WorldWideScience

Sample records for carrier protein crystal

  1. Crystal structure of a PCP/Sfp complex reveals the structural basis for carrier protein posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufar, Peter; Rahighi, Simin; Kraas, Femke I; Kirchner, Donata K; Löhr, Frank; Henrich, Erik; Köpke, Jürgen; Dikic, Ivan; Güntert, Peter; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-04-24

    Phosphopantetheine transferases represent a class of enzymes found throughout all forms of life. From a structural point of view, they are subdivided into three groups, with transferases from group II being the most widespread. They are required for the posttranslational modification of carrier proteins involved in diverse metabolic pathways. We determined the crystal structure of the group II phosphopantetheine transferase Sfp from Bacillus in complex with a substrate carrier protein in the presence of coenzyme A and magnesium, and observed two protein-protein interaction sites. Mutational analysis showed that only the hydrophobic contacts between the carrier protein's second helix and the C-terminal domain of Sfp are essential for their productive interaction. Comparison with a similar structure of a complex of human proteins suggests that the mode of interaction is highly conserved in all domains of life.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabK) from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Jun, E-mail: jun-saito@meiji.co.jp; Yamada, Mototsugu; Watanabe, Takashi; Kitagawa, Hideo; Takeuchi, Yasuo [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Meiji Seika Kaisha Ltd, 760 Morooka-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 222-8567 (Japan)

    2006-06-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductases are responsible for bacterial type II fatty-acid biosynthesis and are attractive targets for developing novel antibiotics. The S. pneumoniae enoyl-ACP reductase (FabK) was crystallized and selenomethionine MAD data were collected to 2 Å resolution. The enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (FabK; EC 1.3.1.9) is responsible for catalyzing the final step in each elongation cycle of fatty-acid biosynthesis. Selenomethionine-substituted FabK was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 277 K. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 50.26, b = 126.70, c = 53.63 Å, β = 112.46°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.00 Å resolution using synchrotron beamline BL32B2 at SPring-8. Two molecules were estimated to be present in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 45.1%.

  3. The crystal structure of BlmI as a model for nonribosomal peptide synthetase peptidyl carrier proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Jeremy R; Ma, Ming; Cuff, Marianne E; Bigelow, Lance; Bearden, Jessica; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N; Shen, Ben

    2014-07-01

    Carrier proteins (CPs) play a critical role in the biosynthesis of various natural products, especially in nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) enzymology, where the CPs are referred to as peptidyl-carrier proteins (PCPs) or acyl-carrier proteins (ACPs), respectively. CPs can either be a domain in large multifunctional polypeptides or standalone proteins, termed Type I and Type II, respectively. There have been many biochemical studies of the Type I PKS and NRPS CPs, and of Type II ACPs. However, recently a number of Type II PCPs have been found and biochemically characterized. In order to understand the possible interaction surfaces for combinatorial biosynthetic efforts we crystallized the first characterized and representative Type II PCP member, BlmI, from the bleomycin biosynthetic pathway from Streptomyces verticillus ATCC 15003. The structure is similar to CPs in general but most closely resembles PCPs. Comparisons with previously determined PCP structures in complex with catalytic domains reveals a common interaction surface. This surface is highly variable in charge and shape, which likely confers specificity for interactions. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of a prototypical Type I PCP excised from the multimodular context revealed three conformational states. Comparison of the states with the structure of BlmI and other PCPs reveals that only one of the NMR states is found in other studies, suggesting the other two states may not be relevant. The state represented by the BlmI crystal structure can therefore serve as a model for both Type I and Type II PCPs.

  4. Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  5. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase FabG from Aquifex aeolicus VF5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qilong; Duax, William L; Umland, Timothy C

    2007-02-01

    The gene product of fabG from Aquifex aeolicus has been heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Purification of the protein took place using anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography and the protein was then crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.8 A and the initial phases were determined by molecular replacement. The A. aeolicus FabG protein is a putative beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase. Structure-function studies of this protein are being performed as part of a larger project investigating naturally occurring deviations from highly conserved residues within the short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family.

  6. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase FabG from Aquifex aeolicus VF5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Qilong [Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); Duax, William L.; Umland, Timothy C., E-mail: umland@hwi.buffalo.edu [Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); Department of Structural Biology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2007-02-01

    FabG from A. aeolicus, a putative component of fatty-acid synthase II, has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 1.8 Å resolution. The gene product of fabG from Aquifex aeolicus has been heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Purification of the protein took place using anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography and the protein was then crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.8 Å and the initial phases were determined by molecular replacement. The A. aeolicus FabG protein is a putative β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase. Structure–function studies of this protein are being performed as part of a larger project investigating naturally occurring deviations from highly conserved residues within the short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family.

  7. Crystal Structure of Epiphyas Postvittana Takeout 1 With Bound Ubiquinone Supports a Role As Ligand Carriers for Takeout Proteins in Insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamiaux, C.; Stanley, D.; Greenwood, D.R.; Baker, E.N.; Newcomb, R.D.

    2009-05-19

    Takeout (To) proteins are found exclusively in insects and have been proposed to have important roles in various aspects of their physiology and behavior. Limited sequence similarity with juvenile hormone-binding proteins (JHBPs), which specifically bind and transport juvenile hormones in Lepidoptera, suggested a role for To proteins in binding hydrophobic ligands. We present the first crystal structure of a To protein, EpTo1 from the light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana, solved in-house by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction technique using sulfur anomalous dispersion, and refined to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. EpTo1 adopts the unusual {alpha}/{beta}-wrap fold, seen only for JHBP and several mammalian lipid carrier proteins, a scaffold tailored for the binding and/or transport of hydrophobic ligands. EpTo1 has a 45 {angstrom} long, purely hydrophobic, internal tunnel that extends for the full length of the protein and accommodates a bound ligand. The latter was shown by mass spectrometry to be ubiquinone-8 and is probably derived from Escherichia coli. The structure provides the first direct experimental evidence that To proteins are ligand carriers; gives insights into the nature of endogenous ligand(s) of EpTo1; shows, by comparison with JHBP, a basis for different ligand specificities; and suggests a mechanism for the binding/release of ligands.

  8. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  9. Thioredoxin as a fusion tag for carrier-driven crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, Lorenzo; Hothorn, Michael; Scheffzek, Klaus; Sattler, Michael; Stier, Gunter

    2008-12-01

    Structural investigations are frequently hindered by difficulties in obtaining diffracting crystals of the target protein. Here, we report the crystallization and structure solution of the U2AF homology motif (UHM) domain of splicing factor Puf60 fused to Escherichia coli thioredoxin A. Both modules make extensive crystallographic contacts, contributing to a well-defined crystal lattice with clear electron density for both the thioredoxin and the Puf60-UHM module. We compare two short linker sequences between the two fusion domains, GSAM and GSPPM, for which only the GSAM-linked fusion protein yielded diffracting crystals. While specific interdomain contacts are not observed for both fusion proteins, NMR relaxation data in solution indicate reduced interdomain mobility between the Trx and Puf60-UHM modules. The GSPPM-linked fusion protein is significantly more flexible, albeit both linker sequences have the same number of degrees of torsional freedom. Our analysis provides a rationale for the crystallization of the GSAM-linked fusion protein and indicates that in this case, a four-residue linker between thioredoxin A and the fused target may represent the maximal length for crystallization purposes. Our data provide an experimental basis for the rational design of linker sequences in carrier-driven crystallization and identify thioredoxin A as a powerful fusion partner that can aid crystallization of difficult targets.

  10. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  11. Protein crystallization with paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  12. Introduction to protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Alexander; Gavira, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystallization was discovered by chance about 150 years ago and was developed in the late 19th century as a powerful purification tool and as a demonstration of chemical purity. The crystallization of proteins, nucleic acids and large biological complexes, such as viruses, depends on the creation of a solution that is supersaturated in the macromolecule but exhibits conditions that do not significantly perturb its natural state. Supersaturation is produced through the addition of mild precipitating agents such as neutral salts or polymers, and by the manipulation of various parameters that include temperature, ionic strength and pH. Also important in the crystallization process are factors that can affect the structural state of the macromolecule, such as metal ions, inhibitors, cofactors or other conventional small molecules. A variety of approaches have been developed that combine the spectrum of factors that effect and promote crystallization, and among the most widely used are vapor diffusion, dialysis, batch and liquid-liquid diffusion. Successes in macromolecular crystallization have multiplied rapidly in recent years owing to the advent of practical, easy-to-use screening kits and the application of laboratory robotics. A brief review will be given here of the most popular methods, some guiding principles and an overview of current technologies.

  13. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet S. H. Lorv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions.

  14. Fusion-protein-assisted protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobe, Bostjan; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J

    2015-07-01

    Fusion proteins can be used directly in protein crystallization to assist crystallization in at least two different ways. In one approach, the `heterologous fusion-protein approach', the fusion partner can provide additional surface area to promote crystal contact formation. In another approach, the `fusion of interacting proteins approach', protein assemblies can be stabilized by covalently linking the interacting partners. The linker connecting the proteins plays different roles in the two applications: in the first approach a rigid linker is required to reduce conformational heterogeneity; in the second, conversely, a flexible linker is required that allows the native interaction between the fused proteins. The two approaches can also be combined. The recent applications of fusion-protein technology in protein crystallization from the work of our own and other laboratories are briefly reviewed.

  15. Protein Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕汝昌; 桂璐璐; 师珂; 王耀萍; 陈世芝; 韩青; 胡永林; 沈福苓; 牛秀田; 华子谦; 卢光莹; 张健; 李松林; 龚为民; 牛立文; 黄其辰

    1994-01-01

    Protein crystal growth is quite important for the determination of protein structureswhich are essential to the understanding of life at molecular level as well as to the development of molecu-lar biotechnology.The microgravity environment of space is an ideal place to study the complicated pro-tein crystallization and to grow good-quality protein crystals.A number of crystal-growth experiments of10 different proteins were carried out in August,1992 on the Chinese re-entry satellite FSW-2 in spaceusing a tube crystallization equipment made in China.A total of 25 samples from 6 proteins producedcrystals,and the effects of microgravity on protein crystal growth were observed,especially for an acidicphospholipase A2 and henegg-white lysozyme which gave better crystals in space than earth-grown crys-tals in ground control experiments.The results have shown that the microgravity in space favors the im-provement of the size,perfection,morphology and internal order of the grown protein crytals.

  16. Lasing from fluorescent protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Heon Jeong; Gather, Malte C; Song, Ji-Joon; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-15

    We investigated fluorescent protein crystals for potential photonic applications, for the first time to our knowledge. Rod-shaped crystals of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were synthesized, with diameters of 0.5-2 μm and lengths of 100-200 μm. The crystals exhibit minimal light scattering due to their ordered structure and generate substantially higher fluorescence intensity than EGFP or dye molecules in solutions. The magnitude of concentration quenching in EGFP crystals was measured to be about 7-10 dB. Upon optical pumping at 485 nm, individual EGFP crystals located between dichroic mirrors generated laser emission with a single-mode spectral line at 513 nm. Our results demonstrate the potential of protein crystals as novel optical elements for self-assembled, micro- or nano-lasers and amplifiers in aqueous environment.

  17. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of the [beta]-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH) from Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Xiayang; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Janson, Cheryl A.; Grooms, Michael; Daines, Robert A.; Lonsdale, John T.; Khandekar, Sanjay S. (GSK)

    2010-07-20

    {beta}-Ketoacyl-ACP synthase III (FabH), an essential enzyme for bacterial viability, catalyzes the initiation of fatty acid elongation by condensing malonyl-ACP with acetyl-CoA. We have determined the crystal structure of FabH from Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive human pathogen, to 2 {angstrom} resolution. Although the overall structure of S. aureus FabH is similar to that of Escherichia coli FabH, the primer binding pocket in S. aureus FabH is significantly larger than that present in E. coli FabH. The structural differences, which agree with kinetic parameters, provide explanation for the observed varying substrate specificity for E. coli and S. aureus FabH. The rank order of activity of S. aureus FabH with various acyl-CoA primers was as follows: isobutyryl- > hexanoyl- > butyryl- > isovaleryl- >> acetyl-CoA. The availability of crystal structure may aid in designing potent, selective inhibitors of S. aureus FabH.

  18. Measuring phonons in protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Katherine A.; Snell, Edward; Markelz, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    Using Terahertz near field microscopy we find orientation dependent narrow band absorption features for lysozyme crystals. Here we discuss identification of protein collective modes associated with the observed features. Using normal mode calculations we find good agreement with several of the measured features, suggesting that the modes arise from internal molecular motions and not crystal phonons. Such internal modes have been associated with protein function.

  19. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  20. Protein Crystal Serum Albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    As the most abundant protein in the circulatory system albumin contributes 80% to colloid osmotic blood pressure. Albumin is also chiefly responsible for the maintenance of blood pH. It is located in every tissue and bodily secretion, with extracellular protein comprising 60% of total albumin. Perhaps the most outstanding property of albumin is its ability to bind reversibly to an incredible variety of ligands. It is widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry that the overall distribution, metabolism, and efficiency of many drugs are rendered ineffective because of their unusually high affinity for this abundant protein. An understanding of the chemistry of the various classes of pharmaceutical interactions with albumin can suggest new approaches to drug therapy and design. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter/New Century Pharmaceuticals

  1. Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Protein in Barley Chloroplast Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannangara, C. G.; Jense, C J

    1975-01-01

    Biotin localized in barley chloroplast lamellae is covalently bound to a single protein with an approximate molecular weight of 21000. It contains one mole of biotin per mole of protein and functions as a carboxyl carrier in the acetyl-CoA carboxylase reaction. The protein was obtained by solubil......Biotin localized in barley chloroplast lamellae is covalently bound to a single protein with an approximate molecular weight of 21000. It contains one mole of biotin per mole of protein and functions as a carboxyl carrier in the acetyl-CoA carboxylase reaction. The protein was obtained...

  2. Process for Encapsulating Protein Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Mosier, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    A process for growing protein crystals encapsulated within membranes has been invented. This process begins with the encapsulation of a nearly saturated aqueous protein solution inside semipermeable membranes to form microcapsules. The encapsulation is effected by use of special formulations of a dissolved protein and a surfactant in an aqueous first liquid phase, which is placed into contact with a second, immiscible liquid phase that contains one or more polymers that are insoluble in the first phase. The second phase becomes formed into the semipermeable membranes that surround microglobules of the first phase, thereby forming the microcapsules. Once formed, the microcapsules are then dehydrated osmotically by exposure to a concentrated salt or polymer solution. The dehydration forms supersaturated solutions inside the microcapsules, thereby enabling nucleation and growth of protein crystals inside the microcapsules. By suitable formulation of the polymer or salt solution and of other physical and chemical parameters, one can control the rate of transport of water out of the microcapsules through the membranes and thereby create physicochemical conditions that favor the growth, within each microcapsule, of one or a few large crystals suitable for analysis by x-ray diffraction. The membrane polymer can be formulated to consist of low-molecular-weight molecules that do not interfere with the x-ray diffraction analysis of the encapsulated crystals. During dehydration, an electrostatic field can be applied to exert additional control over the rate of dehydration. This protein-crystal-encapsulation process is expected to constitute the basis of protein-growth experiments to be performed on the space shuttle and the International Space Station. As envisioned, the experiments would involve the exposure of immiscible liquids to each other in sequences of steps under microgravitational conditions. The experiments are expected to contribute to knowledge of the precise

  3. Bacillus thuringiensis crystal proteins that target nematodes

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Jun-Zhi; Hale, Kristina; Carta, Lynn; Platzer, Edward; Wong, Cynthie; Fang, Su-Chiung; Aroian, Raffi V.

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystal proteins are pore-forming toxins used as insecticides around the world. Previously, the extent to which these proteins might also target the invertebrate phylum Nematoda has been mostly ignored. We have expressed seven different crystal toxin proteins from two largely unstudied Bt crystal protein subfamilies. By assaying their toxicity on diverse free-living nematode species, we demonstrate that four of these crystal proteins are active against multiple nem...

  4. Approaches to automated protein crystal harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deller, Marc C., E-mail: mdeller@scripps.edu; Rupp, Bernhard, E-mail: mdeller@scripps.edu

    2014-01-28

    Approaches to automated and robot-assisted harvesting of protein crystals are critically reviewed. While no true turn-key solutions for automation of protein crystal harvesting are currently available, systems incorporating advanced robotics and micro-electromechanical systems represent exciting developments with the potential to revolutionize the way in which protein crystals are harvested.

  5. The fluid phenomena in the crystallization of the protein crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Li; Kang Qi

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports that an optical diagnostic system consisting of Maeh-Zehnder interferometer with a phase shift device and image processor has been used for study of the kinetics of protein crystal growing process. The crystallization process of protein crystal by vapour diffusion is investigated. The interference fringes are observed in real time. The present experiment demonstrates that the diffusion and the sedimentation influence the crystallization of protein crystal which grows in solution, and the concentration capillary convection associated with surface tension occurs at the vicinity of free surface of the protein mother liquor, and directly affects on the outcome of protein crystallization. So far the detailed analysis and the important role of the fluid phenomena in protein crystallization have been discussed a little in both space- and ground-based crystal growth experiments. It is also found that these fluid phenomena affect theoutcome of protein crystallization, regular growth, and crystal quality. This may explain the fact that many results of space-based investigation do not show overall improvement.

  6. Influence of microgravity on protein crystal structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Structural determination and comparison of microgravity and ground grown protein crystals have been carried out in order to investigate the effect of microgravity on the structure of protein crystals. Following the structural studies on the hen egg-white lysozyme cystals grown in space and on the ground, the same kind of comparative studies was performed with acidic phospholipase A2 crystals grown in different gravities. Based on the results obtained so far, a conclusion could be made that microgravity might not be strong enough to change the conformation of polypeptide chain of proteins, but it may improve the bound waters' structure, and this might be an important factor for microgravity to improve the protein crystal quality. In addition, the difference in the improvement between the two kinds of protein crystals may imply that the degree of improvement of a protein crystal in microgravity may be related to the solvent content in the protein crystal.

  7. DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO CRYSTALLIZATION OF MEMBRANE PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash G. Doiphode

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystallography is more like an art than science. Crystallizing membrane proteins are a big challenge; membrane proteins are present in the cell membrane and serve as cell support. The most important feature of membrane protein is that it contains both hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions on its surface. They are generally much more difficult to study than soluble proteins. The problem becomes more difficult when trying to obtain crystals to determine the high resolution structures of membrane proteins. We want to utilize this opportunity to briefly examine various approaches for crystallization of membrane proteins. The important factors for determining the success of crystallization experiments for membrane proteins lies in the purification, preparation of membrane samples, the environment in which the crystals are grown and the technique used to grow the crystals. All the X-ray structures of membrane protein are grown from preparations of detergents by different methods developed to crystallize. In this review different techniques for the crystallization of membrane proteins are being described. The cubic phase method also known as in meso method is discussed along with other methods to understand about the crystallization of membrane proteins, its general applicability, salt, detergent and screening effects on crystallization. Low volumes as nano-liter of samples can be used for crystallization. The effects of different detergents on the crystallization of membrane protein, as well as the use of surfactants like polyoxyethylene. Approach based on the detergent complexation to prove the ability of cyclodextrins to remove detergent from ternary mixtures in order to get 2D crystals. Crystallization of membrane proteins using non-ionic surfactants as well as Lipidic sponge phase and with swollen lipidic mesophases is discussed to better understand the crystallization of membrane proteins.

  8. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, C. Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M., E-mail: gulick@hwi.buffalo.edu [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins.

  9. System and method for forming synthetic protein crystals to determine the conformational structure by crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, George D.; Glass, Robert; Rupp, Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming synthetic crystals of proteins in a carrier fluid by use of the dipole moments of protein macromolecules that self-align in the Helmholtz layer adjacent to an electrode. The voltage gradients of such layers easily exceed 10.sup.6 V/m. The synthetic protein crystals are subjected to x-ray crystallography to determine the conformational structure of the protein involved.

  10. Gold nanoparticle capture within protein crystal scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Ann E.; Huber, Thaddaus R.; Ni, Thomas W.; Hartje, Luke F.; Appel, Karina L.; Yost, Jarad W.; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Snow, Christopher D.

    2016-06-01

    DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography.DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was

  11. The MORPHEUS II protein crystallization screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrec, Fabrice

    2015-07-01

    High-quality macromolecular crystals are a prerequisite for the process of protein structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Unfortunately, the relative yield of diffraction-quality crystals from crystallization experiments is often very low. In this context, innovative crystallization screen formulations are continuously being developed. In the past, MORPHEUS, a screen in which each condition integrates a mix of additives selected from the Protein Data Bank, a cryoprotectant and a buffer system, was developed. Here, MORPHEUS II, a follow-up to the original 96-condition initial screen, is described. Reagents were selected to yield crystals when none might be observed in traditional initial screens. Besides, the screen includes heavy atoms for experimental phasing and small polyols to ensure the cryoprotection of crystals. The suitability of the resulting novel conditions is shown by the crystallization of a broad variety of protein samples and their efficiency is compared with commercially available conditions.

  12. Legionella pneumophila secretes a mitochondrial carrier protein during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Dolezal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mitochondrial Carrier Family (MCF is a signature group of integral membrane proteins that transport metabolites across the mitochondrial inner membrane in eukaryotes. MCF proteins are characterized by six transmembrane segments that assemble to form a highly-selective channel for metabolite transport. We discovered a novel MCF member, termed Legionellanucleotide carrier Protein (LncP, encoded in the genome of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease. LncP was secreted via the bacterial Dot/Icm type IV secretion system into macrophages and assembled in the mitochondrial inner membrane. In a yeast cellular system, LncP induced a dominant-negative phenotype that was rescued by deleting an endogenous ATP carrier. Substrate transport studies on purified LncP reconstituted in liposomes revealed that it catalyzes unidirectional transport and exchange of ATP transport across membranes, thereby supporting a role for LncP as an ATP transporter. A hidden Markov model revealed further MCF proteins in the intracellular pathogens, Legionella longbeachae and Neorickettsia sennetsu, thereby challenging the notion that MCF proteins exist exclusively in eukaryotic organisms.

  13. Explicitly Solvable Model of the Charge Carriers' Phenomena in Isotropic Conducting Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzak, Yaroslav S.; Wacławski, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical analysis of the kinetic properties of the isotropic conducting crystals is presented. The general formulas for these kinetic properties are expressed in terms of the Fermi integrals. These integrals were obtained using methods of statistical ensembles with varying number of particles and the Gibbs's grand canonical distribution. The determination of the scattering function and the exploration of its relation with the mobility of the current carriers inside these crystals have been made. Together with the results of theoretical analysis of the scattering function and its relation with the current carriers' mobility, these formulas constitute the mathematical model of the charge carriers' transport phenomena in conducting crystals (where a non-parabolic energy spectrum is described by Kane's formula) and provide algorithms for the calculation of these properties.

  14. Soft matter perspective on protein crystal assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Diana; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Crystallography may be the gold standard of protein structure determination, but obtaining the necessary high-quality crystals is also in some ways akin to prospecting for the precious metal. The tools and models developed in soft matter physics to understand colloidal assembly offer some insights into the problem of crystallizing proteins. This topical review describes the various analogies that have been made between proteins and colloids in that context. We highlight the explanatory power of patchy particle models, but also the challenges of providing guidance for crystallizing specific proteins. We conclude with a presentation of possible future research directions. This review is intended for soft matter scientists interested in protein crystallization as a self-assembly problem, and as an introduction to the pertinent physics literature for protein scientists more generally.

  15. Squalane as a possible carrier of bone morphogenetic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, T; Uji, H; Antoh, M; Hasegawa, H; Kise, T; Eda, S

    1993-07-01

    Gelatin capsules containing squalane partially purified bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) complex were placed on the perimuscular membrane of rats. Two kinds of control, gelatin capsules containing only BMP and those bearing squalane only, were used. The embedded areas were histopathologically examined at 3 and 6 wk after the operation. The observations revealed that the squalane/BMP complex elicited wide heterotopic bone formation with bone marrow tissue, suggesting that squalane is a possible carrier of BMP for clinical applications.

  16. Biochemical characterization of riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tanya; Ouhtit, Allal; Gaur, Rajiv; Fernando, Augusta; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Su, Joseph; Ismail, Mohamed F; El-Sayyad, Hassan I; Karande, Anjali; Elmageed, Zakaria Abd; Rao, Prakash; Raj, Madhwa

    2009-01-01

    Riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) is a growth- and development-specific protein. Here, we characterized the expression of this protein in prostate cancer by polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against chicken RCP. RCP was localized to both androgen-dependent and independent prostate cancer cell lines. Compared to controls, RCP was over-expressed in all 45 prostate adenocarcinomas, irrespective of the Gleason's score or the stage of the disease. The identified RCP had a molecular weight of 38 kDa, similar to RCP purified from chicken. Presence of this protein was also confirmed by siRNA inhibition analysis. Antibodies to chicken RCP inhibited incorporation of tritiated thymidine into DNA and prevented riboflavin uptake in PC3 prostate cancer cells, suggesting a critical function of this protein in prostate cancer cell growth. These data suggest that RCP can be used as a tumor biomarker in prostate cancer.

  17. Electron crystallography of three dimensional protein crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgieva, Dilyana

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes an investigation of the potential of electron diffraction for studying three dimensional sub-micro-crystals of proteins and pharmaceuticals. A prerequisite for using electron diffraction for structural studies is the predictable availability of tiny crystals. A method for grow

  18. Crystallization of Membrane Proteins by Vapor Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmar, Jared A.; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the most robust method to determine protein structure at the atomic level. However, the bottlenecks of protein expression and purification often discourage further study. In this chapter, we address the most common problems encountered at these stages. Based on our experiences in expressing and purifying antimicrobial efflux proteins, we explain how a pure and homogenous protein sample can be successfully crystallized by the vapor diffusion method. We present our current protocols and methodologies for this technique. Case studies show step-by-step how we have overcome problems related to expression and diffraction, eventually producing high quality membrane protein crystals for structural determinations. It is our hope that a rational approach can be made of the often anecdotal process of membrane protein crystallization. PMID:25950974

  19. Bacillus thuringiensis and Its Pesticidal Crystal Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Schnepf, E.; Crickmore, N; Van Rie, J.; Lereclus, D.; Baum, J; Feitelson, J.; Zeigler, D. R.; Dean, D H

    1998-01-01

    During the past decade the pesticidal bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis has been the subject of intensive research. These efforts have yielded considerable data about the complex relationships between the structure, mechanism of action, and genetics of the organism’s pesticidal crystal proteins, and a coherent picture of these relationships is beginning to emerge. Other studies have focused on the ecological role of the B. thuringiensis crystal proteins, their performance in agricultural and o...

  20. Polyhedral (in-)stability of protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanev, Christo N.; Penkova, Anita N.

    2002-04-01

    The polyhedral (in-)stability of monoclinic hen-egg white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals, grown by means of PEG-6000, and that of orthorhombic trypsin crystals has been investigated experimentally. On the basis of a quantitative theoretical analysis, it is compared with the polyhedral (in-)stability of tetragonal HEWL and cubic ferritin crystals. The unambiguous conclusion is that the phenomenon is due to the diffusive supply of matter. This conclusion is also supported by the fact that the phenomenon has common features for both proteins and small molecular crystals.

  1. Review on the delivery of steroids by carrier proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanphai, P; Vesper, A R; Bariyanga, J; Bérubé, G; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-08-01

    Due to the poor solubility of steroids in aqueous solution, delivery of these biomaterials is of major biomedical importance. We have reviewed the conjugation of testosterone and it aliphatic dimer and aromatic dimer with several carrier proteins, human serum albumin (HSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and milk beta-lactoglobulin (b-LG) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. The results of multiple spectroscopic methods, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and molecular modeling were compared here. Steroid-protein bindings are via hydrophilic and H-bonding contacts. HSA forms more stable conjugate than BSA and b-LG. The stability of steroid-protein conjugates is testosterone>dimer-aromatic>dimer-aliphatic. Encapsulation of steroids by protein is shown by TEM images. Modeling showed the presence of H-bonding, which stabilized testosterone-protein complexes with the free binding energy of -12.95 for HSA and -11.55 for BSA and -8.92kcal/mol for b-LG conjugates. Steroid conjugation induced major perturbations of serum protein conformations. Serum proteins can transport steroids to the target molecules.

  2. Modelling heating effects in cryocooled protein crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, J; Fayz, K; Fell, B; Garman, E

    2001-01-01

    With the application of intense X-ray beams from third generation synchrotron sources, damage to cryocooled macromolecular crystals is being observed more commonly . In order to fully utilize synchrotron facilities now available for studying biological crystals, it is essential to understand the processes involved in radiation damage and beam heating so that, if possible, action can be taken to slow the rate of damage. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been applied to model the heating effects of X-rays on cryocooled protein crystals, and to compare the relative cooling efficiencies of nitrogen and helium.

  3. Magnetic Control of Convection during Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2004-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular Crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for bio-chemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and Sedimentation as is achieved in "microgravity", we have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, f o d o n of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. We postulate that limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with counteracts on for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately positioning the crystal growth cell so that the magnetic susceptibility

  4. Low trap-state density and long carrier diffusion in organolead trihalide perovskite single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong

    2015-01-29

    The fundamental properties and ultimate performance limits of organolead trihalide MAPbX3(MA = CH3NH3 +; X = Br- or I- ) perovskites remain obscured by extensive disorder in polycrystalline MAPbX3 films. We report an antisolvent vapor-assisted crystallization approach that enables us to create sizable crack-free MAPbX3 single crystals with volumes exceeding 100 cubic millimeters. These large single crystals enabled a detailed characterization of their optical and charge transport characteristics.We observed exceptionally low trap-state densities on the order of 109 to 1010 per cubic centimeter in MAPbX3 single crystals (comparable to the best photovoltaic-quality silicon) and charge carrier diffusion lengths exceeding 10 micrometers. These results were validated with density functional theory calculations.

  5. Theory of carrier depletion and light amplification in active slow light photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Using a perturbative approach, we perform a quantitative three-dimensional analysis of slow-light enhanced traveling wave amplification in an active semiconductor photonic crystal waveguide. The impact of slow-light propagation on the carrier-depletion-induced nonlinear gain saturation...... of the device is investigated. An effective rate-equation-based model is presented. It is shown that it well accounts for the three-dimensional simulation results. Simulations indicate that a slow-light-enhanced photonic crystal traveling-wave amplifier has a high small-signal modal gain and low saturation...

  6. Searching for the Best Protein Crystals: Synchrotron Based Measurements of Protein Crystal Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstahl, Gloria; Snell, Edward H.; Bellamy, Henry; Pangborn, Walter; Nelson, Chris; Arvai, Andy; Ohren, Jeff; Pokross, Matt

    1999-01-01

    We are developing X-ray diffraction methods to quantitatively evaluate the quality of protein crystals. The ultimate use for these crystal quality will be to optimize crystal growth and freezing conditions to obtain the best diffraction data. We have combined super fine-phi slicing with highly monochromatic, low divergence synchrotron radiation and the ADSC Quantum 4 CCD detector at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation laboratory beamline 1.5 to accurately measure crystal mosaicity. Comparisons of microgravity versus earth-grown insulin crystals using these methods will be presented.

  7. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Bernhard [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Jaenicke, Elmar [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Jakob Welder Weg 26, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Schnell, Robert [Karolinska Institutet, 17 177 Stockholm (Sweden); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Brenk, Ruth, E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  8. BRIEF REPORT OF ACTIVE CONTROLLED AND OBSERVABLE PROTEIN CRYSTALLIZATION FACILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ There are two tendency of development on space protein crystal growth facility.Increase the number of samples, for commercial purpose, or observe and control the crystallization process, for study of crystallization process.

  9. An investigation into the role of polymeric carriers on crystal growth within amorphous solid dispersion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yiwei; Jones, David S; Andrews, Gavin P

    2015-04-06

    Using phase diagrams derived from Flory-Huggins theory, we defined the thermodynamic state of amorphous felodipine within three different polymeric carriers. Variation in the solubility and miscibility of felodipine within different polymeric materials (using F-H theory) has been identified and used to select the most suitable polymeric carriers for the production of amorphous drug-polymer solid dispersions. With this information, amorphous felodipine solid dispersions were manufactured using three different polymeric materials (HPMCAS-HF, Soluplus, and PVPK15) at predefined drug loadings, and the crystal growth rates of felodipine from these solid dispersions were investigated. Crystallization of amorphous felodipine was studied using Raman spectral imaging and polarized light microscopy. Using this data, we examined the correlation among several characteristics of solid dispersions to the crystal growth rate of felodipine. An exponential relationship was found to exist between drug loading and crystal growth rate. Moreover, crystal growth within all selected amorphous drug-polymer solid dispersion systems were viscosity dependent (η(-ξ)). The exponent, ξ, was estimated to be 1.36 at a temperature of 80 °C. Values of ξ exceeding 1 may indicate strong viscosity dependent crystal growth in the amorphous drug-polymer solid dispersion systems. We argue that the elevated exponent value (ξ > 1) is a result of drug-polymer mixing which leads to a less fragile amorphous drug-polymer solid dispersion system. All systems investigated displayed an upper critical solution temperature, and the solid-liquid boundary was always higher than the spinodal decomposition curve. Furthermore, for PVP-FD amorphous dispersions at drug loadings exceeding 0.6 volume ratio, the mechanism of phase separation within the metastable zone was found to be driven by nucleation and growth rather than liquid-liquid separation.

  10. Mixing it up for Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Carl; Sommer, Morten; Berger, James; Quake, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    In the post-genomic era, X-ray crystallography has emerged as the workhorse of large-scale structural biology initiatives that seek to understand protein function and interaction at the atomic scale. Despite impressive technological advances in X-ray sources, phasing techniques, and computing power, the determination of protein structure continues to be severely hampered by the difficulties in obtaining high-quality protein crystals. Emergent technologies utilizing microfluidics now have the potential to solve these problems on several levels. We will present two microfluidic devices that have been shown to dramatically improve protein crystallization. The first is a formulation device which allows for the rapid combinatorial mixing of reagents to systematically explore protein solubility behavior. A priori solubility mapping allows for the rational design of optimal crystallization screens that are tailored to a specific target. A second screening device allows for massively parallel sample processing while exploiting the properties of mass transport manifest at the micron scale to ensure slow and efficient mixing kinetics that are difficult to achieve in macroscopic reactors.

  11. Porous protein crystals as catalytic vessels for organometallic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabe, Hiroyasu; Abe, Satoshi; Hikage, Tatsuo; Kitagawa, Susumu; Ueno, Takafumi

    2014-05-01

    Porous protein crystals, which are protein assemblies in the solid state, have been engineered to form catalytic vessels by the incorporation of organometallic complexes. Ruthenium complexes in cross-linked porous hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals catalyzed the enantioselective hydrogen-transfer reduction of acetophenone derivatives. The crystals accelerated the catalytic reaction and gave different enantiomers based on the crystal form (tetragonal or orthorhombic). This method represents a new approach for the construction of bioinorganic catalysts from protein crystals.

  12. Crystallization of proteins from crude bovine rod outer segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bo Y; Gulati, Sahil; Shi, Wuxian; Wang, Benlian; Stewart, Phoebe L; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining protein crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies comprises the greatest challenge in the determination of protein crystal structures, especially for membrane proteins and protein complexes. Although high purity has been broadly accepted as one of the most significant requirements for protein crystallization, a recent study of the Escherichia coli proteome showed that many proteins have an inherent propensity to crystallize and do not require a highly homogeneous sample (Totir et al., 2012). As exemplified by RPE65 (Kiser, Golczak, Lodowski, Chance, & Palczewski, 2009), there also are cases of mammalian proteins crystallized from less purified samples. To test whether this phenomenon can be applied more broadly to the study of proteins from higher organisms, we investigated the protein crystallization profile of bovine rod outer segment (ROS) crude extracts. Interestingly, multiple protein crystals readily formed from such extracts, some of them diffracting to high resolution that allowed structural determination. A total of seven proteins were crystallized, one of which was a membrane protein. Successful crystallization of proteins from heterogeneous ROS extracts demonstrates that many mammalian proteins also have an intrinsic propensity to crystallize from complex biological mixtures. By providing an alternative approach to heterologous expression to achieve crystallization, this strategy could be useful for proteins and complexes that are difficult to purify or obtain by recombinant techniques.

  13. Ultrafast carrier dynamics and radiative recombination in multiferroic BiFeO3 single crystals and thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor A. J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a detailed comparison of ultrafast carrier dynamics in single crystals and thin films of multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO. Using degenerate femtosecond optical pump-probe spectroscopy, we find that the observed dynamics are qualitatively similar in both samples. After photoexcitation, electrons relax to the conduction band minimum through electron-phonon coupling, with subsequent carrier relaxation proceeding via various recombination pathways that extend to a nanosecond timescale. Subtle differences observed in our measurements indicate that BFO films have a higher band gap than single crystals. Overall, our results demonstrate that carrier relaxation in BFO is analogous to that in bulk semiconductors.

  14. Control of polythiophene film microstructure and charge carrier dynamics through crystallization temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Marsh, Hilary S.

    2014-03-22

    The microstructure of neat conjugated polymers is crucial in determining the ultimate morphology and photovoltaic performance of polymer/fullerene blends, yet until recently, little work has focused on controlling the former. Here, we demonstrate that both the long-range order along the (100)-direction and the lamellar crystal thickness along the (001)-direction in neat poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and poly[(3,3″-didecyl[2,2′:5′, 2″-terthiophene]-5,5″-diyl)] (PTTT-10) thin films can be manipulated by varying crystallization temperature. Changes in crystalline domain size impact the yield and dynamics of photogenerated charge carriers. Time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements show that neat polymer films composed of larger crystalline domains have longer photoconductance lifetimes and charge carrier yield decreases with increasing crystallite size for P3HT. Our results suggest that the classical polymer science description of temperature-dependent crystallization of polymers from solution can be used to understand thin-film formation in neat conjugated polymers, and hence, should be considered when discussing the structural evolution of organic bulk heterojunctions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Liquid crystalline phase as a probe for crystal engineering of lactose: carrier for pulmonary drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sharvil S; Mahadik, Kakasaheb R; Paradkar, Anant R

    2015-02-20

    The current work was undertaken to assess suitability of liquid crystalline phase for engineering of lactose crystals and their utility as a carrier in dry powder inhalation formulations. Saturated lactose solution was poured in molten glyceryl monooleate which subsequently transformed into gel. The gel microstructure was analyzed by PPL microscopy and SAXS. Lactose particles recovered from gels after 48 h were analyzed for polymorphism using techniques such as FTIR, XRD, DSC and TGA. Particle size, morphology and aerosolisation properties of prepared lactose were analyzed using Anderson cascade impactor. In situ seeding followed by growth of lactose crystals took place in gels with cubic microstructure as revealed by PPL microscopy and SAXS. Elongated (size ∼ 71 μm) lactose particles with smooth surface containing mixture of α and β-lactose was recovered from gel, however percentage of α-lactose was more as compared to β-lactose. The aerosolisation parameters such as RD, ED, %FPF and % recovery of lactose recovered from gel (LPL) were found to be comparable to Respitose® ML001. Thus LC phase (cubic) can be used for engineering of lactose crystals so as to obtain particles with smooth surface, high elongation ratio and further they can be used as carrier in DPI formulations.

  16. Spiro-OMeTAD single crystals: Remarkably enhanced charge-carrier transport via mesoscale ordering

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong

    2016-04-15

    We report the crystal structure and hole-transport mechanism in spiro-OMeTAD [2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenyl-amine)9,9′-spirobifluorene], the dominant hole-transporting material in perovskite and solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Despite spiro-OMeTAD’s paramount role in such devices, its crystal structure was unknown because of highly disordered solution-processed films; the hole-transport pathways remained ill-defined and the charge carrier mobilities were low, posing a major bottleneck for advancing cell efficiencies. We devised an antisolvent crystallization strategy to grow single crystals of spiro-OMeTAD, which allowed us to experimentally elucidate its molecular packing and transport properties. Electronic structure calculations enabled us to map spiro-OMeTAD’s intermolecular charge-hopping pathways. Promisingly, single-crystal mobilities were found to exceed their thin-film counterparts by three orders of magnitude. Our findings underscore mesoscale ordering as a key strategy to achieving breakthroughs in hole-transport material engineering of solar cells.

  17. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mtFabD, a malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadbane, Hemza; Brown, Alistair K; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S; Fütterer, Klaus

    2007-10-01

    Mycobacteria display a unique and unusual cell-wall architecture, central to which is the membrane-proximal mycolyl-arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan core (mAGP). The biosynthesis of mycolic acids, which form the outermost layer of the mAGP core, involves malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT). This essential enzyme catalyses the transfer of malonyl from coenzyme A to acyl carrier protein AcpM, thus feeding these two-carbon units into the chain-elongation cycle of the type II fatty-acid synthase. The crystal structure of M. tuberculosis mtFabD, the mycobacterial MCAT, has been determined to 3.0 A resolution by multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion. Phasing was facilitated by Ni2+ ions bound to the 20-residue N-terminal affinity tag, which packed between the two independent copies of mtFabD.

  18. Promoting protein crystallization using a plate with simple geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Qing; Yin, Da-Chuan; Liu, Yong-Ming; Lu, Qin-Qin; He, Jin; Liu, Yue

    2014-03-01

    Increasing the probability of obtaining protein crystals in crystallization screening is always an important goal for protein crystallography. In this paper, a new method called the cross-diffusion microbatch (CDM) method is presented, which aims to efficiently promote protein crystallization and increase the chance of obtaining protein crystals. In this method, a very simple crystallization plate was designed in which all crystallization droplets are in one sealed space, so that a variety of volatile components from one droplet can diffuse into any other droplet via vapour diffusion. Crystallization screening and reproducibility tests indicate that this method could be a potentially powerful technique in practical protein crystallization screening. It can help to obtain crystals with higher probability and at a lower cost, while using a simple and easy procedure.

  19. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavaty, Andrei S. [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Kim, Youngchang [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Zhou, Min [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L6 (Canada); Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N. [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Joachimiak, Andrzej [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Savchenko, Alexei [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L6 (Canada); Anderson, Wayne F., E-mail: wf-anderson@northwestern.edu [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS{sub SA}), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS{sub VC}) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS{sub BA}) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS{sub BA} is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS{sub BA} may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP.

  20. Simple micromechanical model of protein crystals for their mechanical characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteins have been known to perform the excellent mechanical functions and exhibit the remarkable mechanical properties such as high fracture toughness in spider silk protein [1]. This indicates that the mechanical characterization of protein molecules and/or crystals is very essential to understand such remarkable mechanical function of protein molecules. In this study, for gaining insight into mechanical behavior of protein crystals, we developed the micromechanical model by using the empirical potential field prescribed to alpha carbon atoms of a protein crystal in a unit cell. We consider the simple protein crystals for their mechanical behavior under tensile loading to be compared with full atomic models

  1. Large-scale crystallization of proteins for purification and formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, Dariusch

    2015-07-01

    Since about 170 years, salts were used to create supersaturated solutions and crystallize proteins. The dehydrating effect of salts as well as their kosmotropic or chaotropic character was revealed. Even the suitability of organic solvents for crystallization was already recognized. Interestingly, what was performed during the early times is still practiced today. A lot of effort was put into understanding the underlying physico-chemical interaction mechanisms leading to protein crystallization. However, it was understood that already the solvation of proteins is a highly complex process not to mention the intricate interrelation of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions taking place. Although many basic questions are still unanswered, preparative protein crystallization was attempted as illustrated in the presented case studies. Due to the highly variable nature of crystallization, individual design of the crystallization process is needed in every single case. It was shown that preparative crystallization from impure protein solutions as a capture step is possible after applying adequate pre-treatment procedures like precipitation or extraction. Protein crystallization can replace one or more chromatography steps. It was further shown that crystallization can serve as an attractive alternative means for formulation of therapeutic proteins. Crystalline proteins can offer enhanced purity and enable highly concentrated doses of the active ingredient. Easy scalability of the proposed protein crystallization processes was shown using the maximum local energy dissipation as a suitable scale-up criterion. Molecular modeling and target-oriented protein engineering may allow protein crystallization to become part of a platform purification process in the near future.

  2. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A; Potenza, Marco A C; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-07-01

    Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10(-3) of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in lysozyme and glucose isomerase solutions are locations for crystal nucleation.

  3. The second space experiment of protein crystallization with domestic facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王耀萍; 潘冀燊; 牛秀田; 周元聪; 华子千; 徐谦; 吴伸; 韩青; 李宏民; 刘延顺; 滕脉坤; 何海辉; 林胜祥; 毕汝昌

    1996-01-01

    The second experiment of protein crystallization was performed on domestic re-entry satelliteFSW-2 in 1994-07. The results are superior to the ones of the first mission in 1992: 9 of 10 different proteins were crystallized in space, and 70% of the total 48 samples yielded single crystals. Besides hen egg-white lysozyme which grew high-quality crystals on the first mission, an acidic phospholipase A2(aPLA2) from snake venom and hemoglobin from Anser Indicus produced good-quality crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analyses. The positive effect of microgravity on protein crystal growth is verified again at this time.

  4. Characterization of the yellow fever mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene and ligand-bound protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, David H.; Vyazunova, Irina; Lorch, Jeffery M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Lan, Que; (UW)

    2009-06-12

    The sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene (AeSCP-2L3), a new member of the SCP-2 protein family, is identified from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The predicted molecular weight of AeSCP-2L3 is 13.4 kDa with a calculated pI of 4.98. AeSCP-2L3 transcription occurs in the larval feeding stages and the mRNA levels decrease in pupae and adults. The highest levels of AeSCP-2L3 gene expression are found in the body wall, and possibly originated in the fat body. This is the first report of a mosquito SCP-2-like protein with prominent expression in tissue other than the midgut. The X-ray protein crystal structure of AeSCP-2L3 reveals a bound C16 fatty acid whose acyl tail penetrates deeply into a hydrophobic cavity. Interestingly, the ligand-binding cavity is slightly larger than previously described for AeSCP-2 (Dyer et al. J Biol Chem 278:39085-39091, 2003) and AeSCP-2L2 (Dyer et al. J Lipid Res M700460-JLR200, 2007). There are also an additional 10 amino acids in SCP-2L3 that are not present in other characterized mosquito SCP-2s forming an extended loop between {beta}3 and {beta}4. Otherwise, the protein backbone is exceedingly similar to other SCP-2 and SCP-2-like proteins. In contrast to this observed high structural homology of members in the mosquito SCP2 family, the amino acid sequence identity between the members is less than 30%. The results from structural analysis imply that there have been evolutionary constraints that favor the SCP-2 C{alpha} backbone fold while the specificity of ligand binding can be altered.

  5. Dip-pen nanolithography-assisted protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ielasi, Francesco S; Hirtz, Michael; Sekula-Neuner, Sylwia; Laue, Thomas; Fuchs, Harald; Willaert, Ronnie G

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate the use of dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) to crystallize proteins on surface-localized functionalized lipid layer arrays. DOPC lipid layers, containing small amounts of biotin-DOPE lipid molecules, were printed on glass substrates and evaluated in vapor diffusion and batch crystallization screening setups, where streptavidin was used as a model protein for crystallization. Independently of the crystallization system used and the geometry of the lipid layers, nucleation of streptavidin crystals occurred specifically on the DPN-printed biotinylated structures. Protein crystallization on lipid array patches is also demonstrated in a microfluidic chip, which opens the way toward high-throughput screening to find suitable nucleation and crystal growth conditions. The results demonstrate the use of DPN in directing and inducing protein crystallization on specific surface locations.

  6. Analysis of crystallization data in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Jobie; Hargreaves, David; O'Keefe, Simon; Wilson, Julie

    2015-10-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the largest available repository of solved protein structures and contains a wealth of information on successful crystallization. Many centres have used their own experimental data to draw conclusions about proteins and the conditions in which they crystallize. Here, data from the PDB were used to reanalyse some of these results. The most successful crystallization reagents were identified, the link between solution pH and the isoelectric point of the protein was investigated and the possibility of predicting whether a protein will crystallize was explored.

  7. Protein crystallization: from HTS to kilogram-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyushnichenko, Vadim

    2003-11-01

    The first experiments on protein crystallization started randomly during the 19th century. This technique has been widely used for the determination of the tertiary structure of proteins since the 1950s, when an understanding of the physics of protein crystallization began to emerge. In the 1980s and 1990s, research focused on the study of protein crystal growth processes in microgravity environments, which were created in space shuttle experiments. High-throughput screening (HTS) systems were developed that later found broader laboratory applications. The combination of HTS with an engineering approach opens new opportunities for the protein crystallization process to become a robust, scalable, reproducible and economically viable industrial unit operation.

  8. Fat Metabolism in Higher Plants: LXII. Stearl-acyl Carrier Protein Desaturase from Spinach Chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, B S; Jaworski, J G; Stumpf, P K

    1974-10-01

    Stearyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase (EC 1.14.99.6), present in the stroma fraction of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts, rapidly desaturated enzymatically prepared stearyl-acyl carrier protein to oleic acid. No other substrates were desaturated. In addition to stearyl-acyl carrier protein, reduced ferredoxin was an essential component of the system. The electron donor systems were either ascorbate, dichlorophenolindophenol, photosystem I and light, or NADPH and ferredoxin-NADP reductase. The desaturase was more active in extracts prepared from chloroplasts obtained from immature spinach leaves than from mature leaves. Stearyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase also occurs in soluble extracts of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) mesocarp and of developing safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) seeds.

  9. Promotion of protein crystal growth by actively switching crystal growth mode via femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Yusuke; Maruyama, Mihoko; Yoshimura, Masashi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Masaru; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Adachi, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Mori, Yusuke

    2016-11-01

    Large single crystals with desirable shapes are essential for various scientific and industrial fields, such as X-ray/neutron crystallography and crystalline devices. However, in the case of proteins the production of such crystals is particularly challenging, despite the efforts devoted to optimization of the environmental, chemical and physical parameters. Here we report an innovative approach for promoting the growth of protein crystals by directly modifying the local crystal structure via femtosecond laser ablation. We demonstrate that protein crystals with surfaces that are locally etched (several micrometers in diameter) by femtosecond laser ablation show enhanced growth rates without losing crystal quality. Optical phase-sensitive microscopy and X-ray topography imaging techniques reveal that the local etching induces spiral growth, which is energetically advantageous compared with the spontaneous two-dimensional nucleation growth mode. These findings prove that femtosecond laser ablation can actively switch the crystal growth mode, offering flexible control over the size and shape of protein crystals.

  10. An automated pipeline to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changki; Vink, Martin; Hu, Minghui; Love, James; Stokes, David L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban

    2010-06-01

    Electron crystallography relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals and is particularly well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. To obtain 2D crystals from purified membrane proteins, the detergent in a protein-lipid-detergent ternary mixture must be removed, generally by dialysis, under conditions favoring reconstitution into proteoliposomes and formation of well-ordered lattices. To identify these conditions a wide range of parameters such as pH, lipid composition, lipid-to-protein ratio, ionic strength and ligands must be screened in a procedure involving four steps: crystallization, specimen preparation for electron microscopy, image acquisition, and evaluation. Traditionally, these steps have been carried out manually and, as a result, the scope of 2D crystallization trials has been limited. We have therefore developed an automated pipeline to screen the formation of 2D crystals. We employed a 96-well dialysis block for reconstitution of the target protein over a wide range of conditions designed to promote crystallization. A 96-position magnetic platform and a liquid handling robot were used to prepare negatively stained specimens in parallel. Robotic grid insertion into the electron microscope and computerized image acquisition ensures rapid evaluation of the crystallization screen. To date, 38 2D crystallization screens have been conducted for 15 different membrane proteins, totaling over 3000 individual crystallization experiments. Three of these proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals. Our automated pipeline outperforms traditional 2D crystallization methods in terms of throughput and reproducibility.

  11. Carrier density and lifetime for different dopants in single-crystal and polycrystalline CdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burst, James M.; Farrell, Stuart B.; Albin, David S.; Colegrove, Eric; Reese, Matthew O.; Duenow, Joel N.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2016-11-01

    CdTe defect chemistry is adjusted by annealing samples with excess Cd or Te vapor with and without extrinsic dopants. We observe that Group I (Cu and Na) elements can increase hole density above 1016 cm-3, but compromise lifetime and stability. By post-deposition incorporation of a Group V dopant (P) in a Cd-rich ambient, lifetimes of 30 ns with 1016 cm-3 hole density are achieved in single-crystal and polycrystalline CdTe without CdCl2 or Cu. Furthermore, phosphorus doping appears to be thermally stable. This combination of long lifetime, high carrier concentration, and improved stability can help overcome historic barriers for CdTe solar cell development.

  12. Carrier density and lifetime for different dopants in single-crystal and polycrystalline CdTe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Burst

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available CdTe defect chemistry is adjusted by annealing samples with excess Cd or Te vapor with and without extrinsic dopants. We observe that Group I (Cu and Na elements can increase hole density above 1016 cm−3, but compromise lifetime and stability. By post-deposition incorporation of a Group V dopant (P in a Cd-rich ambient, lifetimes of 30 ns with 1016 cm−3 hole density are achieved in single-crystal and polycrystalline CdTe without CdCl2 or Cu. Furthermore, phosphorus doping appears to be thermally stable. This combination of long lifetime, high carrier concentration, and improved stability can help overcome historic barriers for CdTe solar cell development.

  13. The contribution of polystyrene nanospheres towards the crystallization of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Kallio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallization is a slow process of trial and error and limits the amount of solved protein structures. Search of a universal heterogeneous nucleant is an effort to facilitate crystallizability of proteins. METHODOLOGY: The effect of polystyrene nanospheres on protein crystallization were tested with three commercial proteins: lysozyme, xylanase, xylose isomerase, and with five research target proteins: hydrophobins HFBI and HFBII, laccase, sarcosine dimethylglycine N-methyltransferase (SDMT, and anti-testosterone Fab fragment 5F2. The use of nanospheres both in screening and as an additive for known crystallization conditions was studied. In screening, the addition of an aqueous solution of nanosphere to the crystallization drop had a significant positive effect on crystallization success in comparison to the control screen. As an additive in hydrophobin crystallization, the nanospheres altered the crystal packing, most likely due to the amphiphilic nature of hydrophobins. In the case of laccase, nanospheres could be used as an alternative for streak-seeding, which insofar had remained the only technique to produce high-diffracting crystals. With methyltransferase SDMT the nanospheres, used also as an additive, produced fewer, larger crystals in less time. Nanospheres, combined with the streak-seeding method, produced single 5F2 Fab crystals in shorter equilibration times. CONCLUSIONS: All in all, the use of nanospheres in protein crystallization proved to be beneficial, both when screening new crystallization conditions to promote nucleation and when used as an additive to produce better quality crystals, faster. The polystyrene nanospheres are easy to use, commercially available and close to being inert, as even with amphiphilic proteins only the crystal packing is altered and the nanospheres do not interfere with the structure and function of the protein.

  14. Analysis of crystallization data in the Protein Data Bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkwood, Jobie [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Hargreaves, David [AstraZeneca, Darwin Building, Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); O’Keefe, Simon [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Wilson, Julie, E-mail: julie.wilson@york.ac.uk [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-23

    In a large-scale study using data from the Protein Data Bank, some of the many reported findings regarding the crystallization of proteins were investigated. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the largest available repository of solved protein structures and contains a wealth of information on successful crystallization. Many centres have used their own experimental data to draw conclusions about proteins and the conditions in which they crystallize. Here, data from the PDB were used to reanalyse some of these results. The most successful crystallization reagents were identified, the link between solution pH and the isoelectric point of the protein was investigated and the possibility of predicting whether a protein will crystallize was explored.

  15. An ignored variable: solution preparation temperature in protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Qing; Lu, Qin-Qin; Cheng, Qing-Di; Ao, Liang-Bo; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Hou, Hai; Liu, Yong-Ming; Li, Da-Wei; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2015-01-19

    Protein crystallization is affected by many parameters, among which certain parameters have not been well controlled. The temperature at which the protein and precipitant solutions are mixed (i.e., the ambient temperature during mixing) is such a parameter that is typically not well controlled and is often ignored. In this paper, we show that this temperature can influence protein crystallization. The experimental results showed that both higher and lower mixing temperatures can enhance the success of crystallization, which follows a parabolic curve with an increasing ambient temperature. This work illustrates that the crystallization solution preparation temperature is also an important parameter for protein crystallization. Uncontrolled or poorly controlled room temperature may yield poor reproducibility in protein crystallization.

  16. Detergent-Specific Membrane Protein Crystallization Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A suite of reagents has been developed for three-dimensional crystallization of integral membranes present in solution as protein-detergent complexes (PDCs). The compositions of these reagents have been determined in part by proximity to the phase boundaries (lower consolute boundaries) of the detergents present in the PDCs. The acquisition of some of the requisite phase-boundary data and the preliminary design of several of the detergent- specific screens was supported by a NASA contract. At the time of expiration of the contract, a partial set of preliminary screens had been developed. This work has since been extended under non-NASA sponsorship, leading to near completion of a set of 20 to 30 different and unique detergent- specific 96-condition screens.

  17. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States); Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance.

  18. A dialogue about protein crystallization and phase diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asherie, Neer

    2012-07-01

    A lighthearted researcher and a disheartened student discuss the challenges of protein crystallization and how phase diagrams can be used to address these challenges. The student feels a little better afterwards, but many proteins remain uncrystallized.

  19. Automating the application of smart materials for protein crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurshid, Sahir; Govada, Lata [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); EL-Sharif, Hazim F.; Reddy, Subrayal M. [University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Chayen, Naomi E., E-mail: n.chayen@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    The first semi-liquid, non-protein nucleating agent for automated protein crystallization trials is described. This ‘smart material’ is demonstrated to induce crystal growth and will provide a simple, cost-effective tool for scientists in academia and industry. The fabrication and validation of the first semi-liquid nonprotein nucleating agent to be administered automatically to crystallization trials is reported. This research builds upon prior demonstration of the suitability of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs; known as ‘smart materials’) for inducing protein crystal growth. Modified MIPs of altered texture suitable for high-throughput trials are demonstrated to improve crystal quality and to increase the probability of success when screening for suitable crystallization conditions. The application of these materials is simple, time-efficient and will provide a potent tool for structural biologists embarking on crystallization trials.

