WorldWideScience

Sample records for carrier protein crystal

  1. Crystal structure of a PCP/Sfp complex reveals the structural basis for carrier protein posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufar, Peter; Rahighi, Simin; Kraas, Femke I; Kirchner, Donata K; Löhr, Frank; Henrich, Erik; Köpke, Jürgen; Dikic, Ivan; Güntert, Peter; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-04-24

    Phosphopantetheine transferases represent a class of enzymes found throughout all forms of life. From a structural point of view, they are subdivided into three groups, with transferases from group II being the most widespread. They are required for the posttranslational modification of carrier proteins involved in diverse metabolic pathways. We determined the crystal structure of the group II phosphopantetheine transferase Sfp from Bacillus in complex with a substrate carrier protein in the presence of coenzyme A and magnesium, and observed two protein-protein interaction sites. Mutational analysis showed that only the hydrophobic contacts between the carrier protein's second helix and the C-terminal domain of Sfp are essential for their productive interaction. Comparison with a similar structure of a complex of human proteins suggests that the mode of interaction is highly conserved in all domains of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Crystal Structure of Malonyl CoA-Acyl Carrier Protein Transacylase from Xanthomanous oryzae pv. oryzae and Its Proposed Binding with ACP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Sampath; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Jung, Tae-Kyun; Doan, Thanh Thi Ngoc; Ngo, Ho-Phuong-Thuy; Hong, Myoung-Ki; Kim, Seunghwan; Tan, Viet Pham; Ahn, Seok Joon; Lee, Sang Hee; Han, Yesun; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is a plant bacterial pathogen that causes bacterial blight (BB) disease, resulting in serious production losses of rice. The crystal structure of malonyl CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase (XoMCAT), encoded by the gene fabD (Xoo0880) from Xoo, was determined at 2.3 Å resolution in complex with N-cyclohexyl-2-aminoethansulfonic acid. Malonyl CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase transfers malonyl group from malonyl CoA to acyl carrier protein (ACP). The transacylation step is essential in fatty acid synthesis. Based on the rationale, XoMCAT has been considered as a target for antibacterial agents against BB. Protein-protein interaction between XoMCAT and ACP was also extensively investigated using computational docking, and the proposed model revealed that ACP bound to the cleft between two XoMCAT subdomains. PMID:22134719

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabK) from Streptococcus mutans strain UA159

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-O; Im, Dong-Won; Jung, Ha Yun; Kwon, Seong Jung; Heo, Yong-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabK) from S. mutans strain UA159 was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.40 Å. A triclosan-resistant flavoprotein termed FabK is the sole enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans. In this study, FabK from S. mutans strain UA159 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.40 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystal belonged to space group P6 2 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 105.79, c = 44.15 Å. The asymmetric unit contained one molecule, with a corresponding V M of 2.05 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 39.9%

  4. Crystal Structure of Epiphyas Postvittana Takeout 1 With Bound Ubiquinone Supports a Role As Ligand Carriers for Takeout Proteins in Insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamiaux, C.; Stanley, D.; Greenwood, D.R.; Baker, E.N.; Newcomb, R.D.

    2009-05-19

    Takeout (To) proteins are found exclusively in insects and have been proposed to have important roles in various aspects of their physiology and behavior. Limited sequence similarity with juvenile hormone-binding proteins (JHBPs), which specifically bind and transport juvenile hormones in Lepidoptera, suggested a role for To proteins in binding hydrophobic ligands. We present the first crystal structure of a To protein, EpTo1 from the light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana, solved in-house by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction technique using sulfur anomalous dispersion, and refined to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. EpTo1 adopts the unusual {alpha}/{beta}-wrap fold, seen only for JHBP and several mammalian lipid carrier proteins, a scaffold tailored for the binding and/or transport of hydrophobic ligands. EpTo1 has a 45 {angstrom} long, purely hydrophobic, internal tunnel that extends for the full length of the protein and accommodates a bound ligand. The latter was shown by mass spectrometry to be ubiquinone-8 and is probably derived from Escherichia coli. The structure provides the first direct experimental evidence that To proteins are ligand carriers; gives insights into the nature of endogenous ligand(s) of EpTo1; shows, by comparison with JHBP, a basis for different ligand specificities; and suggests a mechanism for the binding/release of ligands.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) from Psuedomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hye; Park, Ae Kyung; Chi, Young Min; Moon, Jin Ho; Lee, Ki Seog

    2011-01-01

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) from P. aeruginosa was purified and crystallized. FabI was also cocrystallized with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NADH. Crystals of native and complexed FabI diffracted to resolutions of 2.6 and 1.8 Å, respectively. During fatty-acid biosynthesis, enoyl-acyl carrier protein (enoyl-ACP) reductase catalyzes the reduction of trans-2-enoyl-ACP to fully saturated acyl-ACP via the ubiquitous fatty-acid synthase system. NADH-dependent enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been purified and crystallized as an apoenzyme and in a complex form with NADH and triclosan. Triclosan is an inhibitor of FabI and forms a stable ternary complex in the presence of NADH. The crystals of native and complexed FabI diffracted to resolutions of 2.6 and 1.8 Å, respectively. The crystals both belonged to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 117.32, b = 155.844, c = 129.448 Å, β = 111.061° for the native enzyme and a = 64.784, b = 107.573, c = 73.517 Å, β = 116.162° for the complex. Preliminary molecular replacement further confirmed the presence of four tetramers of native FabI and one tetramer of the complex in the asymmetric unit, corresponding to Matthews coefficients (V M ) of 2.46 and 2.05 Å 3 Da −1 and solvent contents of 50.1 and 40.1%, respectively

  6. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  7. Protein carriers of conjugate vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    The immunogenicity of polysaccharides as human vaccines was enhanced by coupling to protein carriers. Conjugation transformed the T cell-independent polysaccharide vaccines of the past to T cell-dependent antigenic vaccines that were much more immunogenic and launched a renaissance in vaccinology. This review discusses the conjugate vaccines for prevention of infections caused by Hemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis. Specifically, the characteristics of the proteins used in the construction of the vaccines including CRM, tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid, Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex, and Hemophilus influenzae protein D are discussed. The studies that established differences among and key features of conjugate vaccines including immunologic memory induction, reduction of nasopharyngeal colonization and herd immunity, and antibody avidity and avidity maturation are presented. Studies of dose, schedule, response to boosters, of single protein carriers with single and multiple polysaccharides, of multiple protein carriers with multiple polysaccharides and conjugate vaccines administered concurrently with other vaccines are discussed along with undesirable consequences of conjugate vaccines. The clear benefits of conjugate vaccines in improving the protective responses of the immature immune systems of young infants and the senescent immune systems of the elderly have been made clear and opened the way to development of additional vaccines using this technology for future vaccine products. PMID:23955057

  8. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  9. Introduction to protein crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Alexander; Gavira, Jose A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystallization was discovered by chance about 150 years ago and was developed in the late 19th century as a powerful purification tool and as a demonstration of chemical purity. The crystallization of proteins, nucleic acids and large biological complexes, such as viruses, depends on the creation of a solution that is supersaturated in the macromolecule but exhibits conditions that do not significantly perturb its natural state. Supersaturation is produced through the addition of mild precipitating agents such as neutral salts or polymers, and by the manipulation of various parameters that include temperature, ionic strength and pH. Also important in the crystallization process are factors that can affect the structural state of the macromolecule, such as metal ions, inhibitors, cofactors or other conventional small molecules. A variety of approaches have been developed that combine the spectrum of factors that effect and promote crystallization, and among the most widely used are vapor diffusion, dialysis, batch and liquid–liquid diffusion. Successes in macromolecular crystallization have multiplied rapidly in recent years owing to the advent of practical, easy-to-use screening kits and the application of laboratory robotics. A brief review will be given here of the most popular methods, some guiding principles and an overview of current technologies. PMID:24419610

  10. Food proteins as potential carriers for phenolics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohin, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of phenolic-rich functional foods is often limited by the off-tastes of phenolics that might be counteracted by sequestering these compounds using a carrier, thereby preventing them to interact with bitter taste receptors and salivary proteins. A range of common animal food proteins

  11. Fusion-protein-assisted protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobe, Bostjan; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J

    2015-07-01

    Fusion proteins can be used directly in protein crystallization to assist crystallization in at least two different ways. In one approach, the `heterologous fusion-protein approach', the fusion partner can provide additional surface area to promote crystal contact formation. In another approach, the `fusion of interacting proteins approach', protein assemblies can be stabilized by covalently linking the interacting partners. The linker connecting the proteins plays different roles in the two applications: in the first approach a rigid linker is required to reduce conformational heterogeneity; in the second, conversely, a flexible linker is required that allows the native interaction between the fused proteins. The two approaches can also be combined. The recent applications of fusion-protein technology in protein crystallization from the work of our own and other laboratories are briefly reviewed.

  12. Protein surface shielding agents in protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hašek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization process can be controlled by protein surface shielding agents blocking undesirable competitive adhesion modes during non-equilibrium processes of deposition of protein molecules on the surface of growing crystalline blocks. The hypothesis is based on a number of experimental proofs from diffraction experiments and also retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. The molecules adhering temporarily on the surface of protein molecules change the propensity of protein molecules to deposit on the crystal surface in a definite position and orientation. The concepts of competitive adhesion modes and protein surface shielding agents acting on the surface of molecules in a non-equilibrium process of protein crystallization provide a useful platform for the control of crystallization. The desirable goal, i.e. a transient preference of a single dominating adhesion mode between protein molecules during crystallization, leads to uniform deposition of proteins in a crystal. This condition is the most important factor for diffraction quality and thus also for the accuracy of protein structure determination. The presented hypothesis is a generalization of the experimentally well proven behaviour of hydrophilic polymers on the surface of protein molecules of other compounds

  13. Scientist prepare Lysozyme Protein Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Dan Carter and Charles Sisk center a Lysozyme Protein crystal grown aboard the USML-2 shuttle mission. Protein isolated from hen egg-white and functions as a bacteriostatic enzyme by degrading bacterial cell walls. First enzyme ever characterized by protein crystallography. It is used as an excellent model system for better understanding parameters involved in microgravity crystal growth experiments. The goal is to compare kinetic data from microgravity experiments with data from laboratory experiments to study the equilibrium.

  14. Electroconvection of pure nematic liquid crystals without free charge carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuang-Wu; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2017-11-29

    We consider electroconvection as a response of nematic liquid crystals to an external electric AC field, in the absence of free charge carriers. Previous experimental and theoretical results emphasized charge carriers as a necessary precondition of electroconvection because free-charges in the fluid can respond to an external electric field. Therefore, ionized molecules are considered as responsible for the driving of electroconvective flows. In experiments, finite conductivity is achieved by adding charge-carrying dye molecules or in non-dyed liquid crystals by impurities of the samples. The phenomenon of electroconvection is explained by the Carr-Helfrich theory, supported by numerical simulations. In the present paper, we show that electroconvection may occur also in pure nematic liquid crystals. By means of particle-based numerical simulations we found that bound charges emerge by alignment of polarized liquid crystal molecules in response to the external electric field. In our simulations we could reproduce the characteristic features of electroconvection, such as director-flow patterns, the phase-transition in the voltage-frequency diagram, and dislocation climb/glide motion, which are well known from experiments and hydrodynamic simulations under the assumption of free charge carriers.

  15. Current trends in protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavira, José A

    2016-07-15

    Proteins belong to the most complex colloidal system in terms of their physicochemical properties, size and conformational-flexibility. This complexity contributes to their great sensitivity to any external change and dictate the uncertainty of crystallization. The need of 3D models to understand their functionality and interaction mechanisms with other neighbouring (macro)molecules has driven the tremendous effort put into the field of crystallography that has also permeated other fields trying to shed some light into reluctant-to-crystallize proteins. This review is aimed at revising protein crystallization from a regular-laboratory point of view. It is also devoted to highlight the latest developments and achievements to produce, identify and deliver high-quality protein crystals for XFEL, Micro-ED or neutron diffraction. The low likelihood of protein crystallization is rationalized by considering the intrinsic polypeptide nature (folded state, surface charge, etc) followed by a description of the standard crystallization methods (batch, vapour diffusion and counter-diffusion), including high throughput advances. Other methodologies aimed at determining protein features in solution (NMR, SAS, DLS) or to gather structural information from single particles such as Cryo-EM are also discussed. Finally, current approaches showing the convergence of different structural biology techniques and the cross-methodologies adaptation to tackle the most difficult problems, are presented. Current advances in biomacromolecules crystallization, from nano crystals for XFEL and Micro-ED to large crystals for neutron diffraction, are covered with special emphasis in methodologies applicable at laboratory scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  17. Carrier mobility and crystal perfection of tetracene thin film FET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriguchi, N.; Nishikawa, T.; Anezaki, T.; Unno, A.; Tachibana, M.; Kojima, K.

    2006-01-01

    It is well-known that the carrier mobility of an organic field effect semiconductor (FET) depended on the crystal quality and/or the crystal perfection of the organic thin films [T.W. Kelly, D.V. Muyres, P.F. Baude, T.P. Smith, T.D. Jones, Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 771 (2003) L6.5.1; D.J. Gundlach, J.A. Nichols, L. Zhou, T.N. Jackson, Appl. Phys. Lett. 80 (2002) 2925; H.K. Lauk, M. Halik, U. Zschieschang, G. Schmid, W. Radlik, J. Appl. Phys. 92 (2002) 5259; M. Shtein, J. Mapel, J.B. Benziger, S.R. Forrest, Appl. Phys. Lett. 81 (2002) 268; D. Knipp, R.A. Street, A.R. Volkel, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 3907; R. Ruiz, A.C. Mayer, G.G. Malliaras, Appl. Phys. Lett. 85 (2004) 4926; R.W.I. de Boer, M.E. Gershenson, A.F. Morpurgo, V. Podzorov, Phys. Stat. Sol. A 201 (2004) 1031]. To improve the crystal quality of the thin film many efforts were made. One of the important improvements was the surface treatment of the substrate. The tetracene thin film FET (top contact structure) was fabricated using the substrate, which was coated by a spin-coating method with a 0.1% poly α-methylstyrene (AMS) solution. The crystal quality was improved by this treatment so that the carrier mobility was higher than that of non-treatment. The maximum mobility of the AMS-treated sample was obtained to be 0.12 cm 2 /V s

  18. Can Solution Supersaturation Affect Protein Crystal Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    The formation of large protein crystals of "high quality" is considered a characteristic manifestation of microgravity. The physical processes that predict the formation of large, high quality protein crystals in the microgravity environment of space are considered rooted in the existence of a "depletion zone" in the vicinity of crystal. Namely, it is considered reasonable that crystal quality suffers in earth-grown crystals as a result of the incorporation of large aggregates, micro-crystals and/or large molecular weight "impurities", processes which are aided by density driven convective flow or mixing at the crystal-liquid interface. Sedimentation and density driven convection produce unfavorable solution conditions in the vicinity of the crystal surface, which promotes rapid crystal growth to the detriment of crystal size and quality. In this effort, we shall further present the hypothesis that the solution supersaturatoin at the crystal surface determines the growth mechanism, or mode, by which protein crystals grow. It is further hypothesized that protein crystal quality is affected by the mechanism or mode of crystal growth. Hence the formation of a depletion zone in microgravity environment is beneficial due to inhibition of impurity incorporatoin as well as preventing a kinetic roughening transition. It should be noted that for many proteins the magnitude of neither protein crystal growth rates nor solution supersaturation are predictors of a kinetic roughening transition. That is, the kinetic roughening transition supersaturation must be dtermined for each individual protein.

  19. The fluid phenomena in the crystallization of the protein crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Li; Kang Qi

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports that an optical diagnostic system consisting of Mach–Zehnder interferometer with a phase shift device and image processor has been used for study of the kinetics of protein crystal growing process. The crystallization process of protein crystal by vapour diffusion is investigated. The interference fringes are observed in real time. The present experiment demonstrates that the diffusion and the sedimentation influence the crystallization of protein crystal which grows in solution, and the concentration capillary convection associated with surface tension occurs at the vicinity of free surface of the protein mother liquor, and directly affects on the outcome of protein crystallization. So far the detailed analysis and the important role of the fluid phenomena in protein crystallization have been discussed a little in both space- and ground-based crystal growth experiments. It is also found that these fluid phenomena affect the outcome of protein crystallization, regular growth, and crystal quality. This may explain the fact that many results of space-based investigation do not show overall improvement. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  20. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  1. Mean free paths of charge carriers in CZT crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Se-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Jeon, Sung-Dae; Ha, Jang-Ho; Hong, Duk-Geun

    2007-01-01

    The asymmetrical distortion of the Cadmium Zinc Telluride ((CZT) energy spectrum is mainly caused by the hole trapping in the CZT crystal, and it can be characterized by the mean free path of hole. The mean free paths of the charge carriers in the CZT crystal can be extracted from fitting the peak shape of the measured energy spectrum. The energy spectra of γ-rays from 241 Am, and that of α particles from 238 Pu were measured with a CZT with 5x5x5 mm 3 . The mean free path of the electron was determined from the bias dependence of α-particle response. The energy spectra of γ-ray were simulated with EGSnrc code, in which Hecht equation was included, and the mean free path of the hole was determined by comparing the measured spectrum with the simulated one. The energy spectrum of 662 keV γ-ray was measured with the CZT detector, and it was compared with the simulated spectrum, in which newly determined mean free paths of the electron and the hole were used

  2. Preclinical studies on new proteins as carrier for glycoconjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontini, M; Romano, M R; Proietti, D; Balducci, E; Micoli, F; Balocchi, C; Santini, L; Masignani, V; Berti, F; Costantino, P

    2016-07-29

    Glycoconjugate vaccines are made of carbohydrate antigens covalently bound to a carrier protein to enhance their immunogenicity. Among the different carrier proteins tested in preclinical and clinical studies, five have been used so far for licensed vaccines: Diphtheria and Tetanus toxoids, the non-toxic mutant of diphtheria toxin CRM197, the outer membrane protein complex of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B and the Protein D derived from non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. Availability of novel carriers might help to overcome immune interference in multi-valent vaccines containing several polysaccharide-conjugate antigens, and also to develop vaccines which target both protein as well saccharide epitopes of the same pathogen. Accordingly we have conducted a study to identify new potential carrier proteins. Twenty-eight proteins, derived from different bacteria, were conjugated to the model polysaccharide Laminarin and tested in mice for their ability in inducing antibodies against the carbohydrate antigen and eight of them were subsequently tested as carrier for serogroup meningococcal C oligosaccharides. Four out of these eight were able to elicit in mice satisfactory anti meningococcal serogroup C titers. Based on immunological evaluation, the Streptococcus pneumoniae protein spr96/2021 was successfully evaluated as carrier for serogroups A, C, W, Y and X meningococcal capsular saccharides. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Efficacy of Food Proteins as Carriers for Flavonoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohin, M.C.; Vincken, J.P.; Hijden, H.T.W.M.; Gruppen, H.

    2012-01-01

    Enrichment of flavonoids in food is often limited by their off-tastes, which might be counteracted by the use of food proteins as carriers of flavonoids. Various milk proteins, egg proteins, and gelatin hydrolysates were compared for their binding characteristics to two flavan-3-ols. Among the

  4. Crystal structures of MBP fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, David S

    2016-03-01

    Although chaperone-assisted protein crystallization remains a comparatively rare undertaking, the number of crystal structures of polypeptides fused to maltose-binding protein (MBP) that have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) has grown dramatically during the past decade. Altogether, 102 fusion protein structures were detected by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. Collectively, these structures comprise a range of sizes, space groups, and resolutions that are typical of the PDB as a whole. While most of these MBP fusion proteins were equipped with short inter-domain linkers to increase their rigidity, fusion proteins with long linkers have also been crystallized. In some cases, surface entropy reduction mutations in MBP appear to have facilitated the formation of crystals. A comparison of the structures of fused and unfused proteins, where both are available, reveals that MBP-mediated structural distortions are very rare. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  5. Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Protein in Barley Chloroplast Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannangara, C. G.; Jense, C J

    1975-01-01

    Biotin localized in barley chloroplast lamellae is covalently bound to a single protein with an approximate molecular weight of 21000. It contains one mole of biotin per mole of protein and functions as a carboxyl carrier in the acetyl-CoA carboxylase reaction. The protein was obtained...... by solubilization of the lamellae in phenol/acetic acid/8 M urea. Feeding barley seedlings with [14C]-biotin revealed that the vitamin is not degraded into respiratory substrates by the plant, but is specifically incorporated into biotin carboxyl carrier protein....

  6. Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Single Crystal Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Frisbie, Daniel [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The proposed research aims to achieve quantitative, molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped crystalline organic semiconductors via in situ linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, in conjunction with transport measurements and molecular/crystal engineering.

  7. The MORPHEUS II protein crystallization screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorrec, Fabrice, E-mail: fgorrec@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-27

    MORPHEUS II is a 96-condition initial crystallization screen formulated de novo. The screen incorporates reagents selected from the Protein Data Bank to yield crystals that are not observed in traditional conditions. In addition, the formulation facilitates the optimization and cryoprotection of crystals. High-quality macromolecular crystals are a prerequisite for the process of protein structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Unfortunately, the relative yield of diffraction-quality crystals from crystallization experiments is often very low. In this context, innovative crystallization screen formulations are continuously being developed. In the past, MORPHEUS, a screen in which each condition integrates a mix of additives selected from the Protein Data Bank, a cryoprotectant and a buffer system, was developed. Here, MORPHEUS II, a follow-up to the original 96-condition initial screen, is described. Reagents were selected to yield crystals when none might be observed in traditional initial screens. Besides, the screen includes heavy atoms for experimental phasing and small polyols to ensure the cryoprotection of crystals. The suitability of the resulting novel conditions is shown by the crystallization of a broad variety of protein samples and their efficiency is compared with commercially available conditions.

  8. The MORPHEUS II protein crystallization screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrec, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    MORPHEUS II is a 96-condition initial crystallization screen formulated de novo. The screen incorporates reagents selected from the Protein Data Bank to yield crystals that are not observed in traditional conditions. In addition, the formulation facilitates the optimization and cryoprotection of crystals. High-quality macromolecular crystals are a prerequisite for the process of protein structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Unfortunately, the relative yield of diffraction-quality crystals from crystallization experiments is often very low. In this context, innovative crystallization screen formulations are continuously being developed. In the past, MORPHEUS, a screen in which each condition integrates a mix of additives selected from the Protein Data Bank, a cryoprotectant and a buffer system, was developed. Here, MORPHEUS II, a follow-up to the original 96-condition initial screen, is described. Reagents were selected to yield crystals when none might be observed in traditional initial screens. Besides, the screen includes heavy atoms for experimental phasing and small polyols to ensure the cryoprotection of crystals. The suitability of the resulting novel conditions is shown by the crystallization of a broad variety of protein samples and their efficiency is compared with commercially available conditions

  9. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C. Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins

  10. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, C. Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M., E-mail: gulick@hwi.buffalo.edu [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins.

  11. Characterization of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) is an estrogen induced egg yolk and white protein. Eggs from hens which have a splice mutation in RCP gene fail to hatch, indicating an absolute requirement of RCP for the transport of riboflavin to the oocyte. In order to understand the mechanism of regulation of this gene by ...

  12. Protein Crystallization Using Room Temperature Ionic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Paley, Mark Steve; Turner, Megan B.; Rogers, Robin D.

    2006-01-01

    The ionic liquids (ILs) 1-butyl-3-methylimidizolium chloride (C4mim-C1), 1-butyl-3- methylimidizolium diethyleneglycol monomethylethersulfate ([C4mim]DEMGS), and 1-butyl-1 -methylpyrollidinium dihydrogenphosphate ([p1,4]dhp) were tested for their effects on the crystallization of the proteins canavalin, beta-lactoglobulin B, xylanase, and glucose isomerase, using a standard high throughput screen. The crystallization experiments were set up with the ILs added to the protein solutions at 0.2 and 0.4 M final concentrations. Crystallization droplets were set up at three proteixprecipitant ratios (1:1, 2:1, and 4:l), which served to progressively dilute the effects of the screen components while increasing the equilibrium protein and IL concentrations. Crystals were obtained for all four proteins at a number of conditions where they were not obtained from the IL-free control experiment. Over half of the protein-IL combinations tested had more successful outcomes than negative, where the IL-free crystallization was better than the corresponding IL-containing outcome, relative to the control. One of the most common causes of a negative outcome was solubilization of the protein by the IL, resulting in a clear drop. In one instance, we were able to use the IL-induced solubilizing to obtain beta-lactoglobulin B crystals from conditions that gave precipitated protein in the absence of IL. The results suggest that it may be feasible to develop ILs specifically for the task of macromolecule crystallization.

  13. Electron crystallography of three dimensional protein crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgieva, Dilyana

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes an investigation of the potential of electron diffraction for studying three dimensional sub-micro-crystals of proteins and pharmaceuticals. A prerequisite for using electron diffraction for structural studies is the predictable availability of tiny crystals. A method for

  14. Crystallization of small proteins assisted by green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Hiraki, Masahiko; Yamada, Yusuke; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Kato, Ryuichi; Dikic, Ivan; Drew, David; Iwata, So; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Kawasaki, Masato

    2010-10-01

    The generation of crystal lattice contacts by proteinaceous tags fused to target proteins is an attractive approach to aid in the crystallization of otherwise intractable proteins. Here, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions for this purpose is demonstrated, using ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-binding motif (UBM) of Y-family polymerase ι as examples. The structure of the GFP-ubiquitin fusion protein revealed that the crystal lattice was formed by GFP moieties. Ubiquitin was accommodated in the lattice through interactions with the peripheral loops of GFP. However, in the GFP-UBM fusion crystal UBM formed extensive interactions with GFP and these interactions, together with UBM dimerization, mediated the crystal packing. Interestingly, the tyrosine residues that are involved in mediating crystal contacts in both GFP-ubiquitin and GFP-UBM crystals are arranged in a belt on the surface of the β-barrel structure of GFP. Therefore, it is likely that GFP can assist in the crystallization of small proteins and of protein domains in general.

  15. New technique of manipulating a protein crystal using adhesive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitatani, Tomoya; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2008-01-01

    We have developed Crystal Catcher, a new device for manipulating protein crystals. Crystal Catcher directly captures a crystal with an adhesive. The easy and stable removal of a protein crystal from a drop has been achieved using the Crystal Catcher. The crystal picked up on the Crystal Catcher is positioned in the cryostream on a goniometer and flash-cooled. Various protein crystals can be captured and mounted without causing significant damage. This new approach will replace nylon loops for picking up protein crystals. (author)

  16. Schottky MSM junctions for carrier depletion in silicon photonic crystal microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haret, Laurent-Daniel; Checoury, Xavier; Bayle, Fabien; Cazier, Nicolas; Boucaud, Philippe; Combrié, Sylvain; de Rossi, Alfredo

    2013-04-22

    Collection of free carriers is a key issue in silicon photonics devices. We show that a lateral metal-semiconductor-metal Schottky junction is an efficient and simple way of dealing with that issue in a photonic crystal microcavity. Using a simple electrode design, and taking into account the optical mode profile, the resulting carrier distribution in the structure is calculated. We show that the corresponding effective free carrier lifetime can be reduced by 50 times when the bias is tuned. This allows one to maintain a high cavity quality factor under strong optical injection. In the fabricated structures, carrier depletion is correlated with transmission spectra and directly visualized by Electron Beam Induced Current pictures. These measurements demonstrate the validity of this carrier extraction principle. The design can still be optimized in order to obtain full carrier depletion at a smaller energy cost.

  17. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    This Final Technical Report for NASA Grant NAG8-774 covers the period from April 27, 1989 through December 31, 1992. It covers five main topics: fluid flow studies, the influence of growth conditions on the morphology of isocitrate lyase crystals, control of nucleation, the growth of lysozyme by the temperature gradient method and graphoepitaxy of protein crystals. The section on fluid flow discusses the limits of detectability in the Schlieren imaging of fluid flows around protein crystals. The isocitrate lyase study compares crystals grown terrestrially under a variety of conditions with those grown in space. The controlling factor governing the morphology of the crystals is the supersaturation. The lack of flow in the interface between the drop and the atmosphere in microgravity causes protein precipitation in the boundary layer and a lowering of the supersaturation in the drop. This lowered supersaturation leads to improved crystal morphology. Preliminary experiments with lysozyme indicated that localized temperature gradients could be used to nucleate crystals in a controlled manner. An apparatus (thermonucleator) was designed to study the controlled nucleation of protein crystals. This apparatus has been used to nucleate crystals of materials with both normal (ice-water, Rochelle salt and lysozyme) and retrograde (horse serum albumin and alpha chymotrypsinogen A) solubility. These studies have lead to the design of an new apparatus that small and more compatible with use in microgravity. Lysozyme crystals were grown by transporting nutrient from a source (lysozyme powder) to the crystal in a temperature gradient. The influence of path length and cross section on the growth rate was demonstrated. This technique can be combined with the thermonucleator to control both nucleation and growth. Graphoepitaxy utilizes a patterned substrate to orient growing crystals. In this study, silicon substrates with 10 micron grooves were used to grow crystals of catalase

  18. Characterization of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    chicken RCP gene regulation, the structure and the 5′ flanking region of the gene have been characterized. 2. Methods. 2.1 Isolation of RCP genomic clones ..... The work was supported by the Department of Science and Tech- nology, New Delhi by a grant to PK. References. Adiga P R 1994 Riboflavin Carrier Protein in ...

  19. Protein crystallization on polymeric film surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermani, Simona; Falini, Giuseppe; Minnucci, Massimiliano; Ripamonti, Alberto

    2001-04-01

    Polymeric films containing ionizable groups, such as sulfonated polystyrene, cross-linked gelatin films with adsorbed poly- L-lysine or entrapped poly- L-aspartate and silk fibroin with entrapped poly- L-lysine or poly- L-aspartate, have been tested as heterogeneous nucleant surfaces for proteins. Concanavalin A from jack bean and chicken egg-white lysozyme were used as models. It was found that the crystallization of concanavalin A by the vapor diffusion technique, is strongly influenced by the presence of ionizable groups on the film surface. Both the induction time and protein concentration necessary for the crystal nucleation decrease whereas the nucleation density increases on going from the reference siliconized cover slip to the uncharged polymeric surfaces and even more to the charged ones. Non-specific attractive and local interactions between the protein and the film surface might promote molecular collisions and the clustering with the due symmetry for the formation of the crystal nuclei. The results suggest that the studied polymeric film surfaces could be particularly useful for the crystallization of proteins from solutions at low starting concentration, thus using small quantities of protein, and for proteins with very long crystallization time.

  20. Protein carriers of conjugate vaccines: characteristics, development, and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-12-01

    The immunogenicity of polysaccharides as human vaccines was enhanced by coupling to protein carriers. Conjugation transformed the T cell-independent polysaccharide vaccines of the past to T cell-dependent antigenic vaccines that were much more immunogenic and launched a renaissance in vaccinology. This review discusses the conjugate vaccines for prevention of infections caused by Hemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis. Specifically, the characteristics of the proteins used in the construction of the vaccines including CRM, tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid, Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex, and Hemophilus influenzae protein D are discussed. The studies that established differences among and key features of conjugate vaccines including immunologic memory induction, reduction of nasopharyngeal colonization and herd immunity, and antibody avidity and avidity maturation are presented. Studies of dose, schedule, response to boosters, of single protein carriers with single and multiple polysaccharides, of multiple protein carriers with multiple polysaccharides and conjugate vaccines administered concurrently with other vaccines are discussed along with undesirable consequences of conjugate vaccines. The clear benefits of conjugate vaccines in improving the protective responses of the immature immune systems of young infants and the senescent immune systems of the elderly have been made clear and opened the way to development of additional vaccines using this technology for future vaccine products.

  1. Protein crystal growth - Growth kinetics for tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, M. L.; Snyder, R. S.; Naumann, R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from theoretical and experimental studies of the growth rate of lysozyme as a function of diffusion in earth-gravity conditions. The investigations were carried out to form a comparison database for future studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of space. A diffusion-convection model is presented for predicting crystal growth rates in the presence of solutal concentration gradients. Techniques used to grow and monitor the growth of hen egg white lysozyme are detailed. The model calculations and experiment data are employed to discuss the effects of transport and interfacial kinetics in the growth of the crystals, which gradually diminished the free energy in the growth solution. Density gradient-driven convection, caused by presence of the gravity field, was a limiting factor in the growth rate.

  2. Modelling heating effects in cryocooled protein crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, J; Fayz, K; Fell, B; Garman, E

    2001-01-01

    With the application of intense X-ray beams from third generation synchrotron sources, damage to cryocooled macromolecular crystals is being observed more commonly . In order to fully utilize synchrotron facilities now available for studying biological crystals, it is essential to understand the processes involved in radiation damage and beam heating so that, if possible, action can be taken to slow the rate of damage. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been applied to model the heating effects of X-rays on cryocooled protein crystals, and to compare the relative cooling efficiencies of nitrogen and helium.

  3. Protein crystallization - is it rocket science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucas, L J.

    2001-07-01

    Fueled by initial space shuttle results, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been supporting fundamental studies of macromolecular crystal growth since 1985. The majority of this research is directed at understanding the relationship between experimental variables and important crystal characteristics. The program has resulted in new methods and technology that will benefit the crystallography community's effort to meet the ever-increasing demand for protein structural information. Microgravity crystallization results indicate a potential impact on structural biology's more challenging problems, as soon as long-duration experiments can be performed on the International Space Station.

  4. Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Single Crystal Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10

    The proposed research aims to achieve quantitative, molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped crystalline organic semiconductors via in situ linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, in conjunction with transport measurements and molecular/crystal engineering. Organic semiconductors are emerging as viable materials for low-cost electronics and optoelectronics, such as organic photovoltaics (OPV), organic field effect transistors (OFETs), and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Despite extensive studies spanning many decades, a clear understanding of the nature of charge carriers in organic semiconductors is still lacking. It is generally appreciated that polaron formation and charge carrier trapping are two hallmarks associated with electrical transport in organic semiconductors; the former results from the low dielectric constants and weak intermolecular electronic overlap while the latter can be attributed to the prevalence of structural disorder. These properties have lead to the common observation of low charge carrier mobilities, e.g., in the range of 10-5 - 10-3 cm2/Vs, particularly at low carrier concentrations. However, there is also growing evidence that charge carrier mobility approaching those of inorganic semiconductors and metals can exist in some crystalline organic semiconductors, such as pentacene, tetracene and rubrene. A particularly striking example is single crystal rubrene (Figure 1), in which hole mobilities well above 10 cm2/Vs have been observed in OFETs operating at room temperature. Temperature dependent transport and spectroscopic measurements both revealed evidence of free carriers in rubrene. Outstanding questions are: what are the structural features and physical properties that make rubrene so unique? How do we establish fundamental design principles for the development of other organic semiconductors of high mobility? These questions are critically important but not comprehensive, as the nature of

  5. Magnetic Control of Convection during Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2004-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular Crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for bio-chemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and Sedimentation as is achieved in "microgravity", we have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, f o d o n of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. We postulate that limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with counteracts on for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately positioning the crystal growth cell so that the magnetic susceptibility

  6. Cry protein crystals: a novel platform for protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Manoj S; Lee, Marianne M; Bonnegarde-Bernard, Astrid; Wallace, Julie A; Dean, Donald H; Ostrowski, Michael C; Burry, Richard W; Boyaka, Prosper N; Chan, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Protein delivery platforms are important tools in the development of novel protein therapeutics and biotechnologies. We have developed a new class of protein delivery agent based on sub-micrometer-sized Cry3Aa protein crystals that naturally form within the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. We demonstrate that fusion of the cry3Aa gene to that of various reporter proteins allows for the facile production of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals for use in subsequent applications. These Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals are efficiently taken up and retained by macrophages and other cell lines in vitro, and can be delivered to mice in vivo via multiple modes of administration. Oral delivery of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals to C57BL/6 mice leads to their uptake by MHC class II cells, including macrophages in the Peyer's patches, supporting the notion that the Cry3Aa framework can be used to stabilize cargo protein against degradation for delivery to gastrointestinal lymphoid tissues.

  7. Cry protein crystals: a novel platform for protein delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj S Nair

    Full Text Available Protein delivery platforms are important tools in the development of novel protein therapeutics and biotechnologies. We have developed a new class of protein delivery agent based on sub-micrometer-sized Cry3Aa protein crystals that naturally form within the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. We demonstrate that fusion of the cry3Aa gene to that of various reporter proteins allows for the facile production of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals for use in subsequent applications. These Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals are efficiently taken up and retained by macrophages and other cell lines in vitro, and can be delivered to mice in vivo via multiple modes of administration. Oral delivery of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals to C57BL/6 mice leads to their uptake by MHC class II cells, including macrophages in the Peyer's patches, supporting the notion that the Cry3Aa framework can be used to stabilize cargo protein against degradation for delivery to gastrointestinal lymphoid tissues.

  8. Cry Protein Crystals: A Novel Platform for Protein Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnegarde-Bernard, Astrid; Wallace, Julie A.; Dean, Donald H.; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Burry, Richard W.; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Chan, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Protein delivery platforms are important tools in the development of novel protein therapeutics and biotechnologies. We have developed a new class of protein delivery agent based on sub-micrometer-sized Cry3Aa protein crystals that naturally form within the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. We demonstrate that fusion of the cry3Aa gene to that of various reporter proteins allows for the facile production of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals for use in subsequent applications. These Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals are efficiently taken up and retained by macrophages and other cell lines in vitro, and can be delivered to mice in vivo via multiple modes of administration. Oral delivery of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals to C57BL/6 mice leads to their uptake by MHC class II cells, including macrophages in the Peyer’s patches, supporting the notion that the Cry3Aa framework can be used to stabilize cargo protein against degradation for delivery to gastrointestinal lymphoid tissues. PMID:26030844

  9. Protein carriers of conjugate vaccines: Characteristics, development, and clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    The immunogenicity of polysaccharides as human vaccines was enhanced by coupling to protein carriers. Conjugation transformed the T cell-independent polysaccharide vaccines of the past to T cell-dependent antigenic vaccines that were much more immunogenic and launched a renaissance in vaccinology. This review discusses the conjugate vaccines for prevention of infections caused by Hemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis. Specifically, the characterist...

