketing, since that raises a number of special issues, some of them legal and some having to do with the unique culture of pharmaceutical marketing, which really ought to be dealt with separately. Nor does it touch on the little-explored field of marketing alternative and complementary medicine. It begins with a general description of what is included in "the marketing process." It then briefly tours some of the difficulties faced by those who would market medical services ethically, and ends with some comments on the relevance of professionalism to ethical marketing.

  1. A survey of attitudes, practices, and knowledge regarding drug-drug interactions among medical residents in Iran

    Nabovati, Ehsan; Vakili-Arki, Hasan; Taherzadeh, Zhila; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Eslami, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Background When prescribing medications, physicians should recognize clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). To improve medication safety, it is important to understand prescribers' knowledge and opinions pertaining to DDIs. Objective To determine the current DDI information

  2. The method for production of high purity carrier free ortophosphoric acid labeled with isotopes Phosphorus-32 and Phosphorus-33

    Abdukayumov, M.N.; Abdusalyamov, A.N.; Chistyakov, P.G.; Yuldashev, B.S.

    2001-01-01

    Extensive application for various radioactive isotopes was found in an extremity of the 20-Th century in a science and production. Labeled compounds are used with growing effectiveness in a molecular biology, gene engineering, medicine and other areas. Phosphorus-32 and Phosphorus-33 isotopes as a different labeled compounds that are used mainly in molecular biology are produced at the Radiopreparat enterprise of the Institute of Nuclear Physics of Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan Republic. The quality of labeled preparations is very high. The specifications for above mentioned preparations corresponds to demands most of customers in different countries. P-32 or P-33 labeled orthophosphoric acid has high radiochemical purity (more than 99 %) and specific radioactivity close to theoretical. Orthophosphoric acid prepared by the described above method has radiochemical purity about 95 % and output of the target product 99%

  3. Separation of carrier-free rhodium isotopes from ruthenium cyclotron targets by the extraction of nitrosylruthenium from hydrochloric acid solution

    Haasbroek, F.J.; Strelow, F.W.E.; Van der Walt, T.N.

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for the separation of rhodium isotopes from ruthenium cyclotron targets. After bombardment with deuterons and dissolution of the target material, the ruthenium is converted into a nitrosyl complex by treatment with hydroxylammonium chloride. Aluminium and other elements which have been introduced in the dissolution step, are separated by cation exchange. Ruthenium is then separated by extraction with a mixture of tri-n-butyl phosphate and hexane (4:1), leaving the rhodium in the aqueous phase. No ruthenium is found in the rhodium fraction and the recovery of rhodium is better than 90 per cent [af

  4. Hollow crystalline straws of diclofenac for high-dose and carrier-free dry powder inhaler formulations.

    Yazdi, Ashkan K; Smyth, Hugh D C

    2016-04-11

    To crystallize diclofenac (DF) from diclofenac sodium (DFNa), to micronize DF and DFNa, and to evaluate in vitro aerodynamic performance of the jet-milled formulations From the acidic titration of aqueous DFNa, DF crystals were formed and were identified using thermal analysis, spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction. Following the micronization of the DF and DFNa powders, the recovered samples were imaged, and their particle size distributions were evaluated. Samples before and after jet millings were characterized, and in vitro aerodynamic performance testing was performed on the DF sample before jet milling and the DF and DFNa samples following jet milling. Hollow needles of DF were precipitated. With similar particle size distributions, the jet-milled DFNa sample from the collection bag, and the DF sample from the cyclone were used for further characterization. Despite different deposition patterns in the Next Generation Impactor, the DF hollow needles had a comparable respirable fraction percentage to the jet-milled DF and DFNa particles. However, the jet-milled DF formulation had the best in vitro aerodynamic performance. Hollow, crystalline needles of DF were formed and possessed promising aerosol performance in comparison with the jet-milled powders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Extraction of carrier-free 103Pd from thin rhodium wire irradiated with a proton beam in U-150 cyclotron

    Yuldashev, B.S.; Khudajbergenov, U.; Gulamov, I.R.; Mirzarva, M.A.; Rylov, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    A procedure for preparation of 103 Pd isotope of 99.9 % purity from a thin rhodium wire irradiated by 21 MeV proton beam in a cyclotron was developed. The desired product was prepared by electrolytic dissolution of the irradiated target in 6 M HCl with subsequent extraction of 103 Pd isotope without carrier by dimethylglyoxime in chloroform [ru

  6. The method of determination of micro quantities of labelled iodide in Na125 I carrier free solution

    Kholbaev, A.Kh.; Shilin, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    The analytical method was elaborated with the purpose to increase detection limit and radiation safety of labelled iodide determination. The method includes oxidation of iodide by iodate in diluted sulphur acid solution with molar concentration 0,03-0,04/moles/litre at molar ratio of iodide to iodate I - :IO - 3 1:12,5. The extraction of I 2 produced is done by toluene. (author)

  7. Separation and purification of carrier-free cobalt-58 from neutron irradiated nickel foil for electrochemical studies

    Egamediev, S.; Nurbaeva, D.; Rakhmanov, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Cobalt-58 will be used for tracer studies of the behaviour of cobalt radionuclides in no- carrier-added form during electrochemical deposition on metal backing. The 58 Co can be produced by using 58 Ni(n,p) 58 Co nuclear reaction in nuclear reactor. 58 Co (T 1/2 =71 days) decays by positron emitting (15%) and electron capture (85%) with simultaneous γ -irradiation. In this study, we have developed the simple method for separation and purification of 58 Co in no- carrier-added form from neutron irradiated nickel foil. Previously, we have studied the dissolution of nickel foil in various media to find best conditions for rapid dissolution of nickel target. It was found that nickel foil dissolved completely without heating in 6.3 M hydrobromic acid with addition a few drops of hydrogen peroxide. After dissolution of the target material, the cobalt-58 is separated from nickel, copper, iron and other elements by extraction chromatography. The solution in 6.3 M hydrobromic acid is passed through a column containing suspension of polytetrafluoroethylene powder with 0.5 M trioctylamine in xylene, equilibrated with the same acid. Nickel is not extracted and passed through column. Cobalt is retained and finally eluted with 3 M HBr in the one free column volume. The cobalt fraction is percolated through a column filled with suspension of pure polytetrafluoroethylene powder to purify from the admixture of extractant. The obtained solution is evaporated to dryness and the dry residue is treated by evaporation with aqua regia. After treatment the damp residue is dissolved in electrolyte and the obtained solution is used to study of 58 Co electrochemical deposition procedure. The yield of cobalt-58 was higher than 93% and the radiochemical purity was more than 99%. This method will be used for separation and purification of cobalt-57 to make of sealed sources for X-ray fluorescence analysis

  8. Reinforcing the protection against ionizing radiation in medical uses through following the progress in modern medical physics

    Zheng Junzheng; Li Junli

    2008-01-01

    The medical application of ionizing radiation has the longest history, the most extensive uses and the strongest effect among the multiple applications of ionizing radiation technology. With the development of diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy, for instances, the radiology, the interventional radiology, the nuclear medicine, and the radiation oncology; the infrastructures and teambuilding of medical physics in China has been becoming more and more important and urgent. Fortunately, people in relevant fields have already recognized this situation and made lots of progresses in the recent years, for example, the 221 st Xiangshan Science Conference took 'The Development of Medical Physics' as its main topic in 2004; in recent years, a series of regulations and national standards regarding to the quality assurance and radiological protection of medical exposure and the teambuilding of the relevant departments in hospital have been successively issued; the subject of Medical Physics was opened as both undergraduate and graduated courses in more and more universities (Tsinghua University, Peking University etc); the Committee on Medical Physics was enrolled as a new member of the Chinese Physical Society. Modern medical physics should include 4 parts, medical imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, radiation oncology physics, and health physics. Protection against ionizing radiation needs to fully cover the development of medical physics, which includes the protection against ianizing radiation in medical uses. This article emphasizes the improvement of the ionizing radiation protection in medical uses, for marking of 30th anniversary of the Journal of Radiation Protection. (authors)

  9. Structural Model Error and Decision Relevancy

    Goldsby, M.; Lusk, G.