  20. Lysine and arginine biosyntheses mediated by a common carrier protein in Sulfolobus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Takuya; Tomita, Takeo; Horie, Akira; Yoshida, Ayako; Takahashi, Kento; Nishida, Hiromi; Lassak, Kerstin; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kosono, Saori; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Masui, Ryoji; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    LysW has been identified as a carrier protein in the lysine biosynthetic pathway that is active through the conversion of α-aminoadipate (AAA) to lysine. In this study, we found that the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, not only biosynthesizes lysine through LysW-mediated protection of AAA but also uses LysW to protect the amino group of glutamate in arginine biosynthesis. In this archaeon, after LysW modification, AAA and glutamate are converted to lysine and ornithine, respectively, by a single set of enzymes with dual functions. The crystal structure of ArgX, the enzyme responsible for modification and protection of the amino moiety of glutamate with LysW, was determined in complex with LysW. Structural comparison and enzymatic characterization using Sulfolobus LysX, Sulfolobus ArgX and Thermus LysX identify the amino acid motif responsible for substrate discrimination between AAA and glutamate. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that gene duplication events at different stages of evolution led to ArgX and LysX.

  1. Crystal growth and electronic properties of a 3D Rashba material, BiTeI, with adjusted carrier concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanou, Manabu; Sasagawa, Takao

    2013-04-03

    3D Rashba materials can be a leading player in spin-related novel phenomena, ranging from the metallic extreme (unconventional superconductivity) to the transport intermediate (spin Hall effects) to the novel insulating variant (3D topological insulating states). As the essential backbone for both fundamental and applied research of such a 3D Rashba material, this study established the growth of sizeable single crystals of a candidate compound BiTeI with adjusted carrier concentrations. Three techniques (standard vertical Bridgman, modified horizontal Bridgman, and vapour transport) were employed, and BiTeI crystals (>1 × 1 × 0.2 mm(3)) with fundamentally different electronic states from metallic to insulating were successfully grown by the chosen technique. The 3D Rashba electronic states, including the Fermi surface topology, for the corresponding carrier concentrations of the obtained BiTeI crystals were revealed by relativistic first-principles calculations.

  2. Membrane protein crystallization in lipidic mesophases: detergent effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Ai, X.; Caffrey, M.

    2000-01-01

    The "cubic phase method" for growing crystals of membrane proteins uses a complex mixture of water, lipid, protein, and other components. The current view is that the cubic phase is integral to the process. Thus additives from whatever source introduce the possibility of destabilizing the phase, thereby compromising the crystallization process. Detergents are used to solubilize membrane proteins and are likely to be ported into the cubic medium with the target protein. Depending on the identi...

  3. Molecular Cross-Talk between Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Carrier Proteins and Unstructured Linker Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Bradley J; Frueh, Dominique P

    2017-01-24

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) employ multiple domains separated by linker regions to incorporate substrates into natural products. During synthesis, substrates are covalently tethered to carrier proteins that translocate between catalytic partner domains. The molecular parameters that govern translocation and associated linker remodeling remain unknown. Here, we used NMR to characterize the structure, dynamics, and invisible states of a peptidyl carrier protein flanked by its linkers. We showed that the N-terminal linker stabilizes and interacts with the protein core while modulating dynamics at specific sites involved in post-translational modifications and/or domain interactions. The results detail the molecular communication between peptidyl carrier proteins and their linkers and could guide efforts in engineering NRPSs to obtain new pharmaceuticals.

  4. Stealth carriers for low-resolution structure determination of membrane proteins in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Selma; Skar-Gislinge, Nicholas; Midtgaard, Søren;

    2014-01-01

    Structural studies of membrane proteins remain a great experimental challenge. Functional reconstitution into artificial nanoscale bilayer disc carriers that mimic the native bilayer environment allows the handling of membrane proteins in solution. This enables the use of small-angle scattering...... techniques for fast and reliable structural analysis. The difficulty with this approach is that the carrier discs contribute to the measured scattering intensity in a highly nontrivial fashion, making subsequent data analysis challenging. Here, an elegant solution to circumvent the intrinsic complexity......O at the length scales relevant to SANS. These 'stealth' carrier discs may be used as a general platform for low-resolution structural studies of membrane proteins using well established data-analysis tools originally developed for soluble proteins. © 2014 International Union of Crystallography....

  5. N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) carriers for nasal and pulmonary delivery of therapeutic proteins and vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amidi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis was aimed at evaluating the potential of particulate TMC carrier systems for delivering therapeutic proteins and antigens across respiratory (nasal and pulmonary) epithelia. To this end, TMC nanoparticles and microparticles loaded with different model proteins a

  6. Diagnostic clues and manifesting carriers in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schottlaender, Lucia V; Petzold, Axel; Wood, Nicholas; Houlden, Henry

    2015-01-15

    Mutations in the fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene are a known cause of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Clinically, patients resemble Becker's muscular dystrophy and generally present in the first two decades of life with a mild, progressive phenotype. Cardiac involvement is variable. Heterozygous carriers are usually clinically unaffected. We report a patient presenting later in life with life-threatening cardiac failure and we describe for the first time clinically manifesting carriers in the family.

  7. Lab-on-a-Chip Based Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark J.; Brasseur, Michael M.; Spearing, Scott F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We are developing a novel technique with which we will grow protein crystals in very small volumes, utilizing chip-based, microfluidic ("LabChip") technology. This development, which is a collaborative effort between NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Caliper Technologies Corporation, promises a breakthrough in the field of protein crystal growth. Our initial results obtained from two model proteins, Lysozyme and Thaumatin, show that it is feasible to dispense and adequately mix protein and precipitant solutions on a nano-liter scale. The mixtures have shown crystal growth in volumes in the range of 10 nanoliters to 5 microliters. In addition, large diffraction quality crystals were obtained by this method. X-ray data from these crystals were shown to be of excellent quality. Our future efforts will include the further development of protein crystal growth with LabChip(trademark) technology for more complex systems. We will initially address the batch growth method, followed by the vapor diffusion method and the liquid-liquid diffusion method. The culmination of these chip developments is to lead to an on orbit protein crystallization facility on the International Space Station. Structural biologists will be invited to utilize the on orbit Iterative Biological Crystallization facility to grow high quality macromolecular crystals in microgravity.

  8. Protein nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

  9. Designed Proteins as Optimized Oxygen Carriers for Artificial Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    transport throughout the body. In year two, we developed a new model for oxyferrous state lifetimes, including an equation which predicts an O2...chain four helix bundle. Table 1 demonstrates that the addition of the optimized binding site to both ligating helices of the full chain more than... triples the lifetime. Table 1. Oxyferrous lifetime for single chain proteins with the optimal binding site Protein ligation Rair(s-1) Kd,O2 (mM) kox

  10. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-05-07

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated.

  11. Ionic strength and intermolecular contacts in protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ganesh H.; Dasgupta, Swagata; Bell, Jeffrey A.

    2000-08-01

    The ionic strengths of crystallization solutions for 206 proteins were observed to form a bimodal distribution. The data was divided into two sets at an ionic strength of 4.4 M, and knowledge-based potentials were calculated to determine contact preferences at intermolecular crystal interfaces. Consistent with previous observations over all ionic strengths, intermolecular crystal contacts tend to exclude nonpolar amino acids; lysine is the least favored polar amino acid at crystal contacts; and arginine and glutamine are the two most favored amino acid at crystal contacts. However, some aspects of intermolecular contact preferences within protein crystals are significantly dependent on ionic strength. Arginine is the most favored residue at low ionic strength, but it takes second place to glutamine at high ionic strength. Other major ionic strength-dependent differences in protein crystal contacts can be explained by the binding of cations or anions. While others have shown the importance of ion binding experimentally in selected protein crystals, these statistical results indicate that intermolecular interface formation must involve ion-mediated contacts in a large number of protein crystals.

  12. Imaging and interferometric analysis of protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunandan, Ranjini; Gupta, Anamika Sethia; Muralidhar, K.

    2008-04-01

    Protein crystals are grown under controlled temperature, concentration and vapor pressure conditions, usually by vapor diffusion, liquid-liquid diffusion and dialysis techniques. The present study examines the effects of protein concentration, drop size and reservoir height on the crystal growth of Hen Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL). Crystals are grown by the hanging drop vapor diffusion method using Modular VDX TM Plates. Due to the vapor pressure difference created between the protein drop and the reservoir, evaporation takes place till equilibrium is attained. Crystal formation takes place after a certain level of supersaturation is attained when the protein precipitates out in crystalline form. The observations revealed that the growth is faster for higher lysozyme concentration, smaller drop sizes and larger reservoir heights. The morphology of the crystals is viewed during the growth process using stereomicroscope. The number of crystals formed is the maximum for higher concentrations, drop sizes and reservoir heights. When the number of crystals formed is less, the size of the crystals is comparatively larger. The effect of evaporation of water vapor from the protein drop into the reservoir is studied using Mach-Zehnder interferometry. The recorded interferograms and shadowgraph images indicate the diffusion of condensed water into the reservoir. The radius of the drop is determined using the shadowgraph images of the growth process. The radius decreases with evaporation and the rate of decrease of radius is highest for higher protein concentrations, smaller drop sizes and larger reservoir heights.

  13. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fenglei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-08-09

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To develop an economical, easy to use, automated, high throughput system for large scale protein crystallization screening. (2) To develop a new protein crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and complete compatibility with high throughput screening system. (3) To determine the structure of lactate dehydrogenase complexed with NADH by x-ray protein crystallography to study its inherent structural properties. Firstly, we demonstrated large scale protein crystallization screening can be performed in a high throughput manner with low cost, easy operation. The overall system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection and serves as a whole solution to protein crystallization screening. The system can dispense protein and multiple different precipitants in nanoliter scale and in parallel. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, has been developed in this system to form a two-detector system with a visible light detector for detecting protein crystallization screening results. This detection scheme has capability of eliminating common false positives by distinguishing protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a high throughput and non-destructive manner. The entire system from liquid dispensing, crystallization to crystal detection is essentially parallel, high throughput and compatible with automation. The system was successfully demonstrated by lysozyme crystallization screening. Secondly, we developed a new crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and compatibility with automation and high throughput. In this crystallization method, a gas permeable membrane is employed to achieve the gentle evaporation required by protein crystallization. Protein consumption is significantly reduced to nanoliter scale for each condition and thus permits exploring more conditions in a phase diagram for given amount of protein. In addition

  14. Radiation driven collapse of protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Sébastien; Robinson, Ian K

    2006-01-01

    During coherent X-ray diffraction measurements on crystals of ferritin at room temperature using monochromatic undulator radiation from the Advanced Photon Source, a sudden lattice contraction was observed following a characteristic latent period and ultimately leading to the collapse of the crystal. The progression of this collapse is analysed using a two-state Hendricks-Teller model. It reveals that 55% of the layers collapse by 1.6% before the crystal completely stops diffracting.

  15. Modulation of carrier dynamics and threshold characteristics in 1.3-μm quantum dot photonic crystal nanocavity lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Enbo; Tong, Cunzhu; Rong, Jiamin; Shu, Shili; Wu, Hao; Wang, Lijie; Tian, Sicong; Wang, Lijun

    2016-08-01

    A self-consistent all-pathway quantum dot (QD) rate equation model, in which all possible relaxation pathways are considered, is used to investigate the influence of quality (Q) factor on the carrier dynamics of 1.3-μm InAs/GaAs QD photonic crystal (PhC) nanolasers. It is found that Q factor not only affects the photon lifetime, but also modulates the carrier occupation in QDs. About three times increases of carrier injection efficiency in QD ground state can be realized in nanocavity with high Q factor. However, it also reveals that over 90% improvement of threshold current happens when Q factor increases from 2000 to 7000, which means it might be not necessary to pursuit for ultrahigh Q factor for the purpose of low threshold current.

  16. Progress in the research of carrier protein%载体蛋白研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷春霞; 张振龙

    2009-01-01

    现代生物技术的飞速发展,使传统的疫苗生产方式发生了根本的变化.疫苗研究领域变得异常活跃,从而使新型载体蛋白不断被发现,其作用机制得到全面研究.寻找安全、有效的载体蛋白是目前疫苗领域的课题之一.近年来的初步研究结果为载体蛋白的应用展现了广阔的前景.此文阐述了载体蛋白的作用机制和几种常用的载体蛋白.%With the development of modern biotechnology,the traditional vaccine production methods have changed fundamentally.The field of vaccine research has become so active that new cartier proteins have been found continuously and their action mechanisms have been elucidated.Looking for safe and effective vaccine carrier proteins is one of the subjects of the vaccine area currently.Preliminary results of the research in recent years have demonstrated broad prospects for carrier protein application.This article summarizes the action mechanism of carrier protein and several commonly used carrier proteins.

  17. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Joseph D; Baird, James K; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M; Hodge, Teresa A; Huang, Sijay

    2015-04-01

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for the growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. These include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.

  18. Statistical analysis of crystallization database links protein physico-chemical features with crystallization mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Fusco

    Full Text Available X-ray crystallography is the predominant method for obtaining atomic-scale information about biological macromolecules. Despite the success of the technique, obtaining well diffracting crystals still critically limits going from protein to structure. In practice, the crystallization process proceeds through knowledge-informed empiricism. Better physico-chemical understanding remains elusive because of the large number of variables involved, hence little guidance is available to systematically identify solution conditions that promote crystallization. To help determine relationships between macromolecular properties and their crystallization propensity, we have trained statistical models on samples for 182 proteins supplied by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium. Gaussian processes, which capture trends beyond the reach of linear statistical models, distinguish between two main physico-chemical mechanisms driving crystallization. One is characterized by low levels of side chain entropy and has been extensively reported in the literature. The other identifies specific electrostatic interactions not previously described in the crystallization context. Because evidence for two distinct mechanisms can be gleaned both from crystal contacts and from solution conditions leading to successful crystallization, the model offers future avenues for optimizing crystallization screens based on partial structural information. The availability of crystallization data coupled with structural outcomes analyzed through state-of-the-art statistical models may thus guide macromolecular crystallization toward a more rational basis.

  19. Comparison of CRM197, diphtheria toxoid and tetanus toxoid as protein carriers for meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontini, M; Berti, F; Romano, M R; Proietti, D; Zambonelli, C; Bottomley, M J; De Gregorio, E; Del Giudice, G; Rappuoli, R; Costantino, P; Brogioni, G; Balocchi, C; Biancucci, M; Malito, E

    2013-10-01

    Glycoconjugate vaccines are among the most effective and safest vaccines ever developed. Diphtheria toxoid (DT), tetanus toxoid (TT) and CRM197 have been mostly used as protein carriers in licensed vaccines. We evaluated the immunogenicity of serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y meningococcal oligosaccharides conjugated to CRM197, DT and TT in naïve mice. The three carriers were equally efficient in inducing an immune response against the carbohydrate moiety in immunologically naïve mice. The effect of previous exposure to different dosages of the carrier protein on the anti-carbohydrate response was studied using serogroup A meningococcal (MenA) saccharide conjugates as a model. CRM197 showed a strong propensity to positively prime the anti-carbohydrate response elicited by its conjugates or those with the antigenically related carrier DT. Conversely in any of the tested conditions TT priming did not result in enhancement of the anti-carbohydrate response elicited by the corresponding conjugates. Repeated exposure of mice to TT or to CRM197 before immunization with the respective MenA conjugates resulted in a drastic suppression of the anti-carbohydrate response in the case of TT conjugate and only in a slight reduction in the case of CRM197. The effect of carrier priming on the anti-MenA response of DT-based conjugates varied depending on their carbohydrate to protein ratio. These data may have implications for human vaccination since conjugate vaccines are widely used in individuals previously immunized with DT and TT carrier proteins.

  20. The biological activity of a-mangostin, a larvicidal botanic mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha-mangostin derived from mangosteen was identified as a mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor via high throughput insecticide screening. Alpha-mangostin was tested for its larvicidal activity against 3rd instar larvae of six mosquito species and the LC50 values range from 0.84 to 2.90 ppm....

  1. Riboflavin carrier protein-targeted fluorescent USPIO for the assessment of vascular metabolism in tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayapaul, J.; Arns, S.; Lederle, W.; Lammers, T.G.G.M.; Comba, P.; Gätjens, J.; Kiessling, F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Riboflavin (Rf) and its metabolic analogs flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are essential for normal cellular growth and function. Their intracellular transport is regulated by the riboflavin carrier protein (RCP), which has been shown to be over-expressed b

  2. Intrinsic carrier multiplication efficiency in bulk Si crystals evaluated by optical-pump/terahertz-probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, G.; Nagai, M., E-mail: mnagai@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ashida@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ashida, M., E-mail: mnagai@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ashida@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Matsubara, E. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Department of Physics, Osaka Dental University, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Kanemitsu, Y. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2014-12-08

    We estimated the carrier multiplication efficiency in the most common solar-cell material, Si, by using optical-pump/terahertz-probe spectroscopy. Through close analysis of time-resolved data, we extracted the exact number of photoexcited carriers from the sheet carrier density 10 ps after photoexcitation, excluding the influences of spatial diffusion and surface recombination in the time domain. For incident photon energies greater than 4.0 eV, we observed enhanced internal quantum efficiency due to carrier multiplication. The evaluated value of internal quantum efficiency agrees well with the results of photocurrent measurements. This optical method allows us to estimate the carrier multiplication and surface recombination of carriers quantitatively, which are crucial for the design of the solar cells.

  3. Analysis of Shannon entropy for protein crystallization and prediction of crystallization pH and precipitants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Priede, Mónica; García-Granda, Santiago

    2017-02-01

    This is a new attempt at analysing crystallization data from Protein Data Bank. In line with the idea that crystallization conditions are intimately related with amino acid sequences, we have computed the Shannon entropy of polypeptides and polynucleotides and we have discovered a relationship between Shannon entropy and molecular weight, and also between the entropy of polypeptides, and the precipitants used in crystallization experiments. In fact, the Shannon entropy and the molecular weight of proteins are good precipitant predictors. On the other hand, we have proposed the hypothesis that homologous proteins may have similar crystallization conditions, and we have tried to find evidence that supports it, predicting the crystallization pH of a large amount of polypeptide sequences by means of a nearest neighbour approach combined with local sequence alignment.

  4. Missing strings of residues in protein crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Carugo, Oliviero

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of the protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank are incomplete, since the position of one or more residues is not reported, despite these residues are part of the material that was analyzed. This may bias the use of the protein crystal structures by molecular biologists. Here we observe that in the large majority of the protein crystal structures strings of residues are missing. Polar residues incline to occur in missing strings together with glycine, while apolar and aromatic residues tend to avoid them. Particularly flexible residues, as shown by their extremely high B-factors, by their exposure to the solvent and by their secondary structures, flank the missing strings. These data should be a helpful guideline for crystallographers that encounter regions of flat and uninterpretable electron density as well as end-users of crystal structures.

  5. Inorganic and Protein Crystal Assembly in Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    The basic kinetic and thermodynamic concepts of crystal growth will be revisited in view of recent AFM and interferometric findings. These concepts are as follows: 1) The Kossel crystal model that allows only one kink type on the crystal surface. The modern theory is developed overwhelmingly for the Kessel model; 2) Presumption that intensive step fluctuations maintain kink density sufficiently high to allow applicability of Gibbs-Thomson law; 3) Common experience that unlimited step bunching (morphological instability) during layer growth from solutions and supercooled melts always takes place if the step flow direction coincides with that of the fluid.

  6. The role of mass transport in protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Otálora, Fermín; García-Caballero, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    Mass transport takes place within the mesoscopic to macroscopic scale range and plays a key role in crystal growth that may affect the result of the crystallization experiment. The influence of mass transport is different depending on the crystallization technique employed, essentially because each technique reaches supersaturation in its own unique way. In the case of batch experiments, there are some complex phenomena that take place at the interface between solutions upon mixing. These transport instabilities may drastically affect the reproducibility of crystallization experiments, and different outcomes may be obtained depending on whether or not the drop is homogenized. In diffusion experiments with aqueous solutions, evaporation leads to fascinating transport phenomena. When a drop starts to evaporate, there is an increase in concentration near the interface between the drop and the air until a nucleation event eventually takes place. Upon growth, the weight of the floating crystal overcomes the surface tension and the crystal falls to the bottom of the drop. The very growth of the crystal then triggers convective flow and inhomogeneities in supersaturation values in the drop owing to buoyancy of the lighter concentration-depleted solution surrounding the crystal. Finally, the counter-diffusion technique works if, and only if, diffusive mass transport is assured. The technique relies on the propagation of a supersaturation wave that moves across the elongated protein chamber and is the result of the coupling of reaction (crystallization) and diffusion. The goal of this review is to convince protein crystal growers that in spite of the small volume of the typical protein crystallization setup, transport plays a key role in the crystal quality, size and phase in both screening and optimization experiments.

  7. Investigating the nucleation of protein crystals with hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadri, A [Departement ' Mecanismes et Macromolecules de la Synthese Proteique et Cristallogenese' UPR 9002, Institut de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire du CNRS, 15 rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Damak, M [Laboratoire de Chimie des Substances Naturelles, Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, BP 802, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Jenner, G [Laboratoire de Piezochimie Organique, UMR 7123, Faculte de Chimie, Universite Louis Pasteur, 1 rue Blaise Pascal, F-67008 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Lorber, B [Departement ' Mecanismes et Macromolecules de la Synthese Proteique et Cristallogenese' UPR 9002, Institut de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire du CNRS, 15 rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Giege, R [Departement ' Mecanismes et Macromolecules de la Synthese Proteique et Cristallogenese' UPR 9002, Institut de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire du CNRS, 15 rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2003-12-17

    Hydrostatic pressure in the 0.1-75 MPa range has been used as a non-invasive tool to study the crystallization process of the tetragonal crystal form of the protein thaumatin (M{sub r} 22 200). Crystals were prepared within agarose gel and at temperatures in the range from 283 to 303 K. The solubility, i.e. the concentration of soluble macromolecules remaining in equilibrium with the crystals, decreases when the pressure increases and when the temperature decreases. High pressure was used to probe the nucleation behaviour of thaumatin. The pressure dependence of the nucleation rate leads to an activation volume of -46.5cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1}. It is shown that an increase in pressure decreases the enthalpy, the entropy and the free energy of crystallization of thaumatin. The data are discussed in the light of the results of crystallographic analyses and of the structure of the protein.

  8. Transport and Growth Kinetics in Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otalora, F.; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.; Carotenuto, L.; Castagnolo, D.; Novella, M. L.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic coupling between mass transport and incorporation of growth units into the surface of a crystal growing from solution in microgravity is used to derive quantitative information on the crystal growth kinetics. To this end, new procedures for experiment preparation, interferometric data processing and model fitting have been developed. The use of experimental data from the bulk diffusive maw transport together with a model for steady state stagnant crystal growth allows the detailed quantitative understanding of the kinetics of both the concentration depletion zone around the crystal and the growth of the crystal interface. The protein crystal used in the experiment is shown to be growing in the mixed kinetic regime (0.2 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second less than beta R/D less than 0.9 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second).

  9. Invariant patterns in crystal lattices: Implications for protein folding algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HART,WILLIAM E.; ISTRAIL,SORIN

    2000-06-01

    Crystal lattices are infinite periodic graphs that occur naturally in a variety of geometries and which are of fundamental importance in polymer science. Discrete models of protein folding use crystal lattices to define the space of protein conformations. Because various crystal lattices provide discretizations of the same physical phenomenon, it is reasonable to expect that there will exist invariants across lattices related to fundamental properties of the protein folding process. This paper considers whether performance-guaranteed approximability is such an invariant for HP lattice models. The authors define a master approximation algorithm that has provable performance guarantees provided that a specific sublattice exists within a given lattice. They describe a broad class of crystal lattices that are approximable, which further suggests that approximability is a general property of HP lattice models.

  10. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1995-01-01

    During the fifth semi-annual period under this grant we have pursued the following activities: (1) Characterization of the purity and further purification of lysozyme solutions, these efforts are summarized in Section 2; (2) Crystal growth morphology and kinetics studies with tetragonal lysozyme, our observation on the dependence of lysozyme growth kinetics on step sources and impurities has been summarized in a manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; (3) Numerical modelling of the interaction between bulk transport and interface kinetics, for a detailed summary of this work see the manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; and (4) Light scattering studies, this work has been summarized in a manuscript that has been submitted for publication to the Journal of Chemical Physics.

  11. Evaluation of Salmonella enterica type III secretion system effector proteins as carriers for heterologous vaccine antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Wael Abdel Halim; Xu, Xin; Metelitsa, Leonid; Hensel, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Live attenuated strains of Salmonella enterica have a high potential as carriers of recombinant vaccines. The type III secretion system (T3SS)-dependent translocation of S. enterica can be deployed for delivery of heterologous antigens to antigen-presenting cells. Here we investigated the efficacy of various effector proteins of the Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI2)-encoded T3SS for the translocation of model antigens and elicitation of immune responses. The SPI2 T3SS effector proteins SifA, SteC, SseL, SseJ, and SseF share an endosomal membrane-associated subcellular localization after translocation. We observed that all effector proteins could be used to translocate fusion proteins with the model antigens ovalbumin and listeriolysin into the cytosol of host cells. Under in vitro conditions, fusion proteins with SseJ and SteC stimulated T-cell responses that were superior to those triggered by fusion proteins with SseF. However, in mice vaccinated with Salmonella carrier strains, only fusion proteins based on SseJ or SifA elicited potent T-cell responses. These data demonstrate that the selection of an optimal SPI2 effector protein for T3SS-mediated translocation is a critical parameter for the rational design of effective Salmonella-based recombinant vaccines.

  12. Unveiling the in Vivo Protein Corona of Circulating Leukocyte-like Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, Claudia; Molinaro, Roberto; Taraballi, Francesca; Toledano Furman, Naama E; Hartman, Kelly A; Sherman, Michael B; De Rosa, Enrica; Kirui, Dickson K; Salvatore, Francesco; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-03-10

    Understanding interactions occurring at the interface between nanoparticles and biological components is an urgent challenge in nanomedicine due to their effect on the biological fate of nanoparticles. After the systemic injection of nanoparticles, a protein corona constructed by blood components surrounds the carrier's surface and modulates its pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Biomimicry-based approaches in nanotechnology attempt to imitate what happens in nature in order to transfer specific natural functionalities to synthetic nanoparticles. Several biomimetic formulations have been developed, showing superior in vivo features as a result of their cell-like identity. We have recently designed biomimetic liposomes, called leukosomes, which recapitulate the ability of leukocytes to target inflamed endothelium and escape clearance by the immune system. To gain insight into the properties of leukosomes, we decided to investigate their protein corona in vivo. So far, most information about the protein corona has been obtained using in vitro experiments, which have been shown to minimally reproduce in vivo phenomena. Here we directly show a time-dependent quantitative and qualitative analysis of the protein corona adsorbed in vivo on leukosomes and control liposomes. We observed that leukosomes absorb fewer proteins than liposomes, and we identified a group of proteins specifically adsorbed on leukosomes. Moreover, we hypothesize that the presence of macrophage receptors on leukosomes' surface neutralizes their protein corona-meditated uptake by immune cells. This work unveils the protein corona of a biomimetic carrier and is one of the few studies on the corona performed in vivo.

  13. A microfluidic, high throughput protein crystal growth method for microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl W Carruthers

    Full Text Available The attenuation of sedimentation and convection in microgravity can sometimes decrease irregularities formed during macromolecular crystal growth. Current terrestrial protein crystal growth (PCG capabilities are very different than those used during the Shuttle era and that are currently on the International Space Station (ISS. The focus of this experiment was to demonstrate the use of a commercial off-the-shelf, high throughput, PCG method in microgravity. Using Protein BioSolutions' microfluidic Plug Maker™/CrystalCard™ system, we tested the ability to grow crystals of the regulator of glucose metabolism and adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (apo-hPPAR-γ LBD, as well as several PCG standards. Overall, we sent 25 CrystalCards™ to the ISS, containing ~10,000 individual microgravity PCG experiments in a 3U NanoRacks NanoLab (1U = 10(3 cm.. After 70 days on the ISS, our samples were returned with 16 of 25 (64% microgravity cards having crystals, compared to 12 of 25 (48% of the ground controls. Encouragingly, there were more apo-hPPAR-γ LBD crystals in the microgravity PCG cards than the 1g controls. These positive results hope to introduce the use of the PCG standard of low sample volume and large experimental density to the microgravity environment and provide new opportunities for macromolecular samples that may crystallize poorly in standard laboratories.

  14. Protein crystal growth and the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucas, L. J.; Moore, K. M.; Long, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    Protein structural information plays a key role in understanding biological structure-function relationships and in the development of new pharmaceuticals for both chronic and infectious diseases. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography (CMC) has devoted considerable effort studying the fundamental processes involved in macromolecular crystal growth both in a 1-g and microgravity environment. Results from experiments performed on more than 35 U.S. space shuttle flights have clearly indicated that microgravity can provide a beneficial environment for macromolecular crystal growth. This research has led to the development of a new generation of pharmaceuticals that are currently in preclinical or clinical trials for diseases such as cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, AIDS, influenza, stroke and other cardiovascular complications. The International Space Station (ISS) provides an opportunity to have complete crystallographic capability on orbit, which was previously not possible with the space shuttle orbiter. As envisioned, the x-ray Crystallography Facility (XCF) will be a complete facility for growing protein crystals; selecting, harvesting, and mounting sample crystals for x-ray diffraction; cryo-freezing mounted crystals if necessary; performing x-ray diffraction studies; and downlinking the data for use by crystallographers on the ground. Other advantages of such a facility include crystal characterization so that iterations in the crystal growth conditions can be made, thereby optimizing the final crystals produced in a three month interval on the ISS.

  15. Protein encapsulated magnetic carriers for micro/nanoscale drug delivery systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Y.; Kaminski, M. D.; Mertz, C. J.; Finck, M. R.; Guy, S. G.; Chen, H.; Rosengart, A. J.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine

    2005-01-01

    Novel methods for drug delivery may be based on nanotechnology using non-invasive magnetic guidance of drug loaded magnetic carriers to the targeted site and thereafter released by external ultrasound energy. The key building block of this system is to successfully synthesize biodegradable, magnetic drug carriers. Magnetic carriers using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) as matrix materials were loaded with bovine serum albumin (BSA) by a double-emulsion technique. BSA-loaded magnetic microspheres were characterized for size, morphology, surface charge, and magnetization. The BSA encapsulation efficiency was determined by recovering albumin from the microspheres using dimethyl sulfoxide and 0.05N NaOH/0.5% SDS then quantifying with the Micro-BCA protein assay. BSA release profiles were also determined by the Micro-BCA protein assay. The microspheres had drug encapsulation efficiencies up to 90% depending on synthesis parameters. Particles were spherical with a smooth or porous surface having a size range less than 5 {mu}m. The surface charge (expressed as zeta potential) was near neutral, optimal for prolonged intravascular survival. The magnetization of these BSA loaded magnetic carriers was 2 to 6 emu/g, depending on the specific magnetic materials used during synthesis.

  16. The Study Of Charge Carrier Transport On The Calamitic Liquid Crystals `` 5, 5'-Di-(Alkyl-Pyridin-Yl) - 2' Bithiophenes''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Naresh; Pokhrel, Chandra; Ellman, Brett; Getmanenko, Yulia; Twieg, Robert

    2010-03-01

    The hole and electron mobilities in both types of calamitic liquid crystals C9 [5,5'-Di-(5-n-nonyl-pyridin-2-yl)-2,2'-bithiophenes] and C10 [5,5'-Di-(5-n-decyl-pyridin-2-yl)-2,2'-bithiophenes] were studied. The charge carrier mobilities were strongly electric field dependent. The mobilities decreased continuously with increase in the electric field up to a certain value, after which it became constant. Both types of charge carrier mobilities are independent of the temperature over our temperature range. The qualitative feature of our results could be tentatively explained by the Monte--Carlo modeling proposed by H Bassler. However, the results require further study for better understanding.

  17. Determination of the carrier concentration in CdSe crystals from the effective infrared absorption coefficient measured by means of the photothermal infrared radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlak, M. [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Institute of Physics, Torun (Poland)

    2014-11-11

    In this paper, a non-contact method that allows to determine the carrier concentration in CdSe crystals is presented. The method relies on the measurement of the effective infrared absorption coefficient by means of the photothermal infrared radiometry (PTR). In order to obtain the effective infrared absorption coefficient and thermal diffusivity, the frequency characteristics of the PTR signal were analyzed in the frame of a one-dimensional heat transport model for infrared semitransparent crystals. The carrier concentrations were estimated using a theory introduced by Ruda and a recently proposed normalization procedure for the PTR signal. The deduced carrier concentrations of the investigated CdSe crystals are in reasonable agreement with those obtained using Hall measurements and infrared spectroscopy. The method presented in this paper can also be applied to other semiconductors with the carrier concentration in the range of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. (orig.)

  18. Influence of Polymer Coatings on the Carrier Life Time in Solar Silicon Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    L.P. Steblenko; A.O. Podolyan; O.O. Korotchenkov; L.M. Yashchenko; S.M. Naumenko; D.V. Kalinichenko; Yu.L. Kobzar; A.M. Kuryliuk; V.M. Kravchenko

    2014-01-01

    Influence of polymer coatings on the photovoltage drop kinetics in solar Si crystals exposed to magnetic field action and X-ray irradiation is studied. The features found in the behavior of the electrophysical parameters suggest slowing down the photovoltage drop in the presence of polymer coatings at the surface of solar Si crystals. These features may be due to the influence of polymer coatings to reduce the concentration of recombination centers in crystals solar-Si.

  19. Influence of Polymer Coatings on the Carrier Life Time in Solar Silicon Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Steblenko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Influence of polymer coatings on the photovoltage drop kinetics in solar Si crystals exposed to magnetic field action and X-ray irradiation is studied. The features found in the behavior of the electrophysical parameters suggest slowing down the photovoltage drop in the presence of polymer coatings at the surface of solar Si crystals. These features may be due to the influence of polymer coatings to reduce the concentration of recombination centers in crystals solar-Si.

  20. The nacre protein perlucin nucleates growth of calcium carbonate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, S; Arnoldi, M; Khoshnavaz, S; Treccani, L; Kuntz, M; Mann, K; Grathwohl, G; Fritz, M

    2003-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in aqueous solution was used to investigate native nacre of the marine snail Haliotis laevigata on the microscopic scale and the interaction of purified nacre proteins with calcium carbonate crystals on the nanoscopic scale. These investigations were controlled by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy (LM) and biochemical methods. For investigations with AFM and SEM, nacre was cleaved parallel to the aragonite tablets in this biogenic polymer/mineral composite. Multilamellar organic sheets consisting of a core of chitin with layers of proteins attached on both sides lay between the aragonite layers consisting of confluent aragonite tablets. Cleavage appeared to occur between the aragonite tablet layer and the protein layer. AFM images revealed a honeycomb-like structure to the organic material with a diameter of the 'honeycombs' equalling that of the aragonite tablets. The walls of the structures consisted of filaments, which were suggested to be collagen. The flat regions of the honeycomb-like structures exhibited a hole with a diameter of more than 100 nm. When incubated in saturated calcium carbonate solution, aragonite needles with perfect vertical orientation grew on the proteinacous surface. After treatment with proteinase K, no growth of orientated aragonite needles was detected. Direct AFM measurements on dissolving and growing calcite crystals revealed a surface structure with straight steps the number of which decreased with crystal growth. When the purified nacre protein perlucin was added to the growth solution (a super-saturated calcium carbonate solution) new layers were nucleated and the number of steps increased. Anion exchange chromatography of the water-soluble proteins revealed a mixture of about 10 different proteins. When this mixture was dialysed against saturated calcium carbonate solution and sodium chloride, calcium carbonate crystals precipitated together with perlucin leaving the other proteins

  1. THz Microscopy of Anisotropy and Correlated Motions in Protein Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Katherine; Acbas, Gheorghe; Snell, Edward; Markelz, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    We introduce a new technique, Crystal Anisotropy Terahertz Microscopy (CATM) which can directly measure correlated intra-molecular protein vibrations. The terahertz (THz) frequency range (5-100 cm-1) corresponds to global correlated protein motions, proposed to be essential to protein function [1, 2]. CATM accesses these motions by removal of the relaxational background of the solvent and residue side chain librational motions. We demonstrate narrowband features in the anisotropic absorbance for hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) single crystals as well as HEWL with triacetylglucosamine (HEWL-3NAG) inhibitor single crystals. The most prominent features for the HEWL crystals appear at 45 cm-1, 69 cm-1, and 78 cm-1 and the strength of the absorption varies with crystal orientation relative to the THz polarization. Calculations show similar anisotropic features, suggesting specific correlated mode identification is possible. 1. Hammes-Schiffer, S. and S.J. Benkovic, Relating Protein Motion to Catalysis. Annu. Rev. Biochem., 2006. 75: p. 519-41. 2. Henzler-Wildman, K.A., et al., Intrinsic motions along an enzymatic reaction trajectory. Nature, 2007. 450(7171): p. 838-U13. This work supported by NSF MRI2 grant DBI295998.

  2. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  3. Development of a stealth carrier system for structural studies of membrane proteins in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Selma

    Structural studies of membrane proteins remain a great experimental challenge. Functional reconstitution into artificial carriers that mimic the native bilayer environment allows for the handling of membrane proteins in solution and enables the use of small-angle scattering techniques for fast an......-resolution structural studes of many membrane proteins and their complexes in solution as the analysis of SANS data for this platform is greatly simplified and allows for the application of existing data analysis tools already available for soluble proteins...... and reliable structural analysis. The difficulty with this approach is that the carrier discs contribute to the measured scattering intensity in a highly non-trivial fashion, making subsequent data analysis challenging. This thesis presents the development of a specifically deuterated, stealth nanodisc system...... which can be used for SANS structural analysis of membrane proteins in solution. In combination with the D2O/H2O-based contrast variation method it is demonstrated that it is possible to prepare specifically deuterated analogues of the nanodisc, which give minimal contribution to the neutron scattering...

  4. Understanding the fabric of protein crystals: computational classification of biological interfaces and crystal contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitani, Guido; Duarte, Jose M; Baskaran, Kumaran; Bliven, Spencer; Somody, Joseph C

    2016-02-15

    Modern structural biology still draws the vast majority of information from crystallography, a technique where the objects being investigated are embedded in a crystal lattice. Given the complexity and variety of those objects, it becomes fundamental to computationally assess which of the interfaces in the lattice are biologically relevant and which are simply crystal contacts. Since the mid-1990s, several approaches have been applied to obtain high-accuracy classification of crystal contacts and biological protein-protein interfaces. This review provides an overview of the concepts and main approaches to protein interface classification: thermodynamic estimation of interface stability, evolutionary approaches based on conservation of interface residues, and co-occurrence of the interface across different crystal forms. Among the three categories, evolutionary approaches offer the strongest promise for improvement, thanks to the incessant growth in sequence knowledge. Importantly, protein interface classification algorithms can also be used on multimeric structures obtained using other high-resolution techniques or for protein assembly design or validation purposes. A key issue linked to protein interface classification is the identification of the biological assembly of a crystal structure and the analysis of its symmetry. Here, we highlight the most important concepts and problems to be overcome in assembly prediction. Over the next few years, tools and concepts of interface classification will probably become more frequently used and integrated in several areas of structural biology and structural bioinformatics. Among the main challenges for the future are better addressing of weak interfaces and the application of interface classification concepts to prediction problems like protein-protein docking.

  5. Participation of Low Molecular Weight Electron Carriers in Oxidative Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Mandl

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative protein folding is mediated by a proteinaceous electron relay system, in which the concerted action of protein disulfide isomerase and Ero1 delivers the electrons from thiol groups to the final acceptor. Oxygen appears to be the final oxidant in aerobic living organisms, although the existence of alternative electron acceptors, e.g. fumarate or nitrate, cannot be excluded. Whilst the protein components of the system are well-known, less attention has been turned to the role of low molecular weight electron carriers in the process. The function of ascorbate, tocopherol and vitamin K has been raised recently. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that these redox-active compounds can contribute to the functioning of oxidative folding. This review focuses on the participation of small molecular weight redox compounds in oxidative protein folding.

  6. Crystals x-rays and proteins comprehensive protein crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Sherwood, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Information derived from X-ray crystal structures of biological molecules allows us to explain their functions in living organisms and to develop drugs to treat disease. This book describes the principles and practice of X-ray diffraction as a key technique at the forefront of new discoveries in biology and medicine.

  7. Methodology for fast evaluation of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Lúcia M. Carareto

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the production and use of Bacillus thuringiensis in Brazil at a commercial scale faces certain difficulties, among them the establishment of efficient methodologies for the quantitation of toxic products to be commercialized. Presently, the amount of toxin is given in percentage by analyzing the samples total protein content. Such methodology however, does not measure the actual amount of active protein present in the product, since most strains express different endotoxin genes and might even produce b-toxin. Since the various types of toxins exhibit different antigenic characteristics, this work has as objective the utilization of fast immunological techniques to quantify the level of crystal protein. Crystal protein produced by a subspecies of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis was purified by ultracentrifugation and utilized to immunize rabbits and to produce hiperimmune sera. Such sera were latter used to evaluate the level of proteins on commercial bioinsecticide and on laboratory cultures of B. thuringiensis through the immunodot technique. The results were obtained by comparison of data obtained from reactions with known concentrations of crystal protein permitting to evaluate the level of such protein on various materials.

  8. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  9. Crystallization of cyclase-associated protein from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Andreas; Hess, Sonja; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2002-10-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved two-domain protein that helps to activate the catalytic activity of adenylyl cyclase in the cyclase-bound state through interaction with Ras, which binds to the cyclase in a different region. With its other domain, CAP can bind monomeric actin and therefore also carries a cytoskeletal function. The protein is thus involved in Ras/cAMP-dependent signal transduction and most likely serves as an adapter protein translocating the adenylyl cyclase complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Crystals belonging to the orthorhombic space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.2, b = 75.1, c = 162.9 A, have been obtained from Dictyostelium discoideum CAP carrying a C-terminal His tag. A complete native data set extending to 2.2 A resolution was collected from a single crystal using an in-house X-ray system. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of CAP.

  10. Structure of the adenylation-peptidyl carrier protein didomain of the Microcystis aeruginosa microcystin synthetase McyG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiao-Feng; Dai, Ya-Nan; Zhou, Kang; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Ren, Yan-Min; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Microcystins, which are the most common cause of hepatotoxicity associated with cyanobacterial water blooms, are assembled in vivo on a large multienzyme complex via a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthetase (NRPS/PKS). The biosynthesis of microcystin in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 starts with the enzyme McyG, which contains an adenylation-peptidyl carrier protein (A-PCP) didomain for loading the starter unit to assemble the side chain of an Adda residue. However, the catalytic mechanism remains unclear. Here, the 2.45 Å resolution crystal structure of the McyG A-PCP didomain complexed with the catalytic intermediate L-phenylalanyl-adenylate (L-Phe-AMP) is reported. Each asymmetric unit contains two protein molecules, one of which consists of the A-PCP didomain and the other of which comprises only the A domain. Structural analyses suggest that Val227 is likely to be critical for the selection of hydrophobic substrates. Moreover, two distinct interfaces demonstrating variable crosstalk between the PCP domain and the A domain were observed. A catalytic cycle for the adenylation and peptide transfer of the A-PCP didomain is proposed.

  11. Protein dynamics derived from clusters of crystal structures.

    OpenAIRE

    van Aalten, D M; Conn, D A; de Groot, B L; Berendsen, H J; Findlay, J B; Amadei, A

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented to mathematically extract concerted structural transitions in proteins from collections of crystal structures. The "essential dynamics" procedure is used to filter out small-amplitude fluctuations from such a set of structures; the remaining large conformational changes describe motions such as those important for the uptake/release of substrate/ligand and in catalytic reactions. The method is applied to sets of x-ray structures for a number of proteins, and the results ...

  12. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govada, Lata; Leese, Hannah S.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Kassen, Sean; Chain, Benny; Khurshid, Sahir; Menzel, Robert; Hu, Sheng; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-02-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted materials, combined with a range of controls, were used in a large-scale assessment of the effectiveness for protein crystal nucleation of 20 different carbon nanomaterials on five proteins. This study has allowed a direct comparison of the key characteristics of carbon-based nucleants: appropriate surface chemistry, porosity and/or roughness are required. The most effective solid system tested in this study, carbon black nanoparticles functionalised with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of mean molecular weight 5000, provides a novel highly effective nucleant, that was able to induce crystal nucleation of four out of the five proteins tested at metastable conditions.

  13. Enhanced protein crystallization around the metastable critical point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolde, P.R. ten; Frenkel, D.

    1999-01-01

    We report on a computer-simulation study of homogeneous crystal nucleation in a model for globular proteins. We find that the presence of a metastable vapour-liquid critical point drastically changes the pathway for the formation of a critical nucleus. But what is more important, the large density f

  14. Heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on fluorinated layered silicate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Ino

    Full Text Available Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface.

  15. Domains of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal proteins involved in insecticidal activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.J.; Schipper, B.; Kleij, van der H.; Maagd, de R.A.; Stiekema, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The expected increase in application of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in crop protection makes it necessary to anticipate the development of Bt-resistant insects. To safeguard the long-term use of Bt-based insecticides, we studied the mode of action of Bt crystal proteins. CryIA(b), CryIC and CryIE ar

  16. Dynamic X-ray diffraction sampling for protein crystal positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarborough, Nicole M; Godaliyadda, G M Dilshan P; Ye, Dong Hye; Kissick, David J; Zhang, Shijie; Newman, Justin A; Sheedlo, Michael J; Chowdhury, Azhad U; Fischetti, Robert F; Das, Chittaranjan; Buzzard, Gregery T; Bouman, Charles A; Simpson, Garth J

    2017-01-01

    A sparse supervised learning approach for dynamic sampling (SLADS) is described for dose reduction in diffraction-based protein crystal positioning. Crystal centering is typically a prerequisite for macromolecular diffraction at synchrotron facilities, with X-ray diffraction mapping growing in popularity as a mechanism for localization. In X-ray raster scanning, diffraction is used to identify the crystal positions based on the detection of Bragg-like peaks in the scattering patterns; however, this additional X-ray exposure may result in detectable damage to the crystal prior to data collection. Dynamic sampling, in which preceding measurements inform the next most information-rich location to probe for image reconstruction, significantly reduced the X-ray dose experienced by protein crystals during positioning by diffraction raster scanning. The SLADS algorithm implemented herein is designed for single-pixel measurements and can select a new location to measure. In each step of SLADS, the algorithm selects the pixel, which, when measured, maximizes the expected reduction in distortion given previous measurements. Ground-truth diffraction data were obtained for a 5 µm-diameter beam and SLADS reconstructed the image sampling 31% of the total volume and only 9% of the interior of the crystal greatly reducing the X-ray dosage on the crystal. Using in situ two-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy measurements as a surrogate for diffraction imaging with a 1 µm-diameter beam, the SLADS algorithm enabled image reconstruction from a 7% sampling of the total volume and 12% sampling of the interior of the crystal. When implemented into the beamline at Argonne National Laboratory, without ground-truth images, an acceptable reconstruction was obtained with 3% of the image sampled and approximately 5% of the crystal. The incorporation of SLADS into X-ray diffraction acquisitions has the potential to significantly minimize the impact of X-ray exposure on the crystal by

  17. Protein purification and crystallization artifacts: The tale usually not told.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzialkowska, Ewa; Gasiorowska, Olga; Handing, Katarzyna B; Majorek, Karolina A; Porebski, Przemyslaw J; Shabalin, Ivan G; Zasadzinska, Ewelina; Cymborowski, Marcin; Minor, Wladek

    2016-03-01

    The misidentification of a protein sample, or contamination of a sample with the wrong protein, may be a potential reason for the non-reproducibility of experiments. This problem may occur in the process of heterologous overexpression and purification of recombinant proteins, as well as purification of proteins from natural sources. If the contaminated or misidentified sample is used for crystallization, in many cases the problem may not be detected until structures are determined. In the case of functional studies, the problem may not be detected for years. Here several procedures that can be successfully used for the identification of crystallized protein contaminants, including: (i) a lattice parameter search against known structures, (ii) sequence or fold identification from partially built models, and (iii) molecular replacement with common contaminants as search templates have been presented. A list of common contaminant structures to be used as alternative search models was provided. These methods were used to identify four cases of purification and crystallization artifacts. This report provides troubleshooting pointers for researchers facing difficulties in phasing or model building.

  18. Four crystal forms of a Bence-Jones protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Debora L.; Henschen-Edman, Agnes H.; McPherson, Alexander, E-mail: amcphers@uci.edu [Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California, Irvine, 560 Steinhaus Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Four crystal forms have been grown and characterized by X-ray diffraction of a Bence-Jones protein collected from the urine of a multiple myeloma patient more than 40 y ago. The trigonal crystal form may shed some light on the formation of fibrils common to certain storage diseases. Four crystal forms have been grown and characterized by X-ray diffraction of a Bence-Jones protein collected from the urine of a multiple myeloma patient more than 40 years ago. Closely related tetragonal and orthorhombic forms belonging to space groups P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 68.7, c = 182.1 and a = 67.7, b = 69.4, c = 87.3 Å, diffract to 1.5 and 1.9 Å, respectively. Two closely related trigonal forms, both belonging to space group P3{sub 1}21 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 154.3 Å but differing by a doubling of the c axis, one 46.9 Å and the other 94.0 Å, diffract to 2.9 and 2.6 Å resolution, respectively. The trigonal crystal of short c-axis length shows a positive indication of twinning. The trigonal crystal of longer c axis, which appeared only after eight months of incubation at room temperature, is likely to be composed of proteolytically degraded molecules and unlike the other crystal forms contains two entire Bence-Jones dimers in the asymmetric unit. This latter crystal form may shed some light on the formation of fibrils common to certain storage diseases.

  19. Monitoring and validating active site redox states in protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Hough, Michael A

    2011-06-01

    High resolution protein crystallography using synchrotron radiation is one of the most powerful tools in modern biology. Improvements in resolution have arisen from the use of X-ray beamlines with higher brightness and flux and the development of advanced detectors. However, it is increasingly recognised that the benefits brought by these advances have an associated cost, namely deleterious effects of X-ray radiation on the sample (radiation damage). In particular, X-ray induced reduction and damage to redox centres has been shown to occur much more rapidly than other radiation damage effects, such as loss of resolution or damage to disulphide bridges. Selection of an appropriate combination of in-situ single crystal spectroscopies during crystallographic experiments, such as UV-visible absorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAFS), allows for effective monitoring of redox states in protein crystals in parallel with structure determination. Such approaches are also essential in cases where catalytic intermediate species are generated by exposure to the X-ray beam. In this article, we provide a number of examples in which multiple single crystal spectroscopies have been key to understanding the redox status of Fe and Cu centres in crystal structures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Structure and Function in the Crystalline State.

  20. Scalable photonic crystal chips for high sensitivity protein detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Feng; Clarke, Nigel; Patel, Parth; Loncar, Marko; Quan, Qimin

    2013-12-30

    Scalable microfabrication technology has enabled semiconductor and microelectronics industries, among other fields. Meanwhile, rapid and sensitive bio-molecule detection is increasingly important for drug discovery and biomedical diagnostics. In this work, we designed and demonstrated that photonic crystal sensor chips have high sensitivity for protein detection and can be mass-produced with scalable deep-UV lithography. We demonstrated label-free detection of carcinoembryonic antigen from pg/mL to μg/mL, with high quality factor photonic crystal nanobeam cavities.

  1. Purification and characterization of a novel cell-penetrating carrier similar to cholera toxin chimeric protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weiping; Zheng, Xi; Wang, Huaqian; Yu, Lin; Zhou, Xiaofen; Sun, Yunxiao; Zhao, Suqing; Du, Zhiyun; Zhang, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Developing a recombinant vector for noninvasively delivering biological macromolecules into the brain is important. This study constructed and purified a protein complex based on the cholera toxin (CT) molecular structure. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-modified A2 subunits of CT (CTA2) were used as tracer molecules for introduction of transactivator of transcription (TAT) through the A subunit into cells. The protein complex EGFP-CTA2-TAT/(CTB)5 (CTB: B subunit of CT) was obtained using an in vitro recombination method and verified by monosialoganglioside-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and high performance liquid chromatography assay. The protein complexes bound more strongly to monosialoganglioside (GM1) than (CTB)5 at low concentrations (0.625-1.25 μg/mL). In vitro assays revealed that the transmembrane function of TAT was also maintained. The GM1-binding activity and cell membrane-penetrating ability suggested that a CT structure-based protein complexes could be used to design a delivery carrier for intranasal administration through GM1 binding. The expression vector introduced in this study provides a feasible expression frame for constructing several new macromolecular protein drugs for effective cell penetration.

  2. Fatty acid biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: cloning and characterization of the fabAB operon encoding beta-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase (FabA) and beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I (FabB).

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, T.T.; Schweizer, H P

    1997-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa fabA and fabB genes, encoding beta-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase and beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I, respectively, were cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Northern analysis demonstrated that fabA and fabB are cotranscribed and most probably form a fabAB operon. The FabA and FabB proteins were similar in size and amino acid composition to their counterparts from Escherichia coli and to the putative homologs from Haemop...

  3. Late stage crystallization and healing during spin-coating enhance carrier transport in small-molecule organic semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Chou, Kang Wei

    2014-01-01

    Spin-coating is currently the most widely used solution processing method in organic electronics. Here, we report, for the first time, a direct investigation of the formation process of the small-molecule organic semiconductor (OSC) 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) (TIPS)-pentacene during spin-coating in the context of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) application. The solution thinning and thin film formation were monitored in situ by optical reflectometry and grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering, respectively, both of which were performed during spin-coating. We find that OSC thin film formation is akin to a quenching process, marked by a deposition rate of ∼100 nm s-1, nearly three orders of magnitude faster than drop-casting. This is then followed by a more gradual crystallization and healing step which depends upon the spinning speed. We associate this to further crystallization and healing of defects by residency of the residual solvent trapped inside the kinetically trapped film. The residency time of the trapped solvent is extended to several seconds by slowing the rotational speed of the substrate and is credited with improving the carrier mobility by nearly two orders of magnitude. Based on this insight, we deliberately slow down the solvent evaporation further and increase the carrier mobility by an additional order of magnitude. These results demonstrate how spin-coating conditions can be used as a handle over the crystallinity of organic semiconductors otherwise quenched during initial formation only to recrystallize and heal during extended interaction with the trapped solvent. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  4. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200–250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15–18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96–98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  5. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Pane

    Full Text Available Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids, which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200-250 mg/L. After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15-18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96-98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (PGKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods.

  6. Screening and Crystallization Plates for Manual and High-throughput Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Robert E. (Inventor); Berejnov, Viatcheslav (Inventor); Kalinin, Yevgeniy (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In one embodiment, a crystallization and screening plate comprises a plurality of cells open at a top and a bottom, a frame that defines the cells in the plate, and at least two films. The first film seals a top of the plate and the second film seals a bottom of the plate. At least one of the films is patterned to strongly pin the contact lines of drops dispensed onto it, fixing their position and shape. The present invention also includes methods and other devices for manual and high-throughput protein crystal growth.

  7. An overview of heavy-atom derivatization of protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Ashley C W; Garman, Elspeth F; Krojer, Tobias; von Delft, Frank; Carpenter, Elisabeth P

    2016-03-01

    Heavy-atom derivatization is one of the oldest techniques for obtaining phase information for protein crystals and, although it is no longer the first choice, it remains a useful technique for obtaining phases for unknown structures and for low-resolution data sets. It is also valuable for confirming the chain trace in low-resolution electron-density maps. This overview provides a summary of the technique and is aimed at first-time users of the method. It includes guidelines on when to use it, which heavy atoms are most likely to work, how to prepare heavy-atom solutions, how to derivatize crystals and how to determine whether a crystal is in fact a derivative.

  8. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Previous research from my lab has revealed that several higher plant species have multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein (ACP) and therefore this trait appears highly conserved among higher plants. This level of conservation suggests that the existence of ACP isoforms is not merely the results of neutral gene duplications. We have developed techniques to examine a wider range of species. Acyl carrier proteins can be labelled very specifically and to high specific activity using H-palmitate and the E. coli enzyme acyl-ACP synthetase. Isoforms were then resolved by western blotting and native PAGE of H-palmitate labelled ACP's. Multiple isoforms of ACP were observed the leaf tissue of the monocots Avena sativa and Hordeum vulgare and dicots including Arabidopsis thallina, Cuphea wrightii, and Brassica napus. Lower vascular plants including the cycad, Dioon edule, Ginkgo biloba, the gymnosperm Pinus, the fern Anernia phyllitidis and Psilotum nudum, the most primitive known extant vascular plant, were also found to have multiple ACP isoforms as were the nonvascular liverwort, Marchantia and moss, Polytrichum. Therefore, the development of ACP isoforms occurred early in evolution. However, the uniellular alge Chlamydomonas and Dunaliella and the photosynthetic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Agmnellum have only a single elecrophotetic form of ACP. Thus, multiple forms of ACP do not occur in all photosynthetic organisms but may be associated with multicellular plants.