  10. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  11. Overexpression, Isolation, and Crystallization of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelly, Jane V.; Madden, C. Bernadette

    Rapid developments in recombinant technology have made it possible to overproduce selected proteins of specific interest to the levels required for structural analysis by X-ray crystallography. High-level gene expression has facilitated the purification of many proteins that are normally only expressed at low concentrations, as well as those that have proven difficult to purify to homogeneity from natural sources. Furthermore, advances in oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis have enabled proteins to be engineered so as to possess certain features that may confer stability or assist in then isolation. There are several examples of proteins that, despite rigorous purification from their natural source, have defied crystallization attempts, e.g., human growth hormone, but have been successfully crystallized from recombinant sources (1). The lack of posttranslational processing in bacterial expressed proteins can often be an advantage to the crystallographer where microheterogeneity presents a problem. Indeed, certain features or residues of a protein that are believed to impede crystal formation by preventing a close-packing arrangement may be successfully deleted by genetic manipulation without destroying its essential functionality (2).

  12. The Effect of Protein Impurities on Lysozyme Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    While bulk crystallization from impure solutions is used industrially as a purification step for a wide variety of materials, it is a technique that has rarely been used for proteins. Proteins have a reputation for being difficult to crystallize and high purity of the initial crystallization solution is considered paramount for success in the crystallization. Although little is written on the purifying capability of protein crystallization or of the effect of impurities on the various aspects of the crystallization process, recent published reports show that crystallization shows promise and feasibility as a purification technique for proteins. In order to further examine the issue of purity in macromolecule crystallization this study investigates the effect of the protein impurities, avidin, ovalbumin and conalbumin, at concentrations up to 50%, on the solubility, crystal face growth rates and crystal purity, of the protein lysozyme. Solubility was measured in batch experiments while a computer controlled video microscope system was used to measure the f {101} and {101} lysozyme crystal face growth rates. While little effect was observed on solubility and high crystal purity was obtained (>99.99%), the effect of the impurities on the face growth rates varied from no effect to a significant face specific effect leading to growth cessation, a phenomenon that is frequently observed in protein crystal growth. The results shed interesting light on the effect of protein impurities on protein crystal growth and strengthen the feasibility of using crystallization as a unit operation for protein purification.

  13. Protein crystallization image classification with elastic net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jeffrey; Collins, John; Weldetsion, Mehari; Newland, Oliver; Chiang, Eric; Guerrero, Steve; Okada, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    Protein crystallization plays a crucial role in pharmaceutical research by supporting the investigation of a protein's molecular structure through X-ray diffraction of its crystal. Due to the rare occurrence of crystals, images must be manually inspected, a laborious process. We develop a solution incorporating a regularized, logistic regression model for automatically evaluating these images. Standard image features, such as shape context, Gabor filters and Fourier transforms, are first extracted to represent the heterogeneous appearance of our images. Then the proposed solution utilizes Elastic Net to select relevant features. Its L1-regularization mitigates the effects of our large dataset, and its L2- regularization ensures proper operation when the feature number exceeds the sample number. A two-tier cascade classifier based on naïve Bayes and random forest algorithms categorized the images. In order to validate the proposed method, we experimentally compare it with naïve Bayes, linear discriminant analysis, random forest, and their two-tier cascade classifiers, by 10-fold cross validation. Our experimental results demonstrate a 3-category accuracy of 74%, outperforming other models. In addition, Elastic Net better reduces the false negatives responsible for a high, domain specific risk. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to apply Elastic Net to classifying protein crystallization images. Performance measured on a large pharmaceutical dataset also fared well in comparison with those presented in the previous studies, while the reduction of the high-risk false negatives is promising.

  14. Protein C/S ratio, an accurate and simple tool to identify carriers of a protein C gene mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Libourel, EJ; Meinardi, [No Value; de Kam, PJ; Ruiters, MHJ; van der Meer, J; van der Schaaf, W; Veenstra, R.

    Hereditary protein C deficiency is demonstrated by lowered protein C plasma levels in a patient and at least one first-degree relative. This approach is insufficient in some cases owing to overlapping protein C levels in carriers and non-carriers of a protein C gene mutation. The protein C/S ratio

  15. Convective diffusion in protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, J. K.; Meehan, E. J.; Xidis, A. L.; Howard, S. B.

    1986-08-01

    We considered a protein crystal in the form of a flat plate suspended in its parent solution so that the normal to the largest face was perpendicular to the acceleration due to gravity. For simplicity, the protein concentration in the solution adjacent to the plate was taken to be the equilibrium solubility. The bulk of the solution was supersaturated, however, which gave rise to a horizontal concentration gradient driving fluid toward the plate. We also took into account the diffusion of the dissolved protein with respect to the moving fluid. In the boundary layer next to the plate, we solved the Navier-Stokes equation and the equation for convective diffusion to determine the flow velocity and the protein mass flux. We found that, because of the convection, the local rate of growth of the plate varied strongly with depth. The variation was diminished by a factor of 1/30 when the local gravity was reduced from g to 10 -6g as occurs aboard the Space Shuttle in earth orbit. For an aqueous solution of lysozyme at a concentration of 40 mg/ml, the boundary layer at the top of a 1 mm high crystal has a thickness of 80 μm in earths gravity and 2570 μm in 10 -6g. We examined the optical transmission of the boundary layer and compared it with the "haloes" observed by Feher et al. about growing hemispherical crystals of lysozyme.

  16. Low trap-state density and long carrier diffusion in organolead trihalide perovskite single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong

    2015-01-29

    The fundamental properties and ultimate performance limits of organolead trihalide MAPbX3(MA = CH3NH3 +; X = Br- or I- ) perovskites remain obscured by extensive disorder in polycrystalline MAPbX3 films. We report an antisolvent vapor-assisted crystallization approach that enables us to create sizable crack-free MAPbX3 single crystals with volumes exceeding 100 cubic millimeters. These large single crystals enabled a detailed characterization of their optical and charge transport characteristics.We observed exceptionally low trap-state densities on the order of 109 to 1010 per cubic centimeter in MAPbX3 single crystals (comparable to the best photovoltaic-quality silicon) and charge carrier diffusion lengths exceeding 10 micrometers. These results were validated with density functional theory calculations.

  17. Recognition of hybrid peptidyl carrier proteins/acyl carrier proteins in nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules by the 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferases AcpS and Sfp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Finking, Robert; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2002-05-10

    The acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) of fatty acid synthase and polyketide synthase as well as peptidyl carrier proteins (PCPs) of nonribosomal peptide synthetases are modified by 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferases from inactive apo-enzymes to their active holo forms by transferring the 4'-phosphopantetheinyl moiety of coenzyme A to a conserved serine residue of the carrier protein. 4'-Phosphopantetheinyl transferases have been classified into two types; the AcpS type accepts ACPs of fatty acid synthase and some ACPs of type II polyketide synthase as substrates, whereas the Sfp type exhibits an extraordinarily broad substrate specificity. Based on the previously published co-crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis AcpS and ACP that provided detailed information about the interacting residues of the two proteins, we designed a novel hybrid PCP by replacing the Bacillus brevis TycC3-PCP helix 2 with the corresponding helix of B. subtilis ACP that contains the interacting residues. This was performed for the PCP domain as a single protein as well as for the TycA-PCP domain within the nonribosomal peptide synthetase module TycA from B. brevis. Both resulting proteins, designated hybrid PCP (hPCP) and hybrid TycA (hTycA), were modified in vivo during heterologous expression in Escherichia coli (hPCP, 51%; hTycA, 75%) and in vitro with AcpS as well as Sfp to 100%. The designated hTycA module contains two other domains: an adenylation domain (activating phenylalanine to Phe-AMP and afterward transferring the Phe to the PCP domain) and an epimerization domain (converting the PCP-bound l-Phe to d-Phe). We show here that the modified PCP domain of hTycA communicates with the adenylation domain and that the co-factor of holo-hPCP is loaded with Phe. However, communication between the hybrid PCP and the epimerization domain seems to be disabled. Nevertheless, hTycA is recognized by the next proline-activating elongation module TycB1 in vitro, and the dipeptide is formed and

  18. The plug-based nanovolume Microcapillary Protein Crystallization System (MPCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdts, Cory J.; Elliott, Mark; Lovell, Scott; Mixon, Mark B.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Staker, Bart L.; Nollert, Peter; Stewart, Lance

    2008-01-01

    The Microcapillary Protein Crystallization System (MPCS) is a new protein-crystallization technology used to generate nanolitre-sized crystallization experiments for crystal screening and optimization. Using the MPCS, diffraction-ready crystals were grown in the plastic MPCS CrystalCard and were used to solve the structure of methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase. The Microcapillary Protein Crystallization System (MPCS) embodies a new semi-automated plug-based crystallization technology which enables nanolitre-volume screening of crystallization conditions in a plasticware format that allows crystals to be easily removed for traditional cryoprotection and X-ray diffraction data collection. Protein crystals grown in these plastic devices can be directly subjected to in situ X-ray diffraction studies. The MPCS integrates the formulation of crystallization cocktails with the preparation of the crystallization experiments. Within microfluidic Teflon tubing or the microfluidic circuitry of a plastic CrystalCard, ∼10–20 nl volume droplets are generated, each representing a microbatch-style crystallization experiment with a different chemical composition. The entire protein sample is utilized in crystallization experiments. Sparse-matrix screening and chemical gradient screening can be combined in one comprehensive ‘hybrid’ crystallization trial. The technology lends itself well to optimization by high-granularity gradient screening using optimization reagents such as precipitation agents, ligands or cryoprotectants

  19. Chemically Stable Lipids for Membrane Protein Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishchenko, Andrii; Peng, Lingling; Zinovev, Egor; Vlasov, Alexey; Lee, Sung Chang; Kuklin, Alexander; Mishin, Alexey; Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Zhang, Qinghai; Cherezov, Vadim (MIPT); (USC); (Scripps)

    2017-05-01

    The lipidic cubic phase (LCP) has been widely recognized as a promising membrane-mimicking matrix for biophysical studies of membrane proteins and their crystallization in a lipidic environment. Application of this material to a wide variety of membrane proteins, however, is hindered due to a limited number of available host lipids, mostly monoacylglycerols (MAGs). Here, we designed, synthesized, and characterized a series of chemically stable lipids resistant to hydrolysis, with properties complementary to the widely used MAGs. In order to assess their potential to serve as host lipids for crystallization, we characterized the phase properties and lattice parameters of mesophases made of two most promising lipids at a variety of different conditions by polarized light microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. Both lipids showed remarkable chemical stability and an extended LCP region in the phase diagram covering a wide range of temperatures down to 4 °C. One of these lipids has been used for crystallization and structure determination of a prototypical membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin at 4 and 20 °C.

  20. Simple micromechanical model of protein crystals for their mechanical characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteins have been known to perform the excellent mechanical functions and exhibit the remarkable mechanical properties such as high fracture toughness in spider silk protein [1]. This indicates that the mechanical characterization of protein molecules and/or crystals is very essential to understand such remarkable mechanical function of protein molecules. In this study, for gaining insight into mechanical behavior of protein crystals, we developed the micromechanical model by using the empirical potential field prescribed to alpha carbon atoms of a protein crystal in a unit cell. We consider the simple protein crystals for their mechanical behavior under tensile loading to be compared with full atomic models

  1. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Bernhard [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Jaenicke, Elmar [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Jakob Welder Weg 26, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Schnell, Robert [Karolinska Institutet, 17 177 Stockholm (Sweden); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Brenk, Ruth, E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  2. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A; Potenza, Marco A C; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-07-01

    Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10(-3) of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in lysozyme and glucose isomerase solutions are locations for crystal nucleation.

  3. Nonclassical nucleation pathways in protein crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fajun

    2017-11-01

    Classical nucleation theory (CNT), which was established about 90 years ago, has been very successful in many research fields, and continues to be the most commonly used theory in describing the nucleation process. For a fluid-to-solid phase transition, CNT states that the solute molecules in a supersaturated solution reversibly form small clusters. Once the cluster size reaches a critical value, it becomes thermodynamically stable and favored for further growth. One of the most important assumptions of CNT is that the nucleation process is described by one reaction coordinate and all order parameters proceed simultaneously. Recent studies in experiments, computer simulations and theory have revealed nonclassical features in the early stage of nucleation. In particular, the decoupling of order parameters involved during a fluid-to-solid transition leads to the so-called two-step nucleation mechanism, in which a metastable intermediate phase (MIP) exists between the initial supersaturated solution and the final crystals. Depending on the exact free energy landscapes, the MIPs can be a high density liquid phase, mesoscopic clusters, or a pre-ordered state. In this review, we focus on the studies of nonclassical pathways in protein crystallization and discuss the applications of the various scenarios of two-step nucleation theory. In particular, we focus on protein solutions in the presence of multivalent salts, which serve as a model protein system to study the nucleation pathways. We wish to point out the unique features of proteins as model systems for further studies.

  4. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maes, Dominique, E-mail: dommaes@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Vorontsova, Maria A. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano [Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Sleutel, Mike [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Giglio, Marzio [Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Vekilov, Peter G. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2015-06-27

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10{sup −3} of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  5. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10 −3 of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  6. Two-dimensional silicon crystals with sizable band gaps and ultrahigh carrier mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Zhiwen; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong

    2018-01-18

    Due to their compatibility in the well-developed Si-based semiconductor industry, exploring two-dimensional (2D) silicon crystals with both sizable band gaps and high carrier mobility is important to develop high-performance electronic and optoelectronic devices on the nanoscale. Here, eleven new 2D silicon crystals are reported based on the strategy of mixing 3-fold and 4-fold coordinated silicon atoms in 2D confined phases and first-principles calculations. We establish that these 2D silicon crystals can be obtained by functionalizing silicene with silicon atoms, dimers, or chains, which exhibit lower formation energy than that of silicene. Their dynamic stability and thermal stability are confirmed by phonon calculations and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic simulation at temperatures up to 700 K. Electronic structure calculations reveal that these 2D silicon crystals are semiconductors with sizable and tunable band gaps, ranging from 1.12 to 1.67 eV, and four of them are direct or quasi-direct band gap semiconductors with strong absorption in the visible-light frequency. The calculated Young's stiffness of 2D silicon crystals ranges from 31 to 88 N m -1 , which are comparable to phosphorene, but remarkably smaller than those of MoS 2 monolayer and graphene. Remarkably, C z -P2/c-Si 12 possesses a negative Poisson's ratio with a maximum value of -0.055. In particular, 2D silicon crystals possess ultrahigh carrier mobility of up to 1.7 × 10 5 and 1.3 × 10 4 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at room temperature for electrons and holes, respectively, suitable for high-speed electronic and optoelectronic applications on the nanoscale.

  7. Ultratight crystal packing of a 10 kDa protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trillo-Muyo, Sergio; Jasilionis, Andrius; Domagalski, Marcin J.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Minor, Wladek; Kuisiene, Nomeda; Arolas, Joan L.; Solà, Maria; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase from G. thermoleovorans is reported; it is one of the most tightly packed protein structures reported to date. While small organic molecules generally crystallize forming tightly packed lattices with little solvent content, proteins form air-sensitive high-solvent-content crystals. Here, the crystallization and full structure analysis of a novel recombinant 10 kDa protein corresponding to the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase are reported. The orthorhombic crystal contained only 24.5% solvent and is therefore among the most tightly packed protein lattices ever reported

  8. Ultratight crystal packing of a 10 kDa protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trillo-Muyo, Sergio [Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona, Spanish Research Council CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, c/Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jasilionis, Andrius [Vilnius University, M. K. Čiurlionio 21/27, 03101 Vilnius (Lithuania); Domagalski, Marcin J. [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Chruszcz, Maksymilian [University of South Carolina, 631 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Minor, Wladek [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Kuisiene, Nomeda [Vilnius University, M. K. Čiurlionio 21/27, 03101 Vilnius (Lithuania); Arolas, Joan L.; Solà, Maria; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier, E-mail: xgrcri@ibmb.csic.es [Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona, Spanish Research Council CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, c/Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-03-01

    The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase from G. thermoleovorans is reported; it is one of the most tightly packed protein structures reported to date. While small organic molecules generally crystallize forming tightly packed lattices with little solvent content, proteins form air-sensitive high-solvent-content crystals. Here, the crystallization and full structure analysis of a novel recombinant 10 kDa protein corresponding to the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase are reported. The orthorhombic crystal contained only 24.5% solvent and is therefore among the most tightly packed protein lattices ever reported.

  9. Functionalization of protein crystals with metal ions, complexes and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Satoshi; Maity, Basudev; Ueno, Takafumi

    2018-04-01

    Self-assembled proteins have specific functions in biology. With inspiration provided by natural protein systems, several artificial protein assemblies have been constructed via site-specific mutations or metal coordination, which have important applications in catalysis, material and bio-supramolecular chemistry. Similar to natural protein assemblies, protein crystals have been recognized as protein assemblies formed of densely-packed monomeric proteins. Protein crystals can be functionalized with metal ions, metal complexes or nanoparticles via soaking, co-crystallization, creating new metal binding sites by site-specific mutations. The field of protein crystal engineering with metal coordination is relatively new and has gained considerable attention for developing solid biomaterials as well as structural investigations of enzymatic reactions, growth of nanoparticles and catalysis. This review highlights recent and significant research on functionalization of protein crystals with metal coordination and future prospects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. JAXA protein crystallization in space: ongoing improvements for growing high-quality crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Sachiko; Ohta, Kazunori; Furubayashi, Naoki; Yan, Bin; Koga, Misako; Wada, Yoshio; Yamada, Mitsugu; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Kamigaichi, Shigeki

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s 'high-quality protein crystal growth' project is introduced. If crystallization conditions were carefully fixed in ground-based experiments, high-quality protein crystals grew in microgravity in many experiments on the International Space Station, especially when a highly homogeneous protein sample and a viscous crystallization solution were employed. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) started a high-quality protein crystal growth project, now called JAXA PCG, on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2002. Using the counter-diffusion technique, 14 sessions of experiments have been performed as of 2012 with 580 proteins crystallized in total. Over the course of these experiments, a user-friendly interface framework for high accessibility has been constructed and crystallization techniques improved; devices to maximize the use of the microgravity environment have been designed, resulting in some high-resolution crystal growth. If crystallization conditions were carefully fixed in ground-based experiments, high-quality protein crystals grew in microgravity in many experiments on the ISS, especially when a highly homogeneous protein sample and a viscous crystallization solution were employed. In this article, the current status of JAXA PCG is discussed, and a rational approach to high-quality protein crystal growth in microgravity based on numerical analyses is explained

  11. JAXA protein crystallization in space: ongoing improvements for growing high-quality crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Sachiko [Confocal Science Inc., Hayakawa 2nd Building 7F, 2-12-2 Iwamoto-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0032 (Japan); Ohta, Kazunori [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Furubayashi, Naoki [Maruwa Foods and Biosciences Inc., 170-1 Tsutsui-cho, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Yan, Bin; Koga, Misako [Confocal Science Inc., Hayakawa 2nd Building 7F, 2-12-2 Iwamoto-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0032 (Japan); Wada, Yoshio; Yamada, Mitsugu [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Inaka, Koji [Maruwa Foods and Biosciences Inc., 170-1 Tsutsui-cho, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroaki, E-mail: tanakah@confsci.co.jp [Confocal Science Inc., Hayakawa 2nd Building 7F, 2-12-2 Iwamoto-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0032 (Japan); Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Kamigaichi, Shigeki [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s 'high-quality protein crystal growth' project is introduced. If crystallization conditions were carefully fixed in ground-based experiments, high-quality protein crystals grew in microgravity in many experiments on the International Space Station, especially when a highly homogeneous protein sample and a viscous crystallization solution were employed. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) started a high-quality protein crystal growth project, now called JAXA PCG, on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2002. Using the counter-diffusion technique, 14 sessions of experiments have been performed as of 2012 with 580 proteins crystallized in total. Over the course of these experiments, a user-friendly interface framework for high accessibility has been constructed and crystallization techniques improved; devices to maximize the use of the microgravity environment have been designed, resulting in some high-resolution crystal growth. If crystallization conditions were carefully fixed in ground-based experiments, high-quality protein crystals grew in microgravity in many experiments on the ISS, especially when a highly homogeneous protein sample and a viscous crystallization solution were employed. In this article, the current status of JAXA PCG is discussed, and a rational approach to high-quality protein crystal growth in microgravity based on numerical analyses is explained.

  12. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystallization Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating protein-protein interactions in under- and over-saturated crystallization solution conditions using fluorescence methods. The use of fluorescence requires fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. A number of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) derivatives have been prepared, with the probes covalently attached to one of two different sites on the protein molecule; the side chain carboxyl of ASP 101, within the active site cleft, and the N-terminal amine. The ASP 101 derivatives crystallize while the N-terminal amine derivatives do not. However, the N-terminal amine is part of the contact region between adjacent 43 helix chains, and blocking this site does would not interfere with formation of these structures in solution. Preliminary FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C, using the N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and ASP 101 bound Lucifer Yellow (LY, Ex 425 nm, Em 525 nm) probe combination. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10 (exp 5) M respectively), and all experiments were carried out at approximately Csat or lower total protein concentration. The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence yield of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is apparently more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations (reflected in the lower solubility). The estimated average distance between protein molecules at 5 x 10 (exp 6) M is approximately 70 nm, well beyond the range where any FRET can be expected. The calculated RO, where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, for the PAA-CEWL * LY-CEWL system is 3.28 nm, based upon a PAA-CEWL quantum efficiency of 0.41.

  13. Analysis of crystallization data in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Jobie; Hargreaves, David; O'Keefe, Simon; Wilson, Julie

    2015-10-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the largest available repository of solved protein structures and contains a wealth of information on successful crystallization. Many centres have used their own experimental data to draw conclusions about proteins and the conditions in which they crystallize. Here, data from the PDB were used to reanalyse some of these results. The most successful crystallization reagents were identified, the link between solution pH and the isoelectric point of the protein was investigated and the possibility of predicting whether a protein will crystallize was explored.

  14. Liquid crystalline phase as a probe for crystal engineering of lactose: carrier for pulmonary drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sharvil S; Mahadik, Kakasaheb R; Paradkar, Anant R

    2015-02-20

    The current work was undertaken to assess suitability of liquid crystalline phase for engineering of lactose crystals and their utility as a carrier in dry powder inhalation formulations. Saturated lactose solution was poured in molten glyceryl monooleate which subsequently transformed into gel. The gel microstructure was analyzed by PPL microscopy and SAXS. Lactose particles recovered from gels after 48 h were analyzed for polymorphism using techniques such as FTIR, XRD, DSC and TGA. Particle size, morphology and aerosolisation properties of prepared lactose were analyzed using Anderson cascade impactor. In situ seeding followed by growth of lactose crystals took place in gels with cubic microstructure as revealed by PPL microscopy and SAXS. Elongated (size ∼ 71 μm) lactose particles with smooth surface containing mixture of α and β-lactose was recovered from gel, however percentage of α-lactose was more as compared to β-lactose. The aerosolisation parameters such as RD, ED, %FPF and % recovery of lactose recovered from gel (LPL) were found to be comparable to Respitose® ML001. Thus LC phase (cubic) can be used for engineering of lactose crystals so as to obtain particles with smooth surface, high elongation ratio and further they can be used as carrier in DPI formulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Control of polythiophene film microstructure and charge carrier dynamics through crystallization temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Marsh, Hilary S.

    2014-03-22

    The microstructure of neat conjugated polymers is crucial in determining the ultimate morphology and photovoltaic performance of polymer/fullerene blends, yet until recently, little work has focused on controlling the former. Here, we demonstrate that both the long-range order along the (100)-direction and the lamellar crystal thickness along the (001)-direction in neat poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and poly[(3,3″-didecyl[2,2′:5′, 2″-terthiophene]-5,5″-diyl)] (PTTT-10) thin films can be manipulated by varying crystallization temperature. Changes in crystalline domain size impact the yield and dynamics of photogenerated charge carriers. Time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements show that neat polymer films composed of larger crystalline domains have longer photoconductance lifetimes and charge carrier yield decreases with increasing crystallite size for P3HT. Our results suggest that the classical polymer science description of temperature-dependent crystallization of polymers from solution can be used to understand thin-film formation in neat conjugated polymers, and hence, should be considered when discussing the structural evolution of organic bulk heterojunctions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Spiro-OMeTAD single crystals: Remarkably enhanced charge-carrier transport via mesoscale ordering

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong

    2016-04-15

    We report the crystal structure and hole-transport mechanism in spiro-OMeTAD [2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenyl-amine)9,9′-spirobifluorene], the dominant hole-transporting material in perovskite and solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Despite spiro-OMeTAD’s paramount role in such devices, its crystal structure was unknown because of highly disordered solution-processed films; the hole-transport pathways remained ill-defined and the charge carrier mobilities were low, posing a major bottleneck for advancing cell efficiencies. We devised an antisolvent crystallization strategy to grow single crystals of spiro-OMeTAD, which allowed us to experimentally elucidate its molecular packing and transport properties. Electronic structure calculations enabled us to map spiro-OMeTAD’s intermolecular charge-hopping pathways. Promisingly, single-crystal mobilities were found to exceed their thin-film counterparts by three orders of magnitude. Our findings underscore mesoscale ordering as a key strategy to achieving breakthroughs in hole-transport material engineering of solar cells.

  17. Crystal engineering of lactose using electrospray technology: carrier for pulmonary drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sharvil; Mahadik, Abhijeet; Nalawade, Pradeep; More, Priyesh

    2017-12-01

    Dry powder inhalers (DPIs) consisting of a powder mixture containing coarse carrier particles (generally lactose) and micronized drug particles are used for lung drug delivery. The effective drug delivery to the lungs depends on size and shape of carrier particles. Thus, various methods have been proposed for engineering lactose particles to enhance drug delivery to lungs. The objective of current work was to assess suitability of electrospray technology toward crystal engineering of lactose. Further, utility of the prepared lactose particles as a carrier in DPI was evaluated. Saturated lactose solutions were electrosprayed to obtain electrosprayed lactose (EL) particles. The polymorphic form of EL was determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, and differential scanning calorimetry. In addition, morphological, surface textural, and flow properties of EL were determined using scanning electron microscopy and Carr's index, respectively. The aerosolization properties of EL were determined using twin-stage impinger and compared with commercial lactose particles [Respitose ® (SV003, Goch, Germany)] used in DPI formulations. EL was found to contain both isomers (α and β) of lactose having flow properties comparable to Respitose ® (SV003). In addition, the aerosolization properties of EL were found to be significantly improved when compared to Respitose ® (SV003) which could be attributed to morphological (high elongation ratio) and surface characteristic (smooth surface) alterations induced by electrospray technology. Electrospray technology can serve as an alternative technique for continuous manufacturing of engineered lactose particles which can be used as a carrier in DPI formulations.

  18. Imaging of protein crystals with two–photon microscopy†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padayatti, Pius; Palczewska, Grazyna; Sun, Wenyu; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Salom, David

    2012-01-01

    Second–order non–linear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC), that portrays second harmonic generation (SHG) by non–centrosymmetric crystals, is emerging as a powerful imaging technique for protein crystals in media opaque to visible light because of its high signal–to–noise ratio. Here we report the incorporation of both SONICC and two–photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) into one imaging system that allows visualization of crystals as small as ~10 μm in their longest dimension. Using this system, we then documented an inverse correlation between the level of symmetry in examined crystals and the intensity of their SHG. Moreover, because of blue-green TPEF exhibited by most tested protein crystals, we also could identify and image SHG–silent protein crystals. Our experimental data suggests that the TPEF in protein crystals is mainly caused by the oxidation of tryptophan residues. Additionally, we found that unspecific fluorescent dyes are able to bind to lysozyme crystals and enhance their detection by TPFE. We finally confirmed that the observed fluorescence was generated by a two-photon rather than a three-photon process. The capability for imaging small protein crystals in turbid or opaque media with non–damaging infrared light in a single system, makes the combination of SHG and intrinsic visible TPEF a powerful tool for non–destructive protein crystal identification and characterization during crystallization trials. PMID:22324807

  19. Porous protein crystals as catalytic vessels for organometallic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabe, Hiroyasu; Abe, Satoshi; Hikage, Tatsuo; Kitagawa, Susumu; Ueno, Takafumi

    2014-05-01

    Porous protein crystals, which are protein assemblies in the solid state, have been engineered to form catalytic vessels by the incorporation of organometallic complexes. Ruthenium complexes in cross-linked porous hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals catalyzed the enantioselective hydrogen-transfer reduction of acetophenone derivatives. The crystals accelerated the catalytic reaction and gave different enantiomers based on the crystal form (tetragonal or orthorhombic). This method represents a new approach for the construction of bioinorganic catalysts from protein crystals. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Modeling the SHG activities of diverse protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haupert, Levi M.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2012-01-01

    The origins of the diversity in the SHG signal from protein crystals are investigated and potential protein-crystal coverage by SHG microscopy is assessed. A symmetry-additive ab initio model for second-harmonic generation (SHG) activity of protein crystals was applied to assess the likely protein-crystal coverage of SHG microscopy. Calculations were performed for 250 proteins in nine point-group symmetries: a total of 2250 crystals. The model suggests that the crystal symmetry and the limit of detection of the instrument are expected to be the strongest predictors of coverage of the factors considered, which also included secondary-structural content and protein size. Much of the diversity in SHG activity is expected to arise primarily from the variability in the intrinsic protein response as well as the orientation within the crystal lattice. Two or more orders-of-magnitude variation in intensity are expected even within protein crystals of the same symmetry. SHG measurements of tetragonal lysozyme crystals confirmed detection, from which a protein coverage of ∼84% was estimated based on the proportion of proteins calculated to produce SHG responses greater than that of tetragonal lysozyme. Good agreement was observed between the measured and calculated ratios of the SHG intensity from lysozyme in tetragonal and monoclinic lattices

  1. The contribution of polystyrene nanospheres towards the crystallization of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Kallio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallization is a slow process of trial and error and limits the amount of solved protein structures. Search of a universal heterogeneous nucleant is an effort to facilitate crystallizability of proteins. METHODOLOGY: The effect of polystyrene nanospheres on protein crystallization were tested with three commercial proteins: lysozyme, xylanase, xylose isomerase, and with five research target proteins: hydrophobins HFBI and HFBII, laccase, sarcosine dimethylglycine N-methyltransferase (SDMT, and anti-testosterone Fab fragment 5F2. The use of nanospheres both in screening and as an additive for known crystallization conditions was studied. In screening, the addition of an aqueous solution of nanosphere to the crystallization drop had a significant positive effect on crystallization success in comparison to the control screen. As an additive in hydrophobin crystallization, the nanospheres altered the crystal packing, most likely due to the amphiphilic nature of hydrophobins. In the case of laccase, nanospheres could be used as an alternative for streak-seeding, which insofar had remained the only technique to produce high-diffracting crystals. With methyltransferase SDMT the nanospheres, used also as an additive, produced fewer, larger crystals in less time. Nanospheres, combined with the streak-seeding method, produced single 5F2 Fab crystals in shorter equilibration times. CONCLUSIONS: All in all, the use of nanospheres in protein crystallization proved to be beneficial, both when screening new crystallization conditions to promote nucleation and when used as an additive to produce better quality crystals, faster. The polystyrene nanospheres are easy to use, commercially available and close to being inert, as even with amphiphilic proteins only the crystal packing is altered and the nanospheres do not interfere with the structure and function of the protein.

  2. Sensitized charge carrier injection into organic crystals studied by isotope effects in weak magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bube, W.; Michel-Beyerle, M.E.; Haberkorn, R.; Steffens, E.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic field (H approximately 50 Oe) dependence of the rhodamine sensitized triplet exciton density in anthracene crystals is influenced by isotopic substitution. This confirms the hyperfine interaction as mechanism explaining the change of the spin multiplicity in the initially formed singlet state of the radical pair. The isotope effect occurs in the sensitizing dye ( 14 N/ 15 N) rather than at the molecular site of the injected charge within the crystal. This can be understood in terms of the high hopping frequency of the charge carriers as compared to the time constant of the hyperfine induced singlet-triplet transition. Since the dye molecules adsorb in an oriented fashion, the angular dependence of the magnetic field modulation of the triplet exciton density can be interpreted without assuming any additional interactions. (Auth.)

  3. Acoustic Methods to Monitor Protein Crystallization and to Detect Protein Crystals in Suspensions of Agarose and Lipidic Cubic Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericson, Daniel L.; Yin, Xingyu; Scalia, Alexander; Samara, Yasmin N.; Stearns, Richard; Vlahos, Harry; Ellson, Richard; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2016-02-01

    Improvements needed for automated crystallography include crystal detection and crystal harvesting. A technique that uses acoustic droplet ejection to harvest crystals was previously reported. Here a method is described for using the same acoustic instrument to detect protein crystals and to monitor crystal growth. Acoustic pulses were used to monitor the progress of crystallization trials and to detect the presence and location of protein crystals. Crystals were detected, and crystallization was monitored in aqueous solutions and in lipidic cubic phase. Using a commercially available acoustic instrument, crystals measuring ~150 µm or larger were readily detected. Simple laboratory techniques were used to increase the sensitivity to 50 µm by suspending the crystals away from the plastic surface of the crystallization plate. This increased the sensitivity by separating the strong signal generated by the plate bottom that can mask the signal from small protein crystals. It is possible to further boost the acoustic reflection from small crystals by reducing the wavelength of the incident sound pulse, but our current instrumentation does not allow this option. In the future, commercially available sound-emitting transducers with a characteristic frequency near 300 MHz should detect and monitor the growth of individual 3 µm crystals.

  4. Acoustic Methods to Monitor Protein Crystallization and to Detect Protein Crystals in Suspensions of Agarose and Lipidic Cubic Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Daniel L; Yin, Xingyu; Scalia, Alexander; Samara, Yasmin N; Stearns, Richard; Vlahos, Harry; Ellson, Richard; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2016-02-01

    Improvements needed for automated crystallography include crystal detection and crystal harvesting. A technique that uses acoustic droplet ejection to harvest crystals was previously reported. Here a method is described for using the same acoustic instrument to detect protein crystals and to monitor crystal growth. Acoustic pulses were used to monitor the progress of crystallization trials and to detect the presence and location of protein crystals. Crystals were detected, and crystallization was monitored in aqueous solutions and in lipidic cubic phase. Using a commercially available acoustic instrument, crystals measuring ~150 µm or larger were readily detected. Simple laboratory techniques were used to increase the sensitivity to 50 µm by suspending the crystals away from the plastic surface of the crystallization plate. This increased the sensitivity by separating the strong signal generated by the plate bottom that can mask the signal from small protein crystals. It is possible to further boost the acoustic reflection from small crystals by reducing the wavelength of the incident sound pulse, but our current instrumentation does not allow this option. In the future, commercially available sound-emitting transducers with a characteristic frequency near 300 MHz should detect and monitor the growth of individual 3 µm crystals. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  5. Analysis of crystallization data in the Protein Data Bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkwood, Jobie [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Hargreaves, David [AstraZeneca, Darwin Building, Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); O’Keefe, Simon [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Wilson, Julie, E-mail: julie.wilson@york.ac.uk [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-23

    In a large-scale study using data from the Protein Data Bank, some of the many reported findings regarding the crystallization of proteins were investigated. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the largest available repository of solved protein structures and contains a wealth of information on successful crystallization. Many centres have used their own experimental data to draw conclusions about proteins and the conditions in which they crystallize. Here, data from the PDB were used to reanalyse some of these results. The most successful crystallization reagents were identified, the link between solution pH and the isoelectric point of the protein was investigated and the possibility of predicting whether a protein will crystallize was explored.

  6. Analysis of crystallization data in the Protein Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, Jobie; Hargreaves, David; O’Keefe, Simon; Wilson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    In a large-scale study using data from the Protein Data Bank, some of the many reported findings regarding the crystallization of proteins were investigated. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the largest available repository of solved protein structures and contains a wealth of information on successful crystallization. Many centres have used their own experimental data to draw conclusions about proteins and the conditions in which they crystallize. Here, data from the PDB were used to reanalyse some of these results. The most successful crystallization reagents were identified, the link between solution pH and the isoelectric point of the protein was investigated and the possibility of predicting whether a protein will crystallize was explored

  7. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    -association process is a function of the protein concentration relative to the saturation concentration, and observing it in dilute solution (conc. less than or equal to 10(exp -5)M) requires that the experiments be performed under low solubility conditions, i.e., low temperatures and high salt concentrations. Data from preliminary steady state FRET studies with N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA-lys, donor, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and asp101 LY-lys as an acceptor showed a consistent trend of decreasing donor fluorescence intensity with increasing total protein concentration. The FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding C(sub sat) values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approx. 3.3 and approx. 2.5 x 10(exp -5)M respectively). The donor fluorescence decrease is more pronounced at7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations as reflected in the lower solubility. Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with an emerging model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and the relevance of that model to other proteins.

  8. Biogenesis of mitochondrial carrier proteins: molecular mechanisms of import into mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Zara, Vincenzo

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial metabolite carriers are hydrophobic proteins which catalyze the flux of several charged or hydrophilic substrates across the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins, like most mitochondrial proteins, are nuclear encoded and after their synthesis in the cytosol are transported into the inner mitochondrial membrane. Most metabolite carriers, differently from other nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins, are synthesized without a cleavable presequence and contain several, poorly characterized, internal targeting signals. However, an interesting aspect is the presence of a positively charged N-terminal presequence in a limited number of mitochondrial metabolite carriers. Over the last few years the molecular mechanisms of import of metabolite carrier proteins into mitochondria have been thoroughly investigated. This review summarizes the present knowledge and discusses recent advances on the import and sorting of mitochondrial metabolite carriers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavaty, Andrei S. [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Kim, Youngchang [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Zhou, Min [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L6 (Canada); Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N. [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Joachimiak, Andrzej [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Savchenko, Alexei [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L6 (Canada); Anderson, Wayne F., E-mail: wf-anderson@northwestern.edu [Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, (United States); Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS{sub SA}), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS{sub VC}) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS{sub BA}) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS{sub BA} is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS{sub BA} may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP.