    2017-12-01

    The extent to which climate models can underwrite specific climate policies has long been a contentious issue. Skeptics frequently deny that climate models are trustworthy in an attempt to undermine climate action, whereas policy makers often desire information that exceeds the capabilities of extant models. While not skeptics, a group of mathematicians and philosophers [Frigg et al. (2014)] recently argued that even tiny differences between the structure of a complex dynamical model and its target system can lead to dramatic predictive errors, possibly resulting in disastrous consequences when policy decisions are based upon those predictions. They call this result the Hawkmoth effect (HME), and seemingly use it to rebuke rightwing proposals to forgo mitigation in favor of adaptation. However, a vigorous debate has emerged between Frigg et al. on one side and another philosopher-mathematician pair [Winsberg and Goodwin (2016)] on the other. On one hand, Frigg et al. argue that their result shifts the burden to climate scientists to demonstrate that their models do not fall prey to the HME. On the other hand, Winsberg and Goodwin suggest that arguments like those asserted by Frigg et al. can be, if taken seriously, "dangerous": they fail to consider the variety of purposes for which models can be used, and thus too hastily undermine large swaths of climate science. They put the burden back on Frigg et al. to show their result has any effect on climate science. This paper seeks to attenuate this debate by establishing an irenic middle position; we find that there is more agreement between sides than it first seems. We distinguish a `decision standard' from a `burden of proof', which helps clarify the contributions to the debate from both sides. In making this distinction, we argue that scientists bear the burden of assessing the consequences of HME, but that the standard Frigg et al. adopt for decision relevancy is too strict.

  10. Intracranial Aneurysms of Neuro-Ophthalmologic Relevance.

    Micieli, Jonathan A; Newman, Nancy J; Barrow, Daniel L; Biousse, Valérie

    2017-12-01

    Intracranial saccular aneurysms are acquired lesions that often present with neuro-ophthalmologic symptoms and signs. Recent advances in neurosurgical techniques, endovascular treatments, and neurocritical care have improved the optimal management of symptomatic unruptured aneurysms, but whether the chosen treatment has an impact on neuro-ophthalmologic outcomes remains debated. A review of the literature focused on neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and treatment of intracranial aneurysms with specific relevance to neuro-ophthalmologic outcomes was conducted using Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. Cavernous sinus aneurysms were not included in this review. Surgical clipping vs endovascular coiling for aneurysms causing third nerve palsies was compared in 13 retrospective studies representing 447 patients. Complete recovery was achieved in 78% of surgical patients compared with 44% of patients treated with endovascular coiling. However, the complication rate, hospital costs, and days spent in intensive care were reported as higher in surgically treated patients. Retrospective reviews of surgical clipping and endovascular coiling for all ocular motor nerve palsies (third, fourth, or sixth cranial nerves) revealed similar results of complete resolution in 76% and 49%, respectively. Improvement in visual deficits related to aneurysmal compression of the anterior visual pathways was also better among patients treated with clipping than with coiling. The time to treatment from onset of visual symptoms was a predictive factor of visual recovery in several studies. Few reports have specifically assessed the improvement of visual deficits after treatment with flow diverters. Decisions regarding the choice of therapy for intracranial aneurysms causing neuro-ophthalmologic signs ideally should be made at high-volume centers with access to both surgical and endovascular treatments. The status of the patient, location of the aneurysm, and experience of the treating physicians

  11. Patient-relevant treatment goals in psoriasis.

    Blome, Christine; Gosau, Ramona; Radtke, Marc A; Reich, Kristian; Rustenbach, Stephan J; Spehr, Christina; Thaçi, Diamant; Augustin, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Patient-oriented care requires therapeutic decisions to agree with the patients' treatment needs and goals. This study addressed the following questions: What is important to psoriasis patients starting systemic treatment? How stable are these preferences within the first year of treatment? Are treatment goals associated with age, gender, or treatment success? The importance of treatment goals was assessed for patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis in the German Psoriasis Registry (PsoBest) at baseline (onset of a systemic treatment; n = 3066) and at a 1-year follow-up (n = 1444) using the Patient Benefit Index (PBI). Treatment success was measured with PBI global score and Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI). Patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis pursued a wide range of different goals. The most general treatment goals were rated most relevant, including skin healing and quick skin improvement (94.8/94.5 % "quite" or "very" important), confidence in the therapy (93.0 %), control over the disease (92.3 %), and a clear diagnosis and therapy (89.6 %). Further important goals related to not being in fear of the disease getting worse (84.8 %), reduction in itching (83.9 %), burning (70.6 %), and pain (60.6 %) as well as attaining a normal everyday life (78.4 %) and low treatment burden (64.2-77.9 %). Goals were mostly not associated with sex and gender. Goal importance slightly increased with treatment success. In a substantial proportion of patients (30.3-54.7 %) goal importance changed within 1 year after onset of systemic treatment. We conclude that treatment goal importance should be assessed in clinical practice on a regular basis.

  12. Relevant optical properties for direct restorative materials.

    Pecho, Oscar E; Ghinea, Razvan; do Amaral, Erika A Navarro; Cardona, Juan C; Della Bona, Alvaro; Pérez, María M

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate relevant optical properties of esthetic direct restorative materials focusing on whitened and translucent shades. Enamel (E), body (B), dentin (D), translucent (T) and whitened (Wh) shades for E (WhE) and B (WhB) from a restorative system (Filtek Supreme XTE, 3M ESPE) were evaluated. Samples (1 mm thick) were prepared. Spectral reflectance (R%) and color coordinates (L*, a*, b*, C* and h°) were measured against black and white backgrounds, using a spectroradiometer, in a viewing booth, with CIE D65 illuminant and d/0° geometry. Scattering (S) and absorption (K) coefficients and transmittance (T%) were calculated using Kubelka-Munk's equations. Translucency (TP) and opalescence (OP) parameters and whiteness index (W*) were obtained from differences of CIELAB color coordinates. R%, S, K and T% curves from all shades were compared using VAF (Variance Accounting For) coefficient with Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. Color coordinates and optical parameters were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test with Bonferroni correction (α=0.0007). Spectral behavior of R% and S were different for T shades. In addition, T shades showed the lowest R%, S and K values, as well as the highest T%, TP an OP values. In most cases, WhB shades showed different color and optical properties (including TP and W*) than their corresponding B shades. WhE shades showed similar mean W* values and higher mean T% and TP values than E shades. When using whitened or translucent composites, the final color is influenced not only by the intraoral background but also by the color and optical properties of multilayers used in the esthetic restoration. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of an ITER relevant inspection robot