  9. Humoral Immune Response to Keyhole Limpet Haemocyanin, the Protein Carrier in Cancer Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kantele

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH appears to be a promising protein carrier for tumor antigens in numerous cancer vaccine candidates. The humoral immune response to KLH was characterized at the single-cell level with ELISPOT combined with separations of cell populations according to their expression of homing receptors (HRs. The analysis of HR expressions is expected to reveal the targeting of the immune response in the body. Eight orally primed and four nonprimed volunteers received KLH-vaccine subcutaneously. Circulating KLH-specific plasmablasts were found in all volunteers, 60 KLH-specific plasmablasts/106 PBMC in the nonprimed and 136/106 in the primed group. The proportion of L-selectin+ plasmablasts proved high and integrin α4β7+ low. KLH serving as protein carrier in several vaccines, the homing profile of KLH-specific response may be applicable to the cancer antigen parts in the same vaccines. The present data reflect a systemic homing profile, which appears advantageous for the targeting of immune response to cancer vaccines.

  10. Preparation of bioconjugates by solid-phase conjugation to ion exchange matrix-adsorbed carrier proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houen, G.; Olsen, D.T.; Hansen, P.R.;

    2003-01-01

    A solid-phase conjugation method utilizing carrier protein bound to an ion exchange matrix was developed. Ovalbumin was adsorbed to an anion exchange matrix using a batch procedure, and the immobilized protein was then derivatized with iodoacetic acid N-hydroxysuccinimid ester. The activated......, and immunization experiments with the eluted conjugates showed that the more substituted conjugates gave rise to the highest titers of glutathione antibodies. Direct immunization with the conjugates adsorbed to the ion exchange matrix was possible and gave rise to high titers of glutathione antibodies. Conjugates...... of ovalbumin and various peptides were prepared in a similar manner and used for production of peptide antisera by direct immunization with the conjugates bound to the ion exchanger. Advantages of the method are its solid-phase nature, allowing fast and efficient reactions and intermediate washings...

  11. Studies of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase and implications for the development of antiparasitic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muench, Stephen P. [The Krebs Institute for Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Prigge, Sean T. [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); McLeod, Rima [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Pathology and the Committees on Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Immunology and The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Rafferty, John B. [The Krebs Institute for Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Kirisits, Michael J. [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Pathology and the Committees on Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Immunology and The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Roberts, Craig W. [Department of Immunology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NR, Scotland (United Kingdom); Mui, Ernest J. [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Pathology and the Committees on Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Immunology and The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Rice, David W., E-mail: d.rice@sheffield.ac.uk [The Krebs Institute for Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-01

    The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. Recent studies have demonstrated that submicromolar concentrations of the biocide triclosan arrest the growth of the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii and inhibit the activity of the apicomplexan enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR). The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures of T. gondii ENR have revealed that, as in its bacterial and plant homologues, a loop region which flanks the active site becomes ordered upon inhibitor binding, resulting in the slow tight binding of triclosan. In addition, the T. gondii ENR–triclosan complex reveals the folding of a hydrophilic insert common to the apicomplexan family that flanks the substrate-binding domain and is disordered in all other reported apicomplexan ENR structures. Structural comparison of the apicomplexan ENR structures with their bacterial and plant counterparts has revealed that although the active sites of the parasite enzymes are broadly similar to those of their bacterial counterparts, there are a number of important differences within the drug-binding pocket that reduce the packing interactions formed with several inhibitors in the apicomplexan ENR enzymes. Together with other significant structural differences, this provides a possible explanation of the lower affinity of the parasite ENR enzyme family for aminopyridine-based inhibitors, suggesting that an effective antiparasitic agent may well be distinct from equivalent antimicrobials.

  12. Purification of nonspecific lipid transfer protein (sterol carrier protein 2) from human liver and its deficiency in livers from patients with cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerongen, A. van; Helms, J.B.; Krift, T.P. van der; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Wirtz, K.W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The nonspecific lipid transfer protein (i.e., sterol carrier protein 2) from human liver was purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation, CM-cellulose chromatography, molecular sieve chromatography and fast protein liquid chromatography. Its amino acid composition was determined and

  13. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hau B; Hung, Li-Wei; Yeates, Todd O; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2013-12-01

    A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10-11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1-9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10-11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1-9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization.

  14. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  15. Crystal growth of proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses in gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, Bernard; Sauter, Claude; Théobald-Dietrich, Anne; Moreno, Abel; Schellenberger, Pascale; Robert, Marie-Claire; Capelle, Bernard; Sanglier, Sarah; Potier, Noëlle; Giegé, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Medium-sized single crystals with perfect habits and no defect producing intense and well-resolved diffraction patterns are the dream of every protein crystallographer. Crystals of biological macromolecules possessing these characteristics can be prepared within a medium in which mass transport is restricted to diffusion. Chemical gels (like polysiloxane) and physical gels (such as agarose) provide such an environment and are therefore suitable for the crystallisation of biological macromolecules. Instructions for the preparation of each type of gel are given to urge crystal growers to apply diffusive media for enhancing crystallographic quality of their crystals. Examples of quality enhancement achieved with silica and agarose gels are given. Results obtained with other substances forming gel-like media (such as lipidic phases and cellulose derivatives) are presented. Finally, the use of gels in combination with capillary tubes for counter-diffusion experiments is discussed. Methods and techniques implemented with proteins can also be applied to nucleic acids and nucleoprotein assemblies such as viruses.

  16. Nanoliter-scale protein crystallization and screening with a microfluidic droplet robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Li-Na; Guo, Rui; Cui, Heng-Jun; Ye, Sheng; Fang, Qun

    2014-05-23

    Large-scale screening of hundreds or even thousands of crystallization conditions while with low sample consumption is in urgent need, in current structural biology research. Here we describe a fully-automated droplet robot for nanoliter-scale crystallization screening that combines the advantages of both automated robotics technique for protein crystallization screening and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. A semi-contact dispensing method was developed to achieve flexible, programmable and reliable liquid-handling operations for nanoliter-scale protein crystallization experiments. We applied the droplet robot in large-scale screening of crystallization conditions of five soluble proteins and one membrane protein with 35-96 different crystallization conditions, study of volume effects on protein crystallization, and determination of phase diagrams of two proteins. The volume for each droplet reactor is only ca. 4-8 nL. The protein consumption significantly reduces 50-500 fold compared with current crystallization stations.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of crystals of human protein kinase CK2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Ermakowa, I;

    2000-01-01

    The heterotetrameric recombinant holoenzyme of human protein kinase CK2 was purified to homogeneity. It degraded spontaneously to a stable and fully active state in which the catalytic subunit was about 5 kDa smaller than the wild type. The degraded enzyme was crystallized using polyethylene glycol...... 3350 as precipitant. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6(3). They have unit-cell parameters a = b = 176.0, c = 93.6 A and diffract X-rays to at least 3.5 A resolution. The calculated crystal packing parameter is V(M) = 3.22 A(3) Da(-1), suggesting that one CK2 tetramer is contained...

  18. The effect of the application of protein and cellulose preparations as iodine carriers on stability of thiamine in processed meats

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Szymandera-Buszka; Katarzyna Waszkowiak; Marzanna Hęś; Anna Jędrusek-Golińska

    2011-01-01

      Fortification of processed meat with iodised table salt was shown to increase thiamine losses, both during thermal processing and storage. Taking into consideration the fact, as well as the recommendation for reduction of consumption of table salt, alternative iodine carriers need to be searched for. Thus the aim of the study was to determine the effect of soy protein isolate (SPI) and wheat fibre (WF) as iodine salts’ (potassium iodide and iodate) carriers on thiamine stabil...

  19. Charge carrier transport at the nanoscale: Electron and hole transport in self-assembled discotic liquid crystals: Mobile ionic charges in nanocomposite solid electrolytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkate, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores some fundamental aspects of charge carrier transport at the nanoscale. The study is divided in two parts. In the first part, the structural, dynamical and vibrational properties of discotic liquid crystals are studied in relation to the potential of these self-assembled ‘mesopha

  20. From Protein Structure to Function via Single Crystal Optical Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eRonda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The more than 100.000 protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography provide a wealth of information for the characterization of biological processes at the molecular level. However, several crystallographic artifacts, including conformational selection, crystallization conditions and radiation damages, may affect the quality and the interpretation of the electron density map, thus limiting the relevance of structure determinations. Moreover, for most of these structures no functional data have been obtained in the crystalline state, thus posing serious questions on their validity in the inference for protein mechanisms. In order to solve these issues, spectroscopic methods have been applied for the determination of equilibrium and kinetic properties of proteins in the crystalline state. These methods are UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, IR, EPR, Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Some of these approaches have been implemented with on-line instruments at X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Here, we provide an overview of investigations predominantly carried out in our laboratory by single crystal polarized absorption UV-vis microspectrophotometry, the most applied technique for the functional characterization of proteins in the crystalline state. Studies on hemoglobins, pyridoxal 5’-phosphate dependent enzymes and green fluorescent protein in the crystalline state have addressed key biological issues, leading to either straightforward structure-function correlations or limitations to structure-based mechanisms.

  1. Optical absorption and DFT calculations in L-aspartic acid anhydrous crystals: Charge carrier effective masses point to semiconducting behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A. M.; Silva, B. P.; Sales, F. A. M.; Freire, V. N.; Moreira, E.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Maia, F. F., Jr.; Caetano, E. W. S.

    2012-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) computations within the local-density approximation and generalized gradient approximation in pure form and with dispersion correction (GGA+D) were carried out to investigate the structural, electronic, and optical properties of L-aspartic acid anhydrous crystals. The electronic (band structure and density of states) and optical absorption properties were used to interpret the light absorption measurements we have performed in L-aspartic acid anhydrous crystalline powder at room temperature. We show the important role of the layered spatial disposition of L-aspartic acid molecules in anhydrous L-aspartic crystals to explain the observed electronic and optical properties. There is good agreement between the GGA+D calculated and experimental lattice parameters, with (Δa, Δb, Δc) deviations of (0.029,-0.023,-0.024) (units in Å). Mulliken [J. Chem. Phys.JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.1740588 23, 1833 (1955)] and Hirshfeld [Theor. Chim. ActaTCHAAM0040-574410.1007/BF00549096 44, 129 (1977)] population analyses were also performed to assess the degree of charge polarization in the zwitterion state of the L-aspartic acid molecules in the DFT converged crystal. The lowest-energy optical absorption peaks related to transitions between the top of the valence band and the bottom of the conduction band involve O 2p valence states and C 1p and O 2p conduction states, with the carboxyl and COOH lateral chain group contributing significantly to the energy band gap. Among the calculated band gaps, the lowest GGA+D (4.49-eV) gap is smaller than the experimental estimate of 5.02 eV, as obtained by optical absorption. Such a wide-band-gap energy together with the small carrier effective masses estimated from band curvatures allows us to suggest that an L-aspartic acid anhydrous crystal can behave as a wide-gap semiconductor. A comparison of effective masses among directions parallel and perpendicular to the L-aspartic molecules layers reveals that charge

  2. Structural correlates of carrier protein recognition in tetanus toxoid-conjugated bacterial polysaccharide vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Kay; Gao, Fang; Derrick, Jeremy P; Bolgiano, Barbara

    2015-03-10

    An analysis of structure-antibody recognition relationships in nine licenced polysaccharide-tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccines was performed. The panel of conjugates used included vaccine components to protect against disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b, Neisseria meningitidis groups A, C, W and Y and Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 18C. Conformation and structural analysis included size exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering to determine size, and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching to evaluate the protein folding and exposure of Trp residues. A capture ELISA measured the recognition of TT epitopes in the conjugates, using four rat monoclonal antibodies: 2 localised to the HC domain, and 2 of which were holotoxoid conformation-dependent. The conjugates had a wide range of average molecular masses ranging from 1.8×10(6) g/mol to larger than 20×10(6) g/mol. The panel of conjugates were found to be well folded, and did not have spectral features typical of aggregated TT. A partial correlation was found between molecular mass and epitope recognition. Recognition of the epitopes either on the HC domain or the whole toxoid was not necessarily hampered by the size of the molecule. Correlation was also found between the accessibility of Trp side chains and polysaccharide loading, suggesting also that a higher level of conjugated PS does not necessarily interfere with toxoid accessibility. There were different levels of carrier protein Trp side-chain and epitope accessibility that were localised to the HC domain; these were related to the saccharide type, despite the conjugates being independently manufactured. These findings extend our understanding of the molecular basis for carrier protein recognition in TT conjugate vaccines.

  3. Crystal structure of Homo sapiens protein LOC79017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2010-02-08

    LOC79017 (MW 21.0 kDa, residues 1-188) was annotated as a hypothetical protein encoded by Homo sapiens chromosome 7 open reading frame 24. It was selected as a target by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) because it did not share more than 30% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known. The biological function of the protein has not been established yet. Parts of LOC79017 were identified as members of uncharacterized Pfam families (residues 1-95 as PB006073 and residues 104-180 as PB031696). BLAST searches revealed homologues of LOC79017 in many eukaryotes, but none of them have been functionally characterized. Here, we report the crystal structure of H. sapiens protein LOC79017 (UniGene code Hs.530024, UniProt code O75223, CESG target number go.35223).

  4. Water-soluble chitosan nanoparticles as a novel carrier system for protein delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun; FU Xiong; YANG LianSheng

    2007-01-01

    High MW chitosan (CS) solutions have already been proposed as vehicles for protein delivery. The aim of the present work is to investigate the potential utility of water-soluble chitosan (WSC) as vehicles to load and deliver proteins. WSC nanoparticles (WSC NP) with various formations were prepared based on ionic gelation of WSC with pentasodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) anions. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein drug incorporated into the WSC nanoparticles. Blank and BSA-loaded WSC nanoparticles were examined and determined to have a spherical shape with diameters between 35-190 nm, and zeta potential between 35-42 mV. FTIF confirmed that the tripolyphosphoric groups of TPP linked to the ammonium groups of WSC in the nanoparticles. Some factors affecting delivery properties of BSA have been investigated. Altering the concentration of BSA from 0.05 to 1 mg/mL enhanced the loading capacity of BSA but decreased loading efficiency simultaneously.Also, with the introduction of poly ethylene glycol (PEG), BSA release accelerated. Nanoparticle preparation from WSC with various deacetylation degrees (DDs) from 72.6% to 90% and MWs ranging from 3.5 to 15.8 kDa promoted loading efficiency and decreased the release rate. These results indicate that WSC nanoparticles are promising carriers for protein delivery.

  5. Prospects of riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) as an antifertility vaccine in male and female mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiga, P R; Subramanian, S; Rao, J; Kumar, M

    1997-01-01

    Riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) is obligatorily involved in yolk deposition of the vitamin, riboflavin, in the developing oocyte of the hen. The production of this protein is inducible by oestrogen. It is evolutionarily conserved in terms of its physicochemical, immunological and functional characteristics. It is the prime mediator of vitamin supply to the developing fetus in mammals, including primates. Passive immunoneutralization of the protein terminates pregnancy in rats. Active immunization of rats and bonnet monkeys with avian RCP prevents pregnancy without causing any adverse physiological effects of the mother in terms of her vitamin status, reproductive cycles or reproductive-endocrine profile. Denatured, linearized RCP is more effective in eliciting neutralizing antibodies capable of interfering with embryonic viability either before or during peri-implantation stages. Two defined stretches of sequential epitopes, one located at the N-terminus and the other at the C-terminus of the protein have been identified. Active immunization with either of these epitopes conjugated with diphtheria toxoid curtails pregnancy in rats and monkeys. Immunohistochemical localization of RCP on ovulated oocytes and early embryos shows that the antibodies cause degeneration only of early embryos. RCP is produced intra-testicularly and becomes localized on acrosomal surface of mammalian spermatozoa. Active immunization of male rats and monkeys with denatured RCP markedly reduces fertility by impairing the fertilizing potential of spermatozoa. These findings suggest that RCP, or its defined fragments, could be a novel, first generation vaccine for regulating fertility in both the sexes.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of papaya mosaic virus coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Todderud, E; Stubbs, G

    1993-12-05

    Papaya mosaic virus coat protein has been treated with trypsin and a large fragment of the intact protein has been crystallized in space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21 (unit cell dimensions: a = b = 110 A, c = 237 A). The crystals diffract to 3.5 A resolution. Crystals of the untreated protein have also been grown. The untreated protein crystals diffract to 4 A resolution, but have a large mosaic spread. They have the same space group as the trypsin-treated protein crystals, but a much smaller unit cell (a = b = 72 A, c = 240 A).

  7. Electrospun fish protein fibers as a biopolymer-based carrier – implications for oral protein delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    . The electrospinning process did not affect the functionality of the encapsulated insulin and it provided controlled release kinetics. The epithelial permeability enhancing effect and biocompatibility of the FSP fibers provide evidence for further investigating protein-based electrospun nanofibers for delivery...

  8. Conformational Exchange in a Membrane Transport Protein Is Altered in Protein Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Freed; P Horanyi; M Wiener; D Cafiso

    2011-12-31

    Successful macromolecular crystallography requires solution conditions that may alter the conformational sampling of a macromolecule. Here, site-directed spin labeling is used to examine a conformational equilibrium within BtuB, the Escherichia coli outer membrane transporter for vitamin B{sub 12}. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra from a spin label placed within the N-terminal energy coupling motif (Ton box) of BtuB indicate that this segment is in equilibrium between folded and unfolded forms. In bilayers, substrate binding shifts this equilibrium toward the unfolded form; however, EPR spectra from this same spin-labeled mutant indicate that this unfolding transition is blocked in protein crystals. Moreover, crystal structures of this spin-labeled mutant are consistent with the EPR result. When the free energy difference between substates is estimated from the EPR spectra, the crystal environment is found to alter this energy by 3 kcal/mol when compared to the bilayer state. Approximately half of this energy change is due to solutes or osmolytes in the crystallization buffer, and the remainder is contributed by the crystal lattice. These data provide a quantitative measure of how a conformational equilibrium in BtuB is modified in the crystal environment, and suggest that more-compact, less-hydrated substates will be favored in protein crystals.

  9. An evaluation of garlic lectin as an alternative carrier domain for insecticidal fusion proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elaine Fitches; Judith Philip; Gareth Hinchliffe; Leisbeth Vercruysse; Nanasaheb Chougule; John A.Gatehouse

    2008-01-01

    The mannosc-binding lectin GNA(snowdrop lectin)is used as a"carrier"domain in insecticidal fusion proteins which cross the insect gut after oral ingestion.A similar lectin from garlic bulb,ASAII,has been evaluated as an altemative"carrieff".Recombinant ASAII delivered orally to larvae of cabbage moth(Mamestra brassica;Lepidoptera)Was subse-quently detected in haemolymph,demonstrating transport.Fusion proteins comprising an insect neurotoxin.ButaIT(Buthus tamulus insecticidal toxin;red scorpion toxin)linked to the C-terminal region of ASAII or GNA were produced as recombinant proteins(GNA/ButaIT and ASA/ButaIT)by expression in Pichia pastoris.In both cases the C-terminal sequence of the lectin was truncated to avoid post-translational proteolysis.The GNA-containing fusion protein was toxic by injection to cabbage moth larvae(LD50≈250μg/g),and when fed had a negative effect on survival and growth.It also decreased the survival of cereal aphids(Sitobion avenae;Homoptera)from neonate to adult by>70%when fed.In contrast,the ASA-ButaIT fusion protein was non-toxic to aphids,and had no effect on lepidopteran lalwae,either when injected or when fed.However,intact ASA-ButaIT fusion protein was present in the haemolymph of cabbage moth larvae following ingestion,showing that transport of the fusion had occurred.The stabilities of GNA/BUtaIT and ASA/ButaIT to proteolysis in vivo after injection or ingestion differed,and this may be a factor in determining insecticidal activities.

  10. Effect of increased CRM₁₉₇ carrier protein dose on meningococcal C bactericidal antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lucia H; Blake, Milan S

    2012-04-01

    New multivalent CRM(197)-based conjugate vaccines are available for childhood immunization. Clinical studies were reviewed to assess meningococcal group C (MenC) antibody responses following MenC-CRM(197) coadministration with CRM(197)-based pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines. Infants receiving a total CRM(197) carrier protein dose of ∼50 μg and concomitant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP)-containing vaccine tended to have lower MenC geometric mean antibody titers and continued to have low titers after the toddler dose. Nevertheless, at least 95% of children in the reported studies achieved a MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer of ≥ 1:8 after the last infant or toddler dose. SBA was measured using an assay with a baby rabbit or human complement source. Additional studies are needed to assess long-term antibody persistence and MenC CRM(197) conjugate vaccine immunogenicity using alternative dosing schedules.

  11. Evaluation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Inhibitors as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Quenching Reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Molin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for a wide range of infections. Production of virulence factors and biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa are partly regulated by cell-to-cell communication quorum-sensing systems. Identification of quorum-quenching reagents which block the quorum-sensing process can facilitate development of novel treatment strategies for P. aeruginosa infections. We have used molecular dynamics simulation and experimental studies to elucidate the efficiencies of two potential quorum-quenching reagents, triclosan and green tea epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, which both function as inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP reductase (ENR from the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis pathway. Our studies suggest that EGCG has a higher binding affinity towards ENR of P. aeruginosa and is an efficient quorum-quenching reagent. EGCG treatment was further shown to be able to attenuate the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa.

  12. Isolation and characterization of an enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase gene from microalga Isochrysis galbana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Minggang; LIANG Kepeng; WANG Bo; SUN Xiuqin; YUE Yanyan; WAN Wenwen; ZHENG Li

    2013-01-01

    In most bacteria,plants and algae,fatty acid biosynthesis is catalyzed by a group of freely dissociable proteins known as the type Ⅱ fatty acid synthase (FAS Ⅱ) system.In the FAS Ⅱ system,enoylacyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) acts as a determinant for completing the cycles of fatty acid elongation.In this study,the cDNA sequence of ENR,designated as IgENR,was isolated from the microalga Isochrysis galbana CCMM5001.RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) was used to isolate the full-length cDNA ofIgENR (1 503 bp),which contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1 044 bp and encodes a protein of 347 amino acids.The genomic DNA sequence ofIgENR is interrupted by four introns.The putative amino acid sequence is homologous to the ENRs of seed plants and algae,and they contain common coenzymebinding sites and active site motifs.Under different stress conditions,real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) showed the expression ofIgENR was upregulated by high temperature (35℃),and downregulated by depleted nitrogen (0 mol/L).To clarify the mechanism of lipids accumulating lipids,other genes involved in lipids accumulation should be studied.

  13. Isolation and characterization of an enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase gene from microalga Isochrysis galbana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Minggang; Liang, Kepeng; Wang, Bo; Sun, Xiuqin; Yue, Yanyan; Wan, Wenwen; Zheng, Li

    2013-03-01

    In most bacteria, plants and algae, fatty acid biosynthesis is catalyzed by a group of freely dissociable proteins known as the type II fatty acid synthase (FAS II) system. In the FAS II system, enoylacyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) acts as a determinant for completing the cycles of fatty acid elongation. In this study, the cDNA sequence of ENR, designated as IgENR, was isolated from the microalga Isochrysis galbana CCMM5001. RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) was used to isolate the full-length cDNA of IgENR (1 503 bp), which contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1 044 bp and encodes a protein of 347 amino acids. The genomic DNA sequence of IgENR is interrupted by four introns. The putative amino acid sequence is homologous to the ENRs of seed plants and algae, and they contain common coenzymebinding sites and active site motifs. Under different stress conditions, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) showed the expression of IgENR was upregulated by high temperature (35°C), and downregulated by depleted nitrogen (0 mol/L). To clarify the mechanism of lipids accumulating lipids, other genes involved in lipids accumulation should be studied.

  14. Acyl-acyl carrier protein as a source of fatty acids for bacterial bioluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, D.M.; Meighen, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoic acid and ATP showed that the bioluminescence-related 32-kDa acyltransferase from Vibrio harveyi can specifically catalyze the deacylation of a /sup 3/H-labeled 18-kDa protein observed in extracts of this bacterium. The 18-kDa protein has been partially purified and its physical and chemical properties strongly indicate that it is fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP). Both this V. harveyi (/sup 3/H)acylprotein and (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl-ACP from Escherichia coli were substrates in vitro for either the V. harveyi 32-kDa acyltransferase or the analogous enzyme (34K) from Photobacterium phosphoreum. TLC analysis indicated that the hexane-soluble product of the reaction is fatty acid. No significant cleavage of either E. coli or V. harveyi tetradecanoyl-ACP was observed in extracts of these bacteria unless the 32-kDa or 34K acyltransferase was present. Since these enzymes are believed to be responsible for the supply of fatty acids for reduction to form the aldehyde substrate of luciferase, the above results suggest that long-chain acyl-ACP is the source of fatty acids for bioluminescence.

  15. Crystal structure of cytotoxin protein suilysin from Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingfeng; Huang, Bo; Du, Huamao; Zhang, Xuejun C; Xu, Jianguo; Li, Xuemei; Rao, Zihe

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDC) are pore forming toxins. A prototype of the CDC family members is perfringolysin O (PFO), which directly binds to the cell membrane enriched in cholesterol, causing cell lysis. However, an exception of this general observation is intermedilysin (ILY) of Streptococcus intermedius, which requires human CD59 as a receptor in addition to cholesterol for its hemolytic activity. A possible explanation of this functional difference is the conformational variation between the C-terminal domains of the two toxins, particularly in the highly conserved undecapeptide termed tryptophan rich motif. Here, we present the crystal structure of suilysin, a CDC toxin from the infectious swine pathogen Streptococcus suis. Like PFO, suilysin does not require a host receptor for hemolytic activity; yet the crystal structure of suilysin exhibits a similar conformation in the tryptophan rich motif to ILY. This observation suggests that the current view of the structure-function relationship between CDC proteins and membrane association is far from complete.

  16. Systematic comparison of crystal and NMR protein structures deposited in the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikic, Kresimir; Tomic, Sanja; Carugo, Oliviero

    2010-09-03

    Nearly all the macromolecular three-dimensional structures deposited in Protein Data Bank were determined by either crystallographic (X-ray) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods. This paper reports a systematic comparison of the crystallographic and NMR results deposited in the files of the Protein Data Bank, in order to find out to which extent these information can be aggregated in bioinformatics. A non-redundant data set containing 109 NMR - X-ray structure pairs of nearly identical proteins was derived from the Protein Data Bank. A series of comparisons were performed by focusing the attention towards both global features and local details. It was observed that: (1) the RMDS values between NMR and crystal structures range from about 1.5 Å to about 2.5 Å; (2) the correlation between conformational deviations and residue type reveals that hydrophobic amino acids are more similar in crystal and NMR structures than hydrophilic amino acids; (3) the correlation between solvent accessibility of the residues and their conformational variability in solid state and in solution is relatively modest (correlation coefficient = 0.462); (4) beta strands on average match better between NMR and crystal structures than helices and loops; (5) conformational differences between loops are independent of crystal packing interactions in the solid state; (6) very seldom, side chains buried in the protein interior are observed to adopt different orientations in the solid state and in solution.

  17. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species accelerate the expression of heme carrier protein 1 and enhance photodynamic cancer therapy effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiromu; Matsui, Hirofumi; Tamura, Masato; Majima, Hideyuki J; Indo, Hiroko P; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2014-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy using hematoporphyrin and its derivatives is clinically useful for cancer treatments. It has been reported that cancer cells incorporate hematoporphyrin and its derivatives via heme carrier protein 1, which is a proton-coupled folate transporter. However, the mechanism of this protein expression has not been elucidated. In general, the concentration of reactive oxygen species in cancer cells is higher than that in normal cells. We previously reported that reactive oxygen species from mitochondria involved in the expression of peptide transporter 1 and accelerate the uptake of 5-aminolevulinic acid, which is a precursor of protoporphyrin IX. We suggested mitochondrial reactive oxygen species also regulated the expression of heme carrier protein 1. In this study, we used a rat gastric mucosal cell line RGM1 and its cancer-like mutated cell line RGK1. We clarified the expression of heme carrier protein 1 increased in cancer cells and it decreased in manganese superoxide dismutase expressed cancer cells. In addition, the uptake level of hematoporphyrin and photodynamic therapeutic effect were also decreased in manganese superoxide dismutase expressed cancer cells in comparison with cancer cells. Thus, we concluded that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species regulated heme carrier protein 1 expression and photodynamic therapeutic effect.

  18. Protein-detergent interactions in single crystals of membrane proteins studied by neutron crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmins, P.A. [ILL, Grenoble (France); Pebay-Peyroula, E. [IBS-UJF Grenoble (France)

    1994-12-31

    The detergent micelles surrounding membrane protein molecules in single crystals can be investigated using neutron crystallography combined with H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O contrast variation. If the protein structure is known then the contrast variation method allows phases to be determined at a contrast where the detergent dominates the scattering. The application of various constraints allows the resulting scattering length density map to be realistically modeled. The method has been applied to two different forms of the membrane protein porin. In one case both hydrogenated and partially deuterated protein were used, allowing the head group and tail to be distinguished.

  19. Bioinformatic evidence for a widely distributed, ribosomally produced electron carrier precursor, its maturation proteins, and its nicotinoprotein redox partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haft Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes in the radical SAM (rSAM domain family serve in a wide variety of biological processes, including RNA modification, enzyme activation, bacteriocin core peptide maturation, and cofactor biosynthesis. Evolutionary pressures and relationships to other cellular constituents impose recognizable grammars on each class of rSAM-containing system, shaping patterns in results obtained through various comparative genomics analyses. Results An uncharacterized gene cluster found in many Actinobacteria and sporadically in Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Deltaproteobacteria, and one Archaeal plasmid contains a PqqE-like rSAM protein family that includes Rv0693 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Members occur clustered with a strikingly well-conserved small polypeptide we designate "mycofactocin," similar in size to bacteriocins and PqqA, precursor of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ. Partial Phylogenetic Profiling (PPP based on the distribution of these markers identifies the mycofactocin cluster, but also a second tier of high-scoring proteins. This tier, strikingly, is filled with up to thirty-one members per genome from three variant subfamilies that occur, one each, in three unrelated classes of nicotinoproteins. The pattern suggests these variant enzymes require not only NAD(P, but also the novel gene cluster. Further study was conducted using SIMBAL, a PPP-like tool, to search these nicotinoproteins for subsequences best correlated across multiple genomes to the presence of mycofactocin. For both the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR and iron-containing dehydrogenase families, aligning SIMBAL's top-scoring sequences to homologous solved crystal structures shows signals centered over NAD(P-binding sites rather than over substrate-binding or active site residues. Previous studies on some of these proteins have revealed a non-exchangeable NAD cofactor, such that enzymatic activity in vitro requires an artificial electron acceptor such

  20. Crystal structure of the petal death protein from carnation flower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplyakov, Alexey; Liu, Sijiu; Lu, Zhibing; Howard, Andrew; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat

    2005-12-20

    Expression of the PSR132 protein from Dianthus caryophyllus (carnation, clover pink) is induced in response to ethylene production associated with petal senescence, and thus the protein is named petal death protein (PDP). Recent work has established that despite the annotation of PDP in sequence databases as carboxyphosphoenolpyruvate mutase, the enzyme is actually a C-C bond cleaving lyase exhibiting a broad substrate profile. The crystal structure of PDP has been determined at 2.7 A resolution, revealing a dimer-of-dimers oligomeric association. Consistent with sequence homology, the overall alpha/beta barrel fold of PDP is the same as that of other isocitrate lyase/PEP mutase superfamily members, including a swapped eighth helix within a dimer. Moreover, Mg(2+) binds in the active site of PDP with a coordination pattern similar to that seen in other superfamily members. A compound, covalently bound to the catalytic residue, Cys144, was interpreted as a thiohemiacetal adduct resulting from the reaction of glutaraldehyde used to cross-link the crystals. The Cys144-carrying flexible loop that gates access to the active site is in the closed conformation. Models of bound substrates and comparison with the closed conformation of isocitrate lyase and 2-methylisocitrate lyase revealed the structural basis for the broad substrate profile of PDP.

  1. Crystal structure of nitrogen regulatory protein IIANtr from Neisseria meningitidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stammers David K

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NMB0736 gene of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 encodes the putative nitrogen regulatory protein, IIANtr (abbreviated to NM-IIANtr. The homologous protein present in Escherichia coli is implicated in the control of nitrogen assimilation. As part of a structural proteomics approach to the study of pathogenic Neisseria spp., we have selected this protein for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Results The NM-IIANtr was over-expressed in E. coli and was shown to be partially mono-phosphorylated, as assessed by mass spectrometry of the purified protein. Crystals of un-phosphorylated protein were obtained and diffraction data collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The structure of NM-IIANtr was solved by molecular replacement using the coordinates of the E. coli nitrogen regulatory protein IIAntr [PDB: 1A6J] as the starting model. The overall fold of the Neisseria enzyme shows a high degree of similarity to the IIANtr from E. coli, and the position of the phosphoryl acceptor histidine residue (H67 is conserved. The orientation of an adjacent arginine residue (R69 suggests that it may also be involved in coordinating the phosphate group. Comparison of the structure with that of E. coli IIAmtl complexed with HPr [PDB: 1J6T] indicates that NM-IIANtr binds in a similar way to the HPr-like enzyme in Neisseria. Conclusion The structure of NM-IIANtr confirms its assignment as a homologue of the IIANtr proteins found in a range of other Gram-negative bacteria. We conclude that the NM- IIANtr protein functions as part of a phosphorylation cascade which, in contrast to E. coli, shares the upstream phosphotransfer protein with the sugar uptake phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS, but in common with E. coli has a distinct downstream effector mechanism.

  2. Protein-protein binding detection with nanoparticle photonic crystal enhanced microscopy (NP-PCEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yue; Tian, Limei; Chen, Weili; Yu, Hojeong; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel microscopy-based biosensing approach that utilizes a photonic crystal (PC) surface to detect protein-protein binding with the functionalized nanoparticles as tags. This imaging approach utilizes the measurement of localized shifts in the resonant wavelength and resonant reflection magnitude from the PC biosensor in the presence of individual nanoparticles. Moreover, it substantially increases the sensitivity of the imaging approach through tunable localized surface plasmon resonant frequency of the nanoparticle matching with the resonance of the PC biosensor. Experimental demonstrations of photonic crystal enhanced microscopy (PCEM) imaging with single nanoparticle resolution are supported by Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) computer simulations. The ability to detect the surface adsorption of individual nanoparticles as tags offers a route to single molecule biosensing with photonic crystal biosensor in the future.

  3. Tragacanth as an oral peptide and protein delivery carrier: Characterization and mucoadhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, M; Ramchandran, L; Vasiljevic, T

    2016-06-05

    Biopolymers such as tragacanth, an anionic polysaccharide gum, can be alternative polymeric carrier for physiologically important peptides and proteins. Characterization of tragacanth is thus essential for providing a foundation for possible applications. Rheological studies colloidal solution of tragacanth at pH 3, 5 or 7 were carried out by means of steady shear and small amplitude oscillatory measurements. Tragacanth mucoadhesivity was also analyzed using an applicable rheological method and compared to chitosan, alginate and PVP. The particle size and zeta potential were measured by a zetasizer. Thermal properties of solutions were obtained using a differential scanning calorimetry. The solution exhibited shear-thinning characteristics. The value of the storage modulus (G') and the loss modulus (G″) increased with an increase in angular frequency (Ω). In all cases, loss modulus values were higher than storage values (G″>G') and viscous character was, therefore, dominant. Tragacanth and alginate showed a good mucoadhesion. Tragacanth upon dispersion created particles of a submicron size with a negative zeta potential (-7.98 to -11.92 mV). These properties were pH dependant resulting in acid gel formation at pH 3.5. Tragacanth has thus a potential to be used as an excipient for peptide/protein delivery.

  4. Submicellar bile salts stimulate phosphatidylcholine transfer activity of sterol carrier protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, A N; Cohen, D E

    1998-10-01

    To explore a potential role for sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2, also known as non-specific lipid transfer protein) in hepatocellular phospholipid trafficking, we examined the influence of submicellar bile salt concentrations on phosphatidylcholine (PC) transfer activity of SCP2. We measured rate constants for first-order transfer of sn-1 palmitoyl, sn-2 parinaroyl PC, a naturally fluorescent self-quenching phospholipid between model membranes. Purified bovine liver SCP2 promoted transfer of PC from donor to acceptor small unilamellar vesicles. Taurine- and glycine-conjugated bile salts (anionic steroid detergent-like molecules), at concentrations well below their critical micellar concentrations, stimulated PC transfer activity of SCP2 80- to 140-fold. Rate constants increased in proportion to bile salt concentration, temperature, and bile salt-membrane binding affinity. Sodium taurofusidate, a conjugated fungal bile salt analog, also activated PC transfer whereas no effect was observed with the anionic and non-ionic straight chain detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate and octylglucoside, respectively. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of PC transfer support a mechanism in which bile salts stimulate SCP2 activity by partitioning into donor vesicles and enhancing membrane association of SCP2. These results imply that under physiological conditions, SCP2 may contribute to hepatocellular selection and transport of biliary PCs.

  5. Secretory Carrier Membrane Protein (SCAMP Deficiency Influences Behavior of Adult Flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy eZheng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Secretory Carrier Membrane Proteins (SCAMPs are a group of tetraspanning integral membrane proteins evolutionarily conserved from insects to mammals and plants. Mammalian genomes contain five SCAMP genes SCAMP1-SCAMP5 that regulate membrane dynamics, most prominently membrane-depolarization and Ca2+-induced regulated secretion, a key mechanism for neuronal and neuroendocrine signaling. However, the biological role of SCAMPs has remained poorly understood primarily owing to the lack of appropriate model organisms and behavior assays. Here we generate Drosophila Scamp null mutants and show that they exhibit reduced lifespan and behavioral abnormalities including impaired climbing, deficiency in odor associated long-term memory, and a susceptibility to heat-induced seizures. Neuron-specific restoration of Drosophila Scamp rescues all Scamp behavioral phenotypes, indicating that the phenotypes are due to loss of neuronal Scamp. Remarkably, neuronal expression of human SCAMP genes rescues selected behavioral phenotypes of the mutants, suggesting the conserved function of SCAMPs across species. The newly developed Drosophila mutants present the first evidence that genetic depletion of SCAMP at the organismal level leads to varied behavioral abnormalities, and the obtained results indicate the importance of membrane dynamics in neuronal functions in vivo.

  6. Immunocontraceptive potential of recombinantly expressed minimized chicken riboflavin carrier protein (mini-RCP) in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sarada; Karandeb, Anjali A; Adiga, P Radhakantha

    2004-12-01

    Chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP; 219 AA) harbours four linear epitopes, constituted by the peptide residues 3-23, 64-83, 130-147 and 200-219. Antibodies to these sequences bioneutralize maternal RCP and provide protection from pregnancy in rodents. In order to overcome the major histocompatibility complex-dependent variability in immune response often encountered with use of single peptides for vaccination in genetically outbred populations, we have assembled a novel synthetic gene, incorporating in tandem the nucleotide sequences coding for all the four neutralizing epitopes of chicken RCP and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene product, mini-RCP has been characterized for its immunogenic properties and contraceptive potential in rodents. Immunization of rabbits and rats led to generation of antibodies against individual peptide components, as determined by enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA). However, immunized rats carried pregnancy to term and delivered healthy offsprings. Antisera from these rats exhibited decreased affinity of binding to the native protein. These findings suggest that the prospects of covalently-linked epitope peptides need to be cautiously evaluated during the design and development of peptide-based vaccines.

  7. Characterization of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene structure and promoter regulation by estrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nandini Vasudevan; Urvashi Bahadur; Paturu Kondaiah

    2001-03-01

    The chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) is an estrogen induced egg yolk and white protein. Eggs from hens which have a splice mutation in RCP gene fail to hatch, indicating an absolute requirement of RCP for the transport of riboflavin to the oocyte. In order to understand the mechanism of regulation of this gene by estrogen, the chicken RCP gene including 1 kb of the 5′ flanking region has been isolated. Characterization of the gene structure shows that it contains six exons and five introns, including an intron in the 5′ untranslated region. Sequence analysis of the 5′ flanking region does not show the presence of any classical, palindromic estrogen response element (ERE). However, there are six half site ERE consensus elements. Four deletion constructs of the 5′ flanking region with varying number of ERE half sites were made in pGL3 basic vector upstream of the luciferase-coding region. Transient transfection of these RCP promoter deletion constructs into a chicken hepatoma cell line (LMH2A) showed 6-12-fold transcriptional induction by a stable estrogen analogue, moxesterol. This suggests that the RCP gene is induced by estrogen even in the absence of a classical ERE and the half sites of ERE in this promoter may be important for estrogen induction.

  8. Determination of protein and solvent volumes in protein crystals from contrast variation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, J. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    By varying the relative values of protein and solvent scattering densities in a crystal, it is possible to obtain information on the shape and dimensions of protein molecular envelopes. Neutron diffraction methods are ideally suited to these contrast variation experiments because H/D exchange leads to large differential changes in the protein and solvent scattering densities and is structurally non-perturbing. Low resolution structure factors have been measured from cubic insulin crystals with differing H/D contents. Structure factors calculated from a simple binary density model, in which uniform scattering densities represent the protein and solvent volumes in the crystals, were compared with these data. The contrast variation differences in the sets of measured structure factors were found to be accurately fitted by this simple model. Trial applications to two problems in crystal structure determination illustrate how this fact may be exploited. (1) A translation function that employs contrast variation data gave a sharp minimum within 1-9{Angstrom} of the correctly positioned insulin molecule and is relatively insensitive to errors in the atomic model. (2) An ab initio phasing method for the contrast variation data, based on analyzing histograms of the density distributions in trial maps, was found to recover the correct molecular envelope.

  9. Crystallization and evaluation of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals for protein pH titration in the crystalline state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Wakari; Yagi, Daichi; Ishikawa, Takuya; Ohnishi, Yuki; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2008-05-01

    To observe the ionized status of the amino acid residues in proteins at different pH (protein pH titration in the crystalline state) by neutron diffraction, hen egg-white lysozyme was crystallized over a wide pH range (2.5-8.0). Crystallization phase diagrams at pH 2.5, 6.0 and 7.5 were determined. At pH diagram, and at pH > 4.5 the border shifted to the right (higher precipitant concentration). The qualities of these crystals were characterized using the Wilson plot method. The qualities of all crystals at different pH were more or less equivalent (B-factor values within 25-40). It is expected that neutron diffraction analysis of these crystals of different pH provides equivalent data in quality for discussions of protein pH titration in the crystalline state of hen egg-white lysozyme.

  10. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species accelerate the expression of heme carrier protein 1 and enhance photodynamic cancer therapy effect

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Hiromu; Matsui, Hirofumi; Tamura, Masato; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Indo, Hiroko P.; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy using hematoporphyrin and its derivatives is clinically useful for cancer treatments. It has been reported that cancer cells incorporate hematoporphyrin and its derivatives via heme carrier protein 1, which is a proton-coupled folate transporter. However, the mechanism of this protein expression has not been elucidated. In general, the concentration of reactive oxygen species in cancer cells is higher than that in normal cells. We previously reported that reactive oxygen ...

  11. Evolution of hepatitis B virus surface gene and protein among Iranian chronic carriers from different provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ramezani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives:  Iranian chronic HBV carrier’s population has shown a unique pattern of genotype D distri- bution all around the country. The aim of this study was to explore more details of evolutionary history of carriers based on structural surface proteins from different provinces.Materials and Methods: Sera obtained from 360 isolates from 12 Different regions of country were used for amplificationand sequencing of surface proteins. A detailed mutational analysis was undertaken.Results: The total ratio for Missense/Silent nucleotide substitutions was 0.96. Sistan and Kermanshah showed the lowest rate of evolution between provinces (P = 0.055. On the other hand, Khorasan Razavi and Khoozestan contained the highest ratio (P = 0.055. The rest of regions were laid between these two extremes. Azarbayjan and Guilan showed the highest proportion of immune epitope distribution (91.3% and 96%, respectively. Conversely, Sistan and Tehran harbored the least percentage (66.6% and 68.8%, respectively. Kermanshah province contained only 5.2%, whereas Isfahan had 54.5% of B cell epitope distribution. In terms of T helper epitopes, all provinces showed a somehow homogeneity: 22.58% (Fars to 46.6% (Khuz- estan. On the other hand, distribution of substitutions within the CTL epitopes showed a wide range of variation between 6.6% (Khuzestan and 63% (Kermanshah.Conclusion: Further to low selection pressure found in Iranian population, the variations between different regions designate random genetic drift within the surface proteins. These finding would have some applications in terms of specific antiviral regimen, design of more efficient vaccine and public health issues.

  12. Microphase Separation Controlled beta-Sheet Crystallization Kinetics in Fibrous Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, X.; Lu, Q; Kaplan, D; Cebe, P

    2009-01-01

    Silk is a naturally occurring fibrous protein with a multiblock chain architecture. As such, it has many similarities with synthetic block copolymers, including the possibility for e-sheet crystallization restricted within the crystallizable blocks. The mechanism of isothermal crystallization kinetics of e-sheet crystals in silk multiblock fibrous proteins is reported in this study. Kinetics theories, such as Avrami analysis which was established for studies of synthetic polymer crystal growth, are for the first time extended to investigate protein self-assembly in e-sheet rich Bombyx mori silk fibroin samples, using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and synchrotron real-time wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The Avrami exponent, n, was close to 2 for all methods and crystallization temperatures, indicating formation of e-sheet crystals in silk proteins is different from the 3-D spherulitic crystal growth found in synthetic polymers. Observations by scanning electron microscopy support the view that the protein structures vary during the different stages of crystal growth, and show a microphase separation pattern after chymotrypsin enzyme biodegradation. We present a model to explain the crystallization of the multiblock silk fibroin protein, by analogy to block copolymers: crystallization of e-sheets occurs under conditions of geometrical restriction caused by phase separation of the crystallizable and uncrystallizable blocks. This crystallization model could be widely applicable in other proteins with multiblock (i.e., crystallizable and noncrystallizable) domains.

  13. Crysalis: an integrated server for computational analysis and design of protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huilin; Feng, Liubin; Zhang, Ziding; Webb, Geoffrey I; Lin, Donghai; Song, Jiangning

    2016-02-24

    The failure of multi-step experimental procedures to yield diffraction-quality crystals is a major bottleneck in protein structure determination. Accordingly, several bioinformatics methods have been successfully developed and employed to select crystallizable proteins. Unfortunately, the majority of existing in silico methods only allow the prediction of crystallization propensity, seldom enabling computational design of protein mutants that can be targeted for enhancing protein crystallizability. Here, we present Crysalis, an integrated crystallization analysis tool that builds on support-vector regression (SVR) models to facilitate computational protein crystallization prediction, analysis, and design. More specifically, the functionality of this new tool includes: (1) rapid selection of target crystallizable proteins at the proteome level, (2) identification of site non-optimality for protein crystallization and systematic analysis of all potential single-point mutations that might enhance protein crystallization propensity, and (3) annotation of target protein based on predicted structural properties. We applied the design mode of Crysalis to identify site non-optimality for protein crystallization on a proteome-scale, focusing on proteins currently classified as non-crystallizable. Our results revealed that site non-optimality is based on biases related to residues, predicted structures, physicochemical properties, and sequence loci, which provides in-depth understanding of the features influencing protein crystallization. Crysalis is freely available at http://nmrcen.xmu.edu.cn/crysalis/.

  14. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and data collection of Sulfolobus solfataricus Sso6206, a novel highly conserved protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwan, Andrew R.; Liu, Huanting; Oke, Muse; Carter, Lester; Powers, Helen; Dorward, Mark; McMahon, Stephen A.; White, Malcolm F.; Naismith, James H., E-mail: naismith@st-and.ac.uk [The Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, The University, St Andrews KY16 9ST,Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-01

    The novel protein Sso6206 has been crystallized; interestingly, the protein may form large multi-subunit oligomers. Sso6206, a 10.5 kDa protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus, has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The protein crystallizes in space group P6{sub 1/5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 157.8, c = 307.3 Å. The crystals are hexagonal bipyramids and a data set has been collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Molecular replacement cannot be attempted as no convincing model can be identified. Crystals of selenomethionine-variant protein have not yet been obtained. Interestingly, crystal packing, gel filtration and mass spectrometry all suggest the native protein forms a multi-subunit oligomer consisting of >9 subunits.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the haem-binding protein HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Sabine; Paoli, Massimo, E-mail: max.paoli@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Pharmacy and Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    The haem binding protein HemS from Y. enterocolitica has been crystallized in complex with its ligand. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.6 Å in-house. Bacteria have evolved strategies to acquire iron from their environment. Pathogenic microbes rely on specialized proteins to ‘steal’ haem from their host and use it as an iron source. HemS is the ultimate recipient of a molecular-relay system for haem uptake in Gram-negative species, functioning as the cytosolic carrier of haem. Soluble expression and high-quality diffraction crystals were obtained for HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.86, b = 77.45, c = 114.09 Å, and diffract X-rays to 2.6 Å spacing in-house. Determination of the structure of the haem–HemS complex will reveal the molecular basis of haem binding.

  16. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  17. Inorganic Lead Halide Perovskite Single Crystals: Phase-Selective Low-Temperature Growth, Carrier Transport Properties, and Self-Powered Photodetection

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaminov, Makhsud I.

    2016-12-06

    A rapid, low-temperature, and solution-based route is developed for growing large-sized cesium lead halide perovskite single crystals under ambient conditions. An ultralow minority carrier concentration was measured in CsPbBr3 (≈108 holes per cm3, much lower than in any other lead halide perovskite and crystalline silicon), which enables to realize self-powered photodetectors with a high ON/OFF ratio (105).

  18. The Feasibility of Bulk Crystallization as an Industrial Purification and Production Technique for Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Johns, Michael R.; Pusey, Marc L.; White, Edward T.

    1998-01-01

    Bulk crystallization in stirred vessels is used industrially for the recovery and purification of many inorganic and organic materials. Although much has been written on the crystallization of proteins for X-ray diffraction analysis, very little has been reported on the application of bulk crystallization in stirred vessels. In this study, a 1-liter, seeded, stirred, batch crystallizer was used with ovalbumin as a model protein to test the feasibility of this crystallization method as a recovery and purification process for proteins. Results were obtained for ovalbumin solubility, nucleation thresholds, crystal breakage and crystal growth kinetics in bulk solution under a range of operating conditions of pH and ammonium sulphate concentration (Judge et al., 1996). Experiments were also performed to determine the degree of purification that can be achieved by the crystallization of ovalbumin from a mixture of proteins. The effect of the presence of these proteins upon the ovalbumin crystal growth kinetics was also investigated (Judge et al., 1995). All of these aspects are essential for the design of bulk crystallization processes which have not previously been reported for proteins. Results from a second study that investigated the effect of structurally different proteins on the solubility, crystal growth rates and crystal purity of chicken egg white lysozyme are also presented (Judge et al., 1997). In this case face growth rates were measured using lysozyme purified by liquid chromatography and the effect of the addition of specific protein impurities were observed on the (110) and (101) crystal faces. In these two studies the results are presented to show the feasibility and purifying ability of crystallization as a production process for proteins.

  19. Electron Cryomicroscopy of Membrane Proteins: Specimen Preparation for Two-Dimensional Crystals and Single Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt-Krey, Ingeborg; Rubinstein, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Membrane protein structure and function can be studied by two powerful and highly complementary electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) methods: electron crystallography of two-dimensional (2D) crystals and single particle analysis of detergent-solubilized protein complexes. To obtain the highest-possible resolution data from membrane proteins, whether prepared as 2D crystals or single particles, cryo-EM samples must be vitrified with great care. Grid preparation for cryo-EM of 2D crystals is possi...

  20. Preparation and evaluation of oleoyl-carboxymethy-chitosan (OCMCS) nanoparticles as oral protein carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Cheng, Xiao Jie; Dang, Qi Feng; Ma, Fang Kui; Chen, Xi Guang; Park, Hyun Jin; Kim, Bum Keun

    2012-02-01

    Oleoyl-carboxymethy chitosan (OCMCS) nanoparticles based on chitosan with different molecular weights (50, 170 and 820 kDa) were prepared by self-assembled method. The nanoparticles had spherical shape, positive surface charges and the mean diameters were 157.4, 274.1 and 396.7 nm, respectively. FITC-labeled OCMCS nanoparticles were internalized via the intestinal mucosa and observed in liver, spleen, intestine and heart following oral deliverance to carps (Cyprinus carpio). Extracellular products (ECPs) of Aeromonas hydrophila as microbial antigen was efficiently loaded to form OCMCS-ECPs nanoparticles and shown to be sustained release in PBS. Significantly higher (P < 0.05) antigen-specific antibodies were detected in serum after orally immunized with OCMCS-ECPs nanoparticles than that immunized with ECPs alone and non-immunized in control group in carps. These results implied that amphiphilic modified chitosan nanoparticles had great potential to be applied as carriers for the oral administration of protein drugs.

  1. Acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase activity from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Force, E; Cantisán, S; Serrano-Vega, M J; Garcés, R

    2000-10-01

    During sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seed formation there was an active period of lipid biosynthesis between 12 and 28 days after flowering (DAF). The maximum in-vitro acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase activities (EC 3.1.2.14) were found at 15 DAF, preceding the largest accumulation of lipid in the seed. Data from the apparent kinetic parameters, Vmax and Km, from seeds of 15 and 30 DAF, showed that changes in acyl-ACP thioesterase activity are not only quantitative, but also qualitative, since, although the preferred substrate was always oleoyl-ACP, the affinity for palmitoyl-ACP decreased, whereas that for stearoyl-ACP increased with seed maturation. Bisubstrate assays carried out at 30 DAF seemed to indicate that the total activity found in mature seeds is due to a single enzyme with 100/75/15 affinity for oleoyl-ACP/stearoyl-ACP/ palmitoyl-ACP. In contrast, at 15 DAF, enzymatic data together with partial sequences from cDNAs indicated the presence of at least two enzymes with different properties, a FatA-like thioesterase, with a high affinity for oleoyl-ACP, plus a FatB-like enzyme, with preference for long-chain saturated fatty acids, both being expressed during the active lipid biosynthesis period. Competition assays carried out with CAS-5, a mutant with a higher content of palmitic acid in the seed oil, indicated that a modified FatA-type thioesterase is involved in the mutant phenotype.

  2. Novel polymeric scaffolds using protein microbubbles as porogen and growth factor carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Ashwin; Thevenot, Paul; Dey, Jagannath; Shen, Jinhui; Sun, Man-Wu; Yang, Jian; Tang, Liping

    2010-02-01

    Polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds prepared by conventional techniques like salt leaching and phase separation are greatly limited by their poor biomolecule-delivery abilities. Conventional methods of incorporation of various growth factors, proteins, and/or peptides on or in scaffold materials via different crosslinking and conjugation techniques are often tedious and may affect scaffold's physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. To overcome such deficiencies, a novel two-step porous scaffold fabrication procedure has been created in which bovine serum albumin microbubbles (henceforth MB) were used as porogen and growth factor carriers. Polymer solution mixed with MB was phase separated and then lyophilized to create porous scaffold. MB scaffold triggered substantially lesser inflammatory responses than salt-leached and conventional phase-separated scaffolds in vivo. Most importantly, the same technique was used to produce insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-eluting porous scaffolds, simply by incorporating IGF-1-loaded MB (MB-IGF-1) with polymer solution before phase separation. In vitro such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds were able to promote cell growth to a much greater extent than scaffold soaked in IGF-1, confirming the bioactivity of the released IGF-1. Further, such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds elicited IGF-1-specific collagen production in the surrounding tissue in vivo. This novel growth factor-eluting scaffold fabrication procedure can be used to deliver a range of single or combination of bioactive biomolecules to substantially promote cell growth and function in degradable scaffold.

  3. Characterization of a structurally and functionally diverged acyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase from milkweed seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, E B; Coughlan, S J; Shanklin, J

    1997-04-01

    A cDNA for a structurally variant acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase was isolated from milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) seed, a tissue enriched in palmitoleic (16:1delta9)* and cis-vaccenic (18:1delta11) acids. Extracts of Escherichia coli that express the milkweed cDNA catalyzed delta9 desaturation of acyl-ACP substrates, and the recombinant enzyme exhibited seven- to ten-fold greater specificity for palmitoyl (16:0)-ACP and 30-fold greater specificity for myristoyl (14:0)-ACP than did known delta9-stearoyl (18:0)-ACP desaturases. Like other variant acyl-ACP desaturases reported to date, the milkweed enzyme contains fewer amino acids near its N-terminus compared to previously characterized delta9-18:0-ACP desaturases. Based on the activity of an N-terminal deletion mutant of a delta9-18:0-ACP desaturase, this structural feature likely does not account for differences in substrate specificities.

  4. Plasma protein corona modulates the vascular wall interaction of drug carriers in a material and donor specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Sobczynski

    Full Text Available The nanoscale plasma protein interaction with intravenously injected particulate carrier systems is known to modulate their organ distribution and clearance from the bloodstream. However, the role of this plasma protein interaction in prescribing the adhesion of carriers to the vascular wall remains relatively unknown. Here, we show that the adhesion of vascular-targeted poly(lactide-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA spheres to endothelial cells is significantly inhibited in human blood flow, with up to 90% reduction in adhesion observed relative to adhesion in simple buffer flow, depending on the particle size and the magnitude and pattern of blood flow. This reduced PLGA adhesion in blood flow is linked to the adsorption of certain high molecular weight plasma proteins on PLGA and is donor specific, where large reductions in particle adhesion in blood flow (>80% relative to buffer is seen with ∼60% of unique donor bloods while others exhibit moderate to no reductions. The depletion of high molecular weight immunoglobulins from plasma is shown to successfully restore PLGA vascular wall adhesion. The observed plasma protein effect on PLGA is likely due to material characteristics since the effect is not replicated with polystyrene or silica spheres. These particles effectively adhere to the endothelium at a higher level in blood over buffer flow. Overall, understanding how distinct plasma proteins modulate the vascular wall interaction of vascular-targeted carriers of different material characteristics would allow for the design of highly functional delivery vehicles for the treatment of many serious human diseases.