  10. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halavaty, Andrei S.; Kim, Youngchang; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James; Zhou, Min; Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana; Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2012-01-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS SA ), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS VC ) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS BA ) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS BA is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS BA may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP

  11. Continuous Crystallization of Proteins in a Tubular Plug-Flow Crystallizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Peter; Khinast, Johannes G

    2015-03-04

    Protein crystals have many important applications in many fields, including pharmaceutics. Being more stable than other formulations, and having a high degree of purity and bioavailability, they are especially promising in the area of drug delivery. In this contribution, the development of a continuously operated tubular crystallizer for the production of protein crystals has been described. Using the model enzyme lysozyme, we successfully generated product particles ranging between 15 and 40 μm in size. At the reactor inlet, a protein solution was mixed with a crystallization agent solution to create high supersaturations required for nucleation. Along the tube, supersaturation was controlled using water baths that divided the crystallizer into a nucleation zone and a growth zone. Low flow rates minimized the effect of shear forces that may impede crystal growth. Simultaneously, a slug flow was implemented to ensure crystal transport through the reactor and to reduce the residence time distribution.

  12. Phonon focusing and electron–phonon drag in semiconductor crystals with degenerate charge-carrier statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuleyev, I. G., E-mail: kuleev@imp.uran.ru; Kuleyev, I. I.; Bakharev, S. M.; Ustinov, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    We study the effect of anisotropy in elastic properties on the electron–phonon drag and thermoelectric phenomena in gapless semiconductors with degenerate charge-carrier statistics. It is shown that phonon focusing leads to a number of new effects in the drag thermopower at low temperatures, when diffusive phonon scattering from the boundaries is the predominant relaxation mechanism. We analyze the effect of phonon focusing on the dependences of the thermoelectromotive force (thermopower) in HgSe:Fe crystals on geometric parameters and the heat-flow directions relative to the crystal axes in the Knudsen regime of the phonon gas flow. The crystallographic directions that ensure the maximum and minimum values of the thermopower are determined and the role of quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse phonons in the drag thermopower in HgSe:Fe crystals at low temperatures is analyzed. It is shown that the main contribution to the drag thermopower comes from slow quasi-transverse phonons in the directions of focusing in long samples.

  13. Lab-on-a-Chip Based Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark J.; Brasseur, Michael M.; Spearing, Scott F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We are developing a novel technique with which we will grow protein crystals in very small volumes, utilizing chip-based, microfluidic ("LabChip") technology. This development, which is a collaborative effort between NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Caliper Technologies Corporation, promises a breakthrough in the field of protein crystal growth. Our initial results obtained from two model proteins, Lysozyme and Thaumatin, show that it is feasible to dispense and adequately mix protein and precipitant solutions on a nano-liter scale. The mixtures have shown crystal growth in volumes in the range of 10 nanoliters to 5 microliters. In addition, large diffraction quality crystals were obtained by this method. X-ray data from these crystals were shown to be of excellent quality. Our future efforts will include the further development of protein crystal growth with LabChip(trademark) technology for more complex systems. We will initially address the batch growth method, followed by the vapor diffusion method and the liquid-liquid diffusion method. The culmination of these chip developments is to lead to an on orbit protein crystallization facility on the International Space Station. Structural biologists will be invited to utilize the on orbit Iterative Biological Crystallization facility to grow high quality macromolecular crystals in microgravity.

  14. Simulation of diffusion time of small molecules in protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremia, Silvano; Campagnolo, Mara; Demitri, Nicola; Johnson, Louise N

    2006-03-01

    A simple model for evaluation of diffusion times of small molecule into protein crystals has been developed, which takes into account the physical and chemical properties both of protein crystal and the diffusing molecules. The model also includes consideration of binding and the binding affinity of a ligand to the protein. The model has been validated by simulation of experimental set-ups of several examples found in the literature. These experiments cover a wide range of situations: from small to relatively large diffusing molecules, crystals having low, medium, or high protein density, and different size. The reproduced experiments include ligand exchange in protein crystals by soaking techniques. Despite the simplifying assumptions of the model, theoretical and experimental data are in agreement with available data, with experimental diffusion times ranging from a few seconds to several hours. The method has been used successfully for planning intermediate cryotrapping experiments in maltodextrin phosphorylase crystals.

  15. Characterization of the yellow fever mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene and ligand-bound protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, David H.; Vyazunova, Irina; Lorch, Jeffery M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Lan, Que; (UW)

    2009-06-12

    The sterol carrier protein-2 like 3 gene (AeSCP-2L3), a new member of the SCP-2 protein family, is identified from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The predicted molecular weight of AeSCP-2L3 is 13.4 kDa with a calculated pI of 4.98. AeSCP-2L3 transcription occurs in the larval feeding stages and the mRNA levels decrease in pupae and adults. The highest levels of AeSCP-2L3 gene expression are found in the body wall, and possibly originated in the fat body. This is the first report of a mosquito SCP-2-like protein with prominent expression in tissue other than the midgut. The X-ray protein crystal structure of AeSCP-2L3 reveals a bound C16 fatty acid whose acyl tail penetrates deeply into a hydrophobic cavity. Interestingly, the ligand-binding cavity is slightly larger than previously described for AeSCP-2 (Dyer et al. J Biol Chem 278:39085-39091, 2003) and AeSCP-2L2 (Dyer et al. J Lipid Res M700460-JLR200, 2007). There are also an additional 10 amino acids in SCP-2L3 that are not present in other characterized mosquito SCP-2s forming an extended loop between {beta}3 and {beta}4. Otherwise, the protein backbone is exceedingly similar to other SCP-2 and SCP-2-like proteins. In contrast to this observed high structural homology of members in the mosquito SCP2 family, the amino acid sequence identity between the members is less than 30%. The results from structural analysis imply that there have been evolutionary constraints that favor the SCP-2 C{alpha} backbone fold while the specificity of ligand binding can be altered.

  16. Interplay between Long-Range Crystal Order and Short-Range Molecular Interactions Tunes Carrier Mobility in Liquid Crystal Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchamba Yimga, Nadine; Ramanan, Charusheela; Borchert, Holger; Parisi, Jürgen; Untenecker, Harald; Kirsch, Peer; von Hauff, Elizabeth

    2017-02-22

    We investigated the influence of molecular packing on the optical and electrical properties of the liquid crystalline dye 4,7-bis[5-(2-fluoro-4-pentyl-phenyl)-2-thienyl]-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (FPPTB). FPPTB is crystalline at room temperature, exhibits a nematic phase at temperatures above 149 °C and is in an isotropic melt at temperatures above 230 °C. Solution processed FPPTB films were subject to thermal annealing through these phase transition temperatures and characterized with X-ray diffraction and polarized optical microscopy. Cooling FPPTB films from the nematic and isotropic phases increased crystal domain size, but also induced local structural variations in the molecular packing of crystalline FPPTB. The decrease in long-range order was correlated with an increase in short-range π-π interactions, leading to changes in molecular aggregation which persisted even when the FPPTB films were cooled to room temperature. Annealing-induced changes in molecular aggregation were confirmed with optical spectroscopy. The carrier mobility in FPPTB films increased over 2 orders of magnitude from (2.2 ± 0.4) × 10 -5 cm 2 V -1 s -1 in as-spun films to μ = (5.0 ± 0.8) × 10 -3 cm 2 V -1 s -1 in films cooled from the isotropic melt. We discuss the relationship between thermal stability and high carrier mobility values in terms of the interplay between long-range molecular order and increased π-π interactions between molecular pairs in the FPPTB film.

  17. Protein crystal structure analysis using synchrotron radiation at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa

    1999-01-01

    We can now obtain a detailed picture of protein, allowing the identification of individual atoms, by interpreting the diffraction of X-rays from a protein crystal at atomic resolution, 1.2 A or better. As of this writing, about 45 unique protein structures beyond 1.2 A resolution have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This review provides a simplified overview of how protein crystallographers use such diffraction data to solve, refine, and validate protein structures. (author)

  18. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fenglei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-08-09

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To develop an economical, easy to use, automated, high throughput system for large scale protein crystallization screening. (2) To develop a new protein crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and complete compatibility with high throughput screening system. (3) To determine the structure of lactate dehydrogenase complexed with NADH by x-ray protein crystallography to study its inherent structural properties. Firstly, we demonstrated large scale protein crystallization screening can be performed in a high throughput manner with low cost, easy operation. The overall system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection and serves as a whole solution to protein crystallization screening. The system can dispense protein and multiple different precipitants in nanoliter scale and in parallel. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, has been developed in this system to form a two-detector system with a visible light detector for detecting protein crystallization screening results. This detection scheme has capability of eliminating common false positives by distinguishing protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a high throughput and non-destructive manner. The entire system from liquid dispensing, crystallization to crystal detection is essentially parallel, high throughput and compatible with automation. The system was successfully demonstrated by lysozyme crystallization screening. Secondly, we developed a new crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and compatibility with automation and high throughput. In this crystallization method, a gas permeable membrane is employed to achieve the gentle evaporation required by protein crystallization. Protein consumption is significantly reduced to nanoliter scale for each condition and thus permits exploring more conditions in a phase diagram for given amount of protein. In addition

  19. Protein-Protein Interaction on Lysozyme Crystallization Revealed by Rotational Diffusion Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Nishimoto, Etsuko; Murase, Tadashi; Yamashita, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions between protein molecules diffusing in various environments underlie many biological processes as well as control protein crystallization, which is a crucial step in x-ray protein structure determinations. Protein interactions were investigated through protein rotational diffusion analysis. First, it was confirmed that tetragonal lysozyme crystals containing fluorescein-tagged lysozyme were successfully formed with the same morphology as that of native protein. Usi...

  20. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Joseph D; Baird, James K; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M; Hodge, Teresa A; Huang, Sijay

    2015-04-01

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for the growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. These include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.

  1. Detection of carriers and genetic counseling in duchenne muscular dystrophy by ribosomal protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionasescu, V; Zellweger, H; Burmeister, L

    1976-11-01

    The in vitro protein synthesis by polyribosomes extracted from biopsied muscle (vastus lateralis) was studied in 47 known carriers, 87 possible carriers and in 60 normal females. A significant increase in specific activity of monomeric ribosomes, total polyribosomes and collagen synthesis was found in 46 (97.8 per cent) known carriers and 47 (54 per cent) possible carriers of Duchenne muscular dytrophy. The latter showed an increase in ribosomal protein synthesis in 10 (52.6 per cent) of 19 mothers of isolated cases, 31 (53.3 per cent) of 58 sisters, and 6 (60 per cent) of other female relatives. Serum creatine phosphokinase was increased in 30 (63.8 per cent) of 47 known carriers.

  2. High-throughput bioscreening system utilizing high-performance affinity magnetic carriers exhibiting minimal non-specific protein binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Naohiro; Nishio, Kosuke; Hatakeyama, Mamoru; Yasuno, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Tada, Masaru; Nakagawa, Takashi; Sandhu, Adarsh; Abe, Masanori; Handa, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    For affinity purification of drug target protein we have developed magnetic carriers, narrow in size distribution (184±9 nm), which exhibit minimal non-specific binding of unwanted proteins. The carriers were highly dispersed in aqueous solutions and highly resistant to organic solvents, which enabled immobilization of various hydrophobic chemicals as probes on the carrier surfaces. Utilizing the carriers we have automated the process of separation and purification of the target proteins that had been done by manual operation previously.

  3. Spatiotemporal development of soaked protein crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Ryuta; Shimizu, Yusuke; Saiga, Rino; Ueno, Go; Nakamura, Yuki; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2014-07-01

    Crystal soaking is widely performed in biological crystallography. This paper reports time-resolved X-ray crystallographic and microtomographic analyses of tetragonal crystals of chicken egg-white lysozyme soaked in mother liquor containing potassium hexachloroplatinate. The microtomographic analysis showed that X-ray attenuation spread from the superficial layer of the crystal and then to the crystal core. The crystallographic analyses indicated that platinum sites can be classified into two groups from the temporal development of the electron densities. A soaking process consisting of binding-rate-driven and equilibrium-driven layers is proposed to describe these results. This study suggests that the composition of chemical and structural species resulting from the soaking process varies depending on the position in the crystal.

  4. Influence of two photon absorption induced free carriers on coherent polariton and phonon generation in ZnTe crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraju, N.; Kumar, Sunil; Freysz, Eric; Sood, A. K.

    2010-05-01

    Combination of femtosecond Kerr, two photon absorption, and impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) experiments have been carried out to investigate the effect of pulse energy and crystal temperature on the generation of coherent polaritons and phonons in ⟨110⟩ cut ZnTe single crystals of three different resistivities. We demonstrate that the effect of two photon induced free carriers on the creation of both the polaritons and phonons is largest at 4 K where the free carrier lifetime is enhanced. The temperature dependant ISRS on high and low purity ZnTe crystals allows us to unambiguously assign the phonon mode at 3.5 THz to the longitudinal acoustic mode at X-point in the Brillouin zone, LA(X).

  5. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States); Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance.

  6. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J.; Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian; Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance

  7. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    instar larvae of dipteran insects Culex fatigans, Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti. The sequence of the cloned crystal protein gene showed almost complete homology with a mosquitocidal toxin gene from Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki, ...

  8. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth HIV Reverse Transcriptase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    HIV Reverse Transcriptase crystals grown during the USML-1 (STS-50) mission using Commercial Refrigerator/Incubator Module (CR/IM) at 4 degrees C and the Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDA). Reverse transcriptase is an enzyme responsible for copying the nucleic acid genome of the AIDS virus from RNA to DNA. Studies indicated that the space-grown crystals were larger and better ordered (beyond 4 angstroms) than were comparable Earth-grown crystals. Principal Investigators were Charles Bugg and Larry DeLucas.

  9. A Comparative Study of Impurity Effects on Protein Crystallization : Diffusive versus Convective Crystal Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adawy, Alaa; van der Heijden, Esther G. G.; Hekelaar, Johan; van Enckevort, Willem J. P.; de Grip, Willem J.; Vlieg, Elias

    The incorporation of impurities during protein crystallization is one of the main obstacles that prevents the growth of high quality crystals. Mass transport has been shown to affect the incorporation of impurities. Here we used a special growth configuration that enables the simultaneous

  10. The biochemistry of the protein crystal toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul G. Fast

    1985-01-01

    The crystal consists of dimeric protein subunits. The monomer peptide chains are held together in the subunit and the subunit in the crystal by disulfide and non-covalent bonds. The monomer peptide has a molecular weight of about 130 kdaltons which, in the presence of proteases, is hydrolyzed to a protease-resistant-protein of 65 kda that is toxic both to larvae by...

  11. Definition study for temperature control in advanced protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyce, Thomas A.; Rosenberger, Franz; Sowers, Jennifer W.; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the technical requirements for an expedient application of temperature control to advanced protein crystal growth activities are defined. Lysozome was used to study the effects of temperature ramping and temperature gradients for nucleation/dissolution and consecutive growth of sizable crystals and, to determine a prototype temperature program. The solubility study was conducted using equine serum albumin (ESA) which is an extremely stable, clinically important protein due to its capability to bind and transport many different small ions and molecules.

  12. Lysine and arginine biosyntheses mediated by a common carrier protein in Sulfolobus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Takuya; Tomita, Takeo; Horie, Akira; Yoshida, Ayako; Takahashi, Kento; Nishida, Hiromi; Lassak, Kerstin; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kosono, Saori; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Masui, Ryoji; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    LysW has been identified as a carrier protein in the lysine biosynthetic pathway that is active through the conversion of α-aminoadipate (AAA) to lysine. In this study, we found that the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, not only biosynthesizes lysine through LysW-mediated protection of AAA but also uses LysW to protect the amino group of glutamate in arginine biosynthesis. In this archaeon, after LysW modification, AAA and glutamate are converted to lysine and ornithine, respectively, by a single set of enzymes with dual functions. The crystal structure of ArgX, the enzyme responsible for modification and protection of the amino moiety of glutamate with LysW, was determined in complex with LysW. Structural comparison and enzymatic characterization using Sulfolobus LysX, Sulfolobus ArgX and Thermus LysX identify the amino acid motif responsible for substrate discrimination between AAA and glutamate. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that gene duplication events at different stages of evolution led to ArgX and LysX.

  13. Calcium Sulfate with Stearic Acid as an Encouraging Carrier for Reindeer Bone Protein Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Jalovaara

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Various bone proteins and growth factors in specific concentrations are required for bone formation. If the body cannot produce sufficient quantities of these factors, bone trauma can be healed with an implant that includes the required factors in a carrier. This study was designed to evaluate various calcium salt candidates that can be used as carrier with reindeer bone protein extract to induce ectopic bone formation in the muscle pouch model of mouse. The bone protein extract was either impregnated into the disc form of carrier or mixed with carrier powder before implantation. The radiographic analysis indicated increased bone formation in all of the active groups containing the bone protein extract compared to the controls within 21 days follow-up. The highest bone formation was seen in the group with calcium sulfate with stearic acid where new bone and calcified cartilage were clearly visible. The greatest bone formation occurred in the groups that had bone protein extract readily available. This indicates that the bone forming factors in sufficient concentrations are required at the early stage of bone formation. The calcium sulfate with stearic acid was the most suitable and effective carrier for reindeer bone protein extract.

  14. N-type compensated silicon: resistivity, crystal growth, carrier lifetime, and relevant application for HIT solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Gao, Wenxiu; Li, Zhen; Cheng, Haoran; Lin, Jinxia; Cheng, Qijin

    2017-05-01

    N-type compensated silicon shows unusual distribution of resistivity as crystal grows compared to the n-type uncompensated silicon. In this paper, evolutions of resistivities with varied concentrations of boron and varied starting resistivities of the n-type silicon are intensively calculated. Moreover, reduction of carrier mobility is taken into account by Schindler’s modified model of carrier mobility for the calculation of resistivity of the compensated silicon. As for substrates of solar cells, optimized starting resistivity and corresponding concentration of boron are suggested for better uniformity of resistivity and higher yield (fraction with ρ >0.5 ~ Ω \\centerdot \\text{cm} ) of the n-type compensated Cz crystal rod. A two-step growth method is investigated to obtain better uniformity of resistivity of crystal rod, and this method is very practical especially for the n-type compensated silicon. Regarding the carrier lifetime, the recombination by shallow energy-level dopants is taken into account for the compensated silicon, and evolution of carrier lifetime is simulated by considering all main recombination centers which agrees well with our measured carrier lifetimes as crystal grows. The n-type compensated silicon shows a larger reduction of carrier lifetime compared to the uncompensated silicon at the beginning of crystal growth, and recombination with a oxygen-related deep defect is sufficient to describe the reduction of degraded lifetime. Finally, standard heterojunction with intrinsic thin-layer (HIT) solar cells are made with substrates from the n-type compensated silicon rod, and a high efficiency of 22.1% is obtained with a high concentration (0.8× {{10}16}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} ) of boron in the n-type compensated silicon feedstock. However, experimental efficiencies of HIT solar cells based on the n-type compensated silicon show an average reduction of 4% along with the crystal length compared to the uncompensated silicon. The

  15. Engineering nanoparticle-protein associations for protein crystal nucleation and nanoparticle arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Denise N.

    Engineering the nanoparticle - protein association offers a new way to form protein crystals as well as new approaches for arrangement of nanoparticles. Central to this control is the nanoparticle surface. By conjugating polymers on the surface with controlled molecular weights many properties of the nanoparticle can be changed including its size, stability in buffers and the association of proteins with its surface. Large molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings allow for weak associations between proteins and nanoparticles. These interactions can lead to changes in how proteins crystallize. In particular, they decrease the time to nucleation and expand the range of conditions over which protein crystals form. Interestingly, when PEG chain lengths are too short then protein association is minimized and these effects are not observed. One important feature of protein crystals nucleated with nanoparticles is that the nanoparticles are incorporated into the crystals. What results are nanoparticles placed at well-defined distances in composite protein-nanoparticle crystals. Crystals on the size scale of 10 - 100 micrometers exhibit optical absorbance, fluorescence and super paramagnetic behavior derivative from the incorporated nanomaterials. The arrangement of nanoparticles into three dimensional arrays also gives rise to new and interesting physical and chemical properties, such as fluorescence enhancement and varied magnetic response. In addition, anisotropic nanomaterials aligned throughout the composite crystal have polarization dependent optical properties.

  16. Nature of impurities during protein crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskakova, S. S.; Volkov, V. V.; Laptinskaya, T. V.; Lyasnikova, M. S.; Voloshin, A. E.; Koval'chuk, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    Lysozyme crystal growth was studied using reagents of different purity of three trademarks— Seikagaku Corporation (sixfold recrystallized lysozyme), Sigma-Aldrich (threefold recrystallized lysozyme), and Hampton Research (threefold recrystallized lysozyme). Solutions of these reagents were investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering, dynamic light scattering (DLS), ultracentrifugation, and electrophoresis. It was found that crystal-growth and oligomerization processes are more intense in solutions of the reagent of higher purity. The dependences of the fraction of lysozyme oligomers on the supersaturation and purity of the solution are analyzed.

  17. Reprogramming Acyl Carrier Protein Interactions of an Acyl-CoA Promiscuous trans-Acyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Zhixia; Musiol-Kroll, Ewa Maria; Weber, Tilmann

    2014-01-01

    Protein interactions between acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) and trans-acting acyltransferase domains (trans-ATs) are critical for regioselective extender unit installation by many polyketide synthases, yet little is known regarding the specificity of these interactions, particularly for trans...... and for engineering modular polyketide synthases to produce analogs....

  18. Convective-diffusive transport in protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.; Rosenberger, F.; Alexander, J. I. D.; Nadarajah, A.

    1995-05-01

    Particular interest in the role of convection in protein crystallization has arisen since some protein single crystals of improved structural quality have been obtained under reduced gravity conditions. We have numerically modeled the time-dependent diffusive-convective transport in an isothermal protein crystal growth system at standard and zero gravity (1 g and 0 g). In the 2D model used, a rectangular crystal of fixed dimensions 400 μm × 600 μm is positioned at the bottom of a 1 mm high and 6 mm wide growth cell. The aqueous solution contains protein and precipitant. For the dependence of the crystal growth rate on interfacial supersaturation, experimental data for lysozyme are used. The repartitioning of water and precipitant at the growing interface is based on experimental segregation data for lysozyme: NaCl, and on complete rejection for a fictitious system in which lysozyme and precipitant have the same diffusivity. The results show that even in the small cell employed, protein concentration nonuniformities and gravity-driven solutal convection can be significant. The calculated convection velocities are of the same order of magnitude as those found in earlier experiments. As expected, convective transport enhances the growth rates. However, even when diffusion dominates mass transport, i.e. at 0 g, lysozyme crystal growth remains kinetically limited. Irrespective of the diffusivity of the precipitant, due to the low growth rates, the precipitant distribution in the solution remains rather uniform even at 0 g, unless strong coupling between precipitant and protein fluxes is assumed. The salt distribution in the crystal is predicted to be non-uniform at both 1 g and 0 g, as a consequence of protein depletion in the solution.

  19. The Role of Multivalent Counterions in Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fajun

    2012-02-01

    In this talk, I will give an overview of our recent studies on the phase behavior of model globular proteins in solution in the presence of multivalent counterions. We have shown that negatively charged globular proteins at neutral pH in the presence of multivalent counterions undergo a ``reentrant condensation (RC)'' phase behavior [1,2], i.e. a phase-separated regime occurs in between two critical salt concentrations, c* proteins as confirmed by zeta-potential measurements and supported by Monte Carlo simulations [1,2]. Crystallization from the condensed regime follows different mechanisms. Near c*, crystals grow following a classic nucleation and growth mechanism; near c**, the crystallization follows a two-step mechanism, i.e, crystals growth follows a metastable LLPS [3,4]. Nucleation rate is faster from the protein-poor phase than that from the protein-rich phase, which cannot be explained by the recent theories. SAXS measurements demonstrate that protein clusters act as precursors for crystal growth, which reduce the energy barrier of nucleation [4]. X-ray diffraction analyses on the high quality single crystals provide direct evidence of the crystal structure and cation binding sites [3]. The bridging effect of the metal cations explains the cluster formation.[4pt] [1] Zhang, F.; et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 101, 148101.[0pt] [2] Zhang, F.; et al. Proteins 2010, 78, 3450.[0pt] [3] Zhang, F.; et al. J. Appl. Cryst. 2011, 44, 755.[0pt] [4] Zhang, F.; et al. In preparation.

  20. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    toxin gene from Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki, with only five mutations scattered in different regions. Amino acid alignment with different insecticidal crystal proteins using the MUTALIN program suggested presence of the conserved block 3 region in the sequence of this protein. A mutation in codon 409 of this gene that ...

  1. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warangkana Lohcharoenkal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

  2. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy. PMID:24772414

  3. Isolation of recombinant proteins from culture broth by co-precipitation with an amino acid carrier to form stable dry powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Barry D; Deere, Joseph; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Ingram, Andrew; van der Walle, Christopher F

    2010-08-01

    Protein-coated microcrystals can be generated by co-precipitation of protein and a water-soluble crystalline carrier by addition to excess water miscible organic solvent. We have investigated this novel process for its utility in the concentration and partial purification of a recombinant protein exported into the culture broth during expression by Pichia pastoris. Co-precipitation with a L-glutamine carrier selectively isolated the protein content of the culture broth, with a minimal number of steps, and simultaneously removed contaminants including a novel yeast metabolite. This pigment co-elutes during aqueous chromatography but its elucidation as a benzoylated glycosamine suggested a simple route of removal by partition during the co-precipitation process. Scale-up of the process was readily achieved through in-line mixing and subsequent reconstitution of the dried protein-coated microcrystals yielded natively folded, bioactive protein. Additional washing of the crystals with saturated L-glutamine facilitated further purification of the recombinant protein immobilized on the L-glutamine carrier. Thus, we present a novel method for the harvesting of recombinant protein from culture broth as a dry powder, which may be of general applicability to bioprocessing. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assenberg, René [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Delmas, Olivier [UPRE Lyssavirus Dynamics and Host Adaptation, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, Institut Pasteur, 28 Rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J. [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Bourhy, Hervé [UPRE Lyssavirus Dynamics and Host Adaptation, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, Institut Pasteur, 28 Rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Grimes, Jonathan M., E-mail: jonathan@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress.

  5. Influence of Crystal Packing on Global Protein Conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Logan; Miyashita, Osamu

    2011-10-01

    X-ray crystallography is the most robust method for solving protein structure. However, packing forces in the crystal lattice select just a snapshot of a protein's conformational ensemble, whereas proteins are flexible and can adopt different conformations. Here we compare molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in solution and the crystal lattice to add dynamical insight to the static X-ray images of proteins. As a model system, we consider the λ Cro dimer, whose solved X-ray structures range from a ``closed'' to an ``open'' global conformation. Free energy profiles depicting the conformational space sampled by the dimer in solution show some reported structures correspond to stable states. Yet other conformations, while accessible, lie higher in energy, indicating the effect of crystal packing. Subsequent crystal MD simulations estimated the strength of packing interfaces in the lattice, showing the influence of crystal form and mutation in stabilizing different dimer conformations. Our quantitative results will aid analysis of X-ray data in establishing protein structure-function relationships.

  6. Mitochondrial carrier protein biogenesis: role of the chaperones Hsc70 and Hsp90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Ferramosca, Alessandra; Robitaille-Foucher, Philippe; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Young, Jason C

    2009-04-15

    Metabolite carrier proteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane share homology in their transmembrane domains, which also carries their targeting information. In addition, some carriers have cleavable presequences which are not essential for targeting, but have some other function before import. The cytosolic chaperones Hsc70 (heat-shock cognate 70) and Hsp90 (heat-shock protein 90) complex with carrier precursors and interact specifically with the Tom (translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane) 70 import receptor to promote import. We analysed how the presequences of the PiC (phosphate carrier) and CIC (citrate carrier) relate to the mechanisms of chaperone-mediated import. Deletion of the PiC presequence reduced the efficiency of import but, notably, not by causing aggregation. Instead, binding of the protein to Hsc70 was reduced, as well as the dependence on Hsc70 for import. Hsp90 binding and function in import was not greatly affected, but it could not entirely compensate for the lack of Hsc70 interaction. Deletion of the presequence from CIC was shown to cause its aggregation, but had little effect on the contribution to import of either Hsc70 or Hsp90. The presequence of PiC, but not that of CIC, conferred Hsc70 binding to dihydrofolate reductase fusion proteins. In comparison, OGC (oxoglutarate carrier) lacks a presequence and was more soluble, though it is still dependent on both Hsc70 and Hsp90. We propose that carrier presequences evolved to improve targeting competence by different mechanisms, depending on physical properties of the precursors in the cytosolic targeting environment.

  7. Development of a stealth carrier system for structural studies of membrane proteins in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Selma

    Structural studies of membrane proteins remain a great experimental challenge. Functional reconstitution into artificial carriers that mimic the native bilayer environment allows for the handling of membrane proteins in solution and enables the use of small-angle scattering techniques for fast...... and reliable structural analysis. The difficulty with this approach is that the carrier discs contribute to the measured scattering intensity in a highly non-trivial fashion, making subsequent data analysis challenging. This thesis presents the development of a specifically deuterated, stealth nanodisc system...

  8. Applications of the second virial coefficient: protein crystallization and solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, William W. [Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39759 (United States); DeLucas, Lawrence J., E-mail: duke2@uab.edu [University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 Second Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39759 (United States)

    2014-04-30

    This article highlights some of the ground-based studies emanating from NASA’s Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) program, and includes a more detailed discussion of the history and the progress made in one of the NASA-funded PCG investigations involving the use of measured second virial coefficients (B values) as a diagnostic indicator of solution conditions conducive to protein crystallization. This article begins by highlighting some of the ground-based studies emanating from NASA’s Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) program. This is followed by a more detailed discussion of the history of and the progress made in one of the NASA-funded PCG investigations involving the use of measured second virial coefficients (B values) as a diagnostic indicator of solution conditions conducive to protein crystallization. A second application of measured B values involves the determination of solution conditions that improve or maximize the solubility of aqueous and membrane proteins. These two important applications have led to several technological improvements that simplify the experimental expertise required, enable the measurement of membrane proteins and improve the diagnostic capability and measurement throughput.

  9. Structure-based mutational analysis of the 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferases Sfp from Bacillus subtilis: carrier protein recognition and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Finking, Robert; Essen, Lars Oliver; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2004-04-13

    The activation of apo-peptidyl carrier proteins (PCPs) of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs), apo-acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) of polyketide synthases (PKSs), and fatty acid synthases (FASs) to their active holo form is accomplished with dedicated 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases). They catalyze the transfer of the essential prosthetic group 4'-phosphopantetheine (4'-Ppant) from coenzyme A (CoA) to a highly conserved serine residue in all PCPs and ACPs. PPTases, based on sequence and substrate specifity, have been classified into three types: bacterial holo-acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS), fatty acid synthase of eukaryotes (FAS2) and Sfp, a PPTase of secondary metabolism. The recently solved crystal structures of AcpS and Sfp-type PPTases with CoA revealed a common alpha + beta-fold with a beta(1)alpha(3)beta(2) motif and similarities in CoA binding and polymerization mode. However, it was not possible to discern neither the PCP binding region of Sfp nor the priming reaction mechanism from the Sfp-CoA cocrystal. In this work, we provide a model for the reaction mechanism based on mutational analysis of Sfp that suggests a reaction mechanism in which the highly conserved E151 deprotonates the hydroxyl group of the invariant serine of PCP. That, in turn, acts as a nucleophile to attack the beta-phosphate of CoA. The Sfp mutants K112, E117, and K120 further revealed that the loop region between beta4 and alpha5 (residues T111-S124) in Sfp is the PCP binding region. Also, residues T44, K75, S89, H90, D107, E109, E151, and K155 that have been shown in the Sfp-CoA cocrystal structure to coordinate CoA are now all confirmed by mutational and biochemical analysis.

  10. Effects of Phonon Coupling and Free Carriers on Band-Edge Emission at Room Temperature in n-type ZnO Crystals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giles, N. C; Xu, Chunchuan; Callahan, M. J; Wang, Buguo; Neal, J. S; Boatner, L. A

    2008-01-01

    Room-temperature photoluminescence has been studied in II-type bulk ZnO crystals representing three different growth methods and having free-carrier concentrations (n) ranging from 10(exp 13) to 10(exp 18) /cu cm...

  11. Subpollen particles: Carriers of allergenic proteins and oxidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacsi, Attila; Choudhury, Barun K.; Dharajiya, Nilesh; Sur, Sanjiv; Boldogh, Istvan

    2011-01-01

    Background Pollen is known to induce allergic asthma in atopic individuals, although only a few inhaled pollen grains penetrate into the lower respiratory tract. Objective We sought to provide evidence that subpollen particles (SPPs) of respirable size, possessing both antigenic and redox properties, are released from weed pollen grains and to test their role in allergic airway inflammation. Methods The release of SPPs was analyzed by means of microscopic imaging and flow cytometry. The redox properties of SPPs and the SPP-mediated oxidative effect on epithelial cells were determined by using redox-sensitive probes and specific inhibitors. Western blotting and amino acid sequence analysis were used to examine the protein components of the SPP. The allergenic properties of the SPP were determined in a murine model of experimental asthma. Results Ragweed pollen grains released 0.5 to 4.5 μm of SPPs on hydration. These contained Amb a 1, along with other allergenic proteins of ragweed pollen, and possessed nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced) or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) [NAD(P)H] oxidase activity. The SPPs significantly increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured cells and induced allergic airway inflammation in the experimental animals. Pretreatment of the SPPs with NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors attenuated their capacity to increase ROS levels in the airway epithelial cells and subsequent airway inflammation. Conclusions The allergenic potency of SPPs released from ragweed pollen grains is mediated in tandem by ROS generated by intrinsic NAD(P)H oxidases and antigenic proteins. Clinical implications Severe clinical symptoms associated with seasonal asthma might be explained by immune responses to inhaled SPPs carrying allergenic proteins and ROS-producing NAD(P)H oxidases. PMID:17030236

  12. Methodology for fast evaluation of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Lúcia M. Carareto

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the production and use of Bacillus thuringiensis in Brazil at a commercial scale faces certain difficulties, among them the establishment of efficient methodologies for the quantitation of toxic products to be commercialized. Presently, the amount of toxin is given in percentage by analyzing the samples total protein content. Such methodology however, does not measure the actual amount of active protein present in the product, since most strains express different endotoxin genes and might even produce b-toxin. Since the various types of toxins exhibit different antigenic characteristics, this work has as objective the utilization of fast immunological techniques to quantify the level of crystal protein. Crystal protein produced by a subspecies of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis was purified by ultracentrifugation and utilized to immunize rabbits and to produce hiperimmune sera. Such sera were latter used to evaluate the level of proteins on commercial bioinsecticide and on laboratory cultures of B. thuringiensis through the immunodot technique. The results were obtained by comparison of data obtained from reactions with known concentrations of crystal protein permitting to evaluate the level of such protein on various materials.

  13. The role of shape vs. patches in protein crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Jens; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    Proteins fold into a multitude of three-dimensional native structures. The structures of over 100,000 known proteins are deposited in the protein data bank, and most of them have been determined through X-ray crystallography. We ask the question if the role of shape in protein crystallization can be isolated using simulation. Current computational studies show that patchy complementary contacts stabilize experimentally observed P212121 crystal structures for relatively globular protein using spherical protein models. Here we study an anisotropic rigid shape model of green fluorescent protein based on a coarse-grained representation of the atomic coordinates. Using GPU-accelerated molecular dynamics simulations, we find that the experimentally found crystal structure can be stabilized in self-assembly by using complementary attractive patches, confirming the earlier findings. However, we discuss the additional roles of solvent mediated and electrostatic interactions, depletion effects and the self-assembly properties of a purely hard shape model in stabilizing different assemblies. Our findings shed light on fundamental assembly mechanisms in colloidal systems with many competing interactions.

  14. Crystals x-rays and proteins comprehensive protein crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Sherwood, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Information derived from X-ray crystal structures of biological molecules allows us to explain their functions in living organisms and to develop drugs to treat disease. This book describes the principles and practice of X-ray diffraction as a key technique at the forefront of new discoveries in biology and medicine.

  15. Analysis of oscillatory rocking curve by dynamical diffraction in protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Hirano, Keiichi; Kumasaka, Takashi; Kojima, Kenichi; Tachibana, Masaru

    2018-04-03

    High-quality protein crystals meant for structural analysis by X-ray diffraction have been grown by various methods. The observation of dynamical diffraction in protein crystals is an interesting topic because dynamical diffraction generally occurs in perfect crystals such as Si crystals. However, to our knowledge, there is no report yet on protein crystals showing clear dynamical diffraction. We wonder whether the perfection of protein crystals might still be low compared with that of high-quality Si crystals. Here, we present observations of the oscillatory profile of rocking curves for protein crystals such as glucose isomerase crystals. The oscillatory profiles are in good agreement with those predicted by the dynamical theory of diffraction. We demonstrate that dynamical diffraction occurs even in protein crystals. This suggests the possibility of the use of dynamical diffraction for the determination of the structure and charge density of proteins.