    Gargiulo, L.; Bayetti, P.; Cordier, J.J.; Grisolia, C.; Hatchressian, J.C. [Association Euratom-CEA, Cadarache (France). Dept. de Recherche sur la Fusion Controlee; Friconneau, J.P.; Keller, D.; Perrot, Y. [CEA-LIST Robotics and Interactive Systems Unit, Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2007-07-01

    Robotic operations are one of the major maintenance challenges for ITER and future fusion reactors. In particular, in vessel inspection operations without loss of conditioning could be very useful. Within this framework, the aim of the project called AIA (Articulated Inspection Arm) is to demonstrate the feasibility of a multi-purpose in-vessel Remote Handling inspection system using a long reach, limited payload carrier (up to 10 kg). It is composed of 5 segments with 11 degrees of freedom and a total range of 8 m. The project is currently developed by the CEA within the European workprogramme. Its first in situ tests are planned this summer on the Tore Supra tokamak at Cadarache (France). They will validate chosen concepts for operations under ITER relevant vacuum and temperature conditions. After qualification, the arm will constitute a promising tool for generic application. Several processes are already considered for ITER maintenance and will be demonstrated on the AIA robot carrier: - The first embedded process is the viewing system. It is currently being manufactured and will allow for close visual inspection of the complex Plasma Facing Components (limiters, neutralisers, RF antennae, diagnostic windows, etc.). - In situ localisation of leakage based on helium sniffer is also studied to improve maintenance operations. - Finally the laser ablation system for PFC detritiation, also developed in CEA laboratories, is being fitted to be implanted into the robot and put into operation in Tore Supra. This paper deals with the integration of the robot in the Tore Supra tokamak and the advances in the development of the listed processes. It also introduces the current test campaign aiming to qualify the robot performance and reliability under vacuum and temperature conditions. (orig.)

  14. Development of an ITER relevant inspection robot

    Gargiulo, Laurent [Association Euratom-CEA, Departement de Recherche sur la Fusion Controlee, CE Cadarache 13108 (France)], E-mail: laurent.gargiulo@cea.fr; Bayetti, Pascal; Bruno, Vincent; Cordier, Jean-Jacques [Association Euratom-CEA, Departement de Recherche sur la Fusion Controlee, CE Cadarache 13108 (France); Friconneau, Jean-Pierre [CEA-LIST Robotics and Interactive Systems Unit, CE Fontenay Aux Roses (France); Grisolia, Christian; Hatchressian, Jean-Claude; Houry, Michael [Association Euratom-CEA, Departement de Recherche sur la Fusion Controlee, CE Cadarache 13108 (France); Keller, Delphine; Perrot, Yann [CEA-LIST Robotics and Interactive Systems Unit, CE Fontenay Aux Roses (France)

    2008-12-15

    Robotic operations are one of the major maintenance challenges for ITER and future fusion reactors. In particular, in-vessel inspection operations without loss of conditioning will be mandatory. In this context, an Articulated Inspection Arm (AIA) is currently developed by the CEA within the European work programme framework, which aims at demonstrating the feasibility of a multi-purpose in-vessel Remote Handling inspection system using a long reach, limited payload carrier (up to 10 kg). It is composed of 5 segments with 8 degrees of freedom and a total range of 8 m. The first in situ tests will take place by the end of 2007 on the Tore Supra Tokamak at Cadarache (France). They will validate concepts for operations under ITER relevant vacuum and temperature conditions. After qualification, the arm will constitute a promising tool for various applications. Several processes are already considered for ITER maintenance and will be demonstrated on the AIA robot carrier: - The first embedded process is the viewing system. It is already manufactured and will allow close visual inspection of the complex Plasma Facing Components (PFC) (limiters, neutralisers, RF antenna, diagnostic windows, etc.). - In situ localisation of water leakage based on a helium sniffing system is also being studied to improve and facilitate maintenance operations. - Finally a laser ablation system for PFC detritiation, developed in CEA laboratories, is being fitted to be implemented on the robot for future operation in Tore Supra. This paper deals with the integration of the robot into Tore Supra and the progress in the development of the processes listed above. It also describes the current test campaign aiming to qualify the robot performance and reliability under vacuum and temperature conditions.

  15. Development of an ITER relevant inspection robot

    Gargiulo, L.; Bayetti, P.; Cordier, J.J.; Grisolia, C.; Hatchressian, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Robotic operations are one of the major maintenance challenges for ITER and future fusion reactors. In particular, in vessel inspection operations without loss of conditioning could be very useful. Within this framework, the aim of the project called AIA (Articulated Inspection Arm) is to demonstrate the feasibility of a multi-purpose in-vessel Remote Handling inspection system using a long reach, limited payload carrier (up to 10 kg). It is composed of 5 segments with 11 degrees of freedom and a total range of 8 m. The project is currently developed by the CEA within the European workprogramme. Its first in situ tests are planned this summer on the Tore Supra tokamak at Cadarache (France). They will validate chosen concepts for operations under ITER relevant vacuum and temperature conditions. After qualification, the arm will constitute a promising tool for generic application. Several processes are already considered for ITER maintenance and will be demonstrated on the AIA robot carrier: - The first embedded process is the viewing system. It is currently being manufactured and will allow for close visual inspection of the complex Plasma Facing Components (limiters, neutralisers, RF antennae, diagnostic windows, etc.). - In situ localisation of leakage based on helium sniffer is also studied to improve maintenance operations. - Finally the laser ablation system for PFC detritiation, also developed in CEA laboratories, is being fitted to be implanted into the robot and put into operation in Tore Supra. This paper deals with the integration of the robot in the Tore Supra tokamak and the advances in the development of the listed processes. It also introduces the current test campaign aiming to qualify the robot performance and reliability under vacuum and temperature conditions. (orig.)

  16. Development of an ITER relevant inspection robot

    Gargiulo, Laurent; Bayetti, Pascal; Bruno, Vincent; Cordier, Jean-Jacques; Friconneau, Jean-Pierre; Grisolia, Christian; Hatchressian, Jean-Claude; Houry, Michael; Keller, Delphine; Perrot, Yann

    2008-01-01

    Robotic operations are one of the major maintenance challenges for ITER and future fusion reactors. In particular, in-vessel inspection operations without loss of conditioning will be mandatory. In this context, an Articulated Inspection Arm (AIA) is currently developed by the CEA within the European work programme framework, which aims at demonstrating the feasibility of a multi-purpose in-vessel Remote Handling inspection system using a long reach, limited payload carrier (up to 10 kg). It is composed of 5 segments with 8 degrees of freedom and a total range of 8 m. The first in situ tests will take place by the end of 2007 on the Tore Supra Tokamak at Cadarache (France). They will validate concepts for operations under ITER relevant vacuum and temperature conditions. After qualification, the arm will constitute a promising tool for various applications. Several processes are already considered for ITER maintenance and will be demonstrated on the AIA robot carrier: - The first embedded process is the viewing system. It is already manufactured and will allow close visual inspection of the complex Plasma Facing Components (PFC) (limiters, neutralisers, RF antenna, diagnostic windows, etc.). - In situ localisation of water leakage based on a helium sniffing system is also being studied to improve and facilitate maintenance operations. - Finally a laser ablation system for PFC detritiation, developed in CEA laboratories, is being fitted to be implemented on the robot for future operation in Tore Supra. This paper deals with the integration of the robot into Tore Supra and the progress in the development of the processes listed above. It also describes the current test campaign aiming to qualify the robot performance and reliability under vacuum and temperature conditions

  17. Medical History: Compiling Your Medical Family Tree

    ... are missing. If you're adopted, ask your adoptive parents if they received any medical information about your biological parents at the time of your adoption. Adoption agencies also might have family medical information on file. If you were adopted ...