  5. High-throughput method for optimum solubility screening for homogeneity and crystallization of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hou [Moraga, CA; Kim, Rosalind [Moraga, CA; Jancarik, Jamila [Walnut Creek, CA

    2012-01-31

    An optimum solubility screen in which a panel of buffers and many additives are provided in order to obtain the most homogeneous and monodisperse protein condition for protein crystallization. The present methods are useful for proteins that aggregate and cannot be concentrated prior to setting up crystallization screens. A high-throughput method using the hanging-drop method and vapor diffusion equilibrium and a panel of twenty-four buffers is further provided. Using the present methods, 14 poorly behaving proteins have been screened, resulting in 11 of the proteins having highly improved dynamic light scattering results allowing concentration of the proteins, and 9 were crystallized.

  6. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  7. Isolation, purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of the crystals of HU protein from M. gallisepticum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, A. Yu.; Timofeev, V. I.; Boiko, K. M.; Korzhenevskii, D. A.; Rakitina, T. V.; Dorovatovskii, P. V.; Lipkin, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    HU proteins are involved in bacterial DNA and RNA repair. Since these proteins are absent in cells of higher organisms, inhibitors of HU proteins can be used as effective and safe antibiotics. The crystallization conditions for the M. gallisepticum HU protein were found and optimized by the vapor-diffusion method. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.91 Å resolution from the crystals grown by the vapor-diffusion method on a synchrotron source. The crystals of the HU protein belong to sp. gr. P41212 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 97.94 Å, c = 77.92 Å, α = β = γ = 90°.

  8. (Glyco)-protein drug carriers with an intrinsic therapeutic activity : The concept of dual targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, DKF; Molema, G; Moolenaar, F; deZeeuw, D; Swart, PJ

    1996-01-01

    Dual targeting can in principle be achieved by using intrinsically active carriers that not only deliver the conjugated drug but also otherwise influence the pathological process. Potential carriers of this kind are monoclonal antibodies, certain interferons and interleukins, as well as certain enzy

  9. Sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasala, R; Coudray, N; Abdine, A; Zhang, Z; Lopez-Redondo, M; Kirshenbaum, R; Alexopoulos, J; Zolnai, Z; Stokes, D L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, I

    2015-02-01

    Electron crystallography is well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. This technique relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, grown generally by reconstitution of purified membrane proteins into proteoliposomes under conditions favoring the formation of well-ordered lattices. Growing these crystals presents one of the major hurdles in the application of this technique. To identify conditions favoring crystallization a wide range of factors that can lead to a vast matrix of possible reagent combinations must be screened. However, in 2D crystallization these factors have traditionally been surveyed in a relatively limited fashion. To address this problem we carried out a detailed analysis of published 2D crystallization conditions for 12 β-barrel and 138 α-helical membrane proteins. From this analysis we identified the most successful conditions and applied them in the design of new sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization. Using these matrices we have run 19 crystallization screens for 16 different membrane proteins totaling over 1300 individual crystallization conditions. Six membrane proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals suitable for structure determination, indicating that these new matrices show promise to accelerate the success rate of membrane protein 2D crystallization.

  10. Automatic classification and pattern discovery in high-throughput protein crystallization trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbaa, Christian; Jurisica, Igor

    2005-01-01

    Conceptually, protein crystallization can be divided into two phases search and optimization. Robotic protein crystallization screening can speed up the search phase, and has a potential to increase process quality. Automated image classification helps to increase throughput and consistently generate objective results. Although the classification accuracy can always be improved, our image analysis system can classify images from 1,536-well plates with high classification accuracy (85%) and ROC score (0.87), as evaluated on 127 human-classified protein screens containing 5,600 crystal images and 189,472 non-crystal images. Data mining can integrate results from high-throughput screens with information about crystallizing conditions, intrinsic protein properties, and results from crystallization optimization. We apply association mining, a data mining approach that identifies frequently occurring patterns among variables and their values. This approach segregates proteins into groups based on how they react in a broad range of conditions, and clusters cocktails to reflect their potential to achieve crystallization. These results may lead to crystallization screen optimization, and reveal associations between protein properties and crystallization conditions. We also postulate that past experience may lead us to the identification of initial conditions favorable to crystallization for novel proteins.

  11. High Pressure Cryocooling of Protein Crystals: The Enigma of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, Sol M.

    2010-03-01

    A novel high-pressure cryocooling technique for preparation biological samples for x-ray analysis is described. The method, high-pressure cryocooling, involves cooling samples to cryogenic temperatures (e.g., 100 K) in high-pressure Helium gas (up to 200 MPa). It bears both similarities and differences to high-pressure cooling methods that have been used to prepare samples for electron microscopy, and has been especially useful for cryocooling of macromolecular crystals for x-ray diffraction. Examples will be given where the method has been effective in providing high quality crystallographic data for difficult samples, such as cases where ligands needed to be stabilized in binding sites to be visualized, or where very high resolution data were required. The talk concludes with a discussion of data obtained by high-pressure cryocooling that pertains to two of the most important problems in modern science: the enigma of water and how water affects the activity of proteins.

  12. Nucleation of protein crystals in a wide continuous supersaturation gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, A; Chayen, N; Saridakis, E; Nanev, Chr N

    2002-10-01

    By using a supersaturation gradient along a protein solution contained in a glass capillary tube, we modified the classical double pulse technique, thus substantially accelerating the procedure of measurement of nucleation parameters. Data for the number of crystal nuclei, n vs nucleation time, t, were obtained for hen-egg-white lysozyme, chosen as a model because of the availability of reliable solubility data in the literature. The stationary nucleation rate and the nucleation time lag have been measured. Quantitative data for the work required for nucleus formation (A(k) = 4.3 x 10 (-1)3 erg) and the size of the critical cluster (three molecules) were also obtained. Besides, it was observed that Ostwald ripening seems to play an important role for nucleation times longer than 150 min. Using the same technique, semi-quantitative investigations were performed with porcine pancreatic trypsin.

  13. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Diffraction Imaging Study of Protein Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z. W.

    2003-01-01

    The study of defects and growth of protein crystals is of importance in providing a fundamental understanding of this important category of systems and the rationale for crystallization of better ordered crystals for structural determination and drug design. Yet, as a result of the extremely weak scattering power of x-rays in protein and other biological macromolecular crystals, the extinction lengths for those crystals are extremely large and, roughly speaking, of the order of millimeters on average compared to the scale of micrometers for most small molecular crystals. This has significant implication for x-ray diffraction and imaging study of protein crystals, and presents an interesting challenge to currently available x-ray analytical techniques. We proposed that coherence-based phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging could provide a way to augment defect contrast in x-ray diffraction images of weakly diffracting biological macromolecular crystals. I shall examine the principles and ideas behind this approach and compare it to other available x-ray topography and diffraction methods. I shall then present some recent experimental results in two model protein systems-cubic apofemtin and tetragonal lysozyme crystals to demonstrate the capability of the coherence-based imaging method in mapping point defects, dislocations, and the degree of perfection of biological macromolecular crystals with extreme sensitivity. While further work is under way, it is intended to show that the observed new features have yielded important information on protein crystal perfection and nucleation and growth mechanism otherwise unobtainable.

  14. A novel microseeding method for the crystallization of membrane proteins in lipidic cubic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolek, Stefan Andrew; Bräuning, Bastian; Stewart, Patrick Douglas Shaw

    2016-04-01

    Random microseed matrix screening (rMMS), in which seed crystals are added to random crystallization screens, is an important breakthrough in soluble protein crystallization that increases the number of crystallization hits that are available for optimization. This greatly increases the number of soluble protein structures generated every year by typical structural biology laboratories. Inspired by this success, rMMS has been adapted to the crystallization of membrane proteins, making LCP seed stock by scaling up LCP crystallization conditions without changing the physical and chemical parameters that are critical for crystallization. Seed crystals are grown directly in LCP and, as with conventional rMMS, a seeding experiment is combined with an additive experiment. The new method was used with the bacterial integral membrane protein OmpF, and it was found that it increased the number of crystallization hits by almost an order of magnitude: without microseeding one new hit was found, whereas with LCP-rMMS eight new hits were found. It is anticipated that this new method will lead to better diffracting crystals of membrane proteins. A method of generating seed gradients, which allows the LCP seed stock to be diluted and the number of crystals in each LCP bolus to be reduced, if required for optimization, is also demonstrated.

  15. Extracellular matrix protein in calcified endoskeleton: a potential additive for crystal growth and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a key function of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) on seed crystals, which are isolated from calcified endoskeletons of soft coral and contain only CaCO 3 without any living cells. This is the first report that an ECMP protein extracted from a marine organism could potentially influence in modifying the surface of a substrate for designing materials via crystallization. We previously studied with the ECMPs from a different type of soft coral ( Sinularia polydactyla) without introducing any seed crystals in the process , which showed different results. Thus, crystallization on the seed in the presence of ECMPs of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins from soft coral. For understanding this interesting phenomenon, in vitro crystallization was initiated in a supersaturated solution on seed particles of calcite (1 0 4) with and without ECMPs. No change in the crystal growth shape occurred without ECMPs present during the crystallization process. However, with ECMPs, the morphology and phase of the crystals in the crystallization process changed dramatically. Upon completion of crystallization with ECMPs, an attractive crystal morphology was found. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the crystal morphologies on the seeds surface. The mineral phases of crystals nucleated by ECMPs on the seeds surface were examined by Raman spectroscopy. Although 50 mM Mg 2+ is influential in making aragonite in the crystallization process, the ECMPs significantly made calcite crystals even when 50 mM Mg 2+ was present in the process. Crystallization with the ECMP additive seems to be a technically attractive strategy to generate assembled micro crystals that could be used in crystals growth and design in the Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  16. LANGMUIR-BLODGETT NANOTEMPLATE CRYSTALLIZATION COMBINED TO LASER-MICROFRAGMENTATION UNIQUELY CHARACTERIZE PROTEINS CRYSTALS BY SYNCHROTRON MICRODIFFRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Nicolini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced microfragmentation of LB nanotemplate-induced protein crystals in glycerol solution results in distinct, coherently diffracting domains. Only crystals produced according to the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB nanotemplate technique reveal in all four proteins being tested (lysozyme, insulin, thaumatin and ribonuclease domains highly radiation resistant, while the crystals produced by the standard hanging drop crystallization method do not. Actually the very same laser exposure causes the disappearance of these “classical” protein crystals during the same time frame of 40 min needed for the laser cutting in all four proteins being tested. The microdiffraction of microcrystals prepered by the combination of Langmuir-Blodgett and Laser technologies proves that not only the Lysozyme survives the process, as shown recently by nanodifraction, but also all three other model proteins appear to behave similarly well, namely insulin, thaumatin and ribonuclease. The result confirms the emerging of a new biophysical technique uniquely usefull for synchrotron radiation studies based on small protein microcrystals uniquely radiation resistant when prepered by LB nanotemplate and subsequently fragmented by Laser.

  17. Overview of electron crystallography of membrane proteins: crystallization and screening strategies using negative stain electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannenga, Brent L; Iadanza, Matthew G; Vollmar, Breanna S; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy, or cryoEM, is an emerging technique for studying the three-dimensional structures of proteins and large macromolecular machines. Electron crystallography is a branch of cryoEM in which structures of proteins can be studied at resolutions that rival those achieved by X-ray crystallography. Electron crystallography employs two-dimensional crystals of a membrane protein embedded within a lipid bilayer. The key to a successful electron crystallographic experiment is the crystallization, or reconstitution, of the protein of interest. This unit describes ways in which protein can be expressed, purified, and reconstituted into well-ordered two-dimensional crystals. A protocol is also provided for negative stain electron microscopy as a tool for screening crystallization trials. When large and well-ordered crystals are obtained, the structures of both protein and its surrounding membrane can be determined to atomic resolution.

  18. Immunization of mice by Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as carriers of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 ORF2 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Hui-Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgroud Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 is a primary etiological agent of post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS, which is a disease of increasing importance to the pig industry worldwide. Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs have gained increasing interest for use in vaccines. Methods To study the potential of HMSNs for use as a protein delivery system or vaccine carriers. HMSNs were synthesized by a sol–gel/emulsion(oil-in-water/ethanol method, purified PCV2 GST-ORF2-E protein was loaded into HMSNs, and the resulting HMSN/protein mixture was injected into mice. The uptake and release profiles of protein by HMSNs in vitro were investigated. PCV2 GST-ORF2-E specific antibodies and secretion of IFN-γ were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, spleen lymphocyte proliferation was measured by the MTS method, and the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ were determined by flow cytometry. Results HMSNs were found to yield better binding capacities and delivery profiles of proteins; the specific immune response induced by PCV2 GST-ORF2-E was maintained for a relatively long period of time after immunization with the HMSN/protein complex. Conclusion The findings suggest that HMSNs are good protein carriers and have high potential for use in future applications in therapeutic drug delivery.

  19. Self-interaction chromatography as a tool for optimizing conditions for membrane protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Nagy, Lisa A; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Cogdell, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    The second virial coefficient, or B value, is a measurement of how well a protein interacts with itself in solution. These interactions can lead to protein crystallization or precipitation, depending on their strength, with a narrow range of B values (the 'crystallization slot') being known to promote crystallization. A convenient method of determining the B value is by self-interaction chromatography. This paper describes how the light-harvesting complex 1-reaction centre core complex from Allochromatium vinosum yielded single straight-edged crystals after iterative cycles of self-interaction chromatography and crystallization. This process allowed the rapid screening of small molecules and detergents as crystallization additives. Here, a description is given of how self-interaction chromatography has been utilized to improve the crystallization conditions of a membrane protein.

  20. Controlled in meso phase crystallization--a method for the structural investigation of membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kubicek

    Full Text Available We investigated in meso crystallization of membrane proteins to develop a fast screening technology which combines features of the well established classical vapor diffusion experiment with the batch meso phase crystallization, but without premixing of protein and monoolein. It inherits the advantages of both methods, namely (i the stabilization of membrane proteins in the meso phase, (ii the control of hydration level and additive concentration by vapor diffusion. The new technology (iii significantly simplifies in meso crystallization experiments and allows the use of standard liquid handling robots suitable for 96 well formats. CIMP crystallization furthermore allows (iv direct monitoring of phase transformation and crystallization events. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR crystals of high quality and diffraction up to 1.3 Å resolution have been obtained in this approach. CIMP and the developed consumables and protocols have been successfully applied to obtain crystals of sensory rhodopsin II (SRII from Halobacterium salinarum for the first time.

  1. Protein-complex structure completion using IPCAS (Iterative Protein Crystal structure Automatic Solution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weizhe; Zhang, Hongmin; Zhang, Tao; Fan, Haifu; Hao, Quan

    2015-07-01

    Protein complexes are essential components in many cellular processes. In this study, a procedure to determine the protein-complex structure from a partial molecular-replacement (MR) solution is demonstrated using a direct-method-aided dual-space iterative phasing and model-building program suite, IPCAS (Iterative Protein Crystal structure Automatic Solution). The IPCAS iteration procedure involves (i) real-space model building and refinement, (ii) direct-method-aided reciprocal-space phase refinement and (iii) phase improvement through density modification. The procedure has been tested with four protein complexes, including two previously unknown structures. It was possible to use IPCAS to build the whole complex structure from one or less than one subunit once the molecular-replacement method was able to give a partial solution. In the most challenging case, IPCAS was able to extend to the full length starting from less than 30% of the complex structure, while conventional model-building procedures were unsuccessful.

  2. Two Rab proteins, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2) and secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs), are present on immunoisolated parietal cell tubulovesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, B C; Goldenring, J R

    1997-01-01

    The tubulovesicles of gastric parietal cells sequester H+/K+-ATPase molecules within resting parietal cells. Stimulation of parietal cell secretion elicits delivery of intracellular H+/K+-ATPase to the apically oriented secretory canaliculus. Previous investigations have suggested that this process requires the regulated fusion of intracellular tubulovesicles with the canalicular target membrane. We have sought to investigate the presence of critical putative regulators of vesicle fusion on immunoisolated gastric parietal cell tubulovesicles. Highly purified tubulovesicles were prepared by gradient fractionation and immunoisolation on magnetic beads coated with monoclonal antibodies against the alpha subunit of H+/K+-ATPase. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of Rab11, Rab25, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2) and secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs) on immunoisolated vesicles. The same cohort of proteins was recovered on vesicles immunoisolated with monoclonal antibodies against SCAMPs and VAMP-2. In contrast, whereas immunoreactivities for syntaxin 1A/1B and synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP-25) were present in gradient-isolated vesicles, none of the immunoreactivity was associated with immunoisolated vesicles. The observation of VAMP-2 and two Rab proteins on immunoisolated H+/K+-ATPase-containing tubulovesicles supports the role for tubulovesicles in a regulated vesicle fusion process. In addition, the presence of SCAMPs along with Rab11 and Rab25 implicates the tubulovesicles as a critical apical recycling vesicle population. PMID:9230141

  3. [Advances in effects of insecticidal crystal proteins released from transgenic Bt crops on soil ecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue-Yong; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Man; Li, He; Zhou, Lang; Tang, Zong-Wen; Cao, Fei; Li, Wei

    2011-05-01

    With the large scale cultivation of transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal crystal proteins in the world, the problem of environmental safety caused by these Bt crops has received extensive attention. These insecticidal crystal proteins can be released into the soil continuously in the growing period of Bt plants. If their accumulation of the insecticidal crystal proteins exceeds consumption by insect larvae and degradation by the environmental factors, these insecticidal crystal proteins could constitute a hazard to non-target insects and soil microbiota. There are three main ways to release insecticidal crystal proteins into soil for Bt plants: root exudates, pollen falling, and crop reside returning. The Bt insecticidal crystal proteins released into soil can be adsorbed rapidly by active soil particles and the absorption equilibrium attained within 1-3 h. The adsorption protects Bt insecticidal crystal proteins against soil microbial degradation or enzyme degradation, which leads to remarkable prolong of the persistence of insecticidal activity. The change of soil microorganism species is an important index for evaluating the effect of Bt plants on soil ecology. The research showed that these insecticidal crystal proteins released by the Bt plant root exudates or Bt organism had no toxicity to the soil earthworms, nematodes, protozoa, bacteria and fungi; however, it could reduce the mycelium length of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and restrain AMF to form invasion unit. The influencing degree of Bt protein on soil enzyme activity varied with the releasing modes or growth period of Bt crops. Bt Cry1Ab protein can be taken up from soil by parts of following crops; however, different results were obtained with different commercial kits. To better understand the soil ecological evaluation about the insecticidal crystal proteins released from transgenic Bt crops, this review provides a comprehensive overview about the release

  4. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Ritsu; Kallen, C.B.; Babalola, G.O.; Rennert, H.; Strauss, J.F. III (Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)); Billheimer, J.T. (E.I. DuPont de Nemours, Inc., Wilmington, DE (United States))

    1991-01-15

    The authors report the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). The 1.3-kilobase (kb) cDNA contains an open reading frame which encompasses a 143-amino acid sequence which is 89% identical to the rat SCP{sub 2} amino acid sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence of the polypeptide reveals a 20-residue amino-terminal leader sequence in front of the mature polypeptide, which contains a carboxyl-terminal tripeptide (Ala-Lys-Leu) related to the peroxisome targeting sequence. The expressed cDNA in COS-7 cells yields a 15.3-kDa polypeptide and increased amounts of a 13.2-kDa polypeptide, both reacting with a specific rabbit antiserum to rat liver SCP{sub 2}. The cDNA insert hybridizes with 3.2- and 1.8-kb mRNA species in human liver poly(A){sup +} RNA. In human fibroblasts and placenta the 1.8-kb mRNA was most abundant. Southern blot analysis suggests either that there are multiple copies of the SCP{sub 2} gene in the human genome or that the SCP{sub 2} gene is very large. Coexpression of the SCP{sub 2} cDNA with expression vectors for cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme and adrenodoxin resulted in a 2.5-fold enhancement of progestin synthesis over that obtained with expression of the steroidogenic enzyme system alone. These findings are concordant with the notion that SCP{sub 2} plays a role in regulating steroidogenesis, among other possible functions.

  5. Novel Structural Components Contribute to the High Thermal Stability of Acyl Carrier Protein from Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Guen; Jung, Min-Cheol; Song, Heesang; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Bang, Eunjung; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Kim, Yangmee

    2016-01-22

    Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive, commensal bacterium that lives in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other mammals. It causes severe infections because of high antibiotic resistance. E. faecalis can endure extremes of temperature and pH. Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a key element in the biosynthesis of fatty acids responsible for acyl group shuttling and delivery. In this study, to understand the origin of high thermal stabilities of E. faecalis ACP (Ef-ACP), its solution structure was investigated for the first time. CD experiments showed that the melting temperature of Ef-ACP is 78.8 °C, which is much higher than that of Escherichia coli ACP (67.2 °C). The overall structure of Ef-ACP shows the common ACP folding pattern consisting of four α-helices (helix I (residues 3-17), helix II (residues 39-53), helix III (residues 60-64), and helix IV (residues 68-78)) connected by three loops. Unique Ef-ACP structural features include a hydrophobic interaction between Phe(45) in helix II and Phe(18) in the α1α2 loop and a hydrogen bonding between Ser(15) in helix I and Ile(20) in the α1α2 loop, resulting in its high thermal stability. Phe(45)-mediated hydrophobic packing may block acyl chain binding subpocket II entry. Furthermore, Ser(58) in the α2α3 loop in Ef-ACP, which usually constitutes a proline in other ACPs, exhibited slow conformational exchanges, resulting in the movement of the helix III outside the structure to accommodate a longer acyl chain in the acyl binding cavity. These results might provide insights into the development of antibiotics against pathogenic drug-resistant E. faecalis strains.

  6. The nanoscience behind the art of in-meso crystallization of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabara, Alexandru; Meikle, Thomas G; Newman, Janet; Peat, Thomas S; Conn, Charlotte E; Drummond, Calum J

    2017-01-05

    The structural changes occurring at the nanoscale level within the lipid bilayer and driving the in-meso formation of large well-diffracting membrane protein crystals have been uniquely characterized for a model membrane protein, intimin. Importantly, the order to order transitions taking place within the bilayer and the lipidic nanostructures required for crystal growth have been shown to be general, occurring for both the cubic and the sponge mesophase crystallization pathways. For the first time, a transient fluid lamellar phase has been observed and unambiguously assigned for both crystallization pathways, present at the earliest stages of protein crystallogenesis but no longer observed once the crystals surpass the size of the average lyotropic liquid crystalline domain. The reported time-resolved structural investigation provides a significantly improved and general understanding of the nanostructural changes taking place within the mesophase during in-meso crystallization which is a fundamental advance in the enabling area of membrane protein structural biology.

  7. Enhanced discrimination of malignant from benign pancreatic disease by measuring the CA 19-9 antigen on specific protein carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Yue

    Full Text Available The CA 19-9 assay detects a carbohydrate antigen on multiple protein carriers, some of which may be preferential carriers of the antigen in cancer. We tested the hypothesis that the measurement of the CA 19-9 antigen on individual proteins could improve performance over the standard CA 19-9 assay. We used antibody arrays to measure the levels of the CA 19-9 antigen on multiple proteins in serum or plasma samples from patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma or pancreatitis. Sample sets from three different institutions were examined, comprising 531 individual samples. The measurement of the CA 19-9 antigen on any individual protein did not improve upon the performance of the standard CA 19-9 assay (82% sensitivity at 75% specificity for early-stage cancer, owing to diversity among patients in their CA 19-9 protein carriers. However, a subset of cancer patients with no elevation in the standard CA 19-9 assay showed elevations of the CA 19-9 antigen specifically on the proteins MUC5AC or MUC16 in all sample sets. By combining measurements of the standard CA 19-9 assay with detection of CA 19-9 on MUC5AC and MUC16, the sensitivity of cancer detection was improved relative to CA 19-9 alone in each sample set, achieving 67-80% sensitivity at 98% specificity. This finding demonstrates the value of measuring glycans on specific proteins for improving biomarker performance. Diagnostic tests with improved sensitivity for detecting pancreatic cancer could have important applications for improving the treatment and management of patients suffering from this disease.

  8. Protein crystallization using microfluidic technologies based on valves, droplets, and SlipChip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2010-01-01

    To obtain protein crystals, researchers must search for conditions in multidimensional chemical space. Empirically, thousands of crystallization experiments are carried out to screen various precipitants at multiple concentrations. Microfluidics can manipulate fluids on a nanoliter scale, and it affects crystallization twofold. First, it miniaturizes the experiments that can currently be done on a larger scale and enables crystallization of proteins that are available only in small amounts. Second, it offers unique experimental approaches that are difficult or impossible to implement on a larger scale. Ongoing development of microfluidic techniques and their integration with protein production, characterization, and in situ diffraction promises to accelerate the progress of structural biology.

  9. Potential protective immunogenicity of tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid and Cross Reacting Material 197 (CRM197) when used as carrier proteins in glycoconjugates

    OpenAIRE

    Bröker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    When tetanus toxoid (TT), diphtheria toxoid (DT) or Cross Reacting Material 197 (CRM197), a non-toxic diphtheria toxin mutant protein, are used as carrier proteins in glycoconjugate vaccines, these carriers induce a protein specific antibody response as measured by in vitro assays. Here, it was evaluated whether or not glycoconjugates based on TT, DT or CRM197 can induce a protective immune response as measured by potency tests according to the European Pharmacopoeia. It could be shown, that ...

  10. The kidney in vitamin B12 and folate homeostasis: characterization of receptors for tubular uptake of vitamins and carrier proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, Henrik

    2006-07-01

    Over the past 10 years, animal studies have uncovered the molecular mechanisms for the renal tubular recovery of filtered vitamin and vitamin carrier proteins. Relatively few endocytic receptors are responsible for the proximal tubule uptake of a number of different vitamins, preventing urinary losses. In addition to vitamin conservation, tubular uptake by endocytosis is important to vitamin metabolism and homeostasis. The present review focuses on the receptors involved in renal tubular recovery of folate, vitamin B12, and their carrier proteins. The multiligand receptor megalin is important for the uptake and tubular accumulation of vitamin B12. During vitamin load, the kidney accumulates large amounts of free vitamin B12, suggesting a possible storage function. In addition, vitamin B12 is metabolized in the kidney, suggesting a role in vitamin homeostasis. The folate receptor is important for the conservation of folate, mediating endocytosis of the vitamin. Interaction between the structurally closely related, soluble folate-binding protein and megalin suggests that megalin plays an additional role in the uptake of folate bound to filtered folate-binding protein. A third endocytic receptor, the intrinsic factor-B12 receptor cubilin-amnionless complex, is essential to the renal tubular uptake of albumin, a carrier of folate. In conclusion, uptake is mediated by interaction with specific endocytic receptors also involved in the renal uptake of other vitamins and vitamin carriers. Little is known about the mechanisms regulating intracellular transport and release of vitamins, and whereas tubular uptake is a constitutive process, this may be regulated, e.g., by vitamin status.

  11. Moderate PEGylation of the carrier protein improves the polysaccharide-specific immunogenicity of meningococcal group A polysaccharide conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Yu, Weili; Wang, Yanfei; Hu, Tao

    2015-06-22

    Neisseria meningitidis can cause severe and fulminant diseases such as meningitis. Meningococcal capsular polysaccharide (PS) is a key virulence determinant that is not able to induce immunological memory. Conjugation of PS to a carrier protein can significantly increase the immunogenicity of PS and induce immunological memory. Due to the classically described carrier-induced epitopic suppression (CIES) mechanisms, a strong immune response against the carrier protein could suppress the immune response to PS after coadministration of free carrier protein with the conjugate vaccine. However, it was not clear whether suppressing or enhancing the protein-specific immunogenicity could improve the PS-specific immunogenicity of the conjugate vaccine. Thus, moderate PEGylation, extensive PEGylation and oligomerization were used to regulate the immunogenicity of tetanus toxoid (TT) in the conjugate vaccine (PS-TT). Moderate PEGylation led to a 2.7-fold increase in the PS-specific IgG titers elicited by PS-TT. In contrast, extensive PEGylation and oligomerization of TT led to 1.4-fold and 1.6-fold decrease in the PS-specific IgG titers elicited by PS-TT, respectively. The PS-specific immunogenicity of PS-TT can be increased by moderate PEGylation through mild suppression of the TT-specific immunogenicity. The PS-specific immunogenicity of PS-TT was decreased through significant suppression or enhancement of the TT-specific immunogenicity. Thus, our study contributes to understand the CIES mechanisms and improve the PS-specific immunogenicity of a meningococcal PS conjugate vaccine.

  12. Real-time processing of interferograms for monitoring protein crystal growth on the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudry, A.; Dupuis, N.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of using microscopic interferometric techniques to monitor the growth of protein crystals on the Space Station is studied. Digital image processing techniques are used to develop a system for the real-time analysis of microscopic interferograms of nucleation sites during protein crystal growth. Features of the optical setup and the image processing system are discussed and experimental results are presented.

  13. Protein deficiency in pregnant rats causes decreased levels of plasma somatomedin and its carrier protein associated with reduced plasma levels of placental lactogen and hepatic lactogenic receptor number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilistine, S J; Munro, H N

    1984-03-01

    Rats were fed either a 20% lactalbumin (control) or a 5% lactalbumin (low protein) diet for the last 2 weeks of pregnancy. At day 20 of gestation, rat serum placental lactogen levels, measured by radioreceptor assay, were significantly decreased by the low protein diet, thus confirming our earlier findings. The number of microsomal membrane lactogenic receptors, measured on the maternal livers at the end of pregnancy, was severely reduced in the livers of the low protein group, whereas protein deficiency did not affect binding affinity. Serum concentrations of somatomedin, measured by a competitive binding assay after acid treatment of the serum to remove endogenous carrier protein, were extensively reduced in the low protein group. The amounts of the somatomedin carrier proteins in the serum were assayed by separation on Sephacryl-S300 columns into higher- and lower-molecular-weight fractions peak 2 and peak 3, respectively. For the low protein diet group, both fractions showed a reduction in binding capacity, more marked in the case of peak 2. Since placental lactogen is known to influence output of somatomedin by the liver, we hypothesize that protein deficiency during pregnancy causes a fall in serum somatomedin level by reducing secretion of placental lactogen, which regulates its production by the liver.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of merohedrally twinned crystals of MJ0729, a CBS-domain protein from Methanococcus jannaschii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Kortazar, Danel; Lucas, María [Unidad de Cristalografía Macromolecular, CIC bioGUNE, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Ed. 800, 48160 Derio, Vizcaya (Spain); Martínez-Chantar, María Luz [Unidad de Metabolómica, CIC bioGUNE, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Ed. 801, 48160 Derio, Vizcaya (Spain); Astigarraga, Egoitz; Fernández, José Andrés [Departamento de Química-Física, Universidad del País Vasco UPV-EHU, Barrio Sarriena s/n, E-48940 Leioa (Spain); Sabas, Olatz [Unidad de Cristalografía Macromolecular, CIC bioGUNE, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Ed. 800, 48160 Derio, Vizcaya (Spain); Albert, Armando [Instituto de Química-Física ‘Rocasolano’, CSIC, c/Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Mato, Jose M. [Unidad de Metabolómica, CIC bioGUNE, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Ed. 801, 48160 Derio, Vizcaya (Spain); Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso, E-mail: amartinez@cicbiogune.es [Unidad de Cristalografía Macromolecular, CIC bioGUNE, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Ed. 800, 48160 Derio, Vizcaya (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Trigonal crystals of MJ0729 showing different degrees of merohedral twinning that may vary from perfect hemihedral twinning to perfect tetartohedral twinning were obtained upon slight variation of the pH. CBS domains are small protein motifs, usually associated in tandem, that are implicated in binding to adenosyl groups. Several genetic diseases in humans have been associated with mutations in CBS sequences, which has made them very promising targets for rational drug design. Trigonal crystals of the CBS-domain protein MJ0729 from Methanococcus jannaschii were grown by the vapour-diffusion method at acidic pH. Preliminary analysis of nine X-ray diffraction data sets using Yeates statistics and Britton plots showed that slight variation in the pH as well as in the buffer used in the crystallization experiments led to crystals with different degrees of merohedral twinning that may vary from perfect hemihedral twinning to perfect tetartohedral twinning.

  15. An Overview of Hardware for Protein Crystallization in a Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er-Kai Yan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein crystallization under a magnetic field is an interesting research topic because a magnetic field may provide a special environment to acquire improved quality protein crystals. Because high-quality protein crystals are very useful in high-resolution structure determination using diffraction techniques (X-ray, neutron, and electron diffraction, research using magnetic fields in protein crystallization has attracted substantial interest; some studies have been performed in the past two decades. In this research field, the hardware is especially essential for successful studies because the environment is special and the design and utilization of the research apparatus in such an environment requires special considerations related to the magnetic field. This paper reviews the hardware for protein crystallization (including the magnet systems and the apparatus designed for use in a magnetic field and progress in this area. Future prospects in this field will also be discussed.

  16. Influence of precipitating agents on thermodynamic parameters of protein crystallization solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavros, Philemon; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Nounesis, George

    2016-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is the most powerful method for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins to (near-)atomic resolution, but protein crystallization is a poorly explained and often intractable phenomenon. Differential Scanning Calorimetry was used to measure the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) of temperature-driven unfolding of two globular proteins, lysozyme, and ribonuclease A, in various salt solutions. The mixtures were categorized into those that were conducive to crystallization of the protein and those that were not. It was found that even fairly low salt concentrations had very large effects on thermodynamic parameters. High concentrations of salts conducive to crystallization stabilized the native folded forms of proteins, whereas high concentrations of salts that did not crystallize them tended to destabilize them. Considering the ΔH and TΔS contributions to the ΔG of unfolding separately, high concentrations of crystallizing salts were found to enthalpically stabilize and entropically destabilize the protein, and vice-versa for the noncrystallizing salts. These observations suggest an explanation, in terms of protein stability and entropy of hydration, of why some salts are good crystallization agents for a given protein and others are not. This in turn provides theoretical insight into the process of protein crystallization, suggesting ways of predicting and controlling it. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 642-652, 2016.

  17. Application of picosecond four-wave mixing and photoluminescence techniques for investigation of carrier dynamics in bulk crystals and heterostructures of GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarasiunas, K.; Malinauskas, T.; Kadys, A.; Aleksiejunas, R.; Sudzius, M.; Miasojedovas, S.; Jursenas, S.; Zukauskas, A. [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio ave. 9-3, 2040 Vilnius (Lithuania); Gogova, D.; Kakanakova-Georgieva, A.; Janzen, E.; Larsson, H.; Monemar, B. [Department of Physics and Measurement Technology, Linkoeping University (Sweden); Gibart, P.; Beaumont, B. [LUMILOG, 2720, Chemin Saint Bernard, Les Moulins I, 06220 Vallauris (France)

    2005-02-01

    Complementary characterization of the highly-excited nitrides has been performed by using time-resolved four-wave mixing and photoluminescence techniques. Defect-density and excitation dependent carrier recombination and transport have been studied in GaN heterostructures and free-standing crystals, grown by various technologies (hot-wall MOCVD, standard MOCVD, and HVPE) on different substrates (6H-SiC, 4H-SiC, or sapphire). The determined value of carrier lifetime varied from 300 ps in the GaN/SiC epilayers up to 3 ns in the bulk crystals, while the bipolar diffusion coefficient D was found to be in the range from 1.5 cm{sup 2}/s to 2.9 cm{sup 2}/s, correspondingly. An increase of D with excitation density in bulk HVPE crystals was attributed to screening of potential barriers around dislocations. A complete saturation of FWM diffraction in hot-wall MOCVD grown GaN/SiC heterostructures revealed a low threshold of stimulated recombination (0.5 mJ/cm{sup 2}), as confirmed by spectra and intensity of photoluminesce. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. B-cell epitope of beta toxin of Clostridium perfringens genetically conjugated to a carrier protein: expression, purification and characterization of the chimeric protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Bharti; Solanki, Amit Kumar; Kaushik, Himani; Dixit, Aparna; Garg, Lalit C

    2014-10-01

    Beta toxin (btx) is the prime virulence factor for the pathogenesis of Clostridium perfringens type C strain, known to cause necrotic enteritis and enterotoxaemia in mammalian species. The existing vaccines targeting btx are formaldehyde inactivated culture filtrates of Clostridium. These filtrates raise antigenic load in the host leading to nonspecific and poor responses. The present study aimed to overcome these drawbacks and generate a chimeric protein carrying in silico identified B-cell epitope of btx fused with a carrier protein as a vaccine candidate. Using bioinformatic tools, three stretches of amino acids were predicted as putative B-cell epitopes. One of the epitopes spanning 140-156 amino acid residues was genetically conjugated with B-subunit of heat labile enterotoxin (LTB) of Escherichia coli and expressed as a translational fusion in Vibrio cholerae secretory expression system. High level expression of the recombinant fusion protein rLTB-Btx140-156 was obtained and the protein was successfully purified. The recombinant protein retained the native LTB property to pentamerize and bind to GM1 ganglioside receptor of LTB. The antigenicity of both the epitope and the carrier protein was maintained in fusion protein as indicated by immunoblotting against anti-LTB and anti-btx antibody. The rLTB-Btx140-156 fusion protein therefore can be evaluated as a potential vaccine candidate against C. perfringens.

  19. Effects of protein engineering and rational mutagenesis on crystal lattice of single chain antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu, Sibel; Hyun, Jeongmin; Pai, Jennifer C; Johnson, Jennifer L; Entzminger, Kevin; Jain, Avni; Heaner, David P; Morales, Ivan A; Truskett, Thomas M; Maynard, Jennifer A; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2014-09-01

    Protein crystallization is dependent upon, and sensitive to, the intermolecular contacts that assist in ordering proteins into a three-dimensional lattice. Here we used protein engineering and mutagenesis to affect the crystallization of single chain antibody fragments (scFvs) that recognize the EE epitope (EYMPME) with high affinity. These hypercrystallizable scFvs are under development to assist difficult proteins, such as membrane proteins, in forming crystals, by acting as crystallization chaperones. Guided by analyses of intermolecular crystal lattice contacts, two second-generation anti-EE scFvs were produced, which bind to proteins with installed EE tags. Surprisingly, although noncomplementarity determining region (CDR) lattice residues from the parent scFv framework remained unchanged through the processes of protein engineering and rational design, crystal lattices of the derivative scFvs differ. Comparison of energy calculations and the experimentally-determined lattice interactions for this basis set provides insight into the complexity of the forces driving crystal lattice choice and demonstrates the availability of multiple well-ordered surface features in our scFvs capable of forming versatile crystal contacts.

  20. Physical Stability of Octenyl Succinate-Modified Polysaccharides and Whey Proteins for Potential Use as Bioactive Carriers in Food Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerta-Gomez, Alex F; Castell-Perez, M Elena

    2015-06-01

    The high cost and potential toxicity of biodegradable polymers like poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid (PLGA) has increased the interest in natural and modified biopolymers as bioactive carriers. This study characterized the physical stability (water sorption and state transition behavior) of selected starch and proteins: octenyl succinate-modified depolymerized waxy corn starch (DWxCn), waxy rice starch (DWxRc), phytoglycogen, whey protein concentrate (80%, WPC), whey protein isolate (WPI), and α-lactalbumin (α-L) to determine their potential as carriers of bioactive compounds under different environmental conditions. After enzyme modification and particle size characterization, glass transition temperature and moisture isotherms were used to characterize the systems. DWxCn and DWxRc had increased water sorption compared to native starch. The level of octenyl succinate anhydrate (OSA) modification (3% and 7%) did not reduce the water sorption of the DWxCn and phytoglycogen samples. The Guggenheim-Andersen-de Boer model indicated that native waxy corn had significantly (P whey proteins had higher glass transition temperature (Tg) values. On the other hand, depolymerized waxy starches at 7%-OSA modification had a "melted" appearance when exposed to environments with high relative humidity (above 70%) after 10 days at 23 °C. The use of depolymerized and OSA-modified polysaccharides blended with proteins created more stable blends of biopolymers. Hence, this biopolymer would be suitable for materials exposed to high humidity environments in food applications.

  1. Crystallization and X-ray analysis of the T = 4 particle of hepatitis B capsid protein with an N-terminal extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Wen Siang [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); McNae, Iain W.; Ho, Kok Lian; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D., E-mail: m.walkinshaw@ed.ac.uk [Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Michael Swann Building, King’s Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JR,Scotland (United Kingdom); Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2007-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus capsids have significant potential as carriers for immunogenic peptides. The crystal structure of the T = 4 particle of hepatitis B core protein containing an N-terminal extension reveals that the fusion peptide is exposed on the exterior of the particle. Hepatitis B core (HBc) particles have been extensively exploited as carriers for foreign immunological epitopes in the development of multicomponent vaccines and diagnostic reagents. Crystals of the T = 4 HBc particle were grown in PEG 20 000, ammonium sulfate and various types of alcohols. A temperature jump from 277 or 283 to 290 K was found to enhance crystal growth. A crystal grown using MPD as a cryoprotectant diffracted X-rays to 7.7 Å resolution and data were collected to 99.6% completeness at 8.9 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 352.3, b = 465.5, c = 645.0 Å. The electron-density map reveals a protrusion that is consistent with the N-terminus extending out from the surface of the capsid. The structure presented here supports the idea that N-terminal insertions can be exploited in the development of diagnostic reagents, multicomponent vaccines and delivery vehicles into mammalian cells.

  2. A historical perspective on protein crystallization from 1840 to the present day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giegé, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Protein crystallization has been known since 1840 and can prove to be straightforward but, in most cases, it constitutes a real bottleneck. This stimulated the birth of the biocrystallogenesis field with both 'practical' and 'basic' science aims. In the early years of biochemistry, crystallization was a tool for the preparation of biological substances. Today, biocrystallogenesis aims to provide efficient methods for crystal fabrication and a means to optimize crystal quality for X-ray crystallography. The historical development of crystallization methods for structural biology occurred first in conjunction with that of biochemical and genetic methods for macromolecule production, then with the development of structure determination methodologies and, recently, with routine access to synchrotron X-ray sources. Previously, the identification of conditions that sustain crystal growth occurred mostly empirically but, in recent decades, this has moved progressively towards more rationality as a result of a deeper understanding of the physical chemistry of protein crystal growth and the use of idea-driven screening and high-throughput procedures. Protein and nucleic acid engineering procedures to facilitate crystallization, as well as crystallization methods in gelled-media or by counter-diffusion, represent recent important achievements, although the underlying concepts are old. The new nanotechnologies have brought a significant improvement in the practice of protein crystallization. Today, the increasing number of crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank could mean that crystallization is no longer a bottleneck. This is not the case, however, because structural biology projects always become more challenging and thereby require adapted methods to enable the growth of the appropriate crystals, notably macromolecular assemblages.

  3. Crystal Structure of the Human Astrovirus Capsid Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Yukimatsu; Harper, Justin; Dryden, Kelly A.; Yeager, Mark; Méndez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human astrovirus (HAstV) is a leading cause of viral diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. HAstV is a nonenveloped virus with a T=3 capsid and a positive-sense RNA genome. The capsid protein (CP) of HAstV is synthesized as a 90-kDa precursor (VP90) that can be divided into three linear domains: a conserved N-terminal domain, a hypervariable domain, and an acidic C-terminal domain. Maturation of HAstV requires proteolytic processing of the astrovirus CP both inside and outside the host cell, resulting in the removal of the C-terminal domain and the breakdown of the rest of the CP into three predominant protein species with molecular masses of ∼34, 27/29, and 25/26 kDa, respectively. We have now solved the crystal structure of VP9071–415 (amino acids [aa] 71 to 415 of VP90) of human astrovirus serotype 8 at a 2.15-Å resolution. VP9071–415 encompasses the conserved N-terminal domain of VP90 but lacks the hypervariable domain, which forms the capsid surface spikes. The structure of VP9071–415 is comprised of two domains: an S domain, which adopts the typical jelly-roll β-barrel fold, and a P1 domain, which forms a squashed β-barrel consisting of six antiparallel β-strands similar to what was observed in the hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid structure. Fitting of the VP9071–415 structure into the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) maps of HAstV produced an atomic model for a continuous, T=3 icosahedral capsid shell. Our pseudoatomic model of the human HAstV capsid shell provides valuable insights into intermolecular interactions required for capsid assembly and trypsin-mediated proteolytic maturation needed for virus infectivity. Such information has potential applications in the development of a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine as well as small-molecule drugs targeting astrovirus assembly/maturation. IMPORTANCE Human astrovirus (HAstV) is a leading cause of viral diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. As a nonenveloped virus

  4. Infrared light-induced protein crystallization. Structuring of protein interfacial water and periodic self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowacz, Magdalena; Marchel, Mateusz; Juknaité, Lina; Esperança, José M. S. S.; Romão, Maria João; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N.

    2017-01-01

    We show that a physical trigger, a non-ionizing infrared (IR) radiation at wavelengths strongly absorbed by liquid water, can be used to induce and kinetically control protein (periodic) self-assembly in solution. This phenomenon is explained by considering the effect of IR light on the structuring of protein interfacial water. Our results indicate that the IR radiation can promote enhanced mutual correlations of water molecules in the protein hydration shell. We report on the radiation-induced increase in both the strength and cooperativeness of H-bonds. The presence of a structured dipolar hydration layer can lead to attractive interactions between like-charged biomacromolecules in solution (and crystal nucleation events). Furthermore, our study suggests that enveloping the protein within a layer of structured solvent (an effect enhanced by IR light) can prevent the protein non-specific aggregation favoring periodic self-assembly. Recognizing the ability to affect protein-water interactions by means of IR radiation may have important implications for biological and bio-inspired systems.

  5. Fission of SNX-BAR-coated endosomal retrograde transport carriers is promoted by the dynamin-related protein Vps1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Richard J; Liu, Jingxuan; West, Matthew; Wang, Jing; Odorizzi, Greg; Burd, Christopher G

    2014-03-03

    Retromer is an endosomal sorting device that orchestrates capture and packaging of cargo into transport carriers coated with sorting nexin BAR domain proteins (SNX-BARs). We report that fission of retromer SNX-BAR-coated tubules from yeast endosomes is promoted by Vps1, a dynamin-related protein that localizes to endosomes decorated by retromer SNX-BARs and Mvp1, a SNX-BAR that is homologous to human SNX8. Mvp1 exhibits potent membrane remodeling activity in vitro, and it promotes association of Vps1 with the endosome in vivo. Retrograde transport carriers bud from the endosome coated by retromer and Mvp1, and cargo export is deficient in mvp1- and vps1-null cells, but with distinct endpoints; cargo export is delayed in mvp1-null cells, but cargo export completely fails in vps1-null cells. The results indicate that Mvp1 promotes Vps1-mediated fission of retromer- and Mvp1-coated tubules that bud from the endosome, revealing a functional link between the endosomal sorting and fission machineries to produce retrograde transport carriers.

  6. Solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Sterol Carrier Protein 2 Like 2 (SCP2L2) Reveal the Insecticide Specific Structural Characteristics of SCP2 Proteins in Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Ahuja, Ashish; Potula, Purushotam Reddy; Ummanni, Ramesh

    2016-09-01

    Sterol carrier protein 2 like 2 from Aedes aegypti (AeSCP2L2) plays an important role in lipid transport in mosquitoes for its routine metabolic processes. Repeated unsuccessful attempts to crystallize ligand free SCP2L2 prompted us to undertake nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine its three-dimensional structure. We report here the three-dimensional structures and dynamics of apo-AeSCP2L2 and its complex with palmitate. The (15)N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectrum of apo-AeSCP2L2 displayed multiple peaks for some of the amide resonances, implying the presence of multiple conformations in solution, which are transformed to a single conformation upon formation of the complex with plamitate. The three-dimensional structures of apo-AeSCP2L2 and palmitated AeSCP2L2 reveal an α/β mixed fold, with five β-strands and four α-helices, very similar to the other SCP2 protein structures. Unlike the crystal structure of palmitated AeSCP2L2, both solution structures are monomeric. It is further confirmed by the rotational correlation times determined by NMR relaxation times (T1 and T2) of the amide protons. In addition, the palmitated AeSCP2L2 structure contains two palmitate ligands, bound in the binding pocket, unlike the three palmitates bound in the dimeric form of AeSCP2L2 in the crystals. The relaxation experiments revealed that complex formation significantly reduces the dynamics of the protein in solution.

  7. Effects of buoyancy-driven convection on nucleation and growth of protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanev, Christo N; Penkova, Anita; Chayen, Naomi

    2004-11-01

    Protein crystallization has been studied in presence or absence of buoyancy-driven convection. Gravity-driven flow was created, or suppressed, in protein solutions by means of vertically directed density gradients that were caused by generating suitable temperature gradients. The presence of enhanced mixing was demonstrated directly by experiments with crustacyanin, a blue-colored protein, and other materials. Combined with the vertical tube position the enhanced convection has two main effects. First, it reduces the number of nucleated hen-egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals, as compared with those in a horizontal capillary. By enabling better nutrition from the protein in the solution, convection results in growth of fewer larger HEWL crystals. Second, we observe that due to convection, trypsin crystals grow faster. Suppression of convection, achieved by decreasing solution density upward in the capillary, can to some extent mimic conditions of growth in microgravity. Thus, impurity supply, which may have a detrimental effect on crystal quality, was avoided.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of an SH3 domain from the IB1 scaffold protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dar, Imran; Bonny, Christophe; Pedersen, Jan Torleif

    2003-01-01

    IB1 is a mammalian scaffold protein that interacts with components of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signal-transduction pathway mainly via its protein-protein interaction domains. Crystallization of the key Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of IB1 has been achieved. Crystallization experiments....... These are the first crystallographic data on a scaffold molecule such as IB1 to be reported....

  9. High carrier mobility of Sn-doped polycrystalline-Ge films on insulators by thickness-dependent low-temperature solid-phase crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoh, Taizoh; Kai, Yuki; Matsumura, Ryo; Moto, Kenta; Miyao, Masanobu

    2016-12-01

    To realize the advanced thin-film transistors (TFTs), high-carrier-mobility semiconductor films on insulator structures should be fabricated with low-temperature processing conditions (≤500 °C). To achieve this, we investigated the solid-phase crystallization of amorphous-GeSn films on insulating substrates under a wide range of Sn concentrations (0%-20%), film thicknesses (30-500 nm), and annealing temperatures (380-500 °C). Our results reveal that a Sn concentration close to the solid solubility of Sn in Ge (˜2%) is effective in increasing the grain-size of poly-GeSn. In addition, we discovered that the carrier mobility depends on the film thickness, where the mobilities are determined by the counterbalance between two different carrier scattering mechanisms. Here, vacancy-related defects dominate the carrier scattering near the insulating substrates (≤˜120 nm), and grain-size determined by bulk nucleation dominates the grain-boundary scattering of thick films (≥˜200 nm). Consequently, we obtained the maximum mobilities in samples with a Sn concentration of 2% and a film thickness of 200 nm. The effect of increasing the grain-size of poly-GeSn by lowering the annealing temperature was also clarified. By combining these results, a very high carrier mobility of 320 cm2/Vs was obtained at a low temperature of 380 °C. This mobility is about 2.5 times as high as previously reported data for Ge and GeSn films grown at low temperatures (≤500 °C). Our technique therefore opens up the possibility of high-speed TFTs for use in the next generation of electronics.

  10. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttitta, Christina M; Ericson, Daniel L; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s(-1)) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  11. A clinical trial examining the effect of increased total CRM(197) carrier protein dose on the antibody response to Haemophilus influenzae type b CRM(197) conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usonis, Vytautas; Bakasenas, Vytautas; Lockhart, Stephen; Baker, Sherryl; Gruber, William; Laudat, France

    2008-08-18

    CRM(197) is a carrier protein in certain conjugate vaccines. When multiple conjugate vaccines with the same carrier protein are administered simultaneously, reduced response to vaccines and/or antigens related to the carrier protein may occur. This study examined responses of infants who, in addition to diphtheria toxoid/tetanus toxoid/acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) received either diphtheria CRM(197)-based Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (HbOC) or HbOC and a diphtheria CRM(197)-based combination 9-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine/meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine. Administration of conjugate vaccines with CRM(197) carrier protein load >50 microg did not reduce response to CRM(197) conjugate vaccines or immunogenicity to immunologically cross-reactive diphtheria toxoid.

  12. X-ray Structure of Snow Flea Antifreeze Protein Determined by Racemic Crystallization of Synthetic Protein Enantiomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentelute, Brad L.; Gates, Zachary P.; Tereshko, Valentina; Dashnau, Jennifer L.; Vanderkooi, Jane M.; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Kent, Stephen B.H. (UPENN); (UC)

    2008-08-20

    Chemical protein synthesis and racemic protein crystallization were used to determine the X-ray structure of the snow flea antifreeze protein (sfAFP). Crystal formation from a racemic solution containing equal amounts of the chemically synthesized proteins d-sfAFP and l-sfAFP occurred much more readily than for l-sfAFP alone. More facile crystal formation also occurred from a quasi-racemic mixture of d-sfAFP and l-Se-sfAFP, a chemical protein analogue that contains an additional -SeCH2- moiety at one residue and thus differs slightly from the true enantiomer. Multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing from quasi-racemate crystals was then used to determine the X-ray structure of the sfAFP protein molecule. The resulting model was used to solve by molecular replacement the X-ray structure of l-sfAFP to a resolution of 0.98 {angstrom}. The l-sfAFP molecule is made up of six antiparallel left-handed PPII helixes, stacked in two sets of three, to form a compact brick-like structure with one hydrophilic face and one hydrophobic face. This is a novel experimental protein structure and closely resembles a structural model proposed for sfAFP. These results illustrate the utility of total chemical synthesis combined with racemic crystallization and X-ray crystallography for determining the unknown structure of a protein.

  13. Effect of anticoagulants on the protein corona-induced reduced drug carrier adhesion efficiency in human blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczynski, Daniel J; Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola

    2017-01-15

    Plasma proteins rapidly coat the surfaces of particulate drug carriers to form a protein corona upon their injection into the bloodstream. The high presence of immunoglobulins in the corona formed on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) vascular-targeted carrier (VTC) surfaces was recently shown to negatively impact their adhesion to activated endothelial cells (aECs) in vitro. Here, we characterized the influence of anticoagulants, or their absence, on the binding efficiency of VTCs of various materials via modulation of their protein corona. Specifically, we evaluated the adhesion of PLGA, poly(lactic acid) (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), silica, and polystyrene VTCs to aECs in heparinized, citrated, and non-anticoagulated (serum and whole) blood flows relative to buffer control. Particle adhesion is substantially reduced in non-anticoagulated blood flows regardless of the material type while only moderate to minimal reduction is observed for VTCs in anticoagulant-containing blood flow depending on the anticoagulant and material type. The substantial reduction in VTC adhesion in blood flows was linked to a high presence of immunoglobulin-sized proteins in the VTC corona via SDS-PAGE analysis. Of all the materials evaluated, PLGA was the most sensitive to plasma protein effects while PCL was the most resistant, suggesting particle hydrophobicity is a critical component of the observed negative plasma protein effects. Overall, this work demonstrates that anticoagulant positively alters the effect of plasma proteins in prescribing VTC adhesion to aECs in human blood flow, which has implication in the use of in vitro blood flow assays for functional evaluation of VTCs for in vivo use.

  14. Enhancement of nucleation during hanging drop protein crystallization using HF treatment of cover glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Lu, Qin-Qin; Wang, Xi-Kai; Liu, Jun [Key Laboratory for Space Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China)

    2010-02-15

    We examined a simple approach, i.e., etching cover glasses using hydrofluoric acid (HF), to determine whether cover glass treatment enhances nucleation in hanging drop protein crystallization. Hen egg white lysozyme and proteinase K were used as the model proteins. We found that the treatment increased the success rate of crystallization. The results indicated that the simple treatment, which is easy to adopt without changing much in the hanging drop method, can be utilized as an alternative method to enhance protein crystallization screens (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D. (UAH); (NASA); (Georgia)

    2010-07-20

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain 'low-hanging fruit' protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area

  16. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2005-01-01

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain "low-hanging fruit" protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area are reported from

  17. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, José A; Ng, Joseph D

    2005-07-01

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain "low-hanging fruit" protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area are reported from

  18. Enhancement of crystal homogeneity of protein crystals under application of an external alternating current electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, H.; Uda, S.; Fujiwara, K.; Nozawa, J. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Tachibana, M. [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, 236-0027 (Japan); Kojima, K. [Department of Education, Yokohama Soei University, 1 Miho-tyou, Midori-ku, Yokohama, 226-0015 (Japan)

    2014-10-06

    X-ray diffraction rocking-curve measurements were performed on tetragonal hen egg white (HEW) lysozyme crystals grown with and without the application of an external alternating current (AC) electric field. The crystal quality was assessed by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for each rocking curve. For two-dimensional maps of the FWHMs measured on the 440 and the 12 12 0 reflection, the crystal homogeneity was improved under application of an external electric field at 1 MHz, compared with that without. In particular, the significant improvement of the crystal homogeneity was observed for the 12 12 0 reflection.

  19. PCAM: a multi-user facility-based protein crystallization apparatus for microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Wright, Brenda; Miller, Teresa; Chapman, Jenny; Twigg, Pam; Keeling, Kim; Moody, Kerry; White, Melissa; Click, James; Ruble, John R.; Ho, Joseph X.; Adcock-Downey, Lawana; Dowling, Tim; Chang, Chong-Hwan; Ala, Paul; Rose, John; Wang, B. C.; Declercq, Jean-Paul; Evrard, Christine; Rosenberg, John; Wery, Jean-Pierre; Clawson, David; Wardell, Mark; Stallings, W.; Stevens, A.

    1999-01-01

    A facility-based protein crystallization apparatus for microgravity (PCAM) has been constructed and flown on a series of Space Shuttle Missions. The hardware development was undertaken largely because of the many important examples of quality improvements gained from crystal growth in the diffusion-limited environment in space. The concept was based on the adaptation for microgravity of a commonly available crystallization tray to increase sample density, to facilitate co-investigator participation and to improve flight logistics and handling. A co-investigator group representing scientists from industry, academia, and government laboratories has been established. Microgravity applications of the hardware have produced improvements in a number of structure-based crystallographic studies and include examples of enabling research. Additionally, the facility has been used to support fundamental research in protein crystal growth which has delineated factors contributing to the effect of microgravity on the growth and quality of protein crystals.

  20. Nanoliter-Scale Protein Crystallization and Screening with a Microfluidic Droplet Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Zhu; Li-Na Zhu; Rui Guo; Heng-Jun Cui; Sheng Ye; Qun Fang

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale screening of hundreds or even thousands of crystallization conditions while with low sample consumption is in urgent need, in current structural biology research. Here we describe a fully-automated droplet robot for nanoliter-scale crystallization screening that combines the advantages of both automated robotics technique for protein crystallization screening and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. A semi-contact dispensing method was developed to achieve flexible, programma...

  1. Roles of electrostatics and conformation in protein-crystal interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul V Azzopardi

    Full Text Available In vitro studies have shown that the phosphoprotein osteopontin (OPN inhibits the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite (HA and other biominerals. In vivo, OPN is believed to prevent the calcification of soft tissues. However, the nature of the interaction between OPN and HA is not understood. In the computational part of the present study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to predict the adsorption of 19 peptides, each 16 amino acids long and collectively covering the entire sequence of OPN, to the {100} face of HA. This analysis showed that there is an inverse relationship between predicted strength of adsorption and peptide isoelectric point (P<0.0001. Analysis of the OPN sequence by PONDR (Predictor of Naturally Disordered Regions indicated that OPN sequences predicted to adsorb well to HA are highly disordered. In the experimental part of the study, we synthesized phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated peptides corresponding to OPN sequences 65-80 (pSHDHMDDDDDDDDDGD and 220-235 (pSHEpSTEQSDAIDpSAEK. In agreement with the PONDR analysis, these were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to be largely disordered. A constant-composition/seeded growth assay was used to assess the HA-inhibiting potencies of the synthetic peptides. The phosphorylated versions of OPN65-80 (IC(50 = 1.93 microg/ml and OPN220-235 (IC(50 = 1.48 microg/ml are potent inhibitors of HA growth, as is the nonphosphorylated version of OPN65-80 (IC(50 = 2.97 microg/ml; the nonphosphorylated version of OPN220-235 has no measurable inhibitory activity. These findings suggest that the adsorption of acidic proteins to Ca2+-rich crystal faces of biominerals is governed by electrostatics and is facilitated by conformational flexibility of the polypeptide chain.

  2. Preparation of 2D crystals of membrane proteins for high-resolution electron crystallography data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyrathne, Priyanka D; Chami, Mohamed; Pantelic, Radosav S; Goldie, Kenneth N; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Electron crystallography is a powerful technique for the structure determination of membrane proteins as well as soluble proteins. Sample preparation for 2D membrane protein crystals is a crucial step, as proteins have to be prepared for electron microscopy at close to native conditions. In this review, we discuss the factors of sample preparation that are key to elucidating the atomic structure of membrane proteins using electron crystallography.

  3. Solubilization, Activation, and Insecticidal Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Serovar thompsoni HD542 Crystal Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naimov, S.; Boncheva, R.; Karlova, R.B.; Dukiandjiev, S.; Minkov, I.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Cry15Aa protein, produced by Bacillus thuringiensis serovar thompsoni HD542 in a crystal together with a 40 kDa accompanying protein is one of a small group of non-typical, less well-studied members of the Cry family of insecticidal proteins, and may provide an alternative for the more commonly used

  4. The effect of the application of protein and cellulose preparations as iodine carriers on stability of thiamine in processed meats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Szymandera-Buszka

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available   Fortification of processed meat with iodised table salt was shown to increase thiamine losses, both during thermal processing and storage. Taking into consideration the fact, as well as the recommendation for reduction of consumption of table salt, alternative iodine carriers need to be searched for. Thus the aim of the study was to determine the effect of soy protein isolate (SPI and wheat fibre (WF as iodine salts’ (potassium iodide and iodate carriers on thiamine stability in selected processed meats (steamed meatballs and burgers. The results were compared to the effect of iodised table salt. The highest thiamine losses were found in the presence of iodised table salt, both in the form of iodide and iodate. The application of iodised WF and SPI significantly limited thiamine losses in the course of steaming. It also made possible to reduce thiamine losses during storage in relation to iodised table salt. It was found that the application of WF and SPI as iodine carriers facilitates increased stability of thiamine in relation to table salt during processing and storage of the meat dishes.  

  5. Comparative experiment of four different materials as carriers of Bone morphogenetic protein to repair long bone defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Kuan-hai; PEI Guo-xian; YANG Run-gong

    2001-01-01

    @@ OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of four different materials as carriers of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) to repair long bone defect. METHODS 12 mm radius bone defects were made. They were divided into 4 groups in random and repaired respectively with the vascular muscle flap combined with FS/BMP (group A), vascular muscle flap/BMP (group B), bloodless muscle flap/BMP (group C) and autolyzed antigen-extracted allogeneic bone (AAA)/BMP (group D).Their abilities of bone forming to repair bone defects were observed.

  6. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles synthesized from liquid crystal display manufacturing extracts as a potential candidate for a drug delivery carrier: evaluation of their safety and biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin YC

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Chih Lin,1 Liang-Yi Lin,2 Ming-Yi Gao,3 Yi-Ping Fang31Department of Environmental Engineering and Health, Yuanpei University, 2Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 3Department of Biotechnology, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, TaiwanAbstract: Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs were synthesized as a promising drug delivery carrier due to the large surface area and porous characteristics. Our previous study successfully recycled wastes from the liquid crystal display (LCD industry as the silica precursor. In this study, we substantiated the possibility of applying this material as a drug carrier. MSNs synthesized from the extraction of wastes from the manufacture of LCD panels were characterized as having an average diameter of 100 nm, a surface area of 788 m2/g, a uniform pore size distribution of 3.8 nm, and a pore volume of up to 1.04 cm3/g. Methotrexate and camptothecin were entrapped in MSNs at about 33.88% and 75.12%, respectively. The cell viability assay demonstrated that MSNs at 1 µg/mL had no significant influence on human lung fibroblast (WI-38 cells or ovarian cancer (ES-2 cells. A lactate dehydrogenase assay also indicated no inflammation occurred. Moreover, a hemolytic erythrocyte test indicated that the dose range of <100 µg/mL showed that 5% of erythrocytes were affected. After exposure to biofluids, the ordered structure was slightly degraded. The results revealed that MSNs synthesized from extraction of wastes from the manufacture of LCD panels had a good entrapment capacity for hydrophobic drugs and controllable safety conditions; they may be applied as a drug delivery carrier.Keywords: mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs, waste recycle, drug delivery carrier, safety, biocompatibility

  7. Expanding pH screening space using multiple droplets with secondary buffers for protein crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen-Yan; Dong, Chen; Lu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Bei; He, Tian-Yuan; Yang, Rui-Zeng; Lin, Hua-Long; Yang, Xue-Zhou; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2017-04-01

    We have proposed a rational strategy for selecting a suitable pH of protein solution based on protein biochemical properties. However, it is difficult to use this strategy for biochemical properties unknown proteins. In this paper, a simpler and faster pH buffer strategy was proposed. An additional pH-controlling buffer was added to crystallization droplet mixed with protein solution and commercial crystallization reagents to adjust its pH. The results revealed that protein crystallization success rates were enhanced by this strategy due to expansion of the pH screening space, which was closely related with protein solubility. Thus, the possibility of reaching supersaturation was increased by using this strategy.

  8. Study of Fluid Flow Control in Protein Crystallization using Strong Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Leslie, Fred; Ciszak, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in "microgravity", researchers have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. Whether this limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals is still a matter of conjecture that our research will address. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately

  9. Crystallization Process of Protein Rv0731c from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis for a Successful Atomic Resolution Crystal Structure at 1.2 Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang Cong

    2009-06-08

    Proteins are bio-macromolecules consisting of basic 20 amino acids and have distinct three-dimensional folds. They are essential parts of organisms and participate in every process within cells. Proteins are crucial for human life, and each protein within the body has a specific function, such as antibodies, contractile proteins, enzymes, hormonal proteins, structural proteins, storage proteins and transport proteins. Determining three-dimensional structure of a protein can help researchers discover the remarkable protein folding, binding site, conformation and etc, in order to understand well of protein interaction and aid for possible drug design. The research on protein structure by X-ray protein crystallography carried by Li-Wei Hung's research group in the Physical Bioscience Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is focusing on protein crystallography. The research in this lab is in the process of from crystallizing the proteins to determining the three dimensional crystal structures of proteins. Most protein targets are selected from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. TB (Tuberculosis) is a possible fatal infectious disease. By studying TB target protein can help discover antituberculer drugs, and find treatment for TB. The high-throughput mode of crystallization, crystal harvesting, crystal screening and data collection are applied to the research pipeline (Figure 1). The X-ray diffraction data by protein crystals can be processed and analyzed to result in a three dimensional representation of electron density, producing a detailed model of protein structure. Rv0731c is a conserved hypothetical protein with unknown function from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. This paper is going to report the crystallization process and brief structure information of Rv0731c.

  10. Impact of thermal annealing on nonequilibrium carrier dynamics in single-crystal, freestanding GaAs mesostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulics, M.; Hardtdegen, H.; Adam, R.; Grützmacher, D.; Gregušová, D.; Novák, J.; Kordoš, P.; Sofer, Z.; Serafini, J.; Zhang, J.; Sobolewski, Roman; Marso, M.

    2014-04-01

    We report on the impact of thermal annealing to carrier transport and transient, subpicosecond photoresponse of freestanding GaAs mesostructures. Our measurements included micro-photoluminescence and dark current and responsivity studies as well as optical femtosecond characterization. The fabricated GaAs mesostructures consisted of both mesowires and platelets that were integrated into coplanar striplines to form a photoconductive switch. We demonstrate that an optimized annealing process of our mesostructures, performed at 600 °C for 20 min, led to restoring bulklike properties of our freestanding devices. They exhibited dark currents below 600 pA at 10 V bias, responsivity of 0.2 A W-1 at 30 V, and mobility as high as 7300 cm2 V s-1. The annealed freestanding GaAs photodetectors were characterized by subpicosecond carrier relaxation dynamics with negligible trapping and a cutoff frequency of 1.3 THz. The latter characteristics make them excellent candidates for THz-bandwidth optoelectronics.

  11. RIBER/DIBER: a software suite for crystal content analysis in the studies of protein-nucleic acid complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Bochtler, Matthias

    2012-03-15

    Co-crystallization experiments of proteins with nucleic acids do not guarantee that both components are present in the crystal. We have previously developed DIBER to predict crystal content when protein and DNA are present in the crystallization mix. Here, we present RIBER, which should be used when protein and RNA are in the crystallization drop. The combined RIBER/DIBER suite builds on machine learning techniques to make reliable, quantitative predictions of crystal content for non-expert users and high-throughput crystallography.

  12. Resistance Mechanisms and the Future of Bacterial Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (FabI) Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-01

    Missense mutations leading to clinical antibiotic resistance are a liability of single-target inhibitors. The enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) inhibitors have one intracellular protein target and drug resistance is increased by the acquisition of single-base-pair mutations that alter drug binding. The spectrum of resistance mechanisms to FabI inhibitors suggests criteria that should be considered during the development of single-target antibiotics that would minimize the impact of missense mutations on their clinical usefulness. These criteria include high-affinity, fast on/off kinetics, few drug contacts with residue side chains, and no toxicity. These stringent criteria are achievable by structure-guided design, but this approach will only yield pathogen-specific drugs. Single-step acquisition of resistance may limit the clinical application of broad-spectrum, single-target antibiotics, but appropriately designed pathogen-specific antibiotics have the potential to overcome this liability.

  13. Observation on the modifying activity of the protein from Elytrzgia repens rhizome for ice crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In winter, spring and summer, the rhizome of wild Elytrzgia repens of Heilongjiang Province was selected to extract the soluble which whole protein and the apoplastic protein, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The result indicated that there were two specific polypeptides in two types protein from winter; their relative molecular weight were identified as 52 ku and 26 ku by analyzing software; the apoplastic protein from winter had the ability of modifing the growth of ice crystal which appeared hexagonal in shape observed with the phase-contrast photomicroscope. So the apoplastic protein from winter has the antifreeze characters and the 52 ku protein is more likely the antifreeze protein.

  14. Controlled protein delivery from electrospun non-wovens: novel combination of protein crystals and a biodegradable release matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Sebastian; Li, Linhao; Meinel, Lorenz; Germershaus, Oliver

    2014-07-07

    Poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) is an excellent polymer for electrospinning and matrix-controlled drug delivery combining optimal processability and good biocompatibility. Electrospinning of proteins has been shown to be challenging via the use of organic solvents, frequently resulting in protein unfolding or aggregation. Encapsulation of protein crystals represents an attractive but largely unexplored alternative to established protein encapsulation techniques because of increased thermodynamic stability and improved solvent resistance of the crystalline state. We herein explore the electrospinning of protein crystal suspensions and establish basic design principles for this novel type of protein delivery system. PCL was deployed as a matrix, and lysozyme was used as a crystallizing model protein. By rational combination of lysozyme crystals 0.7 or 2.1 μm in diameter and a PCL fiber diameter between 1.6 and 10 μm, release within the first 24 h could be varied between approximately 10 and 100%. Lysozyme loading of PCL microfibers between 0.5 and 5% was achieved without affecting processability. While relative release was unaffected by loading percentage, the amount of lysozyme released could be tailored. PCL was blended with poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) to further modify the release rate. Under optimized conditions, an almost constant lysozyme release over 11 weeks was achieved.

  15. Structure of the Francisella tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) in complex with NAD[superscript +] and triclosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehboob, Shahila; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E. (UIC)

    2010-11-19

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) catalyzes the last rate-limiting step in the elongation cycle of the fatty-acid biosynthesis pathway and has been validated as a potential antimicrobial drug target in Francisella tularensis. The development of new antibiotic therapies is important both to combat potential drug-resistant bioweapons and to address the broader societal problem of increasing antibiotic resistance among many pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structure of FabI from F. tularensis (FtuFabI) in complex with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NAD{sup +} has been solved to a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. Triclosan is known to effectively inhibit FabI from different organisms. Precise characterization of the mode of triclosan binding is required to develop highly specific inhibitors. Comparison of our structure with the previously determined FtuFabI structure (PDB code 2jjy) which is bound to only NAD{sup +} reveals the conformation of the substrate-binding loop, electron density for which was missing in the earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the conformation of the NAD{sup +} cofactor. This shift in the position of the phosphate groups allows more room in the active site for substrate or inhibitor to bind and be better accommodated. This information will be crucial for virtual screening studies to identify novel scaffolds for development into new active inhibitors.

  16. Improved success of sparse matrix protein crystallization screening with heterogeneous nucleating agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil S Thakur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crystallization is a major bottleneck in the process of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Successful crystallization requires the formation of nuclei and their subsequent growth to crystals of suitable size. Crystal growth generally occurs spontaneously in a supersaturated solution as a result of homogenous nucleation. However, in a typical sparse matrix screening experiment, precipitant and protein concentration are not sampled extensively, and supersaturation conditions suitable for nucleation are often missed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested the effect of nine potential heterogenous nucleating agents on crystallization of ten test proteins in a sparse matrix screen. Several nucleating agents induced crystal formation under conditions where no crystallization occurred in the absence of the nucleating agent. Four nucleating agents: dried seaweed; horse hair; cellulose and hydroxyapatite, had a considerable overall positive effect on crystallization success. This effect was further enhanced when these nucleating agents were used in combination with each other. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the addition of heterogeneous nucleating agents increases the chances of crystal formation when using sparse matrix screens.

  17. Regulation of Microstructure of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Egg White Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wen-kun; LUO Xue-gang; ZHANG Chi; DUAN Tao; ZHOU Jian

    2012-01-01

    Crystal growth of calcium carbonate in biological simulation was investigated via egg white protein with different volume fractions,during which calcium carbonate was synthesized by calcium chloride and sodium carbonate.The morphology,thermal properties and microstructure of the calcium carbonate micro-to-nanoscale crystals were characterized by scanning electron microscopy(SEM),transmission electron microscopy(TEM),Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR),thermogravimetric analysis(TG)and X-ray diffraction(XRD)analysis.The results show that the volume fraction of egg white protein has great influence on the shape,size and morphology of calcium carbonate crystals.The calcium carbonate crystals were the mixtures of calcite-vaterite-like crystals including spherical and rough surface,which are different from that formed in pure water.With the increase of egg white protein concentration,the diameter of calcium carbonate crystals changed,the amount of formed spherical calcium carbonate particles decreased and that of vaterite increased.These results indicate that the coordination and electrostatic interaction between egg white protein and Ca2+ significantly affect the calcium carbonate crystalization.

  18. Crystallization of Ranasmurfin, a blue-coloured protein from Polypedates leucomystax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Stephen A. [Centre for Biomolecular Science and The Scottish Structural Proteomics Facility, The University of St Andrews Fife KY16 9RH,Scotland (United Kingdom); Walsh, Martin A. [Medical Research Council France, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble CEDEX (France); Ching, Rosalind Tan Yan [WestCHEM, Department of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ,Scotland (United Kingdom); Division of Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ,Scotland (United Kingdom); Carter, Lester G.; Dorward, Mark; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Liu, Huanting; Oke, Muse [Centre for Biomolecular Science and The Scottish Structural Proteomics Facility, The University of St Andrews Fife KY16 9RH,Scotland (United Kingdom); Bloch, Carlos Jr [Embrapa Recursos Genéticos e Biotecnologia, Parque Estação Biológica, Asa Norte, Brasilia 70910-900 (Brazil); Kennedy, Malcolm W. [Division of Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ,Scotland (United Kingdom); Latiff, Aishah A. [Doping Control Centre Penang, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Penang (Malaysia); Cooper, Alan [WestCHEM, Department of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ,Scotland (United Kingdom); Taylor, Garry L.; White, Malcolm F.; Naismith, James H., E-mail: naismith@st-and.ac.uk [Centre for Biomolecular Science and The Scottish Structural Proteomics Facility, The University of St Andrews Fife KY16 9RH,Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-01

    A novel blue protein from frog nests has been crystallized. Ranasmurfin, a previously uncharacterized ∼13 kDa blue protein found in the nests of the frog Polypedates leucomystax, has been purified and crystallized. The crystals are an intense blue colour and diffract to 1.51 Å with P2{sub 1} symmetry and unit-cell parameters a = 40.9, b = 59.9, c = 45.0 Å, β = 93.3°. Self-rotation function analysis indicates the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Biochemical data suggest that the blue colour of the protein is related to dimer formation. Sequence data for the protein are incomplete, but thus far have identified no model for molecular replacement. A fluorescence scan shows a peak at 9.676 keV, indicating that the protein binds zinc and suggesting a route for structure solution.

  19. Disordered nano-wrinkle substrates for inducing crystallization over a wide range of concentration of protein and precipitant

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, Anindita Sengupta

    2015-01-01

    There are large number of proteins, the existence of which are known but not their crystal structure, because of difficulty in finding the exact condition for their crystallization. Heterogeneous nucleation on disordered porous substrates with small yet large distribution of pores is considered a panacea for this problem, but a universal nucleant, suitable for crystallizing large variety of proteins does not really exist. To this end, we report here a nano-wrinkled substrate which displays remarkable ability and control over protein crystallization. Experiments with different proteins show that on these substrates, crystals nucleate even at very low protein concentration in buffer. Small number of very large crystals appear for precipitant concentrations varied over orders of magnitude ~0.003-0.3M; for some proteins, crystals appear even without addition of any precipitant, not seen with any other heterogeneous substrates. In essence, these substrates significantly diminish the influence of the above two para...

  20. A robust and scalable microfluidic metering method that allows protein crystal growth by free interface diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Carl L.; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Berger, James M.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Producing robust and scalable fluid metering in a microfluidic device is a challenging problem. We developed a scheme for metering fluids on the picoliter scale that is scalable to highly integrated parallel architectures and is independent of the properties of the working fluid. We demonstrated the power of this method by fabricating and testing a microfluidic chip for rapid screening of protein crystallization conditions, a major hurdle in structural biology efforts. The chip has 480 active valves and performs 144 parallel reactions, each of which uses only 10 nl of protein sample. The properties of microfluidic mixing allow an efficient kinetic trajectory for crystallization, and the microfluidic device outperforms conventional techniques by detecting more crystallization conditions while using 2 orders of magnitude less protein sample. We demonstrate that diffraction-quality crystals may be grown and harvested from such nanoliter-volume reactions. PMID:12486223

  1. A robust and scalable microfluidic metering method that allows protein crystal growth by free interface diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Carl L.; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Berger, James M.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2002-12-01

    Producing robust and scalable fluid metering in a microfluidic device is a challenging problem. We developed a scheme for metering fluids on the picoliter scale that is scalable to highly integrated parallel architectures and is independent of the properties of the working fluid. We demonstrated the power of this method by fabricating and testing a microfluidic chip for rapid screening of protein crystallization conditions, a major hurdle in structural biology efforts. The chip has 480 active valves and performs 144 parallel reactions, each of which uses only 10 nl of protein sample. The properties of microfluidic mixing allow an efficient kinetic trajectory for crystallization, and the microfluidic device outperforms conventional techniques by detecting more crystallization conditions while using 2 orders of magnitude less protein sample. We demonstrate that diffraction-quality crystals may be grown and harvested from such nanoliter-volume reactions.

  2. Modification of an apparatus for tumor-suppressor protein crystal growth in the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    Some human diseases as tumors are being studied continuously for the development of vaccines against them. And a way of doing that is by means of proteins research. There are some kinds of proteins, like the p53 and p73 proteins, which are tumor suppressors. There are other diseases such as A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases which are protein-related. The determination of how proteins geometrically order themselves, during its biological functions is very necessary to understand how a protein's structure affects its function, to design vaccines that intercede in tumor-protein activities and in other proteins related to those other diseases. The protein crystal growth in microgravity environment produces purer crystallization than on the ground, and it is a powerful tool to produce better vaccines. Several data have already been acquired using ground-based research and in spaceflight experiments aboard the Spacelab and Space Shuttle missions, and in the MIR and in the International Space Station (ISS). Here in this paper, I propose to be performed in the ISS Biological Research Facility (which is being developed), multiple crystal growth of proteins related to cancer (as tumors suppressors and oncoproteins), A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases, for the future obtaining of possible vaccines against them. I also propose a simple and practical equipment, a modification of the crystallization plates (which use a vapor diffusion technique) inside each cylinder of the Protein Crystallization Apparatus in Microgravity (PCAM), with multiple chambers with different sizes. Instead of using some chambers with the same size it is better to use several chambers with different sizes. Why is that? The answer is: the energy associated with the surface tension of the liquid in the chamber is directly related to the circle area of it. So, to minimize the total energy of the surface tension of a proteins liquid -making it more stable

  3. Large-scale identification of membrane proteins with properties favorable for crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jared; Kagawa, Allison; Kurasaki, Kellie; Ataie, Niloufar; Cho, Il Kyu; Li, Qing X; Ng, Ho Leung

    2015-11-01

    Membrane protein crystallography is notoriously difficult due to challenges in protein expression and issues of degradation and structural stability. We have developed a novel method for large-scale screening of native sources for integral membrane proteins that have intrinsic biochemical properties favorable for crystallization. Highly expressed membrane proteins that are thermally stable and nonaggregating in detergent solutions were identified by mass spectrometry from Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Sus scrofa cerebrum. Many of the membrane proteins identified had been crystallized previously, supporting the promise of the approach. Most identified proteins have known functions and include high-value targets such as transporters and ATPases. To validate the method, we recombinantly expressed and purified the yeast protein, Yop1, which is responsible for endoplasmic reticulum curvature. We demonstrate that Yop1 can be purified with the detergent dodecylmaltoside without aggregating.

  4. Electron Spin Resonance Study of Interface Trap States and Charge Carrier Concentration in Rubrene Single-Crystal Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Masaki; Arai, Norimichi; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Takeya, Jun; Shimoi, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-ichi; Takenobu, Taishi; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2011-08-01

    Field-induced charge carriers at the semiconductor/dielectric interface of rubrene single-crystal field-effect transistors (RSC-FETs) were studied by ESR. We fabricated bottom-contact RSC-FETs to be used for ESR measurements by laminating RSCs onto SiO2 and polymer/SiO2 gate dielectric surfaces. The observed ESR spectra depict a minimal dependence on gate voltage, whose result is in sharp contrast to those obtained using RSC-FETs fabricated by the deposition of a parylene C gate dielectric. This behavior indicates that few deep trap levels are generated by the lamination technique. The dependence of ESR intensity on drain voltage was also investigated using gradual channel approximation.

  5. Nucleation of protein crystals: critical nuclei, phase behavior, and control pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkin, Oleg; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2001-11-01

    We have studied the nucleation of crystals of the model protein lysozyme using a novel technique that allows direct determinations of homogeneous nucleation rates. At constant temperature of 12.6°C we varied the thermodynamic supersaturation by changing the concentrations of protein and precipitant. We found a broken dependence of the homogeneous nucleation rate on supersaturation that is beyond the predictions of the classical nucleation theory. The nucleation theorem allows us to relate this to discrete changes of the size of the crystal nuclei with increasing supersaturation as (10 or 11)→(4 or 5)→(1 or 2). Furthermore, we observe that the existence of a second liquid phase at high protein concentrations strongly affects crystal nucleation kinetics. We show that the rate of homogeneous nucleation of lysozyme crystals passes through a maximum in the vicinity of the liquid-liquid phase boundary hidden below the liquidus (solubility) line in the phase diagram of the protein solution. We found that glycerol and polyethylene glycol (PEG), which do not specifically bind to proteins, shift this phase boundary and significantly suppress or enhance the crystal nucleation rates, although no simple correlation exists between the action of PEG on the phase diagram and the nucleation kinetics. This provides for a control mechanism which does not require changes in the protein concentration, or the acidity and ionicity of the solution. The effects of the two additives on the phase diagram strongly depend on their concentration and this provides opportunities for further tuning of nucleation rates.

  6. Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase from higher plants is structurally unrelated to the animal and fungal homologs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) desaturase was purified to homogeneity from avocado mesocarp, and monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against the protein were used to isolate full-length cDNA clones from Ricinus communis (castor) seed and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). The nucleotide sequence of the castor clone pRCD1 revealed an open reading frame of 1.2 kilobases encoding a 396-amino acid protein of 45 kDa. The cucumber clone pCSD1 encoded a homologous 396-amino acid protein with 88% amino acid identity to the castor clone. Expression of pRCD1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in the accumulation of a functional stearoyl-ACP desaturase, demonstrating that the introduction of this single gene product was sufficient to confer soluble desaturase activity to yeast. There was a 48-residue region of 29% amino acid sequence identity between residues 53 and 101 of the castor desaturase and the proximal border of the dehydratase region of the fatty acid synthase from yeast. Stearoyl-ACP mRNA was present at substantially higher levels in developing seeds than in leaf and root tissue, suggesting that expression of the {Delta}{sup 9} desaturase is developmentally regulated.

  7. Anomalous transition of major charge carriers from holes to electrons observed in single-crystal films of tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y. C.; Liu, G. Z.; Gao, J.; Wang, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten (W) films were grown on SrTi O3 substrates using pulsed laser deposition. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that these as-grown films are highly epitaxial and single crystalline with the [00 l ] orientation. A special lattice stacking for the W/STO interface is observed to significantly reduce the lattice mismatching, which can be explained by the coincidence lattice model. The Hall effect has been investigated over the temperature range of 4-330 K. An anomalous transition of the major charge carriers from holes to electrons was observed in these W films upon cooling. The threshold temperature, in which the sign of the Hall coefficient RH was reversed, was found to increase with the film thinning. With the sample's thickness reduced to several unit cells, its major carriers remained electrons even at room temperature. Calculations using the density functional perturbation theory revealed that such a transition from p type to n type could be attributed to the appearance of an electron pocket along the M-Γ direction induced by the lattice mismatching between the W film and SrTi O3 substrate.

  8. In vacuo X-ray data collection from graphene-wrapped protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Anna J. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Crawshaw, Adam D. [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Trincao, Jose; Aller, Pierre; Alcock, Simon; Nistea, Ioana [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Salgado, Paula S. [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-26

    A method is reported for collecting room-temperature data from protein crystals under vacuum by protecting them with a thin graphene layer. The measurement of diffraction data from macromolecular crystal samples held in vacuo holds the promise of a very low X-ray background and zero absorption of incident and scattered beams, leading to better data and the potential for accessing very long X-ray wavelengths (>3 Å) for native sulfur phasing. Maintaining the hydration of protein crystals under vacuum is achieved by the use of liquid jets, as with serial data collection at free-electron lasers, or is side-stepped by cryocooling the samples, as implemented at new synchrotron beamlines. Graphene has been shown to protect crystals from dehydration by creating an extremely thin layer that is impermeable to any exchanges with the environment. Furthermore, owing to its hydrophobicity, most of the aqueous solution surrounding the crystal is excluded during sample preparation, thus eliminating most of the background caused by liquid. Here, it is shown that high-quality data can be recorded at room temperature from graphene-wrapped protein crystals in a rough vacuum. Furthermore, it was observed that graphene protects crystals exposed to different relative humidities and a chemically harsh environment.

  9. A high-throughput strategy to screen 2D crystallization trials of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Martin; Derr, Kd; Love, James; Stokes, David L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban

    2007-12-01

    Electron microscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals has demonstrated potential for structure determination of membrane proteins. Technical limitations in large-scale crystallization screens have, however, prevented a major breakthrough in the routine application of this technology. Dialysis is generally used for detergent removal and reconstitution of the protein into a lipid bilayer, and devices for testing numerous conditions in parallel are not readily available. Furthermore, the small size of resulting 2D crystals requires electron microscopy to evaluate the results and automation of the necessary steps is essential to achieve a reasonable throughput. We have designed a crystallization block, using standard microplate dimensions, by which 96 unique samples can be dialyzed simultaneously against 96 different buffers and have demonstrated that the rate of detergent dialysis is comparable to those obtained with conventional dialysis devices. A liquid-handling robot was employed to set up 2D crystallization trials with the membrane proteins CopA from Archaeoglobus fulgidus and light-harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. For CopA, 1 week of dialysis yielded tubular crystals and, for LH2, large and well-ordered vesicular 2D crystals were obtained after 24 h, illustrating the feasibility of this approach. Combined with a high-throughput procedure for preparation of EM-grids and automation of the subsequent negative staining step, the crystallization block offers a novel pipeline that promises to speed up large-scale screening of 2D crystallization and to increase the likelihood of producing well-ordered crystals for analysis by electron crystallography.

  10. Crystal structure of human prion protein fragment reveals a motif for oligomer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Marcin I.; Perry, Kay; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    The structural transition of the prion protein from α-helical to β-sheet rich underlies its conversion into infectious and disease-associated isoforms. Here we describe the crystal structure of a fragment from human prion protein consisting of the disulfide bond linked portions of helices 2 and 3. Instead of forming a pair-of-sheets steric zipper structure characteristic of amyloid fibers, this fragment crystallized into an β-sheet rich assembly of hexameric oligomers. This study reveals a never before observed structural motif for ordered protein aggregates, and suggests a possible mechanism for self-propagation of misfolded conformations by such non-amyloid oligomers. PMID:23808589

  11. Crystal structure of a human prion protein fragment reveals a motif for oligomer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Marcin I; Perry, Kay; Surewicz, Witold K

    2013-07-17

    The structural transition of the prion protein from α-helical- to β-sheet-rich underlies its conversion into infectious and disease-associated isoforms. Here we describe the crystal structure of a fragment from human prion protein consisting of the disulfide-bond-linked portions of helices 2 and 3. Instead of forming a pair-of-sheets steric zipper structure characteristic of amyloid fibers, this fragment crystallized into a β-sheet-rich assembly of hexameric oligomers. This study reveals a never before observed structural motif for ordered protein aggregates and suggests a possible mechanism for self-propagation of misfolded conformations by such nonamyloid oligomers.

  12. Thermal contraction of aqueous glycerol and ethylene glycol solutions for optimized protein-crystal cryoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Julius, Ethan F; Tyree, Timothy J; Moreau, David W; Atakisi, Hakan; Thorne, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    The thermal contraction of aqueous cryoprotectant solutions on cooling to cryogenic temperatures is of practical importance in protein cryocrystallography and in biological cryopreservation. In the former case, differential contraction on cooling of protein molecules and their lattice relative to that of the internal and surrounding solvent may lead to crystal damage and the degradation of crystal diffraction properties. Here, the amorphous phase densities of aqueous solutions of glycerol and ethylene glycol at T = 77 K have been determined. Densities with accuracies of solutions. The use of these densities in contraction matching of internal solvent to the available solvent spaces is complicated by several factors, most notably the exclusion of cryoprotectants from protein hydration shells and the expected deviation of the contraction behavior of hydration water from bulk water. The present methods and results will assist in developing rational approaches to cryoprotection and an understanding of solvent behavior in protein crystals.

  13. Crystallizing membrane proteins for structure-function studies using lipidic mesophases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Martin

    2011-06-01

    The lipidic cubic phase method for crystallizing membrane proteins has posted some high-profile successes recently. This is especially true in the area of G-protein-coupled receptors, with six new crystallographic structures emerging in the last 3½ years. Slowly, it is becoming an accepted method with a proven record and convincing generality. However, it is not a method that is used in every membrane structural biology laboratory and that is unfortunate. The reluctance in adopting it is attributable, in part, to the anticipated difficulties associated with handling the sticky viscous cubic mesophase in which crystals grow. Harvesting and collecting diffraction data with the mesophase-grown crystals is also viewed with some trepidation. It is acknowledged that there are challenges associated with the method. However, over the years, we have worked to make the method user-friendly. To this end, tools for handling the mesophase in the pico- to nano-litre volume range have been developed for efficient crystallization screening in manual and robotic modes. Glass crystallization plates have been built that provide unparalleled optical quality and sensitivity to nascent crystals. Lipid and precipitant screens have been implemented for a more rational approach to crystallogenesis, such that the method can now be applied to a wide variety of membrane protein types and sizes. In the present article, these assorted advances are outlined, along with a summary of the membrane proteins that have yielded to the method. The challenges that must be overcome to develop the method further are described.

  14. Solutal Convection Around Growing Protein Crystal and Diffusional Purification in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun P.; Chernov, Alexander A.

    2004-01-01

    At least some protein crystals were found to preferentially trap microheterogeneous impurities. The latter are, for example, dimmer molecules of the crystallizing proteines (e.g. ferritin, lysozyme), or the regular molecules on which surfaces small molecules or ions are adsorbed (e.g. acetilated lysozyme) and modi@ molecular charge. Impurities may induce lattice defects and deteriorate structural resolution. Distribution of impurities between mother solution and gorwing crystal is defined by two interrelated distribution coefficients: kappa = rho(sup c, sub 2) and K = (rho(sup c, sub 2)/rho(sup c, sub 1)/rho(sub 2)/rho(sub 1). Here, rho(sub 2), rho(sub 1) and rho(sup c, sub 2) are densities of impurity (2) and regular protein (1) in solution at the growing interface and within the crystal ("c"). For the microheterogeneous impurities studied, K approx. = 2 - 4, so that kappa approx. - 10(exp 2) - 10(exp 3), since K = kappa (rho(sub 1)/rho(sup c, sub 1) and protein solubility ratio rho(sub 1)/rho(sub=p c, sub 2) much less than 1. Therefore, a crystal growing in absence of convection purifies mother solution around itself, grows cleaner and, probably, more perfect. If convection is present, the solution flow permanently brings new impurities to the crystal. This work theoretically addressed two subjects: 1) onset of convection, 2) distribution of impurities.

  15. Protein adsorption to monosodium urate crystals: differential responses of human peripheral blood neutrophils. [Etiology of acute gouty arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skosey, J.L.; Kozin, F.; Ginsberg, M.

    1976-01-01

    In order for acute gouty arthritis to occur, neutrophils must interact with monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. As a result of this interaction, enzymes, chemotactic factors, and other mediators of the inflammatory response are released from neutrophil lysosomes. It was observed that MSU crystals adsorb gamma globulin, albumin, and other proteins found in serum and joint fluid. Results are reported from a study designed to demonstrate the effects of coating of MSU crystals with proteins on the phlogistic responses of neutrophils to crystals.

  16. Computer-Aided Design of Orally Bioavailable Pyrrolidine Carboxamide Inhibitors of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Favorable Pharmacokinetic Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi, Affiba Florance; Kone, Mawa; Keita, Melalie; Esmel, Akori; Megnassan, Eugene; N’Guessan, Yao Thomas; Frecer, Vladimir; Miertus, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out a computational structure-based design of new potent pyrrolidine carboxamide (PCAMs) inhibitors of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb). Three-dimensional (3D) models of InhA-PCAMx complexes were prepared by in situ modification of the crystal structure of InhA-PCAM1 (Protein Data Bank (PDB) entry code: 4U0J), the reference compound of a training set of 20 PCAMs with known experimental inhibitory potencies (IC50exp). First, we built a gas phase quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) model, linearly correlating the computed enthalpy of the InhA-PCAM complex formation and the IC50exp. Further, taking into account the solvent effect and loss of inhibitor entropy upon enzyme binding led to a QSAR model with a superior linear correlation between computed Gibbs free energies (ΔΔGcom) of InhA-PCAM complex formation and IC50exp (pIC50exp = −0.1552·ΔΔGcom + 5.0448, R2 = 0.94), which was further validated with a 3D-QSAR pharmacophore model generation (PH4). Structural information from the models guided us in designing of a virtual combinatorial library (VL) of more than 17 million PCAMs. The VL was adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) focused and reduced down to 1.6 million drug like orally bioavailable analogues and PH4 in silico screened to identify new potent PCAMs with predicted IC50pre reaching up to 5 nM. Combining molecular modeling and PH4 in silico screening of the VL resulted in the proposed novel potent antituberculotic agent candidates with favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. PMID:26703572

  17. Computer-Aided Design of Orally Bioavailable Pyrrolidine Carboxamide Inhibitors of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Favorable Pharmacokinetic Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affiba Florance Kouassi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out a computational structure-based design of new potent pyrrolidine carboxamide (PCAMs inhibitors of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb. Three-dimensional (3D models of InhA-PCAMx complexes were prepared by in situ modification of the crystal structure of InhA-PCAM1 (Protein Data Bank (PDB entry code: 4U0J, the reference compound of a training set of 20 PCAMs with known experimental inhibitory potencies (IC50exp. First, we built a gas phase quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR model, linearly correlating the computed enthalpy of the InhA-PCAM complex formation and the IC50exp. Further, taking into account the solvent effect and loss of inhibitor entropy upon enzyme binding led to a QSAR model with a superior linear correlation between computed Gibbs free energies (ΔΔGcom of InhA-PCAM complex formation and IC50exp (pIC50exp = −0.1552·ΔΔGcom + 5.0448, R2 = 0.94, which was further validated with a 3D-QSAR pharmacophore model generation (PH4. Structural information from the models guided us in designing of a virtual combinatorial library (VL of more than 17 million PCAMs. The VL was adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME focused and reduced down to 1.6 million drug like orally bioavailable analogues and PH4 in silico screened to identify new potent PCAMs with predicted IC50pre reaching up to 5 nM. Combining molecular modeling and PH4 in silico screening of the VL resulted in the proposed novel potent antituberculotic agent candidates with favorable pharmacokinetic profiles.

  18. Potential protective immunogenicity of tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid and Cross Reacting Material 197 (CRM197) when used as carrier proteins in glycoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael

    2016-03-03

    When tetanus toxoid (TT), diphtheria toxoid (DT) or Cross Reacting Material 197 (CRM197), a non-toxic diphtheria toxin mutant protein, are used as carrier proteins in glycoconjugate vaccines, these carriers induce a protein specific antibody response as measured by in vitro assays. Here, it was evaluated whether or not glycoconjugates based on TT, DT or CRM197 can induce a protective immune response as measured by potency tests according to the European Pharmacopoeia. It could be shown, that the conjugate carriers TT and DT can induce a protective immune response against a lethal challenge by toxins in animals, while glycoconjugates based on CRM197 failed to induce a protective immune response. Opportunities for new applications of glycoconjugates are discussed.

  19. Structure and stability of designed TPR protein superhelices: unusual crystal packing and implications for natural TPR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajander, Tommi; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Mochrie, Simon; Regan, Lynne

    2007-07-01

    The structure and stability of repeat proteins has been little studied in comparison to the properties of the more familiar globular proteins. Here, the structure and stability of designed tetratricopeptide-repeat (TPR) proteins is described. The TPR is a 34-amino-acid motif which adopts a helix-turn-helix structure and occurs as tandem repeats. The design of a consensus TPR motif (CTPR) has previously been described. Here, the crystal structures and stabilities of proteins that contain eight or 20 identical tandem repeats of the CTPR motif (CTPR8 and CTPR20) are presented. Both CTPR8 and CTPR20 adopt a superhelical overall structure. The structures of the different-length CTPR proteins are compared with each other and with the structures of natural TPR domains. Also, the unusual and perhaps unique crystal-packing interactions resulting in pseudo-infinite crystalline superhelices observed in the different crystal forms of CTPR8 and CTPR20 are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the thermodynamic behavior of CTPR8 and CTPR20 can be predicted from the behavior of other TPRs in this series using an Ising model-based analysis. The designed protein series CTPR2-CTPR20 covers the natural size repertoire of TPR domains and as such is an excellent model system for natural TPR proteins.

  20. PCR-based gene synthesis to produce recombinant proteins for crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne-Steele Miranda L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene synthesis technologies are an important tool for structural biology projects, allowing increased protein expression through codon optimization and facilitating sequence alterations. Existing methods, however, can be complex and not always reproducible, prompting researchers to use commercial suppliers rather than synthesize genes themselves. Results A PCR-based gene synthesis method, referred to as SeqTBIO, is described to efficiently assemble the coding regions of two novel hyperthermophilic proteins, PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille domain, a siRNA-binding domain of an Argonaute protein homologue and a deletion mutant of a family A DNA polymerase (PolA. The gene synthesis procedure is based on sequential assembly such that homogeneous DNA products can be obtained after each synthesis step without extensive manipulation or purification requirements. Coupling the gene synthesis procedure to in vivo homologous recombination techniques allows efficient subcloning and site-directed mutagenesis for error correction. The recombinant proteins of PAZ and PolA were subsequently overexpressed in E. coli and used for protein crystallization. Crystals of both proteins were obtained and they were suitable for X-ray analysis. Conclusion We demonstrate, by using PAZ and PolA as examples, the feasibility of integrating the gene synthesis, error correction and subcloning techniques into a non-automated gene to crystal pipeline such that genes can be designed, synthesized and implemented for recombinant expression and protein crystallization.

  1. A vesicle carrier that mediates peroxisome protein traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sheung Kwan; Yoda, Naofumi; Schekman, Randy

    2010-12-14

    Pex19p, a soluble cytoplasmic transport protein, is required for the traffic of the peroxisomal membrane proteins Pex3p and Pex15p from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the peroxisome. We documented Pex15p traffic from the ER using a chimeric protein containing a C-terminal glycosylation acceptor peptide. Pex15Gp expressed in wild-type yeast cells is N-glycosylated and functions properly in the peroxisome. In contrast, pex19Δ-mutant cells accumulate the glycoprotein Pex15Gp in the ER. We developed a cell-free preperoxisomal vesicle-budding reaction in which Pex15Gp and Pex3p are packaged into small vesicles in the presence of cytosol, Pex19p, and ATP. Secretory vesicle budding (COPII) detected by the packaging of a SNARE protein (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive attachment protein receptor) occurs in the same incubation but does not depend on Pex19p. Conversely a dominant GTPase mutant Sar1p which inhibits COPII has no effect on Pex3p packaging. Pex15Gp and Pex3p budded vesicles sediment as low-buoyant-density membranes on a Nycodenz gradient and copurify by affinity isolation using native but not Triton X-100-treated budded vesicles. ER-peroxisome transport vesicles appear to rely on a novel budding mechanism requiring Pex19p and additional unknown factors.

  2. Controlling protein crystal growth rate by means of temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SantamarIa-Holek, I; Gadomski, A [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, University of Technology and Life Sciences, PL-85796 Bydgoszcz (Poland); RubI, J M, E-mail: isholek.fc@gmail.com, E-mail: agad@utp.edu.pl, E-mail: mrubi@ub.edu [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, University of Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    We have proposed a model to analyze the growth kinetics of lysozyme crystals/aggregates under non-isothermal conditions. The model was formulated through an analysis of the entropy production of the growth process which was obtained by taking into account the explicit dependence of the free energy on the temperature. We found that the growth process is coupled with temperature variations, resulting in a novel Soret-type effect. We identified the surface entropy of the crystal/aggregate as a decisive ingredient controlling the behavior of the average growth rate as a function of temperature. The behavior of the Gibbs free energy as a function of temperature is also analyzed. The agreement between theory and experiments is very good in the range of temperatures considered.

  3. Controlling protein crystal growth rate by means of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanamaría-Holek, I; Gadomski, A; Rubí, J M

    2011-06-15

    We have proposed a model to analyze the growth kinetics of lysozyme crystals/aggregates under non-isothermal conditions. The model was formulated through an analysis of the entropy production of the growth process which was obtained by taking into account the explicit dependence of the free energy on the temperature. We found that the growth process is coupled with temperature variations, resulting in a novel Soret-type effect. We identified the surface entropy of the crystal/aggregate as a decisive ingredient controlling the behavior of the average growth rate as a function of temperature. The behavior of the Gibbs free energy as a function of temperature is also analyzed. The agreement between theory and experiments is very good in the range of temperatures considered.

  4. Polyelectrolyte complex of carboxymethyl starch and chitosan as protein carrier: oral administration of ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaad, Elias; Blemur, Lindsay; Lessard, Martin; Mateescu, Mircea Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    A novel carboxymethyl starch (CMS)/chitosan polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) was proposed as an excipient for oral administration of ovalbumin. The dissolution of ovalbumin from monolithic tablets (200 mg, 2.1 × 9.6 mm, 50% loading) obtained by direct compression was studied. When CMS was used as an excipient, more than 70% of the loaded ovalbumin remained undigested after 1 h of incubation in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) with pepsin. The complete dissolution, after transfer of tablets into simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) with pancreatin, occurred within a total time of about 6 h. Higher protection (more than 90% stability in SGF) and longer dissolution (more than 13 h) were obtained with 50% CMS/50% chitosan physical mixture or with PEC excipients. A lower proportion of chitosan was needed for PEC than for the CMS/chitosan mixture to obtain a similar dissolution profile. The high protection against digestion by pepsin, the various release times and the mucoadhesion properties of these excipients based on CMS favor the development of suitable carriers for oral vaccinations.

  5. Poly(acrylic acid)-grafted graphene oxide as an intracellular protein carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, Thangavelu; Kang, Inn-Kyu; Park, Soo-Young

    2014-01-14

    A pH-sensitive poly(acrylic acid)-grafted graphene oxide (GO-PAA) nanocarrier was synthesized by in situ atom transfer radical polymerization to allow the oral delivery of hydrophilic macromolecular proteins in their active forms to specific cells or organs. The synthesis, morphology, and physiochemical properties of GO-PAA were examined. A model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) (BSAFITC), was loaded onto GO-PAA through noncovalent interactions and its release was arrested at acidic pH similar to stomach, whereas at pH similar to intestine it was reduced, which paves way for site specific delivery without its degradation in the gastrointestinal tract. Confocal laser microscopy showed that the BSAFITC-loaded GO-PAA was internalized by KB cells by endocytosis and released into cytoplasm. Thus the GO-PAA as a transmembrane transporter is a new class of drug transporters with potential protein delivery applications.

  6. KIF6 719Arg Carrier Status Association with Homocysteine and C-Reactive Protein in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Malek-Ahmadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has demonstrated associations between statin use, KIF6 719Arg carrier status, and cholesterol levels and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. The association between 719Arg carrier status with homocysteine (tHcy and c-reactive protein (CRP levels in aMCI and AD has not been previously investigated. Data from 175 aMCI and AD patients were used for the analysis. 719Arg carriers had significantly lower levels of tHcy than noncarriers (P=0.02. No significant difference in CRP levels between 719Arg carriers and noncarriers was present (P=0.37. Logistic regression yielded no significant effect for 719Arg status on CRP [OR = 1.79 (0.85, 3.83, P=0.13] but did demonstrate a significant effect for tHcy [OR = 0.44 (0.23, 0.83, P=0.01] after adjusting for ApoE ε4 carrier status, age, gender, and statin use. This study is the first to explore the relationship between KIF6 719Arg carrier status with tHcy and CRP levels. 719Arg carriers were more likely to have normal tHcy levels after adjusting for ApoE ε4 status, age, gender, and statin use. These results suggest that the KIF6 gene might influence cardiovascular pathways associated with AD.

  7. Carbohydrate particles as protein carriers and scaffolds: physico-chemical characterization and collagen stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Ivone; Rocha, Sandra; Loureiro, Joana A.; do Carmo Pereira, Maria; Ivanova, Galya; Coelho, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The preservation of protein properties after entrapping into polymeric matrices and the effects of drying the emulsions still remains uncertain and controversial. Carbohydrate particles were designed and prepared by homogenization of gum arabic and maltodextrin mixture, with collagen hydrolysate (CH) followed by spray-drying. The encapsulation of CH in the carbohydrate matrix was achieved with an efficiency of 85 ± 2 %. The morphology and the size of the particles, before (40-400 nm) and after spray-drying (maltodextrin matrices to entrap and preserve CH original properties after the spray-drying process and support the potential of the polymeric scaffold for protein delivery and tissue engineering.

  8. Identification of a mitochondrial target of thiazolidinedione insulin sensitizers (mTOT--relationship to newly identified mitochondrial pyruvate carrier proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry R Colca

    Full Text Available Thiazolidinedione (TZD insulin sensitizers have the potential to effectively treat a number of human diseases, however the currently available agents have dose-limiting side effects that are mediated via activation of the transcription factor PPARγ. We have recently shown PPARγ-independent actions of TZD insulin sensitizers, but the molecular target of these molecules remained to be identified. Here we use a photo-catalyzable drug analog probe and mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify a previously uncharacterized mitochondrial complex that specifically recognizes TZDs. These studies identify two well-conserved proteins previously known as brain protein 44 (BRP44 and BRP44 Like (BRP44L, which recently have been renamed Mpc2 and Mpc1 to signify their function as a mitochondrial pyruvate carrier complex. Knockdown of Mpc1 or Mpc2 in Drosophila melanogaster or pre-incubation with UK5099, an inhibitor of pyruvate transport, blocks the crosslinking of mitochondrial membranes by the TZD probe. Knockdown of these proteins in Drosophila also led to increased hemolymph glucose and blocked drug action. In isolated brown adipose tissue (BAT cells, MSDC-0602, a PPARγ-sparing TZD, altered the incorporation of (13C-labeled carbon from glucose into acetyl CoA. These results identify Mpc1 and Mpc2 as components of the mitochondrial target of TZDs (mTOT and suggest that understanding the modulation of this complex, which appears to regulate pyruvate entry into the mitochondria, may provide a viable target for insulin sensitizing pharmacology.

  9. Sterol carrier protein 2 regulates proximal tubule size in the Xenopus pronephric kidney by modulating lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Débora M; Tran, Uyen; Romaker, Daniel; Abreu, José G; Wessely, Oliver

    2014-10-01

    The kidney is a homeostatic organ required for waste excretion and reabsorption of water, salts and other macromolecules. To this end, a complex series of developmental steps ensures the formation of a correctly patterned and properly proportioned organ. While previous studies have mainly focused on the individual signaling pathways, the formation of higher order receptor complexes in lipid rafts is an equally important aspect. These membrane platforms are characterized by differences in local lipid and protein compositions. Indeed, the cells in the Xenopus pronephric kidney were positive for the lipid raft markers ganglioside GM1 and Caveolin-1. To specifically interfere with lipid raft function in vivo, we focused on the Sterol Carrier Protein 2 (scp2), a multifunctional protein that is an important player in remodeling lipid raft composition. In Xenopus, scp2 mRNA was strongly expressed in differentiated epithelial structures of the pronephric kidney. Knockdown of scp2 did not interfere with the patterning of the kidney along its proximo-distal axis, but dramatically decreased the size of the kidney, in particular the proximal tubules. This phenotype was accompanied by a reduction of lipid rafts, but was independent of the peroxisomal or transcriptional activities of scp2. Finally, disrupting lipid micro-domains by inhibiting cholesterol synthesis using Mevinolin phenocopied the defects seen in scp2 morphants. Together these data underscore the importance for localized signaling platforms in the proper formation of the Xenopus kidney.

  10. Protein crystallization in stirred systems--scale-up via the maximum local energy dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smejkal, Benjamin; Helk, Bernhard; Rondeau, Jean-Michel; Anton, Sabine; Wilke, Angelika; Scheyerer, Peter; Fries, Jacqueline; Hekmat, Dariusch; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2013-07-01

    Macromolecular bioproducts like therapeutic proteins have usually been crystallized with µL-scale vapor diffusion experiments for structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Little systematic know-how exists for technical-scale protein crystallization in stirred vessels. In this study, the Fab-fragment of the therapeutic antibody Canakinumab was successfully crystallized in a stirred-tank reactor on a 6 mL-scale. A four times faster onset of crystallization of the Fab-fragment was observed compared to the non-agitated 10 µL-scale. Further studies on a liter-scale with lysozyme confirmed this effect. A 10 times faster onset of crystallization was observed in this case at an optimum stirrer speed. Commonly suggested scale-up criteria (i.e., minimum stirrer speed to keep the protein crystals in suspension or constant impeller tip speed) were shown not to be successful. Therefore, the criterion of constant maximum local energy dissipation was applied for scale-up of the stirred crystallization process for the first time. The maximum local energy dissipation was estimated by measuring the drop size distribution of an oil/surfactant/water emulsion in stirred-tank reactors on a 6 mL-, 100 mL-, and 1 L-scale. A comparable crystallization behavior was achieved in all stirred-tank reactors when the maximum local energy dissipation was kept constant for scale-up. A maximum local energy dissipation of 2.2 W kg(-1) was identified to be the optimum for lysozyme crystallization at all scales under study.

  11. Conformational fluctuations affect protein alignment in dilute liquid crystal media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louhivuori, M.; Otten, R.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of dilute liquid crystalline media to align biological macromolecules has opened many new possibilities to study protein and nucleic acid structures by NMR spectroscopy. We inspect the basic alignment phenomenon for an ensemble of protein conformations to deduce relative contributions...... molecular surfaces. Furthermore, we consider the implications of a dynamic bias to structure determination using data from the weak alignment method....

  12. Hydrogel based drug carriers for controlled release of hydrophobic drugs and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ke Peng,

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare in situ forming hydrogels based on biocompatible polymers for the controlled release of hydrophobic drug and proteins. In order to load hydrophobic drug to the hydrophilic hydrogel matrix, beta-cyclodextrin and human serum albumin was introduced to the hydrogel ne

  13. Reprogramming Acyl Carrier Protein Interactions of an Acyl-CoA Promiscuous trans-Acyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Zhixia; Musiol-Kroll, Ewa Maria; Weber, Tilmann;

    2014-01-01

    on the ACP surface that contribute to specific recognition by KirCII. This information proved sufficient to modify a noncognate ACP from a different biosynthetic system to be a substrate for KirCII. The findings form a foundation for further understanding the specificity of trans-AT:ACP protein interactions...... and for engineering modular polyketide synthases to produce analogs....

  14. The influence of a homologous protein impurity on lysozyme crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamidi, V.; Hanson, B. L.; Edmundson, A.; Skrzypczak-Jankun, E.; Schall, C.

    1999-08-01

    The effect of a structurally similar protein impurity, turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo) egg-white lysozyme (TEWL) on crystallization of the host protein, hen-egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) from chicken ( Gallus gallus) was studied under varying impurity and host solution concentrations. A change in morphology is observed when crystals of HEWL are grown in the presence of TEWL. As the relative amount of TEWL increases, HEWL crystals become more elongated in the [0 0 1] direction. Elongation is more pronounced in samples with lower initial concentrations of HEWL than in samples with higher initial concentrations. This behavior is consistent with that of impurities in small molecule crystal growth and with predictions based on the Kubota-Mullin model. The observed effect on the growth process can be attributed to the apparent inhibition in the [1 1 0] crystal growth direction of HEWL by TEWL since slowly growing faces become dominant faces in crystal growth. Incorporation of TEWL into HEWL crystals grown in a sitting drop batch method was measured using cation exchange chromatography. The results indicate that impurity incorporation is associated with increasing supersaturation. This conclusion is consistent with a kinetically controlled process of impurity incorporation. The observed impurity effects are most probably associated with the interchange of glutamine in position 41 of HEWL by histidine in TEWL.

  15. Matrix Gla Protein is Involved in Crystal Formation in Kidney of Hyperoxaluric Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Lu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matrix Gla protein (MGP is a molecular determinant regulating vascular calcification of the extracellular matrix. However, it is still unclear how MGP may be invovled in crystal formation in the kidney of hyperoxaluric rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the hyperoxaluric group and control group. Hyperoxaluric rats were administrated by 0.75% ethylene glycol (EG for up to 8 weeks. Renal MGP expression was detected by the standard avidin-biotin complex (ABC method. Renal crystal deposition was observed by a polarizing microscope. Total RNA and protein from the rat kidney tissue were extracted. The levels of MGP mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blot. Results: Hyperoxaluria was induced successfully in rats. The MGP was polarly distributed, on the apical membrane of renal tubular epithelial cells, and was found in the ascending thick limbs of Henle's loop (cTAL and the distal convoluted tubule (DCT in hyperoxaluric rats, its expression however, was present in the medullary collecting duct (MCD in stone-forming rats. Crystals with multilaminated structure formed in the injurious renal tubules with lack of MGP expression.MGP mRNA expression was significantly upregulated by the crystals' stimulations. Conclusion: Our results suggested that the MGP was involved in crystals formation by the continuous expression, distributing it polarly in the renal tubular cells and binding directly to the crystals.

  16. Applicability of avidin protein coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles as drug carriers in the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijt, S. H.; Bölükbas, D. A.; Argyo, C.; Wipplinger, K.; Naureen, M.; Datz, S.; Eickelberg, O.; Meiners, S.; Bein, T.; Schmid, O.; Stoeger, T.

    2016-04-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) exhibit unique drug delivery properties and are thus considered as promising candidates for next generation nano-medicines. In particular, inhalation into the lungs represents a direct, non-invasive delivery route for treating lung disease. To assess MSN biocompatibility in the lung, we investigated the bioresponse of avidin-coated MSNs (MSN-AVI), as well as aminated (uncoated) MSNs, after direct application into the lungs of mice. We quantified MSN distribution, clearance rate, cell-specific uptake, and inflammatory responses to MSNs within one week after instillation. We show that amine-functionalized (MSN-NH2) particles are not taken up by lung epithelial cells, but induced a prolonged inflammatory response in the lung and macrophage cell death. In contrast, MSN-AVI co-localized with alveolar epithelial type 1 and type 2 cells in the lung in the absence of sustained inflammatory responses or cell death, and showed preferential epithelial cell uptake in in vitro co-cultures. Further, MSN-AVI particles demonstrated uniform particle distribution in mouse lungs and slow clearance rates. Thus, we provide evidence that avidin functionalized MSNs (MSN-AVI) have the potential to serve as versatile biocompatible drug carriers for lung-specific drug delivery.Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) exhibit unique drug delivery properties and are thus considered as promising candidates for next generation nano-medicines. In particular, inhalation into the lungs represents a direct, non-invasive delivery route for treating lung disease. To assess MSN biocompatibility in the lung, we investigated the bioresponse of avidin-coated MSNs (MSN-AVI), as well as aminated (uncoated) MSNs, after direct application into the lungs of mice. We quantified MSN distribution, clearance rate, cell-specific uptake, and inflammatory responses to MSNs within one week after instillation. We show that amine-functionalized (MSN-NH2) particles are not taken up

  17. Protein purification in multicompartment electrolyzers for crystal growth of r-DNA products in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Casale, Elena; Carter, Daniel; Snyder, Robert S.; Wenisch, Elisabeth; Faupel, Michel

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant-DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) (r-DNA) proteins, produced in large quantities for human consumption, are now available in sufficient amounts for crystal growth. Crystallographic analysis is the only method now available for defining the atomic arrangements within complex biological molecules and decoding, e.g., the structure of the active site. Growing protein crystals in microgravity has become an important aspect of biology in space, since crystals that are large enough and of sufficient quality to permit complete structure determinations are usually obtained. However even small amounts of impurities in a protein preparation are anathema for the growth of a regular crystal lattice. A multicompartment electrolyzer with isoelectric, immobiline membranes, able to purify large quantities of r-DNA proteins is described. The electrolyzer consists of a stack of flow cells, delimited by membranes of very precise isoelectric point (pI, consisting of polyacrylamide supported by glass fiber filters containing Immobiline buffers and titrants to uniquely define a pI value) and very high buffering power, able to titrate all proteins tangent or crossing such membranes. By properly selecting the pI values of two membranes delimiting a flow chamber, a single protein can be kept isoelectric in a single flow chamber and thus, be purified to homogeneity (by the most stringent criterion, charge homogeneity).

  18. Crystal Structure of Human Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobiev, S.; Su, M; Seetharaman, J; Huang, Y; Chen, C; Maglaqui, M; Janjua, H; Montelione, G; Tong, L; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    As a step towards better integrating protein three-dimensional (3D) structural information in cancer systems biology, the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) (www.nesg.org) has constructed a Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network (HCPIN) by analysis of several classical cancer-associated signaling pathways and their physical protein-protein interactions. Many well-known cancer-associated proteins play central roles as hubs or bottlenecks in the HCPIN (http://nmr.cabm.rutgers.edu/hcpin). NESG has selected more than 1000 human proteins and protein domains from the HCPIN for sample production and 3D structure determination. The long-range goal of this effort is to provide a comprehensive 3D structure-function database for human cancer-associated proteins and protein complexes, in the context of their interaction networks. Human retinoblastoma binding protein 9 (RBBP9) is one of the HCPIN proteins targeted by NESG. RBBP9 was initially identified as the product of a new gene, Bog (for B5T over-expressed gene), in several transformed rat liver epithelial cell lines resistant to the growth-inhibitory effect of TGF-1 as well as in primary human liver tumors. RBBP9 contains the retinoblastoma (Rb) binding motif LxCxE in its sequence, and was shown to interact with Rb by yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Mutation of the Leu residue in this motif to Gln blocked the binding to Rb. RBBP9 can displace E2F1 from E2F1-Rb complexes, and over expression of RBBP9 overcomes TGF-1 induced growth arrest and results in transformation of rat liver epithelial cells leading to hepatoblastoma-like tumors in nude mice. RBBP9 may also play a role in cellular responses to chronic low dose radiation. A close homolog of RBBP9, sharing 93% amino acid sequence identity and also known as RBBP10, interacts with a protein with sua5-yciO-yrdC domains.

  19. Biochemical, immunological and toxicological characteristics of the crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. medellin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Orduz

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the insecticidal and hemolytic activity of solubilized crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt subsp. medellin (Btmed was performed and compared to solubilized crystal proteins of isolates 1884 of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti and isolate PG-14 of B. thuringiensis subsp. morrisoni (Btm. In general, at acid pH values solubilization of the Bt crystalline parasporal inclusions (CPI was lower than at alkaline pH. The larvicidal activity demonstrated by the CPI of Btmed indicated that optimal solubilization of CPI takes place at a pH value of 11.3, in Bti at pH values from 5.03 to 11.3 and in Btm at pH values from 9.05 to 11.3. Hemolytic activity against sheep red blood cells was mainly found following extraction at pH 11.3 in all Bt strains tested. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions revealed that optimal solubilization of the CPI in all Bt strains takes place at the alkaline pH values from 9.05 to 11.3. An enriched preparation of Btmed crystals was obtained, solubilized and crystal proteins were separated on a size exclusion column (Sephacryl S-200. Three main protein peaks were observed on the chromatogram. The first peak had two main proteins that migrate between 90 to 100 kDa. These proteins are apparently not common to other Bt strains isolated to date. The second and third peaks obtained from the size exclusion column yielded polypeptides of 68 and 28-30 kDa, respectively. Each peak independently, showed toxicity against 1st instar Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Interestingly, combinations of the fractions corresponding to the 68 and 30 kDa protein showed an increased toxicity. These results suggest that the 94 kDa protein is an important component of the Btmed toxins with the highest potency to kill mosquito larvae. When crystal proteins of Bti were probed with antisera raised independently against the three main protein fractions of Btmed, the only crystal protein that showed

  20. High-throughput crystallization of membrane proteins using the lipidic bicelle method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujwal, Rachna; Abramson, Jeff

    2012-01-09

    Membrane proteins (MPs) play a critical role in many physiological processes such as pumping specific molecules across the otherwise impermeable membrane bilayer that surrounds all cells and organelles. Alterations in the function of MPs result in many human diseases and disorders; thus, an intricate understanding of their structures remains a critical objective for biological research. However, structure determination of MPs remains a significant challenge often stemming from their hydrophobicity. MPs have substantial hydrophobic regions embedded within the bilayer. Detergents are frequently used to solubilize these proteins from the bilayer generating a protein-detergent micelle that can then be manipulated in a similar manner as soluble proteins. Traditionally, crystallization trials proceed using a protein-detergent mixture, but they often resist crystallization or produce crystals of poor quality. These problems arise due to the detergent's inability to adequately mimic the bilayer resulting in poor stability and heterogeneity. In addition, the detergent shields the hydrophobic surface of the MP reducing the surface area available for crystal contacts. To circumvent these drawbacks MPs can be crystallized in lipidic media, which more closely simulates their endogenous environment, and has recently become a de novo technique for MP crystallization. Lipidic cubic phase (LCP) is a three-dimensional lipid bilayer penetrated by an interconnected system of aqueous channels. Although monoolein is the lipid of choice, related lipids such as monopalmitolein and monovaccenin have also been used to make LCP. MPs are incorporated into the LCP where they diffuse in three dimensions and feed crystal nuclei. A great advantage of the LCP is that the protein remains in a more native environment, but the method has a number of technical disadvantages including high viscosity (requiring specialized apparatuses) and difficulties in crystal visualization and manipulation. Because

  1. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  2. Thiolation-enhanced substrate recognition by D-alanyl carrier protein ligase DltA from Bacillus cereus [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3dx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Du

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available D-alanylation of the lipoteichoic acid on Gram-positive cell wall is dependent on dlt gene-encoded proteins DltA, DltB, DltC and DltD. The D-alanyl carrier protein ligase DltA, as a remote homolog of acyl-(coenzyme A (CoA synthetase, cycles through two active conformations for the catalysis of adenylation and subsequent thiolation of D-alanine (D-Ala. The crystal structure of DltA in the absence of any substrate was observed to have a noticeably more disordered pocket for ATP which would explain why DltA has relatively low affinity for ATP in the absence of any D-alanyl carrier. We have previously enabled the thiolation of D-alanine in the presence of CoA as the mimic of D-alanyl carrier protein DltC which carries a 4’-phosphopantetheine group on a serine residue. Here we show that the resulting Michaelis constants in the presence of saturating CoA for both ATP and D-alanine were reduced more than 10 fold as compared to the values obtained in the absence of CoA. The presence of CoA also made DltA ~100-fold more selective on D-alanine over L-alanine. The CoA-enhanced substrate recognition further implies that the ATP and D-alanine substrates of the adenylation reaction are incorporated when the DltA enzyme cycles through its thiolation conformation.

  3. The Biological Activity of alpha-Mangostin, a Larvicidal Botanic Mosquito Sterol Carrier Protein-2 Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    insects rely on dietary sources of cholesterol (Clark and Bloch 1959). Therefore, the inhibitionof cholesterol uptake and transport has con- sequential...deionized water, left overnight, and transferred to a plastic tray containing distilled water. A powdered diet (2:1 pot belly pig chow:brewerÕs yeast...between protein from dietary sources in the midgut andprotein from the insect body.-Mangostinmaybe a feeding deterrent for mosquito larvae and could

  4. Radiation-synthesized protein-based drug carriers: Size-controlled BSA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, R G; Varca, G H C; Kadlubowski, S; Ulanski, P; Lugão, A B

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology has broadened the options for the delivery of agents of biotechnological and clinical relevance. Currently, attention has been driven towards the development of protein-based nanocarriers due to high the biocompatibility and site-specific delivery. In this work we report radiation-synthesized bovine serum albumin nanoparticles as an attempt to overcome limitations of available albumin particles, as a novel route for the development of crosslinked protein nanocarriers for the administration of chemotherapic agents or radiopharmaceuticals. Albumin containing phosphate buffer solutions were irradiated using γ-irradiation at distinct cosolvent concentrations-ethanol or methanol. Nanoparticle size was followed by DLS and bityrosine crosslinking formation using fluorescence measurements and SDS-PAGE. In addition, computational experiments were performed to elucidate the mechanism and pathways for the nanoparticle formation. The synthesis of BSA nanoparticles using γ-irradiation in the presence of a cosolvent allowed the formation of the nanoparticles from 7 to 70 nm without the use of any chemical crosslinker as confirmed by SDS-PAGE and DLS analysis. The combination of cosolvent and γ-irradiation allowed a fine tuning with regard to protein size.

  5. A novel cell penetrating peptide carrier for the delivery of nematocidal proteins drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jea Hyun

    Nematodes have recently become a primary source of harmful diseases to the environment that inflict harsh damages to pine trees and marine species. However, nematodes cannot be killed by normal pesticides or chemicals due to their thick outer protective layer mainly composed of collagen and cuticles. Thus, a novel approach to trigger intracellular delivery of chemicals through the layers of nematodes is required. In this study, the selection of the novel CPP was carefully progressed through protein database and serial digested fragmentation, internalization of each amino sequence was analyzed through flow cytometry and confocal microscope. As one of the most effective CPP material, JH 1.6 was compared with other major CPPs and its cellular toxicity was investigated. Furthermore, JH 1.6 was attached to various RNA, DNA, and proteins and internalization efficiency was evaluated for mammalian cells. To examine its effects on nematodes in vivo, JH 1.6 was conjugated with nematocidal protein - botulinum neurotoxin (BnT) and treated in C.elegans as a model animal. The results showed that JH 1.6 had high relative internalization rate and low cellular toxicity compared to other major CPP such as TAT and GV1001 peptides.

  6. Hyaluronan microgel as a potential carrier for protein sustained delivery by tailoring the crosslink network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Chunhong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhao, Jianhao, E-mail: jhzhao@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Tu, Mei; Zeng, Rong; Rong, Jianhua [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) microgels with different crosslink network, i.e. HGPs-1, HGPs-1.5, HGPs-3, HGPs-6 and HGPs-15, were synthesized using divinyl sulfone (DVS) as the crosslinker in an inverse microemulsion system for controlling the sustained delivery of bovine serum albumin (BSA). With increasing the crosslinker content, the average particle size slightly increased from 1.9 ± 0.3 μm to 3.6 ± 0.5 μm by dynamic laser scattering analysis. However, the crosslinker content had no significant effect on the morphology of HA microgels by scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis proved more sulfur participated in the crosslink reaction when raising the crosslinker amount. The water swelling test confirmed the increasing crosslink density with the crosslinker content by calculating the average molecular weight between two crosslink points to be 8.25 ± 2.51 × 10{sup 5}, 1.26 ± 0.43 × 10{sup 5}, 0.96 ± 0.09 × 10{sup 5}, 0.64 ± 0.03 × 10{sup 5}, and 0.11 ± 0.01 × 10{sup 5} respectively. The degradation of HA microgels by hyaluronidase slowed down by enhancing the crosslink density, only about 5% of HGPs-15 was degraded as opposed to over 90% for HGPs-1. BSA loading had no obvious influence on the surface morphology of HA microgels but seemed to induce their aggregation. The increase of crosslink density decreased the BSA loading capacity but facilitated its long-term sustained delivery. When the molar ratio of DVS to repeating unit of HA reached 3 or higher, similar delivery profiles were obtained. Among all these HA microgels, HGPs-3 was the optimal carrier for BSA sustained delivery in this system because it possessed both high BSA loading capacity and long-term delivery profile simultaneously. - Highlights: • HA microgels with different crosslink densities were prepared. • The crosslinker content had little effect on the morphology and size of HA microgels. • The crosslink density

  7. Use of Chromophoric Ligands to Visually Screen Co-crystals of Putative Protein-Nucleic Acid Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaohua; Egli, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Distinguishing between crystals of protein-nucleic acid complexes and those containing protein alone is a common problem in structural studies of protein-nucleic acid interactions. Currently there are several methods available for detecting nucleic acid in crystals, including gel electrophoresis, SYBR Gold fluorescence dye staining and methyl violet staining. However, they require either that the crystals be sacrificed or access to a fluorescence microscope. In this protocol, we describe an approach that allows direct visualization of either the presence or absence of oligonucleotides in crystals grown from solutions containing both protein and nucleic acid – labeling with the Cy5 dye. In addition to offering the advantage of being able to distinguish between crystals of complex and protein alone with the naked eye or a light microscope, crystals of covalently Cy5-labeled DNA can be directly used for X-ray diffraction data collection. PMID:21901673

  8. Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase from higher plants is structurally unrelated to the animal and fungal homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanklin, J; Somerville, C

    1991-03-15

    Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) desaturase (EC 1.14.99.6) was purified to homogeneity from avocado mesocarp, and monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against the protein were used to isolate full-length cDNA clones from Ricinus communis (castor) seed and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). The nucleotide sequence of the castor clone pRCD1 revealed an open reading frame of 1.2 kilobases encoding a 396-amino acid protein of 45 kDa. The cucumber clone pCSD1 encoded a homologous 396-amino acid protein with 88% amino acid identity to the castor clone. Expression of pRCD1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in the accumulation of a functional stearoyl-ACP desaturase, demonstrating that the introduction of this single gene product was sufficient to confer soluble desaturase activity to yeast. There was no detectable identity between the deduced amino acid sequences of the castor delta 9-stearoyl-ACP desaturase and either the delta 9-stearoyl-CoA desaturase from rat or yeast or the delta 12 desaturase from Synechocystis, suggesting that these enzymes may have evolved independently. However, there was a 48-residue region of 29% amino acid sequence identity between residues 53 and 101 of the castor desaturase and the proximal border of the dehydratase region of the fatty acid synthase from yeast. Stearoyl-ACP mRNA was present at substantially higher levels in developing seeds than in leaf and root tissue, suggesting that expression of the delta 9 desaturase is developmentally regulated.

  9. Protein crystals in Adenovirus type 5-infected cells: requirements for intranuclear crystallogenesis, structural and functional analysis.

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    Laure Franqueville

    Full Text Available Intranuclear crystalline inclusions have been observed in the nucleus of epithelial cells infected with Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 at late steps of the virus life cycle. Using immuno-electron microscopy and confocal microscopy of cells infected with various Ad5 recombinants modified in their penton base or fiber domains, we found that these inclusions represented crystals of penton capsomers, the heteromeric capsid protein formed of penton base and fiber subunits. The occurrence of protein crystals within the nucleus of infected cells required the integrity of the fiber knob and part of the shaft domain. In the knob domain, the region overlapping residues 489-492 in the FG loop was found to be essential for crystal formation. In the shaft, a large deletion of repeats 4 to 16 had no detrimental effect on crystal inclusions, whereas deletion of repeats 8 to 21 abolished crystal formation without altering the level of fiber protein expression. This suggested a crucial role of the five penultimate repeats in the crystallisation process. Chimeric pentons made of Ad5 penton base and fiber domains from different serotypes were analyzed with respect to crystal formation. No crystal was found when fiber consisted of shaft (S from Ad5 and knob (K from Ad3 (heterotypic S5-K3 fiber, but occurred with homotypic S3K3 fiber. However, less regular crystals were observed with homotypic S35-K35 fiber. TB5, a monoclonal antibody directed against the Ad5 fiber knob was found by immunofluorescence microscopy to react with high efficiency with the intranuclear protein crystals in situ. Data obtained with Ad fiber mutants indicated that the absence of crystalline inclusions correlated with a lower infectivity and/or lower yields of virus progeny, suggesting that the protein crystals might be involved in virion assembly. Thus, we propose that TB5 staining of Ad-infected 293 cells can be used as a prognostic assay for the viability and productivity of fiber-modified Ad5

  10. Coupling Peptide Antigens to Virus-Like Particles or to Protein Carriers Influences the Th1/Th2 Polarity of the Resulting Immune Response

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    Rattanaruji Pomwised

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have conjugated the S9 peptide, a mimic of the group B streptococcal type III capsular polysaccharide, to different carriers in an effort to elicit an optimal immune response. As carriers, we utilized the soluble protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin and virus-like particles (VLPs from two plant viruses, Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and Cowpea Mosaic Virus. We have found that coupling the peptide to the soluble protein elicits a Th2 immune response, as evidenced by the production of the peptide-specific IgG1 antibody and IL-4/IL-10 production in response to antigen stimulation, whereas the peptide conjugated to VLPs elicited a Th1 response (IgG2a, IFN-γ. Because the VLPs used as carriers package RNA during the assembly process, we hypothesize that this effect may result from the presence of nucleic acid in the immunogen, which affects the Th1/Th2 polarity of the response.

  11. The development and application of new crystallization method for tobacco mosaic virus coat protein

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    Li Xiangyang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although tobacco mosaic virus (TMV coat protein (CP has been isolated from virus particles and its crystals have grown in ammonium sulfate buffers for many years, to date, no one has reported on the crystallization of recombinant TMV-CP connecting peptides expressed in E. coli. Methods In the present papers genetically engineered TMV-CP was expressed, into which hexahistidine (His tags or glutathione-S-transferase (GST tags were incorporated. Considering that GST-tags are long peptides and His-tags are short peptides, an attempt was made to grow crystals of TMV-CP cleaved GST-tags (WT-TMV-CP32 and TMV-CP incorporated His-tags (WT-His-TMV-CP12 simultaneously in ammonium sulfate buffers and commercial crystallization reagents. It was found that the 20S disk form of WT-TMV-CP32 and WT-His-TMV-CP12 did not form high resolution crystals by using various crystallization buffers and commercial crystallization reagents. Subsequently, a new experimental method was adopted in which a range of truncated TMV-CP was constructed by removing several amino acids from the N- or the C-terminal, and high resolution crystals were grown in ammonium sulfate buffers and commercial crystallization reagents. Results The new crystallization method was developed and 3.0 Å resolution macromolecular crystal was thereby obtained by removing four amino acids at the C-terminal of His-TMV-CP and connecting six His-tags at the N-terminal of His-TMV-CP (TR-His-TMV-CP19. The Four-layer aggregate disk structure of TR-His-TMV-CP19 was solved. This phenomenon showed that peptides at the C-terminus hindered the growth of high resolution crystals and the peptides interactions at the N-terminus were attributed to the quality of TMV-CP crystals. Conclusion A 3.0 Å resolution macromolecular crystal of TR-His-TMV-CP19 was obtained and the corresponding structure was solved by removing four amino acids at the C-terminus of TMV-CP and connecting His-tags at the N

  12. Immunogold localization of acyl carrier protein in plants and Escherichia coli: Evidence for membrane association in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabas, A R; Smith, C G

    1988-08-01

    Immunogold labelling was used to study the distribution of acyl carrier protein (ACP) in Escherichia coli and a variety of plant tissues. In E. coli, ACP is distributed throughout the cytoplasm, confirming the observation of S. Jackowski et al. (1985, J. Bacteriol., 162, 5-8_. In the mesocarp of Avocado (Persea americana) and maturing seeds of oil-seed rape (Brassica napus cv. Jet Neuf), over 95% of the ACP is localised to plastids. The protein is almost exclusively located in the chloroplasts of leaf material from oil-seed rape. Approximately 80% of the gold particles associated with the ACP were further localized to the thylakoid membrane of the chloroplast. Since acetyl-CoA carboxylase has been reported to be localized to the thylakoid membrane (C.G. Kannangara and C.J. Jensen, 1975, Eur. J. Biochem., 54, 25-30), these results are consistent with the view that the two sequential enzymes in fatty-acid synthesis are in close spacial proximity.

  13. Statistical analysis on protein-protein interface in crystals:Specific and non-specific interfaces are differentially distributed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Dan; ZENG Zonghao

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of contact areas, or fractions of contacting, of protein-protein interfaces in crystals of pure polypeptides contains two components: a major exponential distribution and a minor flatter distribution. Suppose the two components belong to specific and non-specific contacts, respectively, then the probability of a contact with a given area, or fraction of contacting, can be estimated. By dividing the whole database into two sub-databases, one of them is known to contain more specific contacts than the other, this hypothesis is confirmed and it is also proved that the fraction of contacting is more effective than the contact area on discriminating specific and non-specific contacts in protein crystals.

  14. Crystallization of a pentapeptide-repeat protein by reductive cyclic pentylation of free amines with glutaraldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting, Matthew W., E-mail: vetting@aecom.yu.edu; Hegde, Subray S.; Blanchard, John S. [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2009-05-01

    A method to modify proteins with glutaraldehyde under reducing conditions is presented. Treatment with glutaraldehyde and dimethylaminoborane was found to result in cyclic pentylation of free amines and facilitated the structural determination of a protein previously recalcitrant to the formation of diffraction quality crystals. The pentapeptide-repeat protein EfsQnr from Enterococcus faecalis protects DNA gyrase from inhibition by fluoroquinolones. EfsQnr was cloned and purified to homogeneity, but failed to produce diffraction-quality crystals in initial crystallization screens. Treatment of EfsQnr with glutaraldehyde and the strong reducing agent borane–dimethylamine resulted in a derivatized protein which produced crystals that diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution; their structure was subsequently determined by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion. Analysis of the derivatized protein using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry indicated a mass increase of 68 Da per free amino group. Electron-density maps about a limited number of structurally ordered lysines indicated that the modification was a cyclic pentylation of free amines, producing piperidine groups.

  15. Carbohydrate particles as protein carriers and scaffolds: physico-chemical characterization and collagen stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Ivone; Rocha, Sandra; Loureiro, Joana A.; Carmo Pereira, Maria do [University of Porto, LEPAE, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering (Portugal); Ivanova, Galya [Universidade do Porto, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias (Portugal); Coelho, Manuel, E-mail: mcoelho@fe.up.pt [University of Porto, LEPAE, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering (Portugal)

    2012-09-15

    The preservation of protein properties after entrapping into polymeric matrices and the effects of drying the emulsions still remains uncertain and controversial. Carbohydrate particles were designed and prepared by homogenization of gum arabic and maltodextrin mixture, with collagen hydrolysate (CH) followed by spray-drying. The encapsulation of CH in the carbohydrate matrix was achieved with an efficiency of 85 {+-} 2 %. The morphology and the size of the particles, before (40-400 nm) and after spray-drying (<20 {mu}m), were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Measurements of the nuclear relaxation times and application of diffusion ordered spectroscopy, obtained through pulsed field gradient NMR experiments, have been performed to determine the structure of the CH-polysaccharide conjugates and to clarify the mechanism of CH immobilization in the polysaccharide matrix. In vitro release profiles in ultrapure water and in cellular medium reveal that the diffusion rate of CH from the polymeric matrix to the dialysis solution decreases in average 30-50 % over time, compared to free CH molecules. In cellular medium at 37 Degree-Sign C, the complete release of CH from the particles is achieved only after 24 h, demonstrating a significant decrease in the CH mass transfer process when compared with free CH. The findings of this study outline the ability of gum arabic/maltodextrin matrices to entrap and preserve CH original properties after the spray-drying process and support the potential of the polymeric scaffold for protein delivery and tissue engineering.

  16. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.961 protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiong-Zhuo [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao, XiaoJun, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Liang, Yu-He, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China)

    2007-10-01

    The SMU.961 protein from S. mutans was crystallized and preliminary characterization of the crystals, which diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution, shows them to belong to space group C2. The smu.961 gene encodes a putative protein of 183 residues in Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen in human dental caries. The gene was cloned into expression vector pET28a and expressed in a substantial quantity in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) with a His tag at its N-terminus. The recombinant protein SMU.961 was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution at beamline I911-3, MAX-II-lab, Sweden. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.62, b = 73.73, c = 184.73 Å, β = 98.82°.

  17. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  18. Antibody fragments for stabilization and crystallization of G protein-coupled receptors and their signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Arun K; Gupta, Charu; Srivastava, Ashish; Jaiman, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the key players in extracellular signal recognition and their subsequent communications with cellular signaling machinery. Crystallization and high-resolution structure determination of GPCRs has been one of the major advances in the area of GPCR biology over the last 7-8 years. There have primarily been three approaches to GPCR crystallization till date. These are fusion protein strategy, thermostabilization, and antibody fragment-mediated crystallization. Of these, antibody fragment-mediated crystallization has not only provided the first breakthrough in structure determination of a non-rhodopsin GPCR but it has also assisted in obtaining structures of fully active conformations of GPCRs. Antibody fragment approach has also been crucial in obtaining structural information on GPCR signaling complexes. Here, we highlight the specific examples of GPCR crystal structures that have utilized antibody fragments for promoting crystallogenesis and structure solution. We also discuss emerging powerful technologies such as the nanobody technology and the synthetic phage display libraries in the context of GPCR crystallization and underline how these tools are likely to propel key GPCR structural studies in future.

  19. Crystal structure of the protein At3g01520, a eukaryotic universal stress protein-like protein from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Jin; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Han, Byung Woo; Phillips, George N

    2015-07-01

    Members of the universal stress protein (USP) family are conserved in a phylogenetically diverse range of prokaryotes, fungi, protists, and plants and confer abilities to respond to a wide range of environmental stresses. Arabidopsis thaliana contains 44 USP domain-containing proteins, and USP domain is found either in a small protein with unknown physiological function or in an N-terminal portion of a multi-domain protein, usually a protein kinase. Here, we report the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic USP-like protein encoded from the gene At3g01520. The crystal structure of the protein At3g01520 was determined by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion method and refined to an R factor of 21.8% (Rfree = 26.1%) at 2.5 Å resolution. The crystal structure includes three At3g01520 protein dimers with one AMP molecule bound to each protomer, comprising a Rossmann-like α/β overall fold. The bound AMP and conservation of residues in the ATP-binding loop suggest that the protein At3g01520 also belongs to the ATP-binding USP subfamily members.

  20. Electron crystallography of ultrathin 3D protein crystals: atomic model with charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekura, Koji; Kato, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Mitsuo; Tomita, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2015-03-17

    Membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes often yield crystals too small or too thin for even the modern synchrotron X-ray beam. Electron crystallography could provide a powerful means for structure determination with such undersized crystals, as protein atoms diffract electrons four to five orders of magnitude more strongly than they do X-rays. Furthermore, as electron crystallography yields Coulomb potential maps rather than electron density maps, it could provide a unique method to visualize the charged states of amino acid residues and metals. Here we describe an attempt to develop a methodology for electron crystallography of ultrathin (only a few layers thick) 3D protein crystals and present the Coulomb potential maps at 3.4-Å and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, obtained from Ca(2+)-ATPase and catalase crystals. These maps demonstrate that it is indeed possible to build atomic models from such crystals and even to determine the charged states of amino acid residues in the Ca(2+)-binding sites of Ca(2+)-ATPase and that of the iron atom in the heme in catalase.

  1. Study of Fluid Flow Control in Protein Crystallization using Strong Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Leslie, Fred; Ciszak, Ewa

    2002-11-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in "microgravity", researchers have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. Whether this limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals is still a matter of conjecture that our research will address. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately

  2. Characterization of salt interferences in second-harmonic generation detection of protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closser, R. G.; Gualtieri, E. J.; Newman, J. A.; Simpson, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to assess the merits and limitations of second-harmonic generation (SHG) for the selective detection of protein and polypeptide crystal formation, focusing on the potential for false positives from SHG-active salts present in crystallization media. The SHG activities of salts commonly used in protein crystallization were measured and quantitatively compared with reference samples. Out of 19 salts investigated, six produced significant background SHG and 15 of the 96 wells of a sparse-matrix screen produced SHG upon solvent evaporation. SHG-active salts include phosphates, hydrated sulfates, formates and tartrates, while chlorides, acetates and anhydrous sulfates resulted in no detectable SHG activity. The identified SHG-active salts produced a range of signal intensities spanning nearly three orders of magnitude. However, even the weakest SHG-active salt produced signals that were several orders of magnitude greater than those produced by typical protein crystals. In general, SHG-active salts were identifiable through characteristically strong SHG and negligible two-photon-excited ultraviolet fluorescence (TPE-UVF). Exceptions included trials containing either potassium dihydrogen phosphate or ammonium formate, which produced particularly strong SHG, but with residual weak TPE-UVF signals that could potentially complicate discrimination in crystallization experiments using these precipitants. PMID:24282335

  3. Lysosome-associated protein 1 (LAMP-1) and lysosome-associated protein 2 (LAMP-2) in a larger family carrier of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ester M; do Monte, Semiramis J H; do Nascimento, Fernando F; de Castro, Jose A F; Sousa, Jackeline L M; Filho, Henrique C S A L C; da Silva, Raimundo N; Labilloy, Anatália; Monte Neto, José T; da Silva, Adalberto S

    2014-02-15

    This study investigated the potential relationship between the expression levels of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP) 1 and 2 and responses to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in the members of a single family with Fabry disease (FD). LAMP levels were assessed by flow cytometry in leukocytes from 17 FD patients who received an eight-month course of ERT course and 101 healthy individuals. We found that phagocytic cells from the FD patients had higher expression levels of both LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, relative to the levels in phagocytes from the healthy controls (p=0.001). Furthermore, the LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 levels in phagocytes from the FD carriers continuously decreased with ERT administration to reach levels similar to those in healthy controls. We suggest that LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 could be used as additional markers with which to assess ERT effectiveness in FD.

  4. Crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of a vicilin-type seed storage protein from Pinus koraiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tengchuan; Fu, Tong Jen; Kothary, Mahendra H; Howard, Andrew; Zhang, Yu Zhu

    2007-12-01

    The cupin superfamily of proteins includes the 7S and 11S seed storage proteins. Many members of this family of proteins are known allergens. In this study, the Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) vicilin-type 7S seed storage protein was isolated from defatted pine-nut extract and purified by sequential gel-filtration and anion-exchange chromatography. Well diffracting single crystals were obtained by the vapor-diffusion method in hanging drops. The crystals belong to the primitive cubic space group P2(1)3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 148.174 A. Two vicilin molecules were present in the asymmetric unit and the Matthews coefficient was determined to be 2.90 A(3) Da(-1), with a corresponding solvent content of approximately 58%. A molecular-replacement structural solution has been obtained using the program Phaser. Refinement of the structure is currently under way.

  5. Facilitating protein crystal cryoprotection in thick-walled plastic capillaries by high-pressure cryocooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Fan; Tate, Mark W; Gruner, Sol M

    2009-06-01

    Many steps in the X-ray crystallographic solution of protein structures have been automated. However, the harvesting and cryocooling of crystals still rely primarily on manual handling, frequently with consequent mechanical damage. An attractive alternative is to grow crystals directly inside robust plastic capillaries that may be cryocooled and mounted on the beamline goniometer. In this case, it is still desirable to devise a way to cryoprotect the crystals, which is difficult owing to the poor thermal conductivity of thick plastic capillary walls and the large thermal mass of the capillary and internal mother liquor. A method is described to circumvent these difficulties. It is shown that high-pressure cryocooling substantially reduced the minimal concentrations of cryoprotectants required to cryocool water inside capillaries without formation of ice crystals. The minimal concentrations of PEG 200, PEG 400 and glycerol necessary for complete vitrification under pressure cryocooling were determined.

  6. Precise Manipulation and Patterning of Protein Crystals for Macromolecular Crystallography Using Surface Acoustic Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Zhou, Weijie; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Yennawar, Neela H; French, Jarrod B; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-06-01

    Advances in modern X-ray sources and detector technology have made it possible for crystallographers to collect usable data on crystals of only a few micrometers or less in size. Despite these developments, sample handling techniques have significantly lagged behind and often prevent the full realization of current beamline capabilities. In order to address this shortcoming, a surface acoustic wave-based method for manipulating and patterning crystals is developed. This method, which does not damage the fragile protein crystals, can precisely manipulate and pattern micrometer and submicrometer-sized crystals for data collection and screening. The technique is robust, inexpensive, and easy to implement. This method not only promises to significantly increase efficiency and throughput of both conventional and serial crystallography experiments, but will also make it possible to collect data on samples that were previously intractable.

  7. Role of Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin in calcium oxalate crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the defenses against nephrolithiasis is provided by macromolecules that modulate the nucleation, growth, aggregation and retention of crystals in the kidneys. The aim of the present study was to determine the behavior of two of these proteins, Tamm-Horsfall and uromodulin, in calcium oxalate crystallization in vitro. We studied a group of 10 male stone formers who had formed at least one kidney stone composed of calcium oxalate. They were classified as having idiopathic nephrolithiasis and had no well-known metabolic risk factors involved in kidney stone pathogenesis. Ten normal men were used as controls, as was a group consisting of five normal women and another consisting of five pregnant women. Crystallization was induced by a fixed supersaturation of calcium oxalate and measured with a Coulter Counter. All findings were confirmed by light and scanning electron microscopy. The number of particulate material deposited from patients with Tamm-Horsfall protein was higher than that of the controls (P<0.001. However, Tamm-Horsfall protein decreased the particle diameter of the stone formers when analyzed by the mode of the volume distribution curve (P<0.002 (5.64 ± 0.55 µm compared to 11.41 ± 0.48 µm of uromodulin; 15.94 ± 3.93 µm and 12.45 ± 0.97 µm of normal men Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin, respectively; 8.17 ± 1.57 µm and 9.82 ± 0.95 µm of normal women Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin, respectively; 12.17 ± 1.41 µm and 12.99 ± 0.51 µm of pregnant Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin, respectively. Uromodulin produced fewer particles than Tamm-Horsfall protein in all groups. Nonetheless, the total volume of the crystals produced by uromodulin was higher than that produced by Tamm-Horsfall protein. Our results indicate a different effect of Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin. This dual behavior suggests different functions. Tamm-Horsfall protein may act on nucleation and inhibit crystal aggregation, while

  8. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular carriers for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, Matthew W; Kaczocha, Martin; Berger, William T; Leung, KwanNok; Ralph, Brian P; Wang, Liqun; Sweeney, Joseph M; Miyauchi, Jeremy T; Tsirka, Stella E; Ojima, Iwao; Deutsch, Dale G

    2015-04-03

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) occur naturally in marijuana (Cannabis) and may be formulated, individually or in combination in pharmaceuticals such as Marinol or Sativex. Although it is known that these hydrophobic compounds can be transported in blood by albumin or lipoproteins, the intracellular carrier has not been identified. Recent reports suggest that CBD and THC elevate the levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) when administered to humans, suggesting that phytocannabinoids target cellular proteins involved in endocannabinoid clearance. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular proteins that mediate AEA transport to its catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By computational analysis and ligand displacement assays, we show that at least three human FABPs bind THC and CBD and demonstrate that THC and CBD inhibit the cellular uptake and catabolism of AEA by targeting FABPs. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to rodent FAAH, CBD does not inhibit the enzymatic actions of human FAAH, and thus FAAH inhibition cannot account for the observed increase in circulating AEA in humans following CBD consumption. Using computational molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis we identify key residues within the active site of FAAH that confer the species-specific sensitivity to inhibition by CBD. Competition for FABPs may in part or wholly explain the increased circulating levels of endocannabinoids reported after consumption of cannabinoids. These data shed light on the mechanism of action of CBD in modulating the endocannabinoid tone in vivo and may explain, in part, its reported efficacy toward epilepsy and other neurological disorders.

  9. Novel approach to protein crystallizations: Control of the phase behavior of aqueous solutions using microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jung Uk

    A microfluidic device denoted the Phase Chip has been developed to exploit the permeation of water through poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) in order to vary the concentration of aqueous nanoliter volume microdrops stored in wells. The permeation of water in the Phase Chip is modeled using the diffusion equation and good agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. The phase diagram of a polymer/salt mixture is measured employing the Phase Chip and agrees well with the phase diagram obtained off-chip. The Phase Chip first creates drops of the polymer/salt mixture whose composition varies sequentially. Subsequently the drops are docked in storage wells and the concentration of each stored drop is controlled by varying the water activity of a reservoir that is separated from the drops by a thin layer of PDMS through which water, but not the solutes, permeates. The Phase Chip, incorporating a dialysis membrane on-chip, presents several advantages for protein crystallizations. First, protein crystallization is a non-equilibrium process so it makes sense to have dynamic control over the key thermodynamic variable; concentration. The Phase Chip, with its ability to reversibly control protein and precipitant concentrations, renders varying concentration as convenient as varying temperature. Second, by varying the water content of each drop we can explore many different crystallization conditions in the same drop. Finally, we have demonstrated that we can first formulate stable protein solutions, next induce nucleation and then grow large protein crystals. For these reasons, the Phase Chip promises to be a faster, better, and cheaper method for protein crystallization.

  10. Correlation of acidic and basic carrier ampholyte and immobilized pH gradient two-dimensional gel electrophoresis patterns based on mass spectrometric protein identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawrocki, A; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Podtelejnikov, A V;

    1998-01-01

    Separation of proteins on either carrier ampholyte-based or immobilized pH gradient-based two-dimensional (2-D) gels gives rise to electrophoretic patterns that are difficult to compare visually. In this paper we have used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI......-MS) to determine the identities of 335 protein spots in these two 2-D gel systems, including a substantial number of basic proteins which had never been identified before. Proteins that were identified in both gel systems allowed us to cross-reference the gel patterns. Vector analysis of these cross...

  11. Antifreeze protein modulates cell survival during cryopreservation: mediation through influence on ice crystal growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, J F; Hansen, T N

    1992-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are extremely efficient at inhibiting ice recrystallization in frozen solutions. Knight and Duman [Knight, C. A. & Duman, J. G. (1986) Cryobiology 23, 256-263] have proposed that this may be an important function of the proteins in freeze-tolerant organisms. We have tested this proposal in vitro by characterizing the influence of AFP on the recovery of cryopreserved cells, which often can survive cooling and yet subsequently be damaged by ice crystal growth during w...

  12. Enhancement and suppression of protein crystal nucleation due to electrically driven convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, Anita; Gliko, Olga; Dimitrov, Ivaylo L.; Hodjaoglu, Feyzim V.; Nanev, Christo; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2005-02-01

    We investigated the effects of the constant electric fields from 2.0 to 6.0 kV cm -1 on the nucleation of ferritin, apoferritin and lysozyme crystals. For this, supersaturated solutions of the three proteins were held between electrodes separated by 1.0 cm in batch and sitting drop geometries without contact between electrodes and solutions. The nucleation rate was characterized by the number of crystals appearing after a certain time (1-3 days). We show that in sitting drop arrangements, weak electric fields (<4 kV cm -1) either suppress or have no effect on the nucleation rate of ferritin and apoferritin, while electric fields of 5 or 6 kV cm -1 reproducibly enhance crystal nucleation of both proteins. Electric fields of all tested strengths consistently enhance lysozyme crystal nucleation. All batch experiments showed no effect of the electric field on the nucleation rates. Since the solutions contain high electrolyte concentrations and are conductive, the electric field strengths within them are negligible. We show that the electric field causes solution stirring with rates of up to 100 μm s -1, depending of the field strength. Thus, our observations indicate that at slow solution flow rates, the rates of nucleation of ferritin and apoferritin crystal are suppressed, while faster stirring enhances crystal nucleation of these proteins. All solution flow rates enhance lysozyme crystal nucleation. Our results suggest that solution convection may strongly affect nucleation, and that for some systems, an optimal convection velocity, leading to fastest nucleation, exists.

  13. Expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Niefind, K; Pinna, L A

    1998-01-01

    a = 142.6, b = 61.3, c = 45.6 A, beta = 103.3 degrees and diffract X-rays to at least 2.0 A resolution. The calculated crystal packing parameter is Vm = 2.47 A3 Da-1 suggesting that one CK2alpha molecule is contained in the asymmetric unit and that the solvent content of the unit cell is 50%.......The catalytic (alpha) subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2alpha) was originally cloned and overexpressed in the Escherichia coli strain pT7-7/BL21(DE3). The protein has been purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, they have unit-cell parameters...

  14. Development of compartment for studies on the growth of protein crystals in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, T; Tsukamoto, K; Yoshizaki, I; Fukuyama, S; Miura, H; Shimaoka, T; Maki, T; Oshi, K; Kimura, Y

    2016-03-01

    To clarify the growth mechanism of a protein crystal, it is essential to measure its growth rate with respect to the supersaturation. We developed a compartment (growth cell) for measuring the growth rate (materials for these components with care. The equipment was successfully used to examine the growth of a lysozyme crystal at a controlled supersaturation in space, where convection is negligible because of the microgravity environment, thereby advancing our understanding of the mechanism of protein crystal growth from solution. The technique used to develop the growth cell is useful not only for space experiments but also for kinetic studies of materials with very slow growth and dissolution rates (<10(-3) nm s(-1)).

  15. Two-dimensional crystallization of integral membrane proteins for electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, David L; Rice, William J; Hu, Minghui; Kim, Changki; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban

    2010-01-01

    Although membrane proteins make up 30% of the proteome and are a common target for therapeutic drugs, determination of their atomic structure remains a technical challenge. Electron crystallography represents an alternative to the conventional methods of X-ray diffraction and NMR and relies on the formation of two-dimensional crystals. These crystals are produced by reconstituting purified, detergent-solubilized membrane proteins back into the native environment of a lipid bilayer. This chapter reviews methods for producing two-dimensional crystals and for screening them by negative stain electron microscopy. In addition, we show examples of the different morphologies that are commonly obtained and describe basic image analysis procedures that can be used to evaluate their promise for structure determination by cryoelectron microscopy.

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, Christian, E-mail: clin180@ec.auckland.ac.nz [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Caradoc-Davies, Tom T. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Proft, Thomas [School of Medical Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Baker, Edward N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2008-02-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution.

  17. Combined Charge Carrier Transport and Photoelectrochemical Characterization of BiVO4 Single Crystals: Intrinsic Behavior of a Complex Metal Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettie, Alexander J.; Lee, Heung Chan; Marshall, Luke G.; Lin, Jung-Fu; Capen, Cigdem; Lindemuth, Jeffrey; McCloy, John S.; Zhou, Jianshi; Bard, Allen J.; Mullins, C. Buddie

    2013-07-08

    ABSTRACT: Bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) is a promising photoelectrode material for the oxidation of water, but fundamental studies of this material are lacking. To address this, we report electrical and photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties of BiVO4 single crystals (undoped, 0.6% Mo and 0.3% W:BiVO4) grown using the floating zone technique. We demonstrate that a small polaron hopping conduction mechanism dominates from 250-400 K, transitioning to a variable range hopping mechanism at lower temperatures. An anisotropy ratio of ~3 was observed along the c-axis, attributed to the layered structure of BiVO4. Measurements of the AC field Hall effect yielded an electron mobility of ~0.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 for Mo and W:BiVO4 at 300 K. By application of the Gärtner model, a hole diffusion length of ~140 nm was estimated. As a result of low carrier mobility, attempts to measure the DC Hall effect were unsuccessful. Analyses of the Raman spectra showed that Mo and W substituted for V and acted as donor impurities. Mott-Schottky analysis of electrodes with the (001) face exposed yielded a flat band potential of 0.03-0.08 V vs. RHE, while incident photon conversion efficiency tests showed that the dark coloration of the doped single crystals did not result in additional photocurrent. Comparison of these intrinsic properties to other metal oxides for PEC applications gives valuable insight into this material as a photoanode.

  18. Combined charge carrier transport and photoelectrochemical characterization of BiVO4 single crystals: intrinsic behavior of a complex metal oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettie, Alexander J E; Lee, Heung Chan; Marshall, Luke G; Lin, Jung-Fu; Capan, Cigdem; Lindemuth, Jeffrey; McCloy, John S; Zhou, Jianshi; Bard, Allen J; Mullins, C Buddie

    2013-07-31

    Bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) is a promising photoelectrode material for the oxidation of water, but fundamental studies of this material are lacking. To address this, we report electrical and photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties of BiVO4 single crystals (undoped, 0.6% Mo, and 0.3% W:BiVO4) grown using the floating zone technique. We demonstrate that a small polaron hopping conduction mechanism dominates from 250 to 400 K, undergoing a transition to a variable-range hopping mechanism at lower temperatures. An anisotropy ratio of ~3 was observed along the c axis, attributed to the layered structure of BiVO4. Measurements of the ac field Hall effect yielded an electron mobility of ~0.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for Mo and W:BiVO4 at 300 K. By application of the Gärtner model, a hole diffusion length of ~100 nm was estimated. As a result of low carrier mobility, attempts to measure the dc Hall effect were unsuccessful. Analyses of the Raman spectra showed that Mo and W substituted for V and acted as donor impurities. Mott-Schottky analysis of electrodes with the (001) face exposed yielded a flat band potential of 0.03-0.08 V versus the reversible H2 electrode, while incident photon conversion efficiency tests showed that the dark coloration of the doped single crystals did not result in additional photocurrent. Comparison of these intrinsic properties to those of other metal oxides for PEC applications gives valuable insight into this material as a photoanode.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of yeast prion protein Ure2p with shortened N-terminal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An orthorhombic crystal form of a recombinant yeast prion protein with shortened N-terminal, 90Ure2p, has been obtained. Crystals were grown by the vapordiffusion technique against a mother liquor containing imidazole. Crystals belong to the primitive orthorhombic lattice with the cell parameters a = 54.5 ?, b = 74.7 ?, c = 131.0 ?. The crystals diffract to beyond 3.0 ? resolution at a synchrotron beamline.

  20. Non-carrier nanoparticles adjuvant modular protein vaccine in a particle-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Seth

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles are increasingly used to adjuvant vaccine formulations due to their biocompatibility, ease of manufacture and the opportunity to tailor their size, shape, and physicochemical properties. The efficacy of similarly-sized silica (Si-OH, poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA and poly caprolactone (PCL nanoparticles (nps to adjuvant recombinant capsomere presenting antigenic M2e modular peptide from Influenza A virus (CapM2e was investigated in vivo. Formulation of CapM2e with Si-OH or PLGA nps significantly boosted the immunogenicity of modular capsomeres, even though CapM2e was not actively attached to the nanoparticles prior to injection (i.e., formulation was by simple mixing. In contrast, PCL nps showed no significant adjuvant effect using this simple-mixing approach. The immune response induced by CapM2e alone or formulated with nps was antibody-biased with very high antigen-specific antibody titer and less than 20 cells per million splenocytes secreting interferon gamma. Modification of silica nanoparticle surface properties through amine functionalization and pegylation did not lead to significant changes in immune response. This study confirms that simple mixing-based formulation can lead to effective adjuvanting of antigenic protein, though with antibody titer dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties.

  1. Protein nanocoatings on synthetic polymeric nanofibrous membranes designed as carriers for skin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacakova, Marketa; Pajorova, Julia; Stranska, Denisa; Hadraba, Daniel; Lopot, Frantisek; Riedel, Tomas; Brynda, Eduard; Zaloudkova, Margit; Bacakova, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    Protein-coated resorbable synthetic polymeric nanofibrous membranes are promising for the fabrication of advanced skin substitutes. We fabricated electrospun polylactic acid and poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) nanofibrous membranes and coated them with fibrin or collagen I. Fibronectin was attached to a fibrin or collagen nanocoating, in order further to enhance the cell adhesion and spreading. Fibrin regularly formed a coating around individual nanofibers in the membranes, and also formed a thin noncontinuous nanofibrous mesh on top of the membranes. Collagen also coated most of the fibers of the membrane and randomly created a soft gel on the membrane surface. Fibronectin predominantly adsorbed onto a thin fibrin mesh or a collagen gel, and formed a thin nanofibrous structure. Fibrin nanocoating greatly improved the attachment, spreading, and proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts, whereas collagen nanocoating had a positive influence on the behavior of human HaCaT keratinocytes. In addition, fibrin stimulated the fibroblasts to synthesize fibronectin and to deposit it as an extracellular matrix. Fibrin coating also showed a tendency to improve the ultimate tensile strength of the nanofibrous membranes. Fibronectin attached to fibrin or to a collagen coating further enhanced the adhesion, spreading, and proliferation of both cell types. PMID:28223803

  2. Three-Dimentional Structures of Autophosphorylation Complexes in Crystals of Protein Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Dumbrack, Roland

    2016-01-26

    Protein kinase autophosphorylation is a common regulatory mechanism in cell signaling pathways. Several autophosphorylation complexes have been identified in crystals of protein kinases, with a known serine, threonine, or tyrosine autophosphorylation site of one kinase monomer sitting in the active site of another monomer of the same protein in the crystal. We utilized a structural bioinformatics method to identify all such autophosphorylation complexes in X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by generating all unique kinase/kinase interfaces within and between asymmetric units of each crystal and measuring the distance between the hydroxyl oxygen of potential autophosphorylation sites and the oxygen atoms of the active site aspartic acid residue side chain. We have identified 15 unique autophosphorylation complexes in the PDB, of which 5 complexes have not previously been described in the relevant publications on the crystal structures (N-terminal juxtamembrane regions of CSF1R and EPHA2, activation loop tyrosines of LCK and IGF1R, and a serine in a nuclear localization signal region of CLK2. Mutation of residues in the autophosphorylation complex interface of LCK either severely impaired autophosphorylation or increased it. Taking the autophosphorylation complexes as a whole and comparing them with peptide-substrate/kinase complexes, we observe a number of important features among them. The novel and previously observed autophosphorylation sites are conserved in many kinases, indicating that by homology we can extend the relevance of these complexes to many other clinically relevant drug targets.

  3. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals; Simulationsrechnungen zu Strahlenschaeden an Proteinkristallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehnder, M.

    2007-03-15

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  4. Purification and Crystallization of Flammulin, a Basic Protein with Anti-tumor Activities from Flammulina Velutipes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Flammulin, an anti-tumor protein, was purified from the aqueous extract of basidiomes of Flammulina Velutipes to electrophoretic homogeneity and crystallized by microdialysis against a polyethylene glycol- sodium phosphate buffer. The purified product was found to have marked antitumor effects and be able to affect the tumor cells directly.

  5. The 2DX robot: a membrane protein 2D crystallization Swiss Army knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovache, Ioan; Biasini, Marco; Kowal, Julia; Kukulski, Wanda; Chami, Mohamed; van der Goot, F Gisou; Engel, Andreas; Rémigy, Hervé-W

    2010-03-01

    Among the state-of-the-art techniques that provide experimental information at atomic scale for membrane proteins, electron crystallography, atomic force microscopy and solid state NMR make use of two-dimensional crystals. We present a cyclodextrin-driven method for detergent removal implemented in a fully automated robot. The kinetics of the reconstitution processes is precisely controlled, because the detergent complexation by cyclodextrin is of stoichiometric nature. The method requires smaller volumes and lower protein concentrations than established 2D crystallization methods, making it possible to explore more conditions with the same amount of protein. The method yielded highly ordered 2D crystals diffracting to high resolution from the pore-forming toxin Aeromonas hydrophila aerolysin (2.9A), the plant aquaporin SoPIP2;1 (3.1A) and the human aquaporin-8 (hAQP8; 3.3A). This new method outperforms traditional 2D crystallization approaches in terms of accuracy, flexibility, throughput, and allows the usage of detergents having low critical micelle concentration (CMC), which stabilize the structure of membrane proteins in solution.

  6. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalinski, Eva; Bange, Gert; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard, E-mail: irmi.sinning@bzh.uni-heidelberg.de [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, INF 328, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-09-01

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1 from Homo sapiens is provided. ErbB-3-binding protein 1 (Ebp1) is a member of the family of proliferation-associated 2G4 proteins (PA2G4s) and plays a role in cellular growth and differentiation. Ligand-induced activation of the transmembrane receptor ErbB3 leads to dissociation of Ebp1 from the receptor in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The non-associated protein is involved in transcriptional and translational regulation in the cell. Here, the overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Ebp1 from Homo sapiens are reported. Initially observed crystals were improved by serial seeding to single crystals suitable for data collection. The optimized crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å.

  7. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of a choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Neil G., E-mail: neison@chem.gla.ac.uk; Riboldi-Tunicliffe, Alan [Department of Chemistry and WestCHEM, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre (GBRC), University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Timothy J. [Division of Infection and Immunity (IBLS), Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre (GBRC), University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom); Isaacs, Neil W. [Department of Chemistry and WestCHEM, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre (GBRC), University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    The choline-binding protein CbpI from S. pneumoniae has been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to 3.5 Å resolution. The choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae is a 23.4 kDa protein with no known function. The protein has been successfully purified initially using Ni–NTA chromatography and to homogeneity using Q-Sepharose ion-exchange resin as an affinity column. CbpI was crystallized using PEG 3350 as a precipitant and X-ray crystallographic analysis showed that the crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 83.31, c = 80.29 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The crystal contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 55.7% (V{sub M} = 2.77 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}) and shows a diffraction limit of 3.5 Å.

  8. Crystal Structure of Okadaic Acid Binding Protein 2.1: A Sponge Protein Implicated in Cytotoxin Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehara, Haruhiko; Makino, Marie; Kodama, Koichiro; Konoki, Keiichi; Ito, Takuhiro; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Fukuzawa, Seketsu; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tachibana, Kazuo

    2015-07-06

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a marine polyether cytotoxin that was first isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria okadai. OA is a potent inhibitor of protein serine/threonine phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A, and the structural basis of phosphatase inhibition has been well investigated. However, the role and mechanism of OA retention in the marine sponge have remained elusive. We have solved the crystal structure of okadaic acid binding protein 2.1 (OABP2.1) isolated from H. okadai; it has strong affinity for OA and limited sequence homology to other proteins. The structure revealed that OABP2.1 consists of two α-helical domains, with the OA molecule deeply buried inside the protein. In addition, the global fold of OABP2.1 was unexpectedly similar to that of aequorin, a jellyfish photoprotein. The presence of structural homologues suggested that, by using similar protein scaffolds, marine invertebrates have developed diverse survival systems adapted to their living environments.

  9. Structure and function of sterol carrier proteins in insects%昆虫固醇转运蛋白的结构与功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽丽; 郭兴荣; 冯启理; 郑思春

    2011-01-01

    In insects, cholesterol is not only one of the main components of cell membranes, but also a precursor of ecdysone biosynthesis. However, because insects lack two key enzymes for cholesterol biosynthesis, they can not autonomously synthesize cholesterol from simple compounds and therefore have to obtain sterols from their diet. Insects must convert food sterols into cholesterol to meet the requirements of growth, development and reproduction. Sterol carrier proteins (SCPs) are main transport proteins for sterol absorption and transport in insects. It is critical to study the relationship between structure and function of SCPs for understanding the roles of SCPs in sterol transport. In this review, recent progress in the study of the structure, expression and distribution of SCP genes and proteins, post-translation modification, crystal structure, ligand-binding specificity and possible absorption and transport pathways of insect SCPs was summarized and the potential of using SCPs as a molecular target for pest insect control was also discussed.Studies indicate that transcript expression of SCP genes and post-translation modifications of SCP proteins vary depending on different species. In dipteran insects such as Aedes aegypti and Drosophila melangoster SCP-x gene encodes SCP-x and SCP-2 proteins, while there are additional SCP-2 genes and SCP-2-1ike genes encoding SCP-2 and SCP-2-1ike proteins, respectively. In lepidopteran insects such as Spodoptera littoralis,Spodoptera litura and Bombyx mori, the transcript expression and translation processes of SCP-x gene are similar to those in vertebrates, in which SCP-2 protein is produced after post transcription and translation modifications of a unique SCP-x gene. SCP-x and SCP-2 proteins are localized in peroxisomes. SCP-2 protein consists of 5 αt-helixes and 5 β-sheets and the αS-helix appears to impact the binding of the protein to substrates. SCP-2 protein can bind with different affinity to cholesterol

  10. Proteomic analysis of proteins selectively associated with hydroxyapatite, brushite, and uric acid crystals precipitated from human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurgood, Lauren A; Ryall, Rosemary L

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the intracrystalline protein profiles of hydroxyapatite (HA), brushite (BR), and uric acid (UA) crystals precipitated from the same urine samples. HA, BR, and UA crystals were precipitated on two different occasions from the same pooled healthy urine. Crystals were washed to remove surface-bound proteins, and their composition was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). SDS-PAGE was used for visual comparison of the protein content of the demineralised crystal extracts, which were analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). HA comprised nanosized particles interspersed with organic material, which was absent from the BR and UA crystals. The number and type of individual proteins differed between the 3 minerals: 45 proteins were detected in the HA crystal extracts and 77 in the BR crystals, including a number of keratins, which were regarded as methodological contaminants. After excluding the keratins, 21 proteins were common to both HA and BR crystals. Seven nonkeratin proteins were identified in the UA extracts. Several proteins consistently detected in the HA and BR crystal extracts have been previously implicated in kidney stone disease, including osteopontin, prothrombin, protein S100A9 (calgranulin B), inter-α-inhibitor, α1-microglobulin bikunin (AMBP), heparan sulfate proteoglycan, and Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, all of which are strong calcium binders. We concluded that the association of proteins with HA, BR, and UA crystals formed in healthy urine is selective and that only a few of the numerous proteins present in healthy urine are likely to play any significant role in preventing stone pathogenesis.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-20 mediates dental enamel biomineralization by preventing protein occlusion inside apatite crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Saumya; Tao, Jinhui; Ruan, Qichao; De Yoreo, James J; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of enamel-like materials is a central topic of research in dentistry and material sciences. The importance of precise proteolytic mechanisms in amelogenesis to form a hard tissue with more than 95% mineral content has already been reported. A mutation in the Matrix Metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) gene results in hypomineralized enamel that is thin, disorganized and breaks from the underlying dentin. We hypothesized that the absence of MMP-20 during amelogenesis results in the occlusion of amelogenin in the enamel hydroxyapatite crystals. We used spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze occluded proteins within the isolated enamel crystals from MMP-20 null and Wild type (WT) mice. Our results showed that the isolated enamel crystals of MMP-20 null mice had more organic macromolecules occluded inside them than enamel crystals from the WT. The crystal lattice arrangements of MMP-20 null enamel crystals analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) were found to be significantly different from those of the WT. Raman studies indicated that the crystallinity of the MMP-20 null enamel crystals was lower than that of the WT. In conclusion, we present a novel functional mechanism of MMP-20, specifically prevention of unwanted organic material entrapped in the forming enamel crystals, which occurs as the result of precise amelogenin cleavage. MMP-20 action guides the growth morphology of the forming hydroxyapatite crystals and enhances their crystallinity. Elucidating such molecular mechanisms can be applied in the design of novel biomaterials for future clinical applications in dental restoration or repair.

  12. Electric transport of a single-crystal iron chalcogenide FeSe superconductor: Evidence of symmetry-breakdown nematicity and additional ultrafast Dirac cone-like carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, K. K.; Tanabe, Y.; Urata, T.; Oguro, H.; Heguri, S.; Watanabe, K.; Tanigaki, K.

    2014-10-01

    An SDW antiferromagnetic (SDW-AF) low-temperature phase transition is generally observed and the AF spin fluctuations are considered to play an important role for the superconductivity pairing mechanism in FeAs superconductors. However, a similar magnetic phase transition is not observed in FeSe superconductors, which has caused considerable discussion. We report on the intrinsic electronic states of FeSe as elucidated by electric transport measurements under magnetic fields using a high quality single crystal. A mobility spectrum analysis, an ab initio method that does not make assumptions on the transport parameters in a multicarrier system, provides very important and clear evidence that another hidden order, most likely the symmetry broken from the tetragonal C4 symmetry to the C2 symmetry nematicity associated with the selective d -orbital splitting, exists in the case of superconducting FeSe other than the AF magnetic order spin fluctuations. The intrinsic low-temperature phase in FeSe is in the almost compensated semimetallic states but is additionally accompanied by Dirac cone-like ultrafast electrons ˜104cm2(VS) -1 as minority carriers.

  13. Indium-Carrier Minerals in Polymetallic Sulphide Ore Deposits: A Crystal Chemical Insight into an Indium Binding State Supported by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Rosa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Indium is a typical chalcophile element of the Earth’s crust, with a very low average content that seldom forms specific minerals, occurring mainly as dispersed in polymetallic sulphides. Indium recovery is based primarily on zinc extraction from sphalerite, the prototype of so-called tetrahedral sulphides, wherein metal ions fill half of the available tetrahedral sites within the cubic closest packing of sulphur anions, leaving interstices accessible for further in-filling. Ascertaining the tendency towards the establishment of In-In interactions through an x-ray absorption spectroscopy approach would efficiently contribute to understanding the behavior of indium in the carrier mineral. The successful results of applying such a near-edge absorption (XANES study at In L3-edge to samples collected at the Lagoa Salgada polymetallic orebody in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB are described and the crystal chemistry of indium is re-evaluated, disclosing a potential clue for the metal binding state in polymetallic sulphides.

  14. Quinoxaline-2-carboxamide as a carrier ligand in two new platinum(II) compounds: Synthesis, crystal structure, cytotoxic activity and DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqués-Gallego, Patricia; Gamiz-Gonzalez, M Amparo; Fortea-Pérez, Francisco R; Lutz, Martin; Spek, Anthony L; Pevec, Andrej; Kozlevčar, Bojan; Reedijk, Jan

    2010-06-01

    The search for platinum compounds structurally different from cisplatin has led to two new platinum(II) compounds containing quinoxaline-2-carboxamide as a carrier ligand, i.e. cis-[Pt(qnxca)(MeCN)Cl2] (1) and the [Pt(qnxca-H)(dmso)Cl] (2). Both compounds have been synthesized and characterized using different spectroscopic methods. In addition, single-crystal structures have been determined by X-Ray diffraction for both compounds. In each case a square planar Pt(II) is present; in (1) the qnxca is monodentate and neutral, whereas in (2) the ligand has lost a hydrogen, to form the anionic chelating ligand abbreviated as qnxca-H. The biological activity of both compounds has been investigated in a panel of seven human tumour cells, displaying poor cytotoxic activity, compared to cisplatin. The interaction of the new compounds with 1 or 2 equiv. of 9-ethylguanine has been studied using (1)H NMR, (195)Pt NMR and ESI-MS spectroscopy, finding poor reactivity of 1 towards the model base, forming only the monosubstituted adduct. Surprisingly, compound 2, which is more sterically crowded, interacts more efficiently with the 9-EtG, forming a bifunctional adduct with two 9-EtG with substitution of the dmso and the chloride ligand. Unwinding studies of pUC19 plasmid DNA by compound 1 show similar unwinding properties to cisplatin.

  15. Adjuvant and carrier protein-dependent T-cell priming promotes a robust antibody response against the Plasmodium falciparum Pfs25 vaccine candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Andrea J.; Anderson, Charles F.; Riteau, Nicolas; Rausch, Kelly; Scaria, Puthupparampil; Kelnhofer, Emily R.; Howard, Randall F.; Sher, Alan; Germain, Ronald N.; Duffy, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Humoral immune responses have the potential to maintain protective antibody levels for years due to the immunoglobulin-secreting activity of long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs). However, many subunit vaccines under development fail to generate robust LLPC responses, and therefore a variety of strategies are being employed to overcome this limitation, including conjugation to carrier proteins and/or formulation with potent adjuvants. Pfs25, an antigen expressed on malaria zygotes and ookinetes, is a leading transmission blocking vaccine (TBV) candidate for Plasmodium falciparum. Currently, the conjugate vaccine Pfs25-EPA/Alhydrogel is in Phase 1 clinical trials in the USA and Africa. Thus far, it has proven to be safe and immunogenic, but it is expected that a more potent formulation will be required to establish antibody titers that persist for several malaria transmission seasons. We sought to determine the contribution of carrier determinants and adjuvants in promoting high-titer, long-lived antibody responses against Pfs25. We found that both adjuvants and carrier proteins influence the magnitude and capacity of Pfs25-specific humoral responses to remain above a protective level. Furthermore, a liposomal adjuvant with QS21 and a TLR4 agonist (GLA-LSQ) was especially effective at inducing T follicular helper (Tfh) and LLPC responses to Pfs25 when coupled to immunogenic carrier proteins. PMID:28091576

  16. Chemical imaging of protein adsorption and crystallization on a wettability gradient surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassford, Stefanie; Chan, K L Andrew; Byrne, Bernadette; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2012-02-14

    The use of self-assembled monolayers is an established method to study the effect of surface properties on proteins and other biological materials. The generation of a monolayer with a gradient of chemical properties allows for the study of multiple surface properties simultaneously in a high throughput manner. Typically, in order to detect the presence of proteins or biological material on a surface, the use of additional dyes or tags is required. Here we present a novel method of studying the effect of gradient surface properties on protein adsorption and crystallization in situ through the use of ATR-FTIR spectroscopic imaging, which removes the need for additional labeling. We describe the successful application of this technique to the measurement of the growth of a gradient monolayer of octyltrichlorosilane across the surface of a silicon ATR element. ATR-FTIR imaging was also used to study the adsorption of lysozyme, as a model protein, onto the modified surface. The sensitivity of measurements obtained with a focal plane array (FPA) detector were improved though the use of pixel averaging which allowed small absorption bands to be detected with minimal effect on the spatial resolution along the gradient. Study of the effect of surface hydrophobicity on both adsorption of lysozyme to the element and lysozyme crystallization revealed that more lysozyme adsorbed to the hydrophobic side of the ATR element and more lysozyme crystals formed in the same region. These findings strongly suggest a correlation exists between surface protein adsorption and protein crystallization. This method could be applied to the study of other proteins and whole cells.

  17. Protein-Protein Interactions in Crystals of the Human Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase ICA512 Ectodomain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primo M. E.; Jakoncic J.; Noguera M.E.; Risso V.A.; Sosa L.; Sica M.P.; Solimena M.; Poskus E. and Ermacora M.

    2011-09-15

    ICA512 (or IA-2) is a transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase located in secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Initially, it was identified as one of the main antigens of autoimmune diabetes. Later, it was found that during insulin secretion, the cytoplasmic domain of ICA512 is cleaved and relocated to the nucleus, where it stimulates the transcription of the insulin gene. The role of the other parts of the receptor in insulin secretion is yet to be unveiled. The structures of the intracellular pseudocatalytic and mature extracellular domains are known, but the transmembrane domain and several intracellular and extracellular parts of the receptor are poorly characterized. Moreover the overall structure of the receptor remains to be established. We started to address this issue studying by X-ray crystallography the structure of the mature ectodomain of ICA512 (ME ICA512) and variants thereof. The variants and crystallization conditions were chosen with the purpose of exploring putative association interfaces, metal binding sites and all other structural details that might help, in subsequent works, to build a model of the entire receptor. Several structural features were clarified and three main different association modes of ME ICA512 were identified. The results provide essential pieces of information for the design of new experiments aimed to assess the structure in vivo.

  18. Protein-protein interactions in crystals of the human receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase ICA512 ectodomain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E Primo

    Full Text Available ICA512 (or IA-2 is a transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase located in secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Initially, it was identified as one of the main antigens of autoimmune diabetes. Later, it was found that during insulin secretion, the cytoplasmic domain of ICA512 is cleaved and relocated to the nucleus, where it stimulates the transcription of the insulin gene. The role of the other parts of the receptor in insulin secretion is yet to be unveiled. The structures of the intracellular pseudocatalytic and mature extracellular domains are known, but the transmembrane domain and several intracellular and extracellular parts of the receptor are poorly characterized. Moreover the overall structure of the receptor remains to be established. We started to address this issue studying by X-ray crystallography the structure of the mature ectodomain of ICA512 (ME ICA512 and variants thereof. The variants and crystallization conditions were chosen with the purpose of exploring putative association interfaces, metal binding sites and all other structural details that might help, in subsequent works, to build a model of the entire receptor. Several structural features were clarified and three main different association modes of ME ICA512 were identified. The results provide essential pieces of information for the design of new experiments aimed to assess the structure in vivo.

  19. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.961 protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiong-Zhuo; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, XiaoJun; Liang, Yu-He

    2007-10-01

    The smu.961 gene encodes a putative protein of 183 residues in Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen in human dental caries. The gene was cloned into expression vector pET28a and expressed in a substantial quantity in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) with a His tag at its N-terminus. The recombinant protein SMU.961 was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure consisting of Ni2+-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.9 A resolution at beamline I911-3, MAX-II-lab, Sweden. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.62, b = 73.73, c = 184.73 A, beta = 98.82 degrees.

  20. Transport of platinum bonded nucleotides into proteoliposomes, mediated by Drosophila melanogaster thiamine pyrophosphate carrier protein (DmTpc1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrisi, Chiara; Antonucci, Daniela; Lunetti, Paola; Migoni, Danilo; Girelli, Chiara R; Dolce, Vincenza; Fanizzi, Francesco P; Benedetti, Michele; Capobianco, Loredana

    2014-01-01

    The results of the present study suggest that DmTpc1 is actively implicated in the specific uptake of free cytoplasmic Pt bonded nucleotides, and therefore could be linked to the mechanism of action of some platinum-based antitumor drugs. Although DmTpc1 has a low affinity for model [Pt(dien)(N7-5'-dGTP)] and cis-[Pt(NH3)2(py)(N7-5'-dGTP)] compared to dATP it's well known that DNA platination level of few metal atoms per double-stranded molecule may account for the pharmacological activity of platinum based antitumor drugs. This is the first investigation where it has been demonstrated that a mitochondrial carrier is directly involved in the transport of metalated purines related with the cisplatin mechanism of action. Moreover it is shown as a lower hindrance of nucleotide bonded platinum complexes could strongly enhance mitochondrial uptake. Furthermore, a new application of ICP-AES addressed to measure the transport of metalated nucleobases, by using a recombinant protein reconstituted into liposomes, has been here, for the first time, developed and compared with a standard technique such as the liquid scintillation counting.

  1. Structural insights into the mechanism and inhibition of the β-hydroxydecanoyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynié, Lucile; Leckie, Stuart M; McMahon, Stephen A; Duthie, Fraser G; Koehnke, Alessa; Taylor, James W; Alphey, Magnus S; Brenk, Ruth; Smith, Andrew D; Naismith, James H

    2013-01-23

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is an essential component of metabolism in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The fatty acid biosynthetic pathway of Gram-negative bacteria is an established therapeutic target. Two homologous enzymes FabA and FabZ catalyze a key step in fatty acid biosynthesis; both dehydrate hydroxyacyl fatty acids that are coupled via a phosphopantetheine to an acyl carrier protein (ACP). The resulting trans-2-enoyl-ACP is further polymerized in a processive manner. FabA, however, carries out a second reaction involving isomerization of trans-2-enoyl fatty acid to cis-3-enoyl fatty acid. We have solved the structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa FabA with a substrate allowing detailed molecular insight into the interactions of the active site. This has allowed a detailed examination of the factors governing the second catalytic step. We have also determined the structure of FabA in complex with small molecules (so-called fragments). These small molecules occupy distinct regions of the active site and form the basis for a rational inhibitor design program.

  2. Rational design of broad spectrum antibacterial activity based on a clinically relevant enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Johannes; Chang, Andrew; Shah, Sonam; Lu, Yang; Liu, Li; Pan, Pan; Hirschbeck, Maria W; Tareilus, Mona; Eltschkner, Sandra; Yu, Weixuan; Cummings, Jason E; Knudson, Susan E; Bommineni, Gopal R; Walker, Stephen G; Slayden, Richard A; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Tonge, Peter J; Kisker, Caroline

    2014-06-06

    Determining the molecular basis for target selectivity is of particular importance in drug discovery. The ideal antibiotic should be active against a broad spectrum of pathogenic organisms with a minimal effect on human targets. CG400549, a Staphylococcus-specific 2-pyridone compound that inhibits the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI), has recently been shown to possess human efficacy for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, which constitute a serious threat to human health. In this study, we solved the structures of three different FabI homologues in complex with several pyridone inhibitors, including CG400549. Based on these structures, we rationalize the 65-fold reduced affinity of CG400549 toward Escherichia coli versus S. aureus FabI and implement concepts to improve the spectrum of antibacterial activity. The identification of different conformational states along the reaction coordinate of the enzymatic hydride transfer provides an elegant visual depiction of the relationship between catalysis and inhibition, which facilitates rational inhibitor design. Ultimately, we developed the novel 4-pyridone-based FabI inhibitor PT166 that retained favorable pharmacokinetics and efficacy in a mouse model of S. aureus infection with extended activity against Gram-negative and mycobacterial organisms.

  3. Design and evaluation of lipoprotein resembling curcumin-encapsulated protein-free nanostructured lipid carrier for brain targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanfei; Asghar, Sajid; Xu, Yurui; Wang, Jianping; Jin, Xin; Wang, Zhilin; Wang, Jing; Ping, Qineng; Zhou, Jianping; Xiao, Yanyu

    2016-06-15

    Many nanoparticle matrixes have been demonstrated to be efficient in brain targeting, but there are still certain limitations for them. To overcome the shortcomings of the existing nanoparticulate systems for brain-targeted delivery, a lipoprotein resembling protein-free nanostructured lipid carrier (PS80-NLC) loaded with curcumin was constructed and assessed for in vitro and in vivo performance. Firstly, single factor at a time approach was employed to investigate the effects of various formulation factors. Mean particle sizes of ≤100nm, high entrapment efficiency (EE, about 95%) and drug loading (DL, >3%) were obtained for the optimized formulations. In vitro release studies in the presence of plasma indicated stability of the formulation under physiological condition. Compared with NLC, PS80-NLC showed noticeably higher affinity for bEnd.3 cells (1.56 folds greater than NLC) but with lower uptake in macrophages. The brain coronal sections showed strong and widely distributed fluorescence intensity of PS80-NLC than that of NLC in the cortex. Ex vivo imaging studies further confirmed that PS80-NLC could effectively permeate BBB and preferentially accumulate in the brain (2.38 times greater than NLC). The considerable in vitro and in vivo performance of the safe and biocompatible PS80-NLC makes it a suitable option for further investigations in brain targeted drug delivery.

  4. Defective Pollen Wall is Required for Anther and Microspore Development in Rice and Encodes a Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, J.; Shanklin, J.; Tan, H.; Yu, X.-H.; Liu, Y.; Liang, W.; Ranathunge, K.; Franke, R. B.; Schreiber, L.; Wang, Y.; Kai, G.; Ma, H.; Zhang, D.

    2011-06-01

    Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots.

  5. Interaction between Functional Domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Crystal Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rang, Cécile; Vachon, Vincent; de Maagd, Ruud A.; Villalon, Mario; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Bosch, Dirk; Frutos, Roger; Laprade, Raynald

    1999-01-01

    Interactions among the three structural domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins were investigated by functional analysis of chimeric proteins. Hybrid genes were prepared by exchanging the regions coding for either domain I or domain III among Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1C, and Cry1E. The activity of the purified trypsin-activated chimeric toxins was evaluated by testing their effects on the viability and plasma membrane permeability of Sf9 cells. Among the parental toxins, only Cry1C was active against these cells and only chimeras possessing domain II from Cry1C were functional. Combination of domain I from Cry1E with domains II and III from Cry1C, however, resulted in an inactive toxin, indicating that domain II from an active toxin is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity. Pores formed by chimeric toxins in which domain I was from Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac were slightly smaller than those formed by toxins in which domain I was from Cry1C. The properties of the pores formed by the chimeras are therefore likely to result from an interaction between domain I and domain II or III. Domain III appears to modulate the activity of the chimeric toxins: combination of domain III from Cry1Ab with domains I and II of Cry1C gave a protein which was more strongly active than Cry1C. PMID:10388684

  6. Conformational energy range of ligands in protein crystal structures: The difficult quest for accurate understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Megan L; Cachau, Raul E; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2017-02-24

    In this review, we address a fundamental question: What is the range of conformational energies seen in ligands in protein-ligand crystal structures? This value is important biophysically, for better understanding the protein-ligand binding process; and practically, for providing a parameter to be used in many computational drug design methods such as docking and pharmacophore searches. We synthesize a selection of previously reported conflicting results from computational studies of this issue and conclude that high ligand conformational energies really are present in some crystal structures. The main source of disagreement between different analyses appears to be due to divergent treatments of electrostatics and solvation. At the same time, however, for many ligands, a high conformational energy is in error, due to either crystal structure inaccuracies or incorrect determination of the reference state. Aside from simple chemistry mistakes, we argue that crystal structure error may mainly be because of the heuristic weighting of ligand stereochemical restraints relative to the fit of the structure to the electron density. This problem cannot be fixed with improvements to electron density fitting or with simple ligand geometry checks, though better metrics are needed for evaluating ligand and binding site chemistry in addition to geometry during structure refinement. The ultimate solution for accurately determining ligand conformational energies lies in ultrahigh-resolution crystal structures that can be refined without restraints.

  7. Crystal structure of the homology domain of the eukaryotic DNA replication proteins Sld3/Treslin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itou, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Sachiko; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-02

    The initiation of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication requires the formation of an active replicative helicase at the replication origins of chromosomal DNA. Yeast Sld3 and its metazoan counterpart Treslin are the hub proteins mediating protein associations critical for the helicase formation. Here, we show the crystal structure of the central domain of Sld3 that is conserved in Sld3/Treslin family of proteins. The domain consists of two segments with 12 helices and is sufficient to bind to Cdc45, the essential helicase component. The structure model of the Sld3-Cdc45 complex, which is crucial for the formation of the active helicase, is proposed.

  8. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Shibayama, Naoya; Happo, Naohisa; Kimura, Koji; Okabe, Takahiro; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Park, Sam-Yong; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2016-06-01

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α2β2 tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm3) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  9. Gravistimulation changes expression of genes encoding putative carrier proteins of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, T.; Hitotsubashi, R.; Miyamoto, K.; Tanimoto, E.; Ueda, J.

    STS-95 space experiment has showed that auxin polar transport in etiolated epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings is controlled by gravistimulation. In Arabidopsis thaliana auxin polar transport has considered to be regulated by efflux and influx carrier proteins in plasma membranes, AtPIN1 and AtAUX1, respectively. In order to know how gravistimuli control auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls at molecular levels, strenuous efforts have been made, resulting in successful isolation of full-length cDNAs of a putative auxin efflux and influx carriers, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 (accession no. AY222857, Chawla and DeMason, 2003) and AtPINs, and also among PsAUX1, AtAUX1 and their related genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that PsPIN2 belonged to a subclade including AtPIN3, AtPIN4 relating to lateral transport of auxin, while PsPIN1 belonged to the same clade as AtPIN1 relating to auxin polar transport. In the present study, we examined the effects of gravistimuli on the expression of PsPINs and PsAUX1 in etiolated pea seedlings by northern blot analysis. Expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 in hook region of 3.5-d-old etiolated pea seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat increased as compared with that of the seedlings grown under 1 g conditions. On the other hand, that of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 in the 1st internode region under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat also increased, while that of PsPIN2 was affected little. These results suggest that expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 regulating polar/lateral transport of auxin is substantially under the control of gravity. A possible role of PsPINs and PsAUX1 of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea seedlings will also be discussed.

  10. Preparation and testing of a Vi conjugate vaccine using pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) from Streptococcus pneumoniae as the carrier protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Neha; Genschmer, Kristopher R; Kothari, Sudeep; Kim, Jeong Ah; Briles, David E; Rhee, Dong Kwon; Carbis, Rodney

    2014-09-29

    In the current study pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) was conjugated to Vi capsular polysaccharide from Salmonella Typhi to make available a vaccine against typhoid fever that has the potential to also provide broad protection from Streptococcus pneumoniae. High yielding production processes were developed for the purification of PspAs from families 1 and 2. The purified PspAs were conjugated to Vi with high recovery of both Vi and PspA. The processes developed especially for PspA family 2 could readily be adapted for large scale production under cGMP conditions. Previously we have shown that conjugation of diphtheria toxoid (DT) to Vi polysaccharide improves the immune response to Vi but can also enhance the response to DT. In this study it was shown that conjugation of PspA to Vi enhanced the anti-PspA response and that PspA was a suitable carrier protein as demonstrated by the characteristics of a T-cell dependent response to the Vi. We propose that a bivalent vaccine consisting of PspA from families 1 and 2 bound to Vi polysaccharide would protect against typhoid fever and has the potential to also protect against pneumococcal disease and should be considered for use in developing countries.

  11. Crystal Structure of Hyp-1, a Hypericum perforatum PR-10 Protein, in Complex with Melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwiak, Joanna; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Hyp-1, a PR-10-fold protein from Hypericum perforatum, was crystallized in complex with melatonin (MEL). The structure confirms the conserved protein fold and the presence of three unusual ligand binding sites, two of which are internal chambers (1,2), while the third one (3) is formed as an invagination of the protein surface. The MEL ligand in site 1 is well defined while that in site 3 seems to be rotating between the side chains of Lys33 and Tyr150 that act as a molecular vise. The patch of electron density in site 2 does not allow unambiguous modeling of a melatonin molecule but suggests a possible presence of its degradation product. This pattern of ligand occupation is reproducible in repeated crystallization/structure determination experiments. Although the binding of melatonin by Hyp-1 does not appear to be very strong (for example, MEL cannot displace the artificial fluorescence probe ANS), it is strong enough to suggest a physiological role of this interaction. For example, trans-zeatin, which is a common ligand of PR-10 proteins, does not overcompete melatonin for binding to Hyp-1 as it does not affect the crystallization process of the Hyp-1/MEL complex, and among a number of potential natural mediators tested, melatonin was the only one to form a crystalline complex with Hyp-1 with the use of standard crystallization screens. Hyp-1 is the second protein in the Protein Data Bank for which melatonin binding has been demonstrated crystallographically, the first one being human quinone reductase.

  12. Crystal structure of Hyp-1, a Hypericum perforatum PR-10 protein, in complex with melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eSliwiak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hyp-1, a PR-10-fold protein from H. perforatum, was crystallized in complex with melatonin (MEL. The structure confirms the conserved protein fold and the presence of three unusual ligand binding sites, two of which are internal chambers (1, 2, while the third one (3 is formed as an invagination of the protein surface. The MEL ligand in site 1 is well defined while that in site 3 seems to be rotating between the side chains of Lys33 and Tyr150 that act as a molecular vise. The patch of electron density in site 2 does not allow unambiguous modeling of a melatonin molecule but suggests a possible presence of its degradation product. This pattern of ligand occupation is reproducible in repeated crystallization/structure determination experiments. Although the binding of melatonin by Hyp-1 does not appear to be very strong (for example, MEL cannot displace the artificial fluorescence probe ANS, it is strong enough to suggest a physiological role of this interaction. For example, trans-zeatin, which is a common ligand of PR-10 proteins, does not overcompete melatonin for binding to Hyp-1 as it does not affect the crystallization process of the Hyp-1/MEL complex, and among a number of potential natural mediators tested, melatonin was the only one to form a crystalline complex with Hyp-1 with the use of standard crystallization screens. Hyp-1 is the second protein in the Protein Data Bank (PDB for which melatonin binding has been demonstrated crystallographically, the first one being human quinone reductase.

  13. Nucleation of protein crystals under the influence of solution shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, Anita; Pan, Weichun; Hodjaoglu, Feyzim; Vekilov, Peter G

    2006-09-01

    Several recent theories and simulations have predicted that shear flow could enhance, or, conversely, suppress the nucleation of crystals from solution. Such modulations would offer a pathway for nucleation control and provide a novel explanation for numerous mysteries in nucleation research. For experimental tests of the effects of shear flow on protein crystal nucleation, we found that if a protein solution droplet of approximately 5 microL (2-3 mm diameter at base) is held on a hydrophobic substrate in an enclosed environment and in a quasi-uniform constant electric field of 2 to 6 kV cm(-1), a rotational flow with a maximum rate at the droplet top of approximately 10 microm s(-1) is induced. The shear rate varies from 10(-3) to 10(-1) s(-1). The likely mechanism of the rotational flow involves adsorption of the protein and amphiphylic buffer molecules on the air-water interface and their redistribution in the electric field, leading to nonuniform surface tension of the droplet and surface tension-driven flow. Observations of the number of nucleated crystals in 24- and 72-h experiments with the proteins ferritin, apoferritin, and lysozyme revealed that the crystals are typically nucleated at a certain radius of the droplet, that is, at a preferred shear rate. Variations of the rotational flow velocity resulted in suppression or enhancement of the total number of nucleated crystals of ferritin and apoferritin, while all solution flow rates were found to enhance lysozyme crystal nucleation. These observations show that shear flow may strongly affect nucleation, and that for some systems, an optimal flow velocity, leading to fastest nucleation, exists. Comparison with the predictions of theories and simulations suggest that the formation of ordered nuclei in a "normal" protein solution cannot be affected by such low shear rates. We conclude that the flow acts by helping or suppressing the formation of ordered nuclei within mesoscopic metastable dense liquid

  14. Effects of Convective Solute and Impurity Transport in Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Thomas, Bill R.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution optical interferometry was used to investigate the effects of forced solution convection on the crystal growth kinetics of the model protein lysozyme. Most experiments were conducted with 99.99% pure protein solutions. To study impurity effects, approx. 1% of lysozyme dimer (covalently bound) was added in some cases. We show that the unsteady kinetics, corresponding to bunching of growth steps, can be characterized by the Fourier components of time traces of the growth rate. Specific Fourier spectra are uniquely determined by the solution conditions (composition, temperature, and flow rate) and the growth layer source activity. We found that the average step velocity and growth rate increase by approx. I0% with increasing flow rate, as a result of the enhanced solute supply to the interface. More importantly, faster convective transport results in lower fluctuation amplitudes. This observation supports our rationale for system-dependent effects of transport on the structural perfection of protein crystals. We also found that solution flow rates greater than 500 microns/s result in stronger fluctuations while the average growth rate is decreased. This can lead to growth cessation at low supersaturations. With the intentionally contaminated solutions, these undesirable phenomena occurred at about half the flow rates required in pure solutions. Thus, we conclude that they are due to enhanced convective supply of impurities that are incorporated into the crystal during growth. Furthermore, we found that the impurity effects are reduced at higher crystal growth rates. Since the exposure time of terraces is inversely proportional to the growth rate, this observation suggests that the increased kinetics instability results from impurity adsorption on the interface. Finally, we provide evidence relating earlier observations of "slow protein crystal growth kinetics" to step bunch formation in response to nonsteady step generation.

  15. DARPin-Based Crystallization Chaperones Exploit Molecular Geometry as a Screening Dimension in Protein Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batyuk, Alexander; Wu, Yufan; Honegger, Annemarie; Heberling, Matthew M; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-04-24

    DARPin libraries, based on a Designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein consensus framework, are a rich source of binding partners for a wide variety of proteins. Their modular structure, stability, ease of in vitro selection and high production yields make DARPins an ideal starting point for further engineering. The X-ray structures of around 30 different DARPin complexes demonstrate their ability to facilitate crystallization of their target proteins by restricting flexibility and preventing undesired interactions of the target molecule. However, their small size (18 kDa), very hydrophilic surface and repetitive structure can limit the DARPins' ability to provide essential crystal contacts and their usefulness as a search model for addressing the crystallographic phase problem in molecular replacement. To optimize DARPins for their application as crystallization chaperones, rigid domain-domain fusions of the DARPins to larger proteins, proven to yield high-resolution crystal structures, were generated. These fusions were designed in such a way that they affect only one of the terminal capping repeats of the DARPin and do not interfere with residues involved in target binding, allowing to exchange at will the binding specificities of the DARPin in the fusion construct. As a proof of principle, we designed rigid fusions of a stabilized version of Escherichia coli TEM-1 β-lactamase to the C-terminal capping repeat of various DARPins in six different relative domain orientations. Five crystal structures representing four different fusion constructs, alone or in complex with the cognate target, show the predicted relative domain orientations and prove the validity of the concept.

  16. High-throughput identification of purification conditions leads to preliminary crystallization conditions for three inner membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Kroner, Frank; Black, Isobel; Isaacs, Neil W; Roe, Andrew J; McLuskey, Karen

    2011-01-01

    An important factor in the crystallization, and subsequent structural determination, of integral membrane proteins is the ability to produce a stable and monodisperse solution of the protein. Obtaining the correct purification detergent to achieve this can be laborious and is often serendipitous. In this study, high-throughput methods are used to analyze the suitability of eight different detergents on the stability of 12 inner transmembrane proteins from Escherichia coli. The best results obtained from the small-scale experiments were scaled up, the aggregation state of the proteins assessed, and all monodisperse protein solutions entered into crystallization trials. This resulted in preliminary crystallization hits for three inner membrane proteins: XylH, PgpB and YjdL and this study reports the methods, purification procedures and crystallization conditions used to achieve this.

  17. Crystal structure of the Locusta migratoria odorant binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiangge; Li, Junru; Han, Lei; Wang, Yang; Wu, Wei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Tao, Ye; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Ziding; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-01-16

    Locusta migratoria (Lmig) causes enormous losses to agricultural products, especially because it often infests the world with great swarms as locust plagues. Locusts find their plant hosts on which they feed through their olfactory system, in which odorant binding proteins (OBPs) play an important role. Previous study indicated that the amino acid sequences of LmigOBP showed low similarity to OBPs from other insect orders and we speculated that it might perform unique binding behavior. Here, we solved the first LmigOBP1 structure at 1.65Å, which is a monomer in solution and disulfide bonds play a key role in maintaining its function. We show that LmigOBP1 possesses a unique seventh α-helix, which is located at the surface with strong interactions with the LmigOBP1 scaffold consisting of other six α-helices. Moreover, the seventh α-helix forms a wall of an "L" shaped internal hydrophobic cavity to accommodate linear ligands, which is consistent with the binding experiments. We also demonstrate that the ligand-binding pocket in LmigOBP1 is greatly different from that in the closest homologs mosquito OBPs. Taken together, this study provides a structural basis for designing small inhibitors to control locust.

  18. Ultrastructural localization of Charcot-Leyden crystal protein in human eosinophils and basophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calafat, J; Janssen, H; Knol, E F; Weller, P F; Egesten, A

    1997-01-01

    The Charcot-Leyden crystal (CLC) protein with lysophospholipase activity and carbohydrate-binding properties is a characteristic constituent of eosinophils and basophils. We investigated its subcellular distribution using immunoelectron microscopy. Eosinophil progenitors, mature eosinophils and basophils all contained CLC protein in their cytosol and in the euchromatin of the nucleus. A minor population of granules in eosinophils, increasing in number with maturation, and a more abundant granule-population in basophils, were found to contain CLC protein. Double-labeling experiments showed, in eosinophils, that CLC protein-containing granules contain also eosinophil peroxidase, a characteristic specific granule protein. This suggests a relationship between the CLC protein-containing organelle and the specific granule. In basophils both the CLC protein positive and the negative granules showed the same characteristic particulate-like structure of the granular matrix and both share the same membrane marker CD63. In nasal polyps, macrophages were observed phagocytosing necrotic eosinophils. In these macrophages CLC protein-containing vesicles were observed, probably representing late endosomes. The dual (cytosolic/nuclear and granular) localization of CLC protein suggests that this protein enters both a secretory and a nonsecretory pathway during its biosynthesis, indicating functional roles for this protein both within the cell and extracellularly.

  19. High resolution crystal structure of Clostridium propionicum β-alanyl-CoA:ammonia lyase, a new member of the "hot dog fold" protein superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Andreas; Herrmann, Gloria; Selmer, Thorsten; Terwesten, Felix; Buckel, Wolfgang; Reuter, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium propionicum is the only organism known to ferment β-alanine, a constituent of coenzyme A (CoA) and the phosphopantetheinyl prosthetic group of holo-acyl carrier protein. The first step in the fermentation is a CoA-transfer to β-alanine. Subsequently, the resulting β-alanyl-CoA is deaminated by the enzyme β-alanyl-CoA:ammonia lyase (Acl) to reversibly form ammonia and acrylyl-CoA. We have determined the crystal structure of Acl in its apo-form at a resolution of 0.97 Å as well as in complex with CoA at a resolution of 1.59 Å. The structures reveal that the enyzme belongs to a superfamily of proteins exhibiting a so called "hot dog fold" which is characterized by a five-stranded antiparallel β-sheet with a long α-helix packed against it. The functional unit of all "hot dog fold" proteins is a homodimer containing two equivalent substrate binding sites which are established by the dimer interface. In the case of Acl, three functional dimers combine to a homohexamer strongly resembling the homohexamer formed by YciA-like acyl-CoA thioesterases. Here, we propose an enzymatic mechanism based on the crystal structure of the Acl·CoA complex and molecular docking.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matozo, Huita C.; Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Santos, Maria A. M. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Departamento de Física e Informática, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense 400, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Iuliano, Rodolfo [Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università di Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro (Italy); Fusco, Alfredo [Dipartimento di Biologia e Patologia Cellulare e Molecolare, c/o Instituto di Endocrinologia ed Oncologia Sperimentale del CNR, Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università degli Studi di Napoli ‘Federico II’, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); NOGEC (Naples Oncogenomocs Center)-CEINGE, Biotecnologie Avanzate, Via Comunale Margherita 482, 80145 Naples (Italy); Polikarpov, Igor, E-mail: ipolikarpov@if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Departamento de Física e Informática, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense 400, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2006-09-01

    In this study, the catalytic domain of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η (rPTPη) is a cysteine-dependent phosphatase which hydrolyzes phosphoester bonds in proteins and other molecules. rPTPη and its human homologue DEP-1 are involved in neoplastic transformations. Thus, expression of the protein is reduced in all oncogene-transformed thyroid cell lines and is absent in highly malignant thyroid cells. Moreover, consistent with the suggested tumour suppression role of PTPη, inhibition of the tumorigenic process occurs after its exogenous reconstitution, suggesting that PTPη might be important for gene therapy of cancers. In this study, the catalytic domain of rPTPη was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected to 1.87 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.46, b = 63.07, c = 111.64 Å, and contains one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  1. Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal proteins against eri silkworm, Samia cynthia ricini (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep Kumar, Donthula; Tarakeswari, Muddanuru; Lakshminarayana, Maddukuri; Sujatha, Mulpuri

    2016-07-01

    Ten purified crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) were tested at concentrations ranging from 2.93 to 3000ng/cm(2) for their toxicity to eri silkworm through protein paint bioassays using castor leaves. Based on LC50 values, Cry1Aa (2.6ng/cm(2)) was highly toxic followed by Cry1Ac (29.3ng/cm(2)) and Cry1Ab (68.7ng/cm(2)). The Cry1Ca and Cry1Ea proteins were moderately toxic to eri silkworm larvae and resulted in 23% and 28% mortality, respectively at the highest concentration tested (3000ng/cm(2)). Only reduction in larval weight was observed with Cry2Aa, Cry1Da and Cry9Aa proteins while Cry3Aa and Cry1Ba proteins were found to be nontoxic.

  2. Ultrafast dynamics of free carriers induced by two-photon excitation in bulk ZnSe crystal%双光子激发ZnSe自由载流子超快动力学研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor materials exhibiting large optical nonlinearities and ultrafast nonlinear response have received ex-tensive attention because of their potential applications in optical limiting, all-optical devices, optical telecommunication, and so on. As a direct-gap II-VI bulk semiconductor, ZnSe crystal has been exploited as the nonlinear optical devices in the regimes of nanoseconds and picoseconds during the past years. Owing to today’s fast advance of laser sources with ultrashort femtosecond pulse duration, it is possible to investigate the ultrafast optical nonlinearities in the bulk ZnSe crystal. In this paper, we experimentally investigate the ultrafast dynamics of free-carriers induced by two-photon excitation in the bulk ZnSe crystal. By performing open-aperture Z-scan experiments with 41 fs laser pulses at the wavelength of 532 nm under the condition of low excitation intensity, the two-photon absorption coefficient is measured. As the excitation intensity exceeds a critical value, the interplay between third- and fifth-order nonlinear absorption processes is observed. To evaluate the ultrafast dynamics of free carriers, we have carried out femtosecond time-resolved degen-erate pump-probe measurements with the same laser system used for Z-scan experiments in different levels of pump intensities. It is shown that the transient absorption signals peaked at the zero delay is a linearly increasing function of pump intensity, indicating that the observed instantaneous nonlinear absorption is dominated by the interband two-photon absorption process. At moderate irradiance, the transient absorption signals obviously indicate two components, arising from the two-photon absorption-induced free-carrier absorption, which is equivalent to the fifth-order nonlinear absorption process. Under the excitation of relatively high pump intensity, the magnitude of the reduction of free-carrier absorption signal becomes faster, suggesting that the ZnSe crystal exhibits a

  3. Crystals in crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Schmidt, I.; Carlsson, A.;

    2005-01-01

    A major factor governing the performance of catalytically active particles supported on a zeolite carrier is the degree of dispersion. It is shown that the introduction of noncrystallographic mesopores into zeolite single crystals (silicalite-1, ZSM-5) may increase the degree of particle dispersion...... of the zeolite particles, particularly after thermal treatment. When using mesoporous zeolites, the particles were evenly distributed throughout the mesopore system of the zeolitic support, even after calcination, leading to nanocrystals within mesoporous zeolite single crystals....

  4. Influence of acid-soluble proteins from bivalve Siliqua radiata ligaments on calcium carbonate crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zeng-Qiong; Zhang, Gang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    In vitro biomimetic synthesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the presence of shell proteins is a heavily researched topic in biomineralization. However, little is known regarding the function of bivalve ligament proteins in the growth of CaCO3 crystals. In this study, using fibrous protein K58 from Siliqua radiata ligaments or coverslips as substrates, we report the results of our study of CaCO3 precipitation in the presence or absence of acid-soluble proteins (ASP) from inner ligament layers. ASP can disturb the controlling function of K58 or a coverslip on the crystalline phase, resulting in the formation of aragonite, calcite, and vaterite. In addition, we identified the following four primary components from ASP by mass spectroscopy: alkaline phosphatase (ALP), ABC transporter, keratin type II cytoskeletal 1 (KRT 1), and phosphate ABC transporter, phosphate-binding protein (PstS). Further analysis revealed that the first three proteins and especially ALP, which is important in bone mineralisation, could affect the polymorphism and morphology of CaCO3 crystals by trapping calcium ions in their domains. Our results indicate that ALP may play an important role in the formation of aragonite in S. radiata ligaments. This paper may facilitate our understanding of the biomineralization process.

  5. Characterization of a stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene family from chocolate tree, Theobroma cacao L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufan eZhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In plants, the conversion of stearoyl-ACP to oleoyol-ACP is catalyzed by a plastid-localized soluble stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP desaturase (SAD. The activity of SAD significantly impacts the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and is thus a major determinant of fatty acid composition. The cacao genome contains eight putative SAD isoforms with high amino acid sequence similarities and functional domain conservation with SAD genes from other species. Sequence variation in known functional domains between different SAD family members suggested that these eight SAD isoforms might have distinct functions in plant development, a hypothesis supported by their diverse expression patterns in various cacao tissues. Notably, TcSAD1 is universally expressed across all the tissues, and its expression pattern in seeds is highly correlated with the dramatic change in fatty acid composition during seed maturation. Interestingly, TcSAD3 and TcSAD4 appear to be exclusively and highly expressed in flowers, functions of which remain unknown. To test the function of TcSAD1 in vivo, transgenic complementation of the Arabidopsis ssi2 mutant was performed, demonstrating that TcSAD1 successfully rescued all AtSSI2 related phenotypes further supporting the functional orthology between these two genes. The identification of the major SAD gene responsible for cocoa butter biosynthesis provides new strategies for screening for novel genotypes with desirable fatty acid compositions, and for use in breeding programs to help pyramid genes for quality and other traits such as disease resistance.

  6. Characterization of a stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene family from chocolate tree, Theobroma cacao L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufan; Maximova, Siela N; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    In plants, the conversion of stearoyl-ACP to oleoyol-ACP is catalyzed by a plastid-localized soluble stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD). The activity of SAD significantly impacts the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and is thus a major determinant of fatty acid composition. The cacao genome contains eight putative SAD isoforms with high amino acid sequence similarities and functional domain conservation with SAD genes from other species. Sequence variation in known functional domains between different SAD family members suggested that these eight SAD isoforms might have distinct functions in plant development, a hypothesis supported by their diverse expression patterns in various cacao tissues. Notably, TcSAD1 is universally expressed across all the tissues, and its expression pattern in seeds is highly correlated with the dramatic change in fatty acid composition during seed maturation. Interestingly, TcSAD3 and TcSAD4 appear to be exclusively and highly expressed in flowers, functions of which remain unknown. To test the function of TcSAD1 in vivo, transgenic complementation of the Arabidopsis ssi2 mutant was performed, demonstrating that TcSAD1 successfully rescued all AtSSI2 related phenotypes further supporting the functional orthology between these two genes. The identification of the major SAD gene responsible for cocoa butter biosynthesis provides new strategies for screening for novel genotypes with desirable fatty acid compositions, and for use in breeding programs to help pyramid genes for quality and other traits such as disease resistance.

  7. Functional Characterization of Triclosan-Resistant Enoyl-acyl-carrier Protein Reductase (FabV) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Lin, Jin-Shui; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is extremely resistant to triclosan. Previous studies have shown that P. aeruginosa encodes a triclosan-resistant enoyl-acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR), FabV, and that deletion of fabV causes P. aeruginosa to be extremely sensitive to triclosan. In this report, we complemented a P. aeruginosa fabV deletion strain with several triclosan-resistant ENR encoding genes, including Vibrio cholerae fabV, Bacillus subtilis fabL and Enterococcus faecalis fabK. All complemented strains restored triclosan resistance to the level of the wild-type strain, which confirmed that triclosan-resistant ENR allows P. aeruginosa to be extremely resistant to triclosan. Moreover, fabV exhibits pleiotropic effects. Deletion of fabV led P. aeruginosa to show attenuated swarming motility, decreased rhamnolipid, pyoverdine and acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) production. Complementation of the fabV mutant with any one ENR encoding gene could restore these features to some extent, in comparison with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we found that addition of exogenous AHLs could restore the fabV mutant strain to swarm on semisolid plates and to produce more virulence factors than the fabV mutant strain. These findings indicate that deletion of fabV reduced the activity of ENR in P. aeruginosa, decreased fatty acid synthesis, and subsequently depressed the production of AHLs and other virulence factors, which finally may led to a reduction in the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. Therefore, fabV should be an ideal target for the control of P. aeruginosa infectivity. PMID:27965638

  8. Functional characterization of triclosan-resistant enoyl-acyl-carrier protein reductase (FabV in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Heng Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is extremely resistant to triclosan. Previous studies have shown that P. aeruginosa encodes a triclosan-resistant enoyl-acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR, FabV, and that deletion of fabV causes P. aeruginosa to be extremely sensitive to triclosan. In this report, we complemented a P. aeruginosa fabV deletion strain with several triclosan-resistant ENR encoding genes, including Vibrio cholera fabV, Bacillus subtilis fabL and Enterococcus faecalis fabK. All complemented strains restored triclosan resistance to the level of the wild-type strain, which confirmed that triclosan-resistant ENR allows P. aeruginosa to be extremely resistant to triclosan. Moreover, fabV exhibits pleiotropic effects. Deletion of fabV led P. aeruginosa to show attenuated swarming motility, decreased rhamnolipid, pyoverdine and acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs production. Complementation of the fabV mutant with any one ENR encoding gene could restore these features to some extent, in comparison with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we found that addition of exogenous AHLs could restore to the fabV mutant strain the ability to swarm on semisolid plates and to produce more virulence factors than the fabV mutant strain. These findings indicate that deletion of fabV reduced the activity of ENR in P. aeruginosa, decreased fatty acid synthesis, and subsequently depressed the production of AHLs and other virulence factors, which finally may led to a reduction in the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. Therefore, fabV should be an ideal target for the control of P. aeruginosa infectivity.

  9. Characterization of a stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene family from chocolate tree, Theobroma cacao L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufan; Maximova, Siela N.; Guiltinan, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    In plants, the conversion of stearoyl-ACP to oleoyol-ACP is catalyzed by a plastid-localized soluble stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD). The activity of SAD significantly impacts the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and is thus a major determinant of fatty acid composition. The cacao genome contains eight putative SAD isoforms with high amino acid sequence similarities and functional domain conservation with SAD genes from other species. Sequence variation in known functional domains between different SAD family members suggested that these eight SAD isoforms might have distinct functions in plant development, a hypothesis supported by their diverse expression patterns in various cacao tissues. Notably, TcSAD1 is universally expressed across all the tissues, and its expression pattern in seeds is highly correlated with the dramatic change in fatty acid composition during seed maturation. Interestingly, TcSAD3 and TcSAD4 appear to be exclusively and highly expressed in flowers, functions of which remain unknown. To test the function of TcSAD1 in vivo, transgenic complementation of the Arabidopsis ssi2 mutant was performed, demonstrating that TcSAD1 successfully rescued all AtSSI2 related phenotypes further supporting the functional orthology between these two genes. The identification of the major SAD gene responsible for cocoa butter biosynthesis provides new strategies for screening for novel genotypes with desirable fatty acid compositions, and for use in breeding programs to help pyramid genes for quality and other traits such as disease resistance. PMID:25926841

  10. Enhanced growth and recombinant protein production of Escherichia coli by a perfluorinated oxygen carrier in miniaturized fed-batch cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liquid perfluorochemicals (PFCs are interesting oxygen carriers in medicine and biotechnology with a high solubility for oxygen. They have been repeatedly used for improving oxygen transfer into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell cultures, however their application is still limited. Here we show the great benefit of air/oxygen saturated perfluorodecalin (PFD for high cell density cultivation of Escherichia coli in microwell plates and their positive effect on the soluble production of a correctly folded heterologously expressed alcohol dehydrogenase. Results In EnBase® cultivations the best effect was seen with PFD saturated with oxygen enriched air (appr. 10 μM oxygen per ml when PFD was added at the time of induction. In contrast the effect of PFD was negligible when it was added already at the time of inoculation. Optimisation of addition time and content of loaded oxygen into the PFD resulted in an increased the cell density by 40% compared to control cultures, and correspondingly also the product yield increased, demonstrated at the example of a recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase. Conclusions PFCs are a valuable additive in miniaturized cell culture formats. For production of recombinant proteins in low cell density shaken cultures the addition of oxygen-enriched PFD makes the process more robust, i.e. a high product yield is not any more limited to a very narrow cell density window during which the induction has to be done. The positive effect of PFD was even more obvious when it was added during high cell density cultures. The effect of the PFD phase depends on the amount of oxygen which is loaded into the PFD and which thus is a matter of optimisation.

  11. High-resolution structures of the D-alanyl carrier protein (Dcp) DltC from Bacillus subtilis reveal equivalent conformations of apo- and holo-forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Stephan; Pfennig, Sabrina; Neumann, Piotr; Yonus, Huma; Weininger, Ulrich; Kovermann, Michael; Balbach, Jochen; Stubbs, Milton T

    2015-08-19

    D-Alanylation of lipoteichoic acids plays an important role in modulating the properties of Gram-positive bacteria cell walls. The D-alanyl carrier protein DltC from Bacillus subtilis has been solved in apo- and two cofactor-modified holo-forms, whereby the entire phosphopantetheine moiety is defined in one. The atomic resolution of the apo-structure allows delineation of alternative conformations within the hydrophobic core of the 78 residue four helix bundle. In contrast to previous reports for a peptidyl carrier protein from a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, no obvious structural differences between apo- and holo-DltC forms are observed. Solution NMR spectroscopy confirms these findings and demonstrates in addition that the two forms exhibit similar backbone dynamics on the ps-ns and ms timescales.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray structure analysis of human ribosomal protein L30e.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Akiko; Ose, Toyoyuki; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao

    2011-12-01

    Many functions have been reported for the eukaryotic ribosomal protein L30e. L30e makes several inter-subunit and intra-subunit interactions with protein or RNA components of the 80S ribosome. Yeast L30e has been shown to bind to its own transcript to autoregulate expression at both the transcriptional and the translational levels. Furthermore, it has been reported that mammalian L30e is a component of the selenocysteine-incorporation machinery by binding to the selenocysteine-insertion sequence on mRNA. As high-resolution crystal structures of mammalian L30e are not available, the purification, crystallization and X-ray structure analysis of human L30e are presented here.

  13. Research Progress of Protein Crystallization%蛋白质结晶研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姬燕培; 崔虹

    2012-01-01

    蛋白质结晶是研究生物大分子结构的重要手段,也是制约其发展的瓶颈。总结了蛋白质结晶的常用方法及其影响因素,并介绍了近年来蛋白质结晶发展的新技术和新手段。%Protein crystallization was an important mean to study the structure of biological macromolecules,and it was the bottleneck of restricting its development.To summary the crystallization methods and its influencing factors,and present the advanced technologies and means of the protein crystallography in recent years.

  14. Triclosan Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Is Due to FabV, a Triclosan-Resistant Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lei; Lin, Jinshui; Ma, Jincheng; Cronan, John E.; Wang, Haihong

    2009-01-01

    Triclosan, a very widely used biocide, specifically inhibits fatty acid synthesis by inhibition of enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase. Escherichia coli FabI is the prototypical triclosan-sensitive enoyl-ACP reductase, and E. coli is extremely sensitive to the biocide. However, other bacteria are resistant to triclosan, because they encode triclosan-resistant enoyl-ACP reductase isozymes. In contrast, the triclosan resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 has been attributed to active...

  15. A robust and scalable microfluidic metering method that allows protein crystal growth by free interface diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Carl L.; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Berger, James M.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Producing robust and scalable fluid metering in a microfluidic device is a challenging problem. We developed a scheme for metering fluids on the picoliter scale that is scalable to highly integrated parallel architectures and is independent of the properties of the working fluid. We demonstrated the power of this method by fabricating and testing a microfluidic chip for rapid screening of protein crystallization conditions, a major hurdle in structural biology efforts. The chip has 480 active...

  16. Crystal structure of the Epithiospecifier Protein, ESP from Arabidopsis thaliana provides insights into its product specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Wenhe; Liu, Zihe; Xie, Yongchao; Wang, Hao; Mu, Yajuan; Huang, Yao; Feng, Yue

    2016-09-16

    Specifier proteins are important components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system, which mediate plant defense against herbivory and pathogen attacks. Upon tissue disruption, glucosinolates are hydrolyzed to instable aglucones by myrosinases, and then aglucones will rearrange to form defensive isothiocyanates. Specifier proteins can redirect this reaction to form other products, such as simple nitriles, epithionitriles and organic thiocyanates instead of isothiocyanates based on the side chain structure of glucosinolate and the type of the specifier proteins. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism underlying the different product spectrums of various specifier proteins was not fully understood. Here in this study, we solved the crystal structure of the Epithiospecifier Protein, ESP from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtESP) at 2.3 Å resolution. Structural comparisons with the previously solved structure of thiocyanate forming protein, TFP from Thlaspi arvense (TaTFP) reveal that AtESP shows a dimerization pattern different from TaTFP. Moreover, AtESP harbors a slightly larger active site pocket than TaTFP and several residues around the active site are different between the two proteins, which might account for the different product spectrums of the two proteins. Together, our structural study provides important insights into the molecular mechanisms of specifier proteins and shed light on the basis of their different product spectrums.

  17. Crystal structure of truncated human coatomer protein complex subunit ζ1 (Copζ1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunev, Sergey; Semmelink, Marije F W; Xian, Jia Ling; Ma, Kai Yu; Leenders, Anna J A; Dömling, Alexander S S; Shtutman, Michael; Groves, Matthew R

    2017-01-01

    The majority of modern anticancer approaches target DNA/protein targets involved in tumour-cell proliferation. Such approaches have a major drawback, as nonproliferating cancer cells remain unaffected and may cause relapse or remission. Human coatomer protein complex I (COPI) subunit ζ (Copζ), a component of the coat protein involved in cell apoptosis and intracellular trafficking, has recently been proposed as a potential anticancer drug target. Previous studies have shown that two different isoforms of the Copζ subunit exist in mammalian cells. While normal cells express both Copζ1 and Copζ2 isoforms, various types of tumour cells display a loss of Copζ2 expression and rely solely on Copζ1 for growth and survival. Subsequent knockdown of Copζ1 results in specific inhibition of both proliferating and dormant tumour-cell populations, with no adverse growth effects on normal cells. Therefore, a Copζ1-targeting therapy was proposed to bypass the problem of dormant cancer cells that are resistant to conventional antiproliferative drugs, which is the major cause of tumour relapse. In order to aid in structure-based inhibitor design, a crystal structure is required. In this article, the recombinant expression, purification, crystallization and crystal structure of Copζ1, as well as the expression and purification of Copζ2, are reported.

  18. Analysis of opportunities and challenges in patenting of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, H M Mahadeva; Asokan, R; Rajasekaran, P E; Mahmood, Riaz; Nagesha, S N; Arora, D K

    2012-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is the most widely used microbial control agent. The broad spectrum of susceptible hosts, production on artificial media and ease of application has caused the widespread use of this bacterium against several pests in agriculture, forest and vectors of human diseases. B.thuringiensis toxins are highly species specific which provide economic, environmental benefits, potential for future control and spread of the technology worldwide. This makes the B. thuringiensis crystal proteins an interesting tool for the implementation in integrated pest management programs. It has gained importance over the last 100 years for its biocontrol properties which is used in this review as a case study and analysis of the patents granted on B. thuringiensis was carried out. This study categorizes a number of patents related to B.thuringiensis insecticidal crystal proteins, application of B.thuringiensis insecticidal crystal proteins and the development of patentable technologies. The analyses were done using various criteria like patenting trends over the years, assignees playing a major role, comparison of the technology used in different patents and the patenting activity across the insect orders. Patent documents related to bacterium B.thuringiensis contain a trove of technical and commercial information and thus, patent analysis is considered as a useful tool for R management and techno economical development. Patent analysis also helps identifying and evaluating new and alternate technologies, keeping abreast with latest technologies for business interests, finding solutions to technical problems and ideas for new innovative trends.

  19. Crystal structure of TruD, a novel pseudouridine synthase with a new protein fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Yusuf; Del Campo, Mark; Ofengand, James; Malhotra, Arun

    2004-04-30

    TruD, a recently discovered novel pseudouridine synthase in Escherichia coli, is responsible for modifying uridine13 in tRNA(Glu) to pseudouridine. It has little sequence homology with the other 10 pseudouridine synthases in E. coli which themselves have been grouped into four related protein families. Crystal structure determination of TruD revealed a two domain structure consisting of a catalytic domain that differs in sequence but is structurally very similar to the catalytic domain of other pseudouridine synthases and a second large domain (149 amino acids, 43% of total) with a novel alpha/beta fold that up to now has not been found in any other protein.

  20. Crystal structure of human tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-2 reveals the mechanism of protein tyrosine sulfation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Takamasa; Fujikawa, Yukari; Kawaguchi, Yoshirou; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Soejima, Masayuki; Adachi, Rumi; Nakanishi, Yuichi; Mishiro-Sato, Emi; Liu, Ming-Cheh; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Kimura, Makoto; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational protein modification by tyrosine sulfation has an important role in extracellular protein-protein interactions. The protein tyrosine sulfation reaction is catalysed by the Golgi enzyme called the tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase. To date, no crystal structure is available for tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase. Detailed mechanism of protein tyrosine sulfation reaction has thus remained unclear. Here we present the first crystal structure of the human tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase isoform 2 complexed with a substrate peptide (C4P5Y3) derived from complement C4 and 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate at 1.9 Å resolution. Structural and complementary mutational analyses revealed the molecular basis for catalysis being an SN2-like in-line displacement mechanism. Tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase isoform 2 appeared to recognize the C4 peptide in a deep cleft by using a short parallel β-sheet type interaction, and the bound C4P5Y3 forms an L-shaped structure. Surprisingly, the mode of substrate peptide recognition observed in the tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase isoform 2 structure resembles that observed for the receptor type tyrosine kinases.

  1. Laboratory information management system for membrane protein structure initiative--from gene to crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Petr V; Morris, Chris; Prince, Stephen M; Papiz, Miroslav Z

    2008-12-01

    Membrane Protein Structure Initiative (MPSI) exploits laboratory competencies to work collaboratively and distribute work among the different sites. This is possible as protein structure determination requires a series of steps, starting with target selection, through cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and finally structure determination. Distributed sites create a unique set of challenges for integrating and passing on information on the progress of targets. This role is played by the Protein Information Management System (PIMS), which is a laboratory information management system (LIMS), serving as a hub for MPSI, allowing collaborative structural proteomics to be carried out in a distributed fashion. It holds key information on the progress of cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. PIMS is employed to track the status of protein targets and to manage constructs, primers, experiments, protocols, sample locations and their detailed histories: thus playing a key role in MPSI data exchange. It also serves as the centre of a federation of interoperable information resources such as local laboratory information systems and international archival resources, like PDB or NCBI. During the challenging task of PIMS integration, within the MPSI, we discovered a number of prerequisites for successful PIMS integration. In this article we share our experiences and provide invaluable insights into the process of LIMS adaptation. This information should be of interest to partners who are thinking about using LIMS as a data centre for their collaborative efforts.

  2. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermannová, Lada, E-mail: lada.biedermannova@ibt.cas.cz; Schneider, Bohdan [Institute of Biotechnology CAS, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  3. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of two crystal forms of stationary-phase survival E protein from Campylobacter jejuni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, A. M. D.; Rêgo, A. T. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Thomaz, M. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica, Apartado 12, 2748-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Enguita, F. J., E-mail: fenguita@fm.ul.pt [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisboa (Portugal); Carrondo, M. A. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal)

    2008-03-01

    Survival E (SurE) protein from Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative mesophile, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein, successfully purified and crystallized in two distinct crystal forms. Survival E (SurE) protein from Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative mesophile, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein, successfully purified and crystallized in two distinct crystal forms. The first form belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with a tetramer in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 80.5, b = 119.0, c = 135.3 Å. The second form belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 121.4, b = 47.1, c = 97.8 Å, and contains a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data have been collected from these crystal forms to 2.5 and 2.95 Å resolution, respectively.

  4. Interaction of the nitrogen regulatory protein GlnB (PII) with biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) controls Acetyl-CoA levels in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    OpenAIRE

    Waldemar Hauf; Katharina Schmid; Edileusa Cristina Marques Gerhardt; Luciano Fernandes Huergo; Karl Forchhammer

    2016-01-01

    The family of PII signal transduction proteins (members GlnB, GlnK, NifI) plays key roles in various cellular processes related to nitrogen metabolism at different functional levels. Recent studies implied that PII proteins may also be involved in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, since GlnB proteins from Proteobacteria and from Arabidopsis thaliana were shown to interact with biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). In case of E. coli ACCase, this intera...

  5. Simulation of modulated protein crystal structure and diffraction data in a supercell and in superspace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelace, Jeffrey J.; Simone, Peter D. [Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, 987696 Nebraska Medical, Omaha, NE 68198-7696 (United States); Petříček, Václav [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 10, 182 21 Praha (Czech Republic); Borgstahl, Gloria E. O., E-mail: gborgstahl@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, 987696 Nebraska Medical, Omaha, NE 68198-7696 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    A computer simulation was created for a modulated protein structure along with structure factors in a periodic supercell and in superspace for the purpose of developing and validating software modifications that will be used to solve and refine modulated protein crystals. The toolbox for computational protein crystallography is full of easy-to-use applications for the routine solution and refinement of periodic diffraction data sets and protein structures. There is a gap in the available software when it comes to aperiodic crystallographic data. Current protein crystallography software cannot handle modulated data, and small-molecule software for aperiodic crystallography cannot work with protein structures. To adapt software for modulated protein data requires training data to test and debug the changed software. Thus, a comprehensive training data set consisting of atomic positions with associated modulation functions and the modulated structure factors packaged as both a three-dimensional supercell and as a modulated structure in (3+1)D superspace has been created. The (3+1)D data were imported into Jana2006; this is the first time that this has been performed for protein data.

  6. Surface (glyco-)proteins: primary structure and crystallization under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, H.; Akca, E.; Schultz, N.; Karbach, G.; Schlott, B.; Debaerdemaeker, T.; De Clercq, J.-P.; König, H.

    2001-08-01

    The Archaea comprise microorganisms that live under environmental extremes, like high temperature, low pH value or high salt concentration. Their cells are often covered by a single layer of (glyco)protein subunits (S-layer) in hexagonal arrangement. In order to get further hints about the molecular mechanisms of protein stabilization we compared the primary and secondary structures of archaeal S-layer (glyco)proteins. We found an increase of charged amino acids in the S-layer proteins of the extreme thermophilic species compared to their mesophilic counterparts. Our data and those of other authors suggest that ionic interactions, e.g., salt bridges seem to be played a major role in protein stabilization at high temperatures. Despite the differences in the growth optima and the predominance of some amino acids the primary structures of S-layers revealed also a significant degree of identity between phylogenetically related archaea. These obervations indicate that protein sequences of S-layers have been conserved during the evolution from extremely thermophilic to mesophilic life. To support these findings the three-dimensional structure of the S-layer proteins has to be elucidated. Recently, we described the first successful crystallization of an extreme thermophilic surface(glyco)protein under microgravity conditions.

  7. Estrogen regulation of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene is mediated by ERE half sites without direct binding of estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Urvashi; Ganjam, Goutham K; Vasudevan, Nandini; Kondaiah, Paturu

    2005-02-28

    Estrogen is an important steroid hormone that mediates most of its effects on regulation of gene expression by binding to intracellular receptors. The consensus estrogen response element (ERE) is a 13bp palindromic inverted repeat with a three nucleotide spacer. However, several reports suggest that many estrogen target genes are regulated by diverse elements, such as imperfect EREs and ERE half sites (ERE 1/2), which are either the proximal or the distal half of the palindrome. To gain more insight into ERE half site-mediated gene regulation, we used a region from the estrogen-regulated chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) gene promoter that contains ERE half sites. Using moxestrol, an analogue of estrogen and transient transfection of deletion and mutation containing RCP promoter/reporter constructs in chicken hepatoma (LMH2A) cells, we identified an estrogen response unit (ERU) composed of two consensus ERE 1/2 sites and one non-consensus ERE 1/2 site. Mutation of any of these sites within this ERU abolishes moxestrol response. Further, the ERU is able to confer moxestrol responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. Interestingly, RCP promoter is regulated by moxestrol in estrogen responsive human MCF-7 cells, but not in other cell lines such as NIH3T3 and HepG2 despite estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-alpha) co transfection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) with promoter regions encompassing the half sites and nuclear extracts from LMH2A cells show the presence of a moxestrol-induced complex that is abolished by a polyclonal anti-ERalpha antibody. Surprisingly, estrogen receptor cannot bind to these promoter elements in isolation. Thus, there appears to be a definite requirement for some other factor(s) in addition to estrogen receptor, for the generation of a suitable response of this promoter to estrogen. Our studies therefore suggest a novel mechanism of gene regulation by estrogen, involving ERE half sites without direct binding of ER to the

  8. New AFM Techniques for Investigating Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huayu; Nadarajah, Arunan; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for investigating protein crystal growth. Earlier AFM studies were among the first to demonstrate that these crystals grew by dislocation and 2D nucleation growth mechanisms [1]. These investigations were restricted to the micron range where only surface features, such as dislocation hillocks and 2D islands are visible. Most AFM instruments can scan at higher resolutions and have the potential to resolve individual protein molecules at nanometer ranges. Such scans are essential for determining the molecular packing arrangements on crystal faces and for probing the growth process at the molecular level. However, at this resolution the AFM tip influences the image produced, with the resulting image being a convolution of the tip shape and the surface morphology [2]. In most studies this problem is resolved by deconvoluting the image to obtain the true surface morphology. Although deconvolution routines work reasonably well for simple one- dimensional shapes, for complex surfaces this approach does not produce accurate results. In this study we devised a new approach which takes advantage of the precise molecular order of crystal surfaces, combined with the knowledge of individual molecular shapes from the crystallographic data of the protein and the AFM tip shape. This information is used to construct expected theoretical AFM images by convoluting the tip shape with the constructed crystal surface shape for a given surface packing arrangement. By comparing the images from actual AFM scans with the constructed ones for different possible surface packing arrangements, the correct packing arrangement can be conclusively determined. This approach was used in this study to determine the correct one from two possible packing arrangements on (I 10) faces of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Another novel AFM technique was also devised to measure the dimension of individual growth units of the crystal faces

  9. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies kenyae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hari S. Misra; Nivedita P. Khairnar; Manjula Mathur; N. Vijayalakshmi; Remesh S. Hire; T. K. Dongre; S. K. Mahajan

    2002-04-01

    A sporulating culture of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kenyae strain HD549 is toxic to larvae of lepidopteran insect species such as Spodoptera litura, Helicoverpa armigera and Phthorimaea operculella, and a dipteran insect, Culex fatigans. A 1.9-kb DNA fragment, PCR-amplified from HD549 using cryII-gene-specific primers, was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant protein produced 92% mortality in first-instar larvae of Spodoptera litura and 86% inhibition of adult emergence in Phthorimaea operculella, but showed very low toxicity against Helicoverpa armigera, and lower mortality against third-instar larvae of dipteran insects Culex fatigans, Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti. The sequence of the cloned crystal protein gene showed almost complete homology with a mosquitocidal toxin gene from Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki, with only five mutations scattered in different regions. Amino acid alignment with different insecticidal crystal proteins using the MUTALIN program suggested presence of the conserved block 3 region in the sequence of this protein. A mutation in codon 409 of this gene that changes a highly conserved phenylalanine residue to serine lies in this block.

  10. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong; Kruse, Andrew C; Chung, Ka Young; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Chae, Pil Seok; Pardon, Els; Calinski, Diane; Mathiesen, Jesper M; Shah, Syed T.A.; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin; Gellman, Samuel H; Steyaert, Jan; Skiniotis, Georgios; Weis, William I; Sunahara, Roger K; Kobilka, Brian K [Brussels; (Trinity); (Michigan); (Stanford-MED); (Michigan-Med); (UW)

    2011-12-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist-occupied receptor. The β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β2AR and nucleotide-free Gs heterotrimer. The principal interactions between the β2AR and Gs involve the amino- and carboxy-terminal α-helices of Gs, with conformational changes propagating to the nucleotide-binding pocket. The largest conformational changes in the β2AR include a 14Å outward movement at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling by a GPCR.

  11. Two studies of colloidal interactions: electric polarizability and protein crystallization. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraden, Seth; Hu, Yue

    2001-08-06

    (I)Electric polarizability. During this grant period, the focus was on five topics concerning electric field effects on colloids. The first topic focuses on electric interactions between charged colloids in the absence of external fields, and the remaining four deal with colloids in the presence of external fields. The topics are (1) calculation of the effect of confinement on the pair-potential between like-charged colloids, (2) experimental determination of the interparticle potential under the conditions of dielectric polarization, (3) measurement of the evolution of structure of ER fluids, (4) synthesis of novel colloids designed for ER studies, and (5) computer modeling of polarization of surface charge. (II) Protein crystallization. Studies of the phase behavior of mixtures of proteins and polymers were initiated. The motivation was to test recent theories that suggested that optimal conditions for protein crystallization could be obtained using such mixtures. Combined light scattering measurements of the virial coefficients and determination of the phase diagram of protein/polymer mixtures revealed that the theoretical picture needs to be substantially modified.

  12. Challenges and Opportunities for New Protein Crystallization Strategies in Structure-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Jessica; Thompson, David

    2010-01-01

    Structure-based drug design (SBDD) has emerged as a valuable pharmaceutical lead discovery tool, showing potential for accelerating the discovery process, while reducing developmental costs and boosting potencies of the drug that is ultimately selected. SBDD is a iterative, rational, lead compound sculpting process that involves both the synthesis of new derivatives and the evaluation of their binding to the target structure either through computational docking or elucidation of the target structure as a complex with the lead compound. This method heavily relies on the production of high-resolution (< 2Å) three-dimensional structures of the drug target, obtained through X-ray crystallographic analysis, in the presence or absence of the drug candidate. The lack of generalized methods for high quality crystal production is still a major bottleneck in the process of macromolecular crystallization. This review provides a brief introduction to SBDD and describes several macromolecular crystallization strategies, with an emphasis on advances and challenges facing researchers in the field today. Recent trends in the development of more universal macromolecular crystallization techniques, particularly nucleation-based techniques that are applicable to both soluble and integral membrane proteins, are also discussed. PMID:21116481

  13. Crystal Structures of Polymorphic Prion Protein β1 Peptides Reveal Variable Steric Zipper Conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu; Lee, Seung-Joo; Yee, Vivien C

    2015-06-16

    The pathogenesis of prion diseases is associated with the conformational conversion of normal, predominantly α-helical prion protein (PrP(C)) into a pathogenic form that is enriched with β-sheets (PrP(Sc)). Several PrP(C) crystal structures have revealed β1-mediated intermolecular sheets, suggesting that the β1 strand may contribute to a possible initiation site for β-sheet-mediated PrP(Sc) propagation. This β1 strand contains the polymorphic residue 129 that influences disease susceptibility and phenotype. To investigate the effect of the residue 129 polymorphism on the conformation of amyloid-like continuous β-sheets formed by β1, crystal structures of β1 peptides containing each of the polymorphic residues were determined. To probe the conformational influence of the peptide construct design, four different lengths of β1 peptides were studied. From the 12 peptides studied, 11 yielded crystal structures ranging in resolution from 0.9 to 1.4 Å. This ensemble of β1 crystal structures reveals conformational differences that are influenced by both the nature of the polymorphic residue and the extent of the peptide construct, indicating that comprehensive studies in which peptide constructs vary are a more rigorous approach to surveying conformational possibilities.

  14. Crystal structure of the coat protein of the flexible filamentous papaya mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoqing; Wang, Tao; Bohon, Jen; Gagné, Marie-Ève Laliberté; Bolduc, Marilène; Leclerc, Denis; Li, Huilin

    2012-09-14

    Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) is a filamentous plant virus that belongs to the Alphaflexiviridae family. Flexible filamentous viruses have defied more than two decades of effort in fiber diffraction, and no high-resolution structure is available for any member of the Alphaflexiviridae family. Here, we report our structural characterization of PapMV by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction. We found that PapMV is 135Å in diameter with a helical symmetry of ~10 subunits per turn. Crystal structure of the C-terminal truncated PapMV coat protein (CP) reveals a novel all-helix fold with seven α-helices. Thus, the PapMVCP structure is different from the four-helix-bundle fold of tobacco mosaic virus in which helix bundling dominates the subunit interface in tobacco mosaic virus and conveys rigidity to the rod virus. PapMV CP was crystallized as an asymmetrical dimer in which one protein lassoes the other by the N-terminal peptide. Mutation of residues critical to the inter-subunit lasso interaction abolishes CP polymerization. The crystal structure suggests that PapMV may polymerize via the consecutive N-terminal loop lassoing mechanism. The structure of PapMV will be useful for rational design and engineering of the PapMV nanoparticles into innovative vaccines.

  15. Low-density crystal packing of human protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunit in complex with resorufin or other ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klopffleisch, Karsten; Issinger, Olaf Georg; Niefind, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    adopts a closed conformation correlating to a canonically established catalytic spine as is typical for eukaryotic protein kinases. In the corresponding crystal packing the hinge/helix αD region is nearly unaffected by crystal contacts, so that largely unbiased conformational adaptions are possible....... This is documented by published human CK2α structures with the same crystal packing but with an open hinge/helix αD region, one of which has been redetermined here with a higher symmetry. An overview of all published human CK2α crystal packings serves as the basis for a discussion of the factors that determine...

  16. Characterization and crystal structure of lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase (cDHDPS) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Elena A; Bannon, Gary A; Glenn, Kevin C; Jeong, Soon Seog; Sturman, Eric J; Rydel, Timothy J

    2008-12-15

    The lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase enzyme (cDHDPS) was recently successfully introduced into maize plants to enhance the level of lysine in the grain. To better understand lysine insensitivity of the cDHDPS, we expressed, purified, kinetically characterized the protein, and solved its X-ray crystal structure. The cDHDPS enzyme has a fold and overall structure that is highly similar to other DHDPS proteins. A noteworthy feature of the active site is the evidence that the catalytic lysine residue forms a Schiff base adduct with pyruvate. Analyses of the cDHDPS structure in the vicinity of the putative binding site for S-lysine revealed that the allosteric binding site in the Escherichia coli DHDPS protein does not exist in cDHDPS due to three non-conservative amino acids substitutions, and this is likely why cDHDPS is not feedback inhibited by lysine.

  17. Crystal structure of cyclic nucleotide-binding-like protein from Brucella abortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zheng; Gao, Yuan; Dong, Jing; Ke, Yuehua; Li, Xuemei; Chen, Zeliang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-12-25

    The cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB)-like protein (CNB-L) from Brucella abortus shares sequence homology with CNB domain-containing proteins. We determined the crystal structure of CNB-L at 2.0 Å resolution in the absence of its C-terminal helix and nucleotide. The 3D structure of CNB-L is in a two-fold symmetric form. Each protomer shows high structure similarity to that of cGMP-binding domain-containing proteins, and likely mimics their nucleotide-free conformation. A key residue, Glu17, mediates the dimerization and prevents binding of cNMP to the canonical ligand-pocket. The structurally observed dimer of CNB-L is stable in solution, and thus is likely to be biologically relevant.

  18. Expression, Purification, Crystallization and Molecular Replacement Studies of TorI, an Inhibition Protein of Tor System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wei; YUAN Cai; Ansaldi Mireille; Morelli Xavier; Edward J. Meehan; CHEN Li-Qing; HUANG Ming-Dong

    2007-01-01

    TorI, a Tor system inhibitor acting through protein-protein interaction with the TorR response regulator, is an excisionase that interacts with the integrase and DNA during prophage excision. It has been crystallized by the vapor-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant at pH 8.5. The X-ray diffraction data sets from the TorI crystal was collected at a resolution of 2.1 (A), using a synchrotron source. The crystal belongs to primitive monoclinic lattice with cell parameters of 46.210(A) × 53.992(A) × 73.561(A)

  19. Crystal structure of an eIF4G-like protein from Danio rerio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; McCoy, Jason G.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-04-18

    The gene LOC 91917 Danio rerio (zebrafish) encodes a protein annotated in the UniProt knowledgebase as the middle domain of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G domain containing protein b (MIF4Gdb). Its molecular weight is 25.8 kDa, and it comprises 222 amino acid residues. BLAST searches revealed homologues of D. rerio MIF4Gdb in many eukaryotes including humans. The homologue sand MIF4Gdb were identified as members of the Pfam family, MIF4G (PF2854), which is named after the middle domain of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G). eIF4G is a component of eukaryotic translational initiation complex, and contains binding sites for other initiation factors, suggesting its critical role in translational initiation. The MIF4G domain also occurs in several other proteins involved in RNA metabolism, including the Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay 2 protein (NMD2/UPF2), and the nuclear cap-binding protein 80-kDa subunit (CBP80). Sequence and structure analysis of the MIF4G domains in many proteins indicate that the domain assumes an all helical fold and has tandem repeated motifs. The zebrafish protein described here has homology to domains of other proteins variously referred to as NIC-containing proteins (NMD2, eIF4G, CBP80). The biological function of D. rerio MIF4Gdb has not yet been experimentally characterized, and the annotation is based on amino acid sequence comparison. D. rerio MIF4Gdb did not share more than 25% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known and was selected as a target for structure determination by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG). Here, they report the crystal structure of D. rerio MIF4Gdb (UniGene code Dr.79360, UniProt code Q5EAQ1, CESG target number GO.79294).

  20. Assessing two-dimensional crystallization trials of small membrane proteins for structural biology studies by electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew C; Rudolph, Frederik; Dreaden, Tina M; Zhao, Gengxiang; Barry, Bridgette A; Schmidt-Krey, Ingeborg

    2010-10-29

    Electron crystallography has evolved as a method that can be used either alternatively or in combination with three-dimensional crystallization and X-ray crystallography to study structure-function questions of membrane proteins, as well as soluble proteins. Screening for two-dimensional (2D) crystals by transmission electron microscopy (EM) is the critical step in finding, optimizing, and selecting samples for high-resolution data collection by cryo-EM. Here we describe the fundamental steps in identifying both large and ordered, as well as small 2D arrays, that can potentially supply critical information for optimization of crystallization conditions. By working with different magnifications at the EM, data on a range of critical parameters is obtained. Lower magnification supplies valuable data on the morphology and membrane size. At higher magnifications, possible order and 2D crystal dimensions are determined. In this context, it is described how CCD cameras and online-Fourier Transforms are used at higher magnifications to assess proteoliposomes for order and size. While 2D crystals of membrane proteins are most commonly grown by reconstitution by dialysis, the screening technique is equally applicable for crystals produced with the help of monolayers, native 2D crystals, and ordered arrays of soluble proteins. In addition, the methods described here are applicable to the screening for 2D crystals of even smaller as well as larger membrane proteins, where smaller proteins require the same amount of care in identification as our examples and the lattice of larger proteins might be more easily identifiable at earlier stages of the screening.

  1. Binding of 2,2',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-100) and/or its metabolites to mammalian biliary carrier proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, G.; Huwe, J.; Hakk, H. [USDA ARS Biosciences Research Lab, Fargo, ND (United States); Low, M.; Rutherford, D. [Concordia College, Moorhead, MN (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as flame retardants in the textile and electronics industries and are globally produced in the range of 150,000 tons annually. Because they are very lipophilic, structurally similar to polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and biphenyls, environmentally persistent, and display an increasing number of toxicological effects, there is growing concern that this class of compounds may be emerging as a new environmental contaminant. Recent reports have documented their presence in human plasma, milk, and adipose tissue and in aquatic species such as sperm whales, harbor seals, and whitebeaked dolphins. Only a few PBDE congeners are consistently found and reported in the environment, e.g. BDE-47, 99, 100, 153 and 154, and 209. Of this group, only BDE-47 and 99 have been studied in mammals. Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons can associate with endogenous carrier proteins in the urine and bile of rats, either as the parent or as metabolites. Toxic and non-toxic dioxins, PCB's, and PBDE's all have this capacity. Based on its lipophilicity, BDE-100 would be expected to require carrier proteins for mammalian in vivo transport. The purpose of the association has not been established but may be part of the process involved in mammalian elimination of these xenobiotics. However, the association may affect the normal function of these carrier proteins. One of the purposes of the present research was to administer a single oral dose of BDE-100 to male rats and measure the amount eliminated in the urine and bile, as well as characterize the nature and extent of binding to any proteins in these excreta.

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein from Chenopodium album

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuki, Takayuki [Department of Bimolecular Science, Faculty of Science, Toho University, Miyama 2-2-1, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Ohshima, Shigeru [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science, Toho University, Miyama 2-2-1, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Uchida, Akira, E-mail: auchida@biomol.sci.toho-u.ac.jp [Department of Bimolecular Science, Faculty of Science, Toho University, Miyama 2-2-1, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan)

    2007-09-01

    A water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein with photoconvertibility from C. album was extracted, purified and crystallized in a darkroom. The crystal diffracted to around 2.0 Å resolution. A water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein (WSCP) with photoconvertibility from Chenopodium album was extracted, purified and crystallized in a darkroom. Green crystals suitable for data collection appeared in about 10 d. A native data set was collected to 2.0 Å resolution at 100 K. The space group of the crystal was determined to be orthorhombic I222 or I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.13, b = 60.59, c = 107.21 Å. Preliminary analysis of the X-ray data indicated that there is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  3. Microseeding – A Powerful Tool for Crystallizing Proteins Complexed with Hydrolyzable Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Schmitt

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis is an often-encountered obstacle in the crystallization of proteins complexed with their substrates. As the duration of the crystallization process, from nucleation to the growth of the crystal to its final size, commonly requires several weeks, non-enzymatic hydrolysis of an “unstable” ligand occurs frequently. In cases where the crystallization conditions exhibit non neutral pH values this hydrolysis phenomenon may be even more pronounced. ChoX, the substrate binding protein of a choline ABC-importer, produced crystals with its substrate acetylcholine after one month. However, these crystals exhibited only choline, an acetylcholine hydrolysis product, in the binding site. To overcome this obstacle we devised a microseeding protocol leading to crystals of ChoX with bound acetylcholine within 24 hours. One drawback we encountered was the high twinning fraction of the crystals, possibly was due to the rapid crystal growth.

  4. Structure determination using poorly diffracting membrane-protein crystals: the H+-ATPase and Na+,K+-ATPase case history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Bjørn P; Morth, J Preben; Nissen, Poul

    2010-03-01

    An approach is presented for the structure determination of membrane proteins on the basis of poorly diffracting crystals which exploits molecular replacement for heavy-atom site identification at 6-9 A maximum resolution and improvement of the heavy-atom-derived phases by multi-crystal averaging using quasi-isomorphous data sets. The multi-crystal averaging procedure allows real-space density averaging followed by phase combination between non-isomorphous native data sets to exploit crystal-to-crystal nonisomorphism despite the crystals belonging to the same space group. This approach has been used in the structure determination of H(+)-ATPase and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase using Ca(2+)-ATPase models and its successful application to the Mhp1 symporter using LeuT as a search model is demonstrated.

  5. TargetCrys: protein crystallization prediction by fusing multi-view features with two-layered SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Han, Ke; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing-Yu; Shen, Hong-Bin; Yu, Dong-Jun

    2016-11-01

    The accurate prediction of whether a protein will crystallize plays a crucial role in improving the success rate of protein crystallization projects. A common critical problem in the development of machine-learning-based protein crystallization predictors is how to effectively utilize protein features extracted from different views. In this study, we aimed to improve the efficiency of fusing multi-view protein features by proposing a new two-layered SVM (2L-SVM) which switches the feature-level fusion problem to a decision-level fusion problem: the SVMs in the 1st layer of the 2L-SVM are trained on each of the multi-view feature sets; then, the outputs of the 1st layer SVMs, which are the "intermediate" decisions made based on the respective feature sets, are further ensembled by a 2nd layer SVM. Based on the proposed 2L-SVM, we implemented a sequence-based protein crystallization predictor called TargetCrys. Experimental results on several benchmark datasets demonstrated the efficacy of the proposed 2L-SVM for fusing multi-view features. We also compared TargetCrys with existing sequence-based protein crystallization predictors and demonstrated that the proposed TargetCrys outperformed most of the existing predictors and is competitive with the state-of-the-art predictors. The TargetCrys webserver and datasets used in this study are freely available for academic use at: http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/TargetCrys .

  6. Crystal structure of the capsular polysaccharide synthesizing protein CapE of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyafusa, Takamitsu; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tanner, Martin E; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2013-06-11

    Enzymes synthesizing the bacterial CP (capsular polysaccharide) are attractive antimicrobial targets. However, we lack critical information about the structure and mechanism of many of them. In an effort to reduce that gap, we have determined three different crystal structures of the enzyme CapE of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The structure reveals that CapE is a member of the SDR (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase) super-family of proteins. CapE assembles in a hexameric complex stabilized by three major contact surfaces between protein subunits. Turnover of substrate and/or coenzyme induces major conformational changes at the contact interface between protein subunits, and a displacement of the substrate-binding domain with respect to the Rossmann domain. A novel dynamic element that we called the latch is essential for remodelling of the protein-protein interface. Structural and primary sequence alignment identifies a group of SDR proteins involved in polysaccharide synthesis that share the two salient features of CapE: the mobile loop (latch) and a distinctive catalytic site (MxxxK). The relevance of these structural elements was evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis.

  7. X-ray-excited optical luminescence of protein crystals: a new tool for studying radiation damage during diffraction data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robin L; Yorke, Briony A; Pearson, Arwen R

    2012-05-01

    During X-ray irradiation protein crystals radiate energy in the form of small amounts of visible light. This is known as X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL). The XEOL of several proteins and their constituent amino acids has been characterized using the microspectrophotometers at the Swiss Light Source and Diamond Light Source. XEOL arises primarily from aromatic amino acids, but the effects of local environment and quenching within a crystal mean that the XEOL spectrum of a crystal is not the simple sum of the spectra of its constituent parts. Upon repeated exposure to X-rays XEOL spectra decay non-uniformly, suggesting that XEOL is sensitive to site-specific radiation damage. However, rates of XEOL decay were found not to correlate to decays in diffracting power, making XEOL of limited use as a metric for radiation damage to protein crystals.

  8. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axford, Danny [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Foadi, James [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hu, Nien-Jen; Choudhury, Hassanul Ghani [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Iwata, So [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Beis, Konstantinos [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Alguel, Yilmaz, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-14

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines.

  9. Crystallization of an engineered RUN domain of Rab6-interacting protein 1/DENND5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Humberto; Franklin, Edward; Khan, Amir R. (Trinity)

    2011-08-29

    Effectors of the Rab small GTPases are large multi-domain proteins which have proved difficult to express in soluble form in Escherichia coli. Generally, effectors are recruited to a distinct subcellular compartment by active (GTP-bound) Rabs, which are linked to membranes by one or two prenylated Cys residues at their C-termini. Following recruitment via their Rab-binding domain (RBD), effectors carry out various aspects of vesicle formation, transport, tethering and fusion through their other domains. Previously, successful purification of the RUN-PLAT tandem domains (residues 683-1061) of the 1263-residue Rab6-interacting protein 1 (R6IP1) required co-expression with Rab6, as attempts to solubly express the effector alone were unsuccessful. R6IP1 is also known as DENN domain-containing protein 5 (DENND5) and is expressed as two isoforms, R6IP1A/B (DENND5A/B), which differ by 24 amino acids at the N-terminus. Here, a deletion in R6IP1 was engineered to enable soluble expression and to improve the quality of the crystals grown in complex with Rab6. A large 23-residue loop linking two -helices in the RUN1 domain was removed and replaced with a short linker. This loop resides on the opposite face to the Rab6-binding site and is not conserved in the RUN-domain family. In contrast to wild-type R6IP1-Rab6 crystals, which took several weeks to grow to full size, the engineered R6IP1 (RPdel)-Rab6 crystals could be grown in a matter of days.

  10. ContaMiner and ContaBase: a webserver and database for early identification of unwantedly crystallized protein contaminants

    KAUST Repository

    Hungler, Arnaud

    2016-11-02

    Solving the phase problem in protein X-ray crystallography relies heavily on the identity of the crystallized protein, especially when molecular replacement (MR) methods are used. Yet, it is not uncommon that a contaminant crystallizes instead of the protein of interest. Such contaminants may be proteins from the expression host organism, protein fusion tags or proteins added during the purification steps. Many contaminants co-purify easily, crystallize and give good diffraction data. Identification of contaminant crystals may take time, since the presence of the contaminant is unexpected and its identity unknown. A webserver (ContaMiner) and a contaminant database (ContaBase) have been established, to allow fast MR-based screening of crystallographic data against currently 62 known contaminants. The web-based ContaMiner (available at http://strube.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/contaminer/) currently produces results in 5 min to 4 h. The program is also available in a github repository and can be installed locally. ContaMiner enables screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for \\'crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis\\' publications. Thus, in addition to potentially saving X-ray crystallographers much time and effort, ContaMiner might considerably lower the risk of publishing erroneous data. A web server, titled ContaMiner, has been established, which allows fast molecular-replacement-based screening of crystallographic data against a database (ContaBase) of currently 62 potential contaminants. ContaMiner enables systematic screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for \\'crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis\\' publications. © Arnaud Hungler et al. 2016.

  11. Crystal structure of a monomeric thiolase-like protein type 1 (TLP1 from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelanjana Janardan

    Full Text Available An analysis of the Mycobacterium smegmatis genome suggests that it codes for several thiolases and thiolase-like proteins. Thiolases are an important family of enzymes that are involved in fatty acid metabolism. They occur as either dimers or tetramers. Thiolases catalyze the Claisen condensation of two acetyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the synthetic direction and the thiolytic cleavage of 3-ketoacyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the degradative direction. Some of the M. smegmatis genes have been annotated as thiolases of the poorly characterized SCP2-thiolase subfamily. The mammalian SCP2-thiolase consists of an N-terminal thiolase domain followed by an additional C-terminal domain called sterol carrier protein-2 or SCP2. The M. smegmatis protein selected in the present study, referred to here as the thiolase-like protein type 1 (MsTLP1, has been biochemically and structurally characterized. Unlike classical thiolases, MsTLP1 is a monomer in solution. Its structure has been determined at 2.7 Å resolution by the single wavelength anomalous dispersion method. The structure of the protomer confirms that the N-terminal domain has the thiolase fold. An extra C-terminal domain is indeed observed. Interestingly, it consists of six β-strands forming an anti-parallel β-barrel which is completely different from the expected SCP2-fold. Detailed sequence and structural comparisons with thiolases show that the residues known to be essential for catalysis are not conserved in MsTLP1. Consistent with this observation, activity measurements show that MsTLP1 does not catalyze the thiolase reaction. This is the first structural report of a monomeric thiolase-like protein from any organism. These studies show that MsTLP1 belongs to a new group of thiolase related proteins of unknown function.

  12. Crystal Structure of a Truncated Urease Accessory Protein UreF From Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Robert; Romanov, Vladimir; Johns, Kathy; Battaile, Kevin P.; Wu-Brown, Jean; Guthrie, Jennifer L.; Hausinger, Robert P.; Pai, Emil F.; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2010-01-01

    Urease plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori in humans. Maturation of this nickel metalloenzyme in bacteria requires the participation of the accessory proteins UreD (termed UreH in H. pylori), UreF, and UreG which form sequential complexes with the urease apoprotein as well as UreE, a metallochaperone. Here, we describe the crystal structure of C-terminal truncated UreF from H. pylori (residues 1-233), the first UreF structure to be determined, at 1.55 Å resolution ...

  13. Tooth Enamel, the Result of the Relationship between Matrix Proteins and Hydroxyapatite Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Mihaela MIHU

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Enamel, a structure of epithelial origin, represents a protective tooth cover. The cells responsible for the formation of enamel, ameloblasts, are lost at the time of tooth eruption, so that enamel becomes an acellular structure that can no longer regenerate. In order to compensate for this particular phenomenon, enamel has acquired a complex structural organization and a high mineralization degree, in its mature state. This reflects the particular life cycle of ameloblasts and the unique physico-chemical characteristics of matrix proteins, which regulate the formation of the extremely long crystals of enamel. These characteristics differentiate enamel from all the other tissues of the organism.

  14. Glycosylation of solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Carlsson, Michael C; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig

    2016-01-01

    as their posttranslational regulation, but only relatively little is known about the role of SLC glycosylation. Glycosylation is one of the most abundant posttranslational modifications of animal proteins and through recent advances in our understanding of protein-glycan interactions, the functional roles of SLC......Solute carriers (SLCs) are one of the largest groups of multi-spanning membrane proteins in mammals and include ubiquitously expressed proteins as well as proteins with highly restricted tissue expression. A vast number of studies have addressed the function and organization of SLCs as well...

  15. Cloning and functional analysis of putative malonyl-CoA:acyl-carrier protein transacylase gene from the docosahexaenoic acid-producer Schizochytrium sp. TIO1101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rubin; Ge, Yuqing; Yang, Bo; Zhong, Xiaoming; Lin, Xiangzhi; Huang, Zhen

    2013-06-01

    Malonyl-CoA:acyl-carrier protein transacylase (MCAT), which transfers the malonyl group from malonyl-CoA to holo-acyl carrier protein (ACP), is a key enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis. Schizochytrium sp. TIO1101 is a marine protist with high levels of docosahexaenoic acid accumulation. In this study, the putative fabD gene coding MCAT was isolated from Schizochytrium sp. TIO1101. The Schizochytrium MCAT gene (ScTIOfabD) contained an 1176 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 391 amino acids. The ScTIOfabD gene exhibited high novelty in nucleotide and amino acid sequence. The highest amino acid identity was only 35 % between ScTIOMCAT and the reported MCATs. Further studies demonstrated that ScTIOMCAT could bind malonyl-CoA directly and transfer malonyl group from malonyl-CoA to the ACP domain in vitro. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that ScTIOMCAT was relative close to MCATs of yeast strains. Overexpression of ScTIOMCAT in Saccharomyces cereviseae significantly increased the MCAT activity, without negative effects on the growth rate of the host strain. In addition, ScTIOMCAT generated 16.8 and 62 % increase in biomass and fatty acid accumulation, respectively, and did not alter the profile of fatty acid. Our results indicated that the novel MCAT gene from Schizochytrium sp. TIO1101 was crucial for fatty acid synthesis and had potential applications for genetic modifications of oil-producing species.

  16. Structural Characterisation of the Beta-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases, FabF and FabH, of Yersinia pestis

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey D. Nanson; Himiari, Zainab; Swarbrick, Crystall M. D.; Forwood, Jade K.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, remains a major public health threat, with outbreaks of disease occurring in China, Madagascar, and Peru in the last five years. The existence of multidrug resistant Y. pestis and the potential of this bacterium as a bioterrorism agent illustrates the need for new antimicrobials. The β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases, FabB, FabF, and FabH, catalyse the elongation of fatty acids as part of the type II f...

  17. Production, crystallization and neutron diffraction of fully deuterated human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Blakeley, Matthew P; Raasakka, Arne; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Kursula, Petri

    2015-11-01

    The molecular details of the formation of the myelin sheath, a multilayered membrane in the nervous system, are to a large extent unknown. P2 is a peripheral membrane protein from peripheral nervous system myelin, which is believed to play a role in this process. X-ray crystallographic studies and complementary experiments have provided information on the structure-function relationships in P2. In this study, a fully deuterated sample of human P2 was produced. Crystals that were large enough for neutron diffraction were grown by a ten-month procedure of feeding, and neutron diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å from a crystal of 0.09 mm(3) in volume. The neutron crystal structure will allow the positions of H atoms in P2 and its fatty-acid ligand to be visualized, as well as shedding light on the fine details of the hydrogen-bonding networks within the P2 ligand-binding cavity.

  18. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Anna J; Armour, Wes; Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Hall, David R; Horrell, Sam; McAuley, Katherine E; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2013-07-01

    The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Diamond Light Source. The technique is particularly useful for microcrystals and for crystals mounted in opaque materials such as lipid cubic phase. X-ray diffraction raster scanning can be used in combination with radiography to allow informed decision-making at the beamline prior to diffraction data collection. It is demonstrated that the X-ray dose required for a full tomography measurement is similar to that for a diffraction grid-scan, but for sample location and shape estimation alone just a few radiographic projections may be required.

  19. Handheld imaging photonic crystal biosensor for multiplexed, label-free protein detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahns, Sabrina; Bräu, Marion; Meyer, Björn-Ole; Karrock, Torben; Gutekunst, Sören B; Blohm, Lars; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Buhmann, Raymund; Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Gerken, Martina

    2015-10-01

    We present a handheld biosensor system for the label-free and specific multiplexed detection of several biomarkers employing a spectrometer-free imaging measurement system. A photonic crystal surface functionalized with multiple specific ligands forms the optical transducer. The photonic crystal slab is fabricated on a glass substrate by replicating a periodic grating master stamp with a period of 370 nm into a photoresist via nanoimprint lithography and deposition of a 70-nm titanium dioxide layer. Capture molecules are coupled covalently and drop-wise to the photonic crystal surface. With a simple camera and imaging optics the surface-normal transmission is detected. In the transmission spectrum guided-mode resonances are observed that shift due to protein binding. This shift is observed as an intensity change in the green color channel of the camera. Non-functionalized image sections are used for continuous elimination of background drift. In a first experiment we demonstrate the specific and time-resolved detection of 90.0 nm CD40 ligand antibody, 90.0 nM EGF antibody, and 500 nM streptavidin in parallel on one sensor chip. In a second experiment, aptamers with two different spacer lengths are used as receptor. The binding kinetics with association and dissociation of 250 nM thrombin and regeneration of the sensor surface with acidic tris-HCl-buffer (pH 5.0) is presented for two measurement cycles.

  20. Nucleation of apatite crystals in vitro by self-assembled dentin matrix protein 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gen; Dahl, Tom; Veis, Arthur; George, Anne

    2003-08-01

    Bones and teeth are biocomposites that require controlled mineral deposition during their self-assembly to form tissues with unique mechanical properties. Acidic extracellular matrix proteins play a pivotal role during biomineral formation. However, the mechanisms of protein-mediated mineral initiation are far from understood. Here we report that dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), an acidic protein, can nucleate the formation of hydroxyapatite in vitro in a multistep process that begins by DMP1 binding calcium ions and initiating mineral deposition. The nucleated amorphous calcium phosphate precipitates ripen and nanocrystals form. Subsequently, these expand and coalesce into microscale crystals elongated in the c-axis direction. Characterization of the functional domains in DMP1 demonstrated that intermolecular assembly of acidic clusters into a β-sheet template was essential for the observed mineral nucleation. Protein-mediated initiation of nanocrystals, as discussed here, might provide a new methodology for constructing nanoscale composites by self-assembly of polypeptides with tailor-made peptide sequences.

  1. Crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human myelin protein zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Sohi, Jasloveleen; Kamholz, John; Kovari, Ladislau C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2012-03-27

    different mutations in the MPZ gene leading to peripheral neuropathy in patients have been reported worldwide (http://www.molgen. ua.ac.be/CMTMutations). All identified mutations resulting in a change or deletion of amino acid residues in MPZ give rise to neuropathy with the exception of R215L, which instead causes a benign polymorphism. Furthermore, more detailed analysis has classified the MPZ mutations into two major groups. In the first group, the mutations disrupt the intracellular processing of MPZ and are primarily associated with early onset neuropathy. It has been proposed that the mutated MPZ is trapped inside the cell rather than being transported to the plasma membrane. However, other evidence suggests that the mutated MPZ protein is expressed on the plasma membrane, but dominant-negatively disrupts the structure of myelin. In the second group, the MPZ mutations are associated with late onset neuropathy as these mutations cause only mild demyelination. The underlying mechanism is elusive with the hypothesis being that the second group of mutations cause minor abnormalities in the myelin sheath that over time may lead to aberrant Schwann cell-axon interactions and subsequently to axonal degeneration. The crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human MPZ (hP0ex) fused with maltose binding protein (MBP) is reported at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. While the crystal structure of rat MPZ extracellular domain (rP0ex) is available, the crystal structure of the human counterpart is useful for the analysis of the two homologs as well as a comparison between the two species. The hP0ex molecule reveals subtle structural variations between two homologs allowing comparison of the human myelin protein zero to that of the rat protein. The alignment of these homologs is shown in Figure 1(a).

  2. [Genes of insecticidal crystal proteins with dual specificity in Bacillus thuringiensis strains, isolated in the Crimea territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymar, S Iu; Isakova, I A; Kuznietsova, L M; Kordium, V A

    2006-01-01

    The insecticidal crystal proteins of 15 B. thuringiensis strains, isolated in the Crimea territory that are toxical for some Lepidoptera and Colorado potato beetle larvae were identified by PAGE electrophoresis. Ten strains produced the crystal proteins with high molecular weight (> 120 kD). PCR with use of broad specificity primers and DNA of these B. thuringiensis strains as template demonstrated the specific PCR products (1000 bp). Amplified DNA fragments were cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the genomes of ten strains of B. thuringiensis carried Cry1B genes, which are responsible for production of the insecticidal crystal proteins with dual specificity. The influence of the solubilization conditions on the structure and toxicity of Cry1B protein for Colorado potato beetle larvae was shown. The dual toxicity of studied B. thuringiensis strains is explained by the Cry1B genes presence in their genomes. These strains may be used to develop the broad specificity bioinsecticides.

  3. Crystal structure of the single-stranded RNA binding protein HutP from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruselvam, Viswanathan; Sivaraman, Padavattan; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Ponnuswamy, Mondikalipudur Nanjappagounder

    2014-04-18

    RNA binding proteins control gene expression by the attenuation/antitermination mechanism. HutP is an RNA binding antitermination protein. It regulates the expression of hut operon when it binds with RNA by modulating the secondary structure of single-stranded hut mRNA. HutP necessitates the presence of l-histidine and divalent metal ion to bind with RNA. Herein, we report the crystal structures of ternary complex (HutP-l-histidine-Mg(2+)) and EDTA (0.5 M) treated ternary complex (HutP-l-histidine-Mg(2+)), solved at 1.9 Å and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively, from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans. The addition of 0.5 M EDTA does not affect the overall metal-ion mediated ternary complex structure and however, the metal ions at the non-specific binding sites are chelated, as evidenced from the results of structural features.

  4. Development of 170 MHz Electrodeless Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Immunosensor with Nonspecifically Immobilized Receptor Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Nagai, Hironao; Fukunishi, Yuji; Yanagida, Taiji; Hirao, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA) shows high nonspecific binding affinity on a naked quartz surface, and it can be used as the receptor protein for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most important immunoglobulin. The immunosensor ability, however, significantly depends on the immobilization procedure. In this work, the effect of the nonspecific immobilization procedure on the sensor sensitivity is studied using a home-built electrodeless quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. The pure-shear vibration of a 9.7-µm-thick AT-cut quartz plate is excited and detected in liquids by the line antenna located outside the flow channel. SPA molecules are immobilized on the quartz surfaces, and human IgG is injected to monitor the binding reaction between SPA and IgG. This study reveals that a long (nearly 24 h) immersion procedure is required for immobilizing SPA to achieve the tight biding with the quartz surfaces.

  5. A new crystal structure fragment-based pharmacophore method for G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidom, Kimberley; Isberg, Vignir; Hauser, Alexander Sebastian;

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new method for the building of pharmacophores for G protein-coupled receptors, a major drug target family. The method is a combination of the ligand- and target-based pharmacophore methods and founded on the extraction of structural fragments, interacting ligand moiety...... for new targets. A validating retrospective virtual screening of histamine H1 and H3 receptor pharmacophores yielded area-under-the-curves of 0.88 and 0.82, respectively. The fragment-based method has the unique advantage that it can be applied to targets for which no (homologous) crystal structures...... or ligands are known. 47% of the class A G protein-coupled receptors can be targeted with at least four-element pharmacophores. The fragment libraries can also be used to grow known ligands or for rotamer refinement of homology models. Researchers can download the complete fragment library or a subset...

  6. Protein crystallization under microgravity conditions. Analysis of the results of Russian experiments performed on the International Space Station in 2005-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, K. M.; Timofeev, V. I.; Samygina, V. R.; Kuranova, I. P.; Popov, V. O.; Koval'chuk, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    Conditions of mass transport to growing crystals have a considerable effect on the crystal size and quality. The reduction of convective transport can help improve the quality of crystals for X-ray crystallography. One approach to minimizing convective transport is crystallization in a microgravity environment, in particular, in space. The data obtained by our research team in protein crystallization experiments on the International Space Station are surveyed and analyzed.

  7. Ice-binding proteins that accumulate on different ice crystal planes produce distinct thermal hysteresis dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drori, Ran; Celik, Yeliz; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2014-09-01

    Ice-binding proteins that aid the survival of freeze-avoiding, cold-adapted organisms by inhibiting the growth of endogenous ice crystals are called antifreeze proteins (AFPs). The binding of AFPs to ice causes a separation between the melting point and the freezing point of the ice crystal (thermal hysteresis, TH). TH produced by hyperactive AFPs is an order of magnitude higher than that produced by a typical fish AFP. The basis for this difference in activity remains unclear. Here, we have compared the time dependence of TH activity for both hyperactive and moderately active AFPs using a custom-made nanolitre osmometer and a novel microfluidics system. We found that the TH activities of hyperactive AFPs were time-dependent, and that the TH activity of a moderate AFP was almost insensitive to time. Fluorescence microscopy measurement revealed that despite their higher TH activity, hyperactive AFPs from two insects (moth and beetle) took far longer to accumulate on the ice surface than did a moderately active fish AFP. An ice-binding protein from a bacterium that functions as an ice adhesin rather than as an antifreeze had intermediate TH properties. Nevertheless, the accumulation of this ice adhesion protein and the two hyperactive AFPs on the basal plane of ice is distinct and extensive, but not detectable for moderately active AFPs. Basal ice plane binding is the distinguishing feature of antifreeze hyperactivity, which is not strictly needed in fish that require only approximately 1°C of TH. Here, we found a correlation between the accumulation kinetics of the hyperactive AFP at the basal plane and the time sensitivity of the measured TH.

  8. Crystal structure and conformational flexibility of the unligated FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui; Mustafi, Sourajit M. [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); LeMaster, David M. [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); University at Albany – SUNY, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Li, Zhong [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Héroux, Annie [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Li, Hongmin; Hernández, Griselda, E-mail: griselda@wadsworth.org [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); University at Albany – SUNY, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Two crystal forms of unligated FKBP12.6 exhibit multiple conformations in the active site and in the 80s loop, the primary site for known protein-recognition interactions. The previously unreported NMR backbone assignment of FKBP12.6 revealed extensive doubling of amide resonances, which reflects a slow conformational transition centered in the 80s loop. The primary known physiological function of FKBP12.6 involves its role in regulating the RyR2 isoform of ryanodine receptor Ca{sup 2+} channels in cardiac muscle, pancreatic β islets and the central nervous system. With only a single previously reported X-ray structure of FKBP12.6, bound to the immunosuppressant rapamycin, structural inferences for this protein have been drawn from the more extensive studies of the homologous FKBP12. X-ray structures at 1.70 and 1.90 Å resolution from P2{sub 1} and P3{sub 1}21 crystal forms are reported for an unligated cysteine-free variant of FKBP12.6 which exhibit a notable diversity of conformations. In one monomer from the P3{sub 1}21 crystal form, the aromatic ring of Phe59 at the base of the active site is rotated perpendicular to its typical orientation, generating a steric conflict for the immunosuppressant-binding mode. The peptide unit linking Gly89 and Val90 at the tip of the protein-recognition ‘80s loop’ is flipped in the P2{sub 1} crystal form. Unlike the >30 reported FKBP12 structures, the backbone conformation of this loop closely follows that of the first FKBP domain of FKBP51. The NMR resonances for 21 backbone amides of FKBP12.6 are doubled, corresponding to a slow conformational transition centered near the tip of the 80s loop, as recently reported for 31 amides of FKBP12. The comparative absence of doubling for residues along the opposite face of the active-site pocket in FKBP12.6 may in part reflect attenuated structural coupling owing to increased conformational plasticity around the Phe59 ring.

  9. Carotenoid crystal formation in Arabidopsis and carrot roots caused by increased phytoene synthase protein levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Maass

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As the first pathway-specific enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis, phytoene synthase (PSY is a prime regulatory target. This includes a number of biotechnological approaches that have successfully increased the carotenoid content in agronomically relevant non-green plant tissues through tissue-specific PSY overexpression. We investigated the differential effects of constitutive AtPSY overexpression in green and non-green cells of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. This revealed striking similarities to the situation found in orange carrot roots with respect to carotenoid amounts and sequestration mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Arabidopsis seedlings, carotenoid content remained unaffected by increased AtPSY levels although the protein was almost quantitatively imported into plastids, as shown by western blot analyses. In contrast, non-photosynthetic calli and roots overexpressing AtPSY accumulated carotenoids 10 and 100-fold above the corresponding wild-type tissues and contained 1800 and 500 microg carotenoids per g dry weight, respectively. This increase coincided with a change of the pattern of accumulated carotenoids, as xanthophylls decreased relative to beta-carotene and carotene intermediates accumulated. As shown by polarization microscopy, carotenoids were found deposited in crystals, similar to crystalline-type chromoplasts of non-green tissues present in several other taxa. In fact, orange-colored carrots showed a similar situation with increased PSY protein as well as carotenoid levels and accumulation patterns whereas wild white-rooted carrots were similar to Arabidopsis wild type roots in this respect. Initiation of carotenoid crystal formation by increased PSY protein amounts was further confirmed by overexpressing crtB, a bacterial PSY gene, in white carrots, resulting in increased carotenoid amounts deposited in crystals. CONCLUSIONS: The sequestration of carotenoids into crystals can be driven by the

  10. Crystal structure of Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) 7S seed storage protein with copper ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tengchuan; Wang, Yang; Chen, Yu-Wei; Fu, Tong-Jen; Kothary, Mahendra H; McHugh, Tara H; Zhang, Yuzhu

    2014-01-08

    The prevalence of food allergy has increased in recent years, and Korean pine vicilin is a potential food allergen. We have previously reported the crystallization of Korean pine vicilin purified from raw pine nut. Here we report the isolation of vicilin mRNA and the crystal structure of Korean pine vicilin at 2.40 Å resolution. The overall structure of pine nut vicilin is similar to the structures of other 7S seed storage proteins and consists of an N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain. Each assumes a cupin fold, and they are symmetrically related about a pseudodyad axis. Three vicilin molecules form a doughnut-shaped trimer through head-to-tail association. Structure characterization of Korean pine nut vicilin unexpectedly showed that, in its native trimeric state, the vicilin has three copper ligands. Sequence alignments suggested that the copper-coordinating residues were conserved in winter squash, sesame, tomato, and several tree nuts, while they were not conserved in a number of legumes, including peanut and soybean. Additional studies are needed to assess whether the copper-coordinating property of vicilins has a biological function in the relevant plants. The nutritional value of this copper-coordinating protein in tree nuts and other edible seeds may be worth further investigations.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of a novel haem-binding protein of Streptomyces reticuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Peijian [EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Groves, Matthew R. [EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra D.; Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío, E-mail: ortiz@biologie.uni-osnabrueck.de [Universität Osnabrück, FB Biologie/Chemie, Angewandte Genetik der Mikroorganismen, Barbarastrasse 13, 49069 Osnabrück (Germany); EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-05-01

    The haem-binding protein HbpS from Streptomyces reticuli was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å. Streptomyces reticuli is a soil-growing Gram-positive bacteria that has been shown to secrete a novel haem-binding protein known as HbpS. Sequence analysis reveals that homologues of HbpS are found in a wide variety of bacteria, including different Actinobacteria and the Gram-negative Vibrio cholera and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The in vivo production of HbpS is greatly increased when S. reticuli is cultured in the presence of the natural antibiotic haemin (Fe{sup 3+} oxidized form of haem). Mutational analysis demonstrated that HbpS significantly increases the resistance of S. reticuli to toxic concentrations of haemin. Previous data show that the presence of the newly identified two-component sensor system SenS–SenR also considerably enhances the resistance of S. reticuli to haemin and the redox-cycling compound plumbagin, suggesting a role in the sensing of redox changes. Specific interaction between HbpS and SenS–SenR, which regulates the expression of the catalase–peroxidase CpeB, as well as HbpS, has been demonstrated in vitro. HbpS has been recombinantly overexpressed, purified and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}3, with a cell edge of 152.5 Å. Diffraction data were recorded to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å and phases were obtained using the SAD method from crystals briefly soaked in high concentrations of sodium bromide.

  12. Crystal structure of a novel Sm-like protein of putative cyanophage origin at 2.60 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debanu; Kozbial, Piotr; Axelrod, Herbert L; Miller, Mitchell D; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-André; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Johnson, Hope A; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T; Murphy, Kevin D; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Sefcovic, Natasha; Sudek, Sebastian; Tien, Henry; Trame, Christine; Trout, Christina V; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2009-05-01

    ECX21941 represents a very large family (over 600 members) of novel, ocean metagenome-specific proteins identified by clustering of the dataset from the Global Ocean Sampling expedition. The crystal structure of ECX21941 reveals unexpected similarity to Sm/LSm