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Sample records for carrier protein crystal

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabK) from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Jun, E-mail: jun-saito@meiji.co.jp; Yamada, Mototsugu; Watanabe, Takashi; Kitagawa, Hideo; Takeuchi, Yasuo [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Meiji Seika Kaisha Ltd, 760 Morooka-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 222-8567 (Japan)

    2006-06-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductases are responsible for bacterial type II fatty-acid biosynthesis and are attractive targets for developing novel antibiotics. The S. pneumoniae enoyl-ACP reductase (FabK) was crystallized and selenomethionine MAD data were collected to 2 Å resolution. The enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (FabK; EC 1.3.1.9) is responsible for catalyzing the final step in each elongation cycle of fatty-acid biosynthesis. Selenomethionine-substituted FabK was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 277 K. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 50.26, b = 126.70, c = 53.63 Å, β = 112.46°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.00 Å resolution using synchrotron beamline BL32B2 at SPring-8. Two molecules were estimated to be present in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 45.1%.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein and biotin protein ligase complex from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    OpenAIRE

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; MATSUURA, Yoshinori; Bagautdinova, Svetlana; Kunishima, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    A truncated form of biotin carboxyl carrier protein containing the C-terminal half fragment (BCCPΔN76) and the biotin protein ligase (BPL) with the mutation R48A (BPL*) or the double mutation R48A K111A (BPL**) were successfully cocrystallized in the presence of ATP and biotin. The BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 crystals belong to space group P21 and diffract X-rays to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively.

  3. Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein and biotin protein ligase complex from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A truncated form of biotin carboxyl carrier protein containing the C-terminal half fragment (BCCPΔN76) and the biotin protein ligase (BPL) with the mutation R48A (BPL*) or the double mutation R48A K111A (BPL**) were successfully cocrystallized in the presence of ATP and biotin. The BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 crystals belong to space group P21 and diffract X-rays to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Biotin protein ligase (BPL) catalyses the biotinylation of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. To elucidate the exact details of the protein–protein interactions in the biotinylation function, the C-terminal half fragment of BCCP (BCCPΔN76), the R48A mutant of BPL (BPL*) and the R48A K111A double mutant of BPL (BPL**), all of which are from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, have been expressed, purified and successfully cocrystallized. Cocrystals of the BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 complexes as well as crystals of BPL*, BPL** and BCCPΔN76 were obtained by the oil-microbatch method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant at 295 K. Complete X-ray diffraction data sets for BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 crystals were collected at 100 K to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. They belong to the monoclinic space group P21, with similar unit-cell parameters a = 69.85, b = 63.12, c = 75.64 Å, β = 95.9°. Assuming two subunits of the complex per asymmetric unit gives a VM value of 2.45 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 50%

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabK) from Streptococcus mutans strain UA159

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabK) from S. mutans strain UA159 was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.40 Å. A triclosan-resistant flavoprotein termed FabK is the sole enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans. In this study, FabK from S. mutans strain UA159 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.40 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystal belonged to space group P62, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 105.79, c = 44.15 Å. The asymmetric unit contained one molecule, with a corresponding VM of 2.05 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 39.9%

  6. Crystal structures and kinetic properties of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase I from Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Gao, Zengqiang; Li, Yanhua; Wang, Shennan; Dong, Yuhui

    2014-04-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a destructive citrus disease. The leading cause of HLB is Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. Fatty acid biosynthesis is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterial agents. Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (also called ENR or FabI and a product of the fabI gene) is an enzyme required in a critical step of bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis and has attracted attention as a target of novel antimicrobial agents. We determined the crystal structures of FabI from Ca. L. asiaticus in its apoform as well as in complex with b-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) at 1.7 and 2.7 Å resolution, respectively, to facilitate the design and screening of small molecule inhibitors of FabI. The monomeric ClFabI is highly similar to other known FabI structures as expected; however, unlike the typical tetramer, ClFabI exists as a hexamer in crystal, whereas as dimer in solution, on the other hand, the substrate binding loop which always disordered in apoform FabI structures is ordered in apo-ClFabI. Interestingly, the structure of ClFabI undergoes remarkable conformational change in the substrate-binding loop in the presence of NAD. We conclude that the signature sequence motif of FabI can be considered as Gly-(Xaa)5-Ser-(Xaa)n-Val-Tyr-(Xaa)6-Lys-(Xaa)n-Thr instead of Tyr-(Xaa)6-Lys. We have further identified isoniazid as a competitive inhibitor with NADH. PMID:24407918

  7. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase FabG from Aquifex aeolicus VF5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FabG from A. aeolicus, a putative component of fatty-acid synthase II, has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 1.8 Å resolution. The gene product of fabG from Aquifex aeolicus has been heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Purification of the protein took place using anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography and the protein was then crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.8 Å and the initial phases were determined by molecular replacement. The A. aeolicus FabG protein is a putative β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase. Structure–function studies of this protein are being performed as part of a larger project investigating naturally occurring deviations from highly conserved residues within the short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family

  8. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase FabG from Aquifex aeolicus VF5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Qilong [Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); Duax, William L.; Umland, Timothy C., E-mail: umland@hwi.buffalo.edu [Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); Department of Structural Biology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2007-02-01

    FabG from A. aeolicus, a putative component of fatty-acid synthase II, has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 1.8 Å resolution. The gene product of fabG from Aquifex aeolicus has been heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Purification of the protein took place using anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography and the protein was then crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.8 Å and the initial phases were determined by molecular replacement. The A. aeolicus FabG protein is a putative β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase. Structure–function studies of this protein are being performed as part of a larger project investigating naturally occurring deviations from highly conserved residues within the short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family.

  9. Crystal structure of enoyl–acyl carrier protein reductase (FabK) from Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals the binding mode of an inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Jun; Yamada, Mototsugu; Watanabe, Takashi; Iida, Maiko; Kitagawa, Hideo; Takahata, Sho; Ozawa, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ohsawa, Fukuichi

    2008-01-01

    Enoyl–acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductases are critical for bacterial type II fatty acid biosynthesis and thus are attractive targets for developing novel antibiotics. We determined the crystal structure of enoyl–ACP reductase (FabK) from Streptococcus pneumoniae at 1.7 Å resolution. There was one dimer per asymmetric unit. Each subunit formed a triose phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel structure, and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) was bound as a cofactor in the active site. The overall structure...

  10. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of malonyl-CoA–acyl carrier protein transacylase (FabD) from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial blight is the most destructive bacterial disease of rice and is caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Xoo0880 (FabD), a malonyl-CoA–acyl carrier protein transacylase, from Xoo was cloned, purified and crystallized. Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight in rice, which is one of the most devastating diseases in rice-cultivating countries. The Xoo0880 (fabD) gene coding for a malonyl-CoA–acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT) from Xoo was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. MCAT is an essential enzyme that catalyzes a key reaction of fatty-acid synthesis in bacteria and plants: the conversion of malonyl-CoA to malonyl-acyl carrier protein. The FabD enzyme was purified and crystallized in order to elucidate its three-dimensional structure and to determine its enzymatic reaction mechanism and biological importance. The crystal obtained diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution and belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.4, b = 74.6, c = 98.5 Å. According to Matthews coefficient calculations, the crystallographic structure contains only one monomeric unit in the asymmetric unit with a VM of 2.21 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 44.3%

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of a new class of enoyl-(acyl-carrier protein) reductase, FabV, from Vibrio fischeri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An orthorhombic crystal of an enoyl-(acyl-carrier protein) reductase from V. fischeri was obtained and diffraction data were collected to 2.7 Å resolution. Enoyl-(acyl-carrier protein) reductase (ENR) catalyzes the last step of the fatty-acid elongation cycle of the bacterial fatty-acid biosynthesis (FAS II) pathway. Recently, a new class of ENR has been identified from Vibrio cholerae and was named FabV. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of the new class of ENR at the structural level, FabV from V. fischeri was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.7 Å resolution from a native crystal. The crystal belonged to the orthorhombic space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 123.53, b = 164.14, c = 97.07 Å. The presence of four molecules of FabV in the asymmetric unit gave a VM value of 2.81 Å3 Da−1, with a corresponding solvent content of 54.5%

  12. Crystal Structure of Epiphyas Postvittana Takeout 1 With Bound Ubiquinone Supports a Role As Ligand Carriers for Takeout Proteins in Insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamiaux, C.; Stanley, D.; Greenwood, D.R.; Baker, E.N.; Newcomb, R.D.

    2009-05-19

    Takeout (To) proteins are found exclusively in insects and have been proposed to have important roles in various aspects of their physiology and behavior. Limited sequence similarity with juvenile hormone-binding proteins (JHBPs), which specifically bind and transport juvenile hormones in Lepidoptera, suggested a role for To proteins in binding hydrophobic ligands. We present the first crystal structure of a To protein, EpTo1 from the light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana, solved in-house by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction technique using sulfur anomalous dispersion, and refined to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. EpTo1 adopts the unusual {alpha}/{beta}-wrap fold, seen only for JHBP and several mammalian lipid carrier proteins, a scaffold tailored for the binding and/or transport of hydrophobic ligands. EpTo1 has a 45 {angstrom} long, purely hydrophobic, internal tunnel that extends for the full length of the protein and accommodates a bound ligand. The latter was shown by mass spectrometry to be ubiquinone-8 and is probably derived from Escherichia coli. The structure provides the first direct experimental evidence that To proteins are ligand carriers; gives insights into the nature of endogenous ligand(s) of EpTo1; shows, by comparison with JHBP, a basis for different ligand specificities; and suggests a mechanism for the binding/release of ligands.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) from Psuedomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) from P. aeruginosa was purified and crystallized. FabI was also cocrystallized with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NADH. Crystals of native and complexed FabI diffracted to resolutions of 2.6 and 1.8 Å, respectively. During fatty-acid biosynthesis, enoyl-acyl carrier protein (enoyl-ACP) reductase catalyzes the reduction of trans-2-enoyl-ACP to fully saturated acyl-ACP via the ubiquitous fatty-acid synthase system. NADH-dependent enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been purified and crystallized as an apoenzyme and in a complex form with NADH and triclosan. Triclosan is an inhibitor of FabI and forms a stable ternary complex in the presence of NADH. The crystals of native and complexed FabI diffracted to resolutions of 2.6 and 1.8 Å, respectively. The crystals both belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.32, b = 155.844, c = 129.448 Å, β = 111.061° for the native enzyme and a = 64.784, b = 107.573, c = 73.517 Å, β = 116.162° for the complex. Preliminary molecular replacement further confirmed the presence of four tetramers of native FabI and one tetramer of the complex in the asymmetric unit, corresponding to Matthews coefficients (VM) of 2.46 and 2.05 Å3 Da−1 and solvent contents of 50.1 and 40.1%, respectively

  14. Charge carrier transport in liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The materials exhibiting charge carrier mobility ranging from 10−3 to 0.1 cm2/Vs, i.e., between those of amorphous and crystalline materials, had been missing before the 1990s when the electronic conduction in liquid crystals was discovered. Since then, various liquid crystalline materials including discotic and calamitic liquid crystals have been studied in order to clarify their charge carrier transport properties in liquid crystalline mesophases. In this article, the historical background of the discovery of electronic conduction in liquid crystals, intrinsic and extrinsic conductions, unique properties of the charge carrier transport, the effect of molecular alignment on it, and the conduction mechanism in liquid crystalline mesophases are shortly described on the basis of the experimental and theoretical studies accumulated in these two decades, noting that the missing materials were liquid crystals. - Highlights: • Liquid crystals exhibit charge mobility ranging from 10–3 to 0.1 cm2/Vs. • Electronic (intrinsic) and ionic (extrinsic) conductions in liquid crystals • Unique charge carrier transport properties in liquid crystals • Effect of molecular alignment in mesophases on charge carrier transport • Conduction mechanism in smectic liquid crystals

  15. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  16. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  17. Crystal structure of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabK) from Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals the binding mode of an inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Jun; Yamada, Mototsugu; Watanabe, Takashi; Iida, Maiko; Kitagawa, Hideo; Takahata, Sho; Ozawa, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ohsawa, Fukuichi

    2008-04-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductases are critical for bacterial type II fatty acid biosynthesis and thus are attractive targets for developing novel antibiotics. We determined the crystal structure of enoyl-ACP reductase (FabK) from Streptococcus pneumoniae at 1.7 A resolution. There was one dimer per asymmetric unit. Each subunit formed a triose phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel structure, and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) was bound as a cofactor in the active site. The overall structure was similar to the enoyl-ACP reductase (ER) of fungal fatty acid synthase and to 2-nitropropane dioxygenase (2-ND) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, although there were some differences among these structures. We determined the crystal structure of FabK in complex with a phenylimidazole derivative inhibitor to envision the binding site interactions. The crystal structure reveals that the inhibitor binds to a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of FabK, and this is accompanied by induced-fit movements of two loop regions. The thiazole ring and part of the ureido moiety of the inhibitor are involved in a face-to-face pi-pi stacking interaction with the isoalloxazine ring of FMN. The side-chain conformation of the proposed catalytic residue, His144, changes upon complex formation. Lineweaver-Burk plots indicate that the inhibitor binds competitively with respect to NADH, and uncompetitively with respect to crotonoyl coenzyme A. We propose that the primary basis of the inhibitory activity is competition with NADH for binding to FabK, which is the first step of the two-step ping-pong catalytic mechanism. PMID:18305197

  18. Protein crystallization with paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  19. Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    In order to rapidly and efficiently grow crystals, tools were needed to automatically identify and analyze the growing process of protein crystals. To meet this need, Diversified Scientific, Inc. (DSI), with the support of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center, developed CrystalScore(trademark), the first automated image acquisition, analysis, and archiving system designed specifically for the macromolecular crystal growing community. It offers automated hardware control, image and data archiving, image processing, a searchable database, and surface plotting of experimental data. CrystalScore is currently being used by numerous pharmaceutical companies and academic and nonprofit research centers. DSI, located in Birmingham, Alabama, was awarded the patent Method for acquiring, storing, and analyzing crystal images on March 4, 2003. Another DSI product made possible by Marshall SBIR funding is VaporPro(trademark), a unique, comprehensive system that allows for the automated control of vapor diffusion for crystallization experiments.

  20. Food proteins as potential carriers for phenolics

    OpenAIRE

    Bohin, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of phenolic-rich functional foods is often limited by the off-tastes of phenolics that might be counteracted by sequestering these compounds using a carrier, thereby preventing them to interact with bitter taste receptors and salivary proteins. A range of common animal food proteins were tested for binding of phenolics. It appeared that a proline-rich open protein structure, as in β-casein, favored binding of phenolics. Globular proteins other than bovine serum albumin sh...

  1. Characterizing protein crystal nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akella, Sathish V.

    We developed an experimental microfluidic based technique to measure the nucleation rates and successfully applied the technique to measure nucleation rates of lysozyme crystals. The technique involves counting the number of samples which do not have crystals as a function of time. Under the assumption that nucleation is a Poisson process, the fraction of samples with no crystals decays exponentially with the decay constant proportional to nucleation rate and volume of the sample. Since nucleation is a random and rare event, one needs to perform measurements on large number of samples to obtain good statistics. Microfluidics offers the solution of producing large number of samples at minimal material consumption. Hence, we developed a microfluidic method and measured nucleation rates of lysozyme crystals in supersaturated protein drops, each with volume of ˜ 1 nL. Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) describes the kinetics of nucleation and predicts the functional form of nucleation rate in terms of the thermodynamic quantities involved, such as supersaturation, temperature, etc. We analyzed the measured nucleation rates in the context of CNT and obtained the activation energy and the kinetic pre-factor characterizing the nucleation process. One conclusion is that heterogeneous nucleation dominates crystallization. We report preliminary studies on selective enhancement of nucleation in one of the crystal polymorprhs of lysozyme (spherulite) using amorphous mesoporous bioactive gel-glass te{naomi06, naomi08}, CaO.P 2O5.SiO2 (known as bio-glass) with 2-10 nm pore-size diameter distribution. The pores act as heterogeneous nucleation centers and claimed to enhance the nucleation rates by molecular confinement. The measured kinetic profiles of crystal fraction of spherulites indicate that the crystallization of spherulites may be proceeding via secondary nucleation pathways.

  2. Protein Crystal Isocitrate Lyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Isocitrate Lyase earth-grown (left) and space-grown (right). This is a target enzyme for fungicides. A better understanding of this enzyme should lead to the discovery of more potent fungicides to treat serious crop diseases such as rice blast; it regulates the flow of metabolic intermediates required for cell growth. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  3. Legionella pneumophila Secretes a Mitochondrial Carrier Protein during Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Dolezal; Margareta Aili; Janette Tong; Jhih-Hang Jiang; Marobbio, Carlo M.T.; Sau Fung Lee; Ralf Schuelein; Simon Belluzzo; Eva Binova; Aurelie Mousnier; Gad Frankel; Giulia Giannuzzi; Ferdinando Palmieri; Kipros Gabriel; Thomas Naderer

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Mitochondrial carrier proteins evolved during endosymbiosis to transport substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. As such the proteins are associated exclusively with eukaryotic organisms. Despite this, we identified putative mitochondrial carrier proteins in the genomes of different intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease. We named the mitochondrial carrier protein from L. pneumophila LncP and...

  4. Protein Crystals of Raf Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This image shows crystals of the protein raf kinase grown on Earth (photo a) and on USML-2 (photo b). The space-grown crystals are an order of magnitude larger. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals

  5. Trapping of the Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase-Acyl Carrier Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallorin, Lorillee; Finzel, Kara; Nguyen, Quynh G; Beld, Joris; La Clair, James J; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-03-30

    An ideal target for metabolic engineering, fatty acid biosynthesis remains poorly understood on a molecular level. These carrier protein-dependent pathways require fundamental protein-protein interactions to guide reactivity and processivity, and their control has become one of the major hurdles in successfully adapting these biological machines. Our laboratory has developed methods to prepare acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) loaded with substrate mimetics and cross-linkers to visualize and trap interactions with partner enzymes, and we continue to expand the tools for studying these pathways. We now describe application of the slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor triclosan to explore the interactions between the type II fatty acid ACP from Escherichia coli, AcpP, and its corresponding enoyl-ACP reductase, FabI. We show that the AcpP-triclosan complex demonstrates nM binding, inhibits in vitro activity, and can be used to isolate FabI in complex proteomes. PMID:26938266

  6. Thioredoxin as a fusion tag for carrier-driven crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Corsini, Lorenzo; Hothorn, Michael; Scheffzek, Klaus; Sattler, Michael; Stier, Gunter

    2008-01-01

    Structural investigations are frequently hindered by difficulties in obtaining diffracting crystals of the target protein. Here, we report the crystallization and structure solution of the U2AF homology motif (UHM) domain of splicing factor Puf60 fused to Escherichia coli thioredoxin A. Both modules make extensive crystallographic contacts, contributing to a well-defined crystal lattice with clear electron density for both the thioredoxin and the Puf60-UHM module. We compare two short linker ...

  7. High density protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Robyn (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence (Inventor); Hedden, Douglas Keith (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A protein crystal growth assembly including a crystal growth cell and further including a cell body having a top side and a bottom side and a first aperture defined therethrough, the cell body having opposing first and second sides and a second aperture defined therethrough. A cell barrel is disposed within the cell body, the cell barrel defining a cavity alignable with the first aperture of the cell body, the cell barrel being rotatable within the second aperture. A reservoir is coupled to the bottom side of the cell body and a cap having a top side is disposed on the top side of the cell body. The protein crystal growth assembly may be employed in methods including vapor diffusion crystallization, liquid to liquid crystallization, batch crystallization, and temperature induction batch mode crystallization.

  8. Charge carrier rearrangement in spinel crystals irradiated at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an investigation of thermoluminescence (TL) in nominally pure MgAl2O4 spinel single crystals in the temperature range between 80-670 K are presented. For a heating rate of 0.21 K/s, TL spectra exhibit glow peaks in three distinct temperature ranges: 100-160, 270-370 and 470-670 K. The most prominent peaks are at 115, 140, 305, 335, 525, 570 and 605 K. The locations of the temperature maxima, as well as the intensity of the peaks, vary depending on the treatment of the crystals, the type of irradiation and the temperature of irradiation. Measurements of the glow peaks at different emission wavelengths and the use of partial bleaching and isothermal decay techniques for TL, allowed us to propose mechanisms for charge carrier rearrangement at lattice defects and impurity ions, during irradiation and subsequent heating

  9. Carrier mobility and crystal perfection of tetracene thin film FET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well-known that the carrier mobility of an organic field effect semiconductor (FET) depended on the crystal quality and/or the crystal perfection of the organic thin films [T.W. Kelly, D.V. Muyres, P.F. Baude, T.P. Smith, T.D. Jones, Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 771 (2003) L6.5.1; D.J. Gundlach, J.A. Nichols, L. Zhou, T.N. Jackson, Appl. Phys. Lett. 80 (2002) 2925; H.K. Lauk, M. Halik, U. Zschieschang, G. Schmid, W. Radlik, J. Appl. Phys. 92 (2002) 5259; M. Shtein, J. Mapel, J.B. Benziger, S.R. Forrest, Appl. Phys. Lett. 81 (2002) 268; D. Knipp, R.A. Street, A.R. Volkel, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 3907; R. Ruiz, A.C. Mayer, G.G. Malliaras, Appl. Phys. Lett. 85 (2004) 4926; R.W.I. de Boer, M.E. Gershenson, A.F. Morpurgo, V. Podzorov, Phys. Stat. Sol. A 201 (2004) 1031]. To improve the crystal quality of the thin film many efforts were made. One of the important improvements was the surface treatment of the substrate. The tetracene thin film FET (top contact structure) was fabricated using the substrate, which was coated by a spin-coating method with a 0.1% poly α-methylstyrene (AMS) solution. The crystal quality was improved by this treatment so that the carrier mobility was higher than that of non-treatment. The maximum mobility of the AMS-treated sample was obtained to be 0.12 cm2/V s

  10. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  11. Proteins and their crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Hogg, T.; Hilgenfeld, R.; Grandori, R.; Carey, J.; Vácha, František; Štys, Dalibor

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2003), s. 31-32. ISSN 1211-5894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA206/00/D007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902; CEZ:MSM 123100001 Keywords : pokeweed antiviral protein * flavodoxin-like protein * PSII Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  12. Preclinical studies on new proteins as carrier for glycoconjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontini, M; Romano, M R; Proietti, D; Balducci, E; Micoli, F; Balocchi, C; Santini, L; Masignani, V; Berti, F; Costantino, P

    2016-07-29

    Glycoconjugate vaccines are made of carbohydrate antigens covalently bound to a carrier protein to enhance their immunogenicity. Among the different carrier proteins tested in preclinical and clinical studies, five have been used so far for licensed vaccines: Diphtheria and Tetanus toxoids, the non-toxic mutant of diphtheria toxin CRM197, the outer membrane protein complex of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B and the Protein D derived from non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. Availability of novel carriers might help to overcome immune interference in multi-valent vaccines containing several polysaccharide-conjugate antigens, and also to develop vaccines which target both protein as well saccharide epitopes of the same pathogen. Accordingly we have conducted a study to identify new potential carrier proteins. Twenty-eight proteins, derived from different bacteria, were conjugated to the model polysaccharide Laminarin and tested in mice for their ability in inducing antibodies against the carbohydrate antigen and eight of them were subsequently tested as carrier for serogroup meningococcal C oligosaccharides. Four out of these eight were able to elicit in mice satisfactory anti meningococcal serogroup C titers. Based on immunological evaluation, the Streptococcus pneumoniae protein spr96/2021 was successfully evaluated as carrier for serogroups A, C, W, Y and X meningococcal capsular saccharides. PMID:27317455

  13. Proteins and their crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Hogg, T.; Hilgenfeld, R.; Grandori, R.; Carey, J.; Vácha, František; Štys, D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, - (2003), s. 30-31. ISSN 1211-5894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA206/00/D007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 123100001 Keywords : antiviral proteins Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  14. Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Protein in Barley Chloroplast Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannangara, C. G.; Jense, C J

    1975-01-01

    Biotin localized in barley chloroplast lamellae is covalently bound to a single protein with an approximate molecular weight of 21000. It contains one mole of biotin per mole of protein and functions as a carboxyl carrier in the acetyl-CoA carboxylase reaction. The protein was obtained by...... solubilization of the lamellae in phenol/acetic acid/8 M urea. Feeding barley seedlings with [14C]-biotin revealed that the vitamin is not degraded into respiratory substrates by the plant, but is specifically incorporated into biotin carboxyl carrier protein....

  15. Approaches to automated protein crystal harvesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approaches to automated and robot-assisted harvesting of protein crystals are critically reviewed. While no true turn-key solutions for automation of protein crystal harvesting are currently available, systems incorporating advanced robotics and micro-electromechanical systems represent exciting developments with the potential to revolutionize the way in which protein crystals are harvested

  16. Ribonuclease S-peptide as a carrier in fusion proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    J.S. Kim; Raines, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    S-peptide (residues 1-20) and S-protein (residues 21-124) are the enzymatically inactive products of the limited digestion of ribonuclease A by subtilisin. S-peptide binds S-protein with high affinity to form ribonuclease S, which has full enzymatic activity. Recombinant DNA technology was used to produce a fusion protein having three parts: carrier, spacer, and target. The two carriers used were the first 15 residues of S-peptide (S15) and a mutant S15 in which Asp 14 had been changed to Asn...

  17. Modes and Carrier Density in Dispersive and Nonlinear Gain Planar Photonic Crystal Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renlong Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cavity mode and carrier density in dispersive and nonlinear gain planar photonic crystal cavities are studied with the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. Planar photonic crystal cavity can enhance light mater interaction, which can be used to design a photonic crystal cavity laser. With the effect of both total internal reflection and photonic band gap confinement, the frequency responses of the planar photonic crystal cavity can be obtained by simulation. The effect of carrier diffusion is calculated through the laser rate equations. The electric field intensity distribution, temporal behavior of electric field energy, and carrier density characteristics are analyzed from the resonance cavity mode.

  18. Can Solution Supersaturation Affect Protein Crystal Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    The formation of large protein crystals of "high quality" is considered a characteristic manifestation of microgravity. The physical processes that predict the formation of large, high quality protein crystals in the microgravity environment of space are considered rooted in the existence of a "depletion zone" in the vicinity of crystal. Namely, it is considered reasonable that crystal quality suffers in earth-grown crystals as a result of the incorporation of large aggregates, micro-crystals and/or large molecular weight "impurities", processes which are aided by density driven convective flow or mixing at the crystal-liquid interface. Sedimentation and density driven convection produce unfavorable solution conditions in the vicinity of the crystal surface, which promotes rapid crystal growth to the detriment of crystal size and quality. In this effort, we shall further present the hypothesis that the solution supersaturatoin at the crystal surface determines the growth mechanism, or mode, by which protein crystals grow. It is further hypothesized that protein crystal quality is affected by the mechanism or mode of crystal growth. Hence the formation of a depletion zone in microgravity environment is beneficial due to inhibition of impurity incorporatoin as well as preventing a kinetic roughening transition. It should be noted that for many proteins the magnitude of neither protein crystal growth rates nor solution supersaturation are predictors of a kinetic roughening transition. That is, the kinetic roughening transition supersaturation must be dtermined for each individual protein.

  19. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins

  20. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, C. Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M., E-mail: gulick@hwi.buffalo.edu [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins.

  1. Influence of microgravity on protein crystal structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Structural determination and comparison of microgravity and ground grown protein crystals have been carried out in order to investigate the effect of microgravity on the structure of protein crystals. Following the structural studies on the hen egg-white lysozyme cystals grown in space and on the ground, the same kind of comparative studies was performed with acidic phospholipase A2 crystals grown in different gravities. Based on the results obtained so far, a conclusion could be made that microgravity might not be strong enough to change the conformation of polypeptide chain of proteins, but it may improve the bound waters' structure, and this might be an important factor for microgravity to improve the protein crystal quality. In addition, the difference in the improvement between the two kinds of protein crystals may imply that the degree of improvement of a protein crystal in microgravity may be related to the solvent content in the protein crystal.

  2. DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO CRYSTALLIZATION OF MEMBRANE PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash G. Doiphode

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystallography is more like an art than science. Crystallizing membrane proteins are a big challenge; membrane proteins are present in the cell membrane and serve as cell support. The most important feature of membrane protein is that it contains both hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions on its surface. They are generally much more difficult to study than soluble proteins. The problem becomes more difficult when trying to obtain crystals to determine the high resolution structures of membrane proteins. We want to utilize this opportunity to briefly examine various approaches for crystallization of membrane proteins. The important factors for determining the success of crystallization experiments for membrane proteins lies in the purification, preparation of membrane samples, the environment in which the crystals are grown and the technique used to grow the crystals. All the X-ray structures of membrane protein are grown from preparations of detergents by different methods developed to crystallize. In this review different techniques for the crystallization of membrane proteins are being described. The cubic phase method also known as in meso method is discussed along with other methods to understand about the crystallization of membrane proteins, its general applicability, salt, detergent and screening effects on crystallization. Low volumes as nano-liter of samples can be used for crystallization. The effects of different detergents on the crystallization of membrane protein, as well as the use of surfactants like polyoxyethylene. Approach based on the detergent complexation to prove the ability of cyclodextrins to remove detergent from ternary mixtures in order to get 2D crystals. Crystallization of membrane proteins using non-ionic surfactants as well as Lipidic sponge phase and with swollen lipidic mesophases is discussed to better understand the crystallization of membrane proteins.

  3. The fluid phenomena in the crystallization of the protein crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Li; Kang Qi

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports that an optical diagnostic system consisting of Maeh-Zehnder interferometer with a phase shift device and image processor has been used for study of the kinetics of protein crystal growing process. The crystallization process of protein crystal by vapour diffusion is investigated. The interference fringes are observed in real time. The present experiment demonstrates that the diffusion and the sedimentation influence the crystallization of protein crystal which grows in solution, and the concentration capillary convection associated with surface tension occurs at the vicinity of free surface of the protein mother liquor, and directly affects on the outcome of protein crystallization. So far the detailed analysis and the important role of the fluid phenomena in protein crystallization have been discussed a little in both space- and ground-based crystal growth experiments. It is also found that these fluid phenomena affect theoutcome of protein crystallization, regular growth, and crystal quality. This may explain the fact that many results of space-based investigation do not show overall improvement.

  4. Measurements of Protein Crystal Face Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal growth rates will be determined for several hyperthermophile proteins.; The growth rates will be assessed using available theoretical models, including kinetic roughening.; If/when kinetic roughening supersaturations are established, determinations of protein crystal quality over a range of supersaturations will also be assessed.; The results of our ground based effort may well address the existence of a correlation between fundamental growth mechanisms and protein crystal quality.

  5. Mixed Protein Carriers for Modulating DNA Release

    OpenAIRE

    Morán, M. Carmen; Pais, Alberto A. C. C.; Ramalho, Amilcar; Miguel, M. Graça; Lindman, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous mixtures of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes undergo associative phase separation, resulting in coacervation, gelation, or precipitation. This phenomenon has been exploited in forming DNA gel particles by interfacial diffusion. We report here the formation of DNA gel particles by mixing solutions of double-stranded DNA with aqueous solutions containing two cationic proteins, lysozyme and protamine sulfate. The effect of the lysozyme/protamine ratio on the degree of DNA entrapment, ...

  6. System and method for forming synthetic protein crystals to determine the conformational structure by crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, George D.; Glass, Robert; Rupp, Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming synthetic crystals of proteins in a carrier fluid by use of the dipole moments of protein macromolecules that self-align in the Helmholtz layer adjacent to an electrode. The voltage gradients of such layers easily exceed 10.sup.6 V/m. The synthetic protein crystals are subjected to x-ray crystallography to determine the conformational structure of the protein involved.

  7. Protein carriers of conjugate vaccines: characteristics, development, and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-12-01

    The immunogenicity of polysaccharides as human vaccines was enhanced by coupling to protein carriers. Conjugation transformed the T cell-independent polysaccharide vaccines of the past to T cell-dependent antigenic vaccines that were much more immunogenic and launched a renaissance in vaccinology. This review discusses the conjugate vaccines for prevention of infections caused by Hemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis. Specifically, the characteristics of the proteins used in the construction of the vaccines including CRM, tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid, Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex, and Hemophilus influenzae protein D are discussed. The studies that established differences among and key features of conjugate vaccines including immunologic memory induction, reduction of nasopharyngeal colonization and herd immunity, and antibody avidity and avidity maturation are presented. Studies of dose, schedule, response to boosters, of single protein carriers with single and multiple polysaccharides, of multiple protein carriers with multiple polysaccharides and conjugate vaccines administered concurrently with other vaccines are discussed along with undesirable consequences of conjugate vaccines. The clear benefits of conjugate vaccines in improving the protective responses of the immature immune systems of young infants and the senescent immune systems of the elderly have been made clear and opened the way to development of additional vaccines using this technology for future vaccine products. PMID:23955057

  8. Legionella pneumophila secretes a mitochondrial carrier protein during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Dolezal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mitochondrial Carrier Family (MCF is a signature group of integral membrane proteins that transport metabolites across the mitochondrial inner membrane in eukaryotes. MCF proteins are characterized by six transmembrane segments that assemble to form a highly-selective channel for metabolite transport. We discovered a novel MCF member, termed Legionellanucleotide carrier Protein (LncP, encoded in the genome of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease. LncP was secreted via the bacterial Dot/Icm type IV secretion system into macrophages and assembled in the mitochondrial inner membrane. In a yeast cellular system, LncP induced a dominant-negative phenotype that was rescued by deleting an endogenous ATP carrier. Substrate transport studies on purified LncP reconstituted in liposomes revealed that it catalyzes unidirectional transport and exchange of ATP transport across membranes, thereby supporting a role for LncP as an ATP transporter. A hidden Markov model revealed further MCF proteins in the intracellular pathogens, Legionella longbeachae and Neorickettsia sennetsu, thereby challenging the notion that MCF proteins exist exclusively in eukaryotic organisms.

  9. Gold nanoparticle capture within protein crystal scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Ann E; Huber, Thaddaus R; Ni, Thomas W; Hartje, Luke F; Appel, Karina L; Yost, Jarad W; Ackerson, Christopher J; Snow, Christopher D

    2016-07-01

    DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)∼17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)∼1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography. PMID:27264210

  10. Gold nanoparticle capture within protein crystal scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Ann E.; Huber, Thaddaus R.; Ni, Thomas W.; Hartje, Luke F.; Appel, Karina L.; Yost, Jarad W.; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Snow, Christopher D.

    2016-06-01

    DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography.DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was

  11. Growth of shaped single crystals of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Abel; Rondón, Deyanira; García-Ruiz, Juan Ma.

    1996-09-01

    We present a procedure for obtaining protein single crystals that fill the capillary tubes in which they grow. The implementation was typical of the gel acupuncture method and the four different proteins are used as examples: lysozyme (HEW), thaumatin I, ferritin and insulin. Rod- and prismatic-shaped protein single crystals of these four proteins were grown inside capillary tubes of 0.2, 0.3, 0.5 mm in diameter and, for the case of lysozyme, up to 1.2 mm in diameter. The maximum length measured along the long axes of the rod crystals was 1.6 mm again for lysozyme crystals. It was observed that, once the capillary tube was filled, the crystal continues to grow by diffusion of the precipitating agent throughout the porous network formed by the protein crystal structure. We also discuss the possibility of growing these cylinders of crystalline proteins by the addition of protein solution to the mother liquor through the upper end of the glass capillary while the precipitating agent diffuses through the protein crystal itself. X-ray diffraction patterns confirm the single crystal character of the protein rods.

  12. The MORPHEUS II protein crystallization screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorrec, Fabrice, E-mail: fgorrec@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-27

    MORPHEUS II is a 96-condition initial crystallization screen formulated de novo. The screen incorporates reagents selected from the Protein Data Bank to yield crystals that are not observed in traditional conditions. In addition, the formulation facilitates the optimization and cryoprotection of crystals. High-quality macromolecular crystals are a prerequisite for the process of protein structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Unfortunately, the relative yield of diffraction-quality crystals from crystallization experiments is often very low. In this context, innovative crystallization screen formulations are continuously being developed. In the past, MORPHEUS, a screen in which each condition integrates a mix of additives selected from the Protein Data Bank, a cryoprotectant and a buffer system, was developed. Here, MORPHEUS II, a follow-up to the original 96-condition initial screen, is described. Reagents were selected to yield crystals when none might be observed in traditional initial screens. Besides, the screen includes heavy atoms for experimental phasing and small polyols to ensure the cryoprotection of crystals. The suitability of the resulting novel conditions is shown by the crystallization of a broad variety of protein samples and their efficiency is compared with commercially available conditions.

  13. Giant Carrier Mobility in Single Crystals of FeSb2

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Rongwei; Mitrovic, V. F.; Petrovic, C

    2008-01-01

    We report the giant carrier mobility in single crystals of FeSb2. Nonlinear field dependence of Hall resistivity is well described with the two-carrier model. Maximum mobility values in high mobility band reach ~10^5 cm^2/Vs at 8 K, and are ~10^2 cm^2/Vs at the room temperature. Our results point to a class of materials with promising potential for applications in solid state electronics.

  14. Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Single Crystal Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10

    The proposed research aims to achieve quantitative, molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped crystalline organic semiconductors via in situ linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, in conjunction with transport measurements and molecular/crystal engineering. Organic semiconductors are emerging as viable materials for low-cost electronics and optoelectronics, such as organic photovoltaics (OPV), organic field effect transistors (OFETs), and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Despite extensive studies spanning many decades, a clear understanding of the nature of charge carriers in organic semiconductors is still lacking. It is generally appreciated that polaron formation and charge carrier trapping are two hallmarks associated with electrical transport in organic semiconductors; the former results from the low dielectric constants and weak intermolecular electronic overlap while the latter can be attributed to the prevalence of structural disorder. These properties have lead to the common observation of low charge carrier mobilities, e.g., in the range of 10-5 - 10-3 cm2/Vs, particularly at low carrier concentrations. However, there is also growing evidence that charge carrier mobility approaching those of inorganic semiconductors and metals can exist in some crystalline organic semiconductors, such as pentacene, tetracene and rubrene. A particularly striking example is single crystal rubrene (Figure 1), in which hole mobilities well above 10 cm2/Vs have been observed in OFETs operating at room temperature. Temperature dependent transport and spectroscopic measurements both revealed evidence of free carriers in rubrene. Outstanding questions are: what are the structural features and physical properties that make rubrene so unique? How do we establish fundamental design principles for the development of other organic semiconductors of high mobility? These questions are critically important but not comprehensive, as the nature of

  15. Rationalizing α-helical membrane protein crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Newstead, Simon; Ferrandon, Sébastien; Iwata, So

    2008-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is currently the most successful method for determining the three-dimensional structure of membrane proteins. Nevertheless, growing the crystals required for this technique presents one of the major bottlenecks in this area of structural biology. This is especially true for the α-helical type membrane proteins that are of particular interest due to their medical relevance. To address this problem we have undertaken a detailed analysis of the crystallization conditions fr...

  16. Minority carrier recombination in spherical silicon crystals: measurement and process-induced effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minority carrier recombination kinetics in defective, sphere-shaped silicon crystals is studied and a methodology is developed to evaluate the carrier lifetime. A theoretical model has been developed for the conductivity transient taking into account the spherical crystal geometry. The recombination rates are extracted using the experimentally obtained conductivity transient through analytical consideration of the different decay components specific to the spherical crystals. The methodology and analytical interpretation of the recombination kinetics provide an efficient tool to demonstrate the sensitivity of the recombination process to changes in bulk and interfacial electronic properties. We also show that the method is very useful in monitoring process-induced effects in various stages of crystal formation (oxygen denuding, annealing, diffusion) and in defect deactivation (gettering, precipitation, passivation) processes

  17. Insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Höfte, H; Whiteley, H. R.

    1989-01-01

    A classification for crystal protein genes of Bacillus thuringiensis is presented. Criteria used are the insecticidal spectra and the amino acid sequences of the encoded proteins. Fourteen genes are distinguished, encoding proteins active against either Lepidoptera (cryI), Lepidoptera and Diptera (cryII), Coleoptera (cryIII), or Diptera (cryIV). One gene, cytA, encodes a general cytolytic protein and shows no structural similarities with the other genes. Toxicity studies with single purified ...

  18. Bone Regeneration Using Bone Morphogenetic Proteins and Various Biomaterial Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma and disease frequently result in fractures or critical sized bone defects and their management at times necessitates bone grafting. The process of bone healing or regeneration involves intricate network of molecules including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs. BMPs belong to a larger superfamily of proteins and are very promising and intensively studied for in the enhancement of bone healing. More than 20 types of BMPs have been identified but only a subset of BMPs can induce de novo bone formation. Many research groups have shown that BMPs can induce differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and stem cells into osteogenic cells which are capable of producing bone. This review introduces BMPs and discusses current advances in preclinical and clinical application of utilizing various biomaterial carriers for local delivery of BMPs to enhance bone regeneration.

  19. Charge Carrier Lifetimes Exceeding 15 μs in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Single Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yu; Hutter, Eline M; Fang, Yanjun; Dong, Qingfeng; Huang, Jinsong; Savenije, Tom J

    2016-03-01

    The charge carrier lifetime in organic-inorganic perovskites is one of the most important parameters for modeling and design of solar cells and other types of devices. In this work, we use CH3NH3PbI3 single crystal as a model system to study optical absorption, charge carrier generation, and recombination lifetimes. We show that commonly applied photoluminescence lifetime measurements may dramatically underestimate the intrinsic carrier lifetime in CH3NH3PbI3, which could be due to severe charge recombination at the crystal surface and/or fast electron-hole recombination close to the surface. By using the time-resolved microwave conductivity technique, we investigated the lifetime of free mobile charges inside the crystals. Most importantly, we find that for homogeneous excitation throughout the crystal, the charge carrier lifetime exceeds 15 μs. This means that the diffusion length in CH3NH3PbI3 can be as large as 50 μm if it is no longer limited by the dimensions of the crystallites. PMID:26901658

  20. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusey, Marc, E-mail: marc.pusey@ixpressgenes.com; Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph [iXpressGenes Inc., 601 Genome Way, Huntsville, AL 35810 (United States)

    2015-06-27

    The presence of a covalently bound fluorescent probe at a concentration of <0.5% does not affect the outcome of macromolecule crystallization screening experiments. Additionally, the fluorescence can be used to determine new, not immediately apparent, lead crystallization conditions. Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent.

  1. Ostwald Ripening of Clusters during Protein Crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Streets, Aaron M.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to classical nucleation theory, protein crystals can nucleate via a two-step process in which the molecular arrangement of the ordered solid phase is preceded by nucleation of a dense amorphous phase. We study the growth of these precrystalline clusters in lysozyme using a combination of dynamic light scattering, optical microscopy, and microfluidics. Clusters display Ostwald ripening growth kinetics but deviate from this trend after nucleation of the crystal phase. This behavior ari...

  2. Low trap-state density and long carrier diffusion in organolead trihalide perovskite single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong

    2015-01-29

    The fundamental properties and ultimate performance limits of organolead trihalide MAPbX3(MA = CH3NH3 +; X = Br- or I- ) perovskites remain obscured by extensive disorder in polycrystalline MAPbX3 films. We report an antisolvent vapor-assisted crystallization approach that enables us to create sizable crack-free MAPbX3 single crystals with volumes exceeding 100 cubic millimeters. These large single crystals enabled a detailed characterization of their optical and charge transport characteristics.We observed exceptionally low trap-state densities on the order of 109 to 1010 per cubic centimeter in MAPbX3 single crystals (comparable to the best photovoltaic-quality silicon) and charge carrier diffusion lengths exceeding 10 micrometers. These results were validated with density functional theory calculations.

  3. Theory of carrier depletion and light amplification in active slow light photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Using a perturbative approach, we perform a quantitative three-dimensional analysis of slow-light enhanced traveling wave amplification in an active semiconductor photonic crystal waveguide. The impact of slow-light propagation on the carrier-depletion-induced nonlinear gain saturation of the...... device is investigated. An effective rate-equation-based model is presented. It is shown that it well accounts for the three-dimensional simulation results. Simulations indicate that a slow-light-enhanced photonic crystal traveling-wave amplifier has a high small-signal modal gain and low saturation...

  4. A noble microfluidic device for protein crystallizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jung-Uk; Fraden, Seth

    2006-03-01

    A high throughput, low volume microfluidic device has been constructed out of poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer. We have demonstrated that sub-nanoliter water-in-oil drops of protein solutions of different composition can be rapidly stored in individual wells, which allows screening of 1000 conditions while consuming a total of only 1 microgram protein on a 20 cm^2 chip. This reduction in protein needed for crystal screens allows high-throughput crystallization of mammalian proteins expressed in tissue culture. A significant advance over current microfluidic devices is that each pot is in contact with a reservoir through a dialysis membrane which only water and other low molecular weight organic solvents can pass, but not salt, polymer or amphiphile. This enables the concentration of all solutes in a solution to be reversibly, rapidly, and precisely varied in contrast to current microfluidic methods, which are irreversible. This microfluidic dialysis technology solves a major problem in protein crystallization, the decoupling of nucleation from growth. The device will also be useful for general studies of the phase behavior of protein solutions.

  5. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lyase. Target enzyme for fungicides. A better understanding of this enzyme should lead to the discovery of more potent fungicides to treat serious crop diseases such as rice blast. It regulates the flow of metabolic intermediates required for cell growth. Principal Investigator for STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  6. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials

  7. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Bernhard [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Jaenicke, Elmar [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Jakob Welder Weg 26, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Schnell, Robert [Karolinska Institutet, 17 177 Stockholm (Sweden); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Brenk, Ruth, E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acyl carrier protein synthase adopts two different pH-dependent structural conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Aggarwal, Anup; Shipman, Lance [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3474 (United States); Besra, Gurdyal S. [University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Sacchettini, James C., E-mail: sacchett@tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3474 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein synthase plays an essential role in the synthesis of fatty acids, nonribosomal peptides and polyketides. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, AcpS or group I phosphopentatheine transferase exhibits two different structural conformations depending upon the pH. The crystal structures of acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Corynebacterium ammoniagenes determined at pH 5.3 and pH 6.5, respectively, are reported. Comparison of the Mtb apo-AcpS structure with the recently reported structure of the Mtb AcpS–ADP complex revealed that AcpS adopts two different conformations: the orthorhombic and trigonal space-group structures show structural differences in the α2 helix and in the conformation of the α3–α4 connecting loop, which is in a closed conformation. The apo-AcpS structure shows electron density for the entire model and was obtained at lower pH values (4.4–6.0). In contrast, at a higher pH value (6.5) AcpS undergoes significant conformational changes, resulting in disordered regions that show no electron density in the AcpS model. The solved structures also reveal that C. ammoniagenes AcpS undergoes structural rearrangement in two regions, similar to the recently reported Mtb AcpS–ADP complex structure. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that AcpS has a higher post-translational modification activity between pH 4.4 and 6.0 than at pH values above 6.5, where the activity drops owing to the change in conformation. The results show that apo-AcpS and AcpS–ADP adopt different conformations depending upon the pH conditions of the crystallization solution.

  9. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavaty, Andrei S. [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Kim, Youngchang [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Zhou, Min [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L6 (Canada); Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N. [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Joachimiak, Andrzej [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Savchenko, Alexei [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L6 (Canada); Anderson, Wayne F., E-mail: wf-anderson@northwestern.edu [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS{sub SA}), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS{sub VC}) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS{sub BA}) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS{sub BA} is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS{sub BA} may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP.

  10. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpSSA), Vibrio cholerae (AcpSVC) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpSBA) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpSBA is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpSBA may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP

  11. Alternative polymer precipitants for protein crystallization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skálová, Tereza; Dušková, Jarmila; Hašek, Jindřich; Kolenko, Petr; Štěpánková, Andrea; Dohnálek, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 4 (2010), s. 737-742. ISSN 0021-8898 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500500701; GA ČR GA305/07/1073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymer precipitants * protein crystallization * X-ray crystallography Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.794, year: 2010

  12. When proteins are completely hydrated in crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carugo, Oliviero

    2016-08-01

    In the crystalline state, protein surface patches that do not form crystal packing contacts are exposed to the solvent and one or more layers of hydration water molecules can be observed. It is well known that these water molecules cannot be observed at very low resolution, when the scarcity of experimental information precludes the observation of several parts of the protein molecule, like for example side-chains at the protein surface. On the contrary, more details are observable at high resolution. Here it is shown that it is necessary to reach a resolution of about 1.5-1.6Å to observe a continuous hydration layer at the protein surface. This contrasts previous estimations, which were more tolerant and according to which a resolution of 2.5Å was sufficient to describe at the atomic level the structure of the hydration layer. These results should prove useful in guiding a more rigorous selection of structural data to study protein hydration and in interpreting new crystal structures. PMID:27112977

  13. Ultrafast carrier dynamics and radiative recombination in multiferroic BiFeO3 single crystals and thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor A. J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a detailed comparison of ultrafast carrier dynamics in single crystals and thin films of multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO. Using degenerate femtosecond optical pump-probe spectroscopy, we find that the observed dynamics are qualitatively similar in both samples. After photoexcitation, electrons relax to the conduction band minimum through electron-phonon coupling, with subsequent carrier relaxation proceeding via various recombination pathways that extend to a nanosecond timescale. Subtle differences observed in our measurements indicate that BFO films have a higher band gap than single crystals. Overall, our results demonstrate that carrier relaxation in BFO is analogous to that in bulk semiconductors.

  14. The plug-based nanovolume Microcapillary Protein Crystallization System (MPCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Microcapillary Protein Crystallization System (MPCS) is a new protein-crystallization technology used to generate nanolitre-sized crystallization experiments for crystal screening and optimization. Using the MPCS, diffraction-ready crystals were grown in the plastic MPCS CrystalCard and were used to solve the structure of methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase. The Microcapillary Protein Crystallization System (MPCS) embodies a new semi-automated plug-based crystallization technology which enables nanolitre-volume screening of crystallization conditions in a plasticware format that allows crystals to be easily removed for traditional cryoprotection and X-ray diffraction data collection. Protein crystals grown in these plastic devices can be directly subjected to in situ X-ray diffraction studies. The MPCS integrates the formulation of crystallization cocktails with the preparation of the crystallization experiments. Within microfluidic Teflon tubing or the microfluidic circuitry of a plastic CrystalCard, ∼10–20 nl volume droplets are generated, each representing a microbatch-style crystallization experiment with a different chemical composition. The entire protein sample is utilized in crystallization experiments. Sparse-matrix screening and chemical gradient screening can be combined in one comprehensive ‘hybrid’ crystallization trial. The technology lends itself well to optimization by high-granularity gradient screening using optimization reagents such as precipitation agents, ligands or cryoprotectants

  15. Control of polythiophene film microstructure and charge carrier dynamics through crystallization temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Marsh, Hilary S.

    2014-03-22

    The microstructure of neat conjugated polymers is crucial in determining the ultimate morphology and photovoltaic performance of polymer/fullerene blends, yet until recently, little work has focused on controlling the former. Here, we demonstrate that both the long-range order along the (100)-direction and the lamellar crystal thickness along the (001)-direction in neat poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and poly[(3,3″-didecyl[2,2′:5′, 2″-terthiophene]-5,5″-diyl)] (PTTT-10) thin films can be manipulated by varying crystallization temperature. Changes in crystalline domain size impact the yield and dynamics of photogenerated charge carriers. Time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements show that neat polymer films composed of larger crystalline domains have longer photoconductance lifetimes and charge carrier yield decreases with increasing crystallite size for P3HT. Our results suggest that the classical polymer science description of temperature-dependent crystallization of polymers from solution can be used to understand thin-film formation in neat conjugated polymers, and hence, should be considered when discussing the structural evolution of organic bulk heterojunctions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Spiro-OMeTAD single crystals: Remarkably enhanced charge-carrier transport via mesoscale ordering

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong

    2016-04-15

    We report the crystal structure and hole-transport mechanism in spiro-OMeTAD [2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenyl-amine)9,9′-spirobifluorene], the dominant hole-transporting material in perovskite and solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Despite spiro-OMeTAD’s paramount role in such devices, its crystal structure was unknown because of highly disordered solution-processed films; the hole-transport pathways remained ill-defined and the charge carrier mobilities were low, posing a major bottleneck for advancing cell efficiencies. We devised an antisolvent crystallization strategy to grow single crystals of spiro-OMeTAD, which allowed us to experimentally elucidate its molecular packing and transport properties. Electronic structure calculations enabled us to map spiro-OMeTAD’s intermolecular charge-hopping pathways. Promisingly, single-crystal mobilities were found to exceed their thin-film counterparts by three orders of magnitude. Our findings underscore mesoscale ordering as a key strategy to achieving breakthroughs in hole-transport material engineering of solar cells.

  17. Spiro-OMeTAD single crystals: Remarkably enhanced charge-carrier transport via mesoscale ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dong; Qin, Xiang; Li, Yuan; He, Yao; Zhong, Cheng; Pan, Jun; Dong, Huanli; Xu, Wei; Li, Tao; Hu, Wenping; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Bakr, Osman M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the crystal structure and hole-transport mechanism in spiro-OMeTAD [2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenyl-amine)9,9′-spirobifluorene], the dominant hole-transporting material in perovskite and solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Despite spiro-OMeTAD’s paramount role in such devices, its crystal structure was unknown because of highly disordered solution-processed films; the hole-transport pathways remained ill-defined and the charge carrier mobilities were low, posing a major bottleneck for advancing cell efficiencies. We devised an antisolvent crystallization strategy to grow single crystals of spiro-OMeTAD, which allowed us to experimentally elucidate its molecular packing and transport properties. Electronic structure calculations enabled us to map spiro-OMeTAD’s intermolecular charge-hopping pathways. Promisingly, single-crystal mobilities were found to exceed their thin-film counterparts by three orders of magnitude. Our findings underscore mesoscale ordering as a key strategy to achieving breakthroughs in hole-transport material engineering of solar cells. PMID:27152342

  18. Characterization of the yellow fever mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene and ligand-bound protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, David H.; Vyazunova, Irina; Lorch, Jeffery M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Lan, Que; (UW)

    2009-06-12

    The sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene (AeSCP-2L3), a new member of the SCP-2 protein family, is identified from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The predicted molecular weight of AeSCP-2L3 is 13.4 kDa with a calculated pI of 4.98. AeSCP-2L3 transcription occurs in the larval feeding stages and the mRNA levels decrease in pupae and adults. The highest levels of AeSCP-2L3 gene expression are found in the body wall, and possibly originated in the fat body. This is the first report of a mosquito SCP-2-like protein with prominent expression in tissue other than the midgut. The X-ray protein crystal structure of AeSCP-2L3 reveals a bound C16 fatty acid whose acyl tail penetrates deeply into a hydrophobic cavity. Interestingly, the ligand-binding cavity is slightly larger than previously described for AeSCP-2 (Dyer et al. J Biol Chem 278:39085-39091, 2003) and AeSCP-2L2 (Dyer et al. J Lipid Res M700460-JLR200, 2007). There are also an additional 10 amino acids in SCP-2L3 that are not present in other characterized mosquito SCP-2s forming an extended loop between {beta}3 and {beta}4. Otherwise, the protein backbone is exceedingly similar to other SCP-2 and SCP-2-like proteins. In contrast to this observed high structural homology of members in the mosquito SCP2 family, the amino acid sequence identity between the members is less than 30%. The results from structural analysis imply that there have been evolutionary constraints that favor the SCP-2 C{alpha} backbone fold while the specificity of ligand binding can be altered.