  18. Autonomia e relevância dos regimes The autonomy and relevance of regimes

    Gustavo Seignemartin de Carvalho

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Teorias institucionalistas na disciplina de relações internacionais usualmente definem regimes como um conjunto de normas e regras formais ou informais que permitem a convergência de expectativas ou a padronização do comportamento de seus participantes em uma determinada área de interesses com o objetivo de resolver problemas de coordenação que tenderiam a resultados não pareto-eficientes. Como estas definições baseadas meramente na "eficiência" dos regimes não parecem suficientes para explicar sua efetividade, o presente artigo propõe uma definição diferente para regimes: a de arranjos políticos que permitem a redistribuição dos ganhos da cooperação pelos participantes em uma determinada área de interesses em um contexto de interdependência. Regimes possuiriam efetividade pela sua autonomia e relevância, ou seja, por possuírem existência objetiva autônoma da de seus participantes e por influenciarem seu comportamento e expectativas de maneiras que não podem ser reduzidas à ação individual de nenhum deles. O artigo inicia-se com uma breve discussão sobre as dificuldades terminológicas associadas ao estudo de regimes e a definição dos conceitos de autonomia e relevância. Em seguida, classifica os diversos autores participantes do debate em duas perspectivas distintas, uma que nega (não-autonomistas e outra que atribui (autonomistas aos regimes autonomia e relevância, e faz uma breve análise dos autores e tradições mais significativos para o debate, aprofundando-se nos autonomistas e nos argumentos que reforçam a hipótese aqui apresentada. Ao final, o artigo propõe uma decomposição analítica dos regimes nos quatro elementos principais que lhes propiciam autonomia e relevância: normatividade, atores, especificidade da área de interesses e interdependência complexa com o contexto.Regimes are defined by institutionalist theories in the discipline of International Relations as formal or informal sets

  19. Medical service plans in academic medical centers.

    Siegel, B

    1978-10-01

    Medical service plans are of major importance to academic medical centers and are becoming increasingly so each year as evidenced by growing dependence of medical schools on resulting funds. How these funds are generated and used varies among schools. The procedures may affect the governance of the institution, modifying the authority of the central administration or the clinical departments. Recent developments in federal legislation, such as health maintenance organizations and amendments (Section 227) to the Social Security Act, and the future development of national health insurance will certainly have an effect on how academic medical centers organize their clinical activities. How successfully various medical schools deal with the dynamic problem may well determine their future survival.

  20. Experiments with positive, negative and topical relevance feedback

    Kaptein, R.; Kamps, J.; Li, R.; Hiemstra, D.

    2008-01-01

    This document contains a description of experiments for the 2008 Relevance Feedback track. We experiment with different amounts of feedback, including negative relevance feedback. Feedback is implemented using massive weighted query expansion. Parsimonious query expansion using Dirichlet smoothing

  1. Rethinking medical humanities.

    Chiapperino, Luca; Boniolo, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    This paper questions different conceptions of Medical Humanities in order to provide a clearer understanding of what they are and why they matter. Building upon former attempts, we defend a conception of Medical Humanities as a humanistic problem-based approach to medicine aiming at influencing its nature and practice. In particular, we discuss three main conceptual issues regarding the overall nature of this discipline: (i) a problem-driven approach to Medical Humanities; (ii) the need for an integration of Medical Humanities into medicine; (iii) the methodological requirements that could render Medical Humanities an effective framework for medical decision-making.

  2. STS-1 medical report

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The report includes a review of the health of the crew before, during and immediately after the first Shuttle orbital flight (April 12-14, 1981). Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical kit carried inflight; tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results; hematology and immunology analyses; medical microbiology; food and nutrition; potable water; shuttle toxicology; radiological health; cabin acoustical noise. Also included is information on: environmental effects of Shuttle launch and landing, medical information management; and management, planning and implementation of the medical program.

  3. The Medical Ethics of Cognitive Neuroenhancement

    Erick H. Cheung

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Prescription stimulant medications have been sought for cognitive “neuroenhancement”, the practice of enhancing ostensibly normal cognitive function such as attention span, focus, and memory. This trend, particularly studied in college students, has driven a debate about many ethical aspects related to cognitive enhancement; however, the central role of physicians and the medical ethics of this practice have been minimally investigated. In this paper, a clinical case serves as the focal point to review the current state of prescription stimulant use for enhancement, beginning with the medical and legal problems related to the surreptitious, yet common, behaviors of diversion and malingering. In contrast, there may be a growing trend for individuals to seek prescription stimulants “openly” (without malingering or diversion as a direct request from their physician, which leads to complex ethical questions. A model of clinical-ethical decision making (the “four-box model” from Jonsen et al. is applied to analyze the factors that a physician must consider when deciding whether to engage in the open prescribing of a stimulant neuroenhancer to otherwise healthy, autonomous adults. Four domains are explored in depth: medical indications, quality of life/beneficence, patient preferences, and contextual factors. Relevant experiences from the medical disciplines involved in athletic enhancement and cosmetic enhancement are discussed. Although an overall ethical framework for neuroenhancement continues to evolve, from a perspective of medical ethics there are presently significant reasons to be wary of cognitive neuroenhancement with stimulant medications.

  4. The Relevance Voxel Machine (RVoxM): A Self-Tuning Bayesian Model for Informative Image-Based Prediction

    Sabuncu, Mert R.; Van Leemput, Koen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the relevance voxel machine (RVoxM), a dedicated Bayesian model for making predictions based on medical imaging data. In contrast to the generic machine learning algorithms that have often been used for this purpose, the method is designed to utilize a small number of spatially...

  5. 49 CFR 556.9 - Public inspection of relevant information.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public inspection of relevant information. 556.9... NONCOMPLIANCE § 556.9 Public inspection of relevant information. Information relevant to a petition under this... Administration, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20590. Copies of available information may be obtained in...

  6. 46 CFR 560.5 - Receipt of relevant information.

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Receipt of relevant information. 560.5 Section 560.5... FOREIGN PORTS § 560.5 Receipt of relevant information. (a) In making its decision on matters arising under... submissions should be supported by affidavits of fact and memorandum of law. Relevant information may include...

  7. Aspect-based Relevance Learning for Image Retrieval

    M.J. Huiskes (Mark)

    2005-01-01

    htmlabstractWe analyze the special structure of the relevance feedback learning problem, focusing particularly on the effects of image selection by partial relevance on the clustering behavior of feedback examples. We propose a scheme, aspect-based relevance learning, which guarantees that feedback

  8. An Effective Teaching Method to Enhance History-Taking Skills for Chinese Medical Students

    Huang, Simin; Xu, Peng; Feng, Lie; Lu, Chunting; Yang, Jing

    2018-01-01

    History taking is an extremely important skill for medical students to master. In China, medical students usually have opportunities to practise this skill on real patients after they have learned diagnostics and basic relevant theoretical knowledge. Today, however, several factors, such as increased enrolment of medical students and the need to…

  9. A Latent Growth Model Suggests that Empathy of Medical Students Does Not Decline over Time

    Costa, Patrício; Magalhães, Eunice; Costa, Manuel João

    2013-01-01

    Empathy is a relevant attribute in the context of patient care. However, a decline in empathy throughout medical education has been reported in North-American medical schools, particularly, in the transition to clinical training. The present study aims to longitudinally model empathy during medical school at three time points: at the entrance,…

  10. 78 FR 14773 - U.S. Environmental Solutions Toolkit-Medical Waste

    2013-03-07

    ...--Medical Waste AGENCY: International Trade Administration, DOC. ACTION: Notice and Request for Comment... or services relevant to management of medical waste. The Department of Commerce continues to develop... encouraged to submit their company's name, Web site address, contact information, and medical waste...

  11. Automatic detection of omissions in medication lists.

    Hasan, Sharique; Duncan, George T; Neill, Daniel B; Padman, Rema

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the medication lists of patients are often incomplete and could negatively affect patient outcomes. In this article, the authors propose the application of collaborative filtering methods to the medication reconciliation task. Given a current medication list for a patient, the authors employ collaborative filtering approaches to predict drugs the patient could be taking but are missing from their observed list. The collaborative filtering approach presented in this paper emerges from the insight that an omission in a medication list is analogous to an item a consumer might purchase from a product list. Online retailers use collaborative filtering to recommend relevant products using retrospective purchase data. In this article, the authors argue that patient information in electronic medical records, combined with artificial intelligence methods, can enhance medication reconciliation. The authors formulate the detection of omissions in medication lists as a collaborative filtering problem. Detection of omissions is accomplished using several machine-learning approaches. The effectiveness of these approaches is evaluated using medication data from three long-term care centers. The authors also propose several decision-theoretic extensions to the methodology for incorporating medical knowledge into recommendations. Results show that collaborative filtering identifies the missing drug in the top-10 list about 40-50% of the time and the therapeutic class of the missing drug 50%-65% of the time at the three clinics in this study. Results suggest that collaborative filtering can be a valuable tool for reconciling medication lists, complementing currently recommended process-driven approaches. However, a one-size-fits-all approach is not optimal, and consideration should be given to context (eg, types of patients and drug regimens) and consequence (eg, the impact of omission on outcomes).

  12. Towards a collaborative filtering approach to medication reconciliation.

    Hasan, Sharique; Duncan, George T; Neill, Daniel B; Padman, Rema

    2008-11-06

    A physicians prescribing decisions depend on knowledge of the patients medication list. This knowledge is often incomplete, and errors or omissions could result in adverse outcomes. To address this problem, the Joint Commission recommends medication reconciliation for creating a more accurate list of a patients medications. In this paper, we develop techniques for automatic detection of omissions in medication lists, identifying drugs that the patient may be taking but are not on the patients medication list. Our key insight is that this problem is analogous to the collaborative filtering framework increasingly used by online retailers to recommend relevant products to customers. The collaborative filtering approach enables a variety of solution techniques, including nearest neighbor and co-occurrence approaches. We evaluate the effectiveness of these approaches using medication data from a long-term care center in the Eastern US. Preliminary results suggest that this framework may become a valuable tool for medication reconciliation.

  13. Polymyositis: Medical Management

    ... Donate Search MDA.org Close Polymyositis (PM) Medical Management Polymyositis (PM) is a highly treatable disease. Some ... PM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research Find your MDA Care Center Grants at ...

  14. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Treating IBS Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological ... Treating IBS Pain IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological ...

  15. South African Medical Journal

    The South African Medical Journal is published by the South African Medical Association, which represents ... G Watermeyer, S Thomson, 399-402 ... Assessing the value of Western Cape Provincial Government health administrative data and ...

  16. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, ... About IFFGD Our Mission Awareness Activities Advocacy Activities Research Leadership Industry Council Contact us IBS Treatment Working ...

  17. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... by a physician who specializes in motility or stress-related gastrointestinal disorders. More complex medication regimens, and ... IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation Techniques for IBS Take ...

  18. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... effective medications available that relieve the pain and improve the changes in bowel habit. They may need ... effective in treating IBS in multi-center, high quality clinical trials. These are prescription medications intended for ...

  19. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Gallery Contact Us About IBS Twitter Facebook YouTube Search Search ... About Us What is IBS? What is IBS? ... the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Search Medications Details Medications Last Updated: 01 July 2017 ...

  20. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS ... Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS ...

  1. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... He or she can help you monitor quality, effectiveness, possible interactions with other medicines you may be ... Read more about newer IBS medications. Summary The effectiveness of various agents differs between individuals. A medication ...

  2. Understanding Medical Research

    ... you hear about the results of a new medical research study. Sometimes the results of one study ... when reading or listening to reports of new medical findings. Some questions that can help you evaluate ...

  3. Medical Device Safety

    A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They ... may need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep ...

  4. Emergency Medical Services

    ... need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people and ... emergencies, you need help where you are. Emergency medical technicians, or EMTs, do specific rescue jobs. They ...

  5. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... for some people with IBS, mainly those with emotional distress. There are also effective medications available that ... not linked to depression, but rather likely to effects on the brain and the gut. Antidepressant medications ...

  6. Federal Medication Terminologies

    Federal Medication (FedMed) collaboration of 8 partner agencies agreed on a set of standard, comprehensive, freely and easily accessible FMT terminologies to improve the exchange and public availability of medication information.

  7. Marijuana: modern medical chimaera.

    Lamarine, Roland J

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana has been used medically since antiquity. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in medical applications of various cannabis preparations. These drugs have been cited in the medical literature as potential secondary treatment agents for severe pain, muscle spasticity, anorexia, nausea, sleep disturbances, and numerous other uses. This article reviews the research literature related to medical applications of various forms of cannabis. Benefits related to medical use of cannabinoids are examined and a number of potential risks associated with cannabis use, both medical and recreational, are considered. There is a clearly identified need for further research to isolate significant benefits from the medical application of cannabinoids and to establish dosage levels, appropriate delivery mechanisms and formulations, and to determine what role, if any, cannabinoids might play in legitimate medical applications. It is also imperative to determine if reported dangers pose a significant health risks to users.

  8. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy and IBS Travel and IBS ... Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy and IBS Travel and IBS ...

  9. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy and IBS Travel and IBS IBS Patients' Experience and Unmet Needs IBS and ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics ...

  10. Rationing medical education.

    This paper discussed the pros and cons of the application of rationing to medical education and the different ... Even though some stakeholders in medical education might be taken aback at .... Walsh K. Online educational tools to improve the.

  11. Medical Errors Reduction Initiative

    Mutter, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    The Valley Hospital of Ridgewood, New Jersey, is proposing to extend a limited but highly successful specimen management and medication administration medical errors reduction initiative on a hospital-wide basis...

  12. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... J. Lembo, MD, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, ... doctor. We advise seeing a physician whenever a health problem arises requiring an expert’s care. © Copyright 1998- ...

  13. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Read more about antidiarrheal agents. Anti-anxiety medications – can be helpful for some people with IBS, mainly those with emotional distress. There are also effective medications available that relieve ...

  14. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    2003-11-11

    Nov 11, 2003 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. ... Lecturer/Consultant Surgeon, Paediatric Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, College of Medical Sciences, University of Calabar, .... mind and the results obtained were however satisfying.

  15. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy ... Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy ...

  16. Tanzania Medical Journal

    The journal publishes any contribution that advances medical science or ... these core objectives the journal publishes papers on original scientific research, short ... The Tanzania Medical Journal is an international Journal - ISSN: 0856-0719 ...

  17. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies ... IBS Global Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies ...

  18. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... depression, but rather likely to effects on the brain and the gut. Antidepressant medications can reduce the intensity of pain signals going from gut to brain. Read more about antidepressant medications. Newer IBS-Targeted ...

  19. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You ... Treatments IBS Diet Low FODMAP Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You ...

  20. Avoiding Medical Identity Theft

    ... medical records that can plague your medical and financial life for years, or even put your health at risk. ... Monitor your health records closely and address any errors quickly Share personal and health insurance information only ...

  1. Medical Issues: Orthopedics

    ... Information Packets Equipment Pool Living With SMA Medical Issues Palliative Breathing Orthopedics Nutrition Equipment Daily Life At ... curesma.org > support & care > living with sma > medical issues > orthopedics Orthopedics In SMA, muscle weakness can cause ...

  2. Medical Issues: Equipment

    ... Information Packets Equipment Pool Living With SMA Medical Issues Palliative Breathing Orthopedics Nutrition Equipment Daily Life At ... curesma.org > support & care > living with sma > medical issues > equipment Equipment Individuals with SMA often require a ...

  3. Medical Issues: Breathing

    ... Information Packets Equipment Pool Living With SMA Medical Issues Palliative Breathing Orthopedics Nutrition Equipment Daily Life At ... curesma.org > support & care > living with sma > medical issues > breathing Breathing Breathing problems are the most common ...

  4. Medications (for IBS)

    Full Text Available ... of constipation. Laxatives should be used under the supervision of a physician. Read more about laxatives. Bulking ... medications intended for specific use under a doctor’s supervision. Read more about newer IBS medications. Summary The ...

  5. Mental Health Medications

    ... for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Outreach Home Stakeholder Engagement Outreach Partnership Program Alliance for Research Progress ... public health by ensuring the safety, efficacy and security of drugs (medications), biological products, medical devices, our ...

  6. Medical Care during Pregnancy

    ... for Educators Search English Español Medical Care During Pregnancy KidsHealth / For Parents / Medical Care During Pregnancy What's ... and their babies. What Is Prenatal Care Before Pregnancy? Prenatal care should start before you get pregnant. ...

  7. Production of 77 Br for medical application

    Bastos, M.A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Bromine-77 is produced with the variable energy cyclotron (CV-28) at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, via the 75 As. (α, 2 n) 77 Br reaction, by bombarding arsenic trioxide with 28 MeV alpha-particles. The thick target yield is 0.3 mCi/μAh. The target is dissolved in concentrated N H 4 OH and 77 Br, separated from arsenic, by an anionic exchange resin, is obtained carrier-free with a separation yield greater than 90%. All the process is remotely controlled using electric and pneumatic systems, manipulators and tongs. The quality control is made by atomic absorption and gamma-ray spectroscopy. The present production rate of Br-77 is 2.3 mCi per irradiation. (author)

  8. A recommender system for medical imaging diagnostic.

    Monteiro, Eriksson; Valente, Frederico; Costa, Carlos; Oliveira, José Luís

    2015-01-01

    The large volume of data captured daily in healthcare institutions is opening new and great perspectives about the best ways to use it towards improving clinical practice. In this paper we present a context-based recommender system to support medical imaging diagnostic. The system relies on data mining and context-based retrieval techniques to automatically lookup for relevant information that may help physicians in the diagnostic decision.

  9. Medical exposure and optimization of radiological protection

    Drexler, Gunter

    1997-01-01

    Full text. In the context of occupational and populational exposure the concepts of optimization are implemented widely, at least conceptually, by the relevant authorities and the responsible for radiation protection. In the case of medical exposures this is not so common since the patient is exposed deliberately and cannot be isolated from his environment. The concepts and the instruments of optimization in these cases are discussed with emphasis to the ICRP recommendations in Publication 73. (author)

  10. Medical apps: public and academic perspectives.

    Krieger, William H

    2013-01-01

    Medical apps have featured in popular websites and mainstream news media in recent months. However, there has been almost no mention of these tools in journals focusing on relevant ethical or social issues, including conflict of interest, the role of politics in science, and technological oversight. This essay examines the role that these philosophical issues might play in answering both public and academic questions about these pieces of emergent technology.

  11. [Embracing medical innovation in the era of big data].

    You, Suning

    2015-01-01

    Along with the advent of big data era worldwide, medical field has to place itself in it inevitably. The current article thoroughly introduces the basic knowledge of big data, and points out the coexistence of its advantages and disadvantages. Although the innovations in medical field are struggling, the current medical pattern will be changed fundamentally by big data. The article also shows quick change of relevant analysis in big data era, depicts a good intention of digital medical, and proposes some wise advices to surgeons.

  12. A comparative study on medical image segmentation methods

    Praylin Selva Blessy SELVARAJ ASSLEY

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation plays an important role in medical images. It has been a relevant research area in computer vision and image analysis. Many segmentation algorithms have been proposed for medical images. This paper makes a review on segmentation methods for medical images. In this survey, segmentation methods are divided into five categories: region based, boundary based, model based, hybrid based and atlas based. The five different categories with their principle ideas, advantages and disadvantages in segmenting different medical images are discussed.

  13. Implantable electronic medical devices

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  14. Making academic research more relevant: A few suggestions

    Abinash Panda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Academic research in the domain of management scholarship, though steeped in scientific and methodological rigour, is generally found to be of little relevance to practice. The authors of this paper have revisited the rigour-relevance debate in light of recent developments and with special reference to the management research scenario in India. The central thesis of the argument is that the gulf between rigour and relevance needs to be bridged to make academic research more relevant to business organizations and practitioners. They have offered some suggestions to enhance the relevance of academic research to practice.

  15. Relevance Feedback in Content Based Image Retrieval: A Review

    Manesh B. Kokare

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the technical achievements in the research area of relevance feedback (RF in content-based image retrieval (CBIR. Relevance feedback is a powerful technique in CBIR systems, in order to improve the performance of CBIR effectively. It is an open research area to the researcher to reduce the semantic gap between low-level features and high level concepts. The paper covers the current state of art of the research in relevance feedback in CBIR, various relevance feedback techniques and issues in relevance feedback are discussed in detail.

  16. Reliability of medical audit in quality assessment of medical care

    Camacho Luiz Antonio Bastos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical audit of hospital records has been a major component of quality of care assessment, although physician judgment is known to have low reliability. We estimated interrater agreement of quality assessment in a sample of patients with cardiac conditions admitted to an American teaching hospital. Physician-reviewers used structured review methods designed to improve quality assessment based on judgment. Chance-corrected agreement for the items considered more relevant to process and outcome of care ranged from low to moderate (0.2 to 0.6, depending on the review item and the principal diagnoses and procedures the patients underwent. Results from several studies seem to converge on this point. Comparisons among different settings should be made with caution, given the sensitivity of agreement measurements to prevalence rates. Reliability of review methods in their current stage could be improved by combining the assessment of two or more reviewers, and by emphasizing outcome-oriented events.

  17. Medical Schools for Profit?

    [3] The same could be said of E-learning in medical education.[4,5] Thirdly allowing profits within medical education should attract more investment. Investors could sink funds into medical education, and learners would benefit as a result; inevitably investors would like to see a return on investment – however, successful.

  18. MANAGEMENT OF MEDICAL SERVICES

    BARBU MARIA-MAGDALENA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The offer of medical services depends on medical personnel and more than this, on the management in the medical field since any resource not managed well or not managed at all is only a lost one, regardless its value. Management is therefore the key, the

  19. Ghana Medical Journal

    The Ghana Medical Journal is a peer-reviewed, open access journal published by the Ghana Medical Association. It was established in 1962 It publishes quality manuscripts in in all aspects of health, health care and the medical sciences. The full text of published articles are available online at this website and at African ...

  20. Sahel Medical Journal

    Sahel Medical Journal is a quarterly international Journal devoted solely to (1) dissemination of information about medical sciences in Nigeria, particularly the Sahel zone, Africa and the rest of the world, (2) to provide a medium where national and international medical and health organizations may relay information to ...

  1. Medics in Primary School

    Press, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Some time ago a flyer on "Medics in Primary School" came the author's way. It described a programme for making placements in primary schools available to medical students. The benefits of the program to medical students and participating schools were highlighted, including opportunities to develop communication skills and demystify…

  2. Medical Computational Thinking

    Musaeus, Peter; Tatar, Deborah Gail; Rosen, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Computational thinking (CT) in medicine means deliberating when to pursue computer-mediated solutions to medical problems and evaluating when such solutions are worth pursuing in order to assist in medical decision making. Teaching computational thinking (CT) at medical school should be aligned...

  3. Digital medical imaging

    Goeringer, F.; Mun, S.K.; Kerlin, B.D.

    1989-01-01

    In formulating an implementation strategy for digital medical imaging, three interrelated thrusts have emerged for the defense medical establishment. These thrusts: totally filmless medical imaging on the battlefield, teleradiology, and DIN/PACS for peacetime military health care are discussed. They have implications in their fully developed form as resource savers and quality improvers for the unique aspects of military health care

  4. Marijuana: Modern Medical Chimaera

    Lamarine, Roland J.

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana has been used medically since antiquity. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in medical applications of various cannabis preparations. These drugs have been cited in the medical literature as potential secondary treatment agents for severe pain, muscle spasticity, anorexia, nausea, sleep disturbances, and numerous…

  5. Medical device development.

    Panescu, Dorin

    2009-01-01

    The development of a successful medical product requires not only engineering design efforts, but also clinical, regulatory, marketing and business expertise. This paper reviews items related to the process of designing medical devices. It discusses the steps required to take a medical product idea from concept, through development, verification and validation, regulatory approvals and market release.

  6. Highland Medical Research Journal

    The aim of the Highland Medical Research Journal is to publish scientific research in various fields of medical science and to communicate such research findings to the larger world community. It aims to promote cooperation and understanding amoungst workers in various fields of medical science.

  7. Deconstructing medical practice marketing.

    Kasbo, Abe

    2010-01-01

    The healthcare marketing game has radically changed. Medical practices must rely on strategies instead of tactics to better separate themselves from the competition. The Internet has become a disruptive force in marketing, tipping the balance and control of the reputations of medical practices to the patient. Done right, medical practices can harness this new energy to attract new patients and keep current patients loyal.

  8. Contemporary cosmetic surgery: the potential risks and relevance for practice.

    Gilmartin, Jo

    2011-07-01

    To examine and critique the risks of cosmetic surgery and consider implications for practice. Cosmetic surgery is a growing industry with a significant global phenomenon. Feminists have been critical of aesthetic surgery practice, offering a range of representations in regard to 'identity', 'normality', 'cultural and social pressures', 'agency' and 'self-enhancement'. Discourses around minimising risk information acknowledge deficits in not supplying patients with full risk information. The results are usually devastating and lead to serious health complications that incisively diminish well-being for patients and increase health costs. Critical review. This paper represents a critical review of risks associated with cosmetic surgery. A Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System online (Medline) and British Nursing Index (BNI) search with relevant key words were undertaken and selected exemplary articles and research describing and/or evaluating cosmetic surgery risk. Only papers in the English language from 1982-2009 were reviewed. The papers examined were mainly empirical studies; some opinion papers, policy documents, textbooks and websites were examined too. The literature revealed that several factors influence consumer risks including regulation vagaries, medicalisation processes, fear of ageing discrimination, wanting to avoid ethnic prejudice and media pressure. Government strategies in the United Kingdom (UK) have attempted to improve clinical standards; however, little attempt has been made globally to raise institutional and professional awareness of the huge impact of cultural and social pressures on consumers. Avoiding shattering complications by improving the provision of risk information for patients is a worthwhile goal. Therefore, health professionals need to consider consumer rights and autonomy more carefully, facilitate rigorous screening and develop knowledge in regard to

  9. Introducing medical humanities in the medical curriculum in Saudi Arabia: A pedagogical experiment

    Rabie E Abdel-Halim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a marked shift from the modern positivist materialist philosophy that influenced medical education for more than a century, Western medical educators are now beginning to realize the significance of the spiritual element of human nature. Consensus is currently building up in Europe and North America on the need to give more emphasis to the study of humanities disciplines such as history of medicine, ethics, religion, philosophy, medically related poetry, literature, arts and medical sociology in medical colleges with the aim of allowing graduates to reach to the heart of human learning about meaning of life and death and to become kinder, more reflective practitioners. The medicine taught and practiced during the Islamic civilization era was a vivid example of the unity of the two components of medical knowledge: natural sciences and humanities. It was also a brilliant illustration of medical ethics driven by a divine moral code. This historical fact formed the foundation for the three medical humanities courses presented in this article reporting a pedagogical experiment in preparation for starting a humanities program in Alfaisal University Medical College in Riyadh. In a series of lectures alternating with interactive sessions, active learning strategies were employed in teaching a course on history of medicine during the Islamic era and another on Islamic medical ethics. Furthermore, a third course on medically relevant Arabic poetry was designed and prepared in a similar way. The end-of-the-course feedback comments reflected effectiveness of the courses and highlighted the importance of employing student-centered learning techniques in order to motivate medical students to become critical thinkers, problem solvers, life-long learners and self-learners.

  10. Medical marijuana: Medical necessity versus political agenda

    Clark, Peter A.; Capuzzi, Kevin; Fick, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Summary Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as an illegal Schedule I drug which has no accepted medical use. However, recent studies have shown that medical marijuana is effective in controlling chronic non-cancer pain, alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, treating wasting syndrome associated with AIDS, and controlling muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis. These studies state that the alleviating benefits of marijuana outweigh the negative ...

  11. Court decisions on medical malpractice.

    Knaak, Jan-Paul; Parzeller, Markus

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies on court cases dealing with medical malpractice are few and far between. This retrospective study, therefore, undertakes an analysis of medical malpractice lawsuits brought before regional courts in two judicial districts of the federal state of Hesse. Over a 5-year period (2006-2010), 232 court decisions on medical malpractice taken by the regional courts (Landgericht) of Kassel and Marburg were evaluated according to medical discipline, diagnosis, therapy, relevant level of care, charge of neglect of duty by the claimant party, outcome of the lawsuit, and further criteria. With certain overlaps, the disciplines most frequently confronted with claims of medical malpractice were accident surgery and orthopedics (30.2%; n = 70), dentistry (16.4%; n = 38), surgery (12.1%; n = 28), and gynecology and obstetrics (7.8%; n = 18), followed by the remaining medical disciplines (38.8%; n = 90). Malpractice allegations were brought against the practice-based sector in 35.8 % (n = 83) of cases, the hospital-based sector in 63.3% (n = 147) of cases, and other sectors in 0.9% (n = 2) of cases. The allegation grounds included false administration of treatment (67.2%; n = 156), false indication of treatment (37.1%; n = 86), false diagnosis (31.5%; n = 73), and/or organizational negligence (13.8%; n = 32). A breach of duty to inform was given as grounds for the claim in 38.8% (n = 90) of cases. A significant majority of 65.6% (n = 152) of cases ended in a court settlement. Of the cases, 18.9% (n = 44) were concluded by claim withdrawal, 11.2% (n = 26) by claim dismissal and 2.6% (n = 6) by criminal sentence. Of the cases, 1.7% (n = 4) were for purposes of securing evidence. Although there was no conclusive evidence of malpractice, two thirds of the cases ended in a court settlement. On the one hand, this outcome reduces the burden on the courts, but on the other, it can in the long term give