  16. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  17. Comparison of CRM197, diphtheria toxoid and tetanus toxoid as protein carriers for meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontini, M; Berti, F; Romano, M R; Proietti, D; Zambonelli, C; Bottomley, M J; De Gregorio, E; Del Giudice, G; Rappuoli, R; Costantino, P; Brogioni, G; Balocchi, C; Biancucci, M; Malito, E

    2013-10-01

    Glycoconjugate vaccines are among the most effective and safest vaccines ever developed. Diphtheria toxoid (DT), tetanus toxoid (TT) and CRM197 have been mostly used as protein carriers in licensed vaccines. We evaluated the immunogenicity of serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y meningococcal oligosaccharides conjugated to CRM197, DT and TT in naïve mice. The three carriers were equally efficient in inducing an immune response against the carbohydrate moiety in immunologically naïve mice. The effect of previous exposure to different dosages of the carrier protein on the anti-carbohydrate response was studied using serogroup A meningococcal (MenA) saccharide conjugates as a model. CRM197 showed a strong propensity to positively prime the anti-carbohydrate response elicited by its conjugates or those with the antigenically related carrier DT. Conversely in any of the tested conditions TT priming did not result in enhancement of the anti-carbohydrate response elicited by the corresponding conjugates. Repeated exposure of mice to TT or to CRM197 before immunization with the respective MenA conjugates resulted in a drastic suppression of the anti-carbohydrate response in the case of TT conjugate and only in a slight reduction in the case of CRM197. The effect of carrier priming on the anti-MenA response of DT-based conjugates varied depending on their carbohydrate to protein ratio. These data may have implications for human vaccination since conjugate vaccines are widely used in individuals previously immunized with DT and TT carrier proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of Sfp, a Bacillus subtilis phosphopantetheinyl transferase for peptidyl carrier protein domains in peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, L E; Weinreb, P H; Lei, M; Nakano, M M; Zuber, P; Walsh, C T

    1998-02-10

    The Bacillus subtilis enzyme Sfp, required for production of the lipoheptapeptide antibiotic surfactin, posttranslationally phosphopantetheinylates a serine residue in each of the seven peptidyl carrier protein domains of the first three subunits (SrfABC) of surfactin synthetase to yield docking sites for amino acid loading and peptide bond formation. With recombinant Sfp and 16-17-kDa peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domains excised from the SrfB1 and SrfB2 modules as apo substrates, kcat values of 56-104 min-1 and K(m) values of 1.3-1.8 microM were determined, indicating equivalent recognition of the adjacent PCP domains by Sfp. In contrast to other phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases) previously examined, Sfp will modify the apo forms of heterologous recombinant proteins, including the PCP domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Lys2 (involved in lysine biosynthesis), the aryl carrier protein (ArCP) domain of Escherichia coli EntB (involved in enterobactin biosynthesis), and the E. coli acyl carrier protein (ACP) subunit, suggesting Sfp as a good candidate for heterologous coexpression with peptide and polyketide synthase genes to overproduce holo-synthase enzymes. Cosubstrate coenzyme A (CoA), the phosphopantetheinyl group donor, has a K(m) of 0.7 microM. Desulfo-CoA and homocysteamine-CoA are also substrates of Sfp, and benzoyl-CoA and phenylacetyl-CoA are also utilized by Sfp, resulting in direct transfer of acyl phosphopantetheinyl moieties into the carrier protein substrate. Mutagenesis in Sfp of five residues conserved across the PPTase family was assessed for in vivo effects on surfactin production and in vitro effects on PPTase activity.

  19. Transient isotachophoresis in carrier ampholyte-based capillary electrophoresis for protein analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Busnel, J. M.; Descroix, S.; Godfrin, D.; Hennion, M. C.; Kašička, Václav; Peltre, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 18 (2006), s. 3591-3598 ISSN 0173-0835 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : carrier ampholyte-based capillary electrophoresis * transient isotachophoresis * proteins Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.101, year: 2006

  20. A Rational Approach to Identify Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Enoyl Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chhabria, M. T.; Parmar, K. B.; Brahmkshatriya, Pathik

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 21 (2013), s. 3878-3883 ISSN 1381-6128 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : mycobacterium tuberculosis * enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase * pharmacophore modeling * molecular docking * binding interactions Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.288, year: 2013

  1. Riboflavin carrier protein-targeted fluorescent USPIO for the assessment of vascular metabolism in tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayapaul, J.; Arns, S.; Lederle, W.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Comba, P.; Gätjens, J.; Kiessling, F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Riboflavin (Rf) and its metabolic analogs flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are essential for normal cellular growth and function. Their intracellular transport is regulated by the riboflavin carrier protein (RCP), which has been shown to be over-expressed by

  2. Heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on fluorinated layered silicate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Ino

    Full Text Available Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface.

  3. Protein-crystal interface mediates cell adhesion and proangiogenic secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Chen, Weisi; Gillis, Brian; Fischbach, Claudia; Estroff, Lara A; Gourdon, Delphine

    2017-02-01

    The nanoscale materials properties of bone apatite crystals have been implicated in breast cancer bone metastasis and their interactions with extracellular matrix proteins are likely involved. In this study, we used geologic hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 ), closely related to bone apatite, to investigate how HAP surface chemistry and nano/microscale topography individually influence the crystal-protein interface, and how the altered protein deposition impacts subsequent breast cancer cell activities. We first utilized Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to assess the molecular conformation of fibronectin (Fn), a major extracellular matrix protein upregulated in cancer, when it adsorbed onto HAP facets. Our analysis reveals that both low surface charge density and nanoscale roughness of HAP facets individually contributed to molecular unfolding of Fn. We next quantified cell adhesion and secretion on Fn-coated HAP facets using MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Our data show elevated proangiogenic and proinflammatory secretions associated with more unfolded Fn adsorbed onto nano-rough HAP facets with low surface charge density. These findings not only deconvolute the roles of crystal surface chemistry and topography in interfacial protein deposition but also enhance our knowledge of protein-mediated breast cancer cell interactions with apatite, which may be implicated in tumor growth and bone metastasis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. The Growth of Protein Crystals Using McDUCK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Felicia; Wilson, Lori; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Most of the current microgravity crystal growth hardware is optimized to produce crystals within the limited time available on orbit. This often results in the actual nucleation and growth process being rushed or the system not coming to equilibrium within the limited time available. Longer duration hardware exists, but one cannot readily pick out crystals grown early versus those which nucleated and grew more slowly. We have devised a long duration apparatus, the Multi-chamber Dialysis Unit for Crystallization Kinetics, or McDUCK. This apparatus-is a series of protein chambers, stacked upon a precipitant reservoir chamber. All chambers are separated by a dialysis membrane, which serves to pass small molecules while retaining the protein. The volume of the Precipitant chamber is equal to the sum of the volumes of the protein chamber. In operation, the appropriate chambers are filled with precipitant solution or protein solution, and the McDUCK is placed standing upright, with the precipitant chamber on the bottom. The precipitant diffuses upwards over time, with the time to reach equilibration a function of the diffusivity of the precipitant and the overall length of the diffusion pathway. Typical equilibration times are approximately 2-4 months, and one can readily separate rapid from slow nucleation and growth crystals. An advantage on Earth is that the vertical precipitant concentration gradient dominates that of the solute, thus dampening out solute density gradient driven convective flows. However, large Earth-grown crystals have so far tended to be more two dimensional. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of lysozyme crystals grown in McDUCK have indicated that the best, and largest, come from the middle chambers, suggesting that there is an optimal growth rate. Further, the improvements in diffraction resolution have been better signal to noise ratios in the low resolution data, not an increase in resolution overall. Due to the persistently large crystals

  5. Determination of the carrier concentration in CdSe crystals from the effective infrared absorption coefficient measured by means of the photothermal infrared radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlak, M. [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Institute of Physics, Torun (Poland)

    2014-11-11

    In this paper, a non-contact method that allows to determine the carrier concentration in CdSe crystals is presented. The method relies on the measurement of the effective infrared absorption coefficient by means of the photothermal infrared radiometry (PTR). In order to obtain the effective infrared absorption coefficient and thermal diffusivity, the frequency characteristics of the PTR signal were analyzed in the frame of a one-dimensional heat transport model for infrared semitransparent crystals. The carrier concentrations were estimated using a theory introduced by Ruda and a recently proposed normalization procedure for the PTR signal. The deduced carrier concentrations of the investigated CdSe crystals are in reasonable agreement with those obtained using Hall measurements and infrared spectroscopy. The method presented in this paper can also be applied to other semiconductors with the carrier concentration in the range of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. (orig.)

  6. Unveiling the in Vivo Protein Corona of Circulating Leukocyte-like Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, Claudia; Molinaro, Roberto; Taraballi, Francesca; Toledano Furman, Naama E; Hartman, Kelly A; Sherman, Michael B; De Rosa, Enrica; Kirui, Dickson K; Salvatore, Francesco; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-03-28

    Understanding interactions occurring at the interface between nanoparticles and biological components is an urgent challenge in nanomedicine due to their effect on the biological fate of nanoparticles. After the systemic injection of nanoparticles, a protein corona constructed by blood components surrounds the carrier's surface and modulates its pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Biomimicry-based approaches in nanotechnology attempt to imitate what happens in nature in order to transfer specific natural functionalities to synthetic nanoparticles. Several biomimetic formulations have been developed, showing superior in vivo features as a result of their cell-like identity. We have recently designed biomimetic liposomes, called leukosomes, which recapitulate the ability of leukocytes to target inflamed endothelium and escape clearance by the immune system. To gain insight into the properties of leukosomes, we decided to investigate their protein corona in vivo. So far, most information about the protein corona has been obtained using in vitro experiments, which have been shown to minimally reproduce in vivo phenomena. Here we directly show a time-dependent quantitative and qualitative analysis of the protein corona adsorbed in vivo on leukosomes and control liposomes. We observed that leukosomes absorb fewer proteins than liposomes, and we identified a group of proteins specifically adsorbed on leukosomes. Moreover, we hypothesize that the presence of macrophage receptors on leukosomes' surface neutralizes their protein corona-meditated uptake by immune cells. This work unveils the protein corona of a biomimetic carrier and is one of the few studies on the corona performed in vivo.

  7. Models of protein-ligand crystal structures: trust, but verify

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Marc C.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    X-ray crystallography provides the most accurate models of protein-ligand structures. These models serve as the foundation of many computational methods including structure prediction, molecular modelling, and structure-based drug design. The success of these computational methods ultimately depends on the quality of the underlying protein-ligand models. X-ray crystallography offers the unparalleled advantage of a clear mathematical formalism relating the experimental data to the protein-ligand model. In the case of X-ray crystallography, the primary experimental evidence is the electron density of the molecules forming the crystal. The first step in the generation of an accurate and precise crystallographic model is the interpretation of the electron density of the crystal, typically carried out by construction of an atomic model. The atomic model must then be validated for fit to the experimental electron density and also for agreement with prior expectations of stereochemistry. Stringent validation of protein-ligand models has become possible as a result of the mandatory deposition of primary diffraction data, and many computational tools are now available to aid in the validation process. Validation of protein-ligand complexes has revealed some instances of overenthusiastic interpretation of ligand density. Fundamental concepts and metrics of protein-ligand quality validation are discussed and we highlight software tools to assist in this process. It is essential that end users select high quality protein-ligand models for their computational and biological studies, and we provide an overview of how this can be achieved.

  8. Packing topology in crystals of proteins and small molecules: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carugo, Oliviero; Blatova, Olga A; Medrish, Elena O; Blatov, Vladislav A; Proserpio, Davide M

    2017-10-16

    We compared the topologies of protein and small molecule crystals, which have many common features - both are molecular crystals with intermolecular interactions much weaker than intramolecular interactions. They also have different features - a considerably large fraction of the volume of protein crystals is occupied by liquid water while no room is available to other molecules in small molecule crystals. We analyzed the overall and local topology and performed multilevel topological analyses (with the software package ToposPro) of carefully selected high quality sets of protein and small molecule crystal structures. Given the suboptimal packing of protein crystals, which is due the special shape and size of proteins, it would be reasonable to expect that the topology of protein crystals is different from the topology of small molecule crystals. Surprisingly, we discovered that these two types of crystalline compounds have strikingly similar topologies. This might suggest that molecular crystal formations share symmetry rules independent of molecular dimension.

  9. Effects of impurities on membrane-protein crystallization in different systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kors, Christopher A.; Wallace, Ellen; Davies, Douglas R.; Li, Liang; Laible, Philip D.; Nollert, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The effects of commonly encountered impurities on various membrane-protein crystallization regimes are investigated and it is found that the lipidic cubic phase crystallization methodology is the most robust, tolerating protein contamination levels of up to 50%, with little effect on crystal quality. If generally applicable, this tolerance may be exploited (i) in initial crystallization trials to determine the ‘crystallizability’ of a given membrane-protein and (ii) to subject partially pure membrane-protein samples to crystallization trials. When starting a protein-crystallization project, scientists are faced with several unknowns. Amongst them are these questions: (i) is the purity of the starting material sufficient? and (ii) which type of crystallization experiment is the most promising to conduct? The difficulty in purifying active membrane-protein samples for crystallization trials and the high costs associated with producing such samples require an extremely pragmatic approach. Additionally, practical guidelines are needed to increase the efficiency of membrane-protein crystallization. In order to address these conundrums, the effects of commonly encountered impurities on various membrane-protein crystallization regimes have been investigated and it was found that the lipidic cubic phase (LCP) based crystallization methodology is more robust than crystallization in detergent environments using vapor diffusion or microbatch approaches in its ability to tolerate contamination in the forms of protein, lipid or other general membrane components. LCP-based crystallizations produced crystals of the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides from samples with substantial levels of residual impurities. Crystals were obtained with protein contamination levels of up to 50% and the addition of lipid material and membrane fragments to pure samples of RC had little effect on the number or on the quality of crystals obtained in LCP

  10. Crystal growth of proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses in gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, Bernard; Sauter, Claude; Théobald-Dietrich, Anne; Moreno, Abel; Schellenberger, Pascale; Robert, Marie-Claire; Capelle, Bernard; Sanglier, Sarah; Potier, Noëlle; Giegé, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Medium-sized single crystals with perfect habits and no defect producing intense and well-resolved diffraction patterns are the dream of every protein crystallographer. Crystals of biological macromolecules possessing these characteristics can be prepared within a medium in which mass transport is restricted to diffusion. Chemical gels (like polysiloxane) and physical gels (such as agarose) provide such an environment and are therefore suitable for the crystallisation of biological macromolecules. Instructions for the preparation of each type of gel are given to urge crystal growers to apply diffusive media for enhancing crystallographic quality of their crystals. Examples of quality enhancement achieved with silica and agarose gels are given. Results obtained with other substances forming gel-like media (such as lipidic phases and cellulose derivatives) are presented. Finally, the use of gels in combination with capillary tubes for counter-diffusion experiments is discussed. Methods and techniques implemented with proteins can also be applied to nucleic acids and nucleoprotein assemblies such as viruses.

  11. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hau B; Hung, Li-Wei; Yeates, Todd O; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2013-12-01

    A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10-11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1-9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10-11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1-9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization.

  12. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  13. From Protein Structure to Function via Single Crystal Optical Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eRonda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The more than 100.000 protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography provide a wealth of information for the characterization of biological processes at the molecular level. However, several crystallographic artifacts, including conformational selection, crystallization conditions and radiation damages, may affect the quality and the interpretation of the electron density map, thus limiting the relevance of structure determinations. Moreover, for most of these structures no functional data have been obtained in the crystalline state, thus posing serious questions on their validity in the inference for protein mechanisms. In order to solve these issues, spectroscopic methods have been applied for the determination of equilibrium and kinetic properties of proteins in the crystalline state. These methods are UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, IR, EPR, Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Some of these approaches have been implemented with on-line instruments at X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Here, we provide an overview of investigations predominantly carried out in our laboratory by single crystal polarized absorption UV-vis microspectrophotometry, the most applied technique for the functional characterization of proteins in the crystalline state. Studies on hemoglobins, pyridoxal 5’-phosphate dependent enzymes and green fluorescent protein in the crystalline state have addressed key biological issues, leading to either straightforward structure-function correlations or limitations to structure-based mechanisms.

  14. Crystal structure of Homo sapiens protein LOC79017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2010-02-08

    LOC79017 (MW 21.0 kDa, residues 1-188) was annotated as a hypothetical protein encoded by Homo sapiens chromosome 7 open reading frame 24. It was selected as a target by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) because it did not share more than 30% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known. The biological function of the protein has not been established yet. Parts of LOC79017 were identified as members of uncharacterized Pfam families (residues 1-95 as PB006073 and residues 104-180 as PB031696). BLAST searches revealed homologues of LOC79017 in many eukaryotes, but none of them have been functionally characterized. Here, we report the crystal structure of H. sapiens protein LOC79017 (UniGene code Hs.530024, UniProt code O75223, CESG target number go.35223).

  15. Can the propensity of protein crystallization be increased by using systematic screening with metals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Raghurama P; Pavithra, Gowribidanur C; Dey, Debayan; Almo, Steven C; Ramakumar, S; Ramagopal, Udupi A

    2017-09-01

    Protein crystallization is one of the major bottlenecks in protein structure elucidation with new strategies being constantly developed to improve the chances of crystallization. Generally, well-ordered epitopes possessing complementary surface and capable of producing stable inter-protein interactions generate a regular three-dimensional arrangement of protein molecules which eventually results in a crystal lattice. Metals, when used for crystallization, with their various coordination numbers and geometries, can generate such epitopes mediating protein oligomerization and/or establish crystal contacts. Some examples of metal-mediated oligomerization and crystallization together with our experience on metal-mediated crystallization of a putative rRNA methyltransferase from Sinorhizobium meliloti are presented. Analysis of crystal structures from protein data bank (PDB) using a non-redundant data set with a 90% identity cutoff, reveals that around 67% of proteins contain at least one metal ion, with ∼14% containing combination of metal ions. Interestingly, metal containing conditions in most commercially available and popular crystallization kits generally contain only a single metal ion, with combinations of metals only in a very few conditions. Based on the results presented in this review, it appears that the crystallization screens need expansion with systematic screening of metal ions that could be crucial for stabilizing the protein structure or for establishing crystal contact and thereby aiding protein crystallization. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  16. Structure of the Francisella tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) in complex with NAD+ and triclosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehboob, Shahila; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    Structure of the ternary complex of F. tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase reveals the structure of the substrate binding loop whose electron density was missing in an earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the position of the NAD + cofactor. Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) catalyzes the last rate-limiting step in the elongation cycle of the fatty-acid biosynthesis pathway and has been validated as a potential antimicrobial drug target in Francisella tularensis. The development of new antibiotic therapies is important both to combat potential drug-resistant bioweapons and to address the broader societal problem of increasing antibiotic resistance among many pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structure of FabI from F. tularensis (FtuFabI) in complex with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NAD + has been solved to a resolution of 2.1 Å. Triclosan is known to effectively inhibit FabI from different organisms. Precise characterization of the mode of triclosan binding is required to develop highly specific inhibitors. Comparison of our structure with the previously determined FtuFabI structure which is bound to only NAD + reveals the conformation of the substrate-binding loop, electron density for which was missing in the earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the conformation of the NAD + cofactor. This shift in the position of the phosphate groups allows more room in the active site for substrate or inhibitor to bind and be better accommodated. This information will be crucial for virtual screening studies to identify novel scaffolds for development into new active inhibitors

  17. Induction of the lac carrier and an associated membrane protein in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagarias, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Induction of the lac operon in wild type Escherichia coli strains results in synthesis of a 16 kilodalton inner membrane protein in addition to the known products of the lacZ, lacY and lacA genes. Cells carrying the lacY gene on a plasmid over produce this 16 kilodalton polypeptide as well as the Lac carrier, the membrane protein product of the lacY gene. However, [ 35 S]methionine labeling of minicells carrying the lacY plasmid shows that the 16 kDa protein is not synthesized from the plasmid DNA. The 16 kDa protein was purified and partially characterized. It is an acidic membrane protein of apparent molecular weight 15,800 whose amino terminal sequence (NH 2 -Met-Arg-Asn-Phe-Asp-Leu-) does not correspond to any nucleotide sequence known in lac operon DNA. Using antibody prepared to the purified 16 kDa protein, a quantitative analysis of conditions under which this protein is made was accomplished, and reveals that the amount of 16 kDa protein which appears in the membrane is proportional to lac operon expression. Hybridization of a synthetic oligonucleotide probe complementary to the 5' end of 16 kDa protein mRNA shows that its synthesis is regulated at the level of transcription. A description of attempts to clone this gene is given. Possible functional roles for the 16 kDa protein are discussed

  18. Plant protein-based hydrophobic fine and ultrafine carrier particles in drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekzad, Hedieh; Mirshekari, Hamed; Sahandi Zangabad, Parham; Moosavi Basri, S M; Baniasadi, Fazel; Sharifi Aghdam, Maryam; Karimi, Mahdi; Hamblin, Michael R

    2018-02-01

    For thousands of years, plants and their products have been used as the mainstay of medicinal therapy. In recent years, besides attempts to isolate the active ingredients of medicinal plants, other new applications of plant products, such as their use to prepare drug delivery vehicles, have been discovered. Nanobiotechnology is a branch of pharmacology that can provide new approaches for drug delivery by the preparation of biocompatible carrier nanoparticles (NPs). In this article, we review recent studies with four important plant proteins that have been used as carriers for targeted delivery of drugs and genes. Zein is a water-insoluble protein from maize; Gliadin is a 70% alcohol-soluble protein from wheat and corn; legumin is a casein-like protein from leguminous seeds such as peas; lectins are glycoproteins naturally occurring in many plants that recognize specific carbohydrate residues. NPs formed from these proteins show good biocompatibility, possess the ability to enhance solubility, and provide sustained release of drugs and reduce their toxicity and side effects. The effects of preparation methods on the size and loading capacity of these NPs are also described in this review.

  19. Structure, High Affinity, and Negative Cooperativity of the Escherichia coli Holo-(Acyl Carrier Protein):Holo-(Acyl Carrier Protein) Synthase Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcella, Aaron M.; Culbertson, Sannie J.; Shogren-Knaak, Michael A.; Barb, Adam W.

    2017-11-01

    The Escherichia coli holo-(acyl carrier protein) synthase (ACPS) catalyzes the coenzyme A-dependent activation of apo-ACPP to generate holo-(acyl carrier protein) (holo-ACPP) in an early step of fatty acid biosynthesis. E. coli ACPS is sufficiently different from the human fatty acid synthase to justify the development of novel ACPS-targeting antibiotics. Models of E. coli ACPS in unliganded and holo-ACPP-bound forms solved by X-ray crystallography to 2.05 and 4.10 Å, respectively, revealed that ACPS bound three product holo-ACPP molecules to form a 3:3 hexamer. Solution NMR spectroscopy experiments validated the ACPS binding interface on holo-ACPP using chemical shift perturbations and by determining the relative orientation of holo-ACPP to ACPS by fitting residual dipolar couplings. The binding interface is organized to arrange contacts between positively charged ACPS residues and the holo-ACPP phosphopantetheine moiety, indicating product contains more stabilizing interactions than expected in the enzyme:substrate complex. Indeed, holo-ACPP bound the enzyme with greater affinity than the substrate, apo-ACPP, and with negative cooperativity. The first equivalent of holo-ACPP bound with a KD = 62 ± 13 nM, followed by the binding of two more equivalents of holo-ACPP with KD = 1.2 ± 0.2 μM. Cooperativity was not observed for apo-ACPP which bound with KD = 2.4 ± 0.1 μM. Strong product binding and high levels of holo-ACPP in the cell identify a potential regulatory role of ACPS in fatty acid biosynthesis.

  20. Participation of Low Molecular Weight Electron Carriers in Oxidative Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Mandl

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative protein folding is mediated by a proteinaceous electron relay system, in which the concerted action of protein disulfide isomerase and Ero1 delivers the electrons from thiol groups to the final acceptor. Oxygen appears to be the final oxidant in aerobic living organisms, although the existence of alternative electron acceptors, e.g. fumarate or nitrate, cannot be excluded. Whilst the protein components of the system are well-known, less attention has been turned to the role of low molecular weight electron carriers in the process. The function of ascorbate, tocopherol and vitamin K has been raised recently. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that these redox-active compounds can contribute to the functioning of oxidative folding. This review focuses on the participation of small molecular weight redox compounds in oxidative protein folding.

  1. Implementation of Temperature-Controlled Method of Protein Crystallization in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelov, V. I.; Zakharov, B. G.; Bezbakh, I. Zh.; Safronov, V. V.; Chernyshev, B. V.; Dutyshev, I. N.

    2018-01-01

    An experimental scientific equipment for implementing temperature-controlled protein crystallization in capillaries under microgravity has been developed, fabricated, and tested. This crystallization method, providing on-line separate control of crystal growth both in the stage of nucleation of crystals and during their further growth, requires small amounts of protein solution. The equipment has been tested on board of Foton-M4 spacecraft (growth of lysozyme protein crystals of high structural quality in microgravity) using a cyclogram developed in ground-based experiments. The results obtained have demonstrated efficiency and importance of the developed equipment and method for growing biomacromolecular crystals of high-structural quality.

  2. Theory of carrier depletion and light amplification in active slow light photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    of the device is investigated. An effective rate-equation-based model is presented. It is shown that it well accounts for the three-dimensional simulation results. Simulations indicate that a slow-light-enhanced photonic crystal traveling-wave amplifier has a high small-signal modal gain and low saturation...

  3. Structure of a second crystal form of Bence-Jones protein Loc: Strikingly different domain associations in two crystal forms of a single protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, M.; Ainsworth, C.; Xu, Z.B.; Carperos, W.; Olsen, K.; Solomon, A.; Stevens, F.J.; Chang, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have determined the structure of the immunoglobulin light-chain dimer Loc in a second crystal form that was grown from distilled water. The crystal structure was determined to 2.8-angstrom resolution; the R factor is 0.22. The two variable domains are related by local 2-fold axes and form an antigen binding pocket. The variable domain-variable domain interaction observed in this crystal form differs from the one exhibited by the protein when crystallized from ammonium sulfate in which the two variable domains formed a protrusion. The structure attained in the distilled water crystals is similar to, but not identical with, the one observed for the Mcg light-chain dimer in crystals grown from ammonium sulfate. Thus, two strikingly different structures were attained by this multisubunit protein in crystals grown under two different, commonly used, crystallization techniques. The quaternary interactions exhibited by the protein in the two crystal forms are sufficiently different to suggest fundamentally different interpretations of the structural basis for the function of this protein. This observation may have general implications regarding the use of single crystallographic determinations for detailed identification of structural and functional relationships. On the other hand, proteins whose structures can be altered by manipulation of crystallization conditions may provide useful systems for study of fundamental structural chemistry

  4. Systematic comparison of crystal and NMR protein structures deposited in the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikic, Kresimir; Tomic, Sanja; Carugo, Oliviero

    2010-09-03

    Nearly all the macromolecular three-dimensional structures deposited in Protein Data Bank were determined by either crystallographic (X-ray) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods. This paper reports a systematic comparison of the crystallographic and NMR results deposited in the files of the Protein Data Bank, in order to find out to which extent these information can be aggregated in bioinformatics. A non-redundant data set containing 109 NMR - X-ray structure pairs of nearly identical proteins was derived from the Protein Data Bank. A series of comparisons were performed by focusing the attention towards both global features and local details. It was observed that: (1) the RMDS values between NMR and crystal structures range from about 1.5 Å to about 2.5 Å; (2) the correlation between conformational deviations and residue type reveals that hydrophobic amino acids are more similar in crystal and NMR structures than hydrophilic amino acids; (3) the correlation between solvent accessibility of the residues and their conformational variability in solid state and in solution is relatively modest (correlation coefficient = 0.462); (4) beta strands on average match better between NMR and crystal structures than helices and loops; (5) conformational differences between loops are independent of crystal packing interactions in the solid state; (6) very seldom, side chains buried in the protein interior are observed to adopt different orientations in the solid state and in solution.

  5. Cubic crystal protein inclusions in the neodermis of the pancreatic fluke, Eurytrema pancreaticum, and Eurytrema coelomaticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tsukasa; Oikawa, Tetsuo

    2007-10-01

    Light microscopy of Eurytrema pancreaticum and Eurytrema coelomaticum collected from cattle in Japan, China, Thailand, and Brazil showed many cubic crystal inclusions in the neodermis (tegument) of all flukes. The crystal inclusions were histochemically positive for protein. Scanning electron microscopy showed many cubic protrusions containing cubic crystal protein inclusions on the surface of the neodermis. Transmission electron microscopy showed that cubic crystal protein inclusions appeared in the perikarya of subtegumental parts, passed through the cytoplasmic bridge, moved into the syncytial neodermal cytoplasm, and then protruded from, and finally separated from, the neodermal cytoplasm. Cubic crystal protein inclusions were hexahedral with each side 2-18 microm long. High-resolution microscopy of ultrathin sections of crystal inclusions showed a lattice fringe at spacings of about 0.52 nm by using a filtering processing. Diffractograms were obtained by Fourier transform of the images. The lattice structure of the crystal protein inclusions was shown by inverse Fourier transform, indicating that the cubic crystal protein inclusions were single crystals. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis estimated the molecular weight of protein in the cubic crystal inclusion as 36.6 kDa. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy proved that the cubic crystal protein inclusions were composed of protein and sulfur.

  6. Escherichia coli PII protein: purification, crystallization and oligomeric structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, S G; Gedye, C; Dixon, N E; Cheah, E; Carr, P D; Suffolk, P M; Jeffrey, P D; Ollis, D L

    1994-01-17

    The Escherichia coli signal transduction protein PII, product of the glnB gene, was overproduced and purified. The predicted molecular weight of the protein based on the correct nucleotide sequence is 12,427 and is very close to the value 12,435 obtained by matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry. Hexagonal crystals of the unuridylylated form of PII with dimensions 0.2 x 0.2 x 0.3 mm were grown and analysed by X-ray diffraction. The crystals belong to space group P6(3) with a = b = 61.6 A, c = 56.3 A and Vm of 2.5 for one subunit in the asymmetric unit. A low-resolution electron density map showed electron density concentrated around a three-fold axis, suggesting the molecule to be a trimer. A sedimentation equilibrium experiment of the meniscus depletion type was used to estimate a molecular weight of 35,000 +/- 1,000 for PII in solution. This result is consistent with the native protein being a homotrimer.

  7. Polymorphism of Protein Aggregation: From Amyloid Fibrils to Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad S.; Conrad, Jacinta C.; Vekilov, Peter G.

    Protein aggregation is commonly observed in neurological diseases and in different types of cancer. Despite the established mechanism of amyloid formation, the polymorphism of aggregation is not very well understood; improved knowledge of mechanisms for aggregation that operate in vivo or under physiological conditions is likely to inform therapeutic design. Here we show that reduction of disulfide bonds in lysozyme can lead to formation of gel-like oligomers that are precursors for protein crystal nucleation events. The growth in size of oligomers follows slow first-order kinetics, suggesting that monomers with free thiol contribute to formation of clusters. Free thiol concentration measurements showed that the thiol concentration was relatively stable over 12 hr, confirming the slow kinetics was due to gelation inside the clusters. We probed the hydrophobicity of the clusters using ANS and ThT assays, and showed that the protein conformation in these clusters differs from that of thermally denatured aggregates. Although partial unfolding aids the formation of precursors to both amyloids and crystals, our results suggest that these pathways exhibit distinct signatures even at the earliest stages. NASA.

  8. Protein edible films with emulsified maize oil as paprika carrier to improve color and rancidity in beef Bologna

    OpenAIRE

    Erick C. Tellez-Rangel; Ignacio Garcia-Martinez; Eva Rodriguez-Huezo; Alfonso Totosaus

    2017-01-01

    Edible films are a way to improve meat products shelf life. If edible films are formulated with proteins, oil can be emulsified by proteins, changing edible film properties. In this research protein edible films elaborated with milk protein concentrate or functional plasma proteins with or without emulsified oil were employed as carrier for functional ingredient, paprika, as antioxidant and to improve color in beef Bologna during vacuum packing storage at 4 °C. Edible films with emulsified oi...

  9. Late stage crystallization and healing during spin-coating enhance carrier transport in small-molecule organic semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Chou, Kang Wei

    2014-01-01

    Spin-coating is currently the most widely used solution processing method in organic electronics. Here, we report, for the first time, a direct investigation of the formation process of the small-molecule organic semiconductor (OSC) 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) (TIPS)-pentacene during spin-coating in the context of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) application. The solution thinning and thin film formation were monitored in situ by optical reflectometry and grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering, respectively, both of which were performed during spin-coating. We find that OSC thin film formation is akin to a quenching process, marked by a deposition rate of ∼100 nm s-1, nearly three orders of magnitude faster than drop-casting. This is then followed by a more gradual crystallization and healing step which depends upon the spinning speed. We associate this to further crystallization and healing of defects by residency of the residual solvent trapped inside the kinetically trapped film. The residency time of the trapped solvent is extended to several seconds by slowing the rotational speed of the substrate and is credited with improving the carrier mobility by nearly two orders of magnitude. Based on this insight, we deliberately slow down the solvent evaporation further and increase the carrier mobility by an additional order of magnitude. These results demonstrate how spin-coating conditions can be used as a handle over the crystallinity of organic semiconductors otherwise quenched during initial formation only to recrystallize and heal during extended interaction with the trapped solvent. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  10. Study of the Bulk Charge Carrier Dynamics in Anatase and Rutile TiO2 Single Crystals by Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Maity, Partha

    2018-04-02

    Understanding of the fundamentals behind charge carriers of photo-catalytic materials are still illusive hindering progress in our quest for renewable energy. TiO2 anatase and rutile are the most understood phases in photo-catalysis and serve as the best model for fundamental studies. Their ultrafast charge carrier dynamics especially on TiO2 anatase single crystal (the most active phase) are unresolved. Here femtosecond time resolved spectroscopy (TRS) was carried out to explore the dynamics of photo-excited charge carriers’ recombination in anatase single crystal, for the first time using pump fluence effects, and compares it to that of the rutile single crystal. A significant difference in charge carrier recombination rates between both crystals is observed. We found that the time constants for carrier recombination are two orders of magnitude slower for anatase (101) when compared to those of rutile (110). Moreover, bulk defects introduced by reduction of the samples via annealing in ultra-high vacuum resulted in faster recombination rates for both polymorphs. Both states (fresh and reduced) probed by pump fluence dependence measurements revealed that the major recombination channel in fresh and reduced anatase and reduced rutile is the first-order Shockley–Reed mediated. However, for fresh rutile, third-body Auger recombination was observed, attributed to the presence of higher density of intrinsic charge carriers. At all excitation wavelengths and fluence investigated, anatase (101) single crystal show longer charge carrier lifetime when compared to rutile (110) single. This may explain the superiority of the anatase phase for the electron transfer H+ reduction to molecular hydrogen.

  11. Crystal Structure of the Capsid Protein from Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zifang; Song, Hao; Shi, Yi; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F

    2018-03-30

    Recently, Zika virus (ZIKV) emerged as a global public health concern and is distinct from other flaviviruses in many aspects, for example, causing transplacental infection, fetal abnormalities and vector-independent transmission through body fluids in humans. The capsid (C) protein is a multifunctional protein, since it binds to viral RNA in the process of nucleocapsid assembly and plays important roles in virus infection processes by interacting with cellular proteins, modulating cellular metabolism, apoptosis and immune response. Here we solved the crystal structure of ZIKV C protein at a resolution of 1.9Å. The ZIKV C protein structure contains four α helices with a long pre-α1 loop and forms dimers. The unique long pre-α1 loop in ZIKV C contributes to the tighter association of dimeric assembly and renders a divergent hydrophobic feature at the lipid bilayer interface in comparison with the known C structures of West Nile and dengue viruses. We reported the interaction between the ZIKV C protein and lipid droplets through confocal microscopy analysis. Substitutions of key amino acids in the pre-α1 loop of ZIKV C disrupted the interaction with lipid droplets, indicating that the loop is critical for membrane association. We also recognized that ZIKV C protein possesses broad binding capability to different nucleotide types, including single-stranded and double-stranded RNAs or DNAs. Furthermore, the highly positively charged interface, mainly formed by α4 helix, is proposed to be responsible for nucleotide binding. These findings will greatly enhance our understanding of ZIKV C protein, providing information for anti-ZIKV drug design targeting the C protein. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Development of a stealth carrier system for structural studies of membrane proteins in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Selma

    Structural studies of membrane proteins remain a great experimental challenge. Functional reconstitution into artificial carriers that mimic the native bilayer environment allows for the handling of membrane proteins in solution and enables the use of small-angle scattering techniques for fast...... which can be used for SANS structural analysis of membrane proteins in solution. In combination with the D2O/H2O-based contrast variation method it is demonstrated that it is possible to prepare specifically deuterated analogues of the nanodisc, which give minimal contribution to the neutron scattering...... data when used in 100% D2O. An important challenge in the project was obtaining selective partial deuteration of the nanodisc system necessary for the total matching at 100% D2O. This was achieved through an E. coli based biosynthesis for both deuterated phosphatidylcholines as well as membrane...

  13. Crystal structure of human protein kinase CK2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Ermakowa, I

    2001-01-01

    The crystal structure of a fully active form of human protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) consisting of two C-terminally truncated catalytic and two regulatory subunits has been determined at 3.1 A resolution. In the CK2 complex the regulatory subunits form a stable dimer linking the two catalytic...... subunits, which make no direct contact with one another. Each catalytic subunit interacts with both regulatory chains, predominantly via an extended C-terminal tail of the regulatory subunit. The CK2 structure is consistent with its constitutive activity and with a flexible role of the regulatory subunit...