  19. Evaluation of anisotropic charge carrier mobility of perylene single crystals by time-of-flight method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kougo, Junichi; Ishikawa, Ken

    2016-03-01

    The charge carrier mobilities along the vertical and lateral directions of perylene platelet single crystals were measured by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. In the lateral directional measurement, the entire region between electrodes was irradiated to obtain measurable signals. The transient photocurrent was different from the conventional TOF measurements; hence, we developed an analytic method for lateral directional measurement. The electron mobilities along the thickness and lateral directions were 0.33 and 2.0 cm2·V-1·s-1 and the hole mobilities were 0.12 and 0.6 cm2·V-1·s-1, respectively.

  20. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maes, Dominique, E-mail: dommaes@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Vorontsova, Maria A. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano [Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Sleutel, Mike [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Giglio, Marzio [Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Vekilov, Peter G. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2015-06-27

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10{sup −3} of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  1. Growth of high-strength protein crystals with nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Nakabayashi, Iori; Tsuchikura, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Atsushi; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-03-01

    Here, we present a novel method of growing protein crystals with nanofibers. Protein crystals were grown by incorporating nanofibers. No obvious differences were observed in diffraction data between fiber-containing and as-grown crystals. The fiber-containing crystals displayed an increased tolerance to osmotic shock caused by soaking in 25% ethanol or 40% dimethyl sulfoxide. This means that the method allowed us to easily increase the crystal mechanical stability. Because the method is very simple, it will provide a variety of possibilities for protein crystallization.

  2. Structure-based analysis of the molecular interactions between acyltransferase and acyl carrier protein in vicenistatin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Iwasawa, Shohei; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-02-16

    Acyltransferases (ATs) are key determinants of building block specificity in polyketide biosynthesis. Despite the importance of protein-protein interactions between AT and acyl carrier protein (ACP) during the acyltransfer reaction, the mechanism of ACP recognition by AT is not understood in detail. Herein, we report the crystal structure of AT VinK, which transfers a dipeptide group between two ACPs, VinL and VinP1LdACP, in vicenistatin biosynthesis. The isolated VinK structure showed a unique substrate-binding pocket for the dipeptide group linked to ACP. To gain greater insight into the mechanism of ACP recognition, we attempted to crystallize the VinK-ACP complexes. Because transient enzyme-ACP complexes are difficult to crystallize, we developed a covalent cross-linking strategy using a bifunctional maleimide reagent to trap the VinK-ACP complexes, allowing the determination of the crystal structure of the VinK-VinL complex. In the complex structure, Arg-153, Met-206, and Arg-299 of VinK interact with the negatively charged helix II region of VinL. The VinK-VinL complex structure allows, to our knowledge, the first visualization of the interaction between AT and ACP and provides detailed mechanistic insights into ACP recognition by AT. PMID:26831085

  3. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystallization Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating protein-protein interactions in under- and over-saturated crystallization solution conditions using fluorescence methods. The use of fluorescence requires fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. A number of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) derivatives have been prepared, with the probes covalently attached to one of two different sites on the protein molecule; the side chain carboxyl of ASP 101, within the active site cleft, and the N-terminal amine. The ASP 101 derivatives crystallize while the N-terminal amine derivatives do not. However, the N-terminal amine is part of the contact region between adjacent 43 helix chains, and blocking this site does would not interfere with formation of these structures in solution. Preliminary FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C, using the N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and ASP 101 bound Lucifer Yellow (LY, Ex 425 nm, Em 525 nm) probe combination. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10 (exp 5) M respectively), and all experiments were carried out at approximately Csat or lower total protein concentration. The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence yield of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is apparently more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations (reflected in the lower solubility). The estimated average distance between protein molecules at 5 x 10 (exp 6) M is approximately 70 nm, well beyond the range where any FRET can be expected. The calculated RO, where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, for the PAA-CEWL * LY-CEWL system is 3.28 nm, based upon a PAA-CEWL quantum efficiency of 0.41.

  4. Stealth carriers for low-resolution structure determination of membrane proteins in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Selma; Skar-Gislinge, Nicholas; Midtgaard, Søren;

    2014-01-01

    O at the length scales relevant to SANS. These 'stealth' carrier discs may be used as a general platform for low-resolution structural studies of membrane proteins using well established data-analysis tools originally developed for soluble proteins. © 2014 International Union of Crystallography.......Structural studies of membrane proteins remain a great experimental challenge. Functional reconstitution into artificial nanoscale bilayer disc carriers that mimic the native bilayer environment allows the handling of membrane proteins in solution. This enables the use of small-angle scattering...

  5. JAXA protein crystallization in space: ongoing improvements for growing high-quality crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Sachiko [Confocal Science Inc., Hayakawa 2nd Building 7F, 2-12-2 Iwamoto-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0032 (Japan); Ohta, Kazunori [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Furubayashi, Naoki [Maruwa Foods and Biosciences Inc., 170-1 Tsutsui-cho, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Yan, Bin; Koga, Misako [Confocal Science Inc., Hayakawa 2nd Building 7F, 2-12-2 Iwamoto-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0032 (Japan); Wada, Yoshio; Yamada, Mitsugu [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Inaka, Koji [Maruwa Foods and Biosciences Inc., 170-1 Tsutsui-cho, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroaki, E-mail: tanakah@confsci.co.jp [Confocal Science Inc., Hayakawa 2nd Building 7F, 2-12-2 Iwamoto-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0032 (Japan); Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Kamigaichi, Shigeki [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s 'high-quality protein crystal growth' project is introduced. If crystallization conditions were carefully fixed in ground-based experiments, high-quality protein crystals grew in microgravity in many experiments on the International Space Station, especially when a highly homogeneous protein sample and a viscous crystallization solution were employed. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) started a high-quality protein crystal growth project, now called JAXA PCG, on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2002. Using the counter-diffusion technique, 14 sessions of experiments have been performed as of 2012 with 580 proteins crystallized in total. Over the course of these experiments, a user-friendly interface framework for high accessibility has been constructed and crystallization techniques improved; devices to maximize the use of the microgravity environment have been designed, resulting in some high-resolution crystal growth. If crystallization conditions were carefully fixed in ground-based experiments, high-quality protein crystals grew in microgravity in many experiments on the ISS, especially when a highly homogeneous protein sample and a viscous crystallization solution were employed. In this article, the current status of JAXA PCG is discussed, and a rational approach to high-quality protein crystal growth in microgravity based on numerical analyses is explained.

  6. JAXA protein crystallization in space: ongoing improvements for growing high-quality crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s 'high-quality protein crystal growth' project is introduced. If crystallization conditions were carefully fixed in ground-based experiments, high-quality protein crystals grew in microgravity in many experiments on the International Space Station, especially when a highly homogeneous protein sample and a viscous crystallization solution were employed. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) started a high-quality protein crystal growth project, now called JAXA PCG, on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2002. Using the counter-diffusion technique, 14 sessions of experiments have been performed as of 2012 with 580 proteins crystallized in total. Over the course of these experiments, a user-friendly interface framework for high accessibility has been constructed and crystallization techniques improved; devices to maximize the use of the microgravity environment have been designed, resulting in some high-resolution crystal growth. If crystallization conditions were carefully fixed in ground-based experiments, high-quality protein crystals grew in microgravity in many experiments on the ISS, especially when a highly homogeneous protein sample and a viscous crystallization solution were employed. In this article, the current status of JAXA PCG is discussed, and a rational approach to high-quality protein crystal growth in microgravity based on numerical analyses is explained

  7. Topological Predictions for Integral Membrane Channel and Carrier Proteins /

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Abhinay Boddu

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated topological predictions for nine different programs, HMMTOP, TMHMM, SVMTOP, DAS, SOSUI, TOPCONS, PHOBIUS, MEMSAT, and SPOCTOPUS. These programs were first evaluated using four large topologically well-defined families of secondary transporters, and the three best programs were further evaluated using topologically more diverse families of channels and carriers. In the initial studies, the order of accuracy was: SPOCTOPUS>MEMSAT> HMMTOP>TOPCONS>PHOBIUS>TMHMM>SVMTOP>DAS>SOSUI. Some...

  8. Topological Predictions for Integral Membrane Channel and Carrier Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Abhinay, Reddy; Jaehoon, Cho; Sam, Ling; Vamsee, Reddy; Maksim, Shlykov; Milton, Saier

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated topological predictions for nine different programs, HMMTOP, TMHMM, SVMTOP, DAS, SOSUI, TOPCONS, PHOBIUS, MEMSAT-SVM (hereinafter referred to as MEMSAT), and SPOCTOPUS. These programs were first evaluated using four large topologically well-defined families of secondary transporters, and the three best programs were further evaluated using topologically more diverse families of channels and carriers. In the initial studies, the order of accuracy was: SPOCTOPUS>M...

  9. The contribution of polystyrene nanospheres towards the crystallization of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Kallio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallization is a slow process of trial and error and limits the amount of solved protein structures. Search of a universal heterogeneous nucleant is an effort to facilitate crystallizability of proteins. METHODOLOGY: The effect of polystyrene nanospheres on protein crystallization were tested with three commercial proteins: lysozyme, xylanase, xylose isomerase, and with five research target proteins: hydrophobins HFBI and HFBII, laccase, sarcosine dimethylglycine N-methyltransferase (SDMT, and anti-testosterone Fab fragment 5F2. The use of nanospheres both in screening and as an additive for known crystallization conditions was studied. In screening, the addition of an aqueous solution of nanosphere to the crystallization drop had a significant positive effect on crystallization success in comparison to the control screen. As an additive in hydrophobin crystallization, the nanospheres altered the crystal packing, most likely due to the amphiphilic nature of hydrophobins. In the case of laccase, nanospheres could be used as an alternative for streak-seeding, which insofar had remained the only technique to produce high-diffracting crystals. With methyltransferase SDMT the nanospheres, used also as an additive, produced fewer, larger crystals in less time. Nanospheres, combined with the streak-seeding method, produced single 5F2 Fab crystals in shorter equilibration times. CONCLUSIONS: All in all, the use of nanospheres in protein crystallization proved to be beneficial, both when screening new crystallization conditions to promote nucleation and when used as an additive to produce better quality crystals, faster. The polystyrene nanospheres are easy to use, commercially available and close to being inert, as even with amphiphilic proteins only the crystal packing is altered and the nanospheres do not interfere with the structure and function of the protein.

  10. Fast carrier dynamics in GaAs photonic crystals near the material band edge at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Ranojoy; Santori, Charles M; Vo, Sonny; Beausoleil, Raymond G

    2014-01-01

    We measure fast carrier decay rates (6 ps) in GaAs photonic crystal cavities with resonances near the GaAs bandgap energy at room temperature using a pump-probe measurement. Carriers generated via photoexcitation using an above-band femtosecond pulse cause a substantial blue-shift in the cavity peak. The experimental results are compared to theoretical models based on free carrier effects near the GaAs band edge. The probe transmission is modified for an estimated above-band pump energy of 4.2 fJ absorbed in the GaAs slab.

  11. Calcium Sulfate with Stearic Acid as an Encouraging Carrier for Reindeer Bone Protein Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Jalovaara

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Various bone proteins and growth factors in specific concentrations are required for bone formation. If the body cannot produce sufficient quantities of these factors, bone trauma can be healed with an implant that includes the required factors in a carrier. This study was designed to evaluate various calcium salt candidates that can be used as carrier with reindeer bone protein extract to induce ectopic bone formation in the muscle pouch model of mouse. The bone protein extract was either impregnated into the disc form of carrier or mixed with carrier powder before implantation. The radiographic analysis indicated increased bone formation in all of the active groups containing the bone protein extract compared to the controls within 21 days follow-up. The highest bone formation was seen in the group with calcium sulfate with stearic acid where new bone and calcified cartilage were clearly visible. The greatest bone formation occurred in the groups that had bone protein extract readily available. This indicates that the bone forming factors in sufficient concentrations are required at the early stage of bone formation. The calcium sulfate with stearic acid was the most suitable and effective carrier for reindeer bone protein extract.

  12. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States); Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance.

  13. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance

  14. Analysis of crystallization data in the Protein Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a large-scale study using data from the Protein Data Bank, some of the many reported findings regarding the crystallization of proteins were investigated. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the largest available repository of solved protein structures and contains a wealth of information on successful crystallization. Many centres have used their own experimental data to draw conclusions about proteins and the conditions in which they crystallize. Here, data from the PDB were used to reanalyse some of these results. The most successful crystallization reagents were identified, the link between solution pH and the isoelectric point of the protein was investigated and the possibility of predicting whether a protein will crystallize was explored

  15. NMR structure of an acyl-carrier protein from Borrelia burgdorferi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-resolution NMR structure of the acyl-carrier protein from the pathogen B. burgdorferi determined to a r.m.s. deviation of 0.4 Å over the protein backbone is reported. The NMR structure was determined using multidimensional NMR spectroscopy and consists of four α-helices and two 310-helices. Structural comparison reveals that this protein is highly similar to the acyl-carrier protein from A. aeolicus. Nearly complete resonance assignment and the high-resolution NMR structure of the acyl-carrier protein from Borrelia burgdorferi, a target of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) structure-determination pipeline, are reported. This protein was chosen as a potential target for drug-discovery efforts because of its involvement in fatty-acid biosynthesis, an essential metabolic pathway, in bacteria. It was possible to assign >98% of backbone resonances and >92% of side-chain resonances using multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure was determined to a backbone r.m.s.d. of 0.4 Å and contained four α-helices and two 310-helices. A structure-homology search revealed that this protein is highly similar to the acyl-carrier protein from Aquifex aeolicus

  16. Protein Crystal Growth With the Aid of Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Protein crystallography is one of three well-known methods to obtain the structure of proteins. A major rate limiting step in protein crystallography is protein crystal nucleation and growth, which is still largely a process conducted by trial-and-error methods. Many attempts have been made to improve protein crystal growth by performing growth in microgravity. Although the use of microgravity appears to improve crystal quality in some attempts, this method has been inefficient because several reasons: we lack a fundamental understanding of macromolecular crystal growth in general and of the influence of microgravity in particular, we have to start with crystal growth conditions in microgravity based on conditions on the ground and finally the hardware does not allow for experimental iteration without reloading samples on the ground. To partially accommodate the disadvantages of the current hardware, we have used microfluidic technology (Lab-on-a-Chip devices) to design the concept of a more efficient crystallization device, suitable for use on the International Space Station and in high-throughput applications on the ground. The concept and properties of microfluidics, the application design process, and the advances in protein crystal growth hardware will be discussed in this presentation. Some examples of proteins crystallized in the new hardware will be discussed, including the differences between conventional crystallization versus crystallization in microfluidics.

  17. Charge carrier mobilities in organic semiconductors: crystal engineering and the importance of molecular contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Asif; Heck, Alexander; Narita, Akimitsu; Feng, Xinliang; Nefedov, Alexei; Rohwerder, Michael; Müllen, Klaus; Elstner, Marcus; Wöll, Christof

    2015-09-14

    We have conducted a combined experimental and theoretical study on the optimization of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC) as organic semiconductor. While orientations with high electronic coupling are unfavorable in the native liquid crystalline phase of HBC, we enforced such orientations by applying external constraints. To this end, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were formed by a non-conventional preparation method on an Au-substrate using electrochemical control. Within these SAMs the HBC units are forced into favorable orientations that cannot be achieved by unconstrained crystallization. For simulating the charge transport we applied a recently developed approach, where the molecular structure and the charge carrier are propagated simultaneously during a molecular dynamics simulation. Experiments as well as simulations are mutually supportive of an improved mobility in these novel materials. The implication of these findings for a rational design of future organic semiconductors will be discussed. PMID:26235109

  18. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    -association process is a function of the protein concentration relative to the saturation concentration, and observing it in dilute solution (conc. less than or equal to 10(exp -5)M) requires that the experiments be performed under low solubility conditions, i.e., low temperatures and high salt concentrations. Data from preliminary steady state FRET studies with N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA-lys, donor, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and asp101 LY-lys as an acceptor showed a consistent trend of decreasing donor fluorescence intensity with increasing total protein concentration. The FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding C(sub sat) values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approx. 3.3 and approx. 2.5 x 10(exp -5)M respectively). The donor fluorescence decrease is more pronounced at7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations as reflected in the lower solubility. Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with an emerging model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and the relevance of that model to other proteins.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acyl carrier protein synthase adopts two different pH-dependent structural conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Aggarwal, Anup; Shipman, Lance; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C. (Birmingham UK); (TAM)

    2011-09-20

    The crystal structures of acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Corynebacterium ammoniagenes determined at pH 5.3 and pH 6.5, respectively, are reported. Comparison of the Mtb apo-AcpS structure with the recently reported structure of the Mtb AcpS-ADP complex revealed that AcpS adopts two different conformations: the orthorhombic and trigonal space-group structures show structural differences in the {alpha}2 helix and in the conformation of the {alpha}3-{alpha}4 connecting loop, which is in a closed conformation. The apo-AcpS structure shows electron density for the entire model and was obtained at lower pH values (4.4-6.0). In contrast, at a higher pH value (6.5) AcpS undergoes significant conformational changes, resulting in disordered regions that show no electron density in the AcpS model. The solved structures also reveal that C. ammoniagenes AcpS undergoes structural rearrangement in two regions, similar to the recently reported Mtb AcpS-ADP complex structure. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that AcpS has a higher post-translational modification activity between pH 4.4 and 6.0 than at pH values above 6.5, where the activity drops owing to the change in conformation. The results show that apo-AcpS and AcpS-ADP adopt different conformations depending upon the pH conditions of the crystallization solution.

  20. Detergent-Specific Membrane Protein Crystallization Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A suite of reagents has been developed for three-dimensional crystallization of integral membranes present in solution as protein-detergent complexes (PDCs). The compositions of these reagents have been determined in part by proximity to the phase boundaries (lower consolute boundaries) of the detergents present in the PDCs. The acquisition of some of the requisite phase-boundary data and the preliminary design of several of the detergent- specific screens was supported by a NASA contract. At the time of expiration of the contract, a partial set of preliminary screens had been developed. This work has since been extended under non-NASA sponsorship, leading to near completion of a set of 20 to 30 different and unique detergent- specific 96-condition screens.

  1. Effect of Fe-doping on nonlinear optical responses and carrier trapping dynamics in GaN single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We presented a quantitative study on the Fe-doping concentration dependence of optical nonlinearities and ultrafast carrier dynamics in Fe-doped GaN (GaN:Fe) single crystals using picosecond Z-scan and femtosecond pump-probe with phase object techniques under two-photon excitation. In contrast to the two-photon absorption that was found to be independent on the Fe-doping, the nonlinear refraction decreased with the Fe concentration due to the fast carrier trapping effect of Fe3+/Fe2+ deep acceptors, which simultaneously acted as an efficient non-radiative recombination channels for excess carriers. Remarkably, compared to that of Si-doped GaN bulk crystal, the free-carrier refraction effect in GaN:Fe crystals was found to be enhanced considerably since Fe-doping and the effective carrier lifetime (∼10 ps) could be tuned over three orders of magnitude at high Fe-doping level of 1 × 1019 cm−3

  2. Crystallization of asymmetric patchy models for globular proteins in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Diana; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    Asymmetric patchy particle models have recently been shown to describe the crystallization of small globular proteins with near-quantitative accuracy. Here, we investigate how asymmetry in patch geometry and bond energy generally impacts the phase diagram and nucleation dynamics of this family of soft matter models. We find the role of the geometry asymmetry to be weak, but the energy asymmetry to markedly interfere with the crystallization thermodynamics and kinetics. These results provide a rationale for the success and occasional failure of the proposal of George and Wilson for protein crystallization conditions as well as physical guidance for developing more effective protein crystallization strategies.

  3. Possible pheromone-carrier function of two lipocalin proteins in the vomeronasal organ.

    OpenAIRE

    Miyawaki, A.; Matsushita, F; Ryo, Y; Mikoshiba, K

    1994-01-01

    We report the molecular cloning and characterization of two secretory proteins specifically expressed in vomeronasal and posterior glands of the nasal septum, the ducts of which open into the lumen of the vomeronasal organ. These two proteins are members of the lipocalin superfamily, consisting of hydrophobic ligand carriers. We immunohistochemically localized one of the proteins in the mucus covering the vomeronasal sensory epithelium, where the primary reception of pheromone takes place. Th...

  4. Interactions between acidic proteins and crystals: stereochemical requirements in biomineralization.

    OpenAIRE

    Addadi, L; Weiner, S

    1985-01-01

    Acidic matrix macromolecules are intimately involved in biological crystal growth. In vitro experiments, in which crystals of calcium dicarboxylate salts were grown in the presence of aspartic acid-rich proteins, revealed a stereochemical property common to all the interacting faces. Calcite crystals are nucleated on stereochemically analogous faces when proteins are adsorbed onto a rigid substrate. The importance of this property in biomineralization is discussed.

  5. Acyl-acyl carrier protein: Lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol acyl transferase in Anabaena variabilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol was produced when membranes isolated from the cyanobacterium, Anabaena variabilis, and washed free of soluble endogenous constituents, were incubated with (14C)acyl-acyl carrier protein. This enzymatic synthesis of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol localized in the membranes was not dependent on any added cofactors, such as ATP, coenzyme A, and dithiothreitol. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-acyl carrier proteins were approximately equally active as substrates with Km of 0.37, 0.36, and 0.23 μM, respectively. The (14C)acyl group was exclusively transferred to the sn-1 hydroxyl of the glycerol backbone of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol as demonstrated by hydrolysis of all incorporated acyl groups by the lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus delamar. Using a double labelled (14C)acyl-(14C)acyl carrier protein, this enzyme catalyzed the direct transfer of the acyl group from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol to form monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. The transfer reaction mechanism was also confirmed by the increased activity with the addition of the lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol suspension. A specific galactolipid acyl hydrolase activity was released into the soluble protein fraction when the membranes of Anabaena variabilis were treated with 2% Triton X-100. The positional specificity of this acyl hydrolase was demonstrated to be similar to that of Rhizopus lipase, i.e. only the acyl group at the sn-1 position was hydrolyzed. The acyl hydrolase which was also localized in the membrane fraction of Anabaena variabilis was presumably responsible for producing endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol used by the acyltransferase

  6. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Warangkana Lohcharoenkal; Liying Wang; Yi Charlie Chen; Yon Rojanasakul

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formula...

  7. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenglei Li

    2006-08-09

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To develop an economical, easy to use, automated, high throughput system for large scale protein crystallization screening. (2) To develop a new protein crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and complete compatibility with high throughput screening system. (3) To determine the structure of lactate dehydrogenase complexed with NADH by x-ray protein crystallography to study its inherent structural properties. Firstly, we demonstrated large scale protein crystallization screening can be performed in a high throughput manner with low cost, easy operation. The overall system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection and serves as a whole solution to protein crystallization screening. The system can dispense protein and multiple different precipitants in nanoliter scale and in parallel. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, has been developed in this system to form a two-detector system with a visible light detector for detecting protein crystallization screening results. This detection scheme has capability of eliminating common false positives by distinguishing protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a high throughput and non-destructive manner. The entire system from liquid dispensing, crystallization to crystal detection is essentially parallel, high throughput and compatible with automation. The system was successfully demonstrated by lysozyme crystallization screening. Secondly, we developed a new crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and compatibility with automation and high throughput. In this crystallization method, a gas permeable membrane is employed to achieve the gentle evaporation required by protein crystallization. Protein consumption is significantly reduced to nanoliter scale for each condition and thus permits exploring more conditions in a phase diagram for given amount of protein. In addition

  8. Mesoporous magnetic hollow nanoparticles—protein carriers for lysosome escaping and cytosolic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinglu; Meng, Xianwei; Tang, Fangqiong; Li, Linlin; Chen, Dong; Liu, Huiyu; Zhang, Yanqi; Ren, Jun

    2008-11-01

    It is important for a controlled release system to determine whether nanoparticles can penetrate cell membranes and deliver protein into the nuclear or cytosolic compartments of cells, and thus function as carriers. Here, we prepared different functionalized mesoporous magnetic hollow nanoparticles (MMHs) and chose bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein to detect the intracellular trafficking of MMHs. The results showed that MMHs modified with amino groups (AMMHs) were efficient in protein loading and that the loading was dependent on the pH, temperature and ionic strength. Furthermore, we found that the AMMHs not only transported BSA into the cells but also released the BSA carried into the nuclear or cytosolic compartments of the cells. In addition, the nanoparticles were biocompatible, and the encapsulation of BSA in AMMHs did not affect their bioactivity. Taken together, AMMHs are excellent carriers for releasing protein into the cytosol and nucleus, and they have the potential to be used in a controlled release system.

  9. A Rational Approach to Identify Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Enoyl Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chhabria, M. T.; Parmar, K. B.; Brahmkshatriya, Pathik

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 21 (2013), s. 3878-3883. ISSN 1381-6128 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : mycobacterium tuberculosis * enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase * pharmacophore modeling * molecular docking * binding interactions Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.288, year: 2013

  10. Transient isotachophoresis in carrier ampholyte-based capillary electrophoresis for protein analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Busnel, J. M.; Descroix, S.; Godfrin, D.; Hennion, M. C.; Kašička, Václav; Peltre, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 18 (2006), s. 3591-3598. ISSN 0173-0835 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : carrier ampholyte-based capillary electrophoresis * transient isotachophoresis * proteins Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.101, year: 2006

  11. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang, E-mail: qshi@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-05-07

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated.

  12. Recombinant Group B Streptococcus Alpha-Like Protein 3 Is an Effective Immunogen and Carrier Protein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hsiao-Hui; Mascuch, Samantha J.; Madoff, Lawrence C.; Paoletti, Lawrence C.

    2008-01-01

    Conjugate vaccines against pathogens of multiple serotypes are optimized when all components induce functional antibody, resulting in broadened coverage. While most clinical studies of vaccines against group B Streptococcus (GBS) have evaluated conjugates composed of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) coupled to tetanus toxoid, conjugates prepared with GBS proteins as carriers have also been efficacious in animals. Here, we report that recombinant GBS alpha-like protein 3 (rAlp3) is both a strong ...

  13. NMR structure of an acyl-carrier protein from Borrelia burgdorferi

    OpenAIRE

    Barnwal, Ravi P.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Varani, G

    2011-01-01

    Nearly complete resonance assignment and the high-resolution NMR structure of the acyl-carrier protein from Borrelia burgdorferi, a target of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) structure-determination pipeline, are reported. This protein was chosen as a potential target for drug-discovery efforts because of its involvement in fatty-acid biosynthesis, an essential metabolic pathway, in bacteria. It was possible to assign >98% of backbone resonances and >92% ...

  14. Engineering acyl carrier protein to enhance production of shortened fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xueliang; Hicks, Wade M.; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Background The acyl carrier protein (ACP) is an essential and ubiquitous component of microbial synthesis of fatty acids, the natural precursor to biofuels. Natural fatty acids usually contain long chains of 16 or more carbon atoms. Shorter carbon chains, with increased fuel volatility, are desired for internal combustion engines. Engineering the length specificity of key proteins in fatty acid metabolism, such as ACP, may enable microbial synthesis of these shorter chain fatty acids. Results...

  15. Real-time observation of nonclassical protein crystallization kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Andrea; Roosen-Runge, Felix; Zhang, Fajun; Lotze, Gudrun; Jacobs, Robert M J; Schreiber, Frank

    2015-02-01

    We present a real-time study of protein crystallization of bovine β-lactoglobulin in the presence of CdCl(2) using small-angle X-ray scattering and optical microscopy. From observing the crystallization kinetics, we propose the following multistep crystallization mechanism that is consistent with our data. In the first step, an intermediate phase is formed, followed by the nucleation of crystals within the intermediate phase. During this period, the number of crystals increases with time, but the crystal growth is slowed down by the surrounding dense intermediate phase due to the low mobility. In the next step, the intermediate phase is consumed by nucleation and slow growth, and the crystals are exposed to the dilute phase. In this stage, the number of crystals becomes nearly constant, whereas the crystals grow rapidly due to access to the free protein molecules in the dilute phase. This real-time study not only provides evidence for a two-step nucleation process for protein crystallization but also elucidates the role and the structural signature of the metastable intermediate phase in this process. PMID:25569484

  16. Two-photon spectroscopy of free carrier generation in the wide-band gap crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiphoton absorption is able to produce primary free electron concentration, launching avalanch ionization mechanism in the transparent solids. We applied transient photoconductivity technique to investigate free carrier generation, caused by two-photon absorption in the alkali halide undoped crystals. Using radiation of tunable optical parametric oscillator-amplifier, the excitation spectra and temperature dependencies for conduction band electron concentration were measured. Two variations of experiment included optical excitation by equal quanta and by combination of tunable radiation with a fixed wavelength laser source. As it was shown, an efficient free electron producing was observed not only for interband optical transitions, but also for two-photon exciton absorption at room temperature. An analysis of the data obtained and comparison to conventional photoconductivity spectra indicated thermal ionization of the exciton states in the temperature range above 300 K. The corresponding exciton activation energy in KI was estimated and found to be consistent with the location of energy levels, allowed for two-photon exciton transitions

  17. Calcium distribution in globoid crystals of cucurbita cotyledon protein bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, J N; Spitzer, E; Vollmer, C M

    1979-05-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis was used to investigate the location of globoid crystals with relatively high Ca levels within cotyledons of Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita mixta, and Cucurbita andreana. The small globoid crystals in both upper and lower epidermal cells commonly contained Ca. Ca was present in globoid crystals of all provascular regions with the exception of the very small provascular regions of C. maxima. In C. maxima and C. mixta cotyledons, some cases were observed where Ca was found in the globoid crystals of the first layer of mesophyll cells surrounding the provascular region, but in general Ca was absent from globoid crystals of palisade and spongy mesophyll cells. In C. andreana, globoid crystals of palisade and spongy mesophyll cells commonly contained at least some Ca. Cell position and cell type are factors affecting the Ca content of globoid crystals in protein bodies. PMID:16660825

  18. Chamber Design For Slow Nucleation Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc Lee

    1995-01-01

    Multiple-chamber dialysis apparatus grows protein crystals on Earth or in microgravity with minimum of intervention by technician. Use of multiple chambers provides gradation of nucleation and growth rates.

  19. Definition study for temperature control in advanced protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyce, Thomas A.; Rosenberger, Franz; Sowers, Jennifer W.; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the technical requirements for an expedient application of temperature control to advanced protein crystal growth activities are defined. Lysozome was used to study the effects of temperature ramping and temperature gradients for nucleation/dissolution and consecutive growth of sizable crystals and, to determine a prototype temperature program. The solubility study was conducted using equine serum albumin (ESA) which is an extremely stable, clinically important protein due to its capability to bind and transport many different small ions and molecules.

  20. Charge carrier trapping in highly-ordered lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal films based on ionic perylene diimide derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Soroka, Pavlo V.; Vakhnin, Alexander Yu; Skryshevskiy, Yuriy A; Boiko, Oleksandr P.; Anisimov, Maksim I; Slominskiy, Yuriy L; Nazarenko, Vassili G.; Genoe, Jan; Kadashchuk, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    Charge carrier trapping in thin films of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) based on ionic perylene diimide derivative and in chemically-similar neutral N,N′-dipentyl-3,4,9,10-perylene-dicarboximide (PTCDI-C5) films is investigated by thermally-stimulated luminescence (TSL) technique. The LCLC films comprise elongated molecular aggregates featuring a long-range orientational order. The obtained results provide direct evidence for the improved energetic ordering (smaller effective ene...

  1. The role of mass transport in protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Otálora, Fermín; García-Caballero, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    Mass transport takes place within the mesoscopic to macroscopic scale range and plays a key role in crystal growth that may affect the result of the crystallization experiment. The influence of mass transport is different depending on the crystallization technique employed, essentially because each technique reaches supersaturation in its own unique way. In the case of batch experiments, there are some complex phenomena that take place at the interface between solutions upon mixing. These transport instabilities may drastically affect the reproducibility of crystallization experiments, and different outcomes may be obtained depending on whether or not the drop is homogenized. In diffusion experiments with aqueous solutions, evaporation leads to fascinating transport phenomena. When a drop starts to evaporate, there is an increase in concentration near the interface between the drop and the air until a nucleation event eventually takes place. Upon growth, the weight of the floating crystal overcomes the surface tension and the crystal falls to the bottom of the drop. The very growth of the crystal then triggers convective flow and inhomogeneities in supersaturation values in the drop owing to buoyancy of the lighter concentration-depleted solution surrounding the crystal. Finally, the counter-diffusion technique works if, and only if, diffusive mass transport is assured. The technique relies on the propagation of a supersaturation wave that moves across the elongated protein chamber and is the result of the coupling of reaction (crystallization) and diffusion. The goal of this review is to convince protein crystal growers that in spite of the small volume of the typical protein crystallization setup, transport plays a key role in the crystal quality, size and phase in both screening and optimization experiments. PMID:26841759

  2. Sulfonyl 3-alkynyl pantetheinamides as mechanism-based cross-linkers of acyl carrier protein dehydratase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Haushalter, Robert W; Lee, D John; Finzel, Kara; Burkart, Michael D

    2013-06-19

    Acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) play a central role in acetate biosynthetic pathways, serving as tethers for substrates and growing intermediates. Activity and structural studies have highlighted the complexities of this role, and the protein-protein interactions of ACPs have recently come under scrutiny as a regulator of catalysis. As existing methods to interrogate these interactions have fallen short, we have sought to develop new tools to aid their study. Here we describe the design, synthesis, and application of pantetheinamides that can cross-link ACPs with catalytic β-hydroxy-ACP dehydratase (DH) domains by means of a 3-alkynyl sulfone warhead. We demonstrate this process by application to the Escherichia coli fatty acid synthase and apply it to probe protein-protein interactions with noncognate carrier proteins. Finally, we use solution-phase protein NMR spectroscopy to demonstrate that sulfonyl 3-alkynyl pantetheinamide is fully sequestered by the ACP, indicating that the crypto-ACP closely mimics the natural DH substrate. This cross-linking technology offers immediate potential to lock these biosynthetic enzymes in their native binding states by providing access to mechanistically cross-linked enzyme complexes, presenting a solution to ongoing structural challenges. PMID:23718183

  3. Investigating the nucleation of protein crystals with hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrostatic pressure in the 0.1-75 MPa range has been used as a non-invasive tool to study the crystallization process of the tetragonal crystal form of the protein thaumatin (Mr 22 200). Crystals were prepared within agarose gel and at temperatures in the range from 283 to 303 K. The solubility, i.e. the concentration of soluble macromolecules remaining in equilibrium with the crystals, decreases when the pressure increases and when the temperature decreases. High pressure was used to probe the nucleation behaviour of thaumatin. The pressure dependence of the nucleation rate leads to an activation volume of -46.5cm3 mol-1. It is shown that an increase in pressure decreases the enthalpy, the entropy and the free energy of crystallization of thaumatin. The data are discussed in the light of the results of crystallographic analyses and of the structure of the protein

  4. Protein-directed self-assembly of a fullerene crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kook-Han; Ko, Dong-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Nam Hyeong; Paul, Jaydeep; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Murray, Christopher B.; Acharya, Rudresh; Degrado, William F.; Kim, Yong Ho; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2016-04-01

    Learning to engineer self-assembly would enable the precise organization of molecules by design to create matter with tailored properties. Here we demonstrate that proteins can direct the self-assembly of buckminsterfullerene (C60) into ordered superstructures. A previously engineered tetrameric helical bundle binds C60 in solution, rendering it water soluble. Two tetramers associate with one C60, promoting further organization revealed in a 1.67-Å crystal structure. Fullerene groups occupy periodic lattice sites, sandwiched between two Tyr residues from adjacent tetramers. Strikingly, the assembly exhibits high charge conductance, whereas both the protein-alone crystal and amorphous C60 are electrically insulating. The affinity of C60 for its crystal-binding site is estimated to be in the nanomolar range, with lattices of known protein crystals geometrically compatible with incorporating the motif. Taken together, these findings suggest a new means of organizing fullerene molecules into a rich variety of lattices to generate new properties by design.

  5. Protein induced morphological transitions in KCl crystal growth

    CERN Document Server

    Szabó, B; Szabo, Balint; Vicsek, Tamas

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the formation of KCl crystals on glass surface by phase contrast, fluorescent, and atomic force microscopy on the micrometer scale, and observed interesting morphological transitions as a function of the experimental conditions. The presence of proteins in the solution from which the salt crystals grow during the drying up leads to complex microscopic patterns of crystals some of which are analogous to those commonly observed on the macroscopic scale. We tested the effect of tubulin, FITC-labeled albumin and IgG on the morphology of crystals grown either slowly or fast. A rich variety of protein specific and concentration dependent morphologies was found and described by a morphological diagram. We give a phenomenological interpretation, which can explain the growth of complex patterns. Fluorescent images prove that a protein layer covers the surface of the KCl structures. We propose that this layer reduces the anisotropy of the effective surface tension during growth. The tip splitting fracta...

  6. Development of a stealth carrier system for structural studies of membrane proteins in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Selma

    Structural studies of membrane proteins remain a great experimental challenge. Functional reconstitution into artificial carriers that mimic the native bilayer environment allows for the handling of membrane proteins in solution and enables the use of small-angle scattering techniques for fast and...... which can be used for SANS structural analysis of membrane proteins in solution. In combination with the D2O/H2O-based contrast variation method it is demonstrated that it is possible to prepare specifically deuterated analogues of the nanodisc, which give minimal contribution to the neutron scattering......-resolution structural studes of many membrane proteins and their complexes in solution as the analysis of SANS data for this platform is greatly simplified and allows for the application of existing data analysis tools already available for soluble proteins...

  7. An overview on the delivery of antitumor drug doxorubicin by carrier proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo, D; Bérubé, G; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-07-01

    Serum proteins play an increasing role as drug carriers in the clinical settings. In this review, we have compared the binding modalities of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to three model carrier proteins, human serum albumin (HSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and milk beta-lactoglobulin (β-LG) in order to determine the potential application of these model proteins in DOX delivery. Molecular modeling studies showed stronger binding of DOX with HSA than BSA and β-LG with the free binding energies of -10.75 (DOX-HSA), -9.31 (DOX-BSA) and -8.12kcal/mol (DOX-β-LG). Extensive H-boding network stabilizes DOX-protein conjugation and played a major role in drug-protein complex formation. DOX complexation induced major alterations of HSA and BSA conformations, while did not alter β-LG secondary structure. The literature review shows that these proteins can potentially be used for delivery of DOX in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27037051

  8. Identification and Characterization of Inhibitors of Bacterial Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, Losee L.; Xian, Jun; Ali, Syed; Geng, Bolin; Fan, Jun; Mills, Debra M.; Arvanites, Anthony C.; Orgueira, Hernan; Ashwell, Mark A.; Carmel, Gilles; Xiang, Yibin; Moir, Donald T.

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) catalyzes an essential step in fatty acid biosynthesis. ENR is an attractive target for narrow-spectrum antibacterial drug discovery because of its essential role in metabolism and its sequence conservation across many bacterial species. In addition, the bacterial ENR sequence and structural organization are distinctly different from those of mammalian fatty acid biosynthesis enzymes. High-throughput screening to identify inhibitors of Esch...

  9. Slow Onset Inhibition of Bacterial β-Ketoacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Synthases by Thiolactomycin*

    OpenAIRE

    Machutta, Carl A.; Bommineni, Gopal R.; Luckner, Sylvia R.; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Ruzsicska, Bela; Simmerling, Carlos; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Thiolactomycin (TLM), a natural product thiolactone antibiotic produced by species of Nocardia and Streptomyces, is an inhibitor of the β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase (KAS) enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthase pathway. Using enzyme kinetics and direct binding studies, TLM has been shown to bind preferentially to the acyl-enzyme intermediates of the KASI and KASII enzymes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. These studies, which utilized acyl-enzyme mimics in...

  10. Crystal structures of fusion proteins with large-affinity tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Douglas R; Mrozkiewicz, Marek K; McGrath, William J; Listwan, Pawel; Kobe, Bostjan

    2003-07-01

    The fusion of a protein of interest to a large-affinity tag, such as the maltose-binding protein (MBP), thioredoxin (TRX), or glutathione-S-transferase (GST), can be advantageous in terms of increased expression, enhanced solubility, protection from proteolysis, improved folding, and protein purification via affinity chromatography. Unfortunately, crystal growth is hindered by the conformational heterogeneity induced by the fusion tag, requiring that the tag is removed by a potentially problematic cleavage step. The first three crystal structures of fusion proteins with large-affinity tags have been reported recently. All three structures used a novel strategy to rigidly fuse the protein of interest to MBP via a short three- to five-amino acid spacer. This strategy has the potential to aid structure determination of proteins that present particular experimental challenges and are not conducive to more conventional crystallization strategies (e.g., membrane proteins). Structural genomics initiatives may also benefit from this approach as a way to crystallize problematic proteins of significant interest. PMID:12824478

  11. Latest methods of fluorescence-based protein crystal identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence, whether intrinsic or by using trace fluorescent labeling, can be a powerful aid in macromolecule crystallization. Its use in screening for crystals is discussed here. Successful protein crystallization screening experiments are dependent upon the experimenter being able to identify positive outcomes. The introduction of fluorescence techniques has brought a powerful and versatile tool to the aid of the crystal grower. Trace fluorescent labeling, in which a fluorescent probe is covalently bound to a subpopulation (<0.5%) of the protein, enables the use of visible fluorescence. Alternatively, one can avoid covalent modification and use UV fluorescence, exploiting the intrinsic fluorescent amino acids present in most proteins. By the use of these techniques, crystals that had previously been obscured in the crystallization drop can readily be identified and distinguished from amorphous precipitate or salt crystals. Additionally, lead conditions that may not have been obvious as such under white-light illumination can be identified. In all cases review of the screening plate is considerably accelerated, as the eye can quickly note objects of increased intensity

  12. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lysase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Comparison of Earth grown and Space grown Isocitrate Lysase crystals. Target enzyme for fungicides. A better understanding of this enzyme should lead to the discovery of more potent fungicides to treat serious crop diseases such as rice blast. It regulates the flow of metabolic intermediates required for cell growth. Principal Investigator was Charles Bugg.

  13. Induction of the lac carrier and an associated membrane protein in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induction of the lac operon in wild type Escherichia coli strains results in synthesis of a 16 kilodalton inner membrane protein in addition to the known products of the lacZ, lacY and lacA genes. Cells carrying the lacY gene on a plasmid over produce this 16 kilodalton polypeptide as well as the Lac carrier, the membrane protein product of the lacY gene. However, [35S]methionine labeling of minicells carrying the lacY plasmid shows that the 16 kDa protein is not synthesized from the plasmid DNA. The 16 kDa protein was purified and partially characterized. It is an acidic membrane protein of apparent molecular weight 15,800 whose amino terminal sequence (NH2-Met-Arg-Asn-Phe-Asp-Leu-) does not correspond to any nucleotide sequence known in lac operon DNA. Using antibody prepared to the purified 16 kDa protein, a quantitative analysis of conditions under which this protein is made was accomplished, and reveals that the amount of 16 kDa protein which appears in the membrane is proportional to lac operon expression. Hybridization of a synthetic oligonucleotide probe complementary to the 5' end of 16 kDa protein mRNA shows that its synthesis is regulated at the level of transcription. A description of attempts to clone this gene is given. Possible functional roles for the 16 kDa protein are discussed

  14. Purification and characterization of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase from Vibrio harveyi.

    OpenAIRE

    Fice, D; Z. Shen; Byers, D M

    1993-01-01

    A Vibrio harveyi enzyme which catalyzes the ATP-dependent ligation of fatty acids to acyl carrier protein (ACP) has been purified 6,000-fold to apparent homogeneity by anion-exchange, gel filtration, and ACP-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Purified acyl-ACP synthetase migrated as a single 62-kDa band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and as an 80-kDa protein by gel filtration under reducing conditions. Activity of the purified enzyme was lost within hours in the ...

  15. A microfluidic, high throughput protein crystal growth method for microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl W Carruthers

    Full Text Available The attenuation of sedimentation and convection in microgravity can sometimes decrease irregularities formed during macromolecular crystal growth. Current terrestrial protein crystal growth (PCG capabilities are very different than those used during the Shuttle era and that are currently on the International Space Station (ISS. The focus of this experiment was to demonstrate the use of a commercial off-the-shelf, high throughput, PCG method in microgravity. Using Protein BioSolutions' microfluidic Plug Maker™/CrystalCard™ system, we tested the ability to grow crystals of the regulator of glucose metabolism and adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (apo-hPPAR-γ LBD, as well as several PCG standards. Overall, we sent 25 CrystalCards™ to the ISS, containing ~10,000 individual microgravity PCG experiments in a 3U NanoRacks NanoLab (1U = 10(3 cm.. After 70 days on the ISS, our samples were returned with 16 of 25 (64% microgravity cards having crystals, compared to 12 of 25 (48% of the ground controls. Encouragingly, there were more apo-hPPAR-γ LBD crystals in the microgravity PCG cards than the 1g controls. These positive results hope to introduce the use of the PCG standard of low sample volume and large experimental density to the microgravity environment and provide new opportunities for macromolecular samples that may crystallize poorly in standard laboratories.

  16. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF RIBOFLAVIN CARRIER PROTEIN FROM EGG WHITE OF SOUTH INDIAN SPOTTED OWLET (ATHENE BRAMA)

    OpenAIRE

    M.P.Pratap Rudra; N.Veerababu; Ramchander Merugu

    2012-01-01

    Riboflavin carrier protein has been isolated and purified from the Indian spotted owlet. The protein was purified to its homogeneity. Purification was achieved successfully by DEAE_ Sepharose column chromatography and gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-100. The protein content was estimated with Lowry method. The purity of the proteins was judged by SDS-PAGE technique. The molecular weight of the protein was found to be 29 Kd. The protein was characterized using absorption, fluoresce...

  17. Influence of Crystal Packing on Global Protein Conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Logan; Miyashita, Osamu

    2011-10-01

    X-ray crystallography is the most robust method for solving protein structure. However, packing forces in the crystal lattice select just a snapshot of a protein's conformational ensemble, whereas proteins are flexible and can adopt different conformations. Here we compare molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in solution and the crystal lattice to add dynamical insight to the static X-ray images of proteins. As a model system, we consider the λ Cro dimer, whose solved X-ray structures range from a ``closed'' to an ``open'' global conformation. Free energy profiles depicting the conformational space sampled by the dimer in solution show some reported structures correspond to stable states. Yet other conformations, while accessible, lie higher in energy, indicating the effect of crystal packing. Subsequent crystal MD simulations estimated the strength of packing interfaces in the lattice, showing the influence of crystal form and mutation in stabilizing different dimer conformations. Our quantitative results will aid analysis of X-ray data in establishing protein structure-function relationships.

  18. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assenberg, René [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Delmas, Olivier [UPRE Lyssavirus Dynamics and Host Adaptation, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, Institut Pasteur, 28 Rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J. [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Bourhy, Hervé [UPRE Lyssavirus Dynamics and Host Adaptation, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, Institut Pasteur, 28 Rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Grimes, Jonathan M., E-mail: jonathan@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress.

  19. MESOSCOPIC THEORIES FOR PROTEIN CRYSTAL-GROWTH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TISSEN, JTWM; FRAAIJE, JGEM; DRENTH, J; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1994-01-01

    A computer-simulation method is proposed for studying the hydrodynamic interactions of rigid protein molecules. It is a combination of Stokes dynamics and continuum hydrodynamics. The Stokes equations of motion for the protein molecules, the creeping-flow equation for the solvent together with the n

  20. Participation of Low Molecular Weight Electron Carriers in Oxidative Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Mandl

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative protein folding is mediated by a proteinaceous electron relay system, in which the concerted action of protein disulfide isomerase and Ero1 delivers the electrons from thiol groups to the final acceptor. Oxygen appears to be the final oxidant in aerobic living organisms, although the existence of alternative electron acceptors, e.g. fumarate or nitrate, cannot be excluded. Whilst the protein components of the system are well-known, less attention has been turned to the role of low molecular weight electron carriers in the process. The function of ascorbate, tocopherol and vitamin K has been raised recently. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that these redox-active compounds can contribute to the functioning of oxidative folding. This review focuses on the participation of small molecular weight redox compounds in oxidative protein folding.

  1. Measurement of charge carrier lifetimes in HgCdTe crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method, developed for the determination of both electrical and photoelectrical properties of the same Hgsub(1-x)Cdsub(x)Te samples (around x=0.2), is presented. A system which includes a pulsed 0.9 μm wavelength GaAs light source was designed and constructed for the measurement of charge carrier lifetimes from 20 ns to 20 ms in temperature range 80-300 K. To find the mobility and concentration of the charge carriers, the Hall effect was determined via the van der Pauw method. Electrical and photoelectrical properties of raw material wafers could thus be established. Charge carrier lifetimes in Hgsub(1-x)Cdsub(x)Te, Ge and InSb were measured. The corresponding theoretical expected lifetimes were calculated on the basis of the charge carriers concentration. The experimental results are compared to the theoretical ones and the discrepancies are discussed

  2. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Lata Govada; Hannah S. Leese; Emmanuel Saridakis; Sean Kassen; Benny Chain; Sahir Khurshid; Robert Menzel; Sheng Hu; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted m...

  3. Liquid Between Macromolecules in Protein Crystals: Static Versus Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    Protein crystals are so fragile that they often can not be handled by tweezers. Indeed, measurements of the Young modulus, E, of lysozyme crystals resulted in E approx. equals 0.1 - 1 GPa, the lower figures, 0.1 - 0.5 GPa, being obtained from triple point bending of as-grown and not cross-linked crystals sitting in solution. The bending strength was found to be approx.10(exp -2) E. On the other hand, ultrasound speed and Mandelstam-Raman-Brilloin light scattering experiments led to much higher figures, E approx. equals 2.7 GPa. The lower figures for E were found from static or low frequency crystal deformations measurements, while the higher moduli are based on high frequency lattice vibrations, 10(exp 7) - 10(exp 10) 1/s. The physical reason for the about an order of magnitude discrepancy is in different behavior of water filling space between protein molecules. At slow lattice deformation, the not-bound intermolecular water has enough time to flow from the compressed to expanded regions of the deformed crystal. At high deformation frequencies in the ultra- and hypersound waves, the water is confined in the intermolecular space and, on that scale, behaves like a solid, thus contributing to the elastic crystal moduli. In this case, the reciprocal crystal modulus is expected to be an average of the water protein and water compressibilities (reciprocal compressibilities): the bulk modulus for lysozyme is 26 GPa, for water it is 7 GPa. Anisotropy of the crystal moduli comes from intermolecular contacts within the lattice while the high frequency hardness comes from the bulk of protein molecules and water bulk moduli. These conclusions are based on the analysis of liquid flow in porous medium to be presented.

  4. Upside-down protein crystallization: designing microbatch experiments for microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Sahir; Chayen, Naomi E

    2006-09-01

    The benefits of protein crystal growth in microgravity are well documented. The crystallization vessels currently employed for microgravity crystallization are far from optimal with regards to cost, sample volume, size, and ease of use. The use of microbatch experiments is a favorable alternative in each respect: 96 experiments of 0.5-2 microL volumes can be performed in a single microtiter tray measuring 5 x 8 cm and costing 1 pound sterling each. To date, the use of microbatch has not been pursued on account of concerns of oil leakage. To address this issue, a novel approach to microbatch crystallization experiments is described, where the microbatch plates are inverted throughout the duration of the experiment. The findings intimate the application of the microbatch method to space flight and the potential to drastically increase the output of microgravity crystallization research . PMID:17124125

  5. Structure of the Francisella tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) in complex with NAD+ and triclosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure of the ternary complex of F. tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase reveals the structure of the substrate binding loop whose electron density was missing in an earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the position of the NAD+ cofactor. Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) catalyzes the last rate-limiting step in the elongation cycle of the fatty-acid biosynthesis pathway and has been validated as a potential antimicrobial drug target in Francisella tularensis. The development of new antibiotic therapies is important both to combat potential drug-resistant bioweapons and to address the broader societal problem of increasing antibiotic resistance among many pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structure of FabI from F. tularensis (FtuFabI) in complex with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NAD+ has been solved to a resolution of 2.1 Å. Triclosan is known to effectively inhibit FabI from different organisms. Precise characterization of the mode of triclosan binding is required to develop highly specific inhibitors. Comparison of our structure with the previously determined FtuFabI structure which is bound to only NAD+ reveals the conformation of the substrate-binding loop, electron density for which was missing in the earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the conformation of the NAD+ cofactor. This shift in the position of the phosphate groups allows more room in the active site for substrate or inhibitor to bind and be better accommodated. This information will be crucial for virtual screening studies to identify novel scaffolds for development into new active inhibitors

  6. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated. PMID:25956086

  7. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strategy using a new split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a modular binding partner to form stable protein complexes with a target protein is presented. The modular split GFP may open the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants. A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10–11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1–9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10–11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1–9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization

  8. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  9. Ultrafast free-carrier dynamics in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} single crystals studied using femtosecond time-resolved optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phuong, L. Q.; Kanemitsu, Y., E-mail: kanemitu@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Okano, M.; Yamada, Y. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Yamashita, G.; Morimoto, T.; Nagai, M.; Ashida, M. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Nagaoka, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics and Electronic Engineering, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Yoshino, K. [Department of Applied Physics and Electronic Engineering, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan)

    2014-12-08

    We studied the dynamics of photogenerated carriers in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) single crystals using femtosecond transient reflectivity (TR) and optical pump-THz probe transient absorption (THz-TA) spectroscopy. The TR and THz-TA decay dynamics consistently showed that free carriers have long lifetimes of up to a few nanoseconds. The excitation-photon-energy-dependent TR measurements revealed a slow picosecond energy relaxation of free carriers to the band edge in CZTS. The relaxation and recombination dynamics of free carriers were affected by nonradiative recombinations at the surface. Our results revealed a global feature of energy relaxation and recombination processes of free carriers in CZTS single crystals.

  10. Mesoscale crystallization of calcium phosphate nanostructures in protein (casein) micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thachepan, Surachai; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    Aqueous micelles of the multi-protein calcium phosphate complex, casein, were treated at 60 °C and pH 7 over several months. Although partial dissociation of the micelles into 12 nm sized amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)/protein nanoparticles occurred within a period of 14 days, crystallization of the ACP nanoclusters into bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanofilaments was not observed until after 12 weeks. The HAP nanofilaments were formed specifically within the partially disrupted protein micelles suggesting a micelle-mediated pathway of mesoscale crystallization. Similar experiments using ACP-containing synthetic micelles prepared from β-casein protein alone indicated that co-aligned bundles of HAP nanofilaments were produced within the protein micelle interior after 24 hours at temperatures as low as 35 °C. The presence of Mg2+ ions in the casein micelles, as well as a possible synergistic effect associated with the multi-protein nature of the native aggregates, could account for the marked inhibition in mesoscale crystallization observed in the casein micelles compared with the single-component β-casein constructs.Aqueous micelles of the multi-protein calcium phosphate complex, casein, were treated at 60 °C and pH 7 over several months. Although partial dissociation of the micelles into 12 nm sized amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)/protein nanoparticles occurred within a period of 14 days, crystallization of the ACP nanoclusters into bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanofilaments was not observed until after 12 weeks. The HAP nanofilaments were formed specifically within the partially disrupted protein micelles suggesting a micelle-mediated pathway of mesoscale crystallization. Similar experiments using ACP-containing synthetic micelles prepared from β-casein protein alone indicated that co-aligned bundles of HAP nanofilaments were produced within the protein micelle interior after 24 hours at temperatures as low as 35 °C. The presence of Mg2+ ions in

  11. Structural Characterisation of the Beta-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases, FabF and FabH, of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanson, Jeffrey D; Himiari, Zainab; Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Forwood, Jade K

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, remains a major public health threat, with outbreaks of disease occurring in China, Madagascar, and Peru in the last five years. The existence of multidrug resistant Y. pestis and the potential of this bacterium as a bioterrorism agent illustrates the need for new antimicrobials. The β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases, FabB, FabF, and FabH, catalyse the elongation of fatty acids as part of the type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FASII) system, to synthesise components of lipoproteins, phospholipids, and lipopolysaccharides essential for bacterial growth and survival. As such, these enzymes are promising targets for the development of novel therapeutic agents. We have determined the crystal structures of the Y. pestis β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases FabF and FabH, and compared these with the unpublished, deposited structure of Y. pestis FabB. Comparison of FabB, FabF, and FabH provides insights into the substrate specificities of these enzymes, and investigation of possible interactions with known β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase inhibitors suggests FabB, FabF and FabH may be targeted simultaneously to prevent synthesis of the fatty acids necessary for growth and survival. PMID:26469877

  12. Protein crystal screening and characterization for serial femtosecond nanocrystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmanin, Connie; Strachan, Jamie; Adda, Christopher G.; Ve, Thomas; Kobe, Bostjan; Abbey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) has spurred the development of serial femtosecond nanocrystallography (SFX) which, for the first time, is enabling structure retrieval from sub-micron protein crystals. Although there are already a growing number of structures published using SFX, the technology is still very new and presents a number of unique challenges as well as opportunities for structural biologists. One of the biggest barriers to the success of SFX experiments is the preparation and selection of suitable protein crystal samples. Here we outline a protocol for preparing and screening for suitable XFEL targets. PMID:27139248

  13. Methodology for fast evaluation of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Lúcia M. Carareto

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the production and use of Bacillus thuringiensis in Brazil at a commercial scale faces certain difficulties, among them the establishment of efficient methodologies for the quantitation of toxic products to be commercialized. Presently, the amount of toxin is given in percentage by analyzing the samples total protein content. Such methodology however, does not measure the actual amount of active protein present in the product, since most strains express different endotoxin genes and might even produce b-toxin. Since the various types of toxins exhibit different antigenic characteristics, this work has as objective the utilization of fast immunological techniques to quantify the level of crystal protein. Crystal protein produced by a subspecies of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis was purified by ultracentrifugation and utilized to immunize rabbits and to produce hiperimmune sera. Such sera were latter used to evaluate the level of proteins on commercial bioinsecticide and on laboratory cultures of B. thuringiensis through the immunodot technique. The results were obtained by comparison of data obtained from reactions with known concentrations of crystal protein permitting to evaluate the level of such protein on various materials.

  14. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  15. Understanding the fabric of protein crystals: computational classification of biological interfaces and crystal contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitani, Guido; Duarte, Jose M; Baskaran, Kumaran; Bliven, Spencer; Somody, Joseph C

    2016-02-15

    Modern structural biology still draws the vast majority of information from crystallography, a technique where the objects being investigated are embedded in a crystal lattice. Given the complexity and variety of those objects, it becomes fundamental to computationally assess which of the interfaces in the lattice are biologically relevant and which are simply crystal contacts. Since the mid-1990s, several approaches have been applied to obtain high-accuracy classification of crystal contacts and biological protein-protein interfaces. This review provides an overview of the concepts and main approaches to protein interface classification: thermodynamic estimation of interface stability, evolutionary approaches based on conservation of interface residues, and co-occurrence of the interface across different crystal forms. Among the three categories, evolutionary approaches offer the strongest promise for improvement, thanks to the incessant growth in sequence knowledge. Importantly, protein interface classification algorithms can also be used on multimeric structures obtained using other high-resolution techniques or for protein assembly design or validation purposes. A key issue linked to protein interface classification is the identification of the biological assembly of a crystal structure and the analysis of its symmetry. Here, we highlight the most important concepts and problems to be overcome in assembly prediction. Over the next few years, tools and concepts of interface classification will probably become more frequently used and integrated in several areas of structural biology and structural bioinformatics. Among the main challenges for the future are better addressing of weak interfaces and the application of interface classification concepts to prediction problems like protein-protein docking. PMID:26508758

  16. Utilization of Protein Crystal Structures in Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kohki

    In industry, protein crystallography is used in mainly two technologies. One is structure-based drug design, and the other is structure-based enzyme engineering. Some successful cases together with recent advances are presented in this article. The cases include the development of an anti-influenza drug, and the introduction of engineered acid phosphatase to the manufacturing process of nucleotides used as umami seasoning.

  17. Charge carrier transport and collection enhancement of copper indium diselenide photoactive nanoparticle-ink by laser crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been increasing needs for cost-effective and high performance thin film deposition techniques for photovoltaics. Among all deposition techniques, roll-to-roll printing of nanomaterials has been a promising method. However, the printed thin film contains many internal imperfections, which reduce the charge-collection performance. Here, direct pulse laser crystallization (DPLC) of photoactive nanoparticles-inks is studied to meet this challenge. In this study, copper indium selenite (CIS) nanoparticle-inks is applied as an example. Enhanced crystallinity, densified structure in the thin film is resulted after DLPC under optimal conditions. It is found that the decreased film internal imperfections after DPLC results in reducing scattering and multi-trapping effects. Both of them contribute to better charge-collection performance of CIS absorber material by increasing extended state mobility and carrier lifetime, when carrier transport and kinetics are coupled. Charge carrier transport was characterized after DPLC, showing mobility increased by 2 orders of magnitude. Photocurrent under AM1.5 illumination was measured and shown 10 times enhancement of integrated power density after DPLC, which may lead to higher efficiency in photo-electric energy conversion.

  18. Charge carrier transport and collection enhancement of copper indium diselenide photoactive nanoparticle-ink by laser crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nian, Qiong; Cheng, Gary J., E-mail: gjcheng@purdue.edu [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); Zhang, Martin Y. [School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); Wang, Yuefeng [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); Das, Suprem R.; Bhat, Venkataprasad S. [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); Huang, Fuqiang [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-09-15

    There has been increasing needs for cost-effective and high performance thin film deposition techniques for photovoltaics. Among all deposition techniques, roll-to-roll printing of nanomaterials has been a promising method. However, the printed thin film contains many internal imperfections, which reduce the charge-collection performance. Here, direct pulse laser crystallization (DPLC) of photoactive nanoparticles-inks is studied to meet this challenge. In this study, copper indium selenite (CIS) nanoparticle-inks is applied as an example. Enhanced crystallinity, densified structure in the thin film is resulted after DLPC under optimal conditions. It is found that the decreased film internal imperfections after DPLC results in reducing scattering and multi-trapping effects. Both of them contribute to better charge-collection performance of CIS absorber material by increasing extended state mobility and carrier lifetime, when carrier transport and kinetics are coupled. Charge carrier transport was characterized after DPLC, showing mobility increased by 2 orders of magnitude. Photocurrent under AM1.5 illumination was measured and shown 10 times enhancement of integrated power density after DPLC, which may lead to higher efficiency in photo-electric energy conversion.

  19. X-ray transparent Microfluidics for Protein Crystallization and Biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opathalage, Achini

    Protein crystallization demands the fundamental understanding of nucleation and applying techniques to find the optimal conditions to achieve the kinetic pathway for a large and defect free crystal. Classical nucleation theory predicts that the nucleation occurs at high supersaturation conditions. In this dissertation we sought out to develop techniques to attain optimal supersaturation profile to a large defect free crystal and subject it to in-situ X-ray diffraction using microfluidics. We have developed an emulsion-based serial crystallographic technology in nanolitre-sized droplets of protein solution encapsulated in to nucleate one crystal per drop. Diffraction data are measured, one crystal at a time, from a series of room temperature crystals stored on an X-ray semi-transparent microfluidic chip, and a 93% complete data set is obtained by merging single diffraction frames taken from different un-oriented crystals. As proof of concept, the structure of Glucose Isomerase was solved to 2.1 A. We have developed a suite of X-ray semi-transparent micrfluidic devices which enables; controlled evaporation as a method of increasing supersaturation and manipulating the phase space of proteins and small molecules. We exploited the inherently high water permeability of the thin X-ray semi-transparent devices as a mean of increasing the supersaturation by controlling the evaporation. We fabricated the X-ray semi-transparent version of the PhaseChip with a thin PDMS membrane by which the storage and the reservoir layers are separated, and studies the phase transition of amorphous CaCO3.

  20. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  1. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govada, Lata; Leese, Hannah S.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Kassen, Sean; Chain, Benny; Khurshid, Sahir; Menzel, Robert; Hu, Sheng; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-02-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted materials, combined with a range of controls, were used in a large-scale assessment of the effectiveness for protein crystal nucleation of 20 different carbon nanomaterials on five proteins. This study has allowed a direct comparison of the key characteristics of carbon-based nucleants: appropriate surface chemistry, porosity and/or roughness are required. The most effective solid system tested in this study, carbon black nanoparticles functionalised with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of mean molecular weight 5000, provides a novel highly effective nucleant, that was able to induce crystal nucleation of four out of the five proteins tested at metastable conditions.

  2. Protein sensing by nanofluidic crystal and its signal enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Jianming; Du, Hongtan; Wang, Wei; Chu, Ming; Wang, Yuedan; Li, Haichao; Alice Zhang, Haixia; Wu, Wengang; Li, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    Nanofluidics has a unique property that ionic conductance across a nanometer-sized confined space is strongly affected by the space surface charge density, which can be utilized to construct electrical read-out biosensor. Based on this principle, this work demonstrated a novel protein sensor along with a sandwich signal enhancement approach. Nanoparticles with designed aptamer onside are assembled in a suspended micropore to form a 3-dimensional network of nanometer-sized interstices, named as nanofluidic crystal hereafter, as the basic sensing unit. Proteins captured by aptamers will change the surface charge density of nanoparticles and thereby can be detected by monitoring the ionic conductance across this nanofluidic crystal. Another aptamer can further enlarge the variations of the surface charge density by forming a sandwich structure (capturing aptamer/protein/signal enhancement aptamer) and the read-out conductance as well. The preliminary experimental results indicated that human α-thrombin was successfully detected by the corresponding aptamer modified nanofluidic crystal with the limit of detection of 5 nM (0.18 μg/ml) and the read-out signal was enhanced up to 3 folds by using another thrombin aptamer. Being easy to graft probe, facile and low-cost to prepare the nano-device, and having an electrical read-out, the present nanofluidic crystal scheme is a promising and universal strategy for protein sensing. PMID:24404017

  3. Electrospun fish protein fibers as a biopolymer-based carrier – implications for oral protein delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming;

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Protein-based electrospun fibers have emerged as novel nanostructured materials for tissue engineering and drug delivery due to their unique structural characteristics, biocompatibility and biodegradability. The aim of this study was to explore the use of electrospun fibers based on fish...... sarcoplasmic proteins as an oral delivery platform for biopharmaceuticals, using insulin as a model protein. Methods: Fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP) were isolated from fresh cod and electrospun into nanomicrofibers using insulin as a model payload. The morphology of FSP fibers was characterized using...... electrospinning process did not affect the functionality of the encapsulated insulin and it provided controlled release kinetics. The epithelial permeability enhancing effect and biocompatibility of the FSP fibers provide evidence for further investigating protein-based electrospun nanofibers for delivery of...

  4. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Katia; Durante, Lorenzo; Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200-250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15-18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96-98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  5. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Previous research from my lab has revealed that several higher plant species have multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein (ACP) and therefore this trait appears highly conserved among higher plants. This level of conservation suggests that the existence of ACP isoforms is not merely the results of neutral gene duplications. We have developed techniques to examine a wider range of species. Acyl carrier proteins can be labelled very specifically and to high specific activity using H-palmitate and the E. coli enzyme acyl-ACP synthetase. Isoforms were then resolved by western blotting and native PAGE of H-palmitate labelled ACP's. Multiple isoforms of ACP were observed the leaf tissue of the monocots Avena sativa and Hordeum vulgare and dicots including Arabidopsis thallina, Cuphea wrightii, and Brassica napus. Lower vascular plants including the cycad, Dioon edule, Ginkgo biloba, the gymnosperm Pinus, the fern Anernia phyllitidis and Psilotum nudum, the most primitive known extant vascular plant, were also found to have multiple ACP isoforms as were the nonvascular liverwort, Marchantia and moss, Polytrichum. Therefore, the development of ACP isoforms occurred early in evolution. However, the uniellular alge Chlamydomonas and Dunaliella and the photosynthetic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Agmnellum have only a single elecrophotetic form of ACP. Thus, multiple forms of ACP do not occur in all photosynthetic organisms but may be associated with multicellular plants.

  6. Purification, stabilization, and crystallization of a modular protein: Grb2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloteau, J P; Fromage, N; Ries-Kautt, M; Reboul, S; Bocquet, D; Dubois, H; Faucher, D; Colonna, C; Ducruix, A; Becquart, J

    1996-05-01

    We report here the purification and the crystallization of the modular protein Grb2. The protein was expressed as a fusion with glutathione-S-transferase and purified by affinity chromatography on glutathione agarose. It was apparent from reverse phase chromatography that the purified protein was conformationally unstable. Instability was overcome by the addition of 100 mM arginine to the buffers. Because Grb2 appeared to be extremely sensitive to oxidation, crystallization experiments were performed with a dialysis button technique involving daily addition of fresh DTT to the reservoirs. The presence of 8 to 14% glycerol was necessary to obtain monocrystals. These results are discussed in relation with the modular nature of Grb2. PMID:8727323

  7. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of crystals of human protein kinase CK2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Ermakowa, I;

    2000-01-01

    The heterotetrameric recombinant holoenzyme of human protein kinase CK2 was purified to homogeneity. It degraded spontaneously to a stable and fully active state in which the catalytic subunit was about 5 kDa smaller than the wild type. The degraded enzyme was crystallized using polyethylene glycol...

  8. Optical nonlinearities and carrier dynamics in Fe doped GaN single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yu; Yang, Junyi; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Feng [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Li, Zhongguo; Wu, Xingzhi [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 15001 (China); Song, Yinglin, E-mail: ylsong@hit.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 15001 (China)

    2014-10-20

    Optical nonlinearities and transient dynamics of Fe doped GaN (GaN:Fe) were studied by Z-scan and pump-probe with phase object techniques under picosecond and nanosecond at 532 nm. From the pump-probe results, an additional decay pathway subsequent to two photon excitation was observed due to the carrier trapping of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} deep acceptors. The trapping state in the band gap results in a pronounced modulation to nonlinear responses of GaN:Fe compared to that of undoped GaN. With an effective three-level model as well as carrier trapping effect we described the photo-physical dynamics in GaN:Fe unambiguously.

  9. Protein-directed self-assembly of a fullerene crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kook-Han; Ko, Dong-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Nam Hyeong; Paul, Jaydeep; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Murray, Christopher B.; Acharya, Rudresh; DeGrado, William F.; Kim, Yong Ho; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2016-01-01

    Learning to engineer self-assembly would enable the precise organization of molecules by design to create matter with tailored properties. Here we demonstrate that proteins can direct the self-assembly of buckminsterfullerene (C60) into ordered superstructures. A previously engineered tetrameric helical bundle binds C60 in solution, rendering it water soluble. Two tetramers associate with one C60, promoting further organization revealed in a 1.67-Å crystal structure. Fullerene groups occupy periodic lattice sites, sandwiched between two Tyr residues from adjacent tetramers. Strikingly, the assembly exhibits high charge conductance, whereas both the protein-alone crystal and amorphous C60 are electrically insulating. The affinity of C60 for its crystal-binding site is estimated to be in the nanomolar range, with lattices of known protein crystals geometrically compatible with incorporating the motif. Taken together, these findings suggest a new means of organizing fullerene molecules into a rich variety of lattices to generate new properties by design. PMID:27113637

  10. Studies of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase and implications for the development of antiparasitic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muench, Stephen P. [The Krebs Institute for Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Prigge, Sean T. [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); McLeod, Rima [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Pathology and the Committees on Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Immunology and The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Rafferty, John B. [The Krebs Institute for Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Kirisits, Michael J. [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Pathology and the Committees on Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Immunology and The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Roberts, Craig W. [Department of Immunology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NR, Scotland (United Kingdom); Mui, Ernest J. [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Pathology and the Committees on Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Immunology and The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Rice, David W., E-mail: d.rice@sheffield.ac.uk [The Krebs Institute for Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-01

    The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. Recent studies have demonstrated that submicromolar concentrations of the biocide triclosan arrest the growth of the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii and inhibit the activity of the apicomplexan enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR). The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures of T. gondii ENR have revealed that, as in its bacterial and plant homologues, a loop region which flanks the active site becomes ordered upon inhibitor binding, resulting in the slow tight binding of triclosan. In addition, the T. gondii ENR–triclosan complex reveals the folding of a hydrophilic insert common to the apicomplexan family that flanks the substrate-binding domain and is disordered in all other reported apicomplexan ENR structures. Structural comparison of the apicomplexan ENR structures with their bacterial and plant counterparts has revealed that although the active sites of the parasite enzymes are broadly similar to those of their bacterial counterparts, there are a number of important differences within the drug-binding pocket that reduce the packing interactions formed with several inhibitors in the apicomplexan ENR enzymes. Together with other significant structural differences, this provides a possible explanation of the lower affinity of the parasite ENR enzyme family for aminopyridine-based inhibitors, suggesting that an effective antiparasitic agent may well be distinct from equivalent antimicrobials.

  11. Studies of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase and implications for the development of antiparasitic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD+ and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. Recent studies have demonstrated that submicromolar concentrations of the biocide triclosan arrest the growth of the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii and inhibit the activity of the apicomplexan enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR). The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD+ and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures of T. gondii ENR have revealed that, as in its bacterial and plant homologues, a loop region which flanks the active site becomes ordered upon inhibitor binding, resulting in the slow tight binding of triclosan. In addition, the T. gondii ENR–triclosan complex reveals the folding of a hydrophilic insert common to the apicomplexan family that flanks the substrate-binding domain and is disordered in all other reported apicomplexan ENR structures. Structural comparison of the apicomplexan ENR structures with their bacterial and plant counterparts has revealed that although the active sites of the parasite enzymes are broadly similar to those of their bacterial counterparts, there are a number of important differences within the drug-binding pocket that reduce the packing interactions formed with several inhibitors in the apicomplexan ENR enzymes. Together with other significant structural differences, this provides a possible explanation of the lower affinity of the parasite ENR enzyme family for aminopyridine-based inhibitors, suggesting that an effective antiparasitic agent may well be distinct from equivalent antimicrobials

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of infectious bronchitis virus nonstructural protein 9

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Yanlin; Chen, Cheng; Wei, Lei; Yang, Qingzhu; Liao, Ming; Li, Xuemei

    2010-01-01

    The gene segment encoding avian infectious bronchitis virus nonstructural protein 9 has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein has been crystallized and the crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.44 Å resolution.

  13. The effect of the application of protein and cellulose preparations as iodine carriers on stability of thiamine in processed meats

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Szymandera-Buszka; Katarzyna Waszkowiak; Marzanna Hęś; Anna Jędrusek-Golińska

    2011-01-01

      Fortification of processed meat with iodised table salt was shown to increase thiamine losses, both during thermal processing and storage. Taking into consideration the fact, as well as the recommendation for reduction of consumption of table salt, alternative iodine carriers need to be searched for. Thus the aim of the study was to determine the effect of soy protein isolate (SPI) and wheat fibre (WF) as iodine salts’ (potassium iodide and iodate) carriers on thiamine stabil...

  14. Protein-Resistant Biodegradable Amphiphilic Graft Copolymer Vesicles as Protein Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yupeng; Yan, Lesan; Li, Bin; Qi, Yanxin; Xie, Zhigang; Jing, Xiabin; Chen, Xuesi; Huang, Yubin

    2015-09-01

    The protein adsorption and self-assembly behavior of biocompatible graft copolymer, poly(lactide-co-diazidomethyl trimethylene carbonate)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) [P(LA-co-DAC)-g-PEG], were systematically studied. The graft copolymers showed enhanced resistance to non-specific protein adsorption compared with their block copolymer counterparts, indicative of the increased effect of PEG density beyond PEG length. Diverse nanostructures including vesicles can be assembled from the amphiphilic graft copolymers with well-defined nano-sizes. Hemoglobin (Hb), as a model protein, can be entrapped in the formed vesicles and keep the gas-binding capacity. The reduced release rate of Hb from graft copolymer vesicles indicated the relatively stable membrane packing compared with block copolymer counterpart. PMID:26036907

  15. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  16. Water-soluble chitosan nanoparticles as a novel carrier system for protein delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun; FU Xiong; YANG LianSheng

    2007-01-01

    High MW chitosan (CS) solutions have already been proposed as vehicles for protein delivery. The aim of the present work is to investigate the potential utility of water-soluble chitosan (WSC) as vehicles to load and deliver proteins. WSC nanoparticles (WSC NP) with various formations were prepared based on ionic gelation of WSC with pentasodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) anions. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein drug incorporated into the WSC nanoparticles. Blank and BSA-loaded WSC nanoparticles were examined and determined to have a spherical shape with diameters between 35-190 nm, and zeta potential between 35-42 mV. FTIF confirmed that the tripolyphosphoric groups of TPP linked to the ammonium groups of WSC in the nanoparticles. Some factors affecting delivery properties of BSA have been investigated. Altering the concentration of BSA from 0.05 to 1 mg/mL enhanced the loading capacity of BSA but decreased loading efficiency simultaneously.Also, with the introduction of poly ethylene glycol (PEG), BSA release accelerated. Nanoparticle preparation from WSC with various deacetylation degrees (DDs) from 72.6% to 90% and MWs ranging from 3.5 to 15.8 kDa promoted loading efficiency and decreased the release rate. These results indicate that WSC nanoparticles are promising carriers for protein delivery.

  17. Ultrafast free-carrier dynamics in Cu2ZnSnS4 single crystals studied using femtosecond time-resolved optical spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Phuong, L. Q.; Okano, M; Yamada, Y.; Yamashita, G.; Morimoto, T.; Nagai, M.; Ashida, M; Nagaoka, A; Yoshino, K; Kanemitsu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of photogenerated carriers in Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) single crystals using femtosecond transient reflectivity (TR) and optical pump-THz probe transient absorption (THz-TA) spectroscopy. The TR and THz-TA decay dynamics consistently showed that free carriers have long lifetimes of up to a few nanoseconds. The excitation-photon-energy-dependent TR measurements revealed a slow picosecond energy relaxation of free carriers to the band edge in CZTS. The relaxation and recombinati...

  18. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF RIBOFLAVIN CARRIER PROTEIN FROM EGG WHITE OF SOUTH INDIAN SPOTTED OWLET (ATHENE BRAMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P.Pratap Rudra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Riboflavin carrier protein has been isolated and purified from the Indian spotted owlet. The protein was purified to its homogeneity. Purification was achieved successfully by DEAE_ Sepharose column chromatography and gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-100. The protein content was estimated with Lowry method. The purity of the proteins was judged by SDS-PAGE technique. The molecular weight of the protein was found to be 29 Kd. The protein was characterized using absorption, fluorescence and CD spectral analysis. Significance of the above results are discussed in the present communication.

  19. Screening and Crystallization Plates for Manual and High-throughput Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Robert E. (Inventor); Berejnov, Viatcheslav (Inventor); Kalinin, Yevgeniy (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In one embodiment, a crystallization and screening plate comprises a plurality of cells open at a top and a bottom, a frame that defines the cells in the plate, and at least two films. The first film seals a top of the plate and the second film seals a bottom of the plate. At least one of the films is patterned to strongly pin the contact lines of drops dispensed onto it, fixing their position and shape. The present invention also includes methods and other devices for manual and high-throughput protein crystal growth.

  20. Charge carrier transport in layers of discotic liquid crystals as studied by transient photocurrents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rybak, A.; Pfleger, Jiří; Jung, J. Y.; Pavlík, Martin; Glowacki, I.; Ulanski, J.; Tomovic, Z.; Müllen, K.; Geerts, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 156, 2-4 (2006), s. 302-309. ISSN 0379-6779 Grant ostatní: NANOFUN-POLY(PL) 5709/R04/R05 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : organic semiconductors * discotic liquid crystals * photoconductivity Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.685, year: 2006

  1. Effects of impurities on membrane-protein crystallization in different systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of commonly encountered impurities on various membrane-protein crystallization regimes are investigated and it is found that the lipidic cubic phase crystallization methodology is the most robust, tolerating protein contamination levels of up to 50%, with little effect on crystal quality. If generally applicable, this tolerance may be exploited (i) in initial crystallization trials to determine the ‘crystallizability’ of a given membrane-protein and (ii) to subject partially pure membrane-protein samples to crystallization trials. When starting a protein-crystallization project, scientists are faced with several unknowns. Amongst them are these questions: (i) is the purity of the starting material sufficient? and (ii) which type of crystallization experiment is the most promising to conduct? The difficulty in purifying active membrane-protein samples for crystallization trials and the high costs associated with producing such samples require an extremely pragmatic approach. Additionally, practical guidelines are needed to increase the efficiency of membrane-protein crystallization. In order to address these conundrums, the effects of commonly encountered impurities on various membrane-protein crystallization regimes have been investigated and it was found that the lipidic cubic phase (LCP) based crystallization methodology is more robust than crystallization in detergent environments using vapor diffusion or microbatch approaches in its ability to tolerate contamination in the forms of protein, lipid or other general membrane components. LCP-based crystallizations produced crystals of the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides from samples with substantial levels of residual impurities. Crystals were obtained with protein contamination levels of up to 50% and the addition of lipid material and membrane fragments to pure samples of RC had little effect on the number or on the quality of crystals obtained in LCP

  2. An evaluation of garlic lectin as an alternative carrier domain for insecticidal fusion proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elaine Fitches; Judith Philip; Gareth Hinchliffe; Leisbeth Vercruysse; Nanasaheb Chougule; John A.Gatehouse

    2008-01-01

    The mannosc-binding lectin GNA(snowdrop lectin)is used as a"carrier"domain in insecticidal fusion proteins which cross the insect gut after oral ingestion.A similar lectin from garlic bulb,ASAII,has been evaluated as an altemative"carrieff".Recombinant ASAII delivered orally to larvae of cabbage moth(Mamestra brassica;Lepidoptera)Was subse-quently detected in haemolymph,demonstrating transport.Fusion proteins comprising an insect neurotoxin.ButaIT(Buthus tamulus insecticidal toxin;red scorpion toxin)linked to the C-terminal region of ASAII or GNA were produced as recombinant proteins(GNA/ButaIT and ASA/ButaIT)by expression in Pichia pastoris.In both cases the C-terminal sequence of the lectin was truncated to avoid post-translational proteolysis.The GNA-containing fusion protein was toxic by injection to cabbage moth larvae(LD50≈250μg/g),and when fed had a negative effect on survival and growth.It also decreased the survival of cereal aphids(Sitobion avenae;Homoptera)from neonate to adult by>70%when fed.In contrast,the ASA-ButaIT fusion protein was non-toxic to aphids,and had no effect on lepidopteran lalwae,either when injected or when fed.However,intact ASA-ButaIT fusion protein was present in the haemolymph of cabbage moth larvae following ingestion,showing that transport of the fusion had occurred.The stabilities of GNA/BUtaIT and ASA/ButaIT to proteolysis in vivo after injection or ingestion differed,and this may be a factor in determining insecticidal activities.

  3. Crystal growth of proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses in gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, Bernard; Sauter, Claude; Théobald-Dietrich, Anne; Moreno, Abel; Schellenberger, Pascale; Robert, Marie-Claire; Capelle, Bernard; Sanglier, Sarah; Potier, Noëlle; Giegé, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Medium-sized single crystals with perfect habits and no defect producing intense and well-resolved diffraction patterns are the dream of every protein crystallographer. Crystals of biological macromolecules possessing these characteristics can be prepared within a medium in which mass transport is restricted to diffusion. Chemical gels (like polysiloxane) and physical gels (such as agarose) provide such an environment and are therefore suitable for the crystallisation of biological macromolecules. Instructions for the preparation of each type of gel are given to urge crystal growers to apply diffusive media for enhancing crystallographic quality of their crystals. Examples of quality enhancement achieved with silica and agarose gels are given. Results obtained with other substances forming gel-like media (such as lipidic phases and cellulose derivatives) are presented. Finally, the use of gels in combination with capillary tubes for counter-diffusion experiments is discussed. Methods and techniques implemented with proteins can also be applied to nucleic acids and nucleoprotein assemblies such as viruses. PMID:20005247

  4. Charge carrier trapping in highly-ordered lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal films based on ionic perylene diimide derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Pavlo V.; Vakhnin, Alexander Yu.; Skryshevskiy, Yuriy A.; Boiko, Oleksandr P.; Anisimov, Maksim I.; Slominskiy, Yuriy L.; Nazarenko, Vassili G.; Genoe, Jan; Kadashchuk, Andrey

    2014-12-01

    Charge carrier trapping in thin films of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) based on ionic perylene diimide derivative and in chemically-similar neutral N,N'-dipentyl-3,4,9,10-perylene-dicarboximide (PTCDI-C5) films is investigated by thermally-stimulated luminescence (TSL) technique. The LCLC films comprise elongated molecular aggregates featuring a long-range orientational order. The obtained results provide direct evidence for the improved energetic ordering (smaller effective energetic disorder) in aggregated LCLC films as compared to conventional PTCDI-C5 films. The width of the density-of-state distribution of 0.09 eV and 0.13 eV was estimated for the LCLC and PTCDI-C5 films, respectively. Relatively small effective energetic disorder in LCLC films is ascribed to formation of macroscopically larger LCLC aggregates.

  5. Late stage crystallization and healing during spin-coating enhance carrier transport in small-molecule organic semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Wei Chou, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Spin-coating is currently the most widely used solution processing method in organic electronics. Here, we report, for the first time, a direct investigation of the formation process of the small-molecule organic semiconductor (OSC) 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) (TIPS)-pentacene during spin-coating in the context of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) application. The solution thinning and thin film formation were monitored in situ by optical reflectometry and grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering, respectively, both of which were performed during spin-coating. We find that OSC thin film formation is akin to a quenching process, marked by a deposition rate of ∼100 nm s-1, nearly three orders of magnitude faster than drop-casting. This is then followed by a more gradual crystallization and healing step which depends upon the spinning speed. We associate this to further crystallization and healing of defects by residency of the residual solvent trapped inside the kinetically trapped film. The residency time of the trapped solvent is extended to several seconds by slowing the rotational speed of the substrate and is credited with improving the carrier mobility by nearly two orders of magnitude. Based on this insight, we deliberately slow down the solvent evaporation further and increase the carrier mobility by an additional order of magnitude. These results demonstrate how spin-coating conditions can be used as a handle over the crystallinity of organic semiconductors otherwise quenched during initial formation only to recrystallize and heal during extended interaction with the trapped solvent. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  6. Optical investigation of non-equilibrium carrier dynamics in differently doped VGF-grown ZnTe single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We applied a time-resolved FWM technique to study the dynamics of photoexcited carriers in differently doped VGF-grown ZnTe crystals at room temperature. We observed a fast carrier trapping to deep levels in phosphorus doped and undoped samples. The measurements at below and above band-gap excitations revealed the much higher concentration of these levels near the surface than in the bulk in both samples. The concentration of deep traps has been estimated for phosphorus doped sample N T = (1 - 2) x 1015 cm-3 in the bulk and N = (3 - 5) x 1018 cm-3 near the surface. In the undoped sample these traps are present at much higher concentration. The electron and hole mobilities μ n = (500 ± 28) cm2/Vs and μ h = (16 ± 6) cm2/Vs were estimated from the measured diffusion coefficient values D = (12.5 ± 0.7) cm2/s in the p-type sample and D = (0.8 ± 0.3) cm2/s in the semi-insulating one. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Crystal structure of Homo sapiens protein LOC79017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2010-02-08

    LOC79017 (MW 21.0 kDa, residues 1-188) was annotated as a hypothetical protein encoded by Homo sapiens chromosome 7 open reading frame 24. It was selected as a target by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) because it did not share more than 30% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known. The biological function of the protein has not been established yet. Parts of LOC79017 were identified as members of uncharacterized Pfam families (residues 1-95 as PB006073 and residues 104-180 as PB031696). BLAST searches revealed homologues of LOC79017 in many eukaryotes, but none of them have been functionally characterized. Here, we report the crystal structure of H. sapiens protein LOC79017 (UniGene code Hs.530024, UniProt code O75223, CESG target number go.35223).

  8. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4'-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. PMID:27540631

  9. Evaluation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Inhibitors as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Quenching Reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Molin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for a wide range of infections. Production of virulence factors and biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa are partly regulated by cell-to-cell communication quorum-sensing systems. Identification of quorum-quenching reagents which block the quorum-sensing process can facilitate development of novel treatment strategies for P. aeruginosa infections. We have used molecular dynamics simulation and experimental studies to elucidate the efficiencies of two potential quorum-quenching reagents, triclosan and green tea epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, which both function as inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP reductase (ENR from the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis pathway. Our studies suggest that EGCG has a higher binding affinity towards ENR of P. aeruginosa and is an efficient quorum-quenching reagent. EGCG treatment was further shown to be able to attenuate the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa.

  10. Binding of 7-dehydrocholesterol to sterol carrier protein and vitamin D3 effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was confirmed that deltasup(5,7)-sterol delta7-reductase activity was suppressed by cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) in the enzyme system consisted of microsomes and sterol carrier protein (SCP). The enzyme activity was significantly decreased in the combination with microsomes obtained from either vitamin D-deficient or vitamin D3-treated rat liver and with SCP obtained from vitamin D3-treated rat. It was also demonstrated by the binding assay of the dextran-charcoal technique that 7-dehydrocholesterol binding to SCP could be specifically displaced by vitamin D3. The inhibition of cholecalciferol on 7-dehydro-cholesterol binding to liver SCP was confirmed to be non-competitive inhibition. (auth.)

  11. Acyl-acyl carrier protein as a source of fatty acids for bacterial bioluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulse-chase experiments with [3H]tetradecanoic acid and ATP showed that the bioluminescence-related 32-kDa acyltransferase from Vibrio harveyi can specifically catalyze the deacylation of a 3H-labeled 18-kDa protein observed in extracts of this bacterium. The 18-kDa protein has been partially purified and its physical and chemical properties strongly indicate that it is fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP). Both this V. harveyi [3H]acylprotein and [3H]palmitoyl-ACP from Escherichia coli were substrates in vitro for either the V. harveyi 32-kDa acyltransferase or the analogous enzyme (34K) from Photobacterium phosphoreum. TLC analysis indicated that the hexane-soluble product of the reaction is fatty acid. No significant cleavage of either E. coli or V. harveyi tetradecanoyl-ACP was observed in extracts of these bacteria unless the 32-kDa or 34K acyltransferase was present. Since these enzymes are believed to be responsible for the supply of fatty acids for reduction to form the aldehyde substrate of luciferase, the above results suggest that long-chain acyl-ACP is the source of fatty acids for bioluminescence

  12. Sticky swinging arm dynamics: studies of an acyl carrier protein domain from the mycolactone polyketide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Steven; Tkachenko, Olga; Thomas, Ben; Bassuni, Mona; Hong, Hui; Nietlispach, Daniel; Broadhurst, William

    2016-04-15

    Type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) produce polyketide natural products by passing a growing acyl substrate chain between a series of enzyme domains housed within a gigantic multifunctional polypeptide assembly. Throughout each round of chain extension and modification reactions, the substrate stays covalently linked to an acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. In the present study we report on the solution structure and dynamics of an ACP domain excised from MLSA2, module 9 of the PKS system that constructs the macrolactone ring of the toxin mycolactone, cause of the tropical disease Buruli ulcer. After modification ofapoACP with 4'-phosphopantetheine (Ppant) to create theholoform,(15)N nuclear spin relaxation and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments suggest that the prosthetic group swings freely. The minimal chemical shift perturbations displayed by Ppant-attached C3and C4acyl chains imply that these substrate-mimics remain exposed to solvent at the end of a flexible Ppant arm. By contrast, hexanoyl and octanoyl chains yield much larger chemical shift perturbations, indicating that they interact with the surface of the domain. The solution structure of octanoyl-ACP shows the Ppant arm bending to allow the acyl chain to nestle into a nonpolar pocket, whereas the prosthetic group itself remains largely solvent exposed. Although the highly reduced octanoyl group is not a natural substrate for the ACP from MLSA2, similar presentation modes would permit partner enzyme domains to recognize an acyl group while it is bound to the surface of its carrier protein, allowing simultaneous interactions with both the substrate and the ACP. PMID:26920023

  13. NMR Solution Structure and Biophysical Characterization of Vibrio harveyi Acyl Carrier Protein A75H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David I.; Chu, Byron C. H.; Lau, Cheryl K. Y.; Hunter, Howard N.; Byers, David M.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a highly anionic, 9 kDa protein that functions as a cofactor protein in fatty acid biosynthesis. Escherichia coli ACP is folded at neutral pH and in the absence of divalent cations, while Vibrio harveyi ACP, which is very similar at 86% sequence identity, is unfolded under the same conditions. V. harveyi ACP adopts a folded conformation upon the addition of divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ and a mutant, A75H, was previously identified that restores the folded conformation at pH 7 in the absence of divalent cations. In this study we sought to understand the unique folding behavior of V. harveyi ACP using NMR spectroscopy and biophysical methods. The NMR solution structure of V. harveyi ACP A75H displays the canonical ACP structure with four helices surrounding a hydrophobic core, with a narrow pocket closed off from the solvent to house the acyl chain. His-75, which is charged at neutral pH, participates in a stacking interaction with Tyr-71 in the far C-terminal end of helix IV. pH titrations and the electrostatic profile of ACP suggest that V. harveyi ACP is destabilized by anionic charge repulsion around helix II that can be partially neutralized by His-75 and is further reduced by divalent cation binding. This is supported by differential scanning calorimetry data which indicate that calcium binding further increases the melting temperature of V. harveyi ACP A75H by ∼20 °C. Divalent cation binding does not alter ACP dynamics on the ps-ns timescale as determined by 15N NMR relaxation experiments, however, it clearly stabilizes the protein fold as observed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies. Finally, we demonstrate that the E. coli ACP H75A mutant is similarly unfolded as wild-type V. harveyi ACP, further stressing the importance of this particular residue for proper protein folding. PMID:20659901

  14. Photosensitizer and polycationic peptide-labeled streptavidin as a nano-carrier for light-controlled protein transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamihata, Kosuke; Maeda, Yasukazu; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishihara, Wataru; Ishiwatari, Akira; Takamori, Satoshi; Yamahira, Shinya; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2015-12-01

    Transductions of exogenous proteins into cells enable the precise study of the effect of the transduced proteins on cellular functions. Accordingly, the protein transduction technique, which can control the release of proteins into the cytosol with certainty and high-throughput, is highly desired in various research fields. In this study, streptavidin (SA) labeled with a photosensitizer and cell-permeable peptides (CPP) was proposed as a nano-carrier for light-controlled protein transduction. SA was modified with biotinylated oligo-arginine peptides (Rpep), which were functionalized with Alexa Fluor 546 (AF546), to achieve cell penetrating and endosomal escape functionalities. The SA-Rpep complex was efficiently internalized into living HeLa cells corresponding to the length and the modification number of Rpep. SA conjugated with more than three equimolar AF546-modified Rpep consisting of fifteen arginine residues was achieved to diffuse throughout the cytosol without cytotoxicity by irradiation of the excitation light for AF546. The optimized nano-carrier was confirmed to transduce a biotinylated model cargo protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein fused with thioredoxin (tEGFP) into the cytosol at the light-irradiated area. The results provided proof-of-principle that SA possessing multiple AF546-modified Rpep has the potential to be a versatile and facile carrier for light-controlled protein transduction into the cytosol of mammalian cells. PMID:25935501

  15. Charge carrier transport at the nanoscale: Electron and hole transport in self-assembled discotic liquid crystals: Mobile ionic charges in nanocomposite solid electrolytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkate, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores some fundamental aspects of charge carrier transport at the nanoscale. The study is divided in two parts. In the first part, the structural, dynamical and vibrational properties of discotic liquid crystals are studied in relation to the potential of these self-assembled ‘mesopha

  16. Bioinformatic evidence for a widely distributed, ribosomally produced electron carrier precursor, its maturation proteins, and its nicotinoprotein redox partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haft Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes in the radical SAM (rSAM domain family serve in a wide variety of biological processes, including RNA modification, enzyme activation, bacteriocin core peptide maturation, and cofactor biosynthesis. Evolutionary pressures and relationships to other cellular constituents impose recognizable grammars on each class of rSAM-containing system, shaping patterns in results obtained through various comparative genomics analyses. Results An uncharacterized gene cluster found in many Actinobacteria and sporadically in Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Deltaproteobacteria, and one Archaeal plasmid contains a PqqE-like rSAM protein family that includes Rv0693 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Members occur clustered with a strikingly well-conserved small polypeptide we designate "mycofactocin," similar in size to bacteriocins and PqqA, precursor of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ. Partial Phylogenetic Profiling (PPP based on the distribution of these markers identifies the mycofactocin cluster, but also a second tier of high-scoring proteins. This tier, strikingly, is filled with up to thirty-one members per genome from three variant subfamilies that occur, one each, in three unrelated classes of nicotinoproteins. The pattern suggests these variant enzymes require not only NAD(P, but also the novel gene cluster. Further study was conducted using SIMBAL, a PPP-like tool, to search these nicotinoproteins for subsequences best correlated across multiple genomes to the presence of mycofactocin. For both the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR and iron-containing dehydrogenase families, aligning SIMBAL's top-scoring sequences to homologous solved crystal structures shows signals centered over NAD(P-binding sites rather than over substrate-binding or active site residues. Previous studies on some of these proteins have revealed a non-exchangeable NAD cofactor, such that enzymatic activity in vitro requires an artificial electron acceptor such

  17. High-resolution structures of Thermus thermophilus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase in the apo form, in complex with NAD+ and in complex with NAD+ and triclosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. thermophilus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase was crystallized in the apo form, with NAD+ bound and with NAD+ and the inhibitor triclosan bound. The structures were solved by molecular replacement and refined at 1.50, 1.86 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. The structures are described, analysed and compared with those of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases from other species. Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR; the product of the fabI gene) is an important enzyme that is involved in the type II fatty-acid-synthesis pathway of bacteria, plants, apicomplexan protozoa and mitochondria. Harmful pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium falciparum use the type II fatty-acid-synthesis system, but not mammals or fungi, which contain a type I fatty-acid-synthesis pathway consisting of one or two multifunctional enzymes. For this reason, specific inhibitors of ENR are attractive antibiotic candidates. Triclosan, a broad-range antibacterial agent, binds to ENR, inhibiting fatty-acid synthesis. As humans do not have an ENR enzyme, they are not affected. Here, high-resolution structures of Thermus thermophilus (Tth) ENR in the apo form, bound to NAD+ and bound to NAD+ plus triclosan are reported. Differences from and similarities to other known ENR structures are reported; in general, the structures are very similar. The cofactor-binding site is also very similar to those of other ENRs and, as reported for other species, triclosan leads to greater ordering of the loop that covers the cofactor-binding site, which, together with the presence of triclosan itself, presumably provides tight binding of the dinucleotide, preventing cycling of the cofactor. Differences between the structures of Tth ENR and other ENRs are the presence of an additional β-sheet at the N-terminus and a larger number of salt bridges and side-chain hydrogen bonds. These features may be related to the high thermal stability of Tth ENR

  18. Protein-detergent interactions in single crystals of membrane proteins studied by neutron crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmins, P.A. [ILL, Grenoble (France); Pebay-Peyroula, E. [IBS-UJF Grenoble (France)

    1994-12-31

    The detergent micelles surrounding membrane protein molecules in single crystals can be investigated using neutron crystallography combined with H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O contrast variation. If the protein structure is known then the contrast variation method allows phases to be determined at a contrast where the detergent dominates the scattering. The application of various constraints allows the resulting scattering length density map to be realistically modeled. The method has been applied to two different forms of the membrane protein porin. In one case both hydrogenated and partially deuterated protein were used, allowing the head group and tail to be distinguished.

  19. Protein-detergent interactions in single crystals of membrane proteins studied by neutron crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detergent micelles surrounding membrane protein molecules in single crystals can be investigated using neutron crystallography combined with H2O/D2O contrast variation. If the protein structure is known then the contrast variation method allows phases to be determined at a contrast where the detergent dominates the scattering. The application of various constraints allows the resulting scattering length density map to be realistically modeled. The method has been applied to two different forms of the membrane protein porin. In one case both hydrogenated and partially deuterated protein were used, allowing the head group and tail to be distinguished

  20. Characterization of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene structure and promoter regulation by estrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nandini Vasudevan; Urvashi Bahadur; Paturu Kondaiah

    2001-03-01

    The chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) is an estrogen induced egg yolk and white protein. Eggs from hens which have a splice mutation in RCP gene fail to hatch, indicating an absolute requirement of RCP for the transport of riboflavin to the oocyte. In order to understand the mechanism of regulation of this gene by estrogen, the chicken RCP gene including 1 kb of the 5′ flanking region has been isolated. Characterization of the gene structure shows that it contains six exons and five introns, including an intron in the 5′ untranslated region. Sequence analysis of the 5′ flanking region does not show the presence of any classical, palindromic estrogen response element (ERE). However, there are six half site ERE consensus elements. Four deletion constructs of the 5′ flanking region with varying number of ERE half sites were made in pGL3 basic vector upstream of the luciferase-coding region. Transient transfection of these RCP promoter deletion constructs into a chicken hepatoma cell line (LMH2A) showed 6-12-fold transcriptional induction by a stable estrogen analogue, moxesterol. This suggests that the RCP gene is induced by estrogen even in the absence of a classical ERE and the half sites of ERE in this promoter may be important for estrogen induction.

  1. Purification and characterization of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase from Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fice, D; Shen, Z; Byers, D M

    1993-01-01

    A Vibrio harveyi enzyme which catalyzes the ATP-dependent ligation of fatty acids to acyl carrier protein (ACP) has been purified 6,000-fold to apparent homogeneity by anion-exchange, gel filtration, and ACP-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Purified acyl-ACP synthetase migrated as a single 62-kDa band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and as an 80-kDa protein by gel filtration under reducing conditions. Activity of the purified enzyme was lost within hours in the absence of glycerol and low concentrations of Triton X-100. Acyl-ACP synthetase exhibited Kms for myristic acid, ACP, and ATP of 7 microM, 18 microM, and 0.3 mM, respectively. The enzyme was specific for adenine-containing nucleotides, and AMP was the product of the reaction. No covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate was observed. Enzyme activity was stimulated up to 50% by iodoacetamide but inhibited > 80% by N-ethylmaleimide: inhibition by the latter was prevented by ATP and ACP but not myristic acid. Dithiothreitol and sulfhydryl-directed reagents also influenced enzyme size, activity, and elution pattern on anion-exchange resins. The function of acyl-ACP synthetase has not been established, but it may be related to the capacity of V. harveyi to elongate exogenous fatty acids by an ACP-dependent mechanism. Images PMID:8384617

  2. Tragacanth as an oral peptide and protein delivery carrier: Characterization and mucoadhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, M; Ramchandran, L; Vasiljevic, T

    2016-06-01

    Biopolymers such as tragacanth, an anionic polysaccharide gum, can be alternative polymeric carrier for physiologically important peptides and proteins. Characterization of tragacanth is thus essential for providing a foundation for possible applications. Rheological studies colloidal solution of tragacanth at pH 3, 5 or 7 were carried out by means of steady shear and small amplitude oscillatory measurements. Tragacanth mucoadhesivity was also analyzed using an applicable rheological method and compared to chitosan, alginate and PVP. The particle size and zeta potential were measured by a zetasizer. Thermal properties of solutions were obtained using a differential scanning calorimetry. The solution exhibited shear-thinning characteristics. The value of the storage modulus (G') and the loss modulus (G″) increased with an increase in angular frequency (Ω). In all cases, loss modulus values were higher than storage values (G″>G') and viscous character was, therefore, dominant. Tragacanth and alginate showed a good mucoadhesion. Tragacanth upon dispersion created particles of a submicron size with a negative zeta potential (-7.98 to -11.92mV). These properties were pH dependant resulting in acid gel formation at pH 3.5. Tragacanth has thus a potential to be used as an excipient for peptide/protein delivery. PMID:27083363

  3. Cloning of a palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase from oil palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, A; Lazarus, C; Fraser, T; Stobart, K

    2000-12-01

    A palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase cDNA clone was isolated from an oil palm cDNA library. The cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein and a crude bacterial extract was assayed for acyl-CoA-hydrolysing activity. The recombinant enzyme was able to hydrolyse medium- and long-chain acyl-CoAs. Northern-blot analysis showed a high level of gene expression in leaf, flower and 15-, 17- and 18-week mesocarp tissues. Low-level gene expression was detected in germinated seedlings and 8- and 12-week mesocarp tissues, but no transcript was detected in any kernel tissues. Southern-blot analysis indicated the presence of a single gene and we have also isolated a genomic clone using the cDNA as a probe. Two genomic fragments were subcloned and a 7 kb contiguous stretch of the oil palm genome was sequenced. Comparison of this sequence with the cDNA sequence identified a putative 93 amino acid transit peptide, most of which is missing from the cDNA. The coding region of the gene consisted of seven exons and six introns. PMID:11171146

  4. Organic crystal-binding peptides: morphology control and one-pot formation of protein-displaying organic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niide, Teppei; Ozawa, Kyohei; Nakazawa, Hikaru; Oliveira, Daniel; Kasai, Hitoshi; Onodera, Mari; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi; Umetsu, Mitsuo

    2015-11-01

    Crystalline assemblies of fluorescent molecules have different functional properties than the constituent monomers, as well as unique optical characteristics that depend on the structure, size, and morphological homogeneity of the crystal particles. In this study, we selected peptides with affinity for the surface of perylene crystal particles by exposing a peptide-displaying phage library in aqueous solution to perylene crystals, eluting the surface-bound phages by means of acidic desorption or liquid-liquid extraction, and amplifying the obtained phages in Escherichia coli. One of the perylene-binding peptides, PeryBPb1: VQHNTKYSVVIR, selected by this biopanning procedure induced perylene molecules to form homogenous planar crystal nanoparticles by means of a poor solvent method, and fusion of the peptide to a fluorescent protein enabled one-pot formation of protein-immobilized crystalline nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were well-dispersed in aqueous solution, and Förster resonance energy transfer from the perylene crystals to the fluorescent protein was observed. Our results show that the crystal-binding peptide could be used for simultaneous control of perylene crystal morphology and dispersion and protein immobilization on the crystals.Crystalline assemblies of fluorescent molecules have different functional properties than the constituent monomers, as well as unique optical characteristics that depend on the structure, size, and morphological homogeneity of the crystal particles. In this study, we selected peptides with affinity for the surface of perylene crystal particles by exposing a peptide-displaying phage library in aqueous solution to perylene crystals, eluting the surface-bound phages by means of acidic desorption or liquid-liquid extraction, and amplifying the obtained phages in Escherichia coli. One of the perylene-binding peptides, PeryBPb1: VQHNTKYSVVIR, selected by this biopanning procedure induced perylene molecules to form homogenous planar

  5. Powder diffraction from a continuous microjet of submicrometer protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, D A; Chapman, H N; Deponte, D; Doak, R B; Fromme, P; Hembree, G; Hunter, M; Marchesini, S; Schmidt, K; Spence, J; Starodub, D; Weierstall, U

    2008-11-01

    Atomic-resolution structures from small proteins have recently been determined from high-quality powder diffraction patterns using a combination of stereochemical restraints and Rietveld refinement [Von Dreele (2007), J. Appl. Cryst. 40, 133-143; Margiolaki et al. (2007), J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 11865-11871]. While powder diffraction data have been obtained from batch samples of small crystal-suspensions, which are exposed to X-rays for long periods of time and undergo significant radiation damage, the proof-of-concept that protein powder diffraction data from nanocrystals of a membrane protein can be obtained using a continuous microjet is shown. This flow-focusing aerojet has been developed to deliver a solution of hydrated protein nanocrystals to an X-ray beam for diffraction analysis. This method requires neither the crushing of larger polycrystalline samples nor any techniques to avoid radiation damage such as cryocooling. Apparatus to record protein powder diffraction in this manner has been commissioned, and in this paper the first powder diffraction patterns from a membrane protein, photosystem I, with crystallite sizes of less than 500 nm are presented. These preliminary patterns show the lowest-order reflections, which agree quantitatively with theoretical calculations of the powder profile. The results also serve to test our aerojet injector system, with future application to femtosecond diffraction in free-electron X-ray laser schemes, and for serial crystallography using a single-file beam of aligned hydrated molecules. PMID:18955765

  6. Potential of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein-Derived Protein Transduction Domains as Antigen Carriers for Nasal Vaccine Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hae-Duck; Lee, Joohyun; Jin, Xing-Hai; Lee, Kyunglim

    2016-09-01

    Nasal vaccination offers a promising alternative to intramuscular (i.m.) vaccination because it can induce both mucosal and systemic immunity. However, its major drawback is poor absorption of large antigens in the nasal epithelium. Protein transduction domains (PTDs), also called cell-penetrating peptides, have been proposed as vehicles for nasal delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins. Here, we evaluated the potential of a mutant PTD derived from translationally controlled tumor protein (designated TCTP-PTD 13) as an antigen carrier for nasal vaccines. We first compared the l- and d-forms of TCTP-PTD 13 isomers (l- or d-TCTP-PTD 13) as antigen carriers. Studies in mice demonstrated that nasally administered mixtures of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) and d-TCTP-PTD 13 induced higher plasma IgG titers and secretory IgA levels in nasal washes than nasally administered OVA alone, OVA/l-TCTP-PTD 13, or i.m.-injected OVA. Plasma IgG subclass responses (IgG1 and IgG2a) of mice nasally administered OVA/d-TCTP-PTD 13 showed that the predominant IgG subclass was IgG1, indicating a Th2-biased immune response. We also used synthetic CpG oligonucleotides (CpG) as a Th1 immune response-inducing adjuvant. Nasally administered CpG plus OVA/d-TCTP-PTD 13 was superior in eliciting systemic and mucosal immune responses compared to those induced by nasally administered OVA/d-TCTP-PTD 13. Furthermore, the OVA/CpG/d-TCTP-PTD 13 combination skewed IgG1 and IgG2a profiles of humoral immune responses toward a Th1 profile. These findings suggest that TCTP-derived PTD is a suitable vehicle to efficiently carry antigens and to induce more powerful antigen-specific immune responses and a more balanced Th1/Th2 response when combined with a DNA adjuvant. PMID:27454469

  7. Lysine(63)-linked ubiquitylation of PIN2 auxin carrier protein governs hormonally controlled adaptation of Arabidopsis root growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Leitner, J.; Petrášek, Jan; Tomanov, K.; Retzer, K.; Pařezová, Markéta; Korbei, B.; Bachmair, A.; Zažímalová, Eva; Luschnig, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 21 (2012), s. 8322-8327. ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2476 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : PLASMA-MEMBRANE PROTEIN * EFFLUX CARRIER * INTRACELLULAR TRAFFICKING Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.737, year: 2012

  8. Crystal structure of nitrogen regulatory protein IIANtr from Neisseria meningitidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stammers David K

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NMB0736 gene of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 encodes the putative nitrogen regulatory protein, IIANtr (abbreviated to NM-IIANtr. The homologous protein present in Escherichia coli is implicated in the control of nitrogen assimilation. As part of a structural proteomics approach to the study of pathogenic Neisseria spp., we have selected this protein for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Results The NM-IIANtr was over-expressed in E. coli and was shown to be partially mono-phosphorylated, as assessed by mass spectrometry of the purified protein. Crystals of un-phosphorylated protein were obtained and diffraction data collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The structure of NM-IIANtr was solved by molecular replacement using the coordinates of the E. coli nitrogen regulatory protein IIAntr [PDB: 1A6J] as the starting model. The overall fold of the Neisseria enzyme shows a high degree of similarity to the IIANtr from E. coli, and the position of the phosphoryl acceptor histidine residue (H67 is conserved. The orientation of an adjacent arginine residue (R69 suggests that it may also be involved in coordinating the phosphate group. Comparison of the structure with that of E. coli IIAmtl complexed with HPr [PDB: 1J6T] indicates that NM-IIANtr binds in a similar way to the HPr-like enzyme in Neisseria. Conclusion The structure of NM-IIANtr confirms its assignment as a homologue of the IIANtr proteins found in a range of other Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that the NM- IIANtr protein functions as part of a phosphorylation cascade which, in contrast to E. coli, shares the upstream phosphotransfer protein with the sugar uptake phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS, but in common with E. coli has a distinct downstream effector mechanism.

  9. Effect of CdTe single crystal surface state on the processes of charge carrier annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the case of CdTe single crystals doped by CI as a result of the etching in Br2-methanol solution the spectrum beyond fundamental absorption caused by LO-phonon scattering of the free and bound electron-hole states is investigated. Formation of the scattering phonons is connected with indirect electron transitions into conduction band Γ-minimum from impurity band associated with CI levels at the edge of Brillouin zone. Explanation of the above-band-gap photoluminescence (APL) nature is based on the theoretical elaborations for direct and indirect exciton absorption in the wide-band-gap AI'IBV'I compounds. APL structure dependence on conditions of sample preparation and surface state is discussed

  10. Evolution of hepatitis B virus surface gene and protein among Iranian chronic carriers from different provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ramezani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives:  Iranian chronic HBV carrier’s population has shown a unique pattern of genotype D distri- bution all around the country. The aim of this study was to explore more details of evolutionary history of carriers based on structural surface proteins from different provinces.Materials and Methods: Sera obtained from 360 isolates from 12 Different regions of country were used for amplificationand sequencing of surface proteins. A detailed mutational analysis was undertaken.Results: The total ratio for Missense/Silent nucleotide substitutions was 0.96. Sistan and Kermanshah showed the lowest rate of evolution between provinces (P = 0.055. On the other hand, Khorasan Razavi and Khoozestan contained the highest ratio (P = 0.055. The rest of regions were laid between these two extremes. Azarbayjan and Guilan showed the highest proportion of immune epitope distribution (91.3% and 96%, respectively. Conversely, Sistan and Tehran harbored the least percentage (66.6% and 68.8%, respectively. Kermanshah province contained only 5.2%, whereas Isfahan had 54.5% of B cell epitope distribution. In terms of T helper epitopes, all provinces showed a somehow homogeneity: 22.58% (Fars to 46.6% (Khuz- estan. On the other hand, distribution of substitutions within the CTL epitopes showed a wide range of variation between 6.6% (Khuzestan and 63% (Kermanshah.Conclusion: Further to low selection pressure found in Iranian population, the variations between different regions designate random genetic drift within the surface proteins. These finding would have some applications in terms of specific antiviral regimen, design of more efficient vaccine and public health issues.

  11. Determination of protein and solvent volumes in protein crystals from contrast variation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, J. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    By varying the relative values of protein and solvent scattering densities in a crystal, it is possible to obtain information on the shape and dimensions of protein molecular envelopes. Neutron diffraction methods are ideally suited to these contrast variation experiments because H/D exchange leads to large differential changes in the protein and solvent scattering densities and is structurally non-perturbing. Low resolution structure factors have been measured from cubic insulin crystals with differing H/D contents. Structure factors calculated from a simple binary density model, in which uniform scattering densities represent the protein and solvent volumes in the crystals, were compared with these data. The contrast variation differences in the sets of measured structure factors were found to be accurately fitted by this simple model. Trial applications to two problems in crystal structure determination illustrate how this fact may be exploited. (1) A translation function that employs contrast variation data gave a sharp minimum within 1-9{Angstrom} of the correctly positioned insulin molecule and is relatively insensitive to errors in the atomic model. (2) An ab initio phasing method for the contrast variation data, based on analyzing histograms of the density distributions in trial maps, was found to recover the correct molecular envelope.

  12. Determination of protein and solvent volumes in protein crystals from contrast variation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By varying the relative values of protein and solvent scattering densities in a crystal, it is possible to obtain information on the shape and dimensions of protein molecular envelopes. Neutron diffraction methods are ideally suited to these contrast variation experiments because H/D exchange leads to large differential changes in the protein and solvent scattering densities and is structurally non-perturbing. Low resolution structure factors have been measured from cubic insulin crystals with differing H/D contents. Structure factors calculated from a simple binary density model, in which uniform scattering densities represent the protein and solvent volumes in the crystals, were compared with these data. The contrast variation differences in the sets of measured structure factors were found to be accurately fitted by this simple model. Trial applications to two problems in crystal structure determination illustrate how this fact may be exploited. (1) A translation function that employs contrast variation data gave a sharp minimum within 1-9 Angstrom of the correctly positioned insulin molecule and is relatively insensitive to errors in the atomic model. (2) An ab initio phasing method for the contrast variation data, based on analyzing histograms of the density distributions in trial maps, was found to recover the correct molecular envelope

  13. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  14. Plasma protein corona modulates the vascular wall interaction of drug carriers in a material and donor specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Sobczynski

    Full Text Available The nanoscale plasma protein interaction with intravenously injected particulate carrier systems is known to modulate their organ distribution and clearance from the bloodstream. However, the role of this plasma protein interaction in prescribing the adhesion of carriers to the vascular wall remains relatively unknown. Here, we show that the adhesion of vascular-targeted poly(lactide-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA spheres to endothelial cells is significantly inhibited in human blood flow, with up to 90% reduction in adhesion observed relative to adhesion in simple buffer flow, depending on the particle size and the magnitude and pattern of blood flow. This reduced PLGA adhesion in blood flow is linked to the adsorption of certain high molecular weight plasma proteins on PLGA and is donor specific, where large reductions in particle adhesion in blood flow (>80% relative to buffer is seen with ∼60% of unique donor bloods while others exhibit moderate to no reductions. The depletion of high molecular weight immunoglobulins from plasma is shown to successfully restore PLGA vascular wall adhesion. The observed plasma protein effect on PLGA is likely due to material characteristics since the effect is not replicated with polystyrene or silica spheres. These particles effectively adhere to the endothelium at a higher level in blood over buffer flow. Overall, understanding how distinct plasma proteins modulate the vascular wall interaction of vascular-targeted carriers of different material characteristics would allow for the design of highly functional delivery vehicles for the treatment of many serious human diseases.

  15. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturases are associated with floral isolation in sexually deceptive orchids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schluter, P.M.; Shanklin, J.; Xu, S.; Gagliardini, V.; Whittle, E.; Grossniklaus, U.; Schiestl, F. P.

    2011-04-05

    The orchids Ophrys sphegodes and O. exaltata are reproductively isolated from each other by the attraction of two different, highly specific pollinator species. For pollinator attraction, flowers chemically mimic the pollinators sex pheromones, the key components of which are alkenes with different double-bond positions. This study identifies genes likely involved in alkene biosynthesis, encoding stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) homologs. The expression of two isoforms, SAD1 and SAD2, is flower-specific and broadly parallels alkene production during flower development. SAD2 shows a significant association with alkene production, and in vitro assays show that O. sphegodes SAD2 has activity both as an 18:0-ACP {Delta}{sup 9} and a 16:0-ACP {Delta}{sup 4} desaturase. Downstream metabolism of the SAD2 reaction products would give rise to alkenes with double-bonds at position 9 or position 12, matching double-bond positions observed in alkenes in the odor bouquet of O. sphegodes. SAD1 and SAD2 show evidence of purifying selection before, and positive or relaxed purifying selection after gene duplication. By contributing to the production of species-specific alkene bouquets, SAD2 is suggested to contribute to differential pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among these species. Taken together, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that SAD2 is a florally expressed barrier gene of large phenotypic effect and, possibly, a genic target of pollinator-mediated selection.

  16. Controlled slow release of anticancer drugs from protein-hydrophilic vinyl polymer carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release behavior has been studied for bleomycin hydrochloride (BLM), an anticancer drug, from carrier composities prepared from mixtures of proteins and hydrophilic vinyl monomers by combined procedures of radiation polymerization and thermal denaturation. The magnitude, Q/tsup(1/2), for BLM release was the smallest when albumin was denatured by thermal treatment after the polymerization of albumin-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) by radiation at -780C. This retardation was further enhanced by the use of cross-linked polymers. On the other hand, the digestion of the albumin-HEMA composite, during the release test carried out in the saline containing some proteases, was markedly suppressed with increasing the HEMA content in the composite. The digestion was lowered more than expected from the albumin content in the composite. In summary of the release tests and the scanning electron microscopic observations, it was concluded that the release of BLM and the digestion of albumin component contained in the composites can be markedly suppressed by the incorporation of the polymeric component. (author)

  17. Crystal Structure of the Japanese Encephalitis Virus Envelope Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, Vincent C.; AbiMansour, Jad; Nelson, Christopher A.; Fremont, Daved H. (WU-MED)

    2012-03-13

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading global cause of viral encephalitis. The JEV envelope protein (E) facilitates cellular attachment and membrane fusion and is the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. We have determined the 2.1-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the JEV E ectodomain refolded from bacterial inclusion bodies. The E protein possesses the three domains characteristic of flavivirus envelopes and epitope mapping of neutralizing antibodies onto the structure reveals determinants that correspond to the domain I lateral ridge, fusion loop, domain III lateral ridge, and domain I-II hinge. While monomeric in solution, JEV E assembles as an antiparallel dimer in the crystal lattice organized in a highly similar fashion as seen in cryo-electron microscopy models of mature flavivirus virions. The dimer interface, however, is remarkably small and lacks many of the domain II contacts observed in other flavivirus E homodimers. In addition, uniquely conserved histidines within the JEV serocomplex suggest that pH-mediated structural transitions may be aided by lateral interactions outside the dimer interface in the icosahedral virion. Our results suggest that variation in dimer structure and stability may significantly influence the assembly, receptor interaction, and uncoating of virions.

  18. A Proposed Model for Protein Crystal Nucleation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    How does one take a molecule, strongly asymmetric in both shape and charge distribution, and assemble it into a crystal? We propose a model for the nucleation and crystal growth process for tetragonal lysozyme, based upon fluorescence, light, neutron, and X-ray scattering data, size exclusion chromatography experiments, dialysis kinetics, AFM, and modeling of growth rate data, from this and other laboratories. The first species formed is postulated to be a 'head to side' dimer. Through repeating associations involving the same intermolecular interactions this grows to a 4(sub 3) helix structure, that in turn serves as the basic unit for nucleation and subsequent crystal growth. High salt attenuates surface charges while promoting hydrophobic interactions. Symmetry facilitates subsequent helix-helix self-association. Assembly stability is enhanced when a four helix structure is obtained, with each bound to two neighbors. Only two unique interactions are required. The first are those for helix formation, where the dominant interaction is the intermolecular bridging anion. The second is the anti-parallel side-by-side helix-helix interaction, guided by alternating pairs of symmetry related salt bridges along each side. At this stage all eight unique positions of the P4(sub3)2(sub 1),2(sub 1) unit cell are filled. The process is one of a) attenuating the most strongly interacting groups, such that b) the molecules begin to self-associate in defined patterns, so that c) symmetry is obtained, which d) propagates as a growing crystal. Simple and conceptually obvious in hindsight, this tells much about what we are empirically doing when we crystallize macromolecules. By adjusting the growth parameters we are empirically balancing the intermolecular interactions, preferentially attenuating the dominant strong (for lysozyme the charged groups) while strengthening the lesser strong (hydrophobic) interactions. In the general case for proteins the lack of a singularly defined

  19. Investigation of carrier scattering mechanisms in TlInS2 single crystals by Hall effect measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TlInS2 single crystals are studied through the conductivity and Hall effect measurements in the temperature regions of 100-400 and 170-400 K, respectively. An anomalous behavior of Hall voltage, which changes sign below 315 K, is interpreted through the existence of deep donor impurity levels that behave as acceptor levels when are empty. The hole and electron mobility are limited by the hole- and electron-phonon short range interactions scattering above and below 315 K, respectively. An energy level of 35 meV and a set of donor energy levels located at 360, 280, 220 and 170/152 meV are determined from the temperature dependencies of the carrier concentration and conductivity. A hole, electron, hole-electron pair effective masses of 0.24 mo, 0.14 mo and 0.09 mo and hole- and electron-phonon coupling constants of 0.50 and 0.64, respectively, are obtained from the Hall effect measurements. The theoretical fit of the Hall coefficient reveals a hole to electron mobility ratio of 0.8. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Polymorphic Protein Crystal Growth: Influence of Hydration and Ions in Glucose Isomerase

    OpenAIRE

    Gillespie, C. M.; Asthagiri, D.; Lenhoff, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Crystal polymorphs of glucose isomerase were examined to characterize the properties and to quantify the energetics of protein crystal growth. Transitions of polymorph stability were measured in poly(ethylene glycol)/NaCl solutions, and one transition point was singled out for more detailed quantitative analysis. Single crystal x-ray diffraction was used to confirm space groups and identify complementary crystal structures. Crystal polymorph stability was found to depend on the NaCl concentra...

  1. Some practical guidelines for UV imaging in the protein crystallization laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Sebastien; Seabrook, Shane A; Newman, Janet

    2013-02-01

    High-throughput imaging of protein crystallization experiments with ultraviolet (UV) light has recently become commercially available and can enable crystallographers to differentiate between crystals of protein and those of salt, as the visualization of protein crystals is based on intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. Unfortunately, UV imaging is not a panacea, as some protein crystals will not fluoresce under UV excitation and some salt crystals are UV-fluorescently active. As a new technology, there is little experience within the general community on how to use this technology effectively and what caveats to look out for. Here, an attempt is made to identify some of the common problems that may arise using UV-imaging technology by examining test proteins, common crystallization reagents and a range of proteins by assessing their UV-Vis absorbance spectra. Some pointers are offered as to which systems may not be appropriate for this methodology. PMID:23385768

  2. Detergents Destabilize the Cubic Phase of Monoolein: Implications for Membrane Protein Crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Misquitta, Y; Caffrey, M

    2003-01-01

    The in meso method for membrane protein crystallization uses a lipidic cubic phase as the hosting medium. The cubic phase provides a lipid bilayer into which the protein presumably reconstitutes and from which protein crystals nucleate and grow. The solutions used to spontaneously form the protein-enriched cubic phase often contain significant amounts of detergents that were employed initially to purify and to solubilize the membrane protein. By virtue of their surface activity, detergents ha...

  3. Immunization of mice by Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as carriers of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 ORF2 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Hui-Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgroud Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 is a primary etiological agent of post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS, which is a disease of increasing importance to the pig industry worldwide. Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs have gained increasing interest for use in vaccines. Methods To study the potential of HMSNs for use as a protein delivery system or vaccine carriers. HMSNs were synthesized by a sol–gel/emulsion(oil-in-water/ethanol method, purified PCV2 GST-ORF2-E protein was loaded into HMSNs, and the resulting HMSN/protein mixture was injected into mice. The uptake and release profiles of protein by HMSNs in vitro were investigated. PCV2 GST-ORF2-E specific antibodies and secretion of IFN-γ were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, spleen lymphocyte proliferation was measured by the MTS method, and the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ were determined by flow cytometry. Results HMSNs were found to yield better binding capacities and delivery profiles of proteins; the specific immune response induced by PCV2 GST-ORF2-E was maintained for a relatively long period of time after immunization with the HMSN/protein complex. Conclusion The findings suggest that HMSNs are good protein carriers and have high potential for use in future applications in therapeutic drug delivery.

  4. Imatinib (Gleevec@) conformations observed in single crystals, protein-Imatinib co-crystals and molecular dynamics: Implications for drug selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzarroshan, B.; Siddegowda, M. S.; Li, Hong qi; Yathirajan, H. S.; Narayana, B.; Rathore, R. S.

    2012-06-01

    Structure and dynamics of the Leukemia drug, Imatinib, were examined using X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics studies. Comparison of conformations observed in single crystals with several reported co-crystals of protein-drug complexes suggests existence of two conserved conformations of Imatinib, extended and compact (or folded), corresponding to two binding modes of interaction with the receptor. Furthermore, these conformations are conserved throughout a dynamics simulation. The present study attempts to draw a parallel on conformations and binding patterns of interactions, obtained from small-molecule single-crystal and macromolecule co-crystal studies, and provides structural insights for understanding the high selectivity of this drug molecule.

  5. Spin dynamics of charge carriers in the process of their localization in α'-(BEDT-TTF)2IBr2 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp changes in the integral intensity and linewidth of the ESR spectrum that accompany the localization of the charge carriers have been revealed in α'-(BEDT-TTF)2IBr2 crystals. It has been found that the types of localization in two compounds under investigation are different: charge carriers in β''-(BEDT-TTF)4NH4[Cr(C2O4)3] are localized on irregular defects of the crystal lattice, whereas charge carriers in α'-(BEDT-TTF)2IBr2 are localized at the regular positions of the unit cell. The exchange narrowing of the ESR line and a sharp decrease in the dc and ac magnetic susceptibilities are observed in α'-(BEDT-TTF)2IBr2 at low temperatures T 2IBr2 at high temperatures T > 50 K differ from each other, because the thermally activated hopping frequency of the charge carriers is higher than the frequency of the measuring UHF field of an ESR spectrometer.

  6. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  7. Sulfhydryl-based tumor antigen-carrier protein conjugates stimulate superior antitumor immunity against B cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betting, David J; Kafi, Kamran; Abdollahi-Fard, Alireza; Hurvitz, Sara A; Timmerman, John M

    2008-09-15

    Therapeutic vaccination of B cell lymphoma patients with tumor-specific Ig (idiotype, or Id) chemically coupled to the immunogenic foreign carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) using glutaraldehyde has shown promising results in early clinical trials, and phase III trials are underway. However, glutaraldehyde Id-KLH vaccines fail to elicit anti-Id immune and clinical responses in many patients, possibly because glutaraldehyde reacts with lysine, cysteine, tyrosine, and histidine residues, damaging critical immunogenic epitopes. A sulfhydryl-based tumor Ag-carrier protein conjugation system using maleimide chemistry was used to enhance the efficacy of Id-KLH vaccines. Maleimide Id-KLH conjugates eradicated A20 lymphoma from most tumor-bearing mice, whereas glutaraldehyde Id-KLH had little efficacy. Maleimide Id-KLH elicited tumor-specific IgG Abs and T cells, with CD8(+) T cells being the major effectors of antilymphoma immunity. Maleimide Id-KLH vaccines also demonstrated superior efficacy in 38C13 and BCL-1 lymphoma models, where Abs were shown to be critical for protection. Importantly, standard glutaraldehyde Id-KLH conjugation procedures could result in "overconjugation" of the tumor Ag, leading to decreased efficacy, whereas the heterobifunctional maleimide-based conjugation yielded potent vaccine product regardless of conjugation duration. Under lysosomal processing conditions, the Id-carrier protein linkage was cleavable only after maleimide conjugation. Maleimide KLH conjugation was easily performed with human Igs analogous to those used in Id-KLH clinical trials. These data support the evaluation of sulfhydryl-based Id-KLH vaccines in lymphoma clinical trials and possibly the use of tumor Ag-carrier protein vaccines for other cancers. PMID:18768870

  8. Discrimination of Potent Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase by Thermal Shift Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Afanador, Gustavo A.; Muench, Stephen P.; McPhillie, Martin; Fomovska, Alina; Schön, Arne; Zhou, Ying; Cheng, Gang; Stec, Jozef; Freundlich, Joel S.; Shieh, Hong-Ming; Anderson, John W.; Jacobus, David P.; Fidock, David A.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Fishwick, Colin W.

    2013-01-01

    Many microbial pathogens rely on a type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway which is distinct from the type I pathway found in humans. Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (ENR) is an essential FASII pathway enzyme and the target of a number of antimicrobial drug discovery efforts. The biocide triclosan is established as a potent inhibitor of ENR and has been the starting point for medicinal chemistry studies. We evaluated a series of triclosan analogs for their ability to inhibit the gro...

  9. Immunization of mice by Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as carriers of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 ORF2 Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Guo Hui-Chen; Feng Xiao-Ming; Sun Shi-Qi; Wei Yan-Quan; Sun De-Hui; Liu Xiang-Tao; Liu Zai-Xin; Luo Jian-Xiong; Yin Hong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Backgroud Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is a primary etiological agent of post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), which is a disease of increasing importance to the pig industry worldwide. Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) have gained increasing interest for use in vaccines. Methods To study the potential of HMSNs for use as a protein delivery system or vaccine carriers. HMSNs were synthesized by a sol–gel/emulsion(oil-in-water/ethanol) method, purified P...

  10. A profile of protein-protein interaction: Crystal structure of a lectin-lectin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surya, Sukumaran; Abhilash, Joseph; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkottu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakathu

    2016-06-01

    Proteins may utilize complex networks of interactions to create/proceed signaling pathways of highly adaptive responses such as programmed cell death. Direct binary interactions study of proteins may help propose models for protein-protein interaction. Towards this goal we applied a combination of thermodynamic kinetics and crystal structure analyses to elucidate the complexity and diversity in such interactions. By determining the heat change on the association of two galactose-specific legume lectins from Butea monosperma (BML) and Spatholobus parviflorus (SPL) belonging to Fabaceae family helped to compute the binding equilibrium. It was extended further by X-ray structural analysis of BML-SPL binary complex. In order to chart the proteins interacting mainly through their interfaces, identification of the nature of forces which stabilized the association of the lectin-lectin complex was examined. Comprehensive analysis of the BMLSPL complex by isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystal structure threw new light on the lectin-lectin interactions suggesting of their use in diverse areas of glycobiology. PMID:26945504

  11. A novel microseeding method for the crystallization of membrane proteins in lipidic cubic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolek, Stefan Andrew; Bräuning, Bastian; Shaw Stewart, Patrick Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Random microseed matrix screening (rMMS), in which seed crystals are added to random crystallization screens, is an important breakthrough in soluble protein crystallization that increases the number of crystallization hits that are available for optimization. This greatly increases the number of soluble protein structures generated every year by typical structural biology laboratories. Inspired by this success, rMMS has been adapted to the crystallization of membrane proteins, making LCP seed stock by scaling up LCP crystallization conditions without changing the physical and chemical parameters that are critical for crystallization. Seed crystals are grown directly in LCP and, as with conventional rMMS, a seeding experiment is combined with an additive experiment. The new method was used with the bacterial integral membrane protein OmpF, and it was found that it increased the number of crystallization hits by almost an order of magnitude: without microseeding one new hit was found, whereas with LCP-rMMS eight new hits were found. It is anticipated that this new method will lead to better diffracting crystals of membrane proteins. A method of generating seed gradients, which allows the LCP seed stock to be diluted and the number of crystals in each LCP bolus to be reduced, if required for optimization, is also demonstrated. PMID:27050265

  12. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Diffraction Imaging Study of Protein Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z. W.

    2003-01-01

    The study of defects and growth of protein crystals is of importance in providing a fundamental understanding of this important category of systems and the rationale for crystallization of better ordered crystals for structural determination and drug design. Yet, as a result of the extremely weak scattering power of x-rays in protein and other biological macromolecular crystals, the extinction lengths for those crystals are extremely large and, roughly speaking, of the order of millimeters on average compared to the scale of micrometers for most small molecular crystals. This has significant implication for x-ray diffraction and imaging study of protein crystals, and presents an interesting challenge to currently available x-ray analytical techniques. We proposed that coherence-based phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging could provide a way to augment defect contrast in x-ray diffraction images of weakly diffracting biological macromolecular crystals. I shall examine the principles and ideas behind this approach and compare it to other available x-ray topography and diffraction methods. I shall then present some recent experimental results in two model protein systems-cubic apofemtin and tetragonal lysozyme crystals to demonstrate the capability of the coherence-based imaging method in mapping point defects, dislocations, and the degree of perfection of biological macromolecular crystals with extreme sensitivity. While further work is under way, it is intended to show that the observed new features have yielded important information on protein crystal perfection and nucleation and growth mechanism otherwise unobtainable.

  13. Towards protein-crystal centering using second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for automated crystal centering to guide synchrotron X-ray diffraction of protein crystals has been explored. The potential of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for automated crystal centering to guide synchrotron X-ray diffraction of protein crystals was explored. These studies included (i) comparison of microcrystal positions in cryoloops as determined by SHG imaging and by X-ray diffraction rastering and (ii) X-ray structure determinations of selected proteins to investigate the potential for laser-induced damage from SHG imaging. In studies using β2 adrenergic receptor membrane-protein crystals prepared in lipidic mesophase, the crystal locations identified by SHG images obtained in transmission mode were found to correlate well with the crystal locations identified by raster scanning using an X-ray minibeam. SHG imaging was found to provide about 2 µm spatial resolution and shorter image-acquisition times. The general insensitivity of SHG images to optical scatter enabled the reliable identification of microcrystals within opaque cryocooled lipidic mesophases that were not identified by conventional bright-field imaging. The potential impact of extended exposure of protein crystals to five times a typical imaging dose from an ultrafast laser source was also assessed. Measurements of myoglobin and thaumatin crystals resulted in no statistically significant differences between structures obtained from diffraction data acquired from exposed and unexposed regions of single crystals. Practical constraints for integrating SHG imaging into an active beamline for routine automated crystal centering are discussed

  14. Isolation of a crystal matrix protein associated with calcium oxalate precipitation in vacuoles of specialized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingxiang; Zhang, Dianzhong; Lynch-Holm, Valerie J; Okita, Thomas W; Franceschi, Vincent R

    2003-10-01

    The formation of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals is considered to be a high-capacity mechanism for regulating Ca in many plants. Ca oxalate precipitation is not a stochastic process, suggesting the involvement of specific biochemical and cellular mechanisms. Microautoradiography of water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) tissue exposed to 3H-glutamate showed incorporation into developing crystals, indicating potential acidic proteins associated with the crystals. Dissolution of crystals leaves behind a crystal-shaped matrix "ghost" that is capable of precipitation of Ca oxalate in the original crystal morphology. To assess whether this matrix has a protein component, purified crystals were isolated and analyzed for internal protein. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of one major polypeptide of about 55 kD and two minor species of 60 and 63 kD. Amino acid analysis indicates the matrix protein is relatively high in acidic amino acids, a feature consistent with its solubility in formic acid but not at neutral pH. 45Ca-binding assays demonstrated the matrix protein has a strong affinity for Ca. Immunocytochemical localization using antibody raised to the isolated protein showed that the matrix protein is specific to crystal-forming cells. Within the vacuole, the surface and internal structures of two morphologically distinct Ca oxalate crystals, raphide and druse, were labeled by the antimatrix protein serum, as were the surfaces of isolated crystals. These results demonstrate that a specific Ca-binding protein exists as an integral component of Ca oxalate crystals, which holds important implications with respect to regulation of crystal formation. PMID:14555781

  15. Controlled in meso phase crystallization--a method for the structural investigation of membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kubicek

    Full Text Available We investigated in meso crystallization of membrane proteins to develop a fast screening technology which combines features of the well established classical vapor diffusion experiment with the batch meso phase crystallization, but without premixing of protein and monoolein. It inherits the advantages of both methods, namely (i the stabilization of membrane proteins in the meso phase, (ii the control of hydration level and additive concentration by vapor diffusion. The new technology (iii significantly simplifies in meso crystallization experiments and allows the use of standard liquid handling robots suitable for 96 well formats. CIMP crystallization furthermore allows (iv direct monitoring of phase transformation and crystallization events. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR crystals of high quality and diffraction up to 1.3 Å resolution have been obtained in this approach. CIMP and the developed consumables and protocols have been successfully applied to obtain crystals of sensory rhodopsin II (SRII from Halobacterium salinarum for the first time.

  16. Extracellular matrix protein in calcified endoskeleton: a potential additive for crystal growth and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a key function of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) on seed crystals, which are isolated from calcified endoskeletons of soft coral and contain only CaCO 3 without any living cells. This is the first report that an ECMP protein extracted from a marine organism could potentially influence in modifying the surface of a substrate for designing materials via crystallization. We previously studied with the ECMPs from a different type of soft coral ( Sinularia polydactyla) without introducing any seed crystals in the process , which showed different results. Thus, crystallization on the seed in the presence of ECMPs of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins from soft coral. For understanding this interesting phenomenon, in vitro crystallization was initiated in a supersaturated solution on seed particles of calcite (1 0 4) with and without ECMPs. No change in the crystal growth shape occurred without ECMPs present during the crystallization process. However, with ECMPs, the morphology and phase of the crystals in the crystallization process changed dramatically. Upon completion of crystallization with ECMPs, an attractive crystal morphology was found. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the crystal morphologies on the seeds surface. The mineral phases of crystals nucleated by ECMPs on the seeds surface were examined by Raman spectroscopy. Although 50 mM Mg 2+ is influential in making aragonite in the crystallization process, the ECMPs significantly made calcite crystals even when 50 mM Mg 2+ was present in the process. Crystallization with the ECMP additive seems to be a technically attractive strategy to generate assembled micro crystals that could be used in crystals growth and design in the Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  17. Loss of nuclear BRCA1 protein staining in normal tissue cells derived from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enhanced genomic instability has been recently reported in normal cells derived from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers when placed in vitro in non-physiological stress conditions. We present here original data which help to explain the observed genomic instability. Leucocytes from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, sporadic breast cancer patients and controls were prepared for BRCA1 immunocytochemistry. We show that BRCA1 containing nuclear dot like structures are detectable in about 80% of the leucocytes from controls and sporadic breast cancer patients, but are absent in the majority of normal cells from BRCA1 as well as BRCA2 mutation carriers (also in their normal breast cells). Our results thus indicate that the genomic instability observed in normal cells from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers is associated with a down-regulation of nuclear BRCA1 protein accumulation in the dot like structures. These results suggest in addition that immunocytochemical or alternative molecular screening strategies might help to identify women with a high risk for breast (ovarian) cancer even when the underlying genetic defect remains undetectable

  18. Loss of nuclear BRCA1 protein staining in normal tissue cells derived from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brakeleer, Sylvia de [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology (Department of Medical Oncology), UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Bogdani, Marika [Department of Experimental Pathology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Greve, Jacques de [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology (Department of Medical Oncology), UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Familial Cancer Clinic, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Decock, Julie [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology (Department of Medical Oncology), UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Sermijn, Erica [Familial Cancer Clinic, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Bonduelle, Maryse [Familial Cancer Clinic, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Goelen, Guido [Familial Cancer Clinic, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Teugels, Erik [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology (Department of Medical Oncology), UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium) and Familial Cancer Clinic, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: eteugels@uzbrussel.be

    2007-06-01

    Enhanced genomic instability has been recently reported in normal cells derived from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers when placed in vitro in non-physiological stress conditions. We present here original data which help to explain the observed genomic instability. Leucocytes from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, sporadic breast cancer patients and controls were prepared for BRCA1 immunocytochemistry. We show that BRCA1 containing nuclear dot like structures are detectable in about 80% of the leucocytes from controls and sporadic breast cancer patients, but are absent in the majority of normal cells from BRCA1 as well as BRCA2 mutation carriers (also in their normal breast cells). Our results thus indicate that the genomic instability observed in normal cells from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers is associated with a down-regulation of nuclear BRCA1 protein accumulation in the dot like structures. These results suggest in addition that immunocytochemical or alternative molecular screening strategies might help to identify women with a high risk for breast (ovarian) cancer even when the underlying genetic defect remains undetectable.

  19. Expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Niefind, K; Pinna, L A;

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic (alpha) subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2alpha) was originally cloned and overexpressed in the Escherichia coli strain pT7-7/BL21(DE3). The protein has been purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, they have unit-cell parameters...

  20. Separation of Protein Crystals from Spores of Bacillus thuringiensis by Ludox Gradient Centrifugation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yu Sheng; Brookes, Allan; Carlson, Ken; Filner, Philip

    1989-01-01

    A method is described for the purification of Bacillus thuringiensis protein crystals by Ludox gradient centrifugation. This method is simple, inexpensive, fast, and efficient compared with other techniques. It has been successfully used to purify and characterize the protein crystals from several B. thuringiensis strains.

  1. Some practical guidelines for UV imaging in the protein crystallization laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of UV imaging as a means of locating protein crystals is a fairly new tool, however not suitable for all protein crystallization trials. Practical examples of the strengths and some of the pitfalls of the technology are presented. High-throughput imaging of protein crystallization experiments with ultraviolet (UV) light has recently become commercially available and can enable crystallographers to differentiate between crystals of protein and those of salt, as the visualization of protein crystals is based on intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. Unfortunately, UV imaging is not a panacea, as some protein crystals will not fluoresce under UV excitation and some salt crystals are UV-fluorescently active. As a new technology, there is little experience within the general community on how to use this technology effectively and what caveats to look out for. Here, an attempt is made to identify some of the common problems that may arise using UV-imaging technology by examining test proteins, common crystallization reagents and a range of proteins by assessing their UV–Vis absorbance spectra. Some pointers are offered as to which systems may not be appropriate for this methodology

  2. Understanding Water Equilibration Fundamentals as a Step for Rational Protein Crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro M Martins; Rocha, Fernando; Damas, Ana M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Vapor diffusion is the most widely used technique for protein crystallization and the rate of water evaporation plays a key role on the quality of the crystals. Attempts have been made in the past to solve the mass transfer problem governing the evaporation process, either analytically or by employing numerical methods. Despite these efforts, the methods used for protein crystallization remain based on trial and error techniques rather than on fundamental principles. Methodology/Pr...

  3. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model for Protein Crystal Growth Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, Sabine; Smith, Lori; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea Victoria has become a popular marker for e.g. mutagenesis work. Its fluorescent property, which originates from a chromophore located in the center of the molecule, makes it widely applicable as a research too]. GFP clones have been produced with a variety of spectral properties, such as blue and yellow emitting species. The protein is a single chain of molecular weight 27 kDa and its structure has been determined at 1.9 Angstrom resolution. The combination of GFP's fluorescent property, the knowledge of its several crystallization conditions, and its increasing use in biophysical and biochemical studies, all led us to consider it as a model material for macromolecular crystal growth studies. Initial preparations of GFP were from E.coli with yields of approximately 5 mg/L of culture media. Current yields are now in the 50 - 120 mg/L range, and we hope to further increase this by expression of the GFP gene in the Pichia system. The results of these efforts and of preliminary crystal growth studies will be presented.

  4. Influence of precipitating agents on thermodynamic parameters of protein crystallization solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavros, Philemon; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Nounesis, George

    2016-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is the most powerful method for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins to (near-)atomic resolution, but protein crystallization is a poorly explained and often intractable phenomenon. Differential Scanning Calorimetry was used to measure the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) of temperature-driven unfolding of two globular proteins, lysozyme, and ribonuclease A, in various salt solutions. The mixtures were categorized into those that were conducive to crystallization of the protein and those that were not. It was found that even fairly low salt concentrations had very large effects on thermodynamic parameters. High concentrations of salts conducive to crystallization stabilized the native folded forms of proteins, whereas high concentrations of salts that did not crystallize them tended to destabilize them. Considering the ΔH and TΔS contributions to the ΔG of unfolding separately, high concentrations of crystallizing salts were found to enthalpically stabilize and entropically destabilize the protein, and vice-versa for the noncrystallizing salts. These observations suggest an explanation, in terms of protein stability and entropy of hydration, of why some salts are good crystallization agents for a given protein and others are not. This in turn provides theoretical insight into the process of protein crystallization, suggesting ways of predicting and controlling it. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 642-652, 2016. PMID:27114109

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of merohedrally twinned crystals of MJ0729, a CBS-domain protein from Methanococcus jannaschii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigonal crystals of MJ0729 showing different degrees of merohedral twinning that may vary from perfect hemihedral twinning to perfect tetartohedral twinning were obtained upon slight variation of the pH. CBS domains are small protein motifs, usually associated in tandem, that are implicated in binding to adenosyl groups. Several genetic diseases in humans have been associated with mutations in CBS sequences, which has made them very promising targets for rational drug design. Trigonal crystals of the CBS-domain protein MJ0729 from Methanococcus jannaschii were grown by the vapour-diffusion method at acidic pH. Preliminary analysis of nine X-ray diffraction data sets using Yeates statistics and Britton plots showed that slight variation in the pH as well as in the buffer used in the crystallization experiments led to crystals with different degrees of merohedral twinning that may vary from perfect hemihedral twinning to perfect tetartohedral twinning

  6. A Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein with a high activity against members of the family Noctuidae.

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, B.; Buysse, L; Decock, C.; Jansens, S.; Piens, C; Saey, B; Seurinck, J; Van Audenhove, K; Van Rie, J.; A. van Vliet; Peferoen, M.

    1996-01-01

    The full characterization of a novel insecticidal crystal protein, named Cry9Ca1 according to the revised nomenclature for Cry proteins, from Bacillus thuringiensis serovar tolworthi is reported. The crystal protein has 1,157 amino acids and a molecular mass of 129.8 kDa. It has the typical features of the Lepidoptera-active crystal proteins such as five conserved sequence blocks. Also, it is truncated upon trypsin digestion to a toxic fragment of 68.7 kDa by removal of 43 amino acids at the ...

  7. The genes encoding the biotin carboxyl carrier protein and biotin carboxylase subunits of Bacillus subtilis acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, the first enzyme of fatty acid synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    P. Marini(GANIL); Li, S J; Gardiol, D; Cronan, J E; De Mendoza, D

    1995-01-01

    The genes encoding two subunits of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, biotin carboxyl carrier protein, and biotin carboxylase have been cloned from Bacillus subtilis. DNA sequencing and RNA blot hybridization studies indicated that the B. subtilis accB homolog which encodes biotin carboxyl carrier protein, is part of an operon that includes accC, the gene encoding the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase.

  8. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction. Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus’ molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 Å resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts

  9. A Double Emulsion-Based, Plastic-Glass Hybrid Microfluidic Platform for Protein Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyong Zhu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the design and construction of a plastic-glass hybrid microfluidic platform for performing protein crystallization trials in nanoliter double emulsions. The double emulsion-based protein crystallization trials were implemented with both the vapor-diffusion method and microbatch method by controlling the diffusion of water between the inner and outer phases and by eliminating water evaporation. Double emulsions, whose inner and outer environments can be easily adjusted, can provide ideal conditions to explore protein crystallization with the advantages of a convection-free environment and a homogeneous interface. The property of the water-oil interface was demonstrated to be a critical factor for nucleation, and appropriate surfactants should be chosen to prevent protein adsorption at the interface. The results from the volume effect study showed a trend of fewer crystals and longer incubation time when the protein solution volume became smaller, suggesting that the nucleation in protein crystallization process can be controlled by changing the volume of protein solutions. Finally, sparse matrix screening was achieved using the double emulsion-based microbatch method. The double emulsion-based approach for protein crystallization is a promising tool for enhancing the crystal quality by controlling the nucleation process.

  10. Crystallization and X-ray analysis of the T = 4 particle of hepatitis B capsid protein with an N-terminal extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatitis B virus capsids have significant potential as carriers for immunogenic peptides. The crystal structure of the T = 4 particle of hepatitis B core protein containing an N-terminal extension reveals that the fusion peptide is exposed on the exterior of the particle. Hepatitis B core (HBc) particles have been extensively exploited as carriers for foreign immunological epitopes in the development of multicomponent vaccines and diagnostic reagents. Crystals of the T = 4 HBc particle were grown in PEG 20 000, ammonium sulfate and various types of alcohols. A temperature jump from 277 or 283 to 290 K was found to enhance crystal growth. A crystal grown using MPD as a cryoprotectant diffracted X-rays to 7.7 Å resolution and data were collected to 99.6% completeness at 8.9 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 352.3, b = 465.5, c = 645.0 Å. The electron-density map reveals a protrusion that is consistent with the N-terminus extending out from the surface of the capsid. The structure presented here supports the idea that N-terminal insertions can be exploited in the development of diagnostic reagents, multicomponent vaccines and delivery vehicles into mammalian cells

  11. Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction From Two-Dimensional Protein Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Matthias [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carlson, David B. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Hunter, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, Garth J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); Messerschmidt, Marc [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Zatsepin, Nadia A. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Barty, Anton [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany); Benner, Henry [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chu, Kaiqin [Center for Biophotonics, Sacramento, CA (United States); Graf, Alexander [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hau-Riege, Stefan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kirian, Rick [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany); Padeste, Celestino [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Pardini, Tommaso [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Segelke, Brent [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Seibert, M. M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Spence, John C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Tsai, Ching-Ju [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Lane, Steve M. [Center for Biophotonics, Sacramento, CA (United States); Li, Xiao-Dan [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Schertler, Gebhard [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Boutet, Sebastien [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Coleman, Matthew A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Evans, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Here we present femtosecond x-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D) protein crystals using an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL). To date it has not been possible to acquire x-ray diffraction from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permits a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy methodology at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we observed Bragg diffraction to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples that were maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  12. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yisong [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States); Brecht, Eric [Montana State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Aznavour, Kristen [University of Southern California, Department of Chemistry (United States); Nix, Jay C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physical Biosciences Division (United States); Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States); George, Simon J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physical Biosciences Division (United States); Bau, Robert [University of Southern California, Department of Chemistry (United States); Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W. [Montana State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (United States); Jenney, Francis E. Jr. [Georgia Campus, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (United States); Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong [Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source (United States); Yoda, Yoshitaka [JASRI (Japan); Cramer, Stephen P., E-mail: spcramer@lbl.gov [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States)

    2013-12-15

    We have applied {sup 57}Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Iron-sulfur protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the crystal structure.

  13. Encapsulating Mobile Proton Carriers into Structural Defects in Coordination Polymer Crystals: High Anhydrous Proton Conduction and Fuel Cell Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, Munehiro; Horike, Satoshi; Itakura, Tomoya; Shinozaki, Ryota; Ogiwara, Naoki; Umeyama, Daiki; Nagarkar, Sanjog; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Malon, Michal; Hayashi, Akari; Ohhara, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2016-07-13

    We describe the encapsulation of mobile proton carriers into defect sites in nonporous coordination polymers (CPs). The proton carriers were encapsulated with high mobility and provided high proton conductivity at 150 °C under anhydrous conditions. The high proton conductivity and nonporous nature of the CP allowed its application as an electrolyte in a fuel cell. The defects and mobile proton carriers were investigated using solid-state NMR, XAFS, XRD, and ICP-AES/EA. On the basis of these analyses, we concluded that the defect sites provide space for mobile uncoordinated H3PO4, H2PO4(-), and H2O. These mobile carriers play a key role in expanding the proton-hopping path and promoting the mobility of protons in the coordination framework, leading to high proton conductivity and fuel cell power generation. PMID:27324658

  14. Charge carrier transport in high purity perylene single crystal studied by time-of-flight measurements and through field effect transistor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronic transport has been studied by measuring the characteristics of field effect transistors using high purity perylene and the results have been compared with those from time-of-flight measurements. The purity of the material has been monitored by carrier trapping time and delayed fluorescence lifetime. Three types of field effect transistors have been studied: (1) thin film transistor, (2) transistor prepared by placing a single crystal flake on a substrate and (3) transistor fabricated on a single crystal by depositing electrodes and insulating layer onto it. Compared to thin film transistors prepared by evaporating perylene onto a SiO2/Si substrate, higher mobility values were obtained with transistors using single crystals, but the electrical characteristics of the transistors were far from ideal: large threshold gate voltage observed in the second class of FETs indicated that a high density of traps are present at the interface between the organics and the insulator. A transistor of the third class showed that it functioned indeed as a FET with a reasonably high mobility, but the operation was not stable enough to allow reliable measurements. Much remains to be improved in the design and construction of a perylene FET before the potentiality of the material is fully developed. Also, it remains to be explored to what extent the bulk purity and the molecular order at the organics/insulator interface influence the transport of the charge carriers in an organic FET

  15. Quantum oscillations of the topological surface states in low carrier concentration crystals of Bi2-xSbxTe3-ySey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.; Nikitin, A. M.; Wu, D.; Huang, Y. K.; Puri, A.; Wiedmann, S.; Zeitler, U.; Frantzeskakis, E.; van Heumen, E.; Golden, M. S.; de Visser, A.

    2016-02-01

    We report a high-field magnetotransport study on selected low-carrier crystals of the topological insulator Bi2-xSbxTe3-ySey. Monochromatic Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations are observed at 4.2 K and their two-dimensional nature is confirmed by tilting the magnetic field with respect to the sample surface. With the help of Lifshitz-Kosevich theory, important transport parameters of the surface states are obtained, including the carrier density, cyclotron mass and mobility. For (x , y) =(0.50 , 1.3) the Landau level plot is analyzed in terms of a model based on a topological surface state in the presence of a non-ideal linear dispersion relation and a Zeeman term with gs=70 or - 54. Input parameters were taken from the electronic dispersion relation measured directly by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy on crystals from the same batch. The Hall resistivity of the same crystal (thickness of 40 μm) is analyzed in a two-band model, from which we conclude that the ratio of the surface conductance to the total conductance amounts to 32%.

  16. Application of picosecond four-wave mixing and photoluminescence techniques for investigation of carrier dynamics in bulk crystals and heterostructures of GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarasiunas, K.; Malinauskas, T.; Kadys, A.; Aleksiejunas, R.; Sudzius, M.; Miasojedovas, S.; Jursenas, S.; Zukauskas, A. [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio ave. 9-3, 2040 Vilnius (Lithuania); Gogova, D.; Kakanakova-Georgieva, A.; Janzen, E.; Larsson, H.; Monemar, B. [Department of Physics and Measurement Technology, Linkoeping University (Sweden); Gibart, P.; Beaumont, B. [LUMILOG, 2720, Chemin Saint Bernard, Les Moulins I, 06220 Vallauris (France)

    2005-02-01

    Complementary characterization of the highly-excited nitrides has been performed by using time-resolved four-wave mixing and photoluminescence techniques. Defect-density and excitation dependent carrier recombination and transport have been studied in GaN heterostructures and free-standing crystals, grown by various technologies (hot-wall MOCVD, standard MOCVD, and HVPE) on different substrates (6H-SiC, 4H-SiC, or sapphire). The determined value of carrier lifetime varied from 300 ps in the GaN/SiC epilayers up to 3 ns in the bulk crystals, while the bipolar diffusion coefficient D was found to be in the range from 1.5 cm{sup 2}/s to 2.9 cm{sup 2}/s, correspondingly. An increase of D with excitation density in bulk HVPE crystals was attributed to screening of potential barriers around dislocations. A complete saturation of FWM diffraction in hot-wall MOCVD grown GaN/SiC heterostructures revealed a low threshold of stimulated recombination (0.5 mJ/cm{sup 2}), as confirmed by spectra and intensity of photoluminesce. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Charge-carrier mobilities in Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te single crystals used as nuclear radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burshtein, Z.; Jayatirtha, H. N.; Burger, A.; Butler, J. F.; Apotovsky, B.; Doty, F. P.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-carrier mobilities were measured for the first time in Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te single crystals using time-of-flight measurements of charge carriers produced by short (10 ns) light pulses from a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The electron mobility displayed a T exp -1.1 dependence on the absolute temperature T in the range 200-320 K, with a room-temperature mobility of 1350 sq cm/V s. The hole mobility displayed a T exp -2.0 dependence in the same temperature range, with a room-temperature mobility of 120 sq cm/V s. Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te appears to be a very favorable material for a room-temperature electronic nuclear radiation detector.

  18. Structure of 3-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) reductase from Rickettsia prowazekii at 2.25 Å resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The R. prowazekii 3-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) reductase is similar to those from other prokaryotic pathogens but differs significantly from the mammalian orthologue, strengthening its case as a potential drug target. Rickettsia prowazekii, a parasitic Gram-negative bacterium, is in the second-highest biodefense category of pathogens of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, but only a handful of structures have been deposited in the PDB for this bacterium; to date, all of these have been solved by the SSGCID. Owing to its small genome (about 800 protein-coding genes), it relies on the host for many basic biosynthetic processes, hindering the identification of potential antipathogenic drug targets. However, like many bacteria and plants, its metabolism does depend upon the type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS) pathway for lipogenesis, whereas the predominant form of fatty-acid biosynthesis in humans is via the type I pathway. Here, the structure of the third enzyme in the FAS pathway, 3-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) reductase, is reported at a resolution of 2.25 Å. Its fold is highly similar to those of the existing structures from some well characterized pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Burkholderia pseudomallei, but differs significantly from the analogous mammalian structure. Hence, drugs known to target the enzymes of pathogenic bacteria may serve as potential leads against Rickettsia, which is responsible for spotted fever and typhus and is found throughout the world

  19. Comparative experiment of four different materials as carriers of Bone morphogenetic protein to repair long bone defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Kuan-hai; PEI Guo-xian; YANG Run-gong

    2001-01-01

    @@ OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of four different materials as carriers of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) to repair long bone defect. METHODS 12 mm radius bone defects were made. They were divided into 4 groups in random and repaired respectively with the vascular muscle flap combined with FS/BMP (group A), vascular muscle flap/BMP (group B), bloodless muscle flap/BMP (group C) and autolyzed antigen-extracted allogeneic bone (AAA)/BMP (group D).Their abilities of bone forming to repair bone defects were observed.

  20. Effect of sterol carrier protein-2 gene ablation on HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from cultured primary mouse hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Storey, Stephen M.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Kerstin K. Landrock; Martin, Gregory G.; Huang, Huan; Ross Payne, H.; Johnson, Jeffery D.; Macfarlane, Ronald D.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    Although HDL-mediated cholesterol transport to the liver is well studied, cholesterol efflux from hepatocytes back to HDL is less well understood. Real-time imaging of efflux of 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol), which is poorly esterified, and [3H]cholesterol, which is extensively esterified, from cultured primary hepatocytes of wild-type and sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) gene-ablated mice showed that 1) NBD-cholesterol efflux w...

  1. Construction of efficient and effective transformation vectors for palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene silencing in oil palm

    OpenAIRE

    Bhore, Subhash Janardhan; Shah, Farida Habib

    2011-01-01

    Palm oil obtained from E. guineensis Jacq. Tenera is known to have about 44% of palmitic acid (C16:0). Palmitoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Thioesterase (PATE) is one of the key enzymes involved in plastidial fatty acid biosynthesis; and it determines the level of the C16:0 assimilation in oilseeds. This enzyme's activity in oil palm is responsible for high (> 44 % in E. guineensis Jacq. Tenera and 25 % in E. oleifera) content of C16:0 in its oil. By post-transcriptional PATE gene silencing, C16:0 ...

  2. Macro-to-micro structural proteomics: native source proteins for high-throughput crystallization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Totir

    Full Text Available Structural biology and structural genomics projects routinely rely on recombinantly expressed proteins, but many proteins and complexes are difficult to obtain by this approach. We investigated native source proteins for high-throughput protein crystallography applications. The Escherichia coli proteome was fractionated, purified, crystallized, and structurally characterized. Macro-scale fermentation and fractionation were used to subdivide the soluble proteome into 408 unique fractions of which 295 fractions yielded crystals in microfluidic crystallization chips. Of the 295 crystals, 152 were selected for optimization, diffraction screening, and data collection. Twenty-three structures were determined, four of which were novel. This study demonstrates the utility of native source proteins for high-throughput crystallography.

  3. Laterally Mobile, Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers at the Fluorous−Aqueous Interface in a Plug-Based Microfluidic System: Characterization and Testing with Membrane Protein Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreutz, Jason E.; Li, Liang; Roach, L. Spencer; Hatakeyama, Takuji; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; (UC)

    2009-11-04

    This paper describes a method to generate functionalizable, mobile self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in plug-based microfluidics. Control of interfaces is advancing studies of biological interfaces, heterogeneous reactions, and nanotechnology. SAMs have been useful for such studies, but they are not laterally mobile. Lipid-based methods, though mobile, are not easily amenable to setting up the hundreds of experiments necessary for crystallization screening. Here we demonstrate a method, complementary to current SAM and lipid methods, for rapidly generating mobile, functionalized SAMs. This method relies on plugs, droplets surrounded by a fluorous carrier fluid, to rapidly explore chemical space. Specifically, we implemented his-tag binding chemistry to design a new fluorinated amphiphile, RfNTA, using an improved one-step synthesis of RfOEG under Mitsunobu conditions. RfNTA introduces specific binding of protein at the fluorous-aqueous interface, which concentrates and orients proteins at the interface, even in the presence of other surfactants. We then applied this approach to the crystallization of a his-tagged membrane protein, Reaction Center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, performed 2400 crystallization trials, and showed that this approach can increase the range of crystal-producing conditions, the success rate at a given condition, the rate of nucleation, and the quality of the crystal formed.

  4. Intracrystalline Proteins Promote Dissolution of Urinary Calcium Oxalate Crystals in Cultured Renal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Phulwinder K.; Thurgood, Lauren A.; Fleming, David E.; van Bronswijk, Wilhelm; Ryall, Rosemary L.

    2007-04-01

    We have proposed that internalized calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals containing intracrystalline proteins would be vulnerable to intracellular dissolution. The aims of this study were (1) to measure non-uniform strain and crystallite size in CaOx monohydrate (COM) crystals containing increasing amounts of intracrystalline crystal matrix extract (CME) and (2) to compare the rates of crystal dissolution in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCKII) cells. CME was isolated by demineralization of COM crystals generated from human urine. Cold and 14C-oxalate-labelled COM crystals were precipitated from ultrafiltered urine containing CME at final concentrations of 0-5mg/L. Non-uniform strain and crystallite size were determined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction with Rietveld whole-pattern peak fitting and profile analysis, and the protein content of the crystals was analyzed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting for prothrombin fragment 1. Radiolabeled crystals were added to MDCKII cells and dissolution was expressed as radioactive label released into the medium relative to that in the crystals at zero time. Non-uniform strain increased and crystallite size decreased proportionally with rising CME concentration, reaching saturation between approximately 1 and 5 mg/L, and demonstrating unequivocally the inclusion of increasing quantities of proteins in the crystals. This was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Crystal dissolution also followed saturation kinetics. These findings were confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), which showed that the degree of crystal degradation increased relative to CME concentration. We conclude that intracrystalline proteins enhance intracellular dissolution of CaOx crystals and thus may provide a natural defense against stone pathogenesis.

  5. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2005-01-01

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain "low-hanging fruit" protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area are reported from

  6. Solvent content of protein crystals from diffraction intensities by Independent Component Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lamura, Antonio; Ladisa, Massimo; Nico, Giovanni; Siliqi, Dritan

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the protein content of several crystal forms of proteins has been performed. We apply a new numerical technique, the Independent Component Analysis (ICA), to determine the volume fraction of the asymmetric unit occupied by the protein. This technique requires only the crystallographic data of structure factors as input.

  7. Ultrafast Solvation Dynamics of Subtilisin-Polyethylene Glycol Interaction for Protein Crystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Qing; MENG Geng; WANG Shu-Feng; ZHENG Xiao-Feng; YANG Hong; GONG Qi-Huang

    2011-01-01

    We study the ultrafast solvation dynamics of protein-precipitant complexes. Protein subtilisin carlsberg (SC) was mixed with several polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitants for protein crystallization. Picosecond-resolved emission spectra from single intrinsic tryptophan residue (Trp-113) are recorded to construct solvation correlation functions. For precipitant concentrations with various crystallization effects, we observe drastically different solvation relaxation processes. These differences in solvation dynamics are correlated with the local protein structural integrity and water-network stability upon interaction with the precipitants. The solvation dynamics at the protein surface is proposed as a new perspective to study precipitant-protein interactions.%@@ We study the ultrafast solvation dynamics of protein-precipitant complexes.Protein subtilisin earlsberg (SC) was mixed with several polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitants for protein crystallization.Picosecond-resolved emission spectra from single intrinsic tryptophan residue (Trp-113) are recorded to construct solvation correlation functions.For precipitant concentrations with various crystallization effects, we observe drastically different solvation relaxation processes.These differences in solvation dynamics are correlated with the local protein structural integrity and water-network stability upon interaction with the precipitants.The solvation dynamics at the protein surface is proposed as a new perspective to study precipitant-protein interactions.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the RAD protein from Antirrhinum majus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 8 kDa proteolytic fragment of the A. majus RADIALIS protein was crystallized and X-ray data were collected to 2 Å resolution. Crystals of the RADIALIS protein from Antirrhinum majus were grown by vapour diffusion after limited proteolysis. Mass spectrometry indicated that an 8 kDa fragment had been crystallized corresponding to the predicted MYB DNA-binding domain. X-ray data collected at room temperature were consistent with tetragonal symmetry, whereas data collected at 100 K using crystals cryoprotected by supplementing the mother liquor with ethylene glycol conformed to orthorhombic symmetry. It was subsequently shown that crystals soaked in cryoprotectants that were ‘osmolality-matched’ to the mother liquor retained tetragonal symmetry. Using these crystals, X-ray data were collected in-house to a maximum resolution of 2 Å

  9. Roles of electrostatics and conformation in protein-crystal interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul V Azzopardi

    Full Text Available In vitro studies have shown that the phosphoprotein osteopontin (OPN inhibits the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite (HA and other biominerals. In vivo, OPN is believed to prevent the calcification of soft tissues. However, the nature of the interaction between OPN and HA is not understood. In the computational part of the present study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to predict the adsorption of 19 peptides, each 16 amino acids long and collectively covering the entire sequence of OPN, to the {100} face of HA. This analysis showed that there is an inverse relationship between predicted strength of adsorption and peptide isoelectric point (P<0.0001. Analysis of the OPN sequence by PONDR (Predictor of Naturally Disordered Regions indicated that OPN sequences predicted to adsorb well to HA are highly disordered. In the experimental part of the study, we synthesized phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated peptides corresponding to OPN sequences 65-80 (pSHDHMDDDDDDDDDGD and 220-235 (pSHEpSTEQSDAIDpSAEK. In agreement with the PONDR analysis, these were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to be largely disordered. A constant-composition/seeded growth assay was used to assess the HA-inhibiting potencies of the synthetic peptides. The phosphorylated versions of OPN65-80 (IC(50 = 1.93 microg/ml and OPN220-235 (IC(50 = 1.48 microg/ml are potent inhibitors of HA growth, as is the nonphosphorylated version of OPN65-80 (IC(50 = 2.97 microg/ml; the nonphosphorylated version of OPN220-235 has no measurable inhibitory activity. These findings suggest that the adsorption of acidic proteins to Ca2+-rich crystal faces of biominerals is governed by electrostatics and is facilitated by conformational flexibility of the polypeptide chain.

  10. Understanding the fabric of protein crystals: computational classification of biological interfaces and crystal contacts

    OpenAIRE

    Capitani, Guido; Duarte, Jose M; Baskaran, Kumaran; Bliven, Spencer; Somody, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Modern structural biology still draws the vast majority of information from crystallography, a technique where the objects being investigated are embedded in a crystal lattice. Given the complexity and variety of those objects, it becomes fundamental to computationally assess which of the interfaces in the lattice are biologically relevant and which are simply crystal contacts. Since the mid-1990s, several approaches have been applied to obtain high-accuracy classification of crystal contacts...

  11. Calcium Distribution in Globoid Crystals of Cucurbita Cotyledon Protein Bodies 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, John N. A.; Spitzer, Ernest; Vollmer, Catherine M.

    1979-01-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis was used to investigate the location of globoid crystals with relatively high Ca levels within cotyledons of Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita mixta, and Cucurbita andreana. The small globoid crystals in both upper and lower epidermal cells commonly contained Ca. Ca was present in globoid crystals of all provascular regions with the exception of the very small provascular regions of C. maxima. In C. maxima and C. mixta cotyledons, some cases were observed where Ca was found in the globoid crystals of the first layer of mesophyll cells surrounding the provascular region, but in general Ca was absent from globoid crystals of palisade and spongy mesophyll cells. In C. andreana, globoid crystals of palisade and spongy mesophyll cells commonly contained at least some Ca. Cell position and cell type are factors affecting the Ca content of globoid crystals in protein bodies. PMID:16660825

  12. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1 from Homo sapiens is provided. ErbB-3-binding protein 1 (Ebp1) is a member of the family of proliferation-associated 2G4 proteins (PA2G4s) and plays a role in cellular growth and differentiation. Ligand-induced activation of the transmembrane receptor ErbB3 leads to dissociation of Ebp1 from the receptor in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The non-associated protein is involved in transcriptional and translational regulation in the cell. Here, the overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Ebp1 from Homo sapiens are reported. Initially observed crystals were improved by serial seeding to single crystals suitable for data collection. The optimized crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P41212 or P43212 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of human seminal plasma protein PSP94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human seminal plasma protein PSP94 has been purified from human seminal plasma and crystallized. The human seminal plasma protein PSP94 is a small protein of 94 residues that contains ten cysteines. Since its discovery about 25 years ago, several potential biological functions have been reported for this protein. Many PSP94 homologues have also been identified since then from various species, but no crystal structure has been determined to date. PSP94 has been purified from human seminal plasma and crystallized. These crystals diffracted to ∼2.3 Å resolution and belonged to space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = 107.9, b = 107.9, c = 92.1 Å. There are four molecules in the asymmetric unit. Structure solution by the heavy-atom method is currently in progress

  14. Expression, purification and crystallization of the cell-division protein YgfE from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An open reading frame from E. coli MG1655 has been cloned, expressed and purified. Crystals obtained from the purified recombinant protein have been obtained in a variety of different forms diffracting to 1.8 Å resolution

  15. Fast high-pressure freezing of protein crystals in their mother liquor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein crystals were vitrified using high-pressure freezing in their mother liquor at 210 MPa and 77 K without cryoprotectants or oil coating. The method was successfully applied to photosystem II, which is representative of a membrane protein with a large unit cell and weak crystal contacts. High-pressure freezing (HPF) is a method which allows sample vitrification without cryoprotectants. In the present work, protein crystals were cooled to cryogenic temperatures at a pressure of 210 MPa. In contrast to other HPF methods published to date in the field of cryocrystallography, this protocol involves rapid sample cooling using a standard HPF device. The fast cooling rates allow HPF of protein crystals directly in their mother liquor without the need for cryoprotectants or external reagents. HPF was first attempted with hen egg-white lysozyme and cubic insulin crystals, yielding good to excellent diffraction quality. Non-cryoprotected crystals of the membrane protein photosystem II have been successfully cryocooled for the first time. This indicates that the presented HPF method is well suited to the vitrification of challenging systems with large unit cells and weak crystal contacts

  16. Two-step purification of pathogenesis-related proteins from grape juice and crystallization of thaumatin-like proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sluyter, Steven C; Marangon, Matteo; Stranks, Samuel D; Neilson, Karlie A; Hayasaka, Yoji; Haynes, Paul A; Menz, R Ian; Waters, Elizabeth J

    2009-12-01

    Grape thaumatin-like (TL) proteins and chitinases play roles in plant-pathogen interactions and can cause protein haze in white wine unless removed prior to bottling. A two-step method is described that highly purified hundreds of milligrams of TL proteins and chitinases from two juices by strong cation exchange (SCX) and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The method was fast and separated isoforms of TL proteins and chitinases from within the same juice, in most cases to >97% purity. The isolated proteins were identified by peptide nanoLC-MS/MS and crystallized using a high-throughput screening method. Crystals from three protein fractions produced high-resolution X-ray crystallography data. PMID:19886666

  17. Development of compartment for studies on the growth of protein crystals in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, T.; Tsukamoto, K.; Yoshizaki, I.; Fukuyama, S.; Miura, H.; Shimaoka, T.; Maki, T.; Oshi, K.; Kimura, Y.

    2016-03-01

    To clarify the growth mechanism of a protein crystal, it is essential to measure its growth rate with respect to the supersaturation. We developed a compartment (growth cell) for measuring the growth rate (microgravity environment, thereby advancing our understanding of the mechanism of protein crystal growth from solution. The technique used to develop the growth cell is useful not only for space experiments but also for kinetic studies of materials with very slow growth and dissolution rates (<10-3 nm s-1).

  18. A Double Emulsion-Based, Plastic-Glass Hybrid Microfluidic Platform for Protein Crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Deyong Zhu; Xiaohu Zhou; Bo Zheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design and construction of a plastic-glass hybrid microfluidic platform for performing protein crystallization trials in nanoliter double emulsions. The double emulsion-based protein crystallization trials were implemented with both the vapor-diffusion method and microbatch method by controlling the diffusion of water between the inner and outer phases and by eliminating water evaporation. Double emulsions, whose inner and outer environments can be easily adjusted, can ...

  19. β-Hydroxyacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Dehydratase (FabZ) from Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis: Structure Determination, Enzymatic Characterization, and Cross-Inhibition Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillick, Brian E; Kumaran, Desigan; Vieni, Casey; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2016-02-23

    The bacterial system for fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS) contains several enzymes whose sequence and structure are highly conserved across a vast array of pathogens. This, coupled with their low homology and difference in organization compared to the equivalent system in humans, makes the FAS pathway an excellent target for antimicrobial drug development. To this end, we have cloned, expressed, and purified the β-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase (FabZ) from both Francisella tularensis (FtFabZ) and Yersinia pestis (YpFabZ). We also solved the crystal structures and performed an enzymatic characterization of both enzymes and several mutant forms of YpFabZ. Additionally, we have discovered two novel inhibitors of FabZ, mangostin and stictic acid, which show similar potencies against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. Lastly, we selected several compounds from the literature that have been shown to be active against single homologues of FabZ and tested them against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. These results have revealed clues as to which scaffolds are likely to lead to broad-spectrum antimicrobials targeted against FabZ as well as modifications to existing FabZ inhibitors that may improve potency. PMID:26818694

  20. Structure of the Francisella tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) in complex with NAD[superscript +] and triclosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehboob, Shahila; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E. (UIC)

    2010-11-19

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) catalyzes the last rate-limiting step in the elongation cycle of the fatty-acid biosynthesis pathway and has been validated as a potential antimicrobial drug target in Francisella tularensis. The development of new antibiotic therapies is important both to combat potential drug-resistant bioweapons and to address the broader societal problem of increasing antibiotic resistance among many pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structure of FabI from F. tularensis (FtuFabI) in complex with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NAD{sup +} has been solved to a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. Triclosan is known to effectively inhibit FabI from different organisms. Precise characterization of the mode of triclosan binding is required to develop highly specific inhibitors. Comparison of our structure with the previously determined FtuFabI structure (PDB code 2jjy) which is bound to only NAD{sup +} reveals the conformation of the substrate-binding loop, electron density for which was missing in the earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the conformation of the NAD{sup +} cofactor. This shift in the position of the phosphate groups allows more room in the active site for substrate or inhibitor to bind and be better accommodated. This information will be crucial for virtual screening studies to identify novel scaffolds for development into new active inhibitors.

  1. Determining and characterizing hapten loads for carrier proteins by MALDI-TOF MS and MALDI-TOF/RTOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Stephan, Christopher; Häubl, Georg; Allmaier, Günter; Krska, Rudolf; Cvak, Barbara

    2016-07-15

    The increasing number of bioconjugates used for bioanalytical purposes and in pharmaceutical industries has led to an increasing demand for robust quality control of products derived from covalently linking small molecules to proteins. Here we report, for the first time, a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF)-based method to determine the quantity and location of the hapten zearalenone (ZEN) introduced to the carrier protein conalbumin (Con). This bioconjugate is of special interest because of its application in lateral flow immunoassays commercially available for fast testing of food and feed for the presence of ZEN, a common contaminant of all major cereal grains worldwide. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of the intact protein turned out to be highly reproducible allowing for the determination of the average hapten load of the carrier protein. In that way an easy and fast method to screen for changes in ZEN load after bioconjugate synthesis was established. For a more detailed hapten load characterization, measurements at the peptide level were of importance. Systematic studies, implementing post-source decay (PSD) and high- and low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID), showed characteristic fragmentation pattern for three model peptides carrying between one and three lysines (the primary target for the ZEN modification) besides other, less obvious modification sites (serine, arginine and the N-terminus). By this, indicative reporter ions (m/z 203 and 316) and neutral losses (Δm/z 373 and 317) for the ZEN modification in general, plus immonium ions (m/z 87, 142 and 159) for the lysine modification in particular were identified. Based on these findings, proteolytic peptides, tentatively assigned to be modified, were unequivocally confirmed to be affected by bioconjugation. For a protein carrying on average only 2-3 modifications per molecule 29 Lys out of 59 potential modifications sites were actually modified

  2. Observation on the modifying activity of the protein from Elytrzgia repens rhizome for ice crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In winter, spring and summer, the rhizome of wild Elytrzgia repens of Heilongjiang Province was selected to extract the soluble which whole protein and the apoplastic protein, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The result indicated that there were two specific polypeptides in two types protein from winter; their relative molecular weight were identified as 52 ku and 26 ku by analyzing software; the apoplastic protein from winter had the ability of modifing the growth of ice crystal which appeared hexagonal in shape observed with the phase-contrast photomicroscope. So the apoplastic protein from winter has the antifreeze characters and the 52 ku protein is more likely the antifreeze protein.

  3. Protein crystallization for drug design in the last 50 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stura, Enrico A.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We live in an era where we expect to be able to visit our doctor and obtain a pill to cure any ailment from which we suffer. Yet, this is still not the case. Many of the current cures are still derived from natural sources although new drugs are increasingly the result of intelligent design. In this process, X-ray protein crystallography now plays a major and effective role in the discovery of new treatments. The developments that have made this possible have evolved during the past fifty years. The methods for crystallizing macromolecules and determining their structures by X-ray crystallography have been automated and the speed for X-ray data acquisition is several orders of magnitude faster. Fifty years ago it took several years to solve a single structure. Now, several protein–ligand complexes can be determined in single day. High-throughput crystallography is considered to be a great asset to the drug discovery process, providing a fast way to tailor drug candidates to their targets by analysing their binding mode in detail. Crystallization remains the main challenge.Vivimos en una época en la que esperamos ir al médico y obtener una pastilla para curar cualquier dolencia que padezcamos; por desgracia, esta expectativa no es real. Aunque muchos de los remedios en uso provienen de fuentes naturales, la mayoría de los nuevos medicamentos son el resultado de la investigación científica. En el proceso de diseño y descubrimiento de fármacos, la cristalografía de proteínas juega un papel central. Los conocimientos que han hecho esto posible han venido evolucionando desde hace cincuenta años aproximadamente. Los métodos de cristalización de macromoléculas y la determinación de sus estructuras a través de la cristalografía de rayos X han sido automatizados y miniaturizados y la velocidad de la adquisición de datos de difracción ha aumentado en varios órdenes de magnitud. Si hace cincuenta años la resolución de una sola

  4. Crystal structure of conserved hypothetical protein Aq1575 from Aquifex aeolicus

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Dong Hae; Yokota, Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2002-01-01

    The crystal structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, Aq1575, from Aquifex aeolicus has been determined by using x-ray crystallography. The protein belongs to the domain of unknown function DUF28 in the Pfam and PALI databases for which there was no structural information available until now. A structural homology search with the DALI algorithm indicates that this protein has a new fold with no obvious similarity to those of other proteins of known three-dimensional structure. The protei...

  5. Large scale crystallization of protein pharmaceuticals in microgravity via temperature change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Marianna M.

    1992-01-01

    The major objective of this research effort is the temperature driven growth of protein crystals in large batches in the microgravity environment of space. Pharmaceutical houses are developing protein products for patient care, for example, human insulin, human growth hormone, interferons, and tissue plasminogen activator or TPA, the clot buster for heart attack victims. Except for insulin, these are very high value products; they are extremely potent in small quantities and have a great value per gram of material. It is feasible that microgravity crystallization can be a cost recoverable, economically sound final processing step in their manufacture. Large scale protein crystal growth in microgravity has significant advantages from the basic science and the applied science standpoints. Crystal growth can proceed unhindered due to lack of surface effects. Dynamic control is possible and relatively easy. The method has the potential to yield large quantities of pure crystalline product. Crystallization is a time honored procedure for purifying organic materials and microgravity crystallization could be the final step to remove trace impurities from high value protein pharmaceuticals. In addition, microgravity grown crystals could be the final formulation for those medicines that need to be administered in a timed release fashion. Long lasting insulin, insulin lente, is such a product. Also crystalline protein pharmaceuticals are more stable for long-term storage. Temperature, as the initiation step, has certain advantages. Again, dynamic control of the crystallization process is possible and easy. A temperature step is non-invasive and is the most subtle way to control protein solubility and therefore crystallization. Seeding is not necessary. Changes in protein and precipitant concentrations and pH are not necessary. Finally, this method represents a new way to crystallize proteins in space that takes advantage of the unique microgravity environment. The results

  6. Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase from higher plants is structurally unrelated to the animal and fungal homologs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) desaturase was purified to homogeneity from avocado mesocarp, and monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against the protein were used to isolate full-length cDNA clones from Ricinus communis (castor) seed and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). The nucleotide sequence of the castor clone pRCD1 revealed an open reading frame of 1.2 kilobases encoding a 396-amino acid protein of 45 kDa. The cucumber clone pCSD1 encoded a homologous 396-amino acid protein with 88% amino acid identity to the castor clone. Expression of pRCD1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in the accumulation of a functional stearoyl-ACP desaturase, demonstrating that the introduction of this single gene product was sufficient to confer soluble desaturase activity to yeast. There was a 48-residue region of 29% amino acid sequence identity between residues 53 and 101 of the castor desaturase and the proximal border of the dehydratase region of the fatty acid synthase from yeast. Stearoyl-ACP mRNA was present at substantially higher levels in developing seeds than in leaf and root tissue, suggesting that expression of the Δ9 desaturase is developmentally regulated

  7. Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase from higher plants is structurally unrelated to the animal and fungal homologs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) desaturase was purified to homogeneity from avocado mesocarp, and monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against the protein were used to isolate full-length cDNA clones from Ricinus communis (castor) seed and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). The nucleotide sequence of the castor clone pRCD1 revealed an open reading frame of 1.2 kilobases encoding a 396-amino acid protein of 45 kDa. The cucumber clone pCSD1 encoded a homologous 396-amino acid protein with 88% amino acid identity to the castor clone. Expression of pRCD1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in the accumulation of a functional stearoyl-ACP desaturase, demonstrating that the introduction of this single gene product was sufficient to confer soluble desaturase activity to yeast. There was a 48-residue region of 29% amino acid sequence identity between residues 53 and 101 of the castor desaturase and the proximal border of the dehydratase region of the fatty acid synthase from yeast. Stearoyl-ACP mRNA was present at substantially higher levels in developing seeds than in leaf and root tissue, suggesting that expression of the {Delta}{sup 9} desaturase is developmentally regulated.

  8. Expression, purification and crystallization of a human protein SH3BGRL at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protein SH3BGRL, containing both SH3-binding and Homer EVH1-binding motifs, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The protein SH3BGRL, containing both SH3-binding and Homer EVH1-binding motifs, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffract to 0.88 Å resolution and belong to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 28.8886, b = 34.9676, c = 98.0016 Å. Preliminary analysis indicates that the asymmetric unit contains one molecule and has a solvent content of about 34%

  9. Interaction of Tenebrio Molitor Antifreeze Protein with Ice Crystal: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, L; Ramakrishnan, Vigneshwar

    2016-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) observed in cold-adapting organisms bind to ice crystals and prevent further ice growth. However, the molecular mechanism of AFP-ice binding and AFP-inhibited ice growth remains unclear. Here we report the interaction of the insect antifreeze protein (Tenebrio molitor, TmAFP) with ice crystal by molecular dynamics simulation studies. Two sets of simulations were carried out at 263 K by placing the protein near the primary prism plane (PP) and basal plane (BL) of the ice crystal. To delineate the effect of temperatures, both the PP and BL simulations were carried out at 253 K as well. The analyses revealed that the protein interacts strongly with the ice crystal in BL simulation than in PP simulation both at 263 K and 253 K. Further, it was observed that the interactions are primarily mediated through the interface waters. We also observed that as the temperature decreases, the interaction between the protein and the ice increases which can be attributed to the decreased flexibility and the increased structuring of the protein at low temperature. In essence, our study has shed light on the interaction mechanism between the TmAFP antifreeze protein and the ice crystal. PMID:27492241

  10. Stability of Magnetically-Suppressed Solutal Convection In Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, F. W.; Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of convection during the crystallization of proteins is not very well understood. In a gravitational field, convection is caused by crystal sedimentation and by solutal buoyancy induced flow and these can lead to crystal imperfections. While crystallization in microgravity can approach diffusion limited growth conditions (no convection), terrestrially strong magnetic fields can be used to control fluid flow and sedimentation effects. In this work, a theory is presented on the stability of solutal convection of a magnetized fluid in the presence of a magnetic field. The requirements for stability are developed and compared to experiments performed within the bore of a superconducting magnet. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experiments and show solutal convection can be stabilized if the surrounding fluid has larger magnetic susceptibility and the magnetic field has a specific structure. Discussion on the application of the technique to protein crystallization is also provided.

  11. Direct observation of bunching of elementary steps on protein crystals under forced flow conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Sazaki

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bunching of elementary steps by solution flow is still not yet clarified for protein crystals. Hence, in this study, we observed elementary steps on crystal surfaces of model protein hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL under forced flow conditions, by our advanced optical microscopy. We found that in the case of a HEWL solution of 99.99% purity, forced flow changed bunched steps into elementary ones (debunching on tetragonal HEWL crystals. In contrast, in the case of a HEWL solution of 98.5% purity, forced flow significantly induced bunching of elementary steps. These results indicate that in the case of HEWL crystals, the mass transfer of impurities is more significantly enhanced by forced solution flow than that of solute HEWL molecules. We also showed that forced flow induced the incorporation of microcrystals into a mother crystal and the subsequent formation of screw dislocations and spiral growth hillocks.

  12. Membrane proteins: functional and structural studies using reconstituted proteoliposomes and 2-D crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigaud J.-L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstitution of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers is a powerful tool to analyze functional as well as structural areas of membrane protein research. First, the proper incorporation of a purified membrane protein into closed lipid vesicles, to produce proteoliposomes, allows the investigation of transport and/or catalytic properties of any membrane protein without interference by other membrane components. Second, the incorporation of a large amount of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers to grow crystals confined to two dimensions has recently opened a new way to solve their structure at high resolution using electron crystallography. However, reconstitution of membrane proteins into functional proteoliposomes or 2-D crystallization has been an empirical domain, which has been viewed for a long time more like "black magic" than science. Nevertheless, in the last ten years, important progress has been made in acquiring knowledge of lipid-protein-detergent interactions and has permitted to build upon a set of basic principles that has limited the empirical approach of reconstitution experiments. Reconstitution strategies have been improved and new strategies have been developed, facilitating the success rate of proteoliposome formation and 2-D crystallization. This review deals with the various strategies available to obtain proteoliposomes and 2-D crystals from detergent-solubilized proteins. It gives an overview of the methods that have been applied, which may be of help for reconstituting more proteins into lipid bilayers in a form suitable for functional studies at the molecular level and for high-resolution structural analysis.

  13. Modification of an apparatus for tumor-suppressor protein crystal growth in the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    Some human diseases as tumors are being studied continuously for the development of vaccines against them. And a way of doing that is by means of proteins research. There are some kinds of proteins, like the p53 and p73 proteins, which are tumor suppressors. There are other diseases such as A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases which are protein-related. The determination of how proteins geometrically order themselves, during its biological functions is very necessary to understand how a protein's structure affects its function, to design vaccines that intercede in tumor-protein activities and in other proteins related to those other diseases. The protein crystal growth in microgravity environment produces purer crystallization than on the ground, and it is a powerful tool to produce better vaccines. Several data have already been acquired using ground-based research and in spaceflight experiments aboard the Spacelab and Space Shuttle missions, and in the MIR and in the International Space Station (ISS). Here in this paper, I propose to be performed in the ISS Biological Research Facility (which is being developed), multiple crystal growth of proteins related to cancer (as tumors suppressors and oncoproteins), A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases, for the future obtaining of possible vaccines against them. I also propose a simple and practical equipment, a modification of the crystallization plates (which use a vapor diffusion technique) inside each cylinder of the Protein Crystallization Apparatus in Microgravity (PCAM), with multiple chambers with different sizes. Instead of using some chambers with the same size it is better to use several chambers with different sizes. Why is that? The answer is: the energy associated with the surface tension of the liquid in the chamber is directly related to the circle area of it. So, to minimize the total energy of the surface tension of a proteins liquid -making it more stable

  14. Improved success of sparse matrix protein crystallization screening with heterogeneous nucleating agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil S Thakur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crystallization is a major bottleneck in the process of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Successful crystallization requires the formation of nuclei and their subsequent growth to crystals of suitable size. Crystal growth generally occurs spontaneously in a supersaturated solution as a result of homogenous nucleation. However, in a typical sparse matrix screening experiment, precipitant and protein concentration are not sampled extensively, and supersaturation conditions suitable for nucleation are often missed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested the effect of nine potential heterogenous nucleating agents on crystallization of ten test proteins in a sparse matrix screen. Several nucleating agents induced crystal formation under conditions where no crystallization occurred in the absence of the nucleating agent. Four nucleating agents: dried seaweed; horse hair; cellulose and hydroxyapatite, had a considerable overall positive effect on crystallization success. This effect was further enhanced when these nucleating agents were used in combination with each other. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the addition of heterogeneous nucleating agents increases the chances of crystal formation when using sparse matrix screens.

  15. Disordered nano-wrinkle substrates for inducing crystallization over a wide range of concentration of protein and precipitant

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, Anindita Sengupta

    2015-01-01

    There are large number of proteins, the existence of which are known but not their crystal structure, because of difficulty in finding the exact condition for their crystallization. Heterogeneous nucleation on disordered porous substrates with small yet large distribution of pores is considered a panacea for this problem, but a universal nucleant, suitable for crystallizing large variety of proteins does not really exist. To this end, we report here a nano-wrinkled substrate which displays remarkable ability and control over protein crystallization. Experiments with different proteins show that on these substrates, crystals nucleate even at very low protein concentration in buffer. Small number of very large crystals appear for precipitant concentrations varied over orders of magnitude ~0.003-0.3M; for some proteins, crystals appear even without addition of any precipitant, not seen with any other heterogeneous substrates. In essence, these substrates significantly diminish the influence of the above two para...

  16. Crystal structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonova, E. Yu.; Tishchenko, S. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Shklyaeva, A. A.; Garber, M. B.; Nikonov, S. V.; Nevskaya, N. A.

    2011-07-01

    The crystal structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus was solved by the molecular-replacement method and refined to R cryst = 19.4% and R free = 25.1% at 2.1 Å protein consists of two domains linked together by a flexible hinge region. In the structure under consideration, the domains are in close proximity and adopt a closed conformation. Earlier, this conformation has been found in the structure of protein L1 from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus, whereas the structures of archaeal L1 proteins and the structures of all L1 proteins in the RNA-bound form have an open conformation. The fact that a closed conformation was found in the structures of two L1 proteins which crystallize in different space groups and belong to different bacteria suggests that this conformation is a characteristic feature of L1 bacterial proteins in the free form.

  17. Numerical model of protein crystal growth in a diffusive field such as the microgravity environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki, E-mail: tanakah@confsci.co.jp [Confocal Science Inc., Hayakawa 2nd Building 7F, 2-12-2 Iwamoto-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0032 (Japan); Sasaki, Susumu [Neo Force, 5-9-14-403 Tsurumaki, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 154-0016 (Japan); Takahashi, Sachiko [Confocal Science Inc., Hayakawa 2nd Building 7F, 2-12-2 Iwamoto-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0032 (Japan); Inaka, Koji [Maruwa Foods and Biosciences Inc., 170-1 Tsutsui-cho, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Wada, Yoshio; Yamada, Mitsugu; Ohta, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Kamigaichi, Shigeki [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Numerical analysis of the concentration depletion zones in a transient state suggested that, in microgravity, protein crystals grow in a lower supersaturation and the impurity ratio decreases in the centre of the crystal. It is said that the microgravity environment positively affects the quality of protein crystal growth. The formation of a protein depletion zone and an impurity depletion zone due to the suppression of convection flow were thought to be the major reasons. In microgravity, the incorporation of molecules into a crystal largely depends on diffusive transport, so the incorporated molecules will be allocated in an orderly manner and the impurity uptake will be suppressed, resulting in highly ordered crystals. Previously, these effects were numerically studied in a steady state using a simplified model and it was determined that the combination of the diffusion coefficient of the protein molecule (D) and the kinetic constant for the protein molecule (β) could be used as an index of the extent of these depletion zones. In this report, numerical analysis of these depletion zones around a growing crystal in a non-steady (i.e. transient) state is introduced, suggesting that this model may be used for the quantitative analysis of these depletion zones in the microgravity environment.

  18. The crystal structure of the thiocyanate-forming protein from Thlaspi arvense, a kelch protein involved in glucosinolate breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumz, Frauke; Krausze, Joern; Eisenschmidt, Daniela; Backenköhler, Anita; Barleben, Leif; Brandt, Wolfgang; Wittstock, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Kelch repeat-containing proteins are involved in diverse cellular processes, but only a small subset of plant kelch proteins has been functionally characterized. Thiocyanate-forming protein (TFP) from field-penny cress, Thlaspi arvense (Brassicaceae), is a representative of specifier proteins, a group of kelch proteins involved in plant specialized metabolism. As components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system of the Brassicaceae, specifier proteins determine the profile of bioactive products formed when plant tissue is disrupted and glucosinolates are hydrolyzed by myrosinases. Here, we describe the crystal structure of TaTFP at a resolution of 1.4 Å. TaTFP crystallized as homodimer. Each monomer forms a six-blade β-propeller with a wide "top" and a narrower "bottom" opening with distinct strand-connecting loops protruding far beyond the lower propeller surface. Molecular modeling and mutational analysis identified residues for glucosinolate aglucone and Fe(2+) cofactor binding within these loops. As the first experimentally determined structure of a plant kelch protein, the crystal structure of TaTFP not only enables more detailed mechanistic studies on glucosinolate breakdown product formation, but also provides a new basis for research on the diverse roles and mechanisms of other kelch proteins in plants. PMID:26260516

  19. Computer-Aided Design of Orally Bioavailable Pyrrolidine Carboxamide Inhibitors of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Favorable Pharmacokinetic Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affiba Florance Kouassi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out a computational structure-based design of new potent pyrrolidine carboxamide (PCAMs inhibitors of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb. Three-dimensional (3D models of InhA-PCAMx complexes were prepared by in situ modification of the crystal structure of InhA-PCAM1 (Protein Data Bank (PDB entry code: 4U0J, the reference compound of a training set of 20 PCAMs with known experimental inhibitory potencies (IC50exp. First, we built a gas phase quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR model, linearly correlating the computed enthalpy of the InhA-PCAM complex formation and the IC50exp. Further, taking into account the solvent effect and loss of inhibitor entropy upon enzyme binding led to a QSAR model with a superior linear correlation between computed Gibbs free energies (ΔΔGcom of InhA-PCAM complex formation and IC50exp (pIC50exp = −0.1552·ΔΔGcom + 5.0448, R2 = 0.94, which was further validated with a 3D-QSAR pharmacophore model generation (PH4. Structural information from the models guided us in designing of a virtual combinatorial library (VL of more than 17 million PCAMs. The VL was adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME focused and reduced down to 1.6 million drug like orally bioavailable analogues and PH4 in silico screened to identify new potent PCAMs with predicted IC50pre reaching up to 5 nM. Combining molecular modeling and PH4 in silico screening of the VL resulted in the proposed novel potent antituberculotic agent candidates with favorable pharmacokinetic profiles.

  20. In situ observation of containerless protein crystallization by magnetically levitating crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Syou; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi; Udagawa, Chikako; Morimoto, Shotaro; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2016-03-01

    We report on the results of the crystal growth of hen-egg lysozyme by magnetically levitating crystals in a small amount of buffer solution. The concentrations of lysozyme and the precipitating agent (gadolinium chloride) were 6.53 wt % and 0.362 mol/kg, respectively. Gadolinium chloride, which induces the magneto-Archimedes effect, was utilized to levitate the crystals with Bz · (dBz/dz) = 22.46 T2/m, where Bz is the vertical (z) component of the magnetic flux density vector. Although the collected crystals were small, we succeeded in maintaining the levitation of the crystals into a specific place in the liquid phase from the beginning of nucleation. In situ observation revealed that a state of pseudo-weightlessness was generated in the vicinity of the magnet bore edge, and small crystals were concentrated inside the domain moving along an hourglass-shaped surface. We found by numerical computations that the formation of the hourglass-shaped domain is attributable to the radial component of the magnetic force.

  1. Membrane's Eleven: heavy-atom derivatives of membrane-protein crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morth, Jens Preben; Sørensen, Thomas Lykke-Møller; Nissen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    A database has been assembled of heavy-atom derivatives used in the structure determination of membrane proteins. The database can serve as a guide to the design of experiments in the search for heavy-atom derivatives of new membrane-protein crystals. The database pinpoints organomercurials...

  2. High-molecular-weight polymers for protein crystallization: poly-γ-glutamic acid-based precipitants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-molecular-weight poly-γ-glutamic acid-based polymers have been synthesized, tested and adopted for protein crystallization. Protein crystallization has been revolutionized by the introduction of high-throughput technologies, which have led to a speeding up of the process while simultaneously reducing the amount of protein sample necessary. Nonetheless, the chemistry dimension of protein crystallization has remained relatively undeveloped. Most crystallization screens are based on the same set of precipitants. To address this shortcoming, the development of new protein precipitants based on poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) polymers with different molecular-weight ranges is reported here: PGA-LM (low molecular weight) of ∼400 kDa and PGA-HM (high molecular weight) of >1000 kDa. It is also demonstrated that protein precipitants can be expanded further to polymers with much higher molecular weight than those that are currently in use. Furthermore, the modification of PGA-like polymers by covalent attachments of glucosamine substantially improved their solubility without affecting their crystallization properties. Some preliminary PGA-based screens are presented here

  3. High-molecular-weight polymers for protein crystallization: poly-γ-glutamic acid-based precipitants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ting-Chou [Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Korczyńska, Justyna [Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Structural Biology Laboratory, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Smith, David K. [Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Brzozowski, Andrzej Marek, E-mail: marek@ysbl.york.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Structural Biology Laboratory, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-01

    High-molecular-weight poly-γ-glutamic acid-based polymers have been synthesized, tested and adopted for protein crystallization. Protein crystallization has been revolutionized by the introduction of high-throughput technologies, which have led to a speeding up of the process while simultaneously reducing the amount of protein sample necessary. Nonetheless, the chemistry dimension of protein crystallization has remained relatively undeveloped. Most crystallization screens are based on the same set of precipitants. To address this shortcoming, the development of new protein precipitants based on poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) polymers with different molecular-weight ranges is reported here: PGA-LM (low molecular weight) of ∼400 kDa and PGA-HM (high molecular weight) of >1000 kDa. It is also demonstrated that protein precipitants can be expanded further to polymers with much higher molecular weight than those that are currently in use. Furthermore, the modification of PGA-like polymers by covalent attachments of glucosamine substantially improved their solubility without affecting their crystallization properties. Some preliminary PGA-based screens are presented here.

  4. Dextran or hydroxyethyl starch in spray-freeze-dried trehalose/mannitol microparticles intended as ballistic particulate carriers for proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Christian; Lee, Geoffrey

    2007-09-01

    The goal of this study was to clarify the effects of dextran 10 kDa on the properties of spray-freeze-dried microparticles for use with ballistic injectors. A novel carrier of trehalose, mannitol, and the polymer is known to maximize particle density. Measurements of T'(g) showed that the dextran anti-plasticizes the trehalose/mannitol, but also undergoes phase separation. The product temperature exceeded T'(g) during primary drying. The collapsed particles can therefore be explained by plastic flow of the freeze concentrate. DSC of the powder showed T(g) at 45 degrees C and, in the first scan, a wide endothermic melting peak caused by mannitol recrystallization. Catalase showed 35% activity loss on rehydration of its spray freeze-drying (SFD) powder, which was improved in the TM/D (3:3:4) formulation, but not up to that level seen with either trehalose or mannitol alone. The dextran 10 kDa, which is vital to maximize particle density, was therefore detrimental to protein integrity during SFD, as also found with a 65-72 kDa dextran. Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 200 kDa gave similar, limited stabilizing effects on the protein. The proportion of polymer in the formulation should be low to minimize protein damage, whilst high enough to give required particle morphology and density. PMID:17274046

  5. A novel approach for over-expression, characterization, and isotopic enrichment of a homogeneous species of acyl carrier protein from Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Shailendra Kumar; Modak, Rahul; Sharma, Shilpi; Sharma, Alok Kumar; Sarma, Siddhartha P; Surolia, Avadhesha; Surolia, Namita

    2005-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) plays a central role in fatty acid biosynthesis by transferring the acyl groups from one enzyme to another for the completion of the fatty acid synthesis cycle. Holo-ACP is the obligatory substrate for the synthesis of acyl-ACPs which act as the carrier and donor for various metabolic reactions. Despite its interactions with numerous proteins in the cell, its mode of interaction is poorly understood. Here, we report the over-expression of PfACP in minimal medium sol...

  6. Crystal structures of Ln2-xCexCuO4-y electron carrier superconductors with Ln = Nd, Sm, Eu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray crystal structures, of three Lna-xCexCuO4-y mixed oxides with Ln = Nd, Sn, and Eu have been determined. All the three oxides crystallize in the tetragonal space group I4/nnn with the following lattice parameters: (Nd,Ce) a = 3.9479(3), c = 12.039(1), A; (Sn,Ce) a =- 3.9219(3), c = 11.8885(7) A; (Eu,Ce) a = 3.9169(6), c = 11.897(2) A. In this paper structural results are compared and discussed with those of other ceramic copper oxides

  7. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined.......To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  8. Expression, purification and crystallization of the Crimean–Congo haemorrhagic fever virus nucleocapsid protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Crimean–Congo haemorrhagic fever virus nucleocapsid protein was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Crimean–Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the Nairovirus genus within the Bunyaviridae family of segmented negative-sense RNA viruses. This paper describes the expression, purification and crystallization of full-length CCHFV nucleocapsid (N) protein and the collection of a 2.1 Å resolution X-ray diffraction data set using synchrotron radiation. Crystals of the CCHFV N protein belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 150.38, b = 72.06, c = 101.23 Å, β = 110.70° and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Circular-dichroism analysis provided insight into the secondary structure, whilst gel-filtration analysis revealed possible oligomeric states of the N protein. Structural determination is ongoing

  9. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a putative Clostridium difficile surface protein Cwp19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cwp19 is a putatively surface-located protein from Clostridium difficile. A recombinant N-terminal protein (residues 27–401) lacking the signal peptide and the C-terminal cell-wall-binding repeats (PFam04122) was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2 Å resolution. Cwp19 is a putatively surface-located protein from Clostridium difficile. A recombinant N-terminal protein (residues 27–401) lacking the signal peptide and the C-terminal cell-wall-binding repeats (PFam04122) was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2 Å resolution. The crystal appeared to belong to the primitive monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 109.1, b = 61.2, c = 109.2 Å, β = 111.85°, and is estimated to contain two molecules of Cwp19 per asymmetric unit

  10. Thermal contraction of aqueous glycerol and ethylene glycol solutions for optimized protein-crystal cryoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Julius, Ethan F; Tyree, Timothy J; Moreau, David W; Atakisi, Hakan; Thorne, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    The thermal contraction of aqueous cryoprotectant solutions on cooling to cryogenic temperatures is of practical importance in protein cryocrystallography and in biological cryopreservation. In the former case, differential contraction on cooling of protein molecules and their lattice relative to that of the internal and surrounding solvent may lead to crystal damage and the degradation of crystal diffraction properties. Here, the amorphous phase densities of aqueous solutions of glycerol and ethylene glycol at T = 77 K have been determined. Densities with accuracies of matching of internal solvent to the available solvent spaces is complicated by several factors, most notably the exclusion of cryoprotectants from protein hydration shells and the expected deviation of the contraction behavior of hydration water from bulk water. The present methods and results will assist in developing rational approaches to cryoprotection and an understanding of solvent behavior in protein crystals. PMID:27303794

  11. Powder Diffraction from a Continuous Micro-Jet of sub-micron Protein Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, D A; Doak, R B; Fromme, P; Hembree, G; Hunter, M; Marchesini, S; Schmidt, K; Starodub, D; Weierstall, U; Chapman, H; Spence, J

    2008-01-01

    Powder diffraction rings have been obtained from sub-micron protein crystallites in a water jet, and the data analysed. Previous powder diffraction has used a suspension of small crystallites, and long exposures, causing significant X-ray damage. We show here that protein powder data from nano-crystals can be obtained using a continuous micro-jet. This allows more efficient use of crystal growth solutions containing nanocrystals and the much shorter exposures needed for next-generation synchrotrons. This method requires neither the crushing of larger polycrystalline samples nor any techniques to avoid radiation damage such as cryo-cooling. We have commissioned an apparatus to record protein powder diffraction in this manner and in this paper present the first such patterns from photosystem I protein crystals with sizes less than 500 nm. These preliminary patterns show the lowest order reflections, which agree quantitatively with theoretical calculations of the powder profile. The results serve also to test ou...

  12. ‘Seeding’ with protease to optimize protein crystallization conditions in in situ proteolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addition of protease instead of seeds using a robot can be used to optimize the concentration of protease in in situ proteolysis experiments and has been successfully tested using two proteins. In situ proteolysis is one of the most effective rescue strategies for protein crystallization, and optimization of the ratio between the protein and the protease is one of the key steps in the process. Seeding is a very powerful tool to optimize crystallization conditions and can be performed by most crystallization robots. Addition of protease instead of seed stock using a robot can be used to optimize the concentration of protease in in situ proteolysis experiments and has been successfully tested using two proteins

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the SOD-TAT fusion protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cell membrane permeable SOD, SOD-TAT fusion protein, was expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 3.2 Å resolution. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) family of proteins are necessary to protect oxygen-utilizing cells from the toxicity of reactive oxygen species. The delivery of SOD into tissues is severely limited by its size and biochemical properties. A cell-membrane-permeable SOD, SOD-TAT, has been demonstrated to have the ability to be directly transduced into mammalian cells. In this study, the SOD-TAT fusion protein was expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of the SOD-TAT fusion protein diffracted to 3.20 Å resolution and belonged to space group C121

  14. Effects of Convective Transport of Solute and Impurities on Defect-Causing Kinetics Instabilities in Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekilov, Peter G.

    2003-01-01

    Insight into the crystallization processes of biological macromolecules into crystals or aggregates can provide valuable guidelines in many fundamental and applied fields. Such insight will prompt new means to regulate protein phase transitions in-vivo, e.g., polymerization of hemoglobin S in the red cells, crystallization of crystallins in the eye lens, etc. Understanding of protein crystal nucleation will help achieve narrow crystallite size distributions, needed for sustained release of pharmaceutical protein preparations such as insulin or interferon. Traditionally, protein crystallization studies have been related to the pursuit of crystal perfection needed to improve the structure details provided by x-ray, electron or neutron diffraction methods. Crystallization trials for the purposes of structural biology carried out in space have posed an intriguing question related to the inconsistency of the effects of the microgravity growth on the quality of the crystals.

  15. Hydrogel based drug carriers for controlled release of hydrophobic drugs and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ke Peng,

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare in situ forming hydrogels based on biocompatible polymers for the controlled release of hydrophobic drug and proteins. In order to load hydrophobic drug to the hydrophilic hydrogel matrix, beta-cyclodextrin and human serum albumin was introduced to the hydrogel ne

  16. In vacuo X-ray data collection from graphene-wrapped protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is reported for collecting room-temperature data from protein crystals under vacuum by protecting them with a thin graphene layer. The measurement of diffraction data from macromolecular crystal samples held in vacuo holds the promise of a very low X-ray background and zero absorption of incident and scattered beams, leading to better data and the potential for accessing very long X-ray wavelengths (>3 Å) for native sulfur phasing. Maintaining the hydration of protein crystals under vacuum is achieved by the use of liquid jets, as with serial data collection at free-electron lasers, or is side-stepped by cryocooling the samples, as implemented at new synchrotron beamlines. Graphene has been shown to protect crystals from dehydration by creating an extremely thin layer that is impermeable to any exchanges with the environment. Furthermore, owing to its hydrophobicity, most of the aqueous solution surrounding the crystal is excluded during sample preparation, thus eliminating most of the background caused by liquid. Here, it is shown that high-quality data can be recorded at room temperature from graphene-wrapped protein crystals in a rough vacuum. Furthermore, it was observed that graphene protects crystals exposed to different relative humidities and a chemically harsh environment

  17. In vacuo X-ray data collection from graphene-wrapped protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Anna J. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Crawshaw, Adam D. [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Trincao, Jose; Aller, Pierre; Alcock, Simon; Nistea, Ioana [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Salgado, Paula S. [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-26

    A method is reported for collecting room-temperature data from protein crystals under vacuum by protecting them with a thin graphene layer. The measurement of diffraction data from macromolecular crystal samples held in vacuo holds the promise of a very low X-ray background and zero absorption of incident and scattered beams, leading to better data and the potential for accessing very long X-ray wavelengths (>3 Å) for native sulfur phasing. Maintaining the hydration of protein crystals under vacuum is achieved by the use of liquid jets, as with serial data collection at free-electron lasers, or is side-stepped by cryocooling the samples, as implemented at new synchrotron beamlines. Graphene has been shown to protect crystals from dehydration by creating an extremely thin layer that is impermeable to any exchanges with the environment. Furthermore, owing to its hydrophobicity, most of the aqueous solution surrounding the crystal is excluded during sample preparation, thus eliminating most of the background caused by liquid. Here, it is shown that high-quality data can be recorded at room temperature from graphene-wrapped protein crystals in a rough vacuum. Furthermore, it was observed that graphene protects crystals exposed to different relative humidities and a chemically harsh environment.

  18. Male Sterile2 Encodes a Plastid-Localized Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Required for Pollen Exine Development in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.; Shanklin, J.; Yu, X.-H.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; De Oliveira, S.; Schreiber, L.; Zhang, D.

    2011-10-01

    Male Sterile2 (MS2) is predicted to encode a fatty acid reductase required for pollen wall development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Transient expression of MS2 in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves resulted in the accumulation of significant levels of C16 and C18 fatty alcohols. Expression of MS2 fused with green fluorescent protein revealed that an amino-terminal transit peptide targets the MS2 to plastids. The plastidial localization of MS2 is biologically important because genetic complementation of MS2 in ms2 homozygous plants was dependent on the presence of its amino-terminal transit peptide or that of the Rubisco small subunit protein amino-terminal transit peptide. In addition, two domains, NAD(P)H-binding domain and sterile domain, conserved in MS2 and its homologs were also shown to be essential for MS2 function in pollen exine development by genetic complementation testing. Direct biochemical analysis revealed that purified recombinant MS2 enzyme is able to convert palmitoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein to the corresponding C16:0 alcohol with NAD(P)H as the preferred electron donor. Using optimized reaction conditions (i.e. at pH 6.0 and 30 C), MS2 exhibits a K{sub m} for 16:0-Acyl Carrier Protein of 23.3 {+-} 4.0 {mu}m, a V{sub max} of 38.3 {+-} 4.5 nmol mg{sup -1} min{sup -1}, and a catalytic efficiency/K{sub m} of 1,873 m{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Based on the high homology of MS2 to other characterized fatty acid reductases, it was surprising that MS2 showed no activity against palmitoyl- or other acyl-coenzyme A; however, this is consistent with its plastidial localization. In summary, genetic and biochemical evidence demonstrate an MS2-mediated conserved plastidial pathway for the production of fatty alcohols that are essential for pollen wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C from Thermus thermophilus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C from T. thermophilus has been crystallized in two different space groups, P21 and R32; the crystals diffracted to 1.9 and 1.75 Å resolution, respectively. The Gram-negative aerobic eubacterium Thermus thermophilus is an extremely important thermophilic microorganism that was originally isolated from a thermal vent environment in Japan. The molybdenum cofactor in this organism is considered to be an essential component required by enzymes that catalyze diverse key reactions in the global metabolism of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. The molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C derived from T. thermophilus was crystallized in two different space groups. Crystals obtained using the first crystallization condition belong to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 64.81, b = 109.84, c = 115.19 Å, β = 104.9°; the crystal diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 Å. The other crystal form belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.57, c = 59.25 Å, and diffracted to 1.75 Å resolution. Preliminary calculations reveal that the asymmetric unit contains 12 monomers and one monomer for the crystals belonging to space group P21 and R32, respectively

  20. Modelling dynamics in protein crystal structures by ensemble refinement

    OpenAIRE

    Burnley, B Tom; Afonine, Pavel V.; Adams, Paul D.; Gros, Piet

    2012-01-01

    eLife digest It has been clear since the early days of structural biology in the late 1950s that proteins and other biomolecules are continually changing shape, and that these changes have an important influence on both the structure and function of the molecules. X-ray diffraction can provide detailed information about the structure of a protein, but only limited information about how its structure fluctuates over time. Detailed information about the dynamic behaviour of proteins is essentia...

  1. Applicability of avidin protein coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles as drug carriers in the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijt, S. H.; Bölükbas, D. A.; Argyo, C.; Wipplinger, K.; Naureen, M.; Datz, S.; Eickelberg, O.; Meiners, S.; Bein, T.; Schmid, O.; Stoeger, T.

    2016-04-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) exhibit unique drug delivery properties and are thus considered as promising candidates for next generation nano-medicines. In particular, inhalation into the lungs represents a direct, non-invasive delivery route for treating lung disease. To assess MSN biocompatibility in the lung, we investigated the bioresponse of avidin-coated MSNs (MSN-AVI), as well as aminated (uncoated) MSNs, after direct application into the lungs of mice. We quantified MSN distribution, clearance rate, cell-specific uptake, and inflammatory responses to MSNs within one week after instillation. We show that amine-functionalized (MSN-NH2) particles are not taken up by lung epithelial cells, but induced a prolonged inflammatory response in the lung and macrophage cell death. In contrast, MSN-AVI co-localized with alveolar epithelial type 1 and type 2 cells in the lung in the absence of sustained inflammatory responses or cell death, and showed preferential epithelial cell uptake in in vitro co-cultures. Further, MSN-AVI particles demonstrated uniform particle distribution in mouse lungs and slow clearance rates. Thus, we provide evidence that avidin functionalized MSNs (MSN-AVI) have the potential to serve as versatile biocompatible drug carriers for lung-specific drug delivery.Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) exhibit unique drug delivery properties and are thus considered as promising candidates for next generation nano-medicines. In particular, inhalation into the lungs represents a direct, non-invasive delivery route for treating lung disease. To assess MSN biocompatibility in the lung, we investigated the bioresponse of avidin-coated MSNs (MSN-AVI), as well as aminated (uncoated) MSNs, after direct application into the lungs of mice. We quantified MSN distribution, clearance rate, cell-specific uptake, and inflammatory responses to MSNs within one week after instillation. We show that amine-functionalized (MSN-NH2) particles are not taken up

  2. PCR-based gene synthesis to produce recombinant proteins for crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne-Steele Miranda L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene synthesis technologies are an important tool for structural biology projects, allowing increased protein expression through codon optimization and facilitating sequence alterations. Existing methods, however, can be complex and not always reproducible, prompting researchers to use commercial suppliers rather than synthesize genes themselves. Results A PCR-based gene synthesis method, referred to as SeqTBIO, is described to efficiently assemble the coding regions of two novel hyperthermophilic proteins, PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille domain, a siRNA-binding domain of an Argonaute protein homologue and a deletion mutant of a family A DNA polymerase (PolA. The gene synthesis procedure is based on sequential assembly such that homogeneous DNA products can be obtained after each synthesis step without extensive manipulation or purification requirements. Coupling the gene synthesis procedure to in vivo homologous recombination techniques allows efficient subcloning and site-directed mutagenesis for error correction. The recombinant proteins of PAZ and PolA were subsequently overexpressed in E. coli and used for protein crystallization. Crystals of both proteins were obtained and they were suitable for X-ray analysis. Conclusion We demonstrate, by using PAZ and PolA as examples, the feasibility of integrating the gene synthesis, error correction and subcloning techniques into a non-automated gene to crystal pipeline such that genes can be designed, synthesized and implemented for recombinant expression and protein crystallization.

  3. Evaluating the efficacy of tryptophan fluorescence and absorbance as a selection tool for identifying protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of using ultraviolet microscopes to illuminate protein crystals in high throughput screens is evaluated. The environment of individual tryptophans in known protein structures and the effectiveness of four commercial robotic UV microscopes to illuminate tryptophan-containing protein crystals by either tryptophan fluorescence (epi-illumination) or absorbance (transmission) are evaluated. In agreement with other studies, tryptophan residues are found on average to be largely buried in protein structures (with ∼84% of their surface area buried) and to be surrounded by partially polar microenvironments (with ∼43% of their surface area covered by polar residues), which suggests an inherent degree of fluorescence signal quenching. In bacterial genomes, up to one-third (∼18.5% on average) of open reading frames are deficient in tryptophan. In the laboratory, because of the attenuation of UV light by the media commonly used in sitting-drop and hanging-drop crystallization trials, it was often necessary to simplify the light path by manually removing or inverting the supporting media. Prolonged exposure (minutes) to UV light precipitates some protein samples. The absorbance spectra of many commercially available media in crystallization trials are presented. The advantages of using tryptophan absorbance over fluorescence for characterizing crystals are discussed

  4. Conformational fluctuations affect protein alignment in dilute liquid crystal media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louhivuori, M.; Otten, R.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten;

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of dilute liquid crystalline media to align biological macromolecules has opened many new possibilities to study protein and nucleic acid structures by NMR spectroscopy. We inspect the basic alignment phenomenon for an ensemble of protein conformations to deduce relative contributions...

  5. Thiolation-enhanced substrate recognition by D-alanyl carrier protein ligase DltA from Bacillus cereus [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3dx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Du

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available D-alanylation of the lipoteichoic acid on Gram-positive cell wall is dependent on dlt gene-encoded proteins DltA, DltB, DltC and DltD. The D-alanyl carrier protein ligase DltA, as a remote homolog of acyl-(coenzyme A (CoA synthetase, cycles through two active conformations for the catalysis of adenylation and subsequent thiolation of D-alanine (D-Ala. The crystal structure of DltA in the absence of any substrate was observed to have a noticeably more disordered pocket for ATP which would explain why DltA has relatively low affinity for ATP in the absence of any D-alanyl carrier. We have previously enabled the thiolation of D-alanine in the presence of CoA as the mimic of D-alanyl carrier protein DltC which carries a 4’-phosphopantetheine group on a serine residue. Here we show that the resulting Michaelis constants in the presence of saturating CoA for both ATP and D-alanine were reduced more than 10 fold as compared to the values obtained in the absence of CoA. The presence of CoA also made DltA ~100-fold more selective on D-alanine over L-alanine. The CoA-enhanced substrate recognition further implies that the ATP and D-alanine substrates of the adenylation reaction are incorporated when the DltA enzyme cycles through its thiolation conformation.

  6. Crystallization and initial X-ray analysis of polyhydroxyalkanoate granule-associated protein from Aeromonas hydrophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phasin PhaPAh from A. hydrophila strain 4AK4 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granule-associated proteins (phasins) were discovered in PHA-accumulating bacteria. They play a crucial role as a structural protein during initial PHA-granule formation and granule growth and also serve as interfaces for granule stabilization in vivo. The phasin PhaPAh from Aeromonas hydrophila strain 4AK4 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Single crystals were cryocooled for X-ray diffraction analysis. The phasin crystals belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.8, b = 108.9, c = 134.4 Å

  7. Crystallization and initial X-ray analysis of polyhydroxyalkanoate granule-associated protein from Aeromonas hydrophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Minglian; Li, Zhenguo; Zheng, Wei; Lou, Zhiyong [MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Guo-Qiang, E-mail: chengq@stu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Multidisciplinary Research Center, Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China)

    2006-08-01

    The phasin PhaP{sub Ah} from A. hydrophila strain 4AK4 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granule-associated proteins (phasins) were discovered in PHA-accumulating bacteria. They play a crucial role as a structural protein during initial PHA-granule formation and granule growth and also serve as interfaces for granule stabilization in vivo. The phasin PhaP{sub Ah} from Aeromonas hydrophila strain 4AK4 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Single crystals were cryocooled for X-ray diffraction analysis. The phasin crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.8, b = 108.9, c = 134.4 Å.

  8. Coupling Peptide Antigens to Virus-Like Particles or to Protein Carriers Influences the Th1/Th2 Polarity of the Resulting Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattanaruji Pomwised

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have conjugated the S9 peptide, a mimic of the group B streptococcal type III capsular polysaccharide, to different carriers in an effort to elicit an optimal immune response. As carriers, we utilized the soluble protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin and virus-like particles (VLPs from two plant viruses, Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and Cowpea Mosaic Virus. We have found that coupling the peptide to the soluble protein elicits a Th2 immune response, as evidenced by the production of the peptide-specific IgG1 antibody and IL-4/IL-10 production in response to antigen stimulation, whereas the peptide conjugated to VLPs elicited a Th1 response (IgG2a, IFN-γ. Because the VLPs used as carriers package RNA during the assembly process, we hypothesize that this effect may result from the presence of nucleic acid in the immunogen, which affects the Th1/Th2 polarity of the response.

  9. Properties of the mitochondrial carrier of adenine-nucleotide after purification. Study of the transport protein under isolated form and reincorporated form in phospho-lipidic vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this research thesis addresses the reconstitution of the ADP/ATP transport by incorporation of the specific carrier, isolated in presence of detergent, in phospholipids vesicles. Fundamental properties of the reconstituted transport are identical to that of transport in mitochondria, notably as far as the exchange stoichiometry, the turn over and the transport Km are concerned, as well as the asymmetric orientation of the carrier in the membrane. The second part of this research addresses the study of interactions of specific ligands with the ADP/ATP transport protein in presence of detergent. The study of the variations of the intrinsic fluorescence of the isolated ADP/ATP carrier highlights conformational changes exclusively induced by the presence of transportable nucleotides which are modulated in a different manner by carboxy-atractyloside or bongkrekic acid. Moreover, by using the isolated protein, a detailed analysis of binding parameters of fluorescent analogues of ATP is reported

  10. Hyaluronan microgel as a potential carrier for protein sustained delivery by tailoring the crosslink network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Chunhong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhao, Jianhao, E-mail: jhzhao@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Tu, Mei; Zeng, Rong; Rong, Jianhua [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) microgels with different crosslink network, i.e. HGPs-1, HGPs-1.5, HGPs-3, HGPs-6 and HGPs-15, were synthesized using divinyl sulfone (DVS) as the crosslinker in an inverse microemulsion system for controlling the sustained delivery of bovine serum albumin (BSA). With increasing the crosslinker content, the average particle size slightly increased from 1.9 ± 0.3 μm to 3.6 ± 0.5 μm by dynamic laser scattering analysis. However, the crosslinker content had no significant effect on the morphology of HA microgels by scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis proved more sulfur participated in the crosslink reaction when raising the crosslinker amount. The water swelling test confirmed the increasing crosslink density with the crosslinker content by calculating the average molecular weight between two crosslink points to be 8.25 ± 2.51 × 10{sup 5}, 1.26 ± 0.43 × 10{sup 5}, 0.96 ± 0.09 × 10{sup 5}, 0.64 ± 0.03 × 10{sup 5}, and 0.11 ± 0.01 × 10{sup 5} respectively. The degradation of HA microgels by hyaluronidase slowed down by enhancing the crosslink density, only about 5% of HGPs-15 was degraded as opposed to over 90% for HGPs-1. BSA loading had no obvious influence on the surface morphology of HA microgels but seemed to induce their aggregation. The increase of crosslink density decreased the BSA loading capacity but facilitated its long-term sustained delivery. When the molar ratio of DVS to repeating unit of HA reached 3 or higher, similar delivery profiles were obtained. Among all these HA microgels, HGPs-3 was the optimal carrier for BSA sustained delivery in this system because it possessed both high BSA loading capacity and long-term delivery profile simultaneously. - Highlights: • HA microgels with different crosslink densities were prepared. • The crosslinker content had little effect on the morphology and size of HA microgels. • The crosslink density

  11. Use of Chromophoric Ligands to Visually Screen Co-crystals of Putative Protein-Nucleic Acid Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xiaohua; Egli, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Distinguishing between crystals of protein-nucleic acid complexes and those containing protein alone is a common problem in structural studies of protein-nucleic acid interactions. Currently there are several methods available for detecting nucleic acid in crystals, including gel electrophoresis, SYBR Gold fluorescence dye staining and methyl violet staining. However, they require either that the crystals be sacrificed or access to a fluorescence microscope. In this protocol, we describe an a...

  12. Functional characterization of solute carrier (SLC) 26/sulfate permease (SulP) proteins in membrane mimetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Baars, Tonie Luise; Fendler, Klaus; Michel, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Solute carrier (SLC) 26 or sulfate permease (SulP) anion transporters, belong to a phylogenetically ancient family of secondary active transporters. Members of the family are involved in several human genetic diseases and cell physiological processes. Despite their importance, the substrates for transport by this family of proteins have been poorly characterized. In this study, recombinant StmYchM/DauA, a SulP from Salmonella typhimurium was purified to homogeneity and functionally characterized. StmYchM/DauA was found to be a dimer in solution as determined by size exclusion chromatography coupled to multiple angle light scattering. We report a functional characterization of the SulP proteins in two membrane mimetic systems and reveal a dual nature of anionic substrates for SulP. StmYchM/DauA functionally incorporated into nanodiscs could bind fumarate with millimolar affinities (KD = 4.6 ± 0.29 mM) as detected by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence quench studies. In contrast, electrophysiological experiments performed in reconstituted liposomes indicate a strong bicarbonate transport in the presence of chloride but no detectable electrogenic fumarate transport. We hence suggest that while SulP acts as an electrogenic bicarbonate transporter, fumarate may serve as substrate under different conditions indicating multiple functions of SulP. PMID:26774215

  13. Protein crystallization in stirred systems--scale-up via the maximum local energy dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smejkal, Benjamin; Helk, Bernhard; Rondeau, Jean-Michel; Anton, Sabine; Wilke, Angelika; Scheyerer, Peter; Fries, Jacqueline; Hekmat, Dariusch; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2013-07-01

    Macromolecular bioproducts like therapeutic proteins have usually been crystallized with µL-scale vapor diffusion experiments for structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Little systematic know-how exists for technical-scale protein crystallization in stirred vessels. In this study, the Fab-fragment of the therapeutic antibody Canakinumab was successfully crystallized in a stirred-tank reactor on a 6 mL-scale. A four times faster onset of crystallization of the Fab-fragment was observed compared to the non-agitated 10 µL-scale. Further studies on a liter-scale with lysozyme confirmed this effect. A 10 times faster onset of crystallization was observed in this case at an optimum stirrer speed. Commonly suggested scale-up criteria (i.e., minimum stirrer speed to keep the protein crystals in suspension or constant impeller tip speed) were shown not to be successful. Therefore, the criterion of constant maximum local energy dissipation was applied for scale-up of the stirred crystallization process for the first time. The maximum local energy dissipation was estimated by measuring the drop size distribution of an oil/surfactant/water emulsion in stirred-tank reactors on a 6 mL-, 100 mL-, and 1 L-scale. A comparable crystallization behavior was achieved in all stirred-tank reactors when the maximum local energy dissipation was kept constant for scale-up. A maximum local energy dissipation of 2.2 W kg(-1) was identified to be the optimum for lysozyme crystallization at all scales under study. PMID:23335375

  14. Humidity control can compensate for the damage induced in protein crystals by alien solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein crystals typically deteriorate upon soaking in solutions very different from those used to grow them (the ‘mother liquor’). This is particularly true of solutions containing lower salt concentrations and organic solvents (i.e. DMSO, ethanol). Optimization of the relative humidity environment of the crystals can compensate for these effects and allow recovery of diffraction quality. The use of relative humidity control of protein crystals to overcome some of the shortcomings of soaking ligands (i.e. inhibitors, substrate analogs, weak ligands) into pre-grown apoprotein crystals has been explored. Crystals of PurE (EC 4.1.1.21), an enzyme from the purine-biosynthesis pathway of Bacillus anthracis, were used as a test case. The findings can be summarized as follows: (i) using humidity control, it is possible to improve/optimize the diffraction quality of crystals soaked in solutions of organic solvent (DMSO, ethanol) containing ligands/inhibitors; (ii) optimization of the relative humidity can compensate for the deterioration of the diffraction pattern that is observed upon desalting crystals grown in high salt; (iii) combining desalting protocols with the addition of PEG it is possible to achieve very high concentrations of weak ligands (in the 5–10 mM range) in soaking solutions and (iv) fine control of the relative humidity of crystals soaked in these solutions can compensate for the deterioration of crystal diffraction and restore ‘high-resolution’ diffraction for structure-based and fragment-based drug design. It is suggested that these experimental protocols may be useful in other protein systems and may be applicable in academic or private research to increase the probability of obtaining structures of protein–ligand complexes at high resolution

  15. Using Magnetic Fields to Control Convection during Protein Crystallization: Analysis and Validation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of convection during the crystallization of proteins is not very well understood. In a gravitational field, convection is caused by crystal sedimentation and by solutal buoyancy induced flow and these can lead to crystal imperfections. While crystallization in microgravity can approach diffusion limited growth conditions (no convection), terrestrially strong magnetic fields can be used to control fluid flow and sedimentation effects. In this work, we develop the analysis for magnetic flow control and test the predictions using analog experiments. Specifically, experiments on solutal convection in a paramagnetic fluid were conducted in a strong magnetic field gradient using a dilute solution of Manganese Chloride. The observed flows indicate that the magnetic field can completely counter the settling effects of gravity locally and are consistent with the theoretical predictions presented. This phenomenon suggests that magnetic fields may be useful in mimicking the microgravity environment of space for some crystal growth ana biological applications where fluid convection is undesirable.

  16. Crystal Structure of Human Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobiev, S.; Su, M; Seetharaman, J; Huang, Y; Chen, C; Maglaqui, M; Janjua, H; Montelione, G; Tong, L; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    As a step towards better integrating protein three-dimensional (3D) structural information in cancer systems biology, the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) (www.nesg.org) has constructed a Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network (HCPIN) by analysis of several classical cancer-associated signaling pathways and their physical protein-protein interactions. Many well-known cancer-associated proteins play central roles as hubs or bottlenecks in the HCPIN (http://nmr.cabm.rutgers.edu/hcpin). NESG has selected more than 1000 human proteins and protein domains from the HCPIN for sample production and 3D structure determination. The long-range goal of this effort is to provide a comprehensive 3D structure-function database for human cancer-associated proteins and protein complexes, in the context of their interaction networks. Human retinoblastoma binding protein 9 (RBBP9) is one of the HCPIN proteins targeted by NESG. RBBP9 was initially identified as the product of a new gene, Bog (for B5T over-expressed gene), in several transformed rat liver epithelial cell lines resistant to the growth-inhibitory effect of TGF-1 as well as in primary human liver tumors. RBBP9 contains the retinoblastoma (Rb) binding motif LxCxE in its sequence, and was shown to interact with Rb by yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Mutation of the Leu residue in this motif to Gln blocked the binding to Rb. RBBP9 can displace E2F1 from E2F1-Rb complexes, and over expression of RBBP9 overcomes TGF-1 induced growth arrest and results in transformation of rat liver epithelial cells leading to hepatoblastoma-like tumors in nude mice. RBBP9 may also play a role in cellular responses to chronic low dose radiation. A close homolog of RBBP9, sharing 93% amino acid sequence identity and also known as RBBP10, interacts with a protein with sua5-yciO-yrdC domains.

  17. Biophysical study on the interaction of etomidate and the carrier protein in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Aijie; Liu, Guoqiang; Wang, Dewei; Chen, Kui; Wang, Hongying

    2016-08-01

    Etomidate is a unique drug used for induction of general anesthesia and sedation, and is usually used through intravenous injection clinically. Before targeting to the receptor, etomidate binds proteins in blood when it comes into veins. Thus to study the interaction of etomidate and serum albumin would be of great toxicological and pharmacological importance. In this study, the interaction between etomidate and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, site maker displacement and molecular modeling methods. Investigations of the binding constant (K = 3.55 × 10(5 )M(-1), 295 K), the number of binding sites (n = 1.16), thermodynamic parameters (ΔG = 3.13 × 10(4 )J·mol(-1), ΔS = 364 J·mol(-1)·K(-1) and ΔH = -6.85 × 10(5 )J·mol(-1)) for the reaction and changes to the binding sites and conformation in HSA in response to etomidate were presented. Results show that etomidate can bind HSA tightly through electrostatic forces, and the protein skeleton conformation and secondary structure changes thereby. This is the first spectroscopic report for etomidate-HSA interactions which illustrates the complex nature of this subject. PMID:25757642

  18. Carbohydrate particles as protein carriers and scaffolds: physico-chemical characterization and collagen stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Ivone; Rocha, Sandra; Loureiro, Joana A.; Carmo Pereira, Maria do [University of Porto, LEPAE, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering (Portugal); Ivanova, Galya [Universidade do Porto, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias (Portugal); Coelho, Manuel, E-mail: mcoelho@fe.up.pt [University of Porto, LEPAE, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering (Portugal)

    2012-09-15

    The preservation of protein properties after entrapping into polymeric matrices and the effects of drying the emulsions still remains uncertain and controversial. Carbohydrate particles were designed and prepared by homogenization of gum arabic and maltodextrin mixture, with collagen hydrolysate (CH) followed by spray-drying. The encapsulation of CH in the carbohydrate matrix was achieved with an efficiency of 85 {+-} 2 %. The morphology and the size of the particles, before (40-400 nm) and after spray-drying (<20 {mu}m), were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Measurements of the nuclear relaxation times and application of diffusion ordered spectroscopy, obtained through pulsed field gradient NMR experiments, have been performed to determine the structure of the CH-polysaccharide conjugates and to clarify the mechanism of CH immobilization in the polysaccharide matrix. In vitro release profiles in ultrapure water and in cellular medium reveal that the diffusion rate of CH from the polymeric matrix to the dialysis solution decreases in average 30-50 % over time, compared to free CH molecules. In cellular medium at 37 Degree-Sign C, the complete release of CH from the particles is achieved only after 24 h, demonstrating a significant decrease in the CH mass transfer process when compared with free CH. The findings of this study outline the ability of gum arabic/maltodextrin matrices to entrap and preserve CH original properties after the spray-drying process and support the potential of the polymeric scaffold for protein delivery and tissue engineering.

  19. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of calcium-binding protein 5 from Entamoeba histolytica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium-binding protein 5 from E. histolytica was cloned, expressed in E. coli and purified. The purified protein crystallized in space group C222 and the crystals diffracted to 2 Å resolution. Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human amoebiasis. Phagocytosis is the major route of food intake by this parasite and is responsible for its virulence. Calcium and calcium-binding proteins play major roles in its phagocytosis. Calcium-binding protein 5 from E. histolytica (EhCaBP5) is a cytoplasmic protein; its expression is very sensitive to serum starvation and it seems to be involved in binding to myosin I. In this study, EhCaBP5 was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. The purified protein crystallized in space group C222 and the crystals diffracted to 2 Å resolution. The Matthews coefficient indicated the presence of one molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a VM of 2.35 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 47.7%

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of infectious bronchitis virus nonstructural protein 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gene segment encoding avian infectious bronchitis virus nonstructural protein 9 has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein has been crystallized and the crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.44 Å resolution. Avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), which causes respiratory disease in infected birds, belongs to coronavirus group 3. IBV encodes 15 nonstructural proteins (nsp2–nsp16) which play crucial roles in RNA transcription and genome replication. Nonstructural protein 9 (nsp9) has been identified as a protein that is essential to viral replication because of its single-stranded RNA-binding ability. The gene segment encoding IBV nsp9 has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein has been crystallized and the crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.44 Å resolution. They belonged to the cubic space group I432, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 123.4 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The asymmetric unit appeared to contain one molecule, with a solvent content of 62% (VM = 3.26 Å3 Da−1)

  1. Matrix Gla Protein is Involved in Crystal Formation in Kidney of Hyperoxaluric Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Lu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matrix Gla protein (MGP is a molecular determinant regulating vascular calcification of the extracellular matrix. However, it is still unclear how MGP may be invovled in crystal formation in the kidney of hyperoxaluric rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the hyperoxaluric group and control group. Hyperoxaluric rats were administrated by 0.75% ethylene glycol (EG for up to 8 weeks. Renal MGP expression was detected by the standard avidin-biotin complex (ABC method. Renal crystal deposition was observed by a polarizing microscope. Total RNA and protein from the rat kidney tissue were extracted. The levels of MGP mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blot. Results: Hyperoxaluria was induced successfully in rats. The MGP was polarly distributed, on the apical membrane of renal tubular epithelial cells, and was found in the ascending thick limbs of Henle's loop (cTAL and the distal convoluted tubule (DCT in hyperoxaluric rats, its expression however, was present in the medullary collecting duct (MCD in stone-forming rats. Crystals with multilaminated structure formed in the injurious renal tubules with lack of MGP expression.MGP mRNA expression was significantly upregulated by the crystals' stimulations. Conclusion: Our results suggested that the MGP was involved in crystals formation by the continuous expression, distributing it polarly in the renal tubular cells and binding directly to the crystals.

  2. Influence of protein solution in nucleation and optimized formulation for the growth of ARM lipase crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Masomian, Malihe; Leow, Adam Thean Chor; Ali, Mohd Shukuri Mohamad

    2015-09-01

    ARM lipase is a thermostable and organic solvent tolerant enzyme which was highly purified prior to crystallization. The His-tagged ARM lipase was purified with immobilized metal affinity chromatography followed by anion-exchange chromatography. The effect of different salt concentrations on stability, solubility and crystal nucleation of the protein was studied. The highly purified and homogeneous ARM lipase with protein concentration of 2 mg/mL was successfully crystallized by a sitting drop, vapor diffusion method with the use of 0.1 M MES monohydrate pH 6.5 and 12% (v/v) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 20000 as precipitant. The crystallization conditions were optimized by changing the pH and concentration of the precipitant. The optimum crystallization condition was 2 mg/mL ARM lipase in 0.1 M Tris-HCl, 0.15 M NaCl, pH 8.0 protein solution, crystallized using 0.1 M Tris-HCl, pH 8.0 and 12% (v/v) PEG 20000 as precipitant.

  3. On increasing protein-crystallization throughput for X-ray diffraction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashit K; Liu, Zhi Jie; Stewart, Patrick D; Schubot, Florian D; Rose, John P; Newton, M Gary; Wang, Bi Cheng

    2005-02-01

    Two recent developments, a novel screening/optimization strategy that considerably reduces the number of trials required to produce diffraction-size crystals and a simple modification that doubles the screening capacity of the Douglas Instruments ORYX 1-6 protein-crystallization robot, have been implemented into a structural genomics project. The new two-step screening/optimization strategy yields diffraction-quality crystals directly from the screening process, reducing the need for further optimization. The ORYX modification involves the addition of extensions to the sample- and oil-delivery arms and software modifications that allow two plates to be set up simultaneously. PMID:15681862

  4. In-situ Optical Waveguides for Monitoring and Modifying Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Ursula; Osterberg, Ulf

    2004-01-01

    The use of electric fields in the growth of protein crystals was investigated, both theoretically and experimentally. We used dc, ac and optical fields to change the spatial distribution of proteins. Dc fields had only local effects, due to the conductivity of the growth solution. We found that for low frequency fields, movement of the buffer and salt ions dominated, and that for high frequency ac fields, &electrophoretic effects could be useful for relocating growing protein crystals. The most promising result was that for optical fields, a large gradient in the field could be used to capture a crystal, and observe growth in-situ. This concept could be developed into an experimental setup compatible with automated x-ray diffraction measurements in microgravity.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biotin protein ligase from S. aureus has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified, crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and analysed using X-ray diffraction. Biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus catalyses the biotinylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase. Recombinant biotin protein ligase from S. aureus has been cloned, expressed and purified. Crystals were grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as the precipitant at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution from crystals using synchrotron X-ray radiation at 100 K. The diffraction was consistent with the tetragonal space group P42212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 93.665, c = 131.95

  6. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of mouse PACSIN 3 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The N-terminal F-BAR domain of mouse PACSIN 3, which contains 341 amino acids, has been successfully cloned, purified and crystallized. PACSIN-family proteins are cytoplasmic proteins that have vesicle-transport, membrane-dynamics, actin-reorganization and microtubule activities. Here, the N-terminal F-BAR domain of mouse PACSIN 3, which contains 341 amino acids, was successfully cloned, purified and crystallized. The crystal of PACSIN 3 (1–341) diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.9, b = 54.7, c = 193.7 Å, α = 90, β = 96.9, γ = 90°. These data should provide further information on PACSIN-family protein structures

  7. Will my protein crystallize? A sequence-based predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialowski, Pawel; Schmidt, Thorsten; Cox, Jürgen; Kirschner, Andreas; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2006-02-01

    We propose a machine-learning approach to sequence-based prediction of protein crystallizability in which we exploit subtle differences between proteins whose structures were solved by X-ray analysis [or by both X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy] and those proteins whose structures were solved by NMR spectroscopy alone. Because the NMR technique is usually applied on relatively small proteins, sequence length distributions of the X-ray and NMR datasets were adjusted to avoid predictions biased by protein size. As feature space for classification, we used frequencies of mono-, di-, and tripeptides represented by the original 20-letter amino acid alphabet as well as by several reduced alphabets in which amino acids were grouped by their physicochemical and structural properties. The classification algorithm was constructed as a two-layered structure in which the output of primary support vector machine classifiers operating on peptide frequencies was combined by a second-level Naive Bayes classifier. Due to the application of metamethods for cost sensitivity, our method is able to handle real datasets with unbalanced class representation. An overall prediction accuracy of 67% [65% on the positive (crystallizable) and 69% on the negative (noncrystallizable) class] was achieved in a 10-fold cross-validation experiment, indicating that the proposed algorithm may be a valuable tool for more efficient target selection in structural genomics. A Web server for protein crystallizability prediction called SECRET is available at http://webclu.bio.wzw.tum.de:8080/secret. PMID:16315316

  8. Co-administration of non-carrier nanoparticles boosts antigen immune response without requiring protein conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Nani; Chuan, Yap P; Seth, Arjun; Cordoba, Yoann; Lua, Linda H L; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2014-06-17

    Nanotechnology promises a revolution in medicine including through new vaccine approaches. The use of nanoparticles in vaccination has, to date, focused on attaching antigen directly to or within nanoparticle structures to enhance antigen uptake by immune cells. Here we question whether antigen incorporation with the nanoparticle is actually necessary to boost vaccine effectiveness. We show that the immunogenicity of a sub-unit protein antigen was significantly boosted by formulation with silica nanoparticles even without specific conjugation of antigen to the nanoparticle. We further show that this effect was observed only for virus-sized nanoparticles (50 nm) but not for larger (1,000 nm) particles, demonstrating a pronounced effect of nanoparticle size. This non-attachment approach has potential to radically simplify the development and application of nanoparticle-based formulations, leading to safer and simpler nanoparticle applications in vaccine development. PMID:24793947

  9. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  10. Energy Band Gap, Intrinsic Carrier Concentration and Fermi Level of CdTe Bulk Crystal between 304 K and 1067 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2007-01-01

    Optical transmission measurements were performed on CdTe bulk single crystal. It was found that when a sliced and polished CdTe wafer was used, a white film started to develop when the sample was heated above 530 K and the sample became opaque. Therefore, a bulk crystal of CdTe was first grown in the window area by physical vapor transport; the optical transmission was then measured and from which the energy band gap was derived between 304 and 1067 K. The band gaps of CdTe can be fit well as a function of temperature using the Varshini expression: Eg (e V) = 1.5860 - 5.9117xl0(exp -4) T(sup 2)/(T + 160). Using the band gap data, the high temperature electron-hole equilibrium was calculated numerically by assuming the Kane's conduction band structure and a heavy-hole parabolic valance band. The calculated intrinsic carrier concentrations agree well with the experimental data reported previously. The calculated intrinsic Fermi levels between 270 and 1200 K were also presented.

  11. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins (FABPs) Are Intracellular Carriers for Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, Matthew W.; Kaczocha, Martin; Berger, William T.; Leung, KwanNok; Ralph, Brian P.; Wang, Liqun; Sweeney, Joseph M.; Miyauchi, Jeremy T.; Tsirka, Stella E.; Ojima, Iwao; Deutsch, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) occur naturally in marijuana (Cannabis) and may be formulated, individually or in combination in pharmaceuticals such as Marinol or Sativex. Although it is known that these hydrophobic compounds can be transported in blood by albumin or lipoproteins, the intracellular carrier has not been identified. Recent reports suggest that CBD and THC elevate the levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) when administered to humans, suggesting that phytocannabinoids target cellular proteins involved in endocannabinoid clearance. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular proteins that mediate AEA transport to its catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By computational analysis and ligand displacement assays, we show that at least three human FABPs bind THC and CBD and demonstrate that THC and CBD inhibit the cellular uptake and catabolism of AEA by targeting FABPs. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to rodent FAAH, CBD does not inhibit the enzymatic actions of human FAAH, and thus FAAH inhibition cannot account for the observed increase in circulating AEA in humans following CBD consumption. Using computational molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis we identify key residues within the active site of FAAH that confer the species-specific sensitivity to inhibition by CBD. Competition for FABPs may in part or wholly explain the increased circulating levels of endocannabinoids reported after consumption of cannabinoids. These data shed light on the mechanism of action of CBD in modulating the endocannabinoid tone in vivo and may explain, in part, its reported efficacy toward epilepsy and other neurological disorders. PMID:25666611

  12. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular carriers for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, Matthew W; Kaczocha, Martin; Berger, William T; Leung, KwanNok; Ralph, Brian P; Wang, Liqun; Sweeney, Joseph M; Miyauchi, Jeremy T; Tsirka, Stella E; Ojima, Iwao; Deutsch, Dale G

    2015-04-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) occur naturally in marijuana (Cannabis) and may be formulated, individually or in combination in pharmaceuticals such as Marinol or Sativex. Although it is known that these hydrophobic compounds can be transported in blood by albumin or lipoproteins, the intracellular carrier has not been identified. Recent reports suggest that CBD and THC elevate the levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) when administered to humans, suggesting that phytocannabinoids target cellular proteins involved in endocannabinoid clearance. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular proteins that mediate AEA transport to its catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By computational analysis and ligand displacement assays, we show that at least three human FABPs bind THC and CBD and demonstrate that THC and CBD inhibit the cellular uptake and catabolism of AEA by targeting FABPs. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to rodent FAAH, CBD does not inhibit the enzymatic actions of human FAAH, and thus FAAH inhibition cannot account for the observed increase in circulating AEA in humans following CBD consumption. Using computational molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis we identify key residues within the active site of FAAH that confer the species-specific sensitivity to inhibition by CBD. Competition for FABPs may in part or wholly explain the increased circulating levels of endocannabinoids reported after consumption of cannabinoids. These data shed light on the mechanism of action of CBD in modulating the endocannabinoid tone in vivo and may explain, in part, its reported efficacy toward epilepsy and other neurological disorders. PMID:25666611

  13. Statistical analysis on protein-protein interface in crystals:Specific and non-specific interfaces are differentially distributed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Dan; ZENG Zonghao

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of contact areas, or fractions of contacting, of protein-protein interfaces in crystals of pure polypeptides contains two components: a major exponential distribution and a minor flatter distribution. Suppose the two components belong to specific and non-specific contacts, respectively, then the probability of a contact with a given area, or fraction of contacting, can be estimated. By dividing the whole database into two sub-databases, one of them is known to contain more specific contacts than the other, this hypothesis is confirmed and it is also proved that the fraction of contacting is more effective than the contact area on discriminating specific and non-specific contacts in protein crystals.

  14. X-Ray Powder Diffraction from Sub-Micron Crystals of Photosystem-1 Membrane Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, D. A.; DePonte, D.; Doak, R. B.; Fromme, P.; Hembree, G.; Hunter, M; Marchesini, S.; Schmidt, K.; Starodub, D.; Weierstall, U.; Chapman, H.; Spence, J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that powder diffraction data can be collected from sub-micron crystals of a mbrane protein with nearly two orders of magnitude more atoms than the molecules commonly used for powder diffraction. The crystals of photosystem-1 protein were size-selected using a 500 nm pore- size filter and delivered to a soft x-ray beam with a photon energy of 1.5 keV using a dynamically focused micro-jet developed for the serial crystallography experiment at beamline 9.0.1. The 10-micron jet pla...

  15. Evaluation of the non-toxic mutant of the diphtheria toxin K51E/E148K as carrier protein for meningococcal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecetta, S; Vijayakrishnan, B; Romano, M R; Proietti, D; Surdo, P Lo; Balocchi, C; Mori, E; Davis, B G; Berti, F

    2016-03-01

    Diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 is a common carrier protein for glycoconjugate vaccines, which has been proven an effective protein vector for, among others, meningococcal carbohydrates. The wide-range use of this protein in massive vaccine production requires constant increase of production yields and adaptability to an ever-growing market. Here we compare CRM197 with the alternative diphtheria non-toxic variant DT-K51E/E148K, an inactive mutant that can be produced in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. Biophysical characterization of DT-K51E/E148K suggested high similarity with CRM197, with main differences in their alpha-helical content, and a suitable purity for conjugation and vaccine preparation. Meningococcal serogroup A (MenA) glycoconjugates were synthesized using CRM197 and DT-K51E/E148K as carrier proteins, obtaining the same conjugation yields and comparable biophysical profiles. Mice were then immunized with these CRM197 and DT-K51E/E148K conjugates, and essentially identical immunogenic and protective effects were observed. Overall, our data indicate that DT-K51E/E148K is a readily produced protein that now allows the added flexibility of E. coli production in vaccine development and that can be effectively used as protein carrier for a meningococcal conjugate vaccine. PMID:26845738

  16. Protein crystals in Adenovirus type 5-infected cells: requirements for intranuclear crystallogenesis, structural and functional analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Franqueville

    Full Text Available Intranuclear crystalline inclusions have been observed in the nucleus of epithelial cells infected with Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 at late steps of the virus life cycle. Using immuno-electron microscopy and confocal microscopy of cells infected with various Ad5 recombinants modified in their penton base or fiber domains, we found that these inclusions represented crystals of penton capsomers, the heteromeric capsid protein formed of penton base and fiber subunits. The occurrence of protein crystals within the nucleus of infected cells required the integrity of the fiber knob and part of the shaft domain. In the knob domain, the region overlapping residues 489-492 in the FG loop was found to be essential for crystal formation. In the shaft, a large deletion of repeats 4 to 16 had no detrimental effect on crystal inclusions, whereas deletion of repeats 8 to 21 abolished crystal formation without altering the level of fiber protein expression. This suggested a crucial role of the five penultimate repeats in the crystallisation process. Chimeric pentons made of Ad5 penton base and fiber domains from different serotypes were analyzed with respect to crystal formation. No crystal was found when fiber consisted of shaft (S from Ad5 and knob (K from Ad3 (heterotypic S5-K3 fiber, but occurred with homotypic S3K3 fiber. However, less regular crystals were observed with homotypic S35-K35 fiber. TB5, a monoclonal antibody directed against the Ad5 fiber knob was found by immunofluorescence microscopy to react with high efficiency with the intranuclear protein crystals in situ. Data obtained with Ad fiber mutants indicated that the absence of crystalline inclusions correlated with a lower infectivity and/or lower yields of virus progeny, suggesting that the protein crystals might be involved in virion assembly. Thus, we propose that TB5 staining of Ad-infected 293 cells can be used as a prognostic assay for the viability and productivity of fiber-modified Ad5

  17. Protein crystal structure from non-oriented, single-axis sparse X-ray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Wierman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs have inspired the development of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX as a method to solve the structure of proteins. SFX datasets are collected from a sequence of protein microcrystals injected across ultrashort X-ray pulses. The idea behind SFX is that diffraction from the intense, ultrashort X-ray pulses leaves the crystal before the crystal is obliterated by the effects of the X-ray pulse. The success of SFX at XFELs has catalyzed interest in analogous experiments at synchrotron-radiation (SR sources, where data are collected from many small crystals and the ultrashort pulses are replaced by exposure times that are kept short enough to avoid significant crystal damage. The diffraction signal from each short exposure is so `sparse' in recorded photons that the process of recording the crystal intensity is itself a reconstruction problem. Using the EMC algorithm, a successful reconstruction is demonstrated here in a sparsity regime where there are no Bragg peaks that conventionally would serve to determine the orientation of the crystal in each exposure. In this proof-of-principle experiment, a hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL crystal rotating about a single axis was illuminated by an X-ray beam from an X-ray generator to simulate the diffraction patterns of microcrystals from synchrotron radiation. Millions of these sparse frames, typically containing only ∼200 photons per frame, were recorded using a fast-framing detector. It is shown that reconstruction of three-dimensional diffraction intensity is possible using the EMC algorithm, even with these extremely sparse frames and without knowledge of the rotation angle. Further, the reconstructed intensity can be phased and refined to solve the protein structure using traditional crystallographic software. This suggests that synchrotron-based serial crystallography of micrometre-sized crystals can be practical with the aid of the EMC algorithm even in cases

  18. Crystal structure analysis, overexpression and refolding behaviour of a DING protein with single mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystals of a member of the DING protein family (HPBP) were obtained accidentally, and the structure was determined at 1.35 Å resolution. For further analysis, a system for preparation of HPBP was constructed and the structure of a prepared sample was confirmed by X-ray crystal structure analysis at 1.03 Å resolution. After crystallization of a certain protein–RNA complex, well diffracting crystals were obtained. However, the asymmetric unit of the crystal was too small to locate any components. Mass spectrometry and X-ray crystal structure analysis showed that it was a member of the DING protein family (HPBP). Surprisingly, the structure of HPBP reported previously was also determined accidentally as a contaminant, suggesting that HPBP has a strong tendency to crystallize. Furthermore, DING proteins were reported to relate in disease. These observations suggest that DING has potential for application in a wide range of research fields. To enable further analyses, a system for preparation of HPBP was constructed. As HPBP was expressed in insoluble form in Escherichia coli, it was unfolded chemically and refolded. Finally, a very high yield preparation method was constructed, in which 43 mg of HPBP was obtained from 1 L of culture. Furthermore, to evaluate the validity of refolding, its crystal structure was determined at 1.03 Å resolution. The determined structure was identical to the native structure, in which two disulfide bonds were recovered correctly and a phosphate ion was captured. Based on these results, it was concluded that the refolded HPBP recovers its structure correctly

  19. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.961 protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiong-Zhuo [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao, XiaoJun, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Liang, Yu-He, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China)

    2007-10-01

    The SMU.961 protein from S. mutans was crystallized and preliminary characterization of the crystals, which diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution, shows them to belong to space group C2. The smu.961 gene encodes a putative protein of 183 residues in Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen in human dental caries. The gene was cloned into expression vector pET28a and expressed in a substantial quantity in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) with a His tag at its N-terminus. The recombinant protein SMU.961 was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution at beamline I911-3, MAX-II-lab, Sweden. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.62, b = 73.73, c = 184.73 Å, β = 98.82°.

  20. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.961 protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SMU.961 protein from S. mutans was crystallized and preliminary characterization of the crystals, which diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution, shows them to belong to space group C2. The smu.961 gene encodes a putative protein of 183 residues in Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen in human dental caries. The gene was cloned into expression vector pET28a and expressed in a substantial quantity in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) with a His tag at its N-terminus. The recombinant protein SMU.961 was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure consisting of Ni2+-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution at beamline I911-3, MAX-II-lab, Sweden. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.62, b = 73.73, c = 184.73 Å, β = 98.82°

  1. Non-carrier nanoparticles adjuvant modular protein vaccine in a particle-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Arjun; Ritchie, Fiona K; Wibowo, Nani; Lua, Linda H L; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly used to adjuvant vaccine formulations due to their biocompatibility, ease of manufacture and the opportunity to tailor their size, shape, and physicochemical properties. The efficacy of similarly-sized silica (Si-OH), poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly caprolactone (PCL) nanoparticles (nps) to adjuvant recombinant capsomere presenting antigenic M2e modular peptide from Influenza A virus (CapM2e) was investigated in vivo. Formulation of CapM2e with Si-OH or PLGA nps significantly boosted the immunogenicity of modular capsomeres, even though CapM2e was not actively attached to the nanoparticles prior to injection (i.e., formulation was by simple mixing). In contrast, PCL nps showed no significant adjuvant effect using this simple-mixing approach. The immune response induced by CapM2e alone or formulated with nps was antibody-biased with very high antigen-specific antibody titer and less than 20 cells per million splenocytes secreting interferon gamma. Modification of silica nanoparticle surface properties through amine functionalization and pegylation did not lead to significant changes in immune response. This study confirms that simple mixing-based formulation can lead to effective adjuvanting of antigenic protein, though with antibody titer dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. PMID:25756283

  2. Crystallization of a pentapeptide-repeat protein by reductive cyclic pentylation of free amines with glutaraldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting, Matthew W., E-mail: vetting@aecom.yu.edu; Hegde, Subray S.; Blanchard, John S. [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2009-05-01

    A method to modify proteins with glutaraldehyde under reducing conditions is presented. Treatment with glutaraldehyde and dimethylaminoborane was found to result in cyclic pentylation of free amines and facilitated the structural determination of a protein previously recalcitrant to the formation of diffraction quality crystals. The pentapeptide-repeat protein EfsQnr from Enterococcus faecalis protects DNA gyrase from inhibition by fluoroquinolones. EfsQnr was cloned and purified to homogeneity, but failed to produce diffraction-quality crystals in initial crystallization screens. Treatment of EfsQnr with glutaraldehyde and the strong reducing agent borane–dimethylamine resulted in a derivatized protein which produced crystals that diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution; their structure was subsequently determined by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion. Analysis of the derivatized protein using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry indicated a mass increase of 68 Da per free amino group. Electron-density maps about a limited number of structurally ordered lysines indicated that the modification was a cyclic pentylation of free amines, producing piperidine groups.

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of fluorescence recovery protein from Synechocystis PCC 6803

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence recovery protein from Synechocystis PCC 6803 plays a key role in the orange carotenoid protein-related photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria. The full-length form and a truncated form were overexpressed, purified and crystallized, and diffraction was observed to 2.75 Å resolution. Fluorescence recovery protein (FRP), which is encoded by the slr1964 gene in Synechocystis PCC 6803, plays a key role in the orange carotenoid protein-related photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria. As the crystal structure of FRP may provide information about the biological functions and mechanism of action of the protein, recombinant full-length FRP and a truncated form were overexpressed, purified and crystallized at 291 K using ethylene imine polymer as the precipitant. An FRP data set was collected to a resolution of 2.75 Å at low temperature (100 K). The crystal belonged to space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.9, c = 160.7 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. Assuming that the asymmetric unit contains three molecules, the Matthews coefficient was calculated to be 2.1 Å3 Da−1

  4. Revision of the nomenclature for the Bacillus thuringiensis pesticidal crystal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crickmore, N; Zeigler, D R; Feitelson, J; Schnepf, E; Van Rie, J; Lereclus, D; Baum, J; Dean, D H

    1998-09-01

    The crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis have been extensively studied because of their pesticidal properties and their high natural levels of production. The increasingly rapid characterization of new crystal protein genes, triggered by an effort to discover proteins with new pesticidal properties, has resulted in a variety of sequences and activities that no longer fit the original nomenclature system proposed in 1989. Bacillus thuringiensis pesticidal crystal protein (Cry and Cyt) nomenclature was initially based on insecticidal activity for the primary ranking criterion. Many exceptions to this systematic arrangement have become apparent, however, making the nomenclature system inconsistent. Additionally, the original nomenclature, with four activity-based primary ranks for 13 genes, did not anticipate the current 73 holotype sequences that form many more than the original four subgroups. A new nomenclature, based on hierarchical clustering using amino acid sequence identity, is proposed. Roman numerals have been exchanged for Arabic numerals in the primary rank (e.g., Cry1Aa) to better accommodate the large number of expected new sequences. In this proposal, 133 crystal proteins comprising 24 primary ranks are systematically arranged. PMID:9729610

  5. Crystallization, diffraction data collection and preliminary crystallographic analysis of DING protein from Pseudomonas fluorescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystallization of DING protein from P. fluorescens is reported. A complete data set was collected to 1.43 Å resolution. PfluDING is a phosphate-binding protein expressed in Pseudomonas fluorescens. This protein is clearly distinct from the bacterial ABC transporter soluble phosphate-binding protein PstS and is more homologous to eukaryotic DING proteins. Interestingly, bacterial DING proteins have only been detected in certain Pseudomonas species. Although DING proteins seem to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes, they are systematically absent from eukaryotic genomic databases and thus are still quite mysterious and poorly characterized. PfluDING displays mitogenic activity towards human cells and binds various ligands such as inorganic phosphate, pyrophosphate, nucleotide triphosphates and cotinine. Here, the crystallization of PfluDING is reported in a monoclinic space group (P21), with typical unit-cell parameters a = 36.7, b = 123.7, c = 40.8 Å, α = 90, β = 116.7, γ = 90°. Preliminary crystallographic analysis reveals good diffraction quality for these crystals and a 1.43 Å resolution data set has been collected

  6. Evaluation of Trichodysplasia Spinulosa-Associated Polyomavirus Capsid Protein as a New Carrier for Construction of Chimeric Virus-Like Particles Harboring Foreign Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Gedvilaite

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs represent a promising tool for protein engineering. Recently, trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV viral protein 1 (VP1 was efficiently produced in yeast expression system and shown to self-assemble to VLPs. In the current study, TSPyV VP1 protein was exploited as a carrier for construction of chimeric VLPs harboring selected B and T cell-specific epitopes and evaluated in comparison to hamster polyomavirus VP1 protein. Chimeric VLPs with inserted either hepatitis B virus preS1 epitope DPAFR or a universal T cell-specific epitope AKFVAAWTLKAAA were produced in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Target epitopes were incorporated either at the HI or BC loop of the VP1 protein. The insertion sites were selected based on molecular models of TSPyV VP1 protein. The surface exposure of the insert positions was confirmed using a collection of monoclonal antibodies raised against the intact TSPyV VP1 protein. All generated chimeric proteins were capable to self-assemble to VLPs, which induced a strong immune response in mice. The chimeric VLPs also activated dendritic cells and T cells as demonstrated by analysis of cell surface markers and cytokine production profiles in spleen cell cultures. In conclusion, TSPyV VP1 protein represents a new potential carrier for construction of chimeric VLPs harboring target epitopes.

  7. Photoaffinity labeling of the dopamine reuptake carrier protein with 3-azido 3H GBR-12935

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high affinity tritiated azido-diphenylpiperazine derivative, 3-azido 3H GBR-12935, was synthesized as a potential photoaffinity probe of the dopamine transporter. Initially, the reversible binding of 3-azido 3H GBR-12935 to crude synaptosomal membranes from the rat striatum was characterized. Specific binding was sodium dependent and inhibited by a variety of drugs that are known to potently inhibit dopamine uptake. Other neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors, as well as cis-flupenthixol, a potent inhibitor of 3H GBR-12935 binding to piperazine binding sites, failed to inhibit specific binding at concentrations of less than or equal to 10 microM. A good correlation was observed between the relative potencies of these drugs in inhibiting dopamine uptake into synaptosomes and in inhibiting specific 3-azido 3H GBR-12935 binding to rat striatal membranes. These data suggest that 3-azido 3H GBR-12935, like other diphenylpiperazines such as 3H GBR-12935 and 3H GBR-12909, binds primarily to the dopamine transporter under defined assay conditions. After UV photolysis of crude synaptosomal membranes preincubated with 3-azido 3H GBR-12935 (1-2 nM), a single radiolabeled polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 80 kDa was observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Photoincorporation of 3-azido 3H GBR-12935 into this polypeptide was inhibited selectively by compounds that inhibit the uptake of dopamine and was completely dependent on the presence of Na+. No photolabeled proteins were observed when cerebellar membranes were substituted for striatal membranes. Essentially complete adsorption of the radiolabeled 80-kDa polypeptide to wheat germ agglutinin and elution with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine strongly suggest that the dopamine transporter polypeptide photolabeled by 3-azido 3H GBR-12935 is glycosylated

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of stationary phase survival protein E (SurE) from Xylella fastidiosa in two crystal forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization and preliminary analysis of two crystal forms of survival protein E from X. fastidiosa are reported. The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a phytopathogenic organism that causes citrus variegated chlorosis, a disease which attacks economically important crops, mainly oranges. In this communication, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of XfSurE, a survival protein E from X. fastidiosa, are reported. Data were collected for two crystal forms, I and II, to 1.93 and 2.9 Å resolution, respectively. Crystal form I belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 172.36, b = 84.18, c = 87.24 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 96.59°, whereas crystal form II belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.05, b = 81.26, c = 72.84 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 94.76°

  9. Role of Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin in calcium oxalate crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the defenses against nephrolithiasis is provided by macromolecules that modulate the nucleation, growth, aggregation and retention of crystals in the kidneys. The aim of the present study was to determine the behavior of two of these proteins, Tamm-Horsfall and uromodulin, in calcium oxalate crystallization in vitro. We studied a group of 10 male stone formers who had formed at least one kidney stone composed of calcium oxalate. They were classified as having idiopathic nephrolithiasis and had no well-known metabolic risk factors involved in kidney stone pathogenesis. Ten normal men were used as controls, as was a group consisting of five normal women and another consisting of five pregnant women. Crystallization was induced by a fixed supersaturation of calcium oxalate and measured with a Coulter Counter. All findings were confirmed by light and scanning electron microscopy. The number of particulate material deposited from patients with Tamm-Horsfall protein was higher than that of the controls (P<0.001. However, Tamm-Horsfall protein decreased the particle diameter of the stone formers when analyzed by the mode of the volume distribution curve (P<0.002 (5.64 ± 0.55 µm compared to 11.41 ± 0.48 µm of uromodulin; 15.94 ± 3.93 µm and 12.45 ± 0.97 µm of normal men Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin, respectively; 8.17 ± 1.57 µm and 9.82 ± 0.95 µm of normal women Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin, respectively; 12.17 ± 1.41 µm and 12.99 ± 0.51 µm of pregnant Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin, respectively. Uromodulin produced fewer particles than Tamm-Horsfall protein in all groups. Nonetheless, the total volume of the crystals produced by uromodulin was higher than that produced by Tamm-Horsfall protein. Our results indicate a different effect of Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin. This dual behavior suggests different functions. Tamm-Horsfall protein may act on nucleation and inhibit crystal aggregation, while

  10. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of X-ray diffraction and radiographic techniques for the location and characterization of protein crystals is demonstrated on membrane protein crystals mounted within lipid cubic phase material. The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Diamond Light Source. The technique is particularly useful for microcrystals and for crystals mounted in opaque materials such as lipid cubic phase. X-ray diffraction raster scanning can be used in combination with radiography to allow informed decision-making at the beamline prior to diffraction data collection. It is demonstrated that the X-ray dose required for a full tomography measurement is similar to that for a diffraction grid-scan, but for sample location and shape estimation alone just a few radiographic projections may be required

  11. Study of Fluid Flow Control in Protein Crystallization using Strong Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Leslie, Fred; Ciszak, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in "microgravity", researchers have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. Whether this limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals is still a matter of conjecture that our research will address. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately

  12. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Mycoplasma genitalium protein MG289

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single orthorhombic crystals of M. genitalium protein MG289 have been grown and shown to diffract X-rays to 2.8 Å resolution with good statistics. The structure obtained from these data will help to provide insight into the function of the protein as well as improving the understanding of its role in this human pathogen. Mycoplasma genitalium is a human pathogen that is associated with nongonococcal urethritis in men and cervicitis in women. The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the protein MG289 from M. genitalium strain G37 are reported here. Crystals of MG289 diffracted X-rays to 2.8 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.7, b = 90.9, c = 176.1 Å. The diffraction data after processing had an overall Rmerge of 8.7%. The crystal structure of Cypl, the ortholog of MG289 from M. hyorhinis, has recently been determined, providing a reasonable phasing model; molecular replacement is currently under way

  13. Understanding water equilibration fundamentals as a step for rational protein crystallization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M Martins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vapor diffusion is the most widely used technique for protein crystallization and the rate of water evaporation plays a key role on the quality of the crystals. Attempts have been made in the past to solve the mass transfer problem governing the evaporation process, either analytically or by employing numerical methods. Despite these efforts, the methods used for protein crystallization remain based on trial and error techniques rather than on fundamental principles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present a new theoretical model which describes the hanging drop method as a function of the different variables that are known to influence the evaporation process. The model is extensively tested against experimental data published by other authors and considering different crystallizing conditions. Aspects responsible for the discrepancies between the existing theories and the measured evaporation kinetics are especially discussed; they include the characterization of vapor-liquid equilibrium, the role of mass transfer within the evaporating droplet, and the influence of the droplet-reservoir distance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The validation tests show that the proposed model can be used to predict the water evaporation rates under a wide range of experimental conditions used in the hanging drop vapor-diffusion method, with no parameter fitting or computational requirements. This model combined with protein solubility data is expected to become a useful tool for a priori screening of crystallization conditions.

  14. Crystal structure of the histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein ZmHP2 from maize

    OpenAIRE

    Sugawara, Hajime; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Yamaya, Tomoyuki; Kamiya, Nobuo; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    In higher plants, histidine-aspartate phosphorelays (two-component system) are involved in hormone signaling and stress responses. In these systems, histidine-containing phosphotransfer (HPt) proteins mediate the signal transmission from sensory histidine kinases to response regulators, including integration of several signaling pathways or branching into different pathways. We have determined the crystal structure of a maize HPt protein, ZmHP2, at 2.2 Å resolution. ZmHP2 has six α-helices wi...

  15. Determination of damage-free crystal structure of an X-ray sensitive protein using XFEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a method of femtosecond crystallography for determining radiation damage-free crystal structures of large proteins at atomic resolution. The name of the method is 'serial femtosecond rotation crystallography' (SF-ROX). Here, we demonstrate experimental details of SF-ROX and 1.9-Å radiation damage-free structure analysis of bovine cytochrome c oxidase, a large (420-kDa), highly radiation-sensitive membrane protein. (author)

  16. Triclosan Resistome from Metagenome Reveals Diverse Enoyl Acyl Carrier Protein Reductases and Selective Enrichment of Triclosan Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Raees; Kong, Hyun Gi; Jung, Yong-Hoon; Choi, Jinhee; Baek, Kwang-Yeol; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a widely used antimicrobial agent and TCS resistance is considered to have evolved in diverse organisms with extensive use of TCS, but distribution of TCS resistance has not been well characterized. Functional screening of the soil metagenome in this study has revealed that a variety of target enoyl acyl carrier protein reductases (ENR) homologues are responsible for the majority of TCS resistance. Diverse ENRs similar to 7-α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (7-α-HSDH), FabG, or the unusual YX7K-type ENR conferred extreme tolerance to TCS. The TCS-refractory 7-α HSDH-like ENR and the TCS-resistant YX7K-type ENR seem to be prevalent in human pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that a selective enrichment occurred in pathogenic bacteria in soil. Additionally, resistance to multiple antibiotics was found to be mediated by antibiotic resistance genes that co-localize with TCS resistance determinants. Further comparative analysis of ENRs from 13 different environments has revealed a huge diversity of both prototypic and metagenomic TCS-resistant ENRs, in addition to a selective enrichment of TCS-resistant specific ENRs in presumably TCS-contaminated environments with reduced ENR diversity. Our results suggest that long-term extensive use of TCS can lead to the selective emergence of TCS-resistant bacterial pathogens, possibly with additional resistance to multiple antibiotics, in natural environments. PMID:27577999

  17. Triclosan Resistome from Metagenome Reveals Diverse Enoyl Acyl Carrier Protein Reductases and Selective Enrichment of Triclosan Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Raees; Kong, Hyun Gi; Jung, Yong-Hoon; Choi, Jinhee; Baek, Kwang-Yeol; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a widely used antimicrobial agent and TCS resistance is considered to have evolved in diverse organisms with extensive use of TCS, but distribution of TCS resistance has not been well characterized. Functional screening of the soil metagenome in this study has revealed that a variety of target enoyl acyl carrier protein reductases (ENR) homologues are responsible for the majority of TCS resistance. Diverse ENRs similar to 7-α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (7-α-HSDH), FabG, or the unusual YX7K-type ENR conferred extreme tolerance to TCS. The TCS-refractory 7-α HSDH-like ENR and the TCS-resistant YX7K-type ENR seem to be prevalent in human pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that a selective enrichment occurred in pathogenic bacteria in soil. Additionally, resistance to multiple antibiotics was found to be mediated by antibiotic resistance genes that co-localize with TCS resistance determinants. Further comparative analysis of ENRs from 13 different environments has revealed a huge diversity of both prototypic and metagenomic TCS-resistant ENRs, in addition to a selective enrichment of TCS-resistant specific ENRs in presumably TCS-contaminated environments with reduced ENR diversity. Our results suggest that long-term extensive use of TCS can lead to the selective emergence of TCS-resistant bacterial pathogens, possibly with additional resistance to multiple antibiotics, in natural environments. PMID:27577999

  18. Iron carrier proteins facilitate engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow and enduring hemopoietic chimerism in the lethally irradiated host

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell-free supernatants of rabbit bone marrow were fractionated, separated, and purified by Ultrogel and Superose chromatography. A single fraction promoted engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow and enduring hemopoietic chimerism across the H-2 barrier in lethally irradiated mice. This 'bio-active' fraction, analyzed by reducing SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, and transblotted on PVDF membrane, and purified by reverse-phase HPLC and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis yielded a main prealbumin band that when examined for primary structure by Edman degradation, proved to be rabbit transferrin. This was also attested by highly specific precipitation of the prealbumin band with polyclonal antibodies to rabbit transferrin. Iron-saturated human transferrin, lactotransferrin, and egg transferrin (conalbumin) were assayed in irradiated C57BL/6 mice infused with bone marrow from histoincompatible BALB/c donors. Mice treated with iron-loaded transferrins survive and develop enduring allogeneic chimerism with no discernible signs of graft-versus-host disease. Iron carrier proteins thus provide an unique means of achieving successful engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow in immunologically hostile murine H-2 combinations

  19. Design and evaluation of lipoprotein resembling curcumin-encapsulated protein-free nanostructured lipid carrier for brain targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanfei; Asghar, Sajid; Xu, Yurui; Wang, Jianping; Jin, Xin; Wang, Zhilin; Wang, Jing; Ping, Qineng; Zhou, Jianping; Xiao, Yanyu

    2016-06-15

    Many nanoparticle matrixes have been demonstrated to be efficient in brain targeting, but there are still certain limitations for them. To overcome the shortcomings of the existing nanoparticulate systems for brain-targeted delivery, a lipoprotein resembling protein-free nanostructured lipid carrier (PS80-NLC) loaded with curcumin was constructed and assessed for in vitro and in vivo performance. Firstly, single factor at a time approach was employed to investigate the effects of various formulation factors. Mean particle sizes of ≤100nm, high entrapment efficiency (EE, about 95%) and drug loading (DL, >3%) were obtained for the optimized formulations. In vitro release studies in the presence of plasma indicated stability of the formulation under physiological condition. Compared with NLC, PS80-NLC showed noticeably higher affinity for bEnd.3 cells (1.56 folds greater than NLC) but with lower uptake in macrophages. The brain coronal sections showed strong and widely distributed fluorescence intensity of PS80-NLC than that of NLC in the cortex. Ex vivo imaging studies further confirmed that PS80-NLC could effectively permeate BBB and preferentially accumulate in the brain (2.38 times greater than NLC). The considerable in vitro and in vivo performance of the safe and biocompatible PS80-NLC makes it a suitable option for further investigations in brain targeted drug delivery. PMID:27094357

  20. Defective Pollen Wall is Required for Anther and Microspore Development in Rice and Encodes a Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, J.; Shanklin, J.; Tan, H.; Yu, X.-H.; Liu, Y.; Liang, W.; Ranathunge, K.; Franke, R. B.; Schreiber, L.; Wang, Y.; Kai, G.; Ma, H.; Zhang, D.

    2011-06-01

    Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots.

  1. Protein sensing by nanofluidic crystal and its signal enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Sang, Jianming; Du, Hongtan; Wang, Wei; Chu, Ming; Wang, Yuedan; Li, Haichao; Alice Zhang, Haixia; Wu, Wengang; Li, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    Nanofluidics has a unique property that ionic conductance across a nanometer-sized confined space is strongly affected by the space surface charge density, which can be utilized to construct electrical read-out biosensor. Based on this principle, this work demonstrated a novel protein sensor along with a sandwich signal enhancement approach. Nanoparticles with designed aptamer onside are assembled in a suspended micropore to form a 3-dimensional network of nanometer-sized interstices, named a...

  2. Glycosylation of solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Carlsson, Michael C; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig

    2016-01-01

    Solute carriers (SLCs) are one of the largest groups of multi-spanning membrane proteins in mammals and include ubiquitously expressed proteins as well as proteins with highly restricted tissue expression. A vast number of studies have addressed the function and organization of SLCs as well as...

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the nucleocapsid protein of Bunyamwera virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nucleocapsid protein of Bunyamwera virus, the prototypic member of the Bunyaviridae family of segmented negative-sense RNA viruses, has been expressed and crystallized. Complete X-ray diffraction data sets have been collected. Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) is the prototypic member of the Bunyaviridae family of segmented negative-sense RNA viruses. The BUNV nucleocapsid protein has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein has been crystallized and a complete data set has been collected to 3.3 Å resolution at a synchrotron source. Crystals of the nucleocapsid protein belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 384.7, b = 89.8, c = 89.2 Å, β = 94.4°. Self-rotation function analysis of the X-ray diffraction data has provided insight into the oligomeric state of the protein as well as the orientation of the oligomers in the asymmetric unit. The structure determination of the protein is ongoing

  4. Cloning, Expression, Purification, Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of Mycoplasma Genitalium Protein MG289

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippel, K.; Boehlein, S; Sakai, Y; Quirit, J; Agbandje-McKenna, M; Rosser, C; McKenna, R

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a human pathogen that is associated with nongonococcal urethritis in men and cervicitis in women. The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the protein MG289 from M. genitalium strain G37 are reported here. Crystals of MG289 diffracted X-rays to 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.7, b = 90.9, c = 176.1 {angstrom}. The diffraction data after processing had an overall R{sub merge} of 8.7%. The crystal structure of Cypl, the ortholog of MG289 from M. hyorhinis, has recently been determined, providing a reasonable phasing model; molecular replacement is currently under way.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, Christian, E-mail: clin180@ec.auckland.ac.nz [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Caradoc-Davies, Tom T. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Proft, Thomas [School of Medical Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Baker, Edward N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2008-02-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution.

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution

  7. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of laminin-binding protein (Lmb) from Streptococcus agalactiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laminin-binding protein from S. agalactiae was expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Laminin-binding protein (Lmb), a surface-exposed lipoprotein from Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus), mediates attachment to human laminin and plays a crucial role in the adhesion/invasion of eukaryotic host cells. However, the structural basis of laminin binding still remains unclear. In the context of detailed structural analysis, the lmb gene has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.5 Å and belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.63, b = 70.60, c = 75.37 Å, β = 96.77°

  8. Protein-protein interactions in crystals of the human receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase ICA512 ectodomain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E Primo

    Full Text Available ICA512 (or IA-2 is a transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase located in secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Initially, it was identified as one of the main antigens of autoimmune diabetes. Later, it was found that during insulin secretion, the cytoplasmic domain of ICA512 is cleaved and relocated to the nucleus, where it stimulates the transcription of the insulin gene. The role of the other parts of the receptor in insulin secretion is yet to be unveiled. The structures of the intracellular pseudocatalytic and mature extracellular domains are known, but the transmembrane domain and several intracellular and extracellular parts of the receptor are poorly characterized. Moreover the overall structure of the receptor remains to be established. We started to address this issue studying by X-ray crystallography the structure of the mature ectodomain of ICA512 (ME ICA512 and variants thereof. The variants and crystallization conditions were chosen with the purpose of exploring putative association interfaces, metal binding sites and all other structural details that might help, in subsequent works, to build a model of the entire receptor. Several structural features were clarified and three main different association modes of ME ICA512 were identified. The results provide essential pieces of information for the design of new experiments aimed to assess the structure in vivo.

  9. Composition of globoid crystals from embryo protein bodies in five species of cucurbita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, J N; Vollmer, C M

    1979-02-01

    Previous energy-dispersive x-ray analysis studies of globoid crystal composition in seed protein bodies gave an indication that there might be a correlation between seed size and the type of elements stored in globoid crystals. This possibility was tested by conducting energy-dispersive x-ray analysis studies of P, K, Mg, and Ca levels in globoid crystals of four embryo regions (radicle, stem, cotyledon center palisade mesophyll, cotyledon center spongy mesophyII) in each of five different Cucurbita species (C. mixta, C. moschata, C. foetidissima, C. pepo, and C. andreana). The species were chosen to provide a range of seed size and weight. Globoid crystals from all embryo regions in all five species contained P, K, and Mg. Some variations in the levels of these elements did occur but there was no consistent pattern with regard to area of the seed or with regard to seed size. Calcium distribution showed significant variations. In species with large seeds (C. mixta, C. moschata) Ca was mainly found in globoid crystals in the radicle. Globoid crystals in species with small seeds (C. foetidissima, C. pepo, C. andreana) contained Ca in all embryo regions tested. The results of this study support the concept that Ca distribution in globoid crystals can be correlated with seed weight. PMID:16660719

  10. Composition of Globoid Crystals from Embryo Protein Bodies in Five Species of Cucurbita1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, John N. A.; Vollmer, Catherine M.

    1979-01-01

    Previous energy-dispersive x-ray analysis studies of globoid crystal composition in seed protein bodies gave an indication that there might be a correlation between seed size and the type of elements stored in globoid crystals. This possibility was tested by conducting energy-dispersive x-ray analysis studies of P, K, Mg, and Ca levels in globoid crystals of four embryo regions (radicle, stem, cotyledon center palisade mesophyll, cotyledon center spongy mesophyII) in each of five different Cucurbita species (C. mixta, C. moschata, C. foetidissima, C. pepo, and C. andreana). The species were chosen to provide a range of seed size and weight. Globoid crystals from all embryo regions in all five species contained P, K, and Mg. Some variations in the levels of these elements did occur but there was no consistent pattern with regard to area of the seed or with regard to seed size. Calcium distribution showed significant variations. In species with large seeds (C. mixta, C. moschata) Ca was mainly found in globoid crystals in the radicle. Globoid crystals in species with small seeds (C. foetidissima, C. pepo, C. andreana) contained Ca in all embryo regions tested. The results of this study support the concept that Ca distribution in globoid crystals can be correlated with seed weight. PMID:16660719

  11. The Stanford Automated Mounter: Enabling High-Throughput Protein Crystal Screening at SSRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The macromolecular crystallography experiment lends itself perfectly to high-throughput technologies. The initial steps including the expression, purification, and crystallization of protein crystals, along with some of the later steps involving data processing and structure determination have all been automated to the point where some of the last remaining bottlenecks in the process have been crystal mounting, crystal screening, and data collection. At the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a National User Facility that provides extremely brilliant X-ray photon beams for use in materials science, environmental science, and structural biology research, the incorporation of advanced robotics has enabled crystals to be screened in a true high-throughput fashion, thus dramatically accelerating the final steps. Up to 288 frozen crystals can be mounted by the beamline robot (the Stanford Auto-Mounting System) and screened for diffraction quality in a matter of hours without intervention. The best quality crystals can then be remounted for the collection of complete X-ray diffraction data sets. Furthermore, the entire screening and data collection experiment can be controlled from the experimenter's home laboratory by means of advanced software tools that enable network-based control of the highly automated beamlines.

  12. Improving protein crystal quality by selective removal of a Ca2+-dependent membrane-insertion loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein engineering dramatically enhances the quality of crystals of a Ca2+-dependent membrane-binding protein. Lipoxygenases (LOXs) catalyze the regiospecific and stereospecific dioxygenation of polyunsaturated membrane-embedded fatty acids. A Ca2+-dependent membrane-binding function was localized to the amino-terminal C2-like domain of 8R-lipoxygenase (8R-LOX) from the soft coral Plexaura homomalla. The 3.2 Å crystal structure of 8R-LOX and spectroscopic data suggested that Ca2+ stabilizes two membrane-insertion loops. Analysis of the protein packing contacts in the crystal lattice indicated that the conformation of one of the two loops complicated efforts to improve the resolution of the X-ray data. A deletion mutant of 8R-LOX in which the corresponding membrane-insertion loop is absent (Δ41–45:GSLOX) was engineered. Removal of the membrane-insertion loop dramatically increases the protein yield from bacterial cultures and the quality of the crystals obtained, resulting in a better than 1 Å improvement in the resolution of the diffraction data

  13. Numerical model of protein crystal growth in a diffusive field such as the microgravity environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Susumu; Takahashi, Sachiko; Inaka, Koji; Wada, Yoshio; Yamada, Mitsugu; Ohta, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Kamigaichi, Shigeki

    2013-11-01

    It is said that the microgravity environment positively affects the quality of protein crystal growth. The formation of a protein depletion zone and an impurity depletion zone due to the suppression of convection flow were thought to be the major reasons. In microgravity, the incorporation of molecules into a crystal largely depends on diffusive transport, so the incorporated molecules will be allocated in an orderly manner and the impurity uptake will be suppressed, resulting in highly ordered crystals. Previously, these effects were numerically studied in a steady state using a simplified model and it was determined that the combination of the diffusion coefficient of the protein molecule (D) and the kinetic constant for the protein molecule (β) could be used as an index of the extent of these depletion zones. In this report, numerical analysis of these depletion zones around a growing crystal in a non-steady (i.e. transient) state is introduced, suggesting that this model may be used for the quantitative analysis of these depletion zones in the microgravity environment. PMID:24121357

  14. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals; Simulationsrechnungen zu Strahlenschaeden an Proteinkristallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehnder, M.

    2007-03-15

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  15. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of a choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Neil G., E-mail: neison@chem.gla.ac.uk; Riboldi-Tunicliffe, Alan [Department of Chemistry and WestCHEM, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre (GBRC), University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Timothy J. [Division of Infection and Immunity (IBLS), Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre (GBRC), University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom); Isaacs, Neil W. [Department of Chemistry and WestCHEM, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre (GBRC), University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    The choline-binding protein CbpI from S. pneumoniae has been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to 3.5 Å resolution. The choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae is a 23.4 kDa protein with no known function. The protein has been successfully purified initially using Ni–NTA chromatography and to homogeneity using Q-Sepharose ion-exchange resin as an affinity column. CbpI was crystallized using PEG 3350 as a precipitant and X-ray crystallographic analysis showed that the crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 83.31, c = 80.29 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The crystal contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 55.7% (V{sub M} = 2.77 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}) and shows a diffraction limit of 3.5 Å.

  16. Three-Dimentional Structures of Autophosphorylation Complexes in Crystals of Protein Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Dumbrack, Roland

    2016-01-26

    Protein kinase autophosphorylation is a common regulatory mechanism in cell signaling pathways. Several autophosphorylation complexes have been identified in crystals of protein kinases, with a known serine, threonine, or tyrosine autophosphorylation site of one kinase monomer sitting in the active site of another monomer of the same protein in the crystal. We utilized a structural bioinformatics method to identify all such autophosphorylation complexes in X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by generating all unique kinase/kinase interfaces within and between asymmetric units of each crystal and measuring the distance between the hydroxyl oxygen of potential autophosphorylation sites and the oxygen atoms of the active site aspartic acid residue side chain. We have identified 15 unique autophosphorylation complexes in the PDB, of which 5 complexes have not previously been described in the relevant publications on the crystal structures (N-terminal juxtamembrane regions of CSF1R and EPHA2, activation loop tyrosines of LCK and IGF1R, and a serine in a nuclear localization signal region of CLK2. Mutation of residues in the autophosphorylation complex interface of LCK either severely impaired autophosphorylation or increased it. Taking the autophosphorylation complexes as a whole and comparing them with peptide-substrate/kinase complexes, we observe a number of important features among them. The novel and previously observed autophosphorylation sites are conserved in many kinases, indicating that by homology we can extend the relevance of these complexes to many other clinically relevant drug targets.

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalinski, Eva; Bange, Gert; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard, E-mail: irmi.sinning@bzh.uni-heidelberg.de [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, INF 328, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-09-01

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1 from Homo sapiens is provided. ErbB-3-binding protein 1 (Ebp1) is a member of the family of proliferation-associated 2G4 proteins (PA2G4s) and plays a role in cellular growth and differentiation. Ligand-induced activation of the transmembrane receptor ErbB3 leads to dissociation of Ebp1 from the receptor in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The non-associated protein is involved in transcriptional and translational regulation in the cell. Here, the overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Ebp1 from Homo sapiens are reported. Initially observed crystals were improved by serial seeding to single crystals suitable for data collection. The optimized crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å.

  18. Gravistimulation changes expression of genes encoding putative carrier proteins of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, T.; Hitotsubashi, R.; Miyamoto, K.; Tanimoto, E.; Ueda, J.

    STS-95 space experiment has showed that auxin polar transport in etiolated epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings is controlled by gravistimulation. In Arabidopsis thaliana auxin polar transport has considered to be regulated by efflux and influx carrier proteins in plasma membranes, AtPIN1 and AtAUX1, respectively. In order to know how gravistimuli control auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls at molecular levels, strenuous efforts have been made, resulting in successful isolation of full-length cDNAs of a putative auxin efflux and influx carriers, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 (accession no. AY222857, Chawla and DeMason, 2003) and AtPINs, and also among PsAUX1, AtAUX1 and their related genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that PsPIN2 belonged to a subclade including AtPIN3, AtPIN4 relating to lateral transport of auxin, while PsPIN1 belonged to the same clade as AtPIN1 relating to auxin polar transport. In the present study, we examined the effects of gravistimuli on the expression of PsPINs and PsAUX1 in etiolated pea seedlings by northern blot analysis. Expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 in hook region of 3.5-d-old etiolated pea seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat increased as compared with that of the seedlings grown under 1 g conditions. On the other hand, that of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 in the 1st internode region under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat also increased, while that of PsPIN2 was affected little. These results suggest that expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 regulating polar/lateral transport of auxin is substantially under the control of gravity. A possible role of PsPINs and PsAUX1 of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea seedlings will also be discussed.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of yeast prion protein Ure2p with shortened N-terminal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An orthorhombic crystal form of a recombinant yeast prion protein with shortened N-terminal, 90Ure2p, has been obtained. Crystals were grown by the vapordiffusion technique against a mother liquor containing imidazole. Crystals belong to the primitive orthorhombic lattice with the cell parameters a = 54.5 ?, b = 74.7 ?, c = 131.0 ?. The crystals diffract to beyond 3.0 ? resolution at a synchrotron beamline.

  20. Effects of insecticidal crystal proteins (Cry proteins) produced by genetically modified maize (Bt maize) on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetically modified maize MON89034 × MON88017 expresses different crystal (Cry) proteins with pesticidal activity against the European corn borer (Cry1.105; Cry2Ab2) and the Western corn root worm (Cry3Bb1). Non-target organisms, such as soil nematodes, might be exposed to the Cry proteins that enter the soil in course of crop growing. Therefore, the risk of those proteins for nematodes was assessed by testing their toxic effects on Caenorhabditis elegans. All three insecticidal Cry proteins showed dose-dependent inhibitory effects on C. elegans reproduction (EC50: 0.12–0.38 μmol L−1), however, at concentrations that were far above the expected soil concentrations. Moreover, a reduced toxicity was observed when Cry proteins were added jointly. A C. elegans mutant strain deficient for receptors for the nematicidal Cry5B was also resistant against Cry1.105 and Cry2Ab2, suggesting that these Cry proteins bound to the same or similar receptors as nematicidal Cry proteins and thereby affect the reproduction of C. elegans. -- Highlights: •Insecticidal Cry proteins dose-dependently inhibited the reproduction of C. elegans. •Mixture toxicity was lower than expected from concentration-additive single effects. •Genes for MAPK-defense-pathway were up-regulated in presence of Cry protein mixture. •Knock-out strains deficient for Cry5B-receptors showed lower susceptibility to insecticidal Cry proteins. •Toxicity of insecticidal Cry-proteins on C. elegans occurred at concentrations far above expected field concentrations. -- Insecticidal Cry proteins expressed by genetically modified maize act on nematodes via a similar mode of action as nematicidal Cry proteins, however, at concentrations far above expected soil levels

  1. The Kinetics of Crystallization of Colloids and Proteins: A Light Scattering Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClymer, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Hard-sphere colloidal systems serve as model systems for aggregation, nucleation, crystallization and gelation as well as interesting systems in their own right.There is strong current interest in using colloidal systems to form photonic crystals. A major scientific thrust of NASA's microgravity research is the crystallization of proteins for structural determination. The crystallization of proteins is a complicated process that requires a great deal of trial and error experimentation. In spite of a great deal of work, "better" protein crystals cannot always be grown in microgravity and conditions for crystallization are not well understood. Crystallization of colloidal systems interacting as hard spheres and with an attractive potential induced by entropic forces have been studied in a series of static light scattering experiments. Additionally, aggregation of a protein as a function of pH has been studied using dynamic light scattering. For our experiments we used PMMA (polymethylacrylate) spherical particles interacting as hard spheres, with no attractive potential. These particles have a radius of 304 nanometers, a density of 1.22 gm/ml and an index of refraction of 1.52. A PMMA colloidal sample at a volume fraction of approximately 54% was index matched in a solution of cycloheptyl bromide (CHB) and cis-decalin. The sample is in a glass cylindrical vial that is placed in an ALV static and dynamic light scattering goniometer system. The vial is immersed in a toluene bath for index matching to minimize flair. Vigorous shaking melts any colloidal crystals initially present. The sample is illuminated with diverging laser light (632.8 nanometers) from a 4x microscope objective placed so that the beam is approximately 1 cm in diameter at the sample location. The sample is rotated about its long axis at approximately 3.5 revolutions per minute (highest speed) as the colloidal crystal system is non-ergodic. The scattered light is detected at various angles using the

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-20 mediates dental enamel biomineralization by preventing protein occlusion inside apatite crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Saumya; Tao, Jinhui; Ruan, Qichao; De Yoreo, James J; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of enamel-like materials is a central topic of research in dentistry and material sciences. The importance of precise proteolytic mechanisms in amelogenesis to form a hard tissue with more than 95% mineral content has already been reported. A mutation in the Matrix Metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) gene results in hypomineralized enamel that is thin, disorganized and breaks from the underlying dentin. We hypothesized that the absence of MMP-20 during amelogenesis results in the occlusion of amelogenin in the enamel hydroxyapatite crystals. We used spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze occluded proteins within the isolated enamel crystals from MMP-20 null and Wild type (WT) mice. Our results showed that the isolated enamel crystals of MMP-20 null mice had more organic macromolecules occluded inside them than enamel crystals from the WT. The crystal lattice arrangements of MMP-20 null enamel crystals analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) were found to be significantly different from those of the WT. Raman studies indicated that the crystallinity of the MMP-20 null enamel crystals was lower than that of the WT. In conclusion, we present a novel functional mechanism of MMP-20, specifically prevention of unwanted organic material entrapped in the forming enamel crystals, which occurs as the result of precise amelogenin cleavage. MMP-20 action guides the growth morphology of the forming hydroxyapatite crystals and enhances their crystallinity. Elucidating such molecular mechanisms can be applied in the design of novel biomaterials for future clinical applications in dental restoration or repair. PMID:26513418

  3. Crystal structure of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein, GFRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, G; Schiffmann, S; Herrmann, A; Fischer, M; Gütlich, M; Auerbach, G; Ploom, T; Bacher, A; Huber, R; Lemm, T

    2001-10-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor required for hydroxylation of aromatic amino acids regulates its own synthesis in mammals through feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I. This mechanism is mediated by a regulatory subunit called GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). The 2.6 A resolution crystal structure of rat GFRP shows that the protein forms a pentamer. This indicates a model for the interaction of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I with its regulator, GFRP. Kinetic investigations of human GTP cyclohydrolase I in complex with rat and human GFRP showed similar regulatory effects of both GFRP proteins. PMID:11580249

  4. Crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of a vicilin-type seed storage protein from Pinus koraiensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) vicilin-type 7S seed storage protein was isolated from defatted pine-nut extract and purified by sequential gel-filtration and anion-exchange chromatography. Well diffracting single crystals were obtained by the vapour-diffusion method in hanging drops. The cupin superfamily of proteins includes the 7S and 11S seed storage proteins. Many members of this family of proteins are known allergens. In this study, the Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) vicilin-type 7S seed storage protein was isolated from defatted pine-nut extract and purified by sequential gel-filtration and anion-exchange chromatography. Well diffracting single crystals were obtained by the vapor-diffusion method in hanging drops. The crystals belong to the primitive cubic space group P213, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 148.174 Å. Two vicilin molecules were present in the asymmetric unit and the Matthews coefficient was determined to be 2.90 Å3 Da−1, with a corresponding solvent content of ∼58%. A molecular-replacement structural solution has been obtained using the program Phaser. Refinement of the structure is currently under way

  5. How to get the magic triangle and the MAD triangle into your protein crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The handling of the phasing tools I3C and B3C is described, emphasizing practical aspects such as the preparation of solutions and incorporation of the compounds into protein crystals. The magic triangle 5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid (I3C) and the MAD triangle 5-amino-2,4,6-tribromoisophthalic acid (B3C) are two representatives of a novel class of compounds that combine heavy atoms for experimental phasing with functional groups for protein interactions. These compounds are readily available and provide easy access to experimental phasing. The preparation of stock solutions and the incorporation of the compounds into protein crystals are discussed. As an example of incorporation via cocrystallization, the incorporation of B3C into bovine trypsin, resulting in a single site with high occupancy, is described

  6. Characterization of a novel acyl carrier protein, RkpF, encoded by an operon involved in capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhizobial capsular polysaccharides (RKPs) play an important role in the development of a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with the plant host and in Sinorhizobium meliloti AK631 functional rkpABCDEF genes are required for the production of RKPs. After cloning the rkpF gene, we overexpressed and purified the derived protein product (RkpF) in Escherichia coli. Like acyl carrier protein (ACP), the RkpF protein can be labeled in vivo with radioactive beta-alanine added to the growth medium. If homogeneous RkpF protein is incubated with radiolabeled coenzyme A in the presence of purified holo-ACP synthase from E. coli, an in vitro transfer of 4'-phosphopantetheine to the RkpF protein can be observed. The conversion from apo-RkpF protein to holo-RkpF protein seems to go along with a major conformational change of the protein structure, because the holo-RkpF protein runs significantly faster on native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis than the apo-RkpF protein. Electrospray mass spectrometric analysis reveals a mass of 9,585 for the apo-RkpF protein and a mass of 9,927 for the holo-RkpF protein. Our data show that RkpF is a novel ACP

  7. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T7 fibre protein gp17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T7 fibre protein gp17, consisting of amino acids 371–553, has been crystallized. Diffraction data have been obtained to around 2.0 Å resolution from two different crystal forms. Multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with a mercury derivative is in progress. Bacteriophage T7 attaches to its host using the C-terminal domains of its six fibres, which are trimers of the gp17 protein. A C-terminal fragment of gp17 consisting of amino acids 371–553 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of two forms were obtained, belonging to space group P212121 (unit-cell parameters a = 61.2, b = 86.0, c = 118.4 Å) and space group C2221 (unit-cell parameters a = 68.3, b = 145.6, c = 172.1 Å). They diffracted to 1.9 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Both crystals are expected to contain one trimer in the asymmetric unit. Multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with a mercury derivative is in progress

  8. Cadmium-induced crystallization of proteins: II. Crystallization of the Salmonella typhimurium histidine-binding protein in complex with L-histidine, L-arginine, or L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakhanov, S; Kreimer, D I; Parkin, S; Ames, G F; Rupp, B

    1998-03-01

    To further investigate favorable effects of divalent cations on the formation of protein crystals, three complexes of Salmonella typhimurium histidine-binding protein were crystallized with varying concentrations of cadmium salts. For each of the three histidine-binding protein complexes, cadmium cations were found to promote or improve crystallization. The optimal cadmium concentration is ligand specific and falls within a narrow concentration range. In each case, crystals grown in the presence of cadmium diffract to better than 2.0 angstroms resolution and belong to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). From our results and from the analysis of cadmium sites in well-refined protein structures, we propose that cadmium addition provides a generally useful technique to modify crystal morphology and to improve diffraction quality. PMID:9541391

  9. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Shibayama, Naoya; Happo, Naohisa; Kimura, Koji; Okabe, Takahiro; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Park, Sam-Yong; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2016-06-01

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α2β2 tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm3) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  10. Studies on the mode of action of sterol carrier protein in the dehydrogenation of 5-cholest-7-en-3 beta-ol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterol carrier protein (SCP) promotes the microsomal dehydrogenation of 5-cholest-7-en-3 beta-ol (lathosterol) to 7-dehydrocholesterol. This promotion occurs whether the substrate is exogenous or preincorporated into microsomes. Similarly, SCP promotes an intermembrane transfer of lathosterol from one microsomal population to another. Here the authors present evidence for an SCP-mediated collisional interaction which results in the intermembrane transfer of sterol substrate and excludes a conventional substrate-carrier mechanism for SCP. Radioactive carboxymethyl SCP is shown to bind to microsomes and to anionic phospholipids but not to phosphatidylcholine. Treatment of microsomes with trypsin, but not with phospholipase A2, reduces SCP binding. Binding studies with small molecules substantiate the identity of SCP with Z-protein

  11. High-resolution structures of the D-alanyl carrier protein (Dcp) DltC from Bacillus subtilis reveal equivalent conformations of apo- and holo-forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Stephan; Pfennig, Sabrina; Neumann, Piotr; Yonus, Huma; Weininger, Ulrich; Kovermann, Michael; Balbach, Jochen; Stubbs, Milton T

    2015-08-19

    D-Alanylation of lipoteichoic acids plays an important role in modulating the properties of Gram-positive bacteria cell walls. The D-alanyl carrier protein DltC from Bacillus subtilis has been solved in apo- and two cofactor-modified holo-forms, whereby the entire phosphopantetheine moiety is defined in one. The atomic resolution of the apo-structure allows delineation of alternative conformations within the hydrophobic core of the 78 residue four helix bundle. In contrast to previous reports for a peptidyl carrier protein from a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, no obvious structural differences between apo- and holo-DltC forms are observed. Solution NMR spectroscopy confirms these findings and demonstrates in addition that the two forms exhibit similar backbone dynamics on the ps-ns and ms timescales. PMID:26193422

  12. A Biphasic Calcium Sulphate/Hydroxyapatite Carrier Containing Bone Morphogenic Protein-2 and Zoledronic Acid Generates Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Deepak Bushan; Isaksson, Hanna; Hettwer, Werner; Kumar, Ashok; Lidgren, Lars; Tägil, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    In orthopedic surgery, large amount of diseased or injured bone routinely needs to be replaced. Autografts are mainly used but their availability is limited. Commercially available bone substitutes allow bone ingrowth but lack the capacity to induce bone formation. Thus, off-the-shelf osteoinductive bone substitutes that can replace bone grafts are required. We tested the carrier properties of a biphasic, calcium sulphate and hydroxyapatite ceramic material, containing a combination of recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) to induce bone, and zoledronic acid (ZA) to delay early resorption. In-vitro, the biphasic material released 90% of rhBMP-2 and 10% of ZA in the first week. No major changes were found in the surface structure using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) or in the mechanical properties after adding rhBMP-2 or ZA. In-vivo bone formation was studied in an abdominal muscle pouch model in rats (n = 6/group). The mineralized volume was significantly higher when the biphasic material was combined with both rhBMP-2 and ZA (21.4 ± 5.5 mm3) as compared to rhBMP-2 alone (10.9 ± 2.1 mm3) when analyzed using micro computed tomography (μ-CT) (p < 0.01). In the clinical setting, the biphasic material combined with both rhBMP-2 and ZA can potentially regenerate large volumes of bone. PMID:27189411

  13. Enhanced growth and recombinant protein production of Escherichia coli by a perfluorinated oxygen carrier in miniaturized fed-batch cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liquid perfluorochemicals (PFCs are interesting oxygen carriers in medicine and biotechnology with a high solubility for oxygen. They have been repeatedly used for improving oxygen transfer into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell cultures, however their application is still limited. Here we show the great benefit of air/oxygen saturated perfluorodecalin (PFD for high cell density cultivation of Escherichia coli in microwell plates and their positive effect on the soluble production of a correctly folded heterologously expressed alcohol dehydrogenase. Results In EnBase® cultivations the best effect was seen with PFD saturated with oxygen enriched air (appr. 10 μM oxygen per ml when PFD was added at the time of induction. In contrast the effect of PFD was negligible when it was added already at the time of inoculation. Optimisation of addition time and content of loaded oxygen into the PFD resulted in an increased the cell density by 40% compared to control cultures, and correspondingly also the product yield increased, demonstrated at the example of a recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase. Conclusions PFCs are a valuable additive in miniaturized cell culture formats. For production of recombinant proteins in low cell density shaken cultures the addition of oxygen-enriched PFD makes the process more robust, i.e. a high product yield is not any more limited to a very narrow cell density window during which the induction has to be done. The positive effect of PFD was even more obvious when it was added during high cell density cultures. The effect of the PFD phase depends on the amount of oxygen which is loaded into the PFD and which thus is a matter of optimisation.

  14. Hydroxyapatite/ovalbumin composite particles as model protein carriers for bone tissue engineering: I. Synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles were synthesized from the co-precipitation reaction between calcium oxide from discarded egg shells and phosphoric acid in the absence and the presence of ovalbumin (OVA). 2-Amino-2-hydroxymethyl-propane-1,3-diol (tris-base) was used to control the pH during the co-precipitation (i.e., 7–9). The formation of HAp was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis, while both the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and the thermogravimetric analysis confirmed the existence of OVA within the HAp–OVA particles. The crystallite sizes of the individual crystalline entities within the HAp and the HAp–OVA particles were approximated from the (002) reflection peaks by means of the Scherrer's equation. The average particle sizes of the HAp and the HAp–OVA particles were measured by particle size analysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that these particles were aggregates of rod-like HAp nanocrystals, whereas scanning electron microscopy revealed that these particles ultimately formed into larger aggregates. Lastly, the decrease in the pH during the precipitation process and the presence of OVA were responsible for the observed increase in the values of pore size, BET specific surface area, and pore volume of the resulting HAp particles. Highlights: ► CaO from discarded egg shells was used as the source of calcium. ► Precipitation of CaO with H3PO4 into HAp was achieved with tris-base ► Precipitation was done with or without ovalbumin (OVA) ► HAp–OVA composite particles are envisioned as model carriers of proteins ► 2nd work in the series showed that release of OVA was good for up to 21 days

  15. Recombinant expression of in silico identified Bcell epitope of epsilon toxin of Clostridium perfringens in translational fusion with a carrier protein

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik, Himani; Deshmukh, Sachin; Mathur, Deepika Dayal; Tiwari, Archana; Garg, Lalit C

    2013-01-01

    Epsilon toxin secreted by Clostridium perfringens types B and D has been directly implicated as the causative agent of fatal enterotoxemia in domestic animals. The aim of the present study is to use in silico approach for identification of B-cell epitope(s) of epsilon toxin, and its expression in fusion with a carrier protein to analyze its potential as vaccine candidate(s). Using different computational analyses and bioinformatics tools, a number of antigenic determinant regions of epsilon t...

  16. Triclosan Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Is Due to FabV, a Triclosan-Resistant Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lei; Lin, Jinshui; Ma, Jincheng; Cronan, John E.; Wang, Haihong

    2009-01-01

    Triclosan, a very widely used biocide, specifically inhibits fatty acid synthesis by inhibition of enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase. Escherichia coli FabI is the prototypical triclosan-sensitive enoyl-ACP reductase, and E. coli is extremely sensitive to the biocide. However, other bacteria are resistant to triclosan, because they encode triclosan-resistant enoyl-ACP reductase isozymes. In contrast, the triclosan resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 has been attributed to active...

  17. Molecular View of Protein Crystal Growth: Molecular Interactions, Surface Reconstruction and Growth Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarajah, Arunan; Li, Huayu; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2000-01-01

    Studies of the growth and molecular packing of tetragonal lysozyme crystals suggest that there is an underlying molecular growth mechanism, in addition to the classical one involving screw dislocation/2D) nucleation growth. These crystals are constructed by strongly bonded molecular chains forming helices about the 43 axes. The helices are connected to each other by weaker bonds. Crystal growth proceeds by the formation of these 4(sub 3) helices, which would explain some unexpected observations by earlier investigators, such as bimolecular growth steps on the (110) face. Another consequence of these molecular considerations is that only one of two possible packing arrangements could occur on the crystal faces and that their growth unit was at least a tetramer corresponding to the 4(sub 3) helix. Two new high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were developed to directly confirm these predictions on tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Most earlier investigations of protein crystal growth with AFM were in the low resolution mode which is adequate to investigate the classical growth mechanisms, but cannot resolve molecular features and mechanisms. Employing the first of the newly developed techniques, high resolution AFM images of the (110) face were compared with the theoretically constructed images for the two possible packing arrangements on this face. The prediction that the molecular packing arrangement of these faces corresponded to that for complete 4(sub 3) helices was confirmed in this manner. This investigation also showed the occurrence of surface reconstruction on protein crystals. The molecules on the surface of the (110) face were found to pack closer along the 4(sub 3) axes than those in the interior. The second new AFM technique was used to follow the growth process by measuring the dimensions of individual growth units on the (110) face. Linescans across a growth step, performed near the saturation limit of the crystals, allowed the growth

  18. Crystal structures of the trimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein: implications for membrane association and assembly.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, C. P.; Worthylake, D; Bancroft, D P; Christensen, A. M.; Sundquist, W. I.

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix protein forms a structural shell associated with the inner viral membrane and performs other essential functions throughout the viral life cycle. The crystal structure of the HIV-1 matrix protein, determined at 2.3 angstrom resolution, reveals that individual matrix molecules are composed of five major helices capped by a three-stranded mixed beta-sheet. Unexpectedly, the protein assembles into a trimer in three different crystal lattices...

  19. Maltose-neopentyl glycol (MNG) amphiphiles for solubilization, stabilization and crystallization of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Rana, Rohini R; Gotfryd, Kamil; Chandra, Richa; Goren, Michael A; Kruse, Andrew C; Nurva, Shailika; Løland, Claus Juul; Pierre, Yves; Drew, David; Popot, Jean-Luc; Picot, Daniel; Fox, Brian G; Guan, Lan; Gether, Ulrik; Byrne, Bernadette; Kobilka, Brian; Gellman, Samuel H

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of integral membrane protein (IMP) structure and function is hampered by the difficulty of handling these proteins. Aqueous solubilization, necessary for many types of biophysical analysis, generally requires a detergent to shield the large lipophilic surfaces of native IMPs. Many...... family show favorable behavior relative to conventional detergents, as manifested in multiple membrane protein systems, leading to enhanced structural stability and successful crystallization. MNG amphiphiles are promising tools for membrane protein science because of the ease with which they may be...... proteins remain difficult to study owing to a lack of suitable detergents. We introduce a class of amphiphiles, each built around a central quaternary carbon atom derived from neopentyl glycol, with hydrophilic groups derived from maltose. Representatives of this maltose-neopentyl glycol (MNG) amphiphile...

  20. Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal proteins against eri silkworm, Samia cynthia ricini (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep Kumar, Donthula; Tarakeswari, Muddanuru; Lakshminarayana, Maddukuri; Sujatha, Mulpuri

    2016-07-01

    Ten purified crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) were tested at concentrations ranging from 2.93 to 3000ng/cm(2) for their toxicity to eri silkworm through protein paint bioassays using castor leaves. Based on LC50 values, Cry1Aa (2.6ng/cm(2)) was highly toxic followed by Cry1Ac (29.3ng/cm(2)) and Cry1Ab (68.7ng/cm(2)). The Cry1Ca and Cry1Ea proteins were moderately toxic to eri silkworm larvae and resulted in 23% and 28% mortality, respectively at the highest concentration tested (3000ng/cm(2)). Only reduction in larval weight was observed with Cry2Aa, Cry1Da and Cry9Aa proteins while Cry3Aa and Cry1Ba proteins were found to be nontoxic. PMID:27377590

  1. Comparison of human solute carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Schlessinger, Avner; Matsson, Pär; Shima, James E.; Pieper, Ursula; Yee, Sook Wah; Kelly, Libusha; Apeltsin, Leonard; Stroud, Robert M.; Ferrin, Thomas E; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Sali, Andrej

    2010-01-01

    Solute carriers are eukaryotic membrane proteins that control the uptake and efflux of solutes, including essential cellular compounds, environmental toxins, and therapeutic drugs. Solute carriers can share similar structural features despite weak sequence similarities. Identification of sequence relationships among solute carriers is needed to enhance our ability to model individual carriers and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of their substrate specificity and transport. Here, we desc...

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matozo, Huita C.; Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Santos, Maria A. M. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Departamento de Física e Informática, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense 400, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Iuliano, Rodolfo [Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università di Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro (Italy); Fusco, Alfredo [Dipartimento di Biologia e Patologia Cellulare e Molecolare, c/o Instituto di Endocrinologia ed Oncologia Sperimentale del CNR, Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università degli Studi di Napoli ‘Federico II’, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); NOGEC (Naples Oncogenomocs Center)-CEINGE, Biotecnologie Avanzate, Via Comunale Margherita 482, 80145 Naples (Italy); Polikarpov, Igor, E-mail: ipolikarpov@if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Departamento de Física e Informática, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense 400, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2006-09-01

    In this study, the catalytic domain of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η (rPTPη) is a cysteine-dependent phosphatase which hydrolyzes phosphoester bonds in proteins and other molecules. rPTPη and its human homologue DEP-1 are involved in neoplastic transformations. Thus, expression of the protein is reduced in all oncogene-transformed thyroid cell lines and is absent in highly malignant thyroid cells. Moreover, consistent with the suggested tumour suppression role of PTPη, inhibition of the tumorigenic process occurs after its exogenous reconstitution, suggesting that PTPη might be important for gene therapy of cancers. In this study, the catalytic domain of rPTPη was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected to 1.87 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.46, b = 63.07, c = 111.64 Å, and contains one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  3. Overproduction, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Cockayne syndrome protein A in complex with DNA damage-binding protein 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human Cockayne syndrome protein A has been cocrystallized with human DNA damage-binding protein 1 and data have been collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Cockayne syndrome protein A is one of the main components in mammalian transcription coupled repair. Here, the overproduction, purification and crystallization of human Cockayne syndrome protein A in complex with its interacting partner DNA damage binding protein 1 are reported. The complex was coproduced in insect cells, copurified and crystallized using sitting drops with PEG 3350 and sodium citrate as crystallizing agents. The crystals had unit-cell parameters a = b = 142.03, c = 250.19 Å and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution on beamline ID14-1 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

  4. New scientific equipment for protein crystallization in microgravity, BELKA, and its approbation on the Bion-M No. 1 spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A space experiment on the crystallization of lisozyme and glucose isomerase proteins in UK-1 and UK-2 crystallizers on the scientific equipment BELKA on the Bion-M no. 1 spacecraft was performed in April–May 2013. A ground-based experiment was carried out simultaneously at the Institute of Crystallography of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IC RAS). Transparent crystals were obtained in both cases. The lisozyme crystals grown in microgravity are larger than their terrestrial analogs. An optical study of glucose isomerase crystals grown in space has shown that the coalescence of equally oriented crystallites leads to the formation of quasi-single-crystal blocks. An X-ray diffraction experiment on lisozyme crystals has revealed the resolutions for crystals obtained under terrestrial conditions and in space to be 1.74 and 1.58 Å, respectively

  5. Expression of cholera toxin B-lumbrokinase fusion protein in Pichia pastoris--the use of transmucosal carriers in the delivery of therapeutic proteins to protect rats against thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunfeng, Guan; Xiaozhou, Li; Gang, Wang; Jing, Ji; Chao, Jin; Josine, Tchouopou Lontchi

    2013-01-01

    Cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) has been widely used to facilitate antigen delivery by serving as an effective mucosal carrier molecule for the induction of oral tolerance. However, whether CTB can be used as a transmucosal carrier in the delivery of not only vaccines but also therapeutic proteins has not been widely studied. Thus, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of lumbrokinase (LK) proteins which is an important fibrinolytic enzyme derived from earthworm. CTB and LK, separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via Pichia pastoris. The activity and proper folding of recombinant protein in yeast were confirmed by Western blot analysis, fibrin plate assays, and G(M1)-ganglioside ELISA. Following oral administration of recombinant protein, the thrombosis model of rats and mice revealed that the oral treatment of rCTB-LK has a more significant anti-thrombotic effect on animals compared with rLK. It is possible to conclude that CTB can successfully enhance its fusion protein LK to be absorbed. The use of CTB as a transmucosal carrier in the delivery of not only vaccines but also therapeutic proteins was supported. PMID:23269637

  6. Crystal Structure of Menin Reveals Binding Site for Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murai, Marcelo J.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Reddy, Gireesh; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz (Michigan); (UV)

    2014-10-02

    Menin is a tumor suppressor protein that is encoded by the MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia 1) gene and controls cell growth in endocrine tissues. Importantly, menin also serves as a critical oncogenic cofactor of MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) fusion proteins in acute leukemias. Direct association of menin with MLL fusion proteins is required for MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemogenesis in vivo, and this interaction has been validated as a new potential therapeutic target for development of novel anti-leukemia agents. Here, we report the first crystal structure of menin homolog from Nematostella vectensis. Due to a very high sequence similarity, the Nematostella menin is a close homolog of human menin, and these two proteins likely have very similar structures. Menin is predominantly an {alpha}-helical protein with the protein core comprising three tetratricopeptide motifs that are flanked by two {alpha}-helical bundles and covered by a {beta}-sheet motif. A very interesting feature of menin structure is the presence of a large central cavity that is highly conserved between Nematostella and human menin. By employing site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that this cavity constitutes the binding site for MLL. Our data provide a structural basis for understanding the role of menin as a tumor suppressor protein and as an oncogenic co-factor of MLL fusion proteins. It also provides essential structural information for development of inhibitors targeting the menin-MLL interaction as a novel therapeutic strategy in MLL-related leukemias.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of an oomycete-derived Nep1-like protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first crystallographic study of a member of the NLP (Nep1-like protein) toxin and elicitor protein family is reported. The elicitor protein Nep1-like protein from the plant pathogen Pythium aphanidermatum was purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A native data set was collected to 1.35 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. Since selenomethionine-labelled protein did not crystallize under the original conditions, a second crystal form was identified that yielded crystals that diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution. A multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) experiment was performed at 100 K and all four selenium sites were identified, which allowed solution of the structure

  8. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. cruzi TcNDPK1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as an N-terminally poly-His-tagged fusion protein and crystallized. The flagellated protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the aetiological agent of Chagas disease. Nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDPKs) are enzymes that are involved in energy management and nucleoside balance in the cell. T. cruzi TcNDPK1, a canonical isoform, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as an N-terminally poly-His-tagged fusion protein and crystallized. Crystals grew after 72 h in 0.2 M MgCl2, 20% PEG 3350. Data were collected to 3.5 Å resolution using synchrotron X-ray radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 127.84, c = 275.49 Å. Structure determination is under way and will provide relevant information that may lead to the first step in rational drug design for the treatment of Chagas disease

  9. Crystallization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-mannosidase, a cargo protein of the Cvt pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacuolar α-mannosidase, a cargo protein of the cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting pathway, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-mannosidase (Ams1) is a cargo protein that is transported to the vacuole by the cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway during conditions of growth and by autophagy during conditions of starvation. After transport to the vacuole, Ams1 functions as a resident hydrolase. Ams1 has been overexpressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, purified and crystallized in two crystal forms. Form I belongs to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 145.7, b = 127.7, c = 164.0 Å, β = 101.5°. Form II belongs to space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 127.9, b = 163.7, c = 291.5 Å. Diffraction data were collected from these crystals to a resolution of 3.3 Å for form I and of 2.6 Å for form II using synchrotron radiation

  10. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Rhagium inquisitor antifreeze protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel hyperactive antifreeze protein from R. inquisitor (RiAFP) has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. A complete native X-ray diffraction data set was recorded to 1.3 Å resolution. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a specialized evolutionary adaptation of a variety of bacteria, fish, arthropods and other organisms to inhibit ice-crystal growth for survival in harsh subzero environments. The recently reported novel hyperactive AFP from Rhagium inquisitor (RiAFP) is the second distinct type of AFP in beetles and its structure could reveal important molecular insights into the evolution of AFPs. For this purpose, RiAFP was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized at 293 K using a combination of 23% PEG 3350 and 0.2 M ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.3 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3121 (or P3221), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 46.46, c = 193.21 Å

  11. A new crystal lattice structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new crystal lattice structure of H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein has been determined. Iron loading causes a series of conformational changes at the ferroxidase centre. A new crystal lattice structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) has been determined in two forms: the native state (Apo) at 2.20 Å resolution and an iron-loaded form (Fe-load) at 2.50 Å resolution. The highly solvated packing of the dodecameric shell is suitable for crystallographic study of the metal ion-uptake pathway. Like other bacterioferritins, HP-NAP forms a spherical dodecamer with 23 symmetry including two kinds of channels. Iron loading causes a series of conformational changes of amino-acid residues (Trp26, Asp52 and Glu56) at the ferroxidase centre

  12. Use of the U1A Protein to Facilitate Crystallization and Structure Determination of Large RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2016-01-01

    The preparation of well-ordered crystals of RNAs with complex three-dimensional architecture can be facilitated by engineering a binding site for the spliceosomal protein U1A into a functionally and structurally dispensable stem-loop of the RNA of interest. Once suitable crystals are obtained, the U1A protein, of known structure, can be employed to facilitate preparation of heavy atom or anomalously scattering atom derivatives, or as a source of partial model phases for the molecular replacement method. Here, we describe the methods for making U1A preparations suitable for cocrystallization with RNA. As an example, the cocrystallization of the tetracycline aptamer with U1A is also described. PMID:26227038

  13. Isolation, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of two 30 kDa proteins from silkworm haemolymph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juvenile hormone-binding protein and PBMHP-12, two major 30 kDa proteins, have been isolated and purified from the haemolymph of B. mori. The proteins were crystallized and the crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.9 and 1.3 Å resolution, respectively. Juvenile hormone-binding protein (JHBP) and the low-molecular-mass lipoprotein PBMHP-12 belong to a group of 30 kDa proteins that comprise the major protein component of the haemolymph specific to the fifth-instar larvae stage of the mulberry silkworm Bombyx mori L. Proteins from this group are often essential for the development of the insect. In a project aimed at crystallographic characterization of B. mori JHBP (BmJHBP), it was copurified together with PBMHP-12. Eventually, the two proteins were isolated and crystallized separately. The BmJHBP crystals were orthorhombic (space group C2221) and the PBMHP-12 crystals were triclinic. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.9 Å (BmJHBP) and 1.3 Å (PBMHP-12) resolution

  14. Crystal structure of the stimulatory complex of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP

    OpenAIRE

    Maita, Nobuo; Okada, Kengo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    In the presence of phenylalanine, GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) forms a stimulatory 360-kDa complex with GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. The crystal structure of the stimulatory complex reveals that the GTPCHI decamer is sandwiched by two GFRP homopentamers. Each GFRP pentamer forms a symmetrical five-membered ring similar to β-propeller. Five phenylalanine molecules are buried inside each i...

  15. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermannová, Lada, E-mail: lada.biedermannova@ibt.cas.cz; Schneider, Bohdan [Institute of Biotechnology CAS, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  16. The effect of protein-precipitant interfaces and applied shear on the nucleation and growth of lysozyme crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Nuno M; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Blundell, Tom L; Mackley, Malcolm R

    2009-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of protein-precipitant interfaces and externally applied shear on the nucleation and growth kinetics of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals. The early stages of microbatch crystallization of lysozyme were explored using both optical and confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging. Initially, an antisolvent (precipitant) was added to a protein drop and the optical development of the protein-precipitant interface was followed with time. In the presence of the water-soluble polymer poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) a sharp interface was observed to form immediately within the drop, giving an initial clear separation between the lighter protein solution and the heavier precipitant. This interface subsequently became unstable and quickly developed within a few seconds into several unstable 'fingers' that represented regions of high concentration-gradient interfaces. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the subsequent nucleation of protein crystals occurred preferentially in the region of these interfaces. Additional experiments using an optical shearing system demonstrated that oscillatory shear significantly decreased nucleation rates whilst extending the growth period of the lysozyme crystals. The experimental observations relating to both nucleation and growth have relevance in developing efficient and reliable protocols for general crystallization procedures and the controlled crystallization of single large high-quality protein crystals for use in X-ray crystallography. PMID:19923710

  17. Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3: insulin-like growth factor-1 binding protein-3, insulin-like growth factor-1 carrier protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 [insulin-like growth factor-1 binding protein-3, SomatoKine] is a recombinant complex of insulin-like growth factor-1 (rhIGF-1) and binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), which is the major circulating somatomedin (insulin-like growth factor) binding protein; binding protein-3 regulates the delivery of somatomedin-1 to target tissues. Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 has potential as replacement therapy for somatomedin-1 which may become depleted in indications such as major surgery, organ damage/failure and traumatic injury, resulting in catabolism. It also has potential for the treatment of osteoporosis; diseases associated with protein wasting including chronic renal failure, cachexia and severe trauma; and to attenuate cardiac dysfunction in a variety of disease states, including after severe burn trauma. Combined therapy with somatomedin-1 and somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 would prolong the duration of action of somatomedin-1 and would reduce or eliminate some of the undesirable effects associated with somatomedin-1 monotherapy. Somatomedin-1 is usually linked to binding protein-3 in the normal state of the body, and particular proteases clip them apart in response to stresses and release somatomedin-1 as needed. Therefore, somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 is a self-dosing system and SomatoKine would augment the natural supply of these linked compounds. Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 was developed by Celtrix using its proprietary recombinant protein production technology. Subsequently, Celtrix was acquired by Insmed Pharmaceuticals on June 1 2000. Insmed and Avecia, UK, have signed an agreement for the manufacturing of SomatoKine and its components, IGF-1 and binding protein-3. CGMP clinical production of SomatoKine and its components will be done in Avecia's Advanced Biologics Centre, Billingham, UK, which manufactures recombinant-based medicines and vaccines with a capacity of up to 1000 litres. In 2003, manufacturing of SomatoKine is

  18. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of C-reactive protein from zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystals of native and selenomethionine-substituted C-reactive protein from zebrafish diffracted to 2.3 and 1.7 Å resolution, respectively, and belonged to space group R3 with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The Matthews coefficient was calculated to be 3.28 Å3 Da−1. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein that is found in blood, the concentration of which in plasma rises rapidly in response to inflammation. It functions as a pattern-recognition molecule, recognizing dead cells and various pathogenic agents and eliminating them by utilizing the classical complement pathway and activating macrophages. CRP is phylogenetically highly conserved in invertebrates and mammals. To date, information on the CRP gene has been reported from numerous species of animals, but little is known about the structure of CRP from species other than humans. In order to solve the structure of CRP from bony fish, the CRP gene from zebrafiah (Danio rerio) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The zebrafish CRP (Dare-CRP) was then purified and crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution and belonged to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 114.7, c = 61.0 Å. The Matthews coefficient and solvent content were calculated to be 3.28 Å3 Da−1 and 62.55%, respectively. Determination of the zebrafish CRP structure should be helpful in investigating the evolution of CRPs in the innate immune system

  19. Crystallization studies of the murine c-di-GMP sensor protein STING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled STING138–344 protein from M. musculus diffracted to resolutions of 2.39 and 2.2 Å, respectively The innate immune response is the first defence system against pathogenic microorganisms, and cytosolic detection of pathogen-derived DNA is believed to be one of the major mechanisms of interferon production. Recently, the mammalian ER membrane protein STING (stimulator of IFNgenes; also known as MITA, ERIS, MPYS and TMEM173) has been found to be the master regulator linking the detection of cytosolic DNA to TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and its downstream transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). In addition, STING itself was soon discovered to be a direct sensor of bacterial cyclic dinucleotides such as c-di-GMP or c-di-AMP. However, structural studies of apo STING and its complexes with these cyclic dinucleotides and with other cognate binding proteins are essential in order to fully understand the roles played by STING in these crucial signalling pathways. In this manuscript, the successful crystallization of the C-terminal domain of murine STING (STING-CTD; residues 138–344) is reported. Native and SeMet-labelled crystals were obtained and diffracted to moderate resolutions of 2.39 and 2.2 Å, respectively

  20. Triosephosphate isomerase is a common crystallization contaminant of soluble His-tagged proteins produced in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystals of E. coli triosephosphate isomerase were obtained as a contaminant and its structure was determined to 1.85 Å resolution. Attempts to crystallize several mammalian proteins overexpressed in Escherichia coli revealed a common contaminant, triosephosphate isomerase, a protein involved in glucose metabolism. Even with triosephosphate isomerase present in very small amounts, similarly shaped crystals appeared in the crystallization drops in a number of polyethylene glycol-containing conditions. All of the target proteins were His-tagged and their purification involved immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC), a step that was likely to lead to triosephosphate isomerase contamination. Analysis of the triosephosphate isomerase crystals led to the structure of E. coli triosephosphate isomerase at 1.85 Å resolution, which is a significant improvement over the previous structure

  1. Protein crystallization as a process step in a novel meso oscillatory flow reactor: study of lysozyme phase behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Filipa; Ferreira, António; Teixeira, J. A.; Rocha, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, it is reported for the first time the study of the applicability of a novel meso oscillatory flow reactor (meso-OFR) for protein crystallization as a process step. Crystallization assays carried out in the designed device enabled to derive a two-dimensional lysozyme phase diagram (lysozyme concentration against sodium chloride concentration). Results evidence the formation of several types of crystals (different size and shape), with a strong influence of salt concentrati...

  2. A dengue-2 Envelope fragment inserted within the structure of the P64k meningococcal protein carrier enables a functional immune response against the virus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermida, Lisset; Rodríguez, Rayner; Lazo, Laura; Silva, Ricardo; Zulueta, Aída; Chinea, Glay; López, Carlos; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo

    2004-01-01

    A gene fragment encoding for the amino acids (aa) 286-426 from the dengue Envelope (E) protein was expressed in Escherichia coli as two forms of fusion proteins. In one case, the E fragment was fused to the first 45 aa of the P64k protein from Neisseria meningitidis (PD2) while, in the other, it was inserted within the lipoil-binding domain of the aforementioned bacterial protein (PD3). PD2 was obtained as insoluble form within the cytoplasm of the bacteria while PD3 was distributed equally as soluble and insoluble forms. The insoluble forms of each protein as well as the soluble fraction of PD3 were semipurified to test the antigenicity and the immunogenicity in mice. The forms containing the entire P64k protein exhibited the highest recognition with different polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, the neutralizing antibodies elicited by the recombinant proteins were higher in the case of PD3 forms than with PD2, independently of the solubility status. In addition, mice inoculated with the semipurified insoluble form of PD3 were partially protected against lethal challenge with dengue-2 virus, administered by intracerebral inoculation. The results suggested the folding and carrier capacity of the P64k protein over the E fragment, converting PD3 as an attractive vaccine candidate against dengue-2 virus. PMID:14656459

  3. Binding of 2,2',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-100) and/or its metabolites to mammalian biliary carrier proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, G.; Huwe, J.; Hakk, H. [USDA ARS Biosciences Research Lab, Fargo, ND (United States); Low, M.; Rutherford, D. [Concordia College, Moorhead, MN (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as flame retardants in the textile and electronics industries and are globally produced in the range of 150,000 tons annually. Because they are very lipophilic, structurally similar to polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and biphenyls, environmentally persistent, and display an increasing number of toxicological effects, there is growing concern that this class of compounds may be emerging as a new environmental contaminant. Recent reports have documented their presence in human plasma, milk, and adipose tissue and in aquatic species such as sperm whales, harbor seals, and whitebeaked dolphins. Only a few PBDE congeners are consistently found and reported in the environment, e.g. BDE-47, 99, 100, 153 and 154, and 209. Of this group, only BDE-47 and 99 have been studied in mammals. Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons can associate with endogenous carrier proteins in the urine and bile of rats, either as the parent or as metabolites. Toxic and non-toxic dioxins, PCB's, and PBDE's all have this capacity. Based on its lipophilicity, BDE-100 would be expected to require carrier proteins for mammalian in vivo transport. The purpose of the association has not been established but may be part of the process involved in mammalian elimination of these xenobiotics. However, the association may affect the normal function of these carrier proteins. One of the purposes of the present research was to administer a single oral dose of BDE-100 to male rats and measure the amount eliminated in the urine and bile, as well as characterize the nature and extent of binding to any proteins in these excreta.

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the biotin–protein ligase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    OpenAIRE

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kuroishi, Chizu; Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    The biotin–protein ligase from P. horikoshii OT3 was overexpressed, purified, crystallized and cocrystallized with biotin, ADP and biotinyl-5′-AMP. The crystals belong to space group P21 and diffract to beyond 1.6 Å resolution.

  5. A study of the growth rates and growth habits of ice crystals in a solution of antifreeze (glyco) proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianzhong; Luo, Liaofu

    1996-12-01

    The mechanism of the antifreeze glycoprotein/antifreeze protein interaction on the surface of ice is analyzed. The theory of ice crystal growth in an AF(G)P solution is presented. A quantitative calculation of the growth rates for gain growth has been obtained. The anisotropic growth habits and growth rates of ice crystals in an AF(G)P solution are explained.

  6. Crystallization of the carboxy-terminal region of the bacteriophage T4 proximal long tail fibre protein gp34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization of three C-terminal fragments of the bacteriophage T4 protein gp34 is reported. Diffraction data have been obtained for three native crystal forms and two selenomethionine derivatives, one of which contained high-quality anomalous signal

  7. Expression, purification, crystallization and structure determination of two glutathione S-transferase-like proteins from Shewanella oneidensis

    OpenAIRE

    Remmerie, Bert; Vandenbroucke, Karen; De Smet, Lina; Carpentier, Wesley; De Vos, Dirk; Stout, Jan; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Savvides, Savvas N.

    2008-01-01

    The production and purification of recombinant SoGST3 and SoGST6, two GST-like proteins from S. oneidensis, are reported and preliminary crystallographic studies of crystals of the recombinant enzymes are presented.

  8. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of insecticidal crystal protein genes in native Bacillus thuringiensis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeva Swamy, H M; Asokan, R; Mahmood, Riaz; Nagesha, S N

    2013-04-01

    The Western Ghats of Karnataka natural ecosystem are among the most diverse and is one of the eight hottest hotspots of biological diversity in the world, that runs along the western part of India through four states including Karnataka. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains were isolated from soils of Western Ghats of Karnataka and characterized by molecular and analytical methods as a result of which 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Bt strains were isolated from soil samples using sodium acetate selection method. The morphology of crystals was studied using light and phase contrast microscopy. Isolates were further characterized for insecticidal cry gene by PCR, composition of toxins in bacterial crystals by SDS-PAGE cloning, sequencing and evaluation of toxicity was done. As a result 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Majority of the isolates showed the presence of a 55 kDa protein bands on SDS-PAGE while the rest showed 130, 73, 34, and 25 kDa bands. PCR analysis revealed predominance of Coleopteran-active cry genes in these isolates. The variations in the nucleotide sequences, crystal morphology, and mass of crystal protein(s) purified from the Bt isolates revealed genetic and molecular diversity. Three strains containing Coleopteran-active cry genes showed higher activity against larvae Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) than B. thuringiensis subsp. Morrisoni. Results indicated that Bt isolates could be utilized for bioinsecticide production, aiming to reduce the use of chemical insecticide which could be useful to use in integrated pest management to control agriculturally important pests for sustainable crop production. PMID:23207696

  9. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of two crystal forms of stationary-phase survival E protein from Campylobacter jejuni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, A. M. D.; Rêgo, A. T. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Thomaz, M. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica, Apartado 12, 2748-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Enguita, F. J., E-mail: fenguita@fm.ul.pt [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisboa (Portugal); Carrondo, M. A. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal)

    2008-03-01

    Survival E (SurE) protein from Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative mesophile, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein, successfully purified and crystallized in two distinct crystal forms. Survival E (SurE) protein from Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative mesophile, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein, successfully purified and crystallized in two distinct crystal forms. The first form belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with a tetramer in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 80.5, b = 119.0, c = 135.3 Å. The second form belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 121.4, b = 47.1, c = 97.8 Å, and contains a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data have been collected from these crystal forms to 2.5 and 2.95 Å resolution, respectively.

  10. PROLIX: rapid mining of protein-ligand interactions in large crystal structure databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Martin; Bitter, Hans-Marcus; Diederich, François; So, W Venus; Kondru, Rama

    2012-06-25

    A central problem in structure-based drug design is understanding protein-ligand interactions quantitatively and qualitatively. Several recent studies have highlighted from a qualitative perspective the nature of these interactions and their utility in drug discovery. However, a common limitation is a lack of adequate tools to mine these interactions comprehensively, since exhaustive searches of the protein data bank are time-consuming and difficult to perform. Consequently, fundamental questions remain unanswered: How unique or how common are the protein-ligand interactions observed in a given drug design project when compared to all complexed structures in the protein data bank? Which interaction patterns might explain the affinity of a tool compound toward unwanted targets? To answer these questions and to enable the systematic and comprehensive study of protein-ligand interactions, we introduce PROLIX (Protein Ligand Interaction Explorer), a tool that uses sophisticated fingerprint representations of protein-ligand interaction patterns for rapid data mining in large crystal structure databases. Our implementation strategy pursues a branch-and-bound technique that enables mining against thousands of complexes within a few seconds. Key elements of PROLIX include (i) an intuitive interface that enables users to formulate complex queries easily, (ii) exceptional speed for results retrieval, and (iii) a sophisticated results summarization. Herein we describe the algorithms developed to enable complex queries and fast retrieval of search results, as well as the intuitive aspects of the user interface and summarization viewer. PMID:22582806

  11. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong; Kruse, Andrew C; Chung, Ka Young; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Chae, Pil Seok; Pardon, Els; Calinski, Diane; Mathiesen, Jesper M; Shah, Syed T.A.; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin; Gellman, Samuel H; Steyaert, Jan; Skiniotis, Georgios; Weis, William I; Sunahara, Roger K; Kobilka, Brian K [Brussels; (Trinity); (Michigan); (Stanford-MED); (Michigan-Med); (UW)

    2011-12-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist-occupied receptor. The β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β2AR and nucleotide-free Gs heterotrimer. The principal interactions between the β2AR and Gs involve the amino- and carboxy-terminal α-helices of Gs, with conformational changes propagating to the nucleotide-binding pocket. The largest conformational changes in the β2AR include a 14Å outward movement at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling by a GPCR.

  12. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies kenyae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hari S. Misra; Nivedita P. Khairnar; Manjula Mathur; N. Vijayalakshmi; Remesh S. Hire; T. K. Dongre; S. K. Mahajan

    2002-04-01

    A sporulating culture of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kenyae strain HD549 is toxic to larvae of lepidopteran insect species such as Spodoptera litura, Helicoverpa armigera and Phthorimaea operculella, and a dipteran insect, Culex fatigans. A 1.9-kb DNA fragment, PCR-amplified from HD549 using cryII-gene-specific primers, was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant protein produced 92% mortality in first-instar larvae of Spodoptera litura and 86% inhibition of adult emergence in Phthorimaea operculella, but showed very low toxicity against Helicoverpa armigera, and lower mortality against third-instar larvae of dipteran insects Culex fatigans, Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti. The sequence of the cloned crystal protein gene showed almost complete homology with a mosquitocidal toxin gene from Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki, with only five mutations scattered in different regions. Amino acid alignment with different insecticidal crystal proteins using the MUTALIN program suggested presence of the conserved block 3 region in the sequence of this protein. A mutation in codon 409 of this gene that changes a highly conserved phenylalanine residue to serine lies in this block.

  13. Two studies of colloidal interactions: electric polarizability and protein crystallization. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraden, Seth; Hu, Yue

    2001-08-06

    (I)Electric polarizability. During this grant period, the focus was on five topics concerning electric field effects on colloids. The first topic focuses on electric interactions between charged colloids in the absence of external fields, and the remaining four deal with colloids in the presence of external fields. The topics are (1) calculation of the effect of confinement on the pair-potential between like-charged colloids, (2) experimental determination of the interparticle potential under the conditions of dielectric polarization, (3) measurement of the evolution of structure of ER fluids, (4) synthesis of novel colloids designed for ER studies, and (5) computer modeling of polarization of surface charge. (II) Protein crystallization. Studies of the phase behavior of mixtures of proteins and polymers were initiated. The motivation was to test recent theories that suggested that optimal conditions for protein crystallization could be obtained using such mixtures. Combined light scattering measurements of the virial coefficients and determination of the phase diagram of protein/polymer mixtures revealed that the theoretical picture needs to be substantially modified.

  14. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies kenyae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Hari S; Khairnar, Nivedita P; Mathur, Manjula; Vijayalakshmi, N; Hire, Ramesh S; Dongre, T K; Mahajan, S K

    2002-04-01

    A sporulating culture of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kenyae strain HD549 is toxic to larvae of lepidopteran insect species such as Spodoptera litura, Helicoverpa armigera and Phthorimaea operculella, and a dipteran insect, Culex fatigans. A 1.9-kb DNA fragment, PCR-amplified from HD549 using cryII-gene-specific primers, was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant protein produced 92% mortality in first-instar larvae of Spodoptera litura and 86% inhibition of adult emergence in Phthorimaea operculella, but showed very low toxicity against Helicoverpa armigera, and lower mortality against third-instar larvae of dipteran insects Culex fatigans, Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti. The sequence of the cloned crystal protein gene showed almost complete homology with a mosquitocidal toxin gene from Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki, with only five mutations scattered in different regions. Amino acid alignment with different insecticidal crystal proteins using the MUTALIN program suggested presence of the conserved block 3 region in the sequence of this protein. A mutation in codon 409 of this gene that changes a highly conserved phenylalanine residue to serine lies in this block. PMID:12357073

  15. Crystallized N-terminal domain of influenza virus matrix protein M1 and method of determining and using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming (Inventor); Sha, Bingdong (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The matrix protein, M1, of influenza virus strain A/PR/8/34 has been purified from virions and crystallized. The crystals consist of a stable fragment (18 Kd) of the M1 protein. X-ray diffraction studies indicated that the crystals have a space group of P3.sub.t 21 or P3.sub.2 21. Vm calculations showed that there are two monomers in an asymmetric unit. A crystallized N-terminal domain of M1, wherein the N-terminal domain of M1 is crystallized such that the three dimensional structure of the crystallized N-terminal domain of M1 can be determined to a resolution of about 2.1 .ANG. or better, and wherein the three dimensional structure of the uncrystallized N-terminal domain of M1 cannot be determined to a resolution of about 2.1 .ANG. or better. A method of purifying M1 and a method of crystallizing M1. A method of using the three-dimensional crystal structure of M1 to screen for antiviral, influenza virus treating or preventing compounds. A method of using the three-dimensional crystal structure of M1 to screen for improved binding to or inhibition of influenza virus M1. The use of the three-dimensional crystal structure of the M1 protein of influenza virus in the manufacture of an inhibitor of influenza virus M1. The use of the three-dimensional crystal structure of the M1 protein of influenza virus in the screening of candidates for inhibition of influenza virus M1.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of central structure domains from mumps virus F protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystals of the central structure domains from mumps virus F protein have been obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A diffraction data set has been collected to 2.2 Å resolution. Fusion of members of the Paramyxoviridae family involves two glycoproteins: the attachment protein and the fusion protein. Changes in the fusion-protein conformation were caused by binding of the attachment protein to the cellular receptor. In the membrane-fusion process, two highly conserved heptad-repeat (HR) regions, HR1 and HR2, are believed to form a stable six-helix coiled-coil bundle. However, no crystal structure has yet been determined for this state in the mumps virus (MuV, a member of the Paramyxoviridae family). In this study, a single-chain protein consisting of two HR regions connected by a flexible amino-acid linker (named 2-Helix) was expressed, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A complete X-ray data set was obtained in-house to 2.2 Å resolution from a single crystal. The crystal belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 161.2, b = 60.8, c = 40.1 Å, β = 98.4°. The crystal structure will help in understanding the molecular mechanism of Paramyxoviridae family membrane fusion

  17. Radionuclide carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new carrier for radionuclide technetium 99m has been prepared for scintiscanning purposes. The new preparate consists of physiologically acceptable water-insoluble Tcsup(99m)-carrier containing from 0.2 to 0.8 weight percent of stannic ion as reductor, bound to an anionic starch derivative with about 1-20% of phosphate substituents. (EG)

  18. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of an antifungal laticifer protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An osmotin from the latex of C. procera has been crystallized in both tetragonal and trigonal forms suitable for structure determination. An osmotin (CpOsm) from the latex of Calotropis procera has been crystallized in both tetragonal and trigonal forms suitable for structure determination. Crystallographic studies of CpOsm are of great interest because limited information is available concerning the structure of latex proteins and CpOsm has previously been shown to interact with the spore membranes of some plant pathogenic fungi, thus impairing spore germination and hyphal growth. CpOsm crystals were grown using 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5, 26% PEG 4000, 0.2 M ammonium sulfate (space group P43) or using 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5, 35% MPD, 0.7 M ammonium sulfate (space group P3112). X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.17 Å (P43) and 1.80 Å (P3112) resolution and molecular-replacement analyses produced initial phases for both crystal forms

  19. Characterization and crystal structure of lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase (cDHDPS) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, E.A.; Bannon, G.A.; Glenn, K.C.; Jeong, S.S.; Sturman, E.J.; Rydel, T.J. (Monsanto)

    2008-11-21

    The lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase enzyme (cDHDPS) was recently successfully introduced into maize plants to enhance the level of lysine in the grain. To better understand lysine insensitivity of the cDHDPS, we expressed, purified, kinetically characterized the protein, and solved its X-ray crystal structure. The cDHDPS enzyme has a fold and overall structure that is highly similar to other DHDPS proteins. A noteworthy feature of the active site is the evidence that the catalytic lysine residue forms a Schiff base adduct with pyruvate. Analyses of the cDHDPS structure in the vicinity of the putative binding site for S-lysine revealed that the allosteric binding site in the Escherichia coli DHDPS protein does not exist in cDHDPS due to three non-conservative amino acids substitutions, and this is likely why cDHDPS is not feedback inhibited by lysine.

  20. Expression, purification and crystallization of a human tau-tubulin kinase 2 that phosphorylates tau protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human tau-tubulin kinase 2 was expressed in insect cells, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Tau-tubulin kinase 2 (TTBK2) is a Ser/Thr kinase that putatively phosphorylates residues Ser208 and Ser210 (numbered according to a 441-residue human tau isoform) in tau protein. Functional analyses revealed that a recombinant kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human TTBK2 expressed in insect cells with a baculovirus overexpression system retains kinase activity for tau protein. The kinase domain of TTBK2 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.6, b = 113.7, c = 117.3 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8

  1. High-resolution crystal structure of an engineered human beta2-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Hanson, Michael A;

    2007-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of eukaryotic signal transduction proteins that communicate across the membrane. We report the crystal structure of a human beta2-adrenergic receptor-T4 lysozyme fusion protein bound to t...... very similar to that of retinal in rhodopsin, structural differences in the ligand-binding site and other regions highlight the challenges in using rhodopsin as a template model for this large receptor family....

  2. Aircraft Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nødskov, Kim; Kværnø, Ole

    the majority of its foreign trade, as well as its oil imports, upon which the country is totally dependent. China therefore has good reasons for acquiring an aircraft carrier to enable it to protect its national interests. An aircraft carrier would also be a prominent symbol of China’s future status...... information is pieced together, then a picture is created of a Chinese aircraft carrier program, where Varyag will be made operational for training purposes. With this as the model, China will build a similar sized carrier themselves. If this project does become a reality, then it will take many years for...... Kuznetsov carrier. The SU-33 is, in its modernized version, technologically at the same level as western combat aircraft in both the offensive as well as the defensive roles. But Russia and China currently have an arms trade 6 dispute that is likely to prevent a deal, unless the dispute is resolved. As an...

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain mutant proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three mutant forms of Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain were crystallized in three different space groups. VP35 is one of seven structural proteins encoded by the Ebola viral genome and mediates viral replication, nucleocapsid formation and host immune suppression. The C-terminal interferon inhibitory domain (IID) of VP35 is critical for dsRNA binding and interferon inhibition. The wild-type VP35 IID structure revealed several conserved residues that are important for dsRNA binding and interferon antagonism. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Zaire Ebola VP35 IID mutants R312A, K319A/R322A and K339A in space groups P6122, P212121 and P21, respectively, are described. Diffraction data were collected using synchrotron sources at the Advanced Light Source and the Advanced Photon Source

  4. Structural Characterisation of the Beta-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases, FabF and FabH, of Yersinia pestis

    OpenAIRE

    Nanson, Jeffrey D.; Zainab Himiari; Swarbrick, Crystall M. D.; Forwood, Jade K.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, remains a major public health threat, with outbreaks of disease occurring in China, Madagascar, and Peru in the last five years. The existence of multidrug resistant Y. pestis and the potential of this bacterium as a bioterrorism agent illustrates the need for new antimicrobials. The β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases, FabB, FabF, and FabH, catalyse the elongation of fatty acids as part of the type II f...

  5. Isolation, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of amaryllin, a plant pathogenesis-related protein from Amaryllis belladonna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel 15 kDa antifungal protein amaryllin has been crystallized using 30% PEG 8000 as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to orthorhombic space group I or I212121 with cell dimensions, a = 48.6, b = 61.9 and c = 79.6–Å. A novel antifungal protein, amaryllin, has been isolated from the underground bulbs of Amaryllis belladonna, purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The protein was extracted using ammonium sulfate fractionation. The purified protein samples indicated a molecular weight of 15 kDa on SDS–PAGE. The protein showed antifungal activity against Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium oxysporum. The N-terminal sequence of the first 15 amino-acid residues was determined using Edman degradation and did not show significant sequence identity to any known protein. The protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with 30% PEG 8000 as precipitating agent. The crystals diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and belonged to the orthorhombic space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.6, b = 61.9, c = 79.6 Å. The complete sequence and structure determination of amaryllin are in progress

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein from Chenopodium album

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein with photoconvertibility from C. album was extracted, purified and crystallized in a darkroom. The crystal diffracted to around 2.0 Å resolution. A water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein (WSCP) with photoconvertibility from Chenopodium album was extracted, purified and crystallized in a darkroom. Green crystals suitable for data collection appeared in about 10 d. A native data set was collected to 2.0 Å resolution at 100 K. The space group of the crystal was determined to be orthorhombic I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.13, b = 60.59, c = 107.21 Å. Preliminary analysis of the X-ray data indicated that there is one molecule per asymmetric unit

  7. Protein crystal growth in microgravity review of large scale temperature induction method: bovine insulin, human insulin and human alpha interferon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Marianna M.; Bishop, John Bradford; Nagabhushan, Tattanahalli L.; Reichert, Paul; Smith, G. David; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    1996-10-01

    The protein crystal growth facility (PCF) is space-flight hardware that accommodates large scale protein crystal growth experiments using temperature change as the inductive step. Recent modifications include specialized instrumentation for monitoring crystal nucleation with laser light scattering. This paper reviews results from the PCF's first seven flights on the Space Shuttle, the last with laser light scattering instrumentation. The PCF's objective is twofold: (1) production of high quality protein crystals for X-ray analysis and subsequent structure based drug design and (2) preparation of a large quantity of relatively contaminant free crystals for use as time-release protein pharmaceuticals. The first three Shuttle flights with bovine insulin constituted the PCF's proof of concept, demonstrating that the space-grown crystals were larger and diffracted to higher resolution than their earth-grown counterparts. The later four PCF missions were used to grow recombinant human insulin crystals for X-ray analysis and to continue productions trials aimed at the development of a processing facility for crystalline recombinant alpha interferon.

  8. Crystal structure of a monomeric thiolase-like protein type 1 (TLP1 from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelanjana Janardan

    Full Text Available An analysis of the Mycobacterium smegmatis genome suggests that it codes for several thiolases and thiolase-like proteins. Thiolases are an important family of enzymes that are involved in fatty acid metabolism. They occur as either dimers or tetramers. Thiolases catalyze the Claisen condensation of two acetyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the synthetic direction and the thiolytic cleavage of 3-ketoacyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the degradative direction. Some of the M. smegmatis genes have been annotated as thiolases of the poorly characterized SCP2-thiolase subfamily. The mammalian SCP2-thiolase consists of an N-terminal thiolase domain followed by an additional C-terminal domain called sterol carrier protein-2 or SCP2. The M. smegmatis protein selected in the present study, referred to here as the thiolase-like protein type 1 (MsTLP1, has been biochemically and structurally characterized. Unlike classical thiolases, MsTLP1 is a monomer in solution. Its structure has been determined at 2.7 Å resolution by the single wavelength anomalous dispersion method. The structure of the protomer confirms that the N-terminal domain has the thiolase fold. An extra C-terminal domain is indeed observed. Interestingly, it consists of six β-strands forming an anti-parallel β-barrel which is completely different from the expected SCP2-fold. Detailed sequence and structural comparisons with thiolases show that the residues known to be essential for catalysis are not conserved in MsTLP1. Consistent with this observation, activity measurements show that MsTLP1 does not catalyze the thiolase reaction. This is the first structural report of a monomeric thiolase-like protein from any organism. These studies show that MsTLP1 belongs to a new group of thiolase related proteins of unknown function.

  9. Microseeding – A Powerful Tool for Crystallizing Proteins Complexed with Hydrolyzable Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Schmitt

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis is an often-encountered obstacle in the crystallization of proteins complexed with their substrates. As the duration of the crystallization process, from nucleation to the growth of the crystal to its final size, commonly requires several weeks, non-enzymatic hydrolysis of an “unstable” ligand occurs frequently. In cases where the crystallization conditions exhibit non neutral pH values this hydrolysis phenomenon may be even more pronounced. ChoX, the substrate binding protein of a choline ABC-importer, produced crystals with its substrate acetylcholine after one month. However, these crystals exhibited only choline, an acetylcholine hydrolysis product, in the binding site. To overcome this obstacle we devised a microseeding protocol leading to crystals of ChoX with bound acetylcholine within 24 hours. One drawback we encountered was the high twinning fraction of the crystals, possibly was due to the rapid crystal growth.

  10. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines

  11. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axford, Danny [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Foadi, James [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hu, Nien-Jen; Choudhury, Hassanul Ghani [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Iwata, So [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Beis, Konstantinos [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Alguel, Yilmaz, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-14

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Nif3-family protein MJ0927 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypothetical protein MJ0927 of the Nif3 family has been crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to a resolution of 2.47 Å. MJ0927 is a member of the Nif3 family and is widely distributed across living organisms. Although several crystal structures of Nif3 proteins have been reported, structural information on archaeal Nif3 is still limited. To understand the structural differences between bacterial and archaeal Nif3 proteins, MJ0927 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii was purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.47 Å and belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.21, b = 172.94, c = 147.42 Å. Determination of this structure may provide insights into the function of MJ0927

  13. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the extrinsic PsbP protein of photosystem II from Spinacia oleracea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation-free crystalization of thrombin-digested recombinant His-tagged PsbP protein of photosystem II from Spinacia oleracea resulting in crystals diffracting to 2.06 Å. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the extrinsic PsbP protein of photosystem II from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was performed using N-terminally His-tagged recombinant PsbP protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PsbP protein (thrombin-digested recombinant His-tagged PsbP) stored in bis-Tris buffer pH 6.00 was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique with PEG 550 MME as a precipitant and zinc sulfate as an additive. SDS–PAGE analysis of a dissolved crystal showed that the crystals did not contain the degradation products of recombinant PsbP protein. PsbP crystals diffracted to 2.06 Å resolution in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.68, b = 46.73, c = 88.9 Å

  14. Crystal Structure of VC0702 at 2.0 Angstrom: Conserved Hypothetical Protein from Vibrio Cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VC0702, a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function from Vibrio cholerae, resides in a three-gene operon containing the MbaA gene that encodes for a GGDEF and EAL domain-containing protein which is involved in regulating formation of the extracellular matrix of biofilms in Vibrio cholerae. The VC0702 crystal structure has been determined at 2.0 Angstroms and refined to Rwork = 22.8% and Rfree = 26.3%. VC0702 crystallized in an orthorhombic crystal lattice in the C2221 space group with dimensions of a = 66.61 Angstroms, b = 88.118 Angstroms, and c = 118.35 Angstroms with a homodimer in the asymmetric unit. VC0702, which forms a mixed α + β three-layered αβα sandwich, belongs to the Pfam DUF84 and COG1986 families of proteins. Sequence conservation within the DUF84 and COG1986 families was used to identify a conserved patch of surface residues that define a cleft and potential substrate-binding site in VC0702. The three-dimensional structure of VC0702 is similar to that of Mj0226 from Methanococcus janeschii, which has been identified as a novel NTPase that binds NTP in a deep cleft similarly located to the conserved patch of surface residues that define an analogous cleft in VC0702. Collectively, the data suggest that VC0702 may have a biochemical function that involves NTP binding and phosphatase activity of some kind, and is likely involved in regulation of the signaling pathway that controls biofilm formation and maintenance in Vibrio cholerae

  15. Solution structure of detergent micelles at conditions relevant to membrane protein crystallization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littrell, K.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Tiede, D.; Urban, V.

    1999-07-02

    In this study small angle neutron scattering was used to characterize the formation of micelles in aqueous solutions of the detergents DMG and SPC as a function of detergent concentration and ionic strength of the solvent. The effects on the micelle structure of the additives glycerol and PEG, alone as well as in combination typical for actual membrane protein crystallization, were also explored. This research suggests that the micelles are cigar-like in form at the concentrations studied. The size of the micelles was observed to increase with increasing ionic strength but decrease with the addition of glycerol or PEG.

  16. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies to a crystal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki.

    OpenAIRE

    Huber-Lukac, M; Jaquet, F; Luethy, P; Huetter, R; Braun, D G

    1986-01-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies were produced against a k-1-type crystal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. Eight of the antibodies belong to the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) subclass, with pI values ranging from 5.5 to 8.6, one could be assigned to the IgG2b subclass, and one could be assigned to the IgM class. Competitive antibody-binding assays and analysis of antibody specificity indicated that the 10 antibodies recognized at least nine distinct antigenic determinants. Eight antibod...

  17. The nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate crystals at protein and phosphatidylserine liposome surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancollas, G H; Tsortos, A; Zieba, A

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of calcium phosphate crystal growth at the surfaces of proteins and phospholipids has been investigated using free drift and constant composition methods in supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions (relative supersaturations: with respect to hydroxyapatite, HAP, sigma HAP = 15.0, and with respect to octacalcium phosphate, OCP, sigma OCP = 1.9). Fibrinogen and collagen molecules adsorbed at hydrophobic surfaces as well as uncross-linked collagen fibrils induce ion binding and subsequent nucleation of calcium phosphate. The formation of OCP on phosphatidylserine vesicles introduced to highly supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions probably involves the interaction of the calcium ions with the ionized carboxylic groups of the phospholipid. PMID:9813627

  18. Crystal structure of a C-terminal deletion mutant of human protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermakova, Inessa; Boldyreff, Brigitte; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Niefind, Karsten

    2003-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (formerly called: casein kinase 2) is a heterotetrameric enzyme composed of two separate catalytic chains (CK2alpha) and a stable dimer of two non-catalytic subunits (CK2beta). CK2alpha is a highly conserved member of the superfamily of eukaryotic protein kinases. The crystal s...

  19. Crystal Structure Analysis and the Identification of Distinctive Functional Regions of the Protein Elicitor Mohrip2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengjie; Duan, Liangwei; Wang, Meifang; Zeng, Hongmei; Liu, Xinqi; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor MoHrip2, which was extracted from Magnaporthe oryzae as an exocrine protein, triggers the tobacco immune system and enhances blast resistance in rice. However, the detailed mechanisms by which MoHrip2 acts as an elicitor remain unclear. Here, we investigated the structure of MoHrip2 to elucidate its functions based on molecular structure. The three-dimensional structure of MoHrip2 was obtained. Overall, the crystal structure formed a β-barrel structure and showed high similarity to the pathogenesis-related (PR) thaumatin superfamily protein thaumatin-like xylanase inhibitor (TL-XI). To investigate the functional regions responsible for MoHrip2 elicitor activities, the full length and eight truncated proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and were evaluated for elicitor activity in tobacco. Biological function analysis showed that MoHrip2 triggered the defense system against Botrytis cinerea in tobacco. Moreover, only MoHrip2M14 and other fragments containing the 14 amino acids residues in the middle region of the protein showed the elicitor activity of inducing a hypersensitive response and resistance related pathways, which were similar to that of full-length MoHrip2. These results revealed that the central 14 amino acid residues were essential for anti-pathogenic activity. PMID:27507984

  20. Crystal structure of kiwellin, a major cell-wall protein from kiwifruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamiaux, Cyril; Maddumage, Ratnasiri; Middleditch, Martin J; Prakash, Roneel; Brummell, David A; Baker, Edward N; Atkinson, Ross G

    2014-09-01

    Kiwellin is a cysteine-rich, cell wall-associated protein with no known structural homologues. It is one of the most abundant proteins in kiwifruit (Actinidia spp.), and has been shown to be recognised by IgE of some patients allergic to kiwifruit. Cleavage of kiwellin into an N-terminal 4 kDa peptide called kissper and a core domain called KiTH is mediated by actinidin in vitro, and isolation of the kissper peptide from green-fleshed kiwifruit extracts suggested it may result from in vivo processing of kiwellin. In solution, kissper is highly flexible and displays pore-forming activity in synthetic lipid-bilayers. We present here the 2.05 Å resolution crystal structure of full-length kiwellin, purified from its native source, Actinidia chinensis (gold-fleshed kiwifruit). The structure confirms the modularity of the protein and the intrinsic flexibility of kissper and reveals that KiTH harbours a double-psi β-barrel fold hooked to an N-terminal β hairpin. Comparisons with structurally-related proteins suggest that a deep gorge located at the protein surface forms a binding site for endogenous ligands. PMID:25093947

  1. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane protein OmpW from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outer membrane protein OmpW from E. coli was overexpressed in inclusion bodies and refolded with the help of detergent. The protein has been crystallized and the crystals diffract to 3.5 Å resolution. OmpW is an eight-stranded 21 kDa molecular-weight β-barrel protein from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. It is a major antigen in bacterial infections and has implications in antibiotic resistance and in the oxidative degradation of organic compounds. OmpW from Escherichia coli was cloned and the protein was expressed in inclusion bodies. A method for refolding and purification was developed which yields properly folded protein according to circular-dichroism measurements. The protein has been crystallized and crystals were obtained that diffracted to a resolution limit of 3.5 Å. The crystals belong to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 122.5, c = 105.7 Å. A homology model of OmpW is presented based on known structures of eight-stranded β-barrels, intended for use in molecular-replacement trials

  2. Aircraft Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nødskov, Kim; Kværnø, Ole

    as a great power in Asia and will balance the carrier acquisitions of the United States, the United Kingdom, Russia and India. China’s current military strategy is predominantly defensive, its offensive elements being mainly focused on Taiwan. If China decides to acquire a large carrier with...... offensive capabilities, then the country will also acquire the capability to project military power into the region beyond Taiwan, which it does not possess today. In this way, China will have the military capability to permit a change of strategy from the mainly defensive, mainland, Taiwan-based strategy...... to a more assertive strategy, with potentially far-reaching consequences for the countries of the region. The Chinese have bought several retired carriers, which they have studied in great detail. The largest is the Russian-built carrier Varyag of the Kuznetsov class, which today is anchored in the...

  3. Crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human myelin protein zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Sohi, Jasloveleen; Kamholz, John; Kovari, Ladislau C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2012-03-27

    different mutations in the MPZ gene leading to peripheral neuropathy in patients have been reported worldwide (http://www.molgen. ua.ac.be/CMTMutations). All identified mutations resulting in a change or deletion of amino acid residues in MPZ give rise to neuropathy with the exception of R215L, which instead causes a benign polymorphism. Furthermore, more detailed analysis has classified the MPZ mutations into two major groups. In the first group, the mutations disrupt the intracellular processing of MPZ and are primarily associated with early onset neuropathy. It has been proposed that the mutated MPZ is trapped inside the cell rather than being transported to the plasma membrane. However, other evidence suggests that the mutated MPZ protein is expressed on the plasma membrane, but dominant-negatively disrupts the structure of myelin. In the second group, the MPZ mutations are associated with late onset neuropathy as these mutations cause only mild demyelination. The underlying mechanism is elusive with the hypothesis being that the second group of mutations cause minor abnormalities in the myelin sheath that over time may lead to aberrant Schwann cell-axon interactions and subsequently to axonal degeneration. The crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human MPZ (hP0ex) fused with maltose binding protein (MBP) is reported at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. While the crystal structure of rat MPZ extracellular domain (rP0ex) is available, the crystal structure of the human counterpart is useful for the analysis of the two homologs as well as a comparison between the two species. The hP0ex molecule reveals subtle structural variations between two homologs allowing comparison of the human myelin protein zero to that of the rat protein. The alignment of these homologs is shown in Figure 1(a).

  4. Isolation of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein and the fabG, acpP, and fabF genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z; Byers, D M

    1996-01-01

    We report the isolation of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein (ACP) and cloning of a 3,973-bp region containing the fabG (encoding 3-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, 25.5 kDa), acpP (encoding ACP, 8.7 kDa), fabF (encoding 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II, 43.1 kDa), and pabC (encoding aminodeoxychorismate lyase, 29.9 kDa) genes. Predicted amino acid sequences were, respectively, 78, 86, 76, and 35% identical to those of the corresponding Escherichia coli proteins. Five of the 11 sequence differences between V. harveyi and E. coli ACP were nonconservative amino acid differences concentrated in a loop region between helices I and II. PMID:8550484

  5. A novel approach for over-expression, characterization, and isotopic enrichment of a homogeneous species of acyl carrier protein from Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) plays a central role in fatty acid biosynthesis by transferring the acyl groups from one enzyme to another for the completion of the fatty acid synthesis cycle. Holo-ACP is the obligatory substrate for the synthesis of acyl-ACPs which act as the carrier and donor for various metabolic reactions. Despite its interactions with numerous proteins in the cell, its mode of interaction is poorly understood. Here, we report the over-expression of PfACP in minimal medium solely in its holo form and in high yield. Expression in minimal media provides a means to isotopically label PfACP for high resolution multi-nuclear and multi-dimensional NMR studies. Indeed, the proton-nitrogen correlated NMR spectrum exhibits very high chemical shift dispersion and resolution. We also show that holo-PfACP thus expressed is amenable to acylation reactions using Escherichia coli acyl-ACP synthetase as well as by standard chemical methods

  6. A new crystal structure fragment-based pharmacophore method for G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidom, Kimberley; Isberg, Vignir; Hauser, Alexander Sebastian; Mordalski, Stefan; Lehto, Thomas; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Gloriam, David E

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new method for the building of pharmacophores for G protein-coupled receptors, a major drug target family. The method is a combination of the ligand- and target-based pharmacophore methods and founded on the extraction of structural fragments, interacting ligand moiety and...... ligands are known. 47% of the class A G protein-coupled receptors can be targeted with at least four-element pharmacophores. The fragment libraries can also be used to grow known ligands or for rotamer refinement of homology models. Researchers can download the complete fragment library or a subset...... receptor residue pairs, from crystal structure complexes. We describe the procedure to collect a library with more than 250 fragments covering 29 residue positions within the generic transmembrane binding pocket. We describe how the library fragments are recombined and inferred to build pharmacophores for...

  7. Crystal structure of the stimulatory complex of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maita, Nobuo; Okada, Kengo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2002-02-01

    In the presence of phenylalanine, GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) forms a stimulatory 360-kDa complex with GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. The crystal structure of the stimulatory complex reveals that the GTPCHI decamer is sandwiched by two GFRP homopentamers. Each GFRP pentamer forms a symmetrical five-membered ring similar to beta-propeller. Five phenylalanine molecules are buried inside each interface between GFRP and GTPCHI, thus enhancing the binding of these proteins. The complex structure suggests that phenylalanine-induced GTPCHI x GFRP complex formation enhances GTPCHI activity by locking the enzyme in the active state. PMID:11818540

  8. High-throughput protein crystallization on the World Community Grid and the GPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed CPU and GPU versions of an automated image analysis and classification system for protein crystallization trial images from the Hauptman Woodward Institute's High-Throughput Screening lab. The analysis step computes 12,375 numerical features per image. Using these features, we have trained a classifier that distinguishes 11 different crystallization outcomes, recognizing 80% of all crystals, 94% of clear drops, 94% of precipitates. The computing requirements for this analysis system are large. The complete HWI archive of 120 million images is being processed by the donated CPU cycles on World Community Grid, with a GPU phase launching in early 2012. The main computational burden of the analysis is the measure of textural (GLCM) features within the image at multiple neighbourhoods, distances, and at multiple greyscale intensity resolutions. CPU runtime averages 4,092 seconds (single threaded) on an Intel Xeon, but only 65 seconds on an NVIDIA Tesla C2050. We report on the process of adapting the C++ code to OpenCL, optimized for multiple platforms.

  9. Guiding synchrotron X-ray diffraction by multimodal video-rate protein crystal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Justin A; Zhang, Shijie; Sullivan, Shane Z; Dow, Ximeng Y; Becker, Michael; Sheedlo, Michael J; Stepanov, Sergey; Carlsen, Mark S; Everly, R Michael; Das, Chittaranjan; Fischetti, Robert F; Simpson, Garth J

    2016-07-01

    Synchronous digitization, in which an optical sensor is probed synchronously with the firing of an ultrafast laser, was integrated into an optical imaging station for macromolecular crystal positioning prior to synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Using the synchronous digitization instrument, second-harmonic generation, two-photon-excited fluorescence and bright field by laser transmittance were all acquired simultaneously with perfect image registry at up to video-rate (15 frames s(-1)). A simple change in the incident wavelength enabled simultaneous imaging by two-photon-excited ultraviolet fluorescence, one-photon-excited visible fluorescence and laser transmittance. Development of an analytical model for the signal-to-noise enhancement afforded by synchronous digitization suggests a 15.6-fold improvement over previous photon-counting techniques. This improvement in turn allowed acquisition on nearly an order of magnitude more pixels than the preceding generation of instrumentation and reductions of well over an order of magnitude in image acquisition times. These improvements have allowed detection of protein crystals on the order of 1 µm in thickness under cryogenic conditions in the beamline. These capabilities are well suited to support serial crystallography of crystals approaching 1 µm or less in dimension. PMID:27359145

  10. Regiospecific chlorination of (S)-beta-tyrosyl-S-carrier protein catalyzed by SgcC3 in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuangjun; Van Lanen, Steven G; Shen, Ben

    2007-10-17

    C-1027 is a potent antitumor antibiotic composed of an apo-protein and a reactive enediyne chromophore. The chromophore consists of four different chemical subunits including an (S)-3-chloro-4,5-dihydroxy-beta-phenylalanine moiety, the biosynthesis of which from l-alpha-tyrosine is catalyzed by six proteins, SgcC, SgcC1, SgcC2, SgcC3, SgcC4, and SgcC5. Biochemical characterization of SgcC3 unveiled the following: (i) SgcC3 is a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent halogenase; (ii) SgcC3 acts only on the SgcC2 peptidyl carrier protein-tethered substrates; (iii) SgcC3-catalyzed halogenation requires O2 and reduced FAD and either the C-1027 pathway-specific flavin reductase SgcE6 or E. coli flavin reductase (Fre) can support the SgcC3 activity; (iv) SgcC3 also efficiently catalyzes bromination but not fluorination or iodination; (v) SgcC3 can utilize both (S)- and (R)-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 but not 3-hydroxy-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 as a substrate. These results establish that SgcC3 catalyzes the third enzymatic transformation during the biosynthesis of the (S)-3-chloro-4,5-dihydroxy-beta-phenylalanine moiety of C-1027 from l-alpha-tyrosine. SgcC3 now represents the second biochemically characterized flavin-dependent halogenase that acts on a carrier protein-tethered substrate. These findings will facilitate the engineering of new C-1027 analogs by combinatorial biosynthesis methods. PMID:17887753

  11. A nonionic surfactant-decorated liquid crystal sensor for sensitive and selective detection of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Hu, Qiongzheng; Tian, Tongtong; Gao, Yan'an; Yu, Li

    2016-09-21

    Proteins are responsible for most biochemical events in human body. It is essential to develop sensitive and selective methods for the detection of proteins. In this study, liquid crystal (LC)-based sensor for highly selective and sensitive detection of lysozyme, concanavalin A (Con A), and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was constructed by utilizing the LC interface decorated with a nonionic surfactant, dodecyl β-d-glucopyranoside. A change of the LC optical images from bright to dark appearance was observed after transferring dodecyl β-d-glucopyranoside onto the aqueous/LC interface due to the formation of stable self-assembled surfactant monolayer, regardless of pH and ion concentrations studied in a wide range. The optical images turned back from dark to bright appearance after addition of lysozyme, Con A and BSA, respectively. Noteworthy is that these proteins can be further distinguished by adding enzyme inhibitors and controlling incubation temperature of the protein solutions based on three different interaction mechanisms between proteins and dodecyl β-d-glucopyranoside, viz. enzymatic hydrolysis, specific saccharide binding, and physical absorption. The LC-based sensor decorated with dodecyl β-d-glucopyranoside shows high sensitivity for protein detection. The limit of detection (LOD) for lysozyme, Con A and BSA reaches around 0.1 μg/mL, 0.01 μg/mL and 0.001 μg/mL, respectively. These results might provide new insights into increasing selectivity and sensitivity of LC-based sensors for the detection of proteins. PMID:27590553

  12. Crystal structure of a novel Sm-like protein of putative cyanophage origin at 2.60 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Debanu; Kozbial, Piotr; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Miller, Mitchell D.; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-André; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Johnson, Hope A.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Sudek, Sebastian; Tien, Henry; Trame, Christine; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.; (SLAC); (Scripps); (SSRL); (JCSG); (SSRl); (UCSD); (Burnham)

    2009-08-28

    ECX21941 represents a very large family (over 600 members) of novel, ocean metagenome-specific proteins identified by clustering of the dataset from the Global Ocean Sampling expedition. The crystal structure of ECX21941 reveals unexpected similarity to Sm/LSm proteins, which are important RNA-binding proteins, despite no detectable sequence similarity. The ECX21941 protein assembles as a homopentamer in solution and in the crystal structure when expressed in Escherichia coli and represents the first pentameric structure for this Sm/LSm family of proteins, although the actual oligomeric form in vivo is currently not known. The genomic neighborhood analysis of ECX21941 and its homologs combined with sequence similarity searches suggest a cyanophage origin for this protein. The specific functions of members of this family are unknown, but our structure analysis of ECX21941 indicates nucleic acid-binding capabilities and suggests a role in RNA and/or DNA processing.

  13. Crystal structure and conformational flexibility of the unligated FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui; Mustafi, Sourajit M. [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); LeMaster, David M. [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); University at Albany – SUNY, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Li, Zhong [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Héroux, Annie [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Li, Hongmin; Hernández, Griselda, E-mail: griselda@wadsworth.org [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); University at Albany – SUNY, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Two crystal forms of unligated FKBP12.6 exhibit multiple conformations in the active site and in the 80s loop, the primary site for known protein-recognition interactions. The previously unreported NMR backbone assignment of FKBP12.6 revealed extensive doubling of amide resonances, which reflects a slow conformational transition centered in the 80s loop. The primary known physiological function of FKBP12.6 involves its role in regulating the RyR2 isoform of ryanodine receptor Ca{sup 2+} channels in cardiac muscle, pancreatic β islets and the central nervous system. With only a single previously reported X-ray structure of FKBP12.6, bound to the immunosuppressant rapamycin, structural inferences for this protein have been drawn from the more extensive studies of the homologous FKBP12. X-ray structures at 1.70 and 1.90 Å resolution from P2{sub 1} and P3{sub 1}21 crystal forms are reported for an unligated cysteine-free variant of FKBP12.6 which exhibit a notable diversity of conformations. In one monomer from the P3{sub 1}21 crystal form, the aromatic ring of Phe59 at the base of the active site is rotated perpendicular to its typical orientation, generating a steric conflict for the immunosuppressant-binding mode. The peptide unit linking Gly89 and Val90 at the tip of the protein-recognition ‘80s loop’ is flipped in the P2{sub 1} crystal form. Unlike the >30 reported FKBP12 structures, the backbone conformation of this loop closely follows that of the first FKBP domain of FKBP51. The NMR resonances for 21 backbone amides of FKBP12.6 are doubled, corresponding to a slow conformational transition centered near the tip of the 80s loop, as recently reported for 31 amides of FKBP12. The comparative absence of doubling for residues along the opposite face of the active-site pocket in FKBP12.6 may in part reflect attenuated structural coupling owing to increased conformational plasticity around the Phe59 ring.

  14. Crystal structure and conformational flexibility of the unligated FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two crystal forms of unligated FKBP12.6 exhibit multiple conformations in the active site and in the 80s loop, the primary site for known protein-recognition interactions. The previously unreported NMR backbone assignment of FKBP12.6 revealed extensive doubling of amide resonances, which reflects a slow conformational transition centered in the 80s loop. The primary known physiological function of FKBP12.6 involves its role in regulating the RyR2 isoform of ryanodine receptor Ca2+ channels in cardiac muscle, pancreatic β islets and the central nervous system. With only a single previously reported X-ray structure of FKBP12.6, bound to the immunosuppressant rapamycin, structural inferences for this protein have been drawn from the more extensive studies of the homologous FKBP12. X-ray structures at 1.70 and 1.90 Å resolution from P21 and P3121 crystal forms are reported for an unligated cysteine-free variant of FKBP12.6 which exhibit a notable diversity of conformations. In one monomer from the P3121 crystal form, the aromatic ring of Phe59 at the base of the active site is rotated perpendicular to its typical orientation, generating a steric conflict for the immunosuppressant-binding mode. The peptide unit linking Gly89 and Val90 at the tip of the protein-recognition ‘80s loop’ is flipped in the P21 crystal form. Unlike the >30 reported FKBP12 structures, the backbone conformation of this loop closely follows that of the first FKBP domain of FKBP51. The NMR resonances for 21 backbone amides of FKBP12.6 are doubled, corresponding to a slow conformational transition centered near the tip of the 80s loop, as recently reported for 31 amides of FKBP12. The comparative absence of doubling for residues along the opposite face of the active-site pocket in FKBP12.6 may in part reflect attenuated structural coupling owing to increased conformational plasticity around the Phe59 ring

  15. Carotenoid crystal formation in Arabidopsis and carrot roots caused by increased phytoene synthase protein levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Maass

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As the first pathway-specific enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis, phytoene synthase (PSY is a prime regulatory target. This includes a number of biotechnological approaches that have successfully increased the carotenoid content in agronomically relevant non-green plant tissues through tissue-specific PSY overexpression. We investigated the differential effects of constitutive AtPSY overexpression in green and non-green cells of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. This revealed striking similarities to the situation found in orange carrot roots with respect to carotenoid amounts and sequestration mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Arabidopsis seedlings, carotenoid content remained unaffected by increased AtPSY levels although the protein was almost quantitatively imported into plastids, as shown by western blot analyses. In contrast, non-photosynthetic calli and roots overexpressing AtPSY accumulated carotenoids 10 and 100-fold above the corresponding wild-type tissues and contained 1800 and 500 microg carotenoids per g dry weight, respectively. This increase coincided with a change of the pattern of accumulated carotenoids, as xanthophylls decreased relative to beta-carotene and carotene intermediates accumulated. As shown by polarization microscopy, carotenoids were found deposited in crystals, similar to crystalline-type chromoplasts of non-green tissues present in several other taxa. In fact, orange-colored carrots showed a similar situation with increased PSY protein as well as carotenoid levels and accumulation patterns whereas wild white-rooted carrots were similar to Arabidopsis wild type roots in this respect. Initiation of carotenoid crystal formation by increased PSY protein amounts was further confirmed by overexpressing crtB, a bacterial PSY gene, in white carrots, resulting in increased carotenoid amounts deposited in crystals. CONCLUSIONS: The sequestration of carotenoids into crystals can be driven by the

  16. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) nucleocapsid protein C-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C-terminal domain of mouse hepatitis virus nucleocapsid protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal belonged to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.6, c = 50.8 Å, and diffracted to 2.20 Å resolution. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) belongs to the group II coronaviruses. The virus produces nine genes encoding 11 proteins that could be recognized as structural proteins and nonstructural proteins and are crucial for viral RNA synthesis. The nucleocapsid (N) protein, one of the structural proteins, interacts with the 30.4 kb virus genomic RNA to form the helical nucleocapsid and associates with the membrane glycoprotein via its C-terminus to stabilize virion assembly. Here, the expression and crystallization of the MHV nucleocapsid protein C-terminal domain are reported. The crystals diffracted to 2.20 Å resolution and belonged to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.6, c = 50.8 Å. Assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content is 43.0% (VM = 2.16 Å3 Da−1)

  17. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Protein Helices Reconciled with Three-Centered Hydrogen Bonds and Multipole Electrostatics

    OpenAIRE

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Liu, Chengyu; Fang, Zheng; Ponder, Jay W.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for non-linear hydrogen bonds in protein helices is ubiquitous. In particular, amide three-centered hydrogen bonds are common features of helices in high-resolution crystal structures of proteins. These high-resolution structures (1.0 to 1.5 Å nominal crystallographic resolution) position backbone atoms without significant bias from modeling constraints and identify Φ = -62°, ψ = -43 as the consensus backbone torsional angles of protein helices. These tor...

  18. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of a novel haem-binding protein of Streptomyces reticuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The haem-binding protein HbpS from Streptomyces reticuli was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å. Streptomyces reticuli is a soil-growing Gram-positive bacteria that has been shown to secrete a novel haem-binding protein known as HbpS. Sequence analysis reveals that homologues of HbpS are found in a wide variety of bacteria, including different Actinobacteria and the Gram-negative Vibrio cholera and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The in vivo production of HbpS is greatly increased when S. reticuli is cultured in the presence of the natural antibiotic haemin (Fe3+ oxidized form of haem). Mutational analysis demonstrated that HbpS significantly increases the resistance of S. reticuli to toxic concentrations of haemin. Previous data show that the presence of the newly identified two-component sensor system SenS–SenR also considerably enhances the resistance of S. reticuli to haemin and the redox-cycling compound plumbagin, suggesting a role in the sensing of redox changes. Specific interaction between HbpS and SenS–SenR, which regulates the expression of the catalase–peroxidase CpeB, as well as HbpS, has been demonstrated in vitro. HbpS has been recombinantly overexpressed, purified and crystallized in space group P213, with a cell edge of 152.5 Å. Diffraction data were recorded to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å and phases were obtained using the SAD method from crystals briefly soaked in high concentrations of sodium bromide

  19. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of a novel haem-binding protein of Streptomyces reticuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Peijian [EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Groves, Matthew R. [EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra D.; Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío, E-mail: ortiz@biologie.uni-osnabrueck.de [Universität Osnabrück, FB Biologie/Chemie, Angewandte Genetik der Mikroorganismen, Barbarastrasse 13, 49069 Osnabrück (Germany); EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-05-01

    The haem-binding protein HbpS from Streptomyces reticuli was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å. Streptomyces reticuli is a soil-growing Gram-positive bacteria that has been shown to secrete a novel haem-binding protein known as HbpS. Sequence analysis reveals that homologues of HbpS are found in a wide variety of bacteria, including different Actinobacteria and the Gram-negative Vibrio cholera and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The in vivo production of HbpS is greatly increased when S. reticuli is cultured in the presence of the natural antibiotic haemin (Fe{sup 3+} oxidized form of haem). Mutational analysis demonstrated that HbpS significantly increases the resistance of S. reticuli to toxic concentrations of haemin. Previous data show that the presence of the newly identified two-component sensor system SenS–SenR also considerably enhances the resistance of S. reticuli to haemin and the redox-cycling compound plumbagin, suggesting a role in the sensing of redox changes. Specific interaction between HbpS and SenS–SenR, which regulates the expression of the catalase–peroxidase CpeB, as well as HbpS, has been demonstrated in vitro. HbpS has been recombinantly overexpressed, purified and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}3, with a cell edge of 152.5 Å. Diffraction data were recorded to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å and phases were obtained using the SAD method from crystals briefly soaked in high concentrations of sodium bromide.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the yeast tRNA-thiouridine modification protein 1 (Tum1p)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeast tRNA-thiouridine modification protein 1 was overpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to space group I41 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 Å. Yeast tRNA-thiouridine modification protein 1 (Tum1p), a crucial component of the Urm1 system, is believed to play important roles in protein urmylation and tRNA-thiouridine modification. Previous studies have demonstrated that the conserved residue Cys259 in the C-terminal rhodanese-like domain of Tum1p is essential for these sulfur-transfer activities. Here, recombinant Tum1p protein has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). After purification, crystals of Tum1p were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution. The preliminary X-ray data showed that the tetragonal Tum1p crystal belonged to space group I41, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 120.94, c = 48.35 Å. The asymmetric unit of the crystal was assumed to contain one protein molecule, giving a Matthews coefficient of 2.41 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 49.0%