  12. MEDIC: medical embedded device for individualized care.

    Wu, Winston H; Bui, Alex A T; Batalin, Maxim A; Au, Lawrence K; Binney, Jonathan D; Kaiser, William J

    2008-02-01

    Presented work highlights the development and initial validation of a medical embedded device for individualized care (MEDIC), which is based on a novel software architecture, enabling sensor management and disease prediction capabilities, and commercially available microelectronic components, sensors and conventional personal digital assistant (PDA) (or a cell phone). In this paper, we present a general architecture for a wearable sensor system that can be customized to an individual patient's needs. This architecture is based on embedded artificial intelligence that permits autonomous operation, sensor management and inference, and may be applied to a general purpose wearable medical diagnostics. A prototype of the system has been developed based on a standard PDA and wireless sensor nodes equipped with commercially available Bluetooth radio components, permitting real-time streaming of high-bandwidth data from various physiological and contextual sensors. We also present the results of abnormal gait diagnosis using the complete system from our evaluation, and illustrate how the wearable system and its operation can be remotely configured and managed by either enterprise systems or medical personnel at centralized locations. By using commercially available hardware components and software architecture presented in this paper, the MEDIC system can be rapidly configured, providing medical researchers with broadband sensor data from remote patients and platform access to best adapt operation for diagnostic operation objectives.

  13. A community of scholars or scholars of the community? A note on the limits of relevance.

    Cox, K R

    1984-09-01

    Universities are increasingly expected to be accountable for the large sums of public money they spend. Universities in Australia are currently under pressure to turn out graduates who are technically trained for immediate entry into the work force. Universities are expected to teach knowledge and skills which are relevant to what the community needs now. If the universities accept such obligations of accountability and relevance, what are the implications for the university enterprise? Over the past decade, medical schools have attempted to spell out their purposes, writing their overall goals and then specific objectives to guide teaching in all departments. These lists of goals and objectives usually incorporate a strong orientation to meeting current community needs. One expression of these community needs is the call for 'Health for all by the year 2000', supported by all governments through the World Health Organization. Turning out graduates to provide community health care would be a relevant goal which an accountable medical school could hardly deny. What evidence is available about university responses to such needs?

  14. Sentinel lymph node biopsy: clinical relevance

    Howman-Giles, R.

    2002-01-01

    accurate determination of sentinel nodes in all areas. There is a significant number of unusual and unexpected drainage patterns found in melanoma many of which would be undetectable if only using a gamma probe alone or delayed imaging with large particles. There is also some controversy in breast cancer on the most accurate sentinel node technique and the relevance of extra axillary drainage sites eg internal mammary chain. The sentinel lymph node mapping with lymphoscintigraphy and blue due in association with applications of the gamma probe at surgery for accurate localisation of sentinel nodes is making a significant impact on patient management. This is in particular by more accurate staging and prognostic information with better stratification of patients requiring further regional node dissection and those suitable for adjuvant therapy and specific clinical trials

  15. The Muddle of Medicalization

    Sholl, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    to describe inappropriate or abusive instances of medical authority. Yet, while this standard approach claims that medicalization is a growing problem, it assumes that there is simply one “medical model” and that the expanding realm of “the medical” can be more or less clearly delineated. Moreover, while...... of medical discourse. In doing so, I will explore the distinction between medicalization and pathologization, a distinction that is often overlooked and that brings with it many conceptual and practical implications. After defining these terms, I will use some examples to show that while pathologizing...

  16. Advanced Medication Dispenser

    A.I. Alexan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Medication dispensing is an important activity that can have major implications if done improperly. Dispensing must be done in the correct time interval, at the correct user, with the correct drug and dose. We propose a smart medication dispenser that can satisfy these needs and provide a mechanism for supervision. In order to ensure that the dispensing process is error free, the concept of a new smart medication container is used. A smart medication container is “smart” as it holds the medication dispensing parameters for the drugs it contains: dispensing time and date and name. Based on this information, the actual dispensing is done.

  17. [Research in medical education

    Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    Research in medical education is a relatively new discipline. Over the past 30 years, the discipline has experienced a tremendous growth, which is reflected in an increase in the number of publications in both medical education journals and medical science journals. However, recent reviews...... of articles on medical education studies indicate a need for improvement of the quality of medical education research in order to contribute to the advancement of educational practice as well as educational research. In particular, there is a need to embed studies in a conceptual theoretical framework...

  18. Medical biofilms--nanotechnology approaches.

    Neethirajan, Suresh; Clond, Morgan A; Vogt, Adam

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are colonies of bacteria or fungi that adhere to a surface, protected by an extracellular polymer matrix composed of polysaccharides and extracellular DNA. They are highly complex and dynamic multicellular structures that resist traditional means of killing planktonic bacteria. Recent developments in nanotechnology provide novel approaches to preventing and dispersing biofilm infections, which are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Medical device infections are responsible for approximately 60% of hospital acquired infections. In the United States, the estimated cost of caring for healthcare-associated infections is approximately between $28 billion and $45 billion per year. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of biofilm formation and degradation, its relevance to challenges in clinical practice, and new technological developments in nanotechnology that are designed to address these challenges.

  19. Technologies for Medical Sciences

    Tavares, João; Barbosa, Marcos; Slade, AP

    2012-01-01

    This book presents novel and advanced technologies for medical sciences in order to solidify knowledge in the related fields and define their key stakeholders.   The fifteen papers included in this book were written by invited experts of international stature and address important technologies for medical sciences, including: computational modeling and simulation, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, human motion and posture, tissue engineering, design and development medical devices, and mechanic biology. Different applications are treated in such diverse fields as biomechanical studies, prosthesis and orthosis, medical diagnosis, sport, and virtual reality.   This book is of interest to researchers, students and manufacturers from  a wide range of disciplines related to bioengineering, biomechanics, computational mechanics, computational vision, human motion, mathematics, medical devices, medical image, medicine and physics.

  20. [Unravelling medical leadership].

    Voogt, Judith J; van Rensen, Elizabeth L J; Noordegraaf, Mirko; Schneider, Margriet M E

    2015-01-01

    Medical leadership is a popular topic in the Netherlands, and several interest groups now incorporate medical leadership into postgraduate medical education. However, there is no consensus on what this concept entails. By conducting a discourse analysis, a qualitative method which uses language and text to reveal existing viewpoints, this article reveals three perspectives on medical leadership: administrative leadership, leadership within organisations and leadership within each doctor's daily practice. Text analysis shows that the first two perspectives refer to medical leadership mainly in a defensive manner: by demonstrating medical leadership doctors could 'take the lead' once again; patient care only seems to play a small part in the process. These perspectives are not free of consequences, they will determine how the medical profession is constructed. For this reason, it is argued that there should be more emphasis on the third perspective, in which the quality of care for patients is of primary importance.