  14. Evaluation of the use of amphipathic peptide-based protein carrier for in vitro cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Seong Loong; Wang, Shu

    2012-03-09

    Intracellular delivery of proteins offers an alternative to genetic modification or siRNA transfection for functional studies of proteins in live cells, especially for studies in cancer cells for therapeutics development. However, lack of efficient and biocompatible delivery system has limited the use of protein for in vitro cancer research. In this study, we design and evaluate an amphipathic peptide RV24, composing of a hydrophobic domain for protein binding, a flexible linker, and a hydrophilic domain to facilitate cell penetration. When using β-galactosidase as a cargo protein for comparison with commercially available peptide- and lipid-based carriers, RV24 peptide provides up to 5-fold increase in quantity delivered into 3 different cancer cell lines. Green fluorescent protein could also be delivered rapidly within 4h and transduced up to 83% of tested cancer cell lines. Although having a cell penetrating domain, RV24 peptide did not compromise cell viability, morphology and granularity significantly. These findings suggest the feasibility of using biocompatible amphipathic peptide to efficiently deliver protein-based molecules intracellularly for in vitro cancer research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of protein and solvent volumes in protein crystals from contrast variation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, J

    1996-01-01

    By varying the relative values of protein and solvent scattering densities in a crystal, it is possible to obtain information on the shape and dimensions of protein molecular envelopes. Neutron diffraction methods are ideally suited to these contrast variation experiments because H/D exchange leads to large differential changes in the protein and solvent scattering densities and is structurally non-perturbing. Low resolution structure factors have been measured from cubic insulin crystals with differing H/D contents. Structure factors calculated from a simple binary density model, in which uniform scattering densities represent the protein and solvent volumes in the crystals, were compared with these data. The contrast variation differences in the sets of measured structure factors were found to be accurately fitted by this simple model. Trial applications to two problems in crystal structure determination illustrate how this fact may be exploited. (i) A translation function that employs contrast variation data gave a sharp minimum within 1-9A of the correctly positioned insulin molecule and is relatively insensitive to errors in the atomic model. (ii) An ab initio phasing method for the contrast variation data, based on analyzing histograms of the density distributions in trial maps, was found to recover the correct molecular envelope.

  16. Equilibrium Kinetics Studies and Crystallization Aboard the International Space Station (ISS) Using the Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achari, Aniruddha; Roeber, Dana F.; Barnes, Cindy L.; Kundrot, Craig E.; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Protein Crystallization Apparatus in Microgravity (PCAM) trays have been used in Shuttle missions to crystallize proteins in a microgravity environment. The crystallization experiments are 'sitting drops' similar to that in Cryschem trays, but the reservoir solution is soaked in a wick. From early 2001, crystallization experiments are conducted on the International Space Station using mission durations of months rather than two weeks on previous shuttle missions. Experiments were set up in April 2001 on Flight 6A to characterize the time crystallization experiments will take to reach equilibrium in a microgravity environment using salts, polyethylene glycols and an organic solvent as precipitants. The experiments were set up to gather data for a series of days of activation with different droplet volumes and precipitants. The experimental set up on ISS and results of this study will be presented. These results will help future users of PCAM to choose precipitants to optimize crystallization conditions for their target macromolecules for a particular mission with known mission duration. Changes in crystal morphology and size between the ground and space grown crystals of a protein and a protein -DNA complex flown on the same mission will also be presented.

  17. A Proposed Model for Protein Crystal Nucleation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    How does one take a molecule, strongly asymmetric in both shape and charge distribution, and assemble it into a crystal? We propose a model for the nucleation and crystal growth process for tetragonal lysozyme, based upon fluorescence, light, neutron, and X-ray scattering data, size exclusion chromatography experiments, dialysis kinetics, AFM, and modeling of growth rate data, from this and other laboratories. The first species formed is postulated to be a 'head to side' dimer. Through repeating associations involving the same intermolecular interactions this grows to a 4(sub 3) helix structure, that in turn serves as the basic unit for nucleation and subsequent crystal growth. High salt attenuates surface charges while promoting hydrophobic interactions. Symmetry facilitates subsequent helix-helix self-association. Assembly stability is enhanced when a four helix structure is obtained, with each bound to two neighbors. Only two unique interactions are required. The first are those for helix formation, where the dominant interaction is the intermolecular bridging anion. The second is the anti-parallel side-by-side helix-helix interaction, guided by alternating pairs of symmetry related salt bridges along each side. At this stage all eight unique positions of the P4(sub3)2(sub 1),2(sub 1) unit cell are filled. The process is one of a) attenuating the most strongly interacting groups, such that b) the molecules begin to self-associate in defined patterns, so that c) symmetry is obtained, which d) propagates as a growing crystal. Simple and conceptually obvious in hindsight, this tells much about what we are empirically doing when we crystallize macromolecules. By adjusting the growth parameters we are empirically balancing the intermolecular interactions, preferentially attenuating the dominant strong (for lysozyme the charged groups) while strengthening the lesser strong (hydrophobic) interactions. In the general case for proteins the lack of a singularly defined

  18. Crystal structure of the Japanese encephalitis virus envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Vincent C; AbiMansour, Jad; Nelson, Christopher A; Fremont, Daved H

    2012-02-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading global cause of viral encephalitis. The JEV envelope protein (E) facilitates cellular attachment and membrane fusion and is the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. We have determined the 2.1-Å resolution crystal structure of the JEV E ectodomain refolded from bacterial inclusion bodies. The E protein possesses the three domains characteristic of flavivirus envelopes and epitope mapping of neutralizing antibodies onto the structure reveals determinants that correspond to the domain I lateral ridge, fusion loop, domain III lateral ridge, and domain I-II hinge. While monomeric in solution, JEV E assembles as an antiparallel dimer in the crystal lattice organized in a highly similar fashion as seen in cryo-electron microscopy models of mature flavivirus virions. The dimer interface, however, is remarkably small and lacks many of the domain II contacts observed in other flavivirus E homodimers. In addition, uniquely conserved histidines within the JEV serocomplex suggest that pH-mediated structural transitions may be aided by lateral interactions outside the dimer interface in the icosahedral virion. Our results suggest that variation in dimer structure and stability may significantly influence the assembly, receptor interaction, and uncoating of virions.

  19. Hot Carrier Trapping in High-Purity and Doped Germanium Crystals at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, M.-C.; Broniatowski, A.; Marnieros, S.; Dumoulin, L.; Olivieri, E.

    2014-09-01

    A new set of experimental data is presented for the mean drift lengths and the drift velocities of hot electrons and holes as a function of the electric field in ultra-pure and in lightly doped (n- and p-type) germanium single crystals at mK temperatures. Measurements are made in the field range between 0.1 and 15 V/cm, typical for the operation of cryogenic germanium detectors for dark matter search. The analysis of the experimental data strongly suggests that the dominant trapping centers are the dopant species in the neutral state.

  20. Studies of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase and implications for the development of antiparasitic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muench, Stephen P. [The Krebs Institute for Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Prigge, Sean T. [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); McLeod, Rima [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Pathology and the Committees on Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Immunology and The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Rafferty, John B. [The Krebs Institute for Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Kirisits, Michael J. [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Pathology and the Committees on Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Immunology and The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Roberts, Craig W. [Department of Immunology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NR, Scotland (United Kingdom); Mui, Ernest J. [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Pathology and the Committees on Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Immunology and The College, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Rice, David W., E-mail: d.rice@sheffield.ac.uk [The Krebs Institute for Biomolecular Research, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-01

    The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. Recent studies have demonstrated that submicromolar concentrations of the biocide triclosan arrest the growth of the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii and inhibit the activity of the apicomplexan enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR). The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures of T. gondii ENR have revealed that, as in its bacterial and plant homologues, a loop region which flanks the active site becomes ordered upon inhibitor binding, resulting in the slow tight binding of triclosan. In addition, the T. gondii ENR–triclosan complex reveals the folding of a hydrophilic insert common to the apicomplexan family that flanks the substrate-binding domain and is disordered in all other reported apicomplexan ENR structures. Structural comparison of the apicomplexan ENR structures with their bacterial and plant counterparts has revealed that although the active sites of the parasite enzymes are broadly similar to those of their bacterial counterparts, there are a number of important differences within the drug-binding pocket that reduce the packing interactions formed with several inhibitors in the apicomplexan ENR enzymes. Together with other significant structural differences, this provides a possible explanation of the lower affinity of the parasite ENR enzyme family for aminopyridine-based inhibitors, suggesting that an effective antiparasitic agent may well be distinct from equivalent antimicrobials.

  1. Studies of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase and implications for the development of antiparasitic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muench, Stephen P.; Prigge, Sean T.; McLeod, Rima; Rafferty, John B.; Kirisits, Michael J.; Roberts, Craig W.; Mui, Ernest J.; Rice, David W.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD + and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. Recent studies have demonstrated that submicromolar concentrations of the biocide triclosan arrest the growth of the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii and inhibit the activity of the apicomplexan enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR). The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD + and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures of T. gondii ENR have revealed that, as in its bacterial and plant homologues, a loop region which flanks the active site becomes ordered upon inhibitor binding, resulting in the slow tight binding of triclosan. In addition, the T. gondii ENR–triclosan complex reveals the folding of a hydrophilic insert common to the apicomplexan family that flanks the substrate-binding domain and is disordered in all other reported apicomplexan ENR structures. Structural comparison of the apicomplexan ENR structures with their bacterial and plant counterparts has revealed that although the active sites of the parasite enzymes are broadly similar to those of their bacterial counterparts, there are a number of important differences within the drug-binding pocket that reduce the packing interactions formed with several inhibitors in the apicomplexan ENR enzymes. Together with other significant structural differences, this provides a possible explanation of the lower affinity of the parasite ENR enzyme family for aminopyridine-based inhibitors, suggesting that an effective antiparasitic agent may well be distinct from equivalent antimicrobials

  2. Microphase Separation Controlled beta-Sheet Crystallization Kinetics in Fibrous Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, X.; Lu, Q.; Kaplan, D.; Cebe, P.

    2009-01-01

    Silk is a naturally occurring fibrous protein with a multiblock chain architecture. As such, it has many similarities with synthetic block copolymers, including the possibility for e-sheet crystallization restricted within the crystallizable blocks. The mechanism of isothermal crystallization kinetics of e-sheet crystals in silk multiblock fibrous proteins is reported in this study. Kinetics theories, such as Avrami analysis which was established for studies of synthetic polymer crystal growth, are for the first time extended to investigate protein self-assembly in e-sheet rich Bombyx mori silk fibroin samples, using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and synchrotron real-time wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The Avrami exponent, n, was close to 2 for all methods and crystallization temperatures, indicating formation of e-sheet crystals in silk proteins is different from the 3-D spherulitic crystal growth found in synthetic polymers. Observations by scanning electron microscopy support the view that the protein structures vary during the different stages of crystal growth, and show a microphase separation pattern after chymotrypsin enzyme biodegradation. We present a model to explain the crystallization of the multiblock silk fibroin protein, by analogy to block copolymers: crystallization of e-sheets occurs under conditions of geometrical restriction caused by phase separation of the crystallizable and uncrystallizable blocks. This crystallization model could be widely applicable in other proteins with multiblock (i.e., crystallizable and noncrystallizable) domains.

  3. Purification of nonspecific lipid transfer protein (sterol carrier protein 2) from human liver and its deficiency in livers from patients with cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerongen, A. van; Helms, J.B.; Krift, T.P. van der; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Wirtz, K.W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The nonspecific lipid transfer protein (i.e., sterol carrier protein 2) from human liver was purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation, CM-cellulose chromatography, molecular sieve chromatography and fast protein liquid chromatography. Its amino acid composition was determined and

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of an SH3 domain from the IB1 scaffold protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dar, Imran; Bonny, Christophe; Pedersen, Jan Torleif

    2003-01-01

    IB1 is a mammalian scaffold protein that interacts with components of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signal-transduction pathway mainly via its protein-protein interaction domains. Crystallization of the key Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of IB1 has been achieved. Crystallization experiments with...

  5. Imatinib (Gleevec@) conformations observed in single crystals, protein-Imatinib co-crystals and molecular dynamics: Implications for drug selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzarroshan, B.; Siddegowda, M. S.; Li, Hong qi; Yathirajan, H. S.; Narayana, B.; Rathore, R. S.

    2012-06-01

    Structure and dynamics of the Leukemia drug, Imatinib, were examined using X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics studies. Comparison of conformations observed in single crystals with several reported co-crystals of protein-drug complexes suggests existence of two conserved conformations of Imatinib, extended and compact (or folded), corresponding to two binding modes of interaction with the receptor. Furthermore, these conformations are conserved throughout a dynamics simulation. The present study attempts to draw a parallel on conformations and binding patterns of interactions, obtained from small-molecule single-crystal and macromolecule co-crystal studies, and provides structural insights for understanding the high selectivity of this drug molecule.

  6. The Feasibility of Bulk Crystallization as an Industrial Purification and Production Technique for Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Johns, Michael R.; Pusey, Marc L.; White, Edward T.

    1998-01-01

    Bulk crystallization in stirred vessels is used industrially for the recovery and purification of many inorganic and organic materials. Although much has been written on the crystallization of proteins for X-ray diffraction analysis, very little has been reported on the application of bulk crystallization in stirred vessels. In this study, a 1-liter, seeded, stirred, batch crystallizer was used with ovalbumin as a model protein to test the feasibility of this crystallization method as a recovery and purification process for proteins. Results were obtained for ovalbumin solubility, nucleation thresholds, crystal breakage and crystal growth kinetics in bulk solution under a range of operating conditions of pH and ammonium sulphate concentration (Judge et al., 1996). Experiments were also performed to determine the degree of purification that can be achieved by the crystallization of ovalbumin from a mixture of proteins. The effect of the presence of these proteins upon the ovalbumin crystal growth kinetics was also investigated (Judge et al., 1995). All of these aspects are essential for the design of bulk crystallization processes which have not previously been reported for proteins. Results from a second study that investigated the effect of structurally different proteins on the solubility, crystal growth rates and crystal purity of chicken egg white lysozyme are also presented (Judge et al., 1997). In this case face growth rates were measured using lysozyme purified by liquid chromatography and the effect of the addition of specific protein impurities were observed on the (110) and (101) crystal faces. In these two studies the results are presented to show the feasibility and purifying ability of crystallization as a production process for proteins.

  7. Expression of a green fluorescence protein-carrier protein into mouse spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogas, Teresa; Fernández-Novell, Josep M; Palomo, Maria Jesús; Otaegui, Pedro J; Gomis, Roger R; Ballester, Joan; Izquierdo, Dolors; Guinovart, Joan J; Ferrer, Joan C; Rigau, Teresa; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E

    2002-10-04

    Intra-testicular inoculation of an adenoviral vector carrying the fusion gene Aequorea victoria green fluorescence protein/rat-liver glycogen synthase (GFP/LGS) resulted in the presence of GFP/GLS in spermatozoa from 7days to, at least, 16days after inoculation. The GFP/LGS was detected in the sperm heads after an "in vitro" fertilization procedure, either before or after the oocyte penetration. Our results indicate that spermatozoa carrying GFP/LGS protein conserved their fertilizing ability and were also detectable after oocyte penetration. This technique will allow to develop an easy system to follow the fate of mature sperm proteins.

  8. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Previous research from my lab has revealed that several higher plant species have multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein (ACP) and therefore this trait appears highly conserved among higher plants. This level of conservation suggests that the existence of ACP isoforms is not merely the results of neutral gene duplications. We have developed techniques to examine a wider range of species. Acyl carrier proteins can be labelled very specifically and to high specific activity using H-palmitate and the E. coli enzyme acyl-ACP synthetase. Isoforms were then resolved by western blotting and native PAGE of H-palmitate labelled ACP's. Multiple isoforms of ACP were observed the leaf tissue of the monocots Avena sativa and Hordeum vulgare and dicots including Arabidopsis thallina, Cuphea wrightii, and Brassica napus. Lower vascular plants including the cycad, Dioon edule, Ginkgo biloba, the gymnosperm Pinus, the fern Anernia phyllitidis and Psilotum nudum, the most primitive known extant vascular plant, were also found to have multiple ACP isoforms as were the nonvascular liverwort, Marchantia and moss, Polytrichum. Therefore, the development of ACP isoforms occurred early in evolution. However, the uniellular alge Chlamydomonas and Dunaliella and the photosynthetic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Agmnellum have only a single elecrophotetic form of ACP. Thus, multiple forms of ACP do not occur in all photosynthetic organisms but may be associated with multicellular plants.

  9. Crystallization and evaluation of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals for protein pH titration in the crystalline state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Wakari; Yagi, Daichi; Ishikawa, Takuya; Ohnishi, Yuki; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2008-01-01

    Hen egg-white lysozyme was crystallized over a wide pH range (2.5–8.0) and the quality of the crystals was characterized. Crystallization phase diagrams at pH 2.5, 6.0 and 7.5 were determined To observe the ionized status of the amino acid residues in proteins at different pH (protein pH titration in the crystalline state) by neutron diffraction, hen egg-white lysozyme was crystallized over a wide pH range (2.5–8.0). Crystallization phase diagrams at pH 2.5, 6.0 and 7.5 were determined. At pH < 4.5 the border between the metastable region and the nucleation region shifted to the left (lower precipitant concentration) in the phase diagram, and at pH > 4.5 the border shifted to the right (higher precipitant concentration). The qualities of these crystals were characterized using the Wilson plot method. The qualities of all crystals at different pH were more or less equivalent (B-factor values within 25–40). It is expected that neutron diffraction analysis of these crystals of different pH provides equivalent data in quality for discussions of protein pH titration in the crystalline state of hen egg-white lysozyme

  10. Use of layer silicate for protein crystallization: effects of Micromica and chlorite powders in hanging drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Masahide; Ino, Keita; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Oshikane, Hiroyuki; Nureki, Osamu; Ebina, Takeo; Mizukami, Fujio; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2008-02-15

    Two kinds of layer silicate powder, Micromica and chlorite, were used to aid protein crystallization by the addition to hanging drops. Using appropriate crystallization buffers, Micromica powder facilitated crystal growth speed for most proteins tested in this study. Furthermore, the addition of Micromica powder to hanging drops allowed the successful crystallization of lysozyme, catalase, concanavalin A, and trypsin even at low protein concentrations and under buffer conditions that otherwise would not generate protein crystals. Except for threonine synthase and apoferritin, the presence of chlorite delayed crystallization but induced the formation of large crystals. X-ray analysis of thaumatin crystals generated by our novel procedure gave better quality data than did that of crystals obtained by a conventional hanging drop method. Our results suggest that the speed of crystal growth and the quality of the corresponding X-ray data may be inversely related, at least for the formation of thaumatin crystals. The effect of Micromica and chlorite powders and the application of layer silicate powder for protein crystallization are discussed.

  11. Electrospun fish protein fibers as a biopolymer-based carrier – implications for oral protein delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Protein-based electrospun fibers have emerged as novel nanostructured materials for tissue engineering and drug delivery due to their unique structural characteristics, biocompatibility and biodegradability. The aim of this study was to explore the use of electrospun fibers based on fish...... sarcoplasmic proteins as an oral delivery platform for biopharmaceuticals, using insulin as a model protein. Methods: Fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP) were isolated from fresh cod and electrospun into nanomicrofibers using insulin as a model payload. The morphology of FSP fibers was characterized using...... was significantly enhanced when administered encapsulated in FSP fibers. The TEER was decreased after 4 h incubation, and no negative effect on cell viability was observed at any time. Conclusion: In this work we present electrospun FSP fibers as a novel oral drug delivery system for biopharmaceuticals...

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the haem-binding protein HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Sabine; Paoli, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    The haem binding protein HemS from Y. enterocolitica has been crystallized in complex with its ligand. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.6 Å in-house. Bacteria have evolved strategies to acquire iron from their environment. Pathogenic microbes rely on specialized proteins to ‘steal’ haem from their host and use it as an iron source. HemS is the ultimate recipient of a molecular-relay system for haem uptake in Gram-negative species, functioning as the cytosolic carrier of haem. Soluble expression and high-quality diffraction crystals were obtained for HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.86, b = 77.45, c = 114.09 Å, and diffract X-rays to 2.6 Å spacing in-house. Determination of the structure of the haem–HemS complex will reveal the molecular basis of haem binding

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the haem-binding protein HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Sabine; Paoli, Massimo, E-mail: max.paoli@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Pharmacy and Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    The haem binding protein HemS from Y. enterocolitica has been crystallized in complex with its ligand. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.6 Å in-house. Bacteria have evolved strategies to acquire iron from their environment. Pathogenic microbes rely on specialized proteins to ‘steal’ haem from their host and use it as an iron source. HemS is the ultimate recipient of a molecular-relay system for haem uptake in Gram-negative species, functioning as the cytosolic carrier of haem. Soluble expression and high-quality diffraction crystals were obtained for HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.86, b = 77.45, c = 114.09 Å, and diffract X-rays to 2.6 Å spacing in-house. Determination of the structure of the haem–HemS complex will reveal the molecular basis of haem binding.

  14. Crystal structure of a mutant of archaeal ribosomal protein L1 from Methanococcus jannaschii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarskikh, A. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Kostareva, O. S.; Shklyaeva, A. A.; Tishchenko, S. V.

    2014-05-01

    The crystal structure of a mutant of archaeal ribosomal protein L1 from Methanococcus jannaschii with the deletion of a nonconserved positively charged cluster consisting of eight C-terminal amino acid residues is determined by the molecular replacement method at 1.75 Å resolution. This mutant is shown to form more stable and ordered crystals belonging to a space group other than that of the wild-type protein crystals. The positively charged C-terminal region has only a slight effect on the interaction between protein L1 and RNA molecules. Hence, this mutant can be used to prepare protein-RNA complexes and obtain their crystals.

  15. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  16. High-throughput method for optimum solubility screening for homogeneity and crystallization of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hou [Moraga, CA; Kim, Rosalind [Moraga, CA; Jancarik, Jamila [Walnut Creek, CA

    2012-01-31

    An optimum solubility screen in which a panel of buffers and many additives are provided in order to obtain the most homogeneous and monodisperse protein condition for protein crystallization. The present methods are useful for proteins that aggregate and cannot be concentrated prior to setting up crystallization screens. A high-throughput method using the hanging-drop method and vapor diffusion equilibrium and a panel of twenty-four buffers is further provided. Using the present methods, 14 poorly behaving proteins have been screened, resulting in 11 of the proteins having highly improved dynamic light scattering results allowing concentration of the proteins, and 9 were crystallized.

  17. Impact of carrier doping on electrical properties of laser-induced liquid-phase-crystallized silicon thin films for solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umishio, Hiroshi; Matsui, Takuya; Sai, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Takeaki; Matsubara, Koji

    2018-02-01

    Large-grain-size (>1 mm) liquid-phase-crystallized silicon (LPC-Si) films with a wide range of carrier doping levels (1016–1018 cm‑3 either of the n- or p-type) were prepared by irradiating amorphous silicon with a line-shaped 804 nm laser, and characterized for solar cell applications. The LPC-Si films show high electron and hole mobilities with maximum values of ∼800 and ∼200 cm2 V‑1 s‑1, respectively, at a doping level of ∼(2–4) × 1016 cm‑3, while their carrier lifetime monotonically increases with decreasing carrier doping level. A grain-boundary charge-trapping model provides good fits to the measured mobility–carrier density relations, indicating that the potential barrier at the grain boundaries limits the carrier transport in the lowly doped films. The open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current density of test LPC-Si solar cells depend strongly on the doping level, peaking at (2–5) × 1016 cm‑3. These results indicate that the solar cell performance is governed by the minority carrier diffusion length for the highly doped films, while it is limited by majority carrier transport as well as by device design for the lowly doped films.

  18. Structural correlates of carrier protein recognition in tetanus toxoid-conjugated bacterial polysaccharide vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Kay; Gao, Fang; Derrick, Jeremy P; Bolgiano, Barbara

    2015-03-10

    An analysis of structure-antibody recognition relationships in nine licenced polysaccharide-tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccines was performed. The panel of conjugates used included vaccine components to protect against disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b, Neisseria meningitidis groups A, C, W and Y and Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 18C. Conformation and structural analysis included size exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering to determine size, and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching to evaluate the protein folding and exposure of Trp residues. A capture ELISA measured the recognition of TT epitopes in the conjugates, using four rat monoclonal antibodies: 2 localised to the HC domain, and 2 of which were holotoxoid conformation-dependent. The conjugates had a wide range of average molecular masses ranging from 1.8×10(6) g/mol to larger than 20×10(6) g/mol. The panel of conjugates were found to be well folded, and did not have spectral features typical of aggregated TT. A partial correlation was found between molecular mass and epitope recognition. Recognition of the epitopes either on the HC domain or the whole toxoid was not necessarily hampered by the size of the molecule. Correlation was also found between the accessibility of Trp side chains and polysaccharide loading, suggesting also that a higher level of conjugated PS does not necessarily interfere with toxoid accessibility. There were different levels of carrier protein Trp side-chain and epitope accessibility that were localised to the HC domain; these were related to the saccharide type, despite the conjugates being independently manufactured. These findings extend our understanding of the molecular basis for carrier protein recognition in TT conjugate vaccines. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Towards protein-crystal centering using second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissick, David J.; Dettmar, Christopher M.; Becker, Michael; Mulichak, Anne M.; Cherezov, Vadim; Ginell, Stephan L.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Fischetti, Robert F.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2013-01-01

    The potential of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for automated crystal centering to guide synchrotron X-ray diffraction of protein crystals has been explored. The potential of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for automated crystal centering to guide synchrotron X-ray diffraction of protein crystals was explored. These studies included (i) comparison of microcrystal positions in cryoloops as determined by SHG imaging and by X-ray diffraction rastering and (ii) X-ray structure determinations of selected proteins to investigate the potential for laser-induced damage from SHG imaging. In studies using β 2 adrenergic receptor membrane-protein crystals prepared in lipidic mesophase, the crystal locations identified by SHG images obtained in transmission mode were found to correlate well with the crystal locations identified by raster scanning using an X-ray minibeam. SHG imaging was found to provide about 2 µm spatial resolution and shorter image-acquisition times. The general insensitivity of SHG images to optical scatter enabled the reliable identification of microcrystals within opaque cryocooled lipidic mesophases that were not identified by conventional bright-field imaging. The potential impact of extended exposure of protein crystals to five times a typical imaging dose from an ultrafast laser source was also assessed. Measurements of myoglobin and thaumatin crystals resulted in no statistically significant differences between structures obtained from diffraction data acquired from exposed and unexposed regions of single crystals. Practical constraints for integrating SHG imaging into an active beamline for routine automated crystal centering are discussed

  20. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) fatty acid synthase complex: β-hydroxyacyl-[acyl carrier protein] dehydratase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Thuillier, Irene; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Sánchez, Rosario; Garcés, Rafael; von Wettstein-Knowles, Penny; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2016-02-01

    Two sunflower hydroxyacyl-[acyl carrier protein] dehydratases evolved into two different isoenzymes showing distinctive expression levels and kinetics' efficiencies. β-Hydroxyacyl-[acyl carrier protein (ACP)]-dehydratase (HAD) is a component of the type II fatty acid synthase complex involved in 'de novo' fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. This complex, formed by four intraplastidial proteins, is responsible for the sequential condensation of two-carbon units, leading to 16- and 18-C acyl-ACP. HAD dehydrates 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP generating trans-2-enoyl-ACP. With the aim of a further understanding of fatty acid biosynthesis in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds, two β-hydroxyacyl-[ACP] dehydratase genes have been cloned from developing seeds, HaHAD1 (GenBank HM044767) and HaHAD2 (GenBank GU595454). Genomic DNA gel blot analyses suggest that both are single copy genes. Differences in their expression patterns across plant tissues were detected. Higher levels of HaHAD2 in the initial stages of seed development inferred its key role in seed storage fatty acid synthesis. That HaHAD1 expression levels remained constant across most tissues suggest a housekeeping function. Heterologous expression of these genes in E. coli confirmed both proteins were functional and able to interact with the bacterial complex 'in vivo'. The large increase of saturated fatty acids in cells expressing HaHAD1 and HaHAD2 supports the idea that these HAD genes are closely related to the E. coli FabZ gene. The proposed three-dimensional models of HaHAD1 and HaHAD2 revealed differences at the entrance to the catalytic tunnel attributable to Phe166/Val1159, respectively. HaHAD1 F166V was generated to study the function of this residue. The 'in vitro' enzymatic characterization of the three HAD proteins demonstrated all were active, with the mutant having intermediate K m and V max values to the wild-type proteins.

  1. Extracellular matrix protein in calcified endoskeleton: a potential additive for crystal growth and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a key function of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) on seed crystals, which are isolated from calcified endoskeletons of soft coral and contain only CaCO 3 without any living cells. This is the first report that an ECMP protein extracted from a marine organism could potentially influence in modifying the surface of a substrate for designing materials via crystallization. We previously studied with the ECMPs from a different type of soft coral ( Sinularia polydactyla) without introducing any seed crystals in the process , which showed different results. Thus, crystallization on the seed in the presence of ECMPs of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins from soft coral. For understanding this interesting phenomenon, in vitro crystallization was initiated in a supersaturated solution on seed particles of calcite (1 0 4) with and without ECMPs. No change in the crystal growth shape occurred without ECMPs present during the crystallization process. However, with ECMPs, the morphology and phase of the crystals in the crystallization process changed dramatically. Upon completion of crystallization with ECMPs, an attractive crystal morphology was found. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the crystal morphologies on the seeds surface. The mineral phases of crystals nucleated by ECMPs on the seeds surface were examined by Raman spectroscopy. Although 50 mM Mg 2+ is influential in making aragonite in the crystallization process, the ECMPs significantly made calcite crystals even when 50 mM Mg 2+ was present in the process. Crystallization with the ECMP additive seems to be a technically attractive strategy to generate assembled micro crystals that could be used in crystals growth and design in the Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  2. Overview of electron crystallography of membrane proteins: crystallization and screening strategies using negative stain electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannenga, Brent L; Iadanza, Matthew G; Vollmar, Breanna S; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy, or cryoEM, is an emerging technique for studying the three-dimensional structures of proteins and large macromolecular machines. Electron crystallography is a branch of cryoEM in which structures of proteins can be studied at resolutions that rival those achieved by X-ray crystallography. Electron crystallography employs two-dimensional crystals of a membrane protein embedded within a lipid bilayer. The key to a successful electron crystallographic experiment is the crystallization, or reconstitution, of the protein of interest. This unit describes ways in which protein can be expressed, purified, and reconstituted into well-ordered two-dimensional crystals. A protocol is also provided for negative stain electron microscopy as a tool for screening crystallization trials. When large and well-ordered crystals are obtained, the structures of both protein and its surrounding membrane can be determined to atomic resolution.

  3. Controlled in meso phase crystallization--a method for the structural investigation of membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kubicek

    Full Text Available We investigated in meso crystallization of membrane proteins to develop a fast screening technology which combines features of the well established classical vapor diffusion experiment with the batch meso phase crystallization, but without premixing of protein and monoolein. It inherits the advantages of both methods, namely (i the stabilization of membrane proteins in the meso phase, (ii the control of hydration level and additive concentration by vapor diffusion. The new technology (iii significantly simplifies in meso crystallization experiments and allows the use of standard liquid handling robots suitable for 96 well formats. CIMP crystallization furthermore allows (iv direct monitoring of phase transformation and crystallization events. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR crystals of high quality and diffraction up to 1.3 Å resolution have been obtained in this approach. CIMP and the developed consumables and protocols have been successfully applied to obtain crystals of sensory rhodopsin II (SRII from Halobacterium salinarum for the first time.

  4. Experimental study of osteoinduction using a new material as a carrier for bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Noriaki; Okubo, Yasunori; Nakao, Kazumasa; Osawa, Kenji; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2011-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of artificial collagen as a new carrier for recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) by comparing it with that of atelopeptide collagen, which is derived from porcine skin, and which we have previously shown to be useful for the induction of bone. rhBMP-2 5μg with either atelopeptide collagen 3mg or artificial collagen 3mg was implanted into the calf muscle of 10-week-old Wistar rats (n=3 in each group). Three rats were given artificial collagen alone and acted as controls (n=3). Radiographic evaluation, histological analysis, and biochemical examinations were made on day 21 after implantation. Soft radiographs (wavelength 10-0.10nm) showed opaque shadows in both groups. Histological analysis showed that new bone had formed in both experimental groups. Endochondral ossification was found at the outermost edge of the implanted collagen in the atelopeptide group. However, there was less ossification in the implanted collagen in the artificial collagen group. On biochemical examination, alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium concentrations in both experimental groups were higher than in the control group, and were higher in the atelopeptide group than in the artificial collagen group. Our results suggest that artificial collagen is useful as a carrier for rhBMP-2 designed to promote the formation of new bone. Copyright © 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genes of ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN Family Show Different Expression Profiles and Overexpression of ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN 5 Modulates Fatty Acid Composition and Enhances Salt Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiexue Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Acyl carrier proteins (ACPs are a group of small acidic proteins functioning as important cofactors in the de novo synthesis of fatty acids. In Arabidopsis, ACPs are encoded by a small gene family comprising five plastid members, AtACP1 to AtACP5, and three mitochondrial members. The biological functions and the transcriptional responses to abiotic stresses of most AtACPs have yet to be elucidated. The present study extends previous findings and provides new knowledge on the function of ACPs by examining the responses of AtACP-encoding genes to several abiotic stresses and, in particular, the role of AtACP5 in the adaptation to salt stress. Phylogenetic analysis showed that AtACP1, AtACP2, AtACP3, and AtACP5 can be classified into one group and separated from a group comprising AtACP4 and ACP homologs from related species. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression of AtACP1, AtACP2, and AtACP3 was induced by drought. Both iron deficiency and nitrogen starvation resulted in down-regulation of AtACP4. The most pronounced response was observed for AtACP5, the expression of which was dramatically decreased by salt stress. Knock-out of AtACP5 showed increased sensitivity to NaCl stress, whereas transgenic lines overexpressing AtACP5 displayed increased salt tolerance relative to the wild-type. Overexpression of AtACP5 further led to an altered composition of fatty acids, mainly a decrease of oleic acid (C18:1 and an increase of palmitic acid (C16:0, and to a lower Na+/K+ ratio when compared to the salt stressed wild-type. The comprehensive transcriptional information on the small plastid AtACP gene family in response to various abiotic stresses and the further investigation of the AtACP5 indicate that AtACP5 might be critical for salt tolerance through alterations of the composition of fatty acids and, subsequently, the Na+/K+ ratio.

  6. Genes of ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN Family Show Different Expression Profiles and Overexpression of ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN 5 Modulates Fatty Acid Composition and Enhances Salt Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiexue; Xue, Caiwen; Wang, Han; Wang, Lisai; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Shen, Renfang; Lan, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) are a group of small acidic proteins functioning as important cofactors in the de novo synthesis of fatty acids. In Arabidopsis , ACPs are encoded by a small gene family comprising five plastid members, AtACP1 to AtACP5 , and three mitochondrial members. The biological functions and the transcriptional responses to abiotic stresses of most AtACPs have yet to be elucidated. The present study extends previous findings and provides new knowledge on the function of ACPs by examining the responses of AtACP-encoding genes to several abiotic stresses and, in particular, the role of AtACP5 in the adaptation to salt stress. Phylogenetic analysis showed that AtACP1, AtACP2, AtACP3, and AtACP5 can be classified into one group and separated from a group comprising AtACP4 and ACP homologs from related species. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression of AtACP1, AtACP2 , and AtACP3 was induced by drought. Both iron deficiency and nitrogen starvation resulted in down-regulation of AtACP4 . The most pronounced response was observed for AtACP5 , the expression of which was dramatically decreased by salt stress. Knock-out of AtACP5 showed increased sensitivity to NaCl stress, whereas transgenic lines overexpressing AtACP5 displayed increased salt tolerance relative to the wild-type. Overexpression of AtACP5 further led to an altered composition of fatty acids, mainly a decrease of oleic acid (C18:1) and an increase of palmitic acid (C16:0), and to a lower Na + /K + ratio when compared to the salt stressed wild-type. The comprehensive transcriptional information on the small plastid AtACP gene family in response to various abiotic stresses and the further investigation of the AtACP5 indicate that AtACP5 might be critical for salt tolerance through alterations of the composition of fatty acids and, subsequently, the Na + /K + ratio.

  7. Dissecting the Structural Elements for the Activation of β-Ketoacyl-(Acyl Carrier Protein) Reductase from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing; Zheng, Heping; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Shumilin, Igor A; Osinski, Tomasz; Demas, Matt; Grimshaw, Sarah; Minor, Wladek

    2016-02-01

    β-Ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) reductase (FabG) catalyzes the key reductive reaction in the elongation cycle of fatty acid synthesis (FAS), which is a vital metabolic pathway in bacteria and a promising target for new antibiotic development. The activation of the enzyme is usually linked to the formation of a catalytic triad and cofactor binding, and crystal structures of FabG from different organisms have been captured in either the active or inactive conformation. However, the structural elements which enable activation of FabG require further exploration. Here we report the findings of structural, enzymatic, and binding studies of the FabG protein found in the causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae (vcFabG). vcFabG exists predominantly as a dimer in solution and is able to self-associate to form tetramers, which is the state seen in the crystal structure. The formation of the tetramer may be promoted by the presence of the cofactor NADP(H). The transition between the dimeric and tetrameric states of vcFabG is related to changes in the conformations of the α4/α5 helices on the dimer-dimer interface. Two glycine residues adjacent to the dimer interface (G92 and G141) are identified to be the hinge for the conformational changes, while the catalytic tyrosine (Y155) and a glutamine residue that forms hydrogen bonds to both loop β4-α4 and loop β5-α5 (Q152) stabilize the active conformation. The functions of the aforementioned residues were confirmed by binding and enzymatic assays for the corresponding mutants. This paper describes the results of structural, enzymatic, and binding studies of FabG from Vibrio cholerae (vcFabG). In this work, we dissected the structural elements responsible for the activation of vcFabG. The structural information provided here is essential for the development of antibiotics specifically targeting bacterial FabG, especially for the multidrug-resistant strains of V. cholerae. Copyright © 2016, American Society for

  8. Protein crystallization in a 100 nl solution with new stirring equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, S.; Murai, R.; Yoshikawa, H. Y.; Kitatani, T.; Nakata, S.; Kawahara, H.; Hasenaka, H.; Kobayashi, A.; Okada, S.; Sugiyama, S.; Adachi, H.; Matsumura, H.; Takano, K.; Murakami, S.; Inoue, T.; Sasaki, T.; Mori, Y.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate quantitatively the effects of stirring on protein crystallization, a new stirring system which can agitate a protein solution, ∼100 nl, by providing Hagen–Poiseuille flow has been successfully developed. To investigate quantitatively the effects of stirring on protein crystallization, a new stirring system which can agitate a protein solution, ∼100 nl, by providing Hagen–Poiseuille flow has been successfully developed. In addition, this new stirring system provides flow with a well defined pattern and velocity. Using this system, hen egg-white lysozyme was crystallized in 100–200 nl solutions while being stirred. The optimum stirring conditions for lysozyme crystals have been explored by evaluating the Reynolds (Re) number and the crystals obtained. Intermittent flow, as well as a low Re number, was found to contribute significantly to the growth of a smaller number of larger crystals

  9. Binding of 7-dehydrocholesterol to sterol carrier protein and vitamin D3 effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Sachiko; Oizumi, Kumiko; Moriuchi, Sachiko; Hosoya, Norimasa

    1975-01-01

    It was confirmed that deltasup(5,7)-sterol delta 7 -reductase activity was suppressed by cholecalciferol (vitamin D 3 ) in the enzyme system consisted of microsomes and sterol carrier protein (SCP). The enzyme activity was significantly decreased in the combination with microsomes obtained from either vitamin D-deficient or vitamin D 3 -treated rat liver and with SCP obtained from vitamin D 3 -treated rat. It was also demonstrated by the binding assay of the dextran-charcoal technique that 7-dehydrocholesterol binding to SCP could be specifically displaced by vitamin D 3 . The inhibition of cholecalciferol on 7-dehydro-cholesterol binding to liver SCP was confirmed to be non-competitive inhibition. (auth.)

  10. Effect of increased CRM₁₉₇ carrier protein dose on meningococcal C bactericidal antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lucia H; Blake, Milan S

    2012-04-01

    New multivalent CRM(197)-based conjugate vaccines are available for childhood immunization. Clinical studies were reviewed to assess meningococcal group C (MenC) antibody responses following MenC-CRM(197) coadministration with CRM(197)-based pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines. Infants receiving a total CRM(197) carrier protein dose of ∼50 μg and concomitant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP)-containing vaccine tended to have lower MenC geometric mean antibody titers and continued to have low titers after the toddler dose. Nevertheless, at least 95% of children in the reported studies achieved a MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer of ≥ 1:8 after the last infant or toddler dose. SBA was measured using an assay with a baby rabbit or human complement source. Additional studies are needed to assess long-term antibody persistence and MenC CRM(197) conjugate vaccine immunogenicity using alternative dosing schedules.

  11. Evaluation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Inhibitors as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Quenching Reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Molin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for a wide range of infections. Production of virulence factors and biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa are partly regulated by cell-to-cell communication quorum-sensing systems. Identification of quorum-quenching reagents which block the quorum-sensing process can facilitate development of novel treatment strategies for P. aeruginosa infections. We have used molecular dynamics simulation and experimental studies to elucidate the efficiencies of two potential quorum-quenching reagents, triclosan and green tea epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, which both function as inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP reductase (ENR from the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis pathway. Our studies suggest that EGCG has a higher binding affinity towards ENR of P. aeruginosa and is an efficient quorum-quenching reagent. EGCG treatment was further shown to be able to attenuate the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa.

  12. Expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Niefind, K; Pinna, L A

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic (alpha) subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2alpha) was originally cloned and overexpressed in the Escherichia coli strain pT7-7/BL21(DE3). The protein has been purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, they have unit-cell parameter...

  13. Repartitioning of NaCl and Protein Impurities in Lysozyme Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Monaco, Lisa A.; Thomas, Bill R.; Stojanoff, Vivian; Rosenberger, Franz

    1996-01-01

    Nonuniform precipitant and impurity incorporation in protein crystals can cause lattice strain and, thus, possibly decrease the X-ray diffraction resolution. To address this issue, a series of crystallization experiments were carried out, in which initial supersaturation, NaCl concentration, protein purity level and crystallized fraction were varied. Lysozyme and protein impurities, as well as sodium and chloride were independently determined in the initial solution, supernatant and crystals. The segregation coefficients for Na(+) and Cl(-) were found to be independent of supersaturation and NaCl concentration, and decreased with crystallized fraction/crystal size. Numerical evaluation of the extensive body of data, based on a nucleation-growth- repartitioning model, suggests a core of approx. 40 microns in which salt is incorporated in much greater concentrations than during later growth. Small crystals containing higher amounts of incorporated NaCl also had higher protein impurity contents. This suggests that the excess salt is associated with the protein impurities in the core. X-ray topography revealed strain fields in the center of the crystals comparable in size to the inferred core. The growth rates of crystals smaller than 30-40 pm in size were consistently 1.5-2 times lower than those of larger crystals, presumably due to higher chemical potentials in the core.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of merohedrally twinned crystals of MJ0729, a CBS-domain protein from Methanococcus jannaschii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Kortazar, Danel; Lucas, María [Unidad de Cristalografía Macromolecular, CIC bioGUNE, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Ed. 800, 48160 Derio, Vizcaya (Spain); Martínez-Chantar, María Luz [Unidad de Metabolómica, CIC bioGUNE, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Ed. 801, 48160 Derio, Vizcaya (Spain); Astigarraga, Egoitz; Fernández, José Andrés [Departamento de Química-Física, Universidad del País Vasco UPV-EHU, Barrio Sarriena s/n, E-48940 Leioa (Spain); Sabas, Olatz [Unidad de Cristalografía Macromolecular, CIC bioGUNE, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Ed. 800, 48160 Derio, Vizcaya (Spain); Albert, Armando [Instituto de Química-Física ‘Rocasolano’, CSIC, c/Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Mato, Jose M. [Unidad de Metabolómica, CIC bioGUNE, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Ed. 801, 48160 Derio, Vizcaya (Spain); Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso, E-mail: amartinez@cicbiogune.es [Unidad de Cristalografía Macromolecular, CIC bioGUNE, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Ed. 800, 48160 Derio, Vizcaya (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Trigonal crystals of MJ0729 showing different degrees of merohedral twinning that may vary from perfect hemihedral twinning to perfect tetartohedral twinning were obtained upon slight variation of the pH. CBS domains are small protein motifs, usually associated in tandem, that are implicated in binding to adenosyl groups. Several genetic diseases in humans have been associated with mutations in CBS sequences, which has made them very promising targets for rational drug design. Trigonal crystals of the CBS-domain protein MJ0729 from Methanococcus jannaschii were grown by the vapour-diffusion method at acidic pH. Preliminary analysis of nine X-ray diffraction data sets using Yeates statistics and Britton plots showed that slight variation in the pH as well as in the buffer used in the crystallization experiments led to crystals with different degrees of merohedral twinning that may vary from perfect hemihedral twinning to perfect tetartohedral twinning.

  15. Metal-assisted and microwave accelerated-evaporative crystallization: Application to lysozyme protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauge-Lewis, Kevin

    In response to the growing need for new crystallization techniques that afford for rapid processing times along with control over crystal size and distribution, the Aslan Research Group has recently demonstrated the use of Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization MA-MAEC technique in conjunction with metal nanoparticles and nanostructures for the crystallization of amino acids and organic small molecules. In this study, we have employed the newly developed MA-MAEC technique to the accelerated crystallization of chicken egg-white lysozyme on circular crystallization platforms in order to demonstrate the proof-of-principle application of the method for protein crystallization. The circular crystallization platforms are constructed in-house from poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and silver nanoparticle films (SNFs), indium tin oxide (ITO) and iron nano-columns. In this study, we prove the MA-MAEC method to be a more effective technique in the rapid crystallization of macromolecules in comparison to other conventional methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of the novel iCrystal system, which incorporates the use of continuous, low wattage heating to facilitate the rapid crystallization of the lysozyme while still retaining excellent crystal quality. With the incorporation of the iCrystal system, we observe crystallization times that are even shorter than those produced by the MA-MAEC technique using a conventional microwave oven in addition to significantly improved crystal quality.

  16. High-resolution structures of Thermus thermophilus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase in the apo form, in complex with NAD+ and in complex with NAD+ and triclosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, José M.; Noël, Ann-Josée; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Wende, Wolfgang; Schierling, Benno; Pingoud, Alfred; Raaij, Mark J. van

    2012-01-01

    T. thermophilus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase was crystallized in the apo form, with NAD + bound and with NAD + and the inhibitor triclosan bound. The structures were solved by molecular replacement and refined at 1.50, 1.86 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. The structures are described, analysed and compared with those of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases from other species. Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR; the product of the fabI gene) is an important enzyme that is involved in the type II fatty-acid-synthesis pathway of bacteria, plants, apicomplexan protozoa and mitochondria. Harmful pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium falciparum use the type II fatty-acid-synthesis system, but not mammals or fungi, which contain a type I fatty-acid-synthesis pathway consisting of one or two multifunctional enzymes. For this reason, specific inhibitors of ENR are attractive antibiotic candidates. Triclosan, a broad-range antibacterial agent, binds to ENR, inhibiting fatty-acid synthesis. As humans do not have an ENR enzyme, they are not affected. Here, high-resolution structures of Thermus thermophilus (Tth) ENR in the apo form, bound to NAD + and bound to NAD + plus triclosan are reported. Differences from and similarities to other known ENR structures are reported; in general, the structures are very similar. The cofactor-binding site is also very similar to those of other ENRs and, as reported for other species, triclosan leads to greater ordering of the loop that covers the cofactor-binding site, which, together with the presence of triclosan itself, presumably provides tight binding of the dinucleotide, preventing cycling of the cofactor. Differences between the structures of Tth ENR and other ENRs are the presence of an additional β-sheet at the N-terminus and a larger number of salt bridges and side-chain hydrogen bonds. These features may be related to the high thermal stability of Tth ENR

  17. Bioinformatic evidence for a widely distributed, ribosomally produced electron carrier precursor, its maturation proteins, and its nicotinoprotein redox partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haft Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes in the radical SAM (rSAM domain family serve in a wide variety of biological processes, including RNA modification, enzyme activation, bacteriocin core peptide maturation, and cofactor biosynthesis. Evolutionary pressures and relationships to other cellular constituents impose recognizable grammars on each class of rSAM-containing system, shaping patterns in results obtained through various comparative genomics analyses. Results An uncharacterized gene cluster found in many Actinobacteria and sporadically in Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Deltaproteobacteria, and one Archaeal plasmid contains a PqqE-like rSAM protein family that includes Rv0693 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Members occur clustered with a strikingly well-conserved small polypeptide we designate "mycofactocin," similar in size to bacteriocins and PqqA, precursor of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ. Partial Phylogenetic Profiling (PPP based on the distribution of these markers identifies the mycofactocin cluster, but also a second tier of high-scoring proteins. This tier, strikingly, is filled with up to thirty-one members per genome from three variant subfamilies that occur, one each, in three unrelated classes of nicotinoproteins. The pattern suggests these variant enzymes require not only NAD(P, but also the novel gene cluster. Further study was conducted using SIMBAL, a PPP-like tool, to search these nicotinoproteins for subsequences best correlated across multiple genomes to the presence of mycofactocin. For both the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR and iron-containing dehydrogenase families, aligning SIMBAL's top-scoring sequences to homologous solved crystal structures shows signals centered over NAD(P-binding sites rather than over substrate-binding or active site residues. Previous studies on some of these proteins have revealed a non-exchangeable NAD cofactor, such that enzymatic activity in vitro requires an artificial electron acceptor such

  18. An Overview of Hardware for Protein Crystallization in a Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er-Kai Yan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein crystallization under a magnetic field is an interesting research topic because a magnetic field may provide a special environment to acquire improved quality protein crystals. Because high-quality protein crystals are very useful in high-resolution structure determination using diffraction techniques (X-ray, neutron, and electron diffraction, research using magnetic fields in protein crystallization has attracted substantial interest; some studies have been performed in the past two decades. In this research field, the hardware is especially essential for successful studies because the environment is special and the design and utilization of the research apparatus in such an environment requires special considerations related to the magnetic field. This paper reviews the hardware for protein crystallization (including the magnet systems and the apparatus designed for use in a magnetic field and progress in this area. Future prospects in this field will also be discussed.

  19. Salvage and storage of infectious disease protein targets in the SSGCID high-throughput crystallization pathway using microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Jeff; Gerdts, Cory J.; Clifton, Mathew C.; Stewart, Lance

    2011-01-01

    SSGCID protein crystals were salvaged and stored using the MPCS Plug Maker and CrystalCards when high-throughput traditional sitting-drop vapor diffusion initially failed. The MPCS Plug Maker is a microcapillary-based protein-crystallization system for generating diffraction-ready crystals from nanovolumes of protein. Crystallization screening using the Plug Maker was used as a salvage pathway for proteins that failed to crystallize during the initial observation period using the traditional sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method. Furthermore, the CrystalCards used to store the crystallization experiments set up by the Plug Maker are shown be a viable container for long-term storage of protein crystals without a discernable loss of diffraction quality with time. Use of the Plug Maker with SSGCID proteins is demonstrated to be an effective crystal-salvage and storage method

  20. Photoreduction and validation of haem-ligand intermediate states in protein crystals byin situsingle-crystal spectroscopy and diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekilli, Demet; Moreno-Chicano, Tadeo; Chaplin, Amanda K; Horrell, Sam; Dworkowski, Florian S N; Worrall, Jonathan A R; Strange, Richard W; Hough, Michael A

    2017-05-01

    Powerful synergies are available from the combination of multiple methods to study proteins in the crystalline form. Spectroscopies which probe the same region of the crystal from which X-ray crystal structures are determined can give insights into redox, ligand and spin states to complement the information gained from the electron-density maps. The correct assignment of crystal structures to the correct protein redox and ligand states is essential to avoid the misinterpretation of structural data. This is a particular concern for haem proteins, which can occupy a wide range of redox states and are exquisitely sensitive to becoming reduced by solvated electrons generated from interactions of X-rays with water molecules in the crystal. Here, single-crystal spectroscopic fingerprinting has been applied to investigate the laser photoreduction of ferric haem in cytochrome c '. Furthermore, in situ X-ray-driven generation of haem intermediates in crystals of the dye-decolourizing-type peroxidase A (DtpA) from Streptomyces lividans is described.

  1. Protein Crystal Growth in Gels and Stationary Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, A.; Quiroz-Garcia, B.; Yokaichiya, F.; Stojanoff, V.; Rudolph, P.

    2007-01-01

    Thaumatin, lysozyme, and ferritin single crystals were grown in solutions and gels without and with surrounding strong stationary magnetic fields. The crystal size, number and alignment in dependence on the induction force were analyzed. The crystal quality, like mosaicity, as function of the magnetic force is discussed by using synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis

  2. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model for Protein Crystal Growth Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, Sabine; Smith, Lori; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea Victoria has become a popular marker for e.g. mutagenesis work. Its fluorescent property, which originates from a chromophore located in the center of the molecule, makes it widely applicable as a research too]. GFP clones have been produced with a variety of spectral properties, such as blue and yellow emitting species. The protein is a single chain of molecular weight 27 kDa and its structure has been determined at 1.9 Angstrom resolution. The combination of GFP's fluorescent property, the knowledge of its several crystallization conditions, and its increasing use in biophysical and biochemical studies, all led us to consider it as a model material for macromolecular crystal growth studies. Initial preparations of GFP were from E.coli with yields of approximately 5 mg/L of culture media. Current yields are now in the 50 - 120 mg/L range, and we hope to further increase this by expression of the GFP gene in the Pichia system. The results of these efforts and of preliminary crystal growth studies will be presented.

  3. Inorganic Lead Halide Perovskite Single Crystals: Phase-Selective Low-Temperature Growth, Carrier Transport Properties, and Self-Powered Photodetection

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaminov, Makhsud I.

    2016-12-06

    A rapid, low-temperature, and solution-based route is developed for growing large-sized cesium lead halide perovskite single crystals under ambient conditions. An ultralow minority carrier concentration was measured in CsPbBr3 (≈108 holes per cm3, much lower than in any other lead halide perovskite and crystalline silicon), which enables to realize self-powered photodetectors with a high ON/OFF ratio (105).

  4. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emamzadah, Soheila; Petty, Tom J.; De Almeida, Victor; Nishimura, Taisuke; Joly, Jacques; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Halazonetis, Thanos D.

    2009-01-01

    A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction. Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus’ molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 Å resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts

  5. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emamzadah, Soheila [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Petty, Tom J. [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Biomedical Graduate Studies Genomics and Computational Biology Group, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); De Almeida, Victor [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Nishimura, Taisuke [Department of Plant Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Joly, Jacques; Ferrer, Jean-Luc [Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, CEA-CNRS-University J. Fourier, 38027 Grenoble CEDEX 1 (France); Halazonetis, Thanos D., E-mail: thanos.halazonetis@unige.ch [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-09-01

    A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction. Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus’ molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 Å resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts.

  6. A visible-light-excited fluorescence method for imaging protein crystals without added dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukk, Tiit; Gillilan, Richard E.; Szebenyi, Doletha M. E.; Zipfel, Warren R.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy methods have seen an increase in popularity in recent years for detecting protein crystals in screening trays. The fluorescence-based crystal detection methods have thus far relied on intrinsic UV-inducible tryptophan fluorescence, nonlinear optics or fluorescence in the visible light range dependent on crystals soaked with fluorescent dyes. In this paper data are presented on a novel visible-light-inducible autofluorescence arising from protein crystals as a result of general stabilization of conjugated double-bond systems and increased charge delocalization due to crystal packing. The visible-light-inducible autofluorescence serves as a complementary method to bright-field microscopy in beamline applications where accurate crystal centering about the rotation axis is essential. Owing to temperature-dependent chromophore stabilization, protein crystals exhibit tenfold higher fluorescence intensity at cryogenic temperatures, making the method ideal for experiments where crystals are cooled to 100 K with a cryostream. In addition to the non-damaging excitation wavelength and low laser power required for imaging, the method can also serve a useful role for differentiating protein crystals from salt crystals in screening trays. PMID:26937240

  7. Lysine(63)-linked ubiquitylation of PIN2 auxin carrier protein governs hormonally controlled adaptation of Arabidopsis root growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Leitner, J.; Petrášek, Jan; Tomanov, K.; Retzer, K.; Pařezová, Markéta; Korbei, B.; Bachmair, A.; Zažímalová, Eva; Luschnig, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 21 (2012), s. 8322-8327 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2476 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : PLASMA-MEMBRANE PROTEIN * EFFLUX CARRIER * INTRACELLULAR TRAFFICKING Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.737, year: 2012

  8. A Biphasic Calcium Sulphate/Hydroxyapatite Carrier Containing Bone Morphogenic Protein-2 and Zoledronic Acid Generates Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raina, Deepak Bushan; Isaksson, Hanna; Hettwer, Werner

    2016-01-01

    -the-shelf osteoinductive bone substitutes that can replace bone grafts are required. We tested the carrier properties of a biphasic, calcium sulphate and hydroxyapatite ceramic material, containing a combination of recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) to induce bone, and zoledronic acid (ZA) to delay...

  9. Microcontact imprinted quartz crystal microbalance nanosensor for protein C recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshpour, Monireh; Özgür, Erdoğan; Bereli, Nilay; Denizli, Adil

    2017-03-01

    Detection of protein C (PC) in human serum was performed by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) based on molecular imprinting technique (MIP). The high-resolution and mass-sensitive QCM based sensor was integrated with high sensitivity and selectivity of the MIP technique. The PC microcontact imprinted (PC-μCIP) nanofilm was prepared on the glass surface. Then, the PC-μCIP/QCM sensor was prepared with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) and N-methacryloyl l-histidine methylester (MAH) as the functional monomer with copper(II) ions. The polymerization was performed under UV light (100W and 365nm) for 20-25min under nitrogen atmosphere. The characterization studies of QCM sensor were done by observation using atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle measurements, ellipsometry and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Detection of PC was investigated in a concentration range of 0.1-30μg/mL. Selectivity of PC-μCIP and PC non-imprinted/QCM (PC-non-μCIP) sensors for PC determination was investigated by using proteins namely hemoglobin (Hb), human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen solutions. QCM sensor was also used for detection of PC molecules in aqueous solutions and human plasma. The detection limit was determined as 0.01μg/mL for PC analysis. The PC-μCIP/QCM sensor was used for five consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles. According to the results, the PC-μCIP/QCM sensor had obtained high selectivity and sensitivity for detection of PC molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s−1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening. PMID:25615864

  11. Crystal structure of Methanococcus jannaschii TATA box-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Naruhiko; Senda, Miki; Natsume, Ryo; Senda, Toshiya; Horikoshi, Masami

    2008-11-01

    As the archaeal transcription system consists of a eukaryotic-type transcription apparatus and bacterial-type regulatory transcription factors, analyses of the molecular interface between the transcription apparatus and regulatory transcription factors are critical to reveal the evolutionary change of the transcription system. TATA box-binding protein (TBP), the central components of the transcription apparatus are classified into three groups: eukaryotic, archaeal-I and archaeal-II TBPs. Thus, comparative functional analysis of these three groups of TBP is important for the study of the evolution of the transcription system. Here, we present the first crystal structure of an archaeal-II TBP from Methanococcus jannaschii. The highly conserved and group-specific conserved surfaces of TBP bind to DNA and TFIIB/TFB, respectively. The phylogenetic trees of TBP and TFIIB/TFB revealed that they evolved in a coupled manner. The diversified surface of TBP is negatively charged in the archaeal-II TBP, which is completely different from the case of eukaryotic and archaeal-I TBPs, which are positively charged and biphasic, respectively. This difference is responsible for the diversification of the regulatory functions of TBP during evolution.

  12. Intracrystalline proteins and calcium oxalate crystal degradation in MDCK II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Magali C; Ryall, Rosemary Lyons

    2005-07-01

    We assessed the effects of intracrystalline urinary proteins on the ability of Type II Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK-II) cells to bind and degrade calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Binding of [14C]-labelled inorganic crystals (iCOM), and COM crystals precipitated from centrifuged and filtered (CF) or ultrafiltered (UF) human urine was quantified by radioactive analysis. SDS-PAGE confirmed the presence of intracrystalline proteins > 10 kDa in CF crystals and their absence from UF crystals. Morphological effects were assessed qualitatively by field emission scanning electron microscopy. iCOM crystals bound rapidly and extensively and were resistant to degradation. Binding of CF crystals was weaker than UF crystals, and both had markedly less affinity than iCOM. CF and UF crystals were extensively degraded within 90 min, the effect being more pronounced with CF. These results support our hypothesis that intracrystalline proteins protect against urolithiasis by facilitating intracellular proteolytic digestion and destruction of crystals phagocytosed by urothelial cells.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of merohedrally twinned crystals of MJ0729, a CBS-domain protein from Methanococcus jannaschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Kortazar, Danel; Lucas, María; Martínez-Chantar, María Luz; Astigarraga, Egoitz; Fernández, José Andrés; Sabas, Olatz; Albert, Armando; Mato, Jose M; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2008-07-01

    CBS domains are small protein motifs, usually associated in tandem, that are implicated in binding to adenosyl groups. Several genetic diseases in humans have been associated with mutations in CBS sequences, which has made them very promising targets for rational drug design. Trigonal crystals of the CBS-domain protein MJ0729 from Methanococcus jannaschii were grown by the vapour-diffusion method at acidic pH. Preliminary analysis of nine X-ray diffraction data sets using Yeates statistics and Britton plots showed that slight variation in the pH as well as in the buffer used in the crystallization experiments led to crystals with different degrees of merohedral twinning that may vary from perfect hemihedral twinning to perfect tetartohedral twinning.

  14. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection. PMID:23999307

  15. Can radiation damage to protein crystals be reduced using small-molecule compounds?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetko, Jan [Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States); Warkentin, Matthew; Englich, Ulrich; Thorne, Robert E., E-mail: ret6@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Free-radical scavengers that are known to be effective protectors of proteins in solution are found to increase global radiation damage to protein crystals. Protective mechanisms may become deleterious in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. Recent studies have defined a data-collection protocol and a metric that provide a robust measure of global radiation damage to protein crystals. Using this protocol and metric, 19 small-molecule compounds (introduced either by cocrystallization or soaking) were evaluated for their ability to protect lysozyme crystals from radiation damage. The compounds were selected based upon their ability to interact with radiolytic products (e.g. hydrated electrons, hydrogen, hydroxyl and perhydroxyl radicals) and/or their efficacy in protecting biological molecules from radiation damage in dilute aqueous solutions. At room temperature, 12 compounds had no effect and six had a sensitizing effect on global damage. Only one compound, sodium nitrate, appeared to extend crystal lifetimes, but not in all proteins and only by a factor of two or less. No compound provided protection at T = 100 K. Scavengers are ineffective in protecting protein crystals from global damage because a large fraction of primary X-ray-induced excitations are generated in and/or directly attack the protein and because the ratio of scavenger molecules to protein molecules is too small to provide appreciable competitive protection. The same reactivity that makes some scavengers effective radioprotectors in protein solutions may explain their sensitizing effect in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. A more productive focus for future efforts may be to identify and eliminate sensitizing compounds from crystallization solutions.

  16. Can radiation damage to protein crystals be reduced using small-molecule compounds?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kmetko, Jan; Warkentin, Matthew; Englich, Ulrich; Thorne, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Free-radical scavengers that are known to be effective protectors of proteins in solution are found to increase global radiation damage to protein crystals. Protective mechanisms may become deleterious in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. Recent studies have defined a data-collection protocol and a metric that provide a robust measure of global radiation damage to protein crystals. Using this protocol and metric, 19 small-molecule compounds (introduced either by cocrystallization or soaking) were evaluated for their ability to protect lysozyme crystals from radiation damage. The compounds were selected based upon their ability to interact with radiolytic products (e.g. hydrated electrons, hydrogen, hydroxyl and perhydroxyl radicals) and/or their efficacy in protecting biological molecules from radiation damage in dilute aqueous solutions. At room temperature, 12 compounds had no effect and six had a sensitizing effect on global damage. Only one compound, sodium nitrate, appeared to extend crystal lifetimes, but not in all proteins and only by a factor of two or less. No compound provided protection at T = 100 K. Scavengers are ineffective in protecting protein crystals from global damage because a large fraction of primary X-ray-induced excitations are generated in and/or directly attack the protein and because the ratio of scavenger molecules to protein molecules is too small to provide appreciable competitive protection. The same reactivity that makes some scavengers effective radioprotectors in protein solutions may explain their sensitizing effect in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. A more productive focus for future efforts may be to identify and eliminate sensitizing compounds from crystallization solutions

  17. Enhancement of crystal homogeneity of protein crystals under application of an external alternating current electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, H.; Uda, S.; Fujiwara, K.; Nozawa, J. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Tachibana, M. [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, 236-0027 (Japan); Kojima, K. [Department of Education, Yokohama Soei University, 1 Miho-tyou, Midori-ku, Yokohama, 226-0015 (Japan)

    2014-10-06

    X-ray diffraction rocking-curve measurements were performed on tetragonal hen egg white (HEW) lysozyme crystals grown with and without the application of an external alternating current (AC) electric field. The crystal quality was assessed by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for each rocking curve. For two-dimensional maps of the FWHMs measured on the 440 and the 12 12 0 reflection, the crystal homogeneity was improved under application of an external electric field at 1 MHz, compared with that without. In particular, the significant improvement of the crystal homogeneity was observed for the 12 12 0 reflection.

  18. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2005-01-01

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain "low-hanging fruit" protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area are reported from

  19. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D. (UAH); (NASA); (Georgia)

    2010-07-20

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain 'low-hanging fruit' protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area

  20. Plasma protein corona modulates the vascular wall interaction of drug carriers in a material and donor specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Sobczynski

    Full Text Available The nanoscale plasma protein interaction with intravenously injected particulate carrier systems is known to modulate their organ distribution and clearance from the bloodstream. However, the role of this plasma protein interaction in prescribing the adhesion of carriers to the vascular wall remains relatively unknown. Here, we show that the adhesion of vascular-targeted poly(lactide-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA spheres to endothelial cells is significantly inhibited in human blood flow, with up to 90% reduction in adhesion observed relative to adhesion in simple buffer flow, depending on the particle size and the magnitude and pattern of blood flow. This reduced PLGA adhesion in blood flow is linked to the adsorption of certain high molecular weight plasma proteins on PLGA and is donor specific, where large reductions in particle adhesion in blood flow (>80% relative to buffer is seen with ∼60% of unique donor bloods while others exhibit moderate to no reductions. The depletion of high molecular weight immunoglobulins from plasma is shown to successfully restore PLGA vascular wall adhesion. The observed plasma protein effect on PLGA is likely due to material characteristics since the effect is not replicated with polystyrene or silica spheres. These particles effectively adhere to the endothelium at a higher level in blood over buffer flow. Overall, understanding how distinct plasma proteins modulate the vascular wall interaction of vascular-targeted carriers of different material characteristics would allow for the design of highly functional delivery vehicles for the treatment of many serious human diseases.

  1. Characterization of a structurally and functionally diverged acyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase from milkweed seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, E B; Coughlan, S J; Shanklin, J

    1997-04-01

    A cDNA for a structurally variant acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase was isolated from milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) seed, a tissue enriched in palmitoleic (16:1delta9)* and cis-vaccenic (18:1delta11) acids. Extracts of Escherichia coli that express the milkweed cDNA catalyzed delta9 desaturation of acyl-ACP substrates, and the recombinant enzyme exhibited seven- to ten-fold greater specificity for palmitoyl (16:0)-ACP and 30-fold greater specificity for myristoyl (14:0)-ACP than did known delta9-stearoyl (18:0)-ACP desaturases. Like other variant acyl-ACP desaturases reported to date, the milkweed enzyme contains fewer amino acids near its N-terminus compared to previously characterized delta9-18:0-ACP desaturases. Based on the activity of an N-terminal deletion mutant of a delta9-18:0-ACP desaturase, this structural feature likely does not account for differences in substrate specificities.

  2. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturases are associated with floral isolation in sexually deceptive orchids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schluter, P.M.; Shanklin, J.; Xu, S.; Gagliardini, V.; Whittle, E.; Grossniklaus, U.; Schiestl, F. P.

    2011-04-05

    The orchids Ophrys sphegodes and O. exaltata are reproductively isolated from each other by the attraction of two different, highly specific pollinator species. For pollinator attraction, flowers chemically mimic the pollinators sex pheromones, the key components of which are alkenes with different double-bond positions. This study identifies genes likely involved in alkene biosynthesis, encoding stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) homologs. The expression of two isoforms, SAD1 and SAD2, is flower-specific and broadly parallels alkene production during flower development. SAD2 shows a significant association with alkene production, and in vitro assays show that O. sphegodes SAD2 has activity both as an 18:0-ACP {Delta}{sup 9} and a 16:0-ACP {Delta}{sup 4} desaturase. Downstream metabolism of the SAD2 reaction products would give rise to alkenes with double-bonds at position 9 or position 12, matching double-bond positions observed in alkenes in the odor bouquet of O. sphegodes. SAD1 and SAD2 show evidence of purifying selection before, and positive or relaxed purifying selection after gene duplication. By contributing to the production of species-specific alkene bouquets, SAD2 is suggested to contribute to differential pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among these species. Taken together, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that SAD2 is a florally expressed barrier gene of large phenotypic effect and, possibly, a genic target of pollinator-mediated selection.

  3. Controlled slow release of anticancer drugs from protein-hydrophilic vinyl polymer carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Masaharu; Yoshida, Masaru; Kaetsu, Isao

    1982-01-01

    The release behavior has been studied for bleomycin hydrochloride (BLM), an anticancer drug, from carrier composities prepared from mixtures of proteins and hydrophilic vinyl monomers by combined procedures of radiation polymerization and thermal denaturation. The magnitude, Q/tsup(1/2), for BLM release was the smallest when albumin was denatured by thermal treatment after the polymerization of albumin-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) by radiation at -78 0 C. This retardation was further enhanced by the use of cross-linked polymers. On the other hand, the digestion of the albumin-HEMA composite, during the release test carried out in the saline containing some proteases, was markedly suppressed with increasing the HEMA content in the composite. The digestion was lowered more than expected from the albumin content in the composite. In summary of the release tests and the scanning electron microscopic observations, it was concluded that the release of BLM and the digestion of albumin component contained in the composites can be markedly suppressed by the incorporation of the polymeric component. (author)

  4. An enhanced chemoenzymatic method for loading substrates onto carrier protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittilä, Tiia; Cryle, Max J

    2017-11-24

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) machineries produce many medically relevant peptides that cannot be easily accessed by chemical synthesis. Thus, understanding NRPS mechanism is of crucial importance to allow efficient redesign of these machineries to produce new compounds. During NRPS-mediated synthesis, substrates are covalently attached to peptidyl carrier proteins (PCPs), and studies of NRPSs are impeded by difficulties in producing PCPs loaded with substrates. Different approaches to load substrates onto PCP domains have been described, but all suffer from difficulties in either the complexity of chemical synthesis or low enzymatic efficiency. Here, we describe an enhanced chemoenzymatic loading method that combines 2 approaches into a single, highly efficient one-pot loading reaction. First, d-pantetheine and ATP are converted into dephospho-coenzyme A via the actions of 2 enzymes from coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. Next, phosphoadenylates are dephosphorylated using alkaline phosphatase to allow linker attachment to PCP domain by Sfp mutant R4-4, which is inhibited by phosphoadenylates. This route does not depend on activity of the commonly problematic dephospho-CoA kinase and, therefore, offers an improved method for substrate loading onto PCP domains.

  5. Cyanobacterial Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferases functionalize carrier proteins of diverse biosynthetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Nicholas K; Cozad, Monica A; Kearney, Sara E; Luesch, Hendrik; Ding, Yousong

    2017-09-19

    Cyanobacteria produce structurally and functionally diverse polyketides, nonribosomal peptides and their hybrids. Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases) are essential to the production of these compounds via functionalizing carrier proteins (CPs) of biosynthetic megaenzymes. However, cyanobacterial Sfp-type PPTases remain poorly characterized, posing a significant barrier to the exploitation of cyanobacteria for biotechnological and biomedical applications. Herein, we describe the detailed characterization of multiple cyanobacterial Sfp-type PPTases that were rationally selected. Biochemical characterization of these enzymes along with the prototypic enzyme Sfp from Bacillus subtilis demonstrated their varying specificities toward 11 recombinant CPs of different types of biosynthetic pathways from cyanobacterial and Streptomyces strains. Kinetic analysis further indicated that PPTases possess the higher binding affinity and catalytic efficiency toward their cognate CPs in comparison with noncognate substrates. Moreover, when chromosomally replacing the native PPTase gene of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, two selected cyanobacterial PPTases and Sfp supported the growth of resulted mutants. Cell lysates of the cyanobacterial mutants further functionalized recombinant CP substrates. Collectively, these studies reveal the versatile catalysis of selected cyanobacterial PPTases and provide new tools to synthesize cyanobacterial natural products using in vitro and in vivo synthetic biology approaches.

  6. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) fatty acid synthase complex: enoyl-[acyl carrier protein]-reductase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Thuillier, Irene; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Garcés, Rafael; von Wettstein-Knowles, Penny; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Enoyl-[acyl carrier protein]-reductases from sunflower. A major factor contributing to the amount of fatty acids in plant oils are the first steps of their synthesis. The intraplastidic fatty acid biosynthetic pathway in plants is catalysed by type II fatty acid synthase (FAS). The last step in each elongation cycle is carried out by the enoyl-[ACP]-reductase, which reduces the dehydrated product of β-hydroxyacyl-[ACP] dehydrase using NADPH or NADH. To determine the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds, two enoyl-[ACP]-reductase genes have been identified and cloned from developing seeds with 75 % identity: HaENR1 (GenBank HM021137) and HaENR2 (HM021138). The two genes belong to the ENRA and ENRB families in dicotyledons, respectively. The genetic duplication most likely originated after the separation of di- and monocotyledons. RT-qPCR revealed distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. Highest expression of HaENR1 was in roots, stems and developing cotyledons whereas that of H a ENR2 was in leaves and early stages of seed development. Genomic DNA gel blot analyses suggest that both are single-copy genes. In vivo activity of the ENR enzymes was tested by complementation experiments with the JP1111 fabI(ts) E. coli strain. Both enzymes were functional demonstrating that they interacted with the bacterial FAS components. That different fatty acid profiles resulted infers that the two Helianthus proteins have different structures, substrate specificities and/or reaction rates. The latter possibility was confirmed by in vitro analysis with affinity-purified heterologous-expressed enzymes that reduced the crotonyl-CoA substrate using NADH with different V max.

  7. Only Acyl Carrier Protein 1 (AcpP1 Functions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fatty Acid Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Cheng Ma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contains three open reading frames, PA2966, PA1869, and PA3334, which encode putative acyl carrier proteins, AcpP1, AcpP2, and AcpP3, respectively. In this study, we found that, although these apo-ACPs were successfully phosphopantetheinylated by P. aeruginosa phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PcpS and all holo-forms of these proteins could be acylated by Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase (AasS, only AcpP1 could be used as a substrate for the synthesis of fatty acids, catalyzed by P. aeruginosa cell free extracts in vitro, and only acpP1 gene could restore growth in the Escherichia coliacpP mutant strain CY1877. And P. aeruginosaacpP1 could not be deleted, while disruption of acpP2 or acpP3 in the P. aeruginosa genome allowed mutant strains to grow as well as the wild type strain. These findings confirmed that only P. aeruginosa AcpP1 functions in fatty acid biosynthesis, and that acpP2 and acpP3 do not play roles in the fatty acid synthetic pathway. Moreover, disruption of acpP2 and acpP3 did not affect the ability of P. aeruginosa to produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHL, but replacement of P. aeruginosaacpP1 with E. coliacpP caused P. aeruginosa to reduce the production of AHL molecules, which indicated that neither P. aeruginosa AcpP2 nor AcpP3 can act as a substrate for synthesis of AHL molecules in vivo. Furthermore, replacement of acpP1 with E. coliacpP reduced the ability of P. aeruginosa to produce some exo-products and abolished swarming motility in P. aeruginosa.

  8. Roles of electrostatics and conformation in protein-crystal interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul V Azzopardi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In vitro studies have shown that the phosphoprotein osteopontin (OPN inhibits the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite (HA and other biominerals. In vivo, OPN is believed to prevent the calcification of soft tissues. However, the nature of the interaction between OPN and HA is not understood. In the computational part of the present study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to predict the adsorption of 19 peptides, each 16 amino acids long and collectively covering the entire sequence of OPN, to the {100} face of HA. This analysis showed that there is an inverse relationship between predicted strength of adsorption and peptide isoelectric point (P<0.0001. Analysis of the OPN sequence by PONDR (Predictor of Naturally Disordered Regions indicated that OPN sequences predicted to adsorb well to HA are highly disordered. In the experimental part of the study, we synthesized phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated peptides corresponding to OPN sequences 65-80 (pSHDHMDDDDDDDDDGD and 220-235 (pSHEpSTEQSDAIDpSAEK. In agreement with the PONDR analysis, these were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to be largely disordered. A constant-composition/seeded growth assay was used to assess the HA-inhibiting potencies of the synthetic peptides. The phosphorylated versions of OPN65-80 (IC(50 = 1.93 microg/ml and OPN220-235 (IC(50 = 1.48 microg/ml are potent inhibitors of HA growth, as is the nonphosphorylated version of OPN65-80 (IC(50 = 2.97 microg/ml; the nonphosphorylated version of OPN220-235 has no measurable inhibitory activity. These findings suggest that the adsorption of acidic proteins to Ca2+-rich crystal faces of biominerals is governed by electrostatics and is facilitated by conformational flexibility of the polypeptide chain.

  9. Solubilization, Activation, and Insecticidal Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Serovar thompsoni HD542 Crystal Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naimov, S.; Boncheva, R.; Karlova, R.B.; Dukiandjiev, S.; Minkov, I.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Cry15Aa protein, produced by Bacillus thuringiensis serovar thompsoni HD542 in a crystal together with a 40 kDa accompanying protein is one of a small group of non-typical, less well-studied members of the Cry family of insecticidal proteins, and may provide an alternative for the more commonly used

  10. The liquid protein phase in crystallization: a case study—intact immunoglobulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Yurii G.; Malkin, Alexander J.; McPherson, Alexander

    2001-11-01

    A common observation by protein chemists has been the appearance, for many proteins in aqueous solutions, of oil like droplets, or in more extreme cases the formation of a second oil like phase. These may accompany the formation of precipitate in "salting out" or "salting in' procedures, but more commonly appear in place of any precipitate. Such phase separations also occur, with even greater frequency, in the presence of polymeric precipitants such as polyethyleneglycol (PEG). In general the appearance of a second liquid phase has been taken as indicative of protein aggregation, though an aggregate state distinctly different from that characteristic of amorphous precipitate. While the latter is thought to be composed of linear and branched assemblies, polymers of a sort, the oil phase suggests a more compact, three-dimensional, but fluid state. An important property of an alternate, fluid phase is that it can mediate transitions between other states, for example, between protein molecules free in solution and protein molecules immobilized in amorphous precipitate or crystals. The "liquid protein" phase can be readily observed in many crystallization experiments either prior to the appearance of visible crystals, or directly participating in the crystal growth process. In some cases the relationship between the liquid phase and developing crystals is intimate. Crystals grow directly from the liquid phase, or appear only after the visible formation of the liquid phase. We describe here our experience with a class of macromolecules, immunoglobulins, and particularly IDEC-151, an IgG specific for CD4 on human lymphocytes. This protein has been crystallized from a Jeffamine-LiSO 4 mother liquor and, its crystallization illustrates many of the features associated with the liquid protein, or protein rich phase.

  11. Monoolein lipid phases as incorporation and enrichment materials for membrane protein crystallization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Wallace

    Full Text Available The crystallization of membrane proteins in amphiphile-rich materials such as lipidic cubic phases is an established methodology in many structural biology laboratories. The standard procedure employed with this methodology requires the generation of a highly viscous lipidic material by mixing lipid, for instance monoolein, with a solution of the detergent solubilized membrane protein. This preparation is often carried out with specialized mixing tools that allow handling of the highly viscous materials while minimizing dead volume to save precious membrane protein sample. The processes that occur during the initial mixing of the lipid with the membrane protein are not well understood. Here we show that the formation of the lipidic phases and the incorporation of the membrane protein into such materials can be separated experimentally. Specifically, we have investigated the effect of different initial monoolein-based lipid phase states on the crystallization behavior of the colored photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We find that the detergent solubilized photosynthetic reaction center spontaneously inserts into and concentrates in the lipid matrix without any mixing, and that the initial lipid material phase state is irrelevant for productive crystallization. A substantial in-situ enrichment of the membrane protein to concentration levels that are otherwise unobtainable occurs in a thin layer on the surface of the lipidic material. These results have important practical applications and hence we suggest a simplified protocol for membrane protein crystallization within amphiphile rich materials, eliminating any specialized mixing tools to prepare crystallization experiments within lipidic cubic phases. Furthermore, by virtue of sampling a membrane protein concentration gradient within a single crystallization experiment, this crystallization technique is more robust and increases the efficiency of identifying productive

  12. Comparative Subcellular Localization Analysis of Magnetosome Proteins Reveals a Unique Localization Behavior of Mms6 Protein onto Magnetite Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Daiki; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Yamagishi, Ayana; Yoda, Takuto; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2016-10-15

    The magnetosome is an organelle specialized for inorganic magnetite crystal synthesis in magnetotactic bacteria. The complex mechanism of magnetosome formation is regulated by magnetosome proteins in a stepwise manner. Protein localization is a key step for magnetosome development; however, a global study of magnetosome protein localization remains to be conducted. Here, we comparatively analyzed the subcellular localization of a series of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged magnetosome proteins. The protein localizations were categorized into 5 groups (short-length linear, middle-length linear, long-length linear, cell membrane, and intracellular dispersing), which were related to the protein functions. Mms6, which regulates magnetite crystal growth, localized along magnetosome chain structures under magnetite-forming (microaerobic) conditions but was dispersed in the cell under nonforming (aerobic) conditions. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy analyses revealed that Mms6 preferentially localized to magnetosomes enclosing magnetite crystals. We suggest that a highly organized spatial regulation mechanism controls magnetosome protein localization during magnetosome formation in magnetotactic bacteria. Magnetotactic bacteria synthesize magnetite (Fe3O4) nanocrystals in a prokaryotic organelle called the magnetosome. This organelle is formed using various magnetosome proteins in multiple steps, including vesicle formation, magnetosome alignment, and magnetite crystal formation, to provide compartmentalized nanospaces for the regulation of iron concentrations and redox conditions, enabling the synthesis of a morphologically controlled magnetite crystal. Thus, to rationalize the complex organelle development, the localization of magnetosome proteins is considered to be highly regulated; however, the mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we performed comparative localization analysis of magnetosome proteins that revealed the presence of a spatial

  13. Fast high-pressure freezing of protein crystals in their mother liquor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, Anja; Warmer, Martin; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Wagner, Armin; Zouni, Athina; Glöckner, Carina; Reimer, Rudolph; Hohenberg, Heinrich; Meents, Alke

    2012-01-01

    Protein crystals were vitrified using high-pressure freezing in their mother liquor at 210 MPa and 77 K without cryoprotectants or oil coating. The method was successfully applied to photosystem II, which is representative of a membrane protein with a large unit cell and weak crystal contacts. High-pressure freezing (HPF) is a method which allows sample vitrification without cryoprotectants. In the present work, protein crystals were cooled to cryogenic temperatures at a pressure of 210 MPa. In contrast to other HPF methods published to date in the field of cryocrystallography, this protocol involves rapid sample cooling using a standard HPF device. The fast cooling rates allow HPF of protein crystals directly in their mother liquor without the need for cryoprotectants or external reagents. HPF was first attempted with hen egg-white lysozyme and cubic insulin crystals, yielding good to excellent diffraction quality. Non-cryoprotected crystals of the membrane protein photosystem II have been successfully cryocooled for the first time. This indicates that the presented HPF method is well suited to the vitrification of challenging systems with large unit cells and weak crystal contacts

  14. Crystallization Process of Protein Rv0731c from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis for a Successful Atomic Resolution Crystal Structure at 1.2 Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang Cong

    2009-06-08

    Proteins are bio-macromolecules consisting of basic 20 amino acids and have distinct three-dimensional folds. They are essential parts of organisms and participate in every process within cells. Proteins are crucial for human life, and each protein within the body has a specific function, such as antibodies, contractile proteins, enzymes, hormonal proteins, structural proteins, storage proteins and transport proteins. Determining three-dimensional structure of a protein can help researchers discover the remarkable protein folding, binding site, conformation and etc, in order to understand well of protein interaction and aid for possible drug design. The research on protein structure by X-ray protein crystallography carried by Li-Wei Hung's research group in the Physical Bioscience Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is focusing on protein crystallography. The research in this lab is in the process of from crystallizing the proteins to determining the three dimensional crystal structures of proteins. Most protein targets are selected from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. TB (Tuberculosis) is a possible fatal infectious disease. By studying TB target protein can help discover antituberculer drugs, and find treatment for TB. The high-throughput mode of crystallization, crystal harvesting, crystal screening and data collection are applied to the research pipeline (Figure 1). The X-ray diffraction data by protein crystals can be processed and analyzed to result in a three dimensional representation of electron density, producing a detailed model of protein structure. Rv0731c is a conserved hypothetical protein with unknown function from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. This paper is going to report the crystallization process and brief structure information of Rv0731c.

  15. Study of Fluid Flow Control in Protein Crystallization using Strong Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Leslie, Fred; Ciszak, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in "microgravity", researchers have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. Whether this limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals is still a matter of conjecture that our research will address. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately

  16. Immunization of mice by Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as carriers of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 ORF2 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Hui-Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgroud Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 is a primary etiological agent of post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS, which is a disease of increasing importance to the pig industry worldwide. Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs have gained increasing interest for use in vaccines. Methods To study the potential of HMSNs for use as a protein delivery system or vaccine carriers. HMSNs were synthesized by a sol–gel/emulsion(oil-in-water/ethanol method, purified PCV2 GST-ORF2-E protein was loaded into HMSNs, and the resulting HMSN/protein mixture was injected into mice. The uptake and release profiles of protein by HMSNs in vitro were investigated. PCV2 GST-ORF2-E specific antibodies and secretion of IFN-γ were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, spleen lymphocyte proliferation was measured by the MTS method, and the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ were determined by flow cytometry. Results HMSNs were found to yield better binding capacities and delivery profiles of proteins; the specific immune response induced by PCV2 GST-ORF2-E was maintained for a relatively long period of time after immunization with the HMSN/protein complex. Conclusion The findings suggest that HMSNs are good protein carriers and have high potential for use in future applications in therapeutic drug delivery.

  17. Charge-carrier mobilities in Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te single crystals used as nuclear radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burshtein, Z.; Jayatirtha, H. N.; Burger, A.; Butler, J. F.; Apotovsky, B.; Doty, F. P.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-carrier mobilities were measured for the first time in Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te single crystals using time-of-flight measurements of charge carriers produced by short (10 ns) light pulses from a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The electron mobility displayed a T exp -1.1 dependence on the absolute temperature T in the range 200-320 K, with a room-temperature mobility of 1350 sq cm/V s. The hole mobility displayed a T exp -2.0 dependence in the same temperature range, with a room-temperature mobility of 120 sq cm/V s. Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te appears to be a very favorable material for a room-temperature electronic nuclear radiation detector.

  18. Enhanced discrimination of malignant from benign pancreatic disease by measuring the CA 19-9 antigen on specific protein carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Yue

    Full Text Available The CA 19-9 assay detects a carbohydrate antigen on multiple protein carriers, some of which may be preferential carriers of the antigen in cancer. We tested the hypothesis that the measurement of the CA 19-9 antigen on individual proteins could improve performance over the standard CA 19-9 assay. We used antibody arrays to measure the levels of the CA 19-9 antigen on multiple proteins in serum or plasma samples from patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma or pancreatitis. Sample sets from three different institutions were examined, comprising 531 individual samples. The measurement of the CA 19-9 antigen on any individual protein did not improve upon the performance of the standard CA 19-9 assay (82% sensitivity at 75% specificity for early-stage cancer, owing to diversity among patients in their CA 19-9 protein carriers. However, a subset of cancer patients with no elevation in the standard CA 19-9 assay showed elevations of the CA 19-9 antigen specifically on the proteins MUC5AC or MUC16 in all sample sets. By combining measurements of the standard CA 19-9 assay with detection of CA 19-9 on MUC5AC and MUC16, the sensitivity of cancer detection was improved relative to CA 19-9 alone in each sample set, achieving 67-80% sensitivity at 98% specificity. This finding demonstrates the value of measuring glycans on specific proteins for improving biomarker performance. Diagnostic tests with improved sensitivity for detecting pancreatic cancer could have important applications for improving the treatment and management of patients suffering from this disease.

  19. Improved success of sparse matrix protein crystallization screening with heterogeneous nucleating agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil S Thakur

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization is a major bottleneck in the process of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Successful crystallization requires the formation of nuclei and their subsequent growth to crystals of suitable size. Crystal growth generally occurs spontaneously in a supersaturated solution as a result of homogenous nucleation. However, in a typical sparse matrix screening experiment, precipitant and protein concentration are not sampled extensively, and supersaturation conditions suitable for nucleation are often missed.We tested the effect of nine potential heterogenous nucleating agents on crystallization of ten test proteins in a sparse matrix screen. Several nucleating agents induced crystal formation under conditions where no crystallization occurred in the absence of the nucleating agent. Four nucleating agents: dried seaweed; horse hair; cellulose and hydroxyapatite, had a considerable overall positive effect on crystallization success. This effect was further enhanced when these nucleating agents were used in combination with each other.Our results suggest that the addition of heterogeneous nucleating agents increases the chances of crystal formation when using sparse matrix screens.

  20. Protein crystallization and initial neutron diffraction studies of the photosystem II subunit PsbO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommer, Martin; Coates, Leighton; Dau, Holger; Zouni, Athina; Dobbek, Holger

    2017-09-01

    The PsbO protein of photosystem II stabilizes the active-site manganese cluster and is thought to act as a proton antenna. To enable neutron diffraction studies, crystals of the β-barrel core of PsbO were grown in capillaries. The crystals were optimized by screening additives in a counter-diffusion setup in which the protein and reservoir solutions were separated by a 1% agarose plug. Crystals were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Initial neutron diffraction data were collected from a 0.25 mm 3 crystal at room temperature using the MaNDi single-crystal diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  1. Direct observation of bunching of elementary steps on protein crystals under forced flow conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Sazaki

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bunching of elementary steps by solution flow is still not yet clarified for protein crystals. Hence, in this study, we observed elementary steps on crystal surfaces of model protein hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL under forced flow conditions, by our advanced optical microscopy. We found that in the case of a HEWL solution of 99.99% purity, forced flow changed bunched steps into elementary ones (debunching on tetragonal HEWL crystals. In contrast, in the case of a HEWL solution of 98.5% purity, forced flow significantly induced bunching of elementary steps. These results indicate that in the case of HEWL crystals, the mass transfer of impurities is more significantly enhanced by forced solution flow than that of solute HEWL molecules. We also showed that forced flow induced the incorporation of microcrystals into a mother crystal and the subsequent formation of screw dislocations and spiral growth hillocks.

  2. Growth of protein crystals under very small gravity environment. Bisho juryoku kankyoka deno tanpakushitsu kessho seicho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aibara, S. (Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1994-04-05

    This paper describes influence of very small gravity in space on growth of protein crystals and its future prospect based on the results of the past three space experiments. Protein crystals under very small gravity in space grow by only mutual actions among protein molecules because precipitation and convection of protein molecules in aqueous solution are suppressed. Further, because the crystal nucleus generation process reaches a rate controlling stage in the crystal growth, the crystals grow taking longer time than on the ground. However, the crystal nuclei would not move much in the aqueous solution and grow in situ, hence it is estimated that monocrystals with good crystallinity can be obtained. An experiment utilizing a space shuttle has performed crystallization at 20[degree]C for seven days. Test samples included lysozyme in chicken egg white, myoglobin in horse skeleton muscle, pseudomonas [omega]-aminotransferases, human insulin, and peroxidase in soil bacteria. High quality monocrystals with little mosaics can be obtained under very small gravity in space. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Design rules for the self-assembly of a protein crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelam, Stephen; Haxton, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Theories and models of protein crystallization based on spheres that form close-packed crystals suggest that protein crystallization can be enhanced by metastable liquid-liquid criticality or demixing, and can be predicted by the osmotic second virial coefficient. However, most protein crystals are open structures, stabilized by anisotropic interactions. I will use analytic theory and computer simulations to argue that the self-assembly of open crystal lattices should not in general be best near the metastable liquid-liquid critical point or binodal (although assembly can certainly happen there), and to argue that the second virial coefficient cannot be a fully predictive measure of assembly propensity (although it is a useful starting point). Instead, the conditions that lead to best self-assembly of one particular computer model of a porous protein crystal are closer to the conditions that lead to best self-assembly of certain model viral capsids than they are to the conditions that optimize assembly of close-packed crystals. Work done at the Molecular Foundry at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  4. Development of amphiphilic gamma-PGA-nanoparticle based tumor vaccine: potential of the nanoparticulate cytosolic protein delivery carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Okada, Naoki; Oda, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kazuhiko; Matsuo, Keisuke; Mukai, Yohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Akagi, Takami; Akashi, Mitsuru; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2008-02-08

    Nanoscopic therapeutic systems that incorporate biomacromolecules, such as protein and peptides, are emerging as the next generation of nanomedicine aimed at improving the therapeutic efficacy of biomacromolecular drugs. In this study, we report that poly(gamma-glutamic acid)-based nanoparticles (gamma-PGA NPs) are excellent protein delivery carriers for tumor vaccines that delivered antigenic proteins to antigen-presenting cells and elicited potent immune responses. Importantly, gamma-PGA NPs efficiently delivered entrapped antigenic proteins through cytosolic translocation from the endosomes, which is a key process of gamma-PGA NP-mediated anti-tumor immune responses. Our findings suggest that the gamma-PGA NP system is suitable for the intracellular delivery of protein-based drugs as well as tumor vaccines.

  5. Controlled protein delivery from electrospun non-wovens: novel combination of protein crystals and a biodegradable release matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Sebastian; Li, Linhao; Meinel, Lorenz; Germershaus, Oliver

    2014-07-07

    Poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) is an excellent polymer for electrospinning and matrix-controlled drug delivery combining optimal processability and good biocompatibility. Electrospinning of proteins has been shown to be challenging via the use of organic solvents, frequently resulting in protein unfolding or aggregation. Encapsulation of protein crystals represents an attractive but largely unexplored alternative to established protein encapsulation techniques because of increased thermodynamic stability and improved solvent resistance of the crystalline state. We herein explore the electrospinning of protein crystal suspensions and establish basic design principles for this novel type of protein delivery system. PCL was deployed as a matrix, and lysozyme was used as a crystallizing model protein. By rational combination of lysozyme crystals 0.7 or 2.1 μm in diameter and a PCL fiber diameter between 1.6 and 10 μm, release within the first 24 h could be varied between approximately 10 and 100%. Lysozyme loading of PCL microfibers between 0.5 and 5% was achieved without affecting processability. While relative release was unaffected by loading percentage, the amount of lysozyme released could be tailored. PCL was blended with poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) to further modify the release rate. Under optimized conditions, an almost constant lysozyme release over 11 weeks was achieved.

  6. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of a novel surface-adhesin protein: protein E from Haemophilus influenzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Birendra; Al Jubair, Tamim; Förnvik, Karolina; Thunnissen, Marjolein M.; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Protein E of the respiratory pathogen H. influenzae is a multifunctional adhesin that is involved in bacterial attachment to host epithelium and direct interactions with vitronectin, laminin and plasminogen. The method of crystallization and X-ray data collection for protein E at 1.8 Å is presented. Protein E (PE) is a ubiquitous multifunctional surface protein of Haemophilus spp. and other bacterial pathogens of the Pasteurellaceae family. H. influenzae utilizes PE for attachment to respiratory epithelial cells. In addition, PE interacts directly with plasminogen and the extracellular matrix (ECM) components vitronectin and laminin. Vitronectin is a complement regulator that inhibits the formation of the membrane-attack complex (MAC). PE-mediated vitronectin recruitment at the H. influenzae surface thus inhibits MAC and protects against serum bactericidal activity. Laminin is an abundant ECM protein and is present in the basement membrane that helps in adherence of H. influenzae during colonization. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of and the collection of high-resolution data for this important H. influenzae adhesin are reported. To solve the phase problem for PE, Met residues were introduced and an SeMet variant was expressed and crystallized. Both native and SeMet-containing PE gave plate-like crystals in space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 44, b = 57, c = 61 Å, β = 96°. Diffraction data collected from native and SeMet-derivative crystals extended to resolutions of 1.8 and 2.6 Å, respectively

  7. Two-Dimensional Crystallization Procedure, from Protein Expression to Sample Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qie Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins play important roles for living cells. Structural studies of membrane proteins provide deeper understanding of their mechanisms and further aid in drug design. As compared to other methods, electron microscopy is uniquely suitable for analysis of a broad range of specimens, from small proteins to large complexes. Of various electron microscopic methods, electron crystallography is particularly well-suited to study membrane proteins which are reconstituted into two-dimensional crystals in lipid environments. In this review, we discuss the steps and parameters for obtaining large and well-ordered two-dimensional crystals. A general description of the principle in each step is provided since this information can also be applied to other biochemical and biophysical methods. The examples are taken from our own studies and published results with related proteins. Our purpose is to give readers a more general idea of electron crystallography and to share our experiences in obtaining suitable crystals for data collection.

  8. In Vitro Calcite Crystal Morphology Is Modulated by Otoconial Proteins Otolin-1 and Otoconin-90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, K. Trent; Hong, Mina; Lu, Wenfu; Rowley, Christopher W.; Ornitz, David M.; De Yoreo, James J.; Thalmann, Ruediger

    2014-01-01

    Otoconia are formed embryonically and are instrumental in detecting linear acceleration and gravity. Degeneration and fragmentation of otoconia in elderly patients leads to imbalance resulting in higher frequency of falls that are positively correlated with the incidence of bone fractures and death. In this work we investigate the roles otoconial proteins Otolin-1 and Otoconin 90 (OC90) perform in the formation of otoconia. We demonstrate by rotary shadowing and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments that Otolin-1 forms homomeric protein complexes and self-assembled networks supporting the hypothesis that Otolin-1 serves as a scaffold protein of otoconia. Our calcium carbonate crystal growth data demonstrate that Otolin-1 and OC90 modulate in vitro calcite crystal morphology but neither protein is sufficient to produce the shape of otoconia. Coadministration of these proteins produces synergistic effects on crystal morphology that contribute to morphology resembling otoconia. PMID:24748133

  9. Interaction of Tenebrio Molitor Antifreeze Protein with Ice Crystal: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, L; Ramakrishnan, Vigneshwar

    2016-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) observed in cold-adapting organisms bind to ice crystals and prevent further ice growth. However, the molecular mechanism of AFP-ice binding and AFP-inhibited ice growth remains unclear. Here we report the interaction of the insect antifreeze protein (Tenebrio molitor, TmAFP) with ice crystal by molecular dynamics simulation studies. Two sets of simulations were carried out at 263 K by placing the protein near the primary prism plane (PP) and basal plane (BL) of the ice crystal. To delineate the effect of temperatures, both the PP and BL simulations were carried out at 253 K as well. The analyses revealed that the protein interacts strongly with the ice crystal in BL simulation than in PP simulation both at 263 K and 253 K. Further, it was observed that the interactions are primarily mediated through the interface waters. We also observed that as the temperature decreases, the interaction between the protein and the ice increases which can be attributed to the decreased flexibility and the increased structuring of the protein at low temperature. In essence, our study has shed light on the interaction mechanism between the TmAFP antifreeze protein and the ice crystal. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of recombinant immunoglobulin G-binding protein from Streptococcus suis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Abdul Hamid; Chu, Fuliang; Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Qinagmin [Center for Molecular Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Qi, Jianxun [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Gao, George Fu, E-mail: gaof@im.ac.cn [Center for Molecular Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2008-08-01

    Crystallization of recombinant IgG-binding protein expressed in Escherichia coli using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method is described. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.98, b = 43.94, c = 78.17 Å. Streptococcus suis, an important zoonotic pathogen, expresses immunoglobulin G-binding protein, which is thought to be helpful to the organism in eluding the host defence system. Recombinant IgG-binding protein expressed in Escherichia coli has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.98, b = 43.94, c = 78.17 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to 2.60 Å resolution.

  11. Numerical model of protein crystal growth in a diffusive field such as the microgravity environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki, E-mail: tanakah@confsci.co.jp [Confocal Science Inc., Hayakawa 2nd Building 7F, 2-12-2 Iwamoto-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0032 (Japan); Sasaki, Susumu [Neo Force, 5-9-14-403 Tsurumaki, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 154-0016 (Japan); Takahashi, Sachiko [Confocal Science Inc., Hayakawa 2nd Building 7F, 2-12-2 Iwamoto-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0032 (Japan); Inaka, Koji [Maruwa Foods and Biosciences Inc., 170-1 Tsutsui-cho, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Wada, Yoshio; Yamada, Mitsugu; Ohta, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Kamigaichi, Shigeki [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Numerical analysis of the concentration depletion zones in a transient state suggested that, in microgravity, protein crystals grow in a lower supersaturation and the impurity ratio decreases in the centre of the crystal. It is said that the microgravity environment positively affects the quality of protein crystal growth. The formation of a protein depletion zone and an impurity depletion zone due to the suppression of convection flow were thought to be the major reasons. In microgravity, the incorporation of molecules into a crystal largely depends on diffusive transport, so the incorporated molecules will be allocated in an orderly manner and the impurity uptake will be suppressed, resulting in highly ordered crystals. Previously, these effects were numerically studied in a steady state using a simplified model and it was determined that the combination of the diffusion coefficient of the protein molecule (D) and the kinetic constant for the protein molecule (β) could be used as an index of the extent of these depletion zones. In this report, numerical analysis of these depletion zones around a growing crystal in a non-steady (i.e. transient) state is introduced, suggesting that this model may be used for the quantitative analysis of these depletion zones in the microgravity environment.

  12. Some Aspects of Crystal Centering During X-ray High-throughput Protein Crystallography Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaponov, Yu. A.; Matsugaki, N.; Sasajima, K.; Igarashi, N.; Wakatsuki, S.

    A set of algorithms and procedures of a crystal loop centering during X-ray high-throughput protein crystallography experiment has been designed and developed. A simple algorithm of the crystal loop detection and preliminary recognition has been designed and developed. The crystal loop detection algorithm is based on finding out the crystal loop ending point (opposite to the crystal loop pin) using image cross section (digital image column) profile analysis. The crystal loop preliminary recognition procedure is based on finding out the crystal loop sizes and position using image cross section profile analysis. The crystal loop fine recognition procedure based on Hooke-Jeeves pattern search method with an ellipse as a fitting pattern has been designed and developed. The procedure of restoring missing coordinate of the crystal loop is described. Based on developed algorithms and procedures the optimal auto-centering procedure has been designed and developed. A procedure of optimal manual crystal centering (Two Clicks Procedure) has been designed and developed. Developed procedures have been integrated into control software system PCCS installed at crystallography beamlines Photon Factory BL5A and PF-AR NW12, KEK.

  13. Membrane proteins: functional and structural studies using reconstituted proteoliposomes and 2-D crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigaud J.-L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstitution of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers is a powerful tool to analyze functional as well as structural areas of membrane protein research. First, the proper incorporation of a purified membrane protein into closed lipid vesicles, to produce proteoliposomes, allows the investigation of transport and/or catalytic properties of any membrane protein without interference by other membrane components. Second, the incorporation of a large amount of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers to grow crystals confined to two dimensions has recently opened a new way to solve their structure at high resolution using electron crystallography. However, reconstitution of membrane proteins into functional proteoliposomes or 2-D crystallization has been an empirical domain, which has been viewed for a long time more like "black magic" than science. Nevertheless, in the last ten years, important progress has been made in acquiring knowledge of lipid-protein-detergent interactions and has permitted to build upon a set of basic principles that has limited the empirical approach of reconstitution experiments. Reconstitution strategies have been improved and new strategies have been developed, facilitating the success rate of proteoliposome formation and 2-D crystallization. This review deals with the various strategies available to obtain proteoliposomes and 2-D crystals from detergent-solubilized proteins. It gives an overview of the methods that have been applied, which may be of help for reconstituting more proteins into lipid bilayers in a form suitable for functional studies at the molecular level and for high-resolution structural analysis.

  14. Crystal Structure of a Plant Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion Family Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiki; Iwaki, Shigehiro; Tsukazaki, Tomoya

    2017-09-05

    The multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family of proteins consists of transporters responsible for multidrug resistance in prokaryotes. In plants, a number of MATE proteins were identified by recent genomic and functional studies, which imply that the proteins have substrate-specific transport functions instead of multidrug extrusion. The three-dimensional structure of eukaryotic MATE proteins, including those of plants, has not been reported, preventing a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of these proteins. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a MATE protein from the plant Camelina sativa at 2.9 Å resolution. Two sets of six transmembrane α helices, assembled pseudo-symmetrically, possess a negatively charged internal pocket with an outward-facing shape. The crystal structure provides insight into the diversity of plant MATE proteins and their substrate recognition and transport through the membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Loss of nuclear BRCA1 protein staining in normal tissue cells derived from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brakeleer, Sylvia de [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology (Department of Medical Oncology), UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Bogdani, Marika [Department of Experimental Pathology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Greve, Jacques de [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology (Department of Medical Oncology), UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Familial Cancer Clinic, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Decock, Julie [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology (Department of Medical Oncology), UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Sermijn, Erica [Familial Cancer Clinic, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Bonduelle, Maryse [Familial Cancer Clinic, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Goelen, Guido [Familial Cancer Clinic, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Teugels, Erik [Laboratory of Molecular Oncology (Department of Medical Oncology), UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium) and Familial Cancer Clinic, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: eteugels@uzbrussel.be

    2007-06-01

    Enhanced genomic instability has been recently reported in normal cells derived from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers when placed in vitro in non-physiological stress conditions. We present here original data which help to explain the observed genomic instability. Leucocytes from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, sporadic breast cancer patients and controls were prepared for BRCA1 immunocytochemistry. We show that BRCA1 containing nuclear dot like structures are detectable in about 80% of the leucocytes from controls and sporadic breast cancer patients, but are absent in the majority of normal cells from BRCA1 as well as BRCA2 mutation carriers (also in their normal breast cells). Our results thus indicate that the genomic instability observed in normal cells from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers is associated with a down-regulation of nuclear BRCA1 protein accumulation in the dot like structures. These results suggest in addition that immunocytochemical or alternative molecular screening strategies might help to identify women with a high risk for breast (ovarian) cancer even when the underlying genetic defect remains undetectable.

  16. Physical Stability of Octenyl Succinate-Modified Polysaccharides and Whey Proteins for Potential Use as Bioactive Carriers in Food Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerta-Gomez, Alex F; Castell-Perez, M Elena

    2015-06-01

    The high cost and potential toxicity of biodegradable polymers like poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid (PLGA) has increased the interest in natural and modified biopolymers as bioactive carriers. This study characterized the physical stability (water sorption and state transition behavior) of selected starch and proteins: octenyl succinate-modified depolymerized waxy corn starch (DWxCn), waxy rice starch (DWxRc), phytoglycogen, whey protein concentrate (80%, WPC), whey protein isolate (WPI), and α-lactalbumin (α-L) to determine their potential as carriers of bioactive compounds under different environmental conditions. After enzyme modification and particle size characterization, glass transition temperature and moisture isotherms were used to characterize the systems. DWxCn and DWxRc had increased water sorption compared to native starch. The level of octenyl succinate anhydrate (OSA) modification (3% and 7%) did not reduce the water sorption of the DWxCn and phytoglycogen samples. The Guggenheim-Andersen-de Boer model indicated that native waxy corn had significantly (P whey proteins had higher glass transition temperature (Tg) values. On the other hand, depolymerized waxy starches at 7%-OSA modification had a "melted" appearance when exposed to environments with high relative humidity (above 70%) after 10 days at 23 °C. The use of depolymerized and OSA-modified polysaccharides blended with proteins created more stable blends of biopolymers. Hence, this biopolymer would be suitable for materials exposed to high humidity environments in food applications. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. In vacuo X-ray data collection from graphene-wrapped protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Anna J.; Crawshaw, Adam D.; Trincao, Jose; Aller, Pierre; Alcock, Simon; Nistea, Ioana; Salgado, Paula S.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2015-01-01

    A method is reported for collecting room-temperature data from protein crystals under vacuum by protecting them with a thin graphene layer. The measurement of diffraction data from macromolecular crystal samples held in vacuo holds the promise of a very low X-ray background and zero absorption of incident and scattered beams, leading to better data and the potential for accessing very long X-ray wavelengths (>3 Å) for native sulfur phasing. Maintaining the hydration of protein crystals under vacuum is achieved by the use of liquid jets, as with serial data collection at free-electron lasers, or is side-stepped by cryocooling the samples, as implemented at new synchrotron beamlines. Graphene has been shown to protect crystals from dehydration by creating an extremely thin layer that is impermeable to any exchanges with the environment. Furthermore, owing to its hydrophobicity, most of the aqueous solution surrounding the crystal is excluded during sample preparation, thus eliminating most of the background caused by liquid. Here, it is shown that high-quality data can be recorded at room temperature from graphene-wrapped protein crystals in a rough vacuum. Furthermore, it was observed that graphene protects crystals exposed to different relative humidities and a chemically harsh environment

  18. In vacuo X-ray data collection from graphene-wrapped protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Anna J. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Crawshaw, Adam D. [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Trincao, Jose; Aller, Pierre; Alcock, Simon; Nistea, Ioana [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Salgado, Paula S. [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-26

    A method is reported for collecting room-temperature data from protein crystals under vacuum by protecting them with a thin graphene layer. The measurement of diffraction data from macromolecular crystal samples held in vacuo holds the promise of a very low X-ray background and zero absorption of incident and scattered beams, leading to better data and the potential for accessing very long X-ray wavelengths (>3 Å) for native sulfur phasing. Maintaining the hydration of protein crystals under vacuum is achieved by the use of liquid jets, as with serial data collection at free-electron lasers, or is side-stepped by cryocooling the samples, as implemented at new synchrotron beamlines. Graphene has been shown to protect crystals from dehydration by creating an extremely thin layer that is impermeable to any exchanges with the environment. Furthermore, owing to its hydrophobicity, most of the aqueous solution surrounding the crystal is excluded during sample preparation, thus eliminating most of the background caused by liquid. Here, it is shown that high-quality data can be recorded at room temperature from graphene-wrapped protein crystals in a rough vacuum. Furthermore, it was observed that graphene protects crystals exposed to different relative humidities and a chemically harsh environment.

  19. Membrane's Eleven: heavy-atom derivatives of membrane-protein crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morth, Jens Preben; Sørensen, Thomas Lykke-Møller; Nissen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    A database has been assembled of heavy-atom derivatives used in the structure determination of membrane proteins. The database can serve as a guide to the design of experiments in the search for heavy-atom derivatives of new membrane-protein crystals. The database pinpoints organomercurials, plat...

  20. Crystallization of water-soluble chlorophyll-proteins from Lepidium virginicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, T; Itoh, R; Yakushiji, E

    1980-11-05

    Water-soluble chlorophyll-proteins were prepared from leaves of Lepidium virginicum, by means of ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and Sephacryl S-200. After intensive purification the chlorophyll-proteins were crystallized by dialysis against an ammonium sulfate solution.

  1. A quality comparison of protein crystals grown under containerless conditions generated by diamagnetic levitation, silicone oil and agarose gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui-Ling; Sun, Li-Hua; Li, Jian; Tang, Lin; Lu, Hui-Meng; Guo, Yun-Zhu; He, Jin; Liu, Yong-Ming; Xie, Xu-Zhuo; Shen, He-Fang; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Huang, Lin-Jun; Shang, Peng; He, Jian-Hua; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2013-10-01

    High-quality crystals are key to obtaining accurate three-dimensional structures of proteins using X-ray diffraction techniques. However, obtaining such protein crystals is often a challenge. Several containerless crystallization techniques have been reported to have the ability to improve crystal quality, but it is unknown which is the most favourable way to grow high-quality protein crystals. In this paper, a quality comparison of protein crystals which were grown under three containerless conditions provided by diamagnetic levitation, silicone oil and agarose gel was conducted. A control experiment on a vessel wall was also simultaneously carried out. Seven different proteins were crystallized under the four conditions, and the crystal quality was assessed in terms of the resolution limit, the mosaicity and the Rmerge. It was found that the crystals grown under the three containerless conditions demonstrated better morphology than those of the control. X-ray diffraction data indicated that the quality of the crystals grown under the three containerless conditions was better than that of the control. Of the three containerless crystallization techniques, the diamagnetic levitation technique exhibited the best performance in enhancing crystal quality. This paper is to our knowledge the first report of improvement of crystal quality using a diamagnetic levitation technique. Crystals obtained from agarose gel demonstrated the second best improvement in crystal quality. The study indicated that the diamagnetic levitation technique is indeed a favourable method for growing high-quality protein crystals, and its utilization is thus potentially useful in practical efforts to obtain well diffracting protein crystals.

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SMU.1108c protein from Streptococcus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Ming-Jing; Fu, Tian-Min; Liu, Xiang; Li, Lan-Fen

    2010-01-01

    SMU.1108c, a putative uncharacterized protein from S. mutans, was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Streptococcus mutans SMU.1108c (KEGG database) encodes a functionally uncharacterized protein consisting of 270 amino-acid residues. This protein is predicted to have a haloacid dehalogenase hydrolase-like domain and is a homologue of haloacid dehalogenase phosphatases that catalyze phosphoryl-transfer reactions. In this work, SMU.1108c was cloned into the pET28a vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). The protein was purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The best crystal diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 77.1, b = 80.2, c = 47.9 Å, β = 99.5°

  3. Mobility of charge carriers in electron-irradiated crystals of n-type Hg0.8Cd0.2Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsekhovskii, A.V.; Kiryushkin, E.M.; Kokhanenko, A.P.; Kurbanov, K.R.; Lilenko, Yu.V.

    1988-01-01

    We present the results of an investigation of the behavior of the mobility of the charge carriers in Hg 1-x Cd x Te crystals with n-type conduction as a function of the dose of irradiation by electrons with an energy of 3.0 MeV at 300 K and the initial content of defects in the material. The complex character of the variation of the mobility of the electrons as a function of the dose observed when crystals of n-Hg 1-x Cd x Te (x ∼ 0.20) with different initial concentrations of defects are irradiated by fast electrons has been attributed to the influence of the factors of the shielding of the ionized scattering centers by electrons and the additional scattering of the charge carriers on the radiation defects. Good agreement between the experimental and calculated plots of the dependence of the mobility of electrons on the irradiation dose has been obtained with consideration of a model of the simultaneous introduction of donor (single charged) and acceptor (doubly charged) defects into a narrow-band semiconductor characterized by a degenerate and nonparabolic conduction band

  4. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    A new crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a combination of controlled humid air and polymer glue for crystal coating. This method is particularly useful when applied to fragile protein crystals that are known to be sensitive to subtle changes in their physicochemical environment. Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection

  5. A clinical trial examining the effect of increased total CRM(197) carrier protein dose on the antibody response to Haemophilus influenzae type b CRM(197) conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usonis, Vytautas; Bakasenas, Vytautas; Lockhart, Stephen; Baker, Sherryl; Gruber, William; Laudat, France

    2008-08-18

    CRM(197) is a carrier protein in certain conjugate vaccines. When multiple conjugate vaccines with the same carrier protein are administered simultaneously, reduced response to vaccines and/or antigens related to the carrier protein may occur. This study examined responses of infants who, in addition to diphtheria toxoid/tetanus toxoid/acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) received either diphtheria CRM(197)-based Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (HbOC) or HbOC and a diphtheria CRM(197)-based combination 9-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine/meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine. Administration of conjugate vaccines with CRM(197) carrier protein load >50 microg did not reduce response to CRM(197) conjugate vaccines or immunogenicity to immunologically cross-reactive diphtheria toxoid.

  6. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of two crystal forms of stationary-phase survival E protein from Campylobacter jejuni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonçalves, A. M. D.; Rêgo, A. T.; Thomaz, M.; Enguita, F. J.; Carrondo, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Survival E (SurE) protein from Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative mesophile, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein, successfully purified and crystallized in two distinct crystal forms. Survival E (SurE) protein from Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative mesophile, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein, successfully purified and crystallized in two distinct crystal forms. The first form belongs to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with a tetramer in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 80.5, b = 119.0, c = 135.3 Å. The second form belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 121.4, b = 47.1, c = 97.8 Å, and contains a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data have been collected from these crystal forms to 2.5 and 2.95 Å resolution, respectively

  7. PCR-based gene synthesis to produce recombinant proteins for crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne-Steele Miranda L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene synthesis technologies are an important tool for structural biology projects, allowing increased protein expression through codon optimization and facilitating sequence alterations. Existing methods, however, can be complex and not always reproducible, prompting researchers to use commercial suppliers rather than synthesize genes themselves. Results A PCR-based gene synthesis method, referred to as SeqTBIO, is described to efficiently assemble the coding regions of two novel hyperthermophilic proteins, PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille domain, a siRNA-binding domain of an Argonaute protein homologue and a deletion mutant of a family A DNA polymerase (PolA. The gene synthesis procedure is based on sequential assembly such that homogeneous DNA products can be obtained after each synthesis step without extensive manipulation or purification requirements. Coupling the gene synthesis procedure to in vivo homologous recombination techniques allows efficient subcloning and site-directed mutagenesis for error correction. The recombinant proteins of PAZ and PolA were subsequently overexpressed in E. coli and used for protein crystallization. Crystals of both proteins were obtained and they were suitable for X-ray analysis. Conclusion We demonstrate, by using PAZ and PolA as examples, the feasibility of integrating the gene synthesis, error correction and subcloning techniques into a non-automated gene to crystal pipeline such that genes can be designed, synthesized and implemented for recombinant expression and protein crystallization.

  8. Vibrational and structural investigation of SOUL protein single crystals by using micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Barbara; Giarola, Marco; Mariotto, Gino; Ambrosi, Emmanuele; Monaco, Hugo L.

    2010-05-01

    Protein SOUL is a new member of the recently discovered putative heme-binding protein family called SOUL/HEBP and, to date, no structural information exists for this protein. Here, micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to study the vibrational properties of single crystals obtained from recombinant protein SOUL by means of two different optimization routes. This spectroscopic approach offers the valuable advantage of the in-situ collection of experimental data from protein crystals, placed onto a hanging-drop plate, under the same conditions used to grow the crystals. By focusing on the regions of amides I and III bands, some secondary structure characteristic features have been recognized. Moreover, some side-chain marker bands were observed in the Raman spectra of SOUL crystals and the unambiguous assignment of these peaks inferred by comparing the experimental Raman spectra of pure amino acids and their Raman intensities computed using quantum chemical calculations. Our comparative analysis allows to get a deeper understanding of the side-chain environments and of the interactions involving these specific amino acids in the two different SOUL crystals.

  9. Crystallization and initial X-ray analysis of polyhydroxyalkanoate granule-associated protein from Aeromonas hydrophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Minglian; Li, Zhenguo; Zheng, Wei; Lou, Zhiyong [MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Guo-Qiang, E-mail: chengq@stu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Multidisciplinary Research Center, Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China)

    2006-08-01

    The phasin PhaP{sub Ah} from A. hydrophila strain 4AK4 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granule-associated proteins (phasins) were discovered in PHA-accumulating bacteria. They play a crucial role as a structural protein during initial PHA-granule formation and granule growth and also serve as interfaces for granule stabilization in vivo. The phasin PhaP{sub Ah} from Aeromonas hydrophila strain 4AK4 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Single crystals were cryocooled for X-ray diffraction analysis. The phasin crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.8, b = 108.9, c = 134.4 Å.

  10. Image processing of small protein-crystals in electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, D.A.

    1978-11-01

    This electron microscope study was undertaken to determine whether high resolution reconstructed images could be obtained from statistically noisy micrographs by the super-position of several small areas of images of well-ordered crystals of biological macromolecules. Methods of rotational and translational alignment which use Fourier space data were demonstrated to be superior to methods which use Real space image data. After alignment, the addition of the diffraction patterns of four small areas did not produce higher resolution because of unexpected image distortion effects. A method was developed to determine the location of the distortion origin and the coefficients of spiral distortion and pincushion/barrel distortion in order to make future correction of distortions in electron microscope images of large area crystals

  11. Image processing of small protein-crystals in electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinberg, D.A.

    1978-11-01

    This electron microscope study was undertaken to determine whether high resolution reconstructed images could be obtained from statistically noisy micrographs by the super-position of several small areas of images of well-ordered crystals of biological macromolecules. Methods of rotational and translational alignment which use Fourier space data were demonstrated to be superior to methods which use Real space image data. After alignment, the addition of the diffraction patterns of four small areas did not produce higher resolution because of unexpected image distortion effects. A method was developed to determine the location of the distortion origin and the coefficients of spiral distortion and pincushion/barrel distortion in order to make future correction of distortions in electron microscope images of large area crystals.

  12. Comparison of NMR and crystal structures highlights conformational isomerism in protein active sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, Pedro; Pedrini, Bill; Geralt, Michael; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Horst, Reto; Herrmann, Torsten; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Tools for systematic comparisons of NMR and crystal structures developed by the JCSG were applied to two proteins with known functions: the T. maritima anti-σ factor antagonist TM1081 and the mouse γ-glutamylamine cyclotransferase A2LD1 (gi:13879369). In an attempt to exploit the complementarity of crystal and NMR data, the combined use of the two structure-determination techniques was explored for the initial steps in the challenge of searching proteins of unknown functions for putative active sites. The JCSG has recently developed a protocol for systematic comparisons of high-quality crystal and NMR structures of proteins. In this paper, the extent to which this approach can provide function-related information on the two functionally annotated proteins TM1081, a Thermotoga maritima anti-σ factor antagonist, and A2LD1 (gi:13879369), a mouse γ-glutamylamine cyclotransferase, is explored. The NMR structures of the two proteins have been determined in solution at 313 and 298 K, respectively, using the current JCSG protocol based on the software package UNIO for extensive automation. The corresponding crystal structures were solved by the JCSG at 100 K and 1.6 Å resolution and at 100 K and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively. The NMR and crystal structures of the two proteins share the same overall molecular architectures. However, the precision of the structure determination along the amino-acid sequence varies over a significantly wider range in the NMR structures than in the crystal structures. Thereby, in each of the two NMR structures about 65% of the residues have displacements below the average and in both proteins the less well ordered residues include large parts of the active sites, in addition to some highly solvent-exposed surface areas. Whereas the latter show increased disorder in the crystal and in solution, the active-site regions display increased displacements only in the NMR structures, where they undergo local conformational exchange on the

  13. The influence of a homologous protein impurity on lysozyme crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamidi, V.; Hanson, B. L.; Edmundson, A.; Skrzypczak-Jankun, E.; Schall, C.

    1999-08-01

    The effect of a structurally similar protein impurity, turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo) egg-white lysozyme (TEWL) on crystallization of the host protein, hen-egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) from chicken ( Gallus gallus) was studied under varying impurity and host solution concentrations. A change in morphology is observed when crystals of HEWL are grown in the presence of TEWL. As the relative amount of TEWL increases, HEWL crystals become more elongated in the [0 0 1] direction. Elongation is more pronounced in samples with lower initial concentrations of HEWL than in samples with higher initial concentrations. This behavior is consistent with that of impurities in small molecule crystal growth and with predictions based on the Kubota-Mullin model. The observed effect on the growth process can be attributed to the apparent inhibition in the [1 1 0] crystal growth direction of HEWL by TEWL since slowly growing faces become dominant faces in crystal growth. Incorporation of TEWL into HEWL crystals grown in a sitting drop batch method was measured using cation exchange chromatography. The results indicate that impurity incorporation is associated with increasing supersaturation. This conclusion is consistent with a kinetically controlled process of impurity incorporation. The observed impurity effects are most probably associated with the interchange of glutamine in position 41 of HEWL by histidine in TEWL.

  14. Stealth carriers for low-resolution structure determination of membrane proteins in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Selma; Skar-Gislinge, Nicholas; Midtgaard, Søren

    2014-01-01

    techniques for fast and reliable structural analysis. The difficulty with this approach is that the carrier discs contribute to the measured scattering intensity in a highly nontrivial fashion, making subsequent data analysis challenging. Here, an elegant solution to circumvent the intrinsic complexity...

  15. NEOGLYCOPROTEINS AS CARRIERS FOR ANTIVIRAL DRUGS - SYNTHESIS AND ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN DRUG CONJUGATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molema, Grietje; Jansen, Robert W.; Visser, Jan; Herdewijn, Piet; Moolenaar, Frits; Meijer, Dirk K.F.

    In order to investigate whether neoglycoproteins can potentially act as carriers for targeting of antiviral drugs to certain cell types in the body, various neoglycoproteins were synthesized using thiophosgene-activated p-aminophenyl sugar derivatives. These neoglycoproteins were conjugated with the

  16. Matrix Gla Protein is Involved in Crystal Formation in Kidney of Hyperoxaluric Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Lu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matrix Gla protein (MGP is a molecular determinant regulating vascular calcification of the extracellular matrix. However, it is still unclear how MGP may be invovled in crystal formation in the kidney of hyperoxaluric rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the hyperoxaluric group and control group. Hyperoxaluric rats were administrated by 0.75% ethylene glycol (EG for up to 8 weeks. Renal MGP expression was detected by the standard avidin-biotin complex (ABC method. Renal crystal deposition was observed by a polarizing microscope. Total RNA and protein from the rat kidney tissue were extracted. The levels of MGP mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blot. Results: Hyperoxaluria was induced successfully in rats. The MGP was polarly distributed, on the apical membrane of renal tubular epithelial cells, and was found in the ascending thick limbs of Henle's loop (cTAL and the distal convoluted tubule (DCT in hyperoxaluric rats, its expression however, was present in the medullary collecting duct (MCD in stone-forming rats. Crystals with multilaminated structure formed in the injurious renal tubules with lack of MGP expression.MGP mRNA expression was significantly upregulated by the crystals' stimulations. Conclusion: Our results suggested that the MGP was involved in crystals formation by the continuous expression, distributing it polarly in the renal tubular cells and binding directly to the crystals.

  17. Influence of protein solution in nucleation and optimized formulation for the growth of ARM lipase crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Masomian, Malihe; Leow, Adam Thean Chor; Ali, Mohd Shukuri Mohamad

    2015-09-01

    ARM lipase is a thermostable and organic solvent tolerant enzyme which was highly purified prior to crystallization. The His-tagged ARM lipase was purified with immobilized metal affinity chromatography followed by anion-exchange chromatography. The effect of different salt concentrations on stability, solubility and crystal nucleation of the protein was studied. The highly purified and homogeneous ARM lipase with protein concentration of 2 mg/mL was successfully crystallized by a sitting drop, vapor diffusion method with the use of 0.1 M MES monohydrate pH 6.5 and 12% (v/v) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 20000 as precipitant. The crystallization conditions were optimized by changing the pH and concentration of the precipitant. The optimum crystallization condition was 2 mg/mL ARM lipase in 0.1 M Tris-HCl, 0.15 M NaCl, pH 8.0 protein solution, crystallized using 0.1 M Tris-HCl, pH 8.0 and 12% (v/v) PEG 20000 as precipitant.

  18. Conformational fluctuations affect protein alignment in dilute liquid crystal media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louhivuori, M.; Otten, R.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of dilute liquid crystalline media to align biological macromolecules has opened many new possibilities to study protein and nucleic acid structures by NMR spectroscopy. We inspect the basic alignment phenomenon for an ensemble of protein conformations to deduce relative contributio...

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of human phosphate-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Carpentier, Philippe; Morales, Renaud [Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble (France); Renault, Frédérique [Unité d’Enzymologie, Département de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 38702 La Tronche (France); Chesne-Seck, Marie-Laure [Laboratoire de Cristallographie Macromoléculaire, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble (France); Rochu, Daniel; Masson, Patrick [Unité d’Enzymologie, Département de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 38702 La Tronche (France); Fontecilla-Camps, Juan Carlos [Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble (France); Chabrière, Eric, E-mail: eric.chabriere@lcm3b.uhp-nancy.fr [Unité d’Enzymologie, Département de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées, 38702 La Tronche (France); Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Modélisation des Matériaux Minéraux et Biologiques, CNRS-Université Henri Poincaré, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Laboratoire de Cristallogenèse et Cristallographie des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, 38027 Grenoble (France)

    2006-01-01

    The purification, detergent-exchange protocol and crystallization conditions that led to the discovery of HPBP are reported. HPBP is a new human apoprotein that is absent from the genomic database and is the first phosphate transporter characterized in human plasma. Human phosphate-binding protein (HPBP) was serendipitously discovered by crystallization and X-ray crystallography. HPBP belongs to a eukaryotic protein family named DING that is systematically absent from the genomic database. This apoprotein of 38 kDa copurifies with the HDL-associated apoprotein paraoxonase (PON1) and binds inorganic phosphate. HPBP is the first identified transporter capable of binding phosphate ions in human plasma. Thus, it may be regarded as a predictor of phosphate-related diseases such as atherosclerosis. In addition, HPBP may be a potential therapeutic protein for the treatment of such diseases. Here, the purification, detergent-exchange protocol and crystallization conditions that led to the discovery of HPBP are reported.

  20. Expression, purification, crystallization and structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marr, Eric; Tardie, Mark; Carty, Maynard; Brown Phillips, Tracy; Wang, Ing-Kae; Soeller, Walt; Qiu, Xiayang; Karam, George

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) with a bound palmitate is reported at 1.5 Å resolution. Human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) belongs to a family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins involved in the transport and storage of lipids. Here, the crystal structure of human aP2 with a bound palmitate is described at 1.5 Å resolution. Unlike the known crystal structure of murine aP2 in complex with palmitate, this structure shows that the fatty acid is in a folded conformation and that the loop containing Phe57 acts as a lid to regulate ligand binding by excluding solvent exposure to the central binding cavity

  1. Amelogenin processing by MMP-20 prevents protein occlusion inside calcite crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Keith M; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Thompson, Mitchell; Lokappa, Sowmya B; Gallon, Victoria A; Cho, Kang R; Qiu, S Roger; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-10-03

    Calcite crystals were grown in the presence of full-length amelogenin and during its proteolysis by recombinant human matrix metalloproteinase 20 (rhMMP-20). Recombinant porcine amelogenin (rP172) altered the shape of calcite crystals by inhibiting the growth of steps on the {104} faces and became occluded inside the crystals. Upon co-addition of rhMMP-20, the majority of the protein was digested resulting in a truncated amelogenin lacking the C-terminal segment. In rP172-rhMMP-20 samples, the occlusion of amelogenin into the calcite crystals was drastically decreased. Truncated amelogenin (rP147) and the 25-residue C-terminal domain produced crystals with regular shape and less occluded organic material. Removal of the C-terminal diminished the affinity of amelogenin to the crystals and therefore prevented occlusion. We hypothesize that HAP and calcite interact with amelogenin in a similar manner. In the case of each material, full-length amelogenin binds most strongly, truncated amelogenin binds weakly and the C-terminus alone has the weakest interaction. Regarding enamel crystal growth, the prevention of occlusion into maturing enamel crystals might be a major benefit resulting from the selective cleavage of amelogenin at the C-terminus by MMP-20. Our data have important implications for understanding the hypomineralized enamel phenotype in cases of amelogenesis imperfecta resulting from MMP-20 mutations and will contribute to the design of enamel inspired biomaterials.

  2. Biochemical, immunological and toxicological characteristics of the crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. medellin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Orduz

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the insecticidal and hemolytic activity of solubilized crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt subsp. medellin (Btmed was performed and compared to solubilized crystal proteins of isolates 1884 of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti and isolate PG-14 of B. thuringiensis subsp. morrisoni (Btm. In general, at acid pH values solubilization of the Bt crystalline parasporal inclusions (CPI was lower than at alkaline pH. The larvicidal activity demonstrated by the CPI of Btmed indicated that optimal solubilization of CPI takes place at a pH value of 11.3, in Bti at pH values from 5.03 to 11.3 and in Btm at pH values from 9.05 to 11.3. Hemolytic activity against sheep red blood cells was mainly found following extraction at pH 11.3 in all Bt strains tested. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions revealed that optimal solubilization of the CPI in all Bt strains takes place at the alkaline pH values from 9.05 to 11.3. An enriched preparation of Btmed crystals was obtained, solubilized and crystal proteins were separated on a size exclusion column (Sephacryl S-200. Three main protein peaks were observed on the chromatogram. The first peak had two main proteins that migrate between 90 to 100 kDa. These proteins are apparently not common to other Bt strains isolated to date. The second and third peaks obtained from the size exclusion column yielded polypeptides of 68 and 28-30 kDa, respectively. Each peak independently, showed toxicity against 1st instar Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Interestingly, combinations of the fractions corresponding to the 68 and 30 kDa protein showed an increased toxicity. These results suggest that the 94 kDa protein is an important component of the Btmed toxins with the highest potency to kill mosquito larvae. When crystal proteins of Bti were probed with antisera raised independently against the three main protein fractions of Btmed, the only crystal protein that showed

  3. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  4. Detergent quantification in membrane protein samples and its application to crystallization experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Chelsy C; Jia, Zongchao

    2013-12-01

    The structural characterization of membrane proteins remains a challenging field, largely because the use of stabilizing detergents is required. Researchers must first select a suitable detergent for the solubility and stability of their protein during in vitro studies. In addition, an appropriate concentration of detergent in membrane protein samples can be essential for protein solubility, stability, and experimental success. For example, in membrane protein crystallography, detergent concentration in the crystallization drop can be a critical parameter influencing crystal growth. Over the past decade, multiple techniques have been developed for the measurement of detergent concentration using a wide variety of strategies. These methods include colorimetric reactions, which target specific detergent classes, and analytical techniques applicable to a wide variety of detergents. This review will summarize and discuss the available options. It will be a useful resource to those selecting a strategy that best fits their experimental requirements and available instruments.

  5. Structure of 3-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) reductase from Rickettsia prowazekii at 2.25 Å resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, Sandhya; Abendroth, Jan; Phan, Isabelle Q. H.; Olsen, Christian; Staker, Bart L.; Napuli, A.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Stacy, Robin; Myler, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    The R. prowazekii 3-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) reductase is similar to those from other prokaryotic pathogens but differs significantly from the mammalian orthologue, strengthening its case as a potential drug target. Rickettsia prowazekii, a parasitic Gram-negative bacterium, is in the second-highest biodefense category of pathogens of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, but only a handful of structures have been deposited in the PDB for this bacterium; to date, all of these have been solved by the SSGCID. Owing to its small genome (about 800 protein-coding genes), it relies on the host for many basic biosynthetic processes, hindering the identification of potential antipathogenic drug targets. However, like many bacteria and plants, its metabolism does depend upon the type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS) pathway for lipogenesis, whereas the predominant form of fatty-acid biosynthesis in humans is via the type I pathway. Here, the structure of the third enzyme in the FAS pathway, 3-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) reductase, is reported at a resolution of 2.25 Å. Its fold is highly similar to those of the existing structures from some well characterized pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Burkholderia pseudomallei, but differs significantly from the analogous mammalian structure. Hence, drugs known to target the enzymes of pathogenic bacteria may serve as potential leads against Rickettsia, which is responsible for spotted fever and typhus and is found throughout the world

  6. Crystal structure analysis, overexpression and refolding behaviour of a DING protein with single mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, Zuoqi; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Hirano, Nagisa; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2013-01-01

    Crystals of a member of the DING protein family (HPBP) were obtained accidentally, and the structure was determined at 1.35 Å resolution. For further analysis, a system for preparation of HPBP was constructed and the structure of a prepared sample was confirmed by X-ray crystal structure analysis at 1.03 Å resolution. After crystallization of a certain protein–RNA complex, well diffracting crystals were obtained. However, the asymmetric unit of the crystal was too small to locate any components. Mass spectrometry and X-ray crystal structure analysis showed that it was a member of the DING protein family (HPBP). Surprisingly, the structure of HPBP reported previously was also determined accidentally as a contaminant, suggesting that HPBP has a strong tendency to crystallize. Furthermore, DING proteins were reported to relate in disease. These observations suggest that DING has potential for application in a wide range of research fields. To enable further analyses, a system for preparation of HPBP was constructed. As HPBP was expressed in insoluble form in Escherichia coli, it was unfolded chemically and refolded. Finally, a very high yield preparation method was constructed, in which 43 mg of HPBP was obtained from 1 L of culture. Furthermore, to evaluate the validity of refolding, its crystal structure was determined at 1.03 Å resolution. The determined structure was identical to the native structure, in which two disulfide bonds were recovered correctly and a phosphate ion was captured. Based on these results, it was concluded that the refolded HPBP recovers its structure correctly

  7. Protein crystal structure from non-oriented, single-axis sparse X-ray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Wierman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs have inspired the development of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX as a method to solve the structure of proteins. SFX datasets are collected from a sequence of protein microcrystals injected across ultrashort X-ray pulses. The idea behind SFX is that diffraction from the intense, ultrashort X-ray pulses leaves the crystal before the crystal is obliterated by the effects of the X-ray pulse. The success of SFX at XFELs has catalyzed interest in analogous experiments at synchrotron-radiation (SR sources, where data are collected from many small crystals and the ultrashort pulses are replaced by exposure times that are kept short enough to avoid significant crystal damage. The diffraction signal from each short exposure is so `sparse' in recorded photons that the process of recording the crystal intensity is itself a reconstruction problem. Using the EMC algorithm, a successful reconstruction is demonstrated here in a sparsity regime where there are no Bragg peaks that conventionally would serve to determine the orientation of the crystal in each exposure. In this proof-of-principle experiment, a hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL crystal rotating about a single axis was illuminated by an X-ray beam from an X-ray generator to simulate the diffraction patterns of microcrystals from synchrotron radiation. Millions of these sparse frames, typically containing only ∼200 photons per frame, were recorded using a fast-framing detector. It is shown that reconstruction of three-dimensional diffraction intensity is possible using the EMC algorithm, even with these extremely sparse frames and without knowledge of the rotation angle. Further, the reconstructed intensity can be phased and refined to solve the protein structure using traditional crystallographic software. This suggests that synchrotron-based serial crystallography of micrometre-sized crystals can be practical with the aid of the EMC algorithm even in cases

  8. Protein crystallization screens developed at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrec, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    In order to solve increasingly challenging protein structures with crystallography, crystallization reagents and screen formulations are regularly investigated. Here, we briefly describe 96-condition screens developed at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology: the LMB sparse matrix screen, Pi incomplete factorial screens, the MORPHEUS grid screens and the ANGSTROM optimization screen. In this short review, we also discuss the difficulties and advantages associated with the development of protein crystallization screens. Copyright © 2016 MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Protein crystals in Adenovirus type 5-infected cells: requirements for intranuclear crystallogenesis, structural and functional analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Franqueville

    Full Text Available Intranuclear crystalline inclusions have been observed in the nucleus of epithelial cells infected with Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 at late steps of the virus life cycle. Using immuno-electron microscopy and confocal microscopy of cells infected with various Ad5 recombinants modified in their penton base or fiber domains, we found that these inclusions represented crystals of penton capsomers, the heteromeric capsid protein formed of penton base and fiber subunits. The occurrence of protein crystals within the nucleus of infected cells required the integrity of the fiber knob and part of the shaft domain. In the knob domain, the region overlapping residues 489-492 in the FG loop was found to be essential for crystal formation. In the shaft, a large deletion of repeats 4 to 16 had no detrimental effect on crystal inclusions, whereas deletion of repeats 8 to 21 abolished crystal formation without altering the level of fiber protein expression. This suggested a crucial role of the five penultimate repeats in the crystallisation process. Chimeric pentons made of Ad5 penton base and fiber domains from different serotypes were analyzed with respect to crystal formation. No crystal was found when fiber consisted of shaft (S from Ad5 and knob (K from Ad3 (heterotypic S5-K3 fiber, but occurred with homotypic S3K3 fiber. However, less regular crystals were observed with homotypic S35-K35 fiber. TB5, a monoclonal antibody directed against the Ad5 fiber knob was found by immunofluorescence microscopy to react with high efficiency with the intranuclear protein crystals in situ. Data obtained with Ad fiber mutants indicated that the absence of crystalline inclusions correlated with a lower infectivity and/or lower yields of virus progeny, suggesting that the protein crystals might be involved in virion assembly. Thus, we propose that TB5 staining of Ad-infected 293 cells can be used as a prognostic assay for the viability and productivity of fiber-modified Ad5

  10. The Effects of Impurities on Protein Crystal Growth and Nucleation: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Constance A.

    1998-01-01

    Kubota and Mullin (1995) devised a simple model to account for the effects of impurities on crystal growth of small inorganic and organic molecules in aqueous solutions. Experimentally, the relative step velocity and crystal growth of these molecules asymptotically approach zero or non-zero values with increasing concentrations of impurities. Alternatively, the step velocity and crystal growth can linearly approach zero as the impurity concentration increases. The Kubota-Mullin model assumes that the impurity exhibits Langmuirian adsorption onto the crystal surface. Decreases in step velocities and subsequent growth rates are related to the fractional coverage (theta) of the crystal surface by adsorbed impurities; theta = Kx / (I +Kx), x = mole fraction of impurity in solution. In the presence of impurities, the relative step velocity, V/Vo, and the relative growth rate of a crystal face, G/Go, are proposed to conform to the following equations: V/Vo approx. = G/Go = 1 - (alpha)(theta). The adsorption of impurity is assumed to be rapid and in quasi-equilibrium with the crystal surface sites available. When the value of alpha, an effectiveness factor, is one the growth will asymptotically approach zero with increasing concentrations of impurity. At values less than one, growth approaches a non-zero value asymptotically. When alpha is much greater than one, there will be a linear relationship between impurity concentration and growth rates. Kubota and Mullin expect alpha to decrease with increasing supersaturation and shrinking size of a two dimensional nucleus. It is expected that impurity effects on protein crystal growth will exhibit behavior similar to that of impurities in small molecule growth. A number of proteins were added to purified chicken egg white lysozyme, the effect on crystal nucleation and growth assessed.

  11. Crystallization of a pentapeptide-repeat protein by reductive cyclic pentylation of free amines with glutaraldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting, Matthew W., E-mail: vetting@aecom.yu.edu; Hegde, Subray S.; Blanchard, John S. [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2009-05-01

    A method to modify proteins with glutaraldehyde under reducing conditions is presented. Treatment with glutaraldehyde and dimethylaminoborane was found to result in cyclic pentylation of free amines and facilitated the structural determination of a protein previously recalcitrant to the formation of diffraction quality crystals. The pentapeptide-repeat protein EfsQnr from Enterococcus faecalis protects DNA gyrase from inhibition by fluoroquinolones. EfsQnr was cloned and purified to homogeneity, but failed to produce diffraction-quality crystals in initial crystallization screens. Treatment of EfsQnr with glutaraldehyde and the strong reducing agent borane–dimethylamine resulted in a derivatized protein which produced crystals that diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution; their structure was subsequently determined by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion. Analysis of the derivatized protein using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry indicated a mass increase of 68 Da per free amino group. Electron-density maps about a limited number of structurally ordered lysines indicated that the modification was a cyclic pentylation of free amines, producing piperidine groups.

  12. Crystallization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae aminopeptidase 1, the major cargo protein of the Cvt pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Wakana; Suzuki, Nobuo N.; Fujioka, Yuko; Suzuki, Kuninori; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2007-01-01

    Aminopeptidase 1, a cargo protein in the cytosol-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, was expressed, purified and crystallized in two crystal forms. The vacuole hydrolase aminopeptidase 1 (Ape1) is a cargo protein transported to the vacuole by the cytosol-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway during conditions of growth and by autophagy during conditions of starvation. After transport to the vacuole, Ape1 is processed into mature Ape1 (mApe1). mApe1 has been expressed, purified and crystallized in two crystal forms. Form I belongs to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 120.6, b = 219.5, c = 133.1 Å, β = 116.5°. Form II belongs to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = 141.2, c = 349.4 Å. Diffraction data were collected from these crystals to a resolution of 2.5 Å for form I and 1.83 Å for form II. Self-rotation functions and the volume-to-weight ratio values suggest that forms I and II contain 12 and four mApe1 molecules per asymmetric unit, respectively, and that mApe1 exists as a tetrahedral dodecamer in both crystal forms

  13. In vacuo X-ray data collection from graphene-wrapped protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Anna J.; Crawshaw, Adam D.; Trincao, Jose; Aller, Pierre; Alcock, Simon; Nistea, Ioana; Salgado, Paula S.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of diffraction data from macromolecular crystal samples held in vacuo holds the promise of a very low X-ray background and zero absorption of incident and scattered beams, leading to better data and the potential for accessing very long X-ray wavelengths (>3 Å) for native sulfur phasing. Maintaining the hydration of protein crystals under vacuum is achieved by the use of liquid jets, as with serial data collection at free-electron lasers, or is side-stepped by cryocooling the samples, as implemented at new synchrotron beamlines. Graphene has been shown to protect crystals from dehydration by creating an extremely thin layer that is impermeable to any exchanges with the environment. Furthermore, owing to its hydrophobicity, most of the aqueous solution surrounding the crystal is excluded during sample preparation, thus eliminating most of the background caused by liquid. Here, it is shown that high-quality data can be recorded at room temperature from graphene-wrapped protein crystals in a rough vacuum. Furthermore, it was observed that graphene protects crystals exposed to different relative humidities and a chemically harsh environment. PMID:26457431

  14. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.961 protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xiong-Zhuo; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, XiaoJun; Liang, Yu-He

    2007-01-01

    The SMU.961 protein from S. mutans was crystallized and preliminary characterization of the crystals, which diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution, shows them to belong to space group C2. The smu.961 gene encodes a putative protein of 183 residues in Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen in human dental caries. The gene was cloned into expression vector pET28a and expressed in a substantial quantity in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) with a His tag at its N-terminus. The recombinant protein SMU.961 was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure consisting of Ni 2+ -chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution at beamline I911-3, MAX-II-lab, Sweden. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.62, b = 73.73, c = 184.73 Å, β = 98.82°

  15. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.961 protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiong-Zhuo [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao, XiaoJun, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Liang, Yu-He, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China)

    2007-10-01

    The SMU.961 protein from S. mutans was crystallized and preliminary characterization of the crystals, which diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution, shows them to belong to space group C2. The smu.961 gene encodes a putative protein of 183 residues in Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen in human dental caries. The gene was cloned into expression vector pET28a and expressed in a substantial quantity in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) with a His tag at its N-terminus. The recombinant protein SMU.961 was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution at beamline I911-3, MAX-II-lab, Sweden. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.62, b = 73.73, c = 184.73 Å, β = 98.82°.

  16. X-ray structural analysis of Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase as a pathway toward the optimization of triclosan antimalarial efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, Joel S; Wang, Feng; Tsai, Han-Chun; Kuo, Mack; Shieh, Hong-Ming; Anderson, John W; Nkrumah, Louis J; Valderramos, Juan-Carlos; Yu, Min; Kumar, T R Santha; Valderramos, Stephanie G; Jacobs, William R; Schiehser, Guy A; Jacobus, David P; Fidock, David A; Sacchettini, James C

    2007-08-31

    The x-ray crystal structures of five triclosan analogs, in addition to that of the isoniazid-NAD adduct, are described in relation to their integral role in the design of potent inhibitors of the malarial enzyme Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (PfENR). Many of the novel 5-substituted analogs exhibit low micromolar potency against in vitro cultures of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive strains of the P. falciparum parasite and inhibit purified PfENR enzyme with IC50 values of <200 nM. This study has significantly expanded the knowledge base with regard to the structure-activity relationship of triclosan while affording gains against cultured parasites and purified PfENR enzyme. In contrast to a recent report in the literature, these results demonstrate the ability to improve the in vitro potency of triclosan significantly by replacing the suboptimal 5-chloro group with larger hydrophobic moieties. The biological and x-ray crystallographic data thus demonstrate the flexibility of the active site and point to future rounds of optimization to improve compound potency against purified enzyme and intracellular Plasmodium parasites.

  17. Structure of the Francisella tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) in complex with NAD[superscript +] and triclosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehboob, Shahila; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E. (UIC)

    2010-11-19

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) catalyzes the last rate-limiting step in the elongation cycle of the fatty-acid biosynthesis pathway and has been validated as a potential antimicrobial drug target in Francisella tularensis. The development of new antibiotic therapies is important both to combat potential drug-resistant bioweapons and to address the broader societal problem of increasing antibiotic resistance among many pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structure of FabI from F. tularensis (FtuFabI) in complex with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NAD{sup +} has been solved to a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. Triclosan is known to effectively inhibit FabI from different organisms. Precise characterization of the mode of triclosan binding is required to develop highly specific inhibitors. Comparison of our structure with the previously determined FtuFabI structure (PDB code 2jjy) which is bound to only NAD{sup +} reveals the conformation of the substrate-binding loop, electron density for which was missing in the earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the conformation of the NAD{sup +} cofactor. This shift in the position of the phosphate groups allows more room in the active site for substrate or inhibitor to bind and be better accommodated. This information will be crucial for virtual screening studies to identify novel scaffolds for development into new active inhibitors.

  18. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Anna J.; Armour, Wes; Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Hall, David R.; Horrell, Sam; McAuley, Katherine E.; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2013-01-01

    A comparison of X-ray diffraction and radiographic techniques for the location and characterization of protein crystals is demonstrated on membrane protein crystals mounted within lipid cubic phase material. The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Diamond Light Source. The technique is particularly useful for microcrystals and for crystals mounted in opaque materials such as lipid cubic phase. X-ray diffraction raster scanning can be used in combination with radiography to allow informed decision-making at the beamline prior to diffraction data collection. It is demonstrated that the X-ray dose required for a full tomography measurement is similar to that for a diffraction grid-scan, but for sample location and shape estimation alone just a few radiographic projections may be required

  19. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Anna J. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Armour, Wes [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Oxford e-Research Centre, 7 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3QG (United Kingdom); Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Hall, David R. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Horrell, Sam [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); McAuley, Katherine E.; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin; Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    A comparison of X-ray diffraction and radiographic techniques for the location and characterization of protein crystals is demonstrated on membrane protein crystals mounted within lipid cubic phase material. The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Diamond Light Source. The technique is particularly useful for microcrystals and for crystals mounted in opaque materials such as lipid cubic phase. X-ray diffraction raster scanning can be used in combination with radiography to allow informed decision-making at the beamline prior to diffraction data collection. It is demonstrated that the X-ray dose required for a full tomography measurement is similar to that for a diffraction grid-scan, but for sample location and shape estimation alone just a few radiographic projections may be required.

  20. Electron crystallography of ultrathin 3D protein crystals: atomic model with charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekura, Koji; Kato, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Mitsuo; Tomita, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2015-03-17

    Membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes often yield crystals too small or too thin for even the modern synchrotron X-ray beam. Electron crystallography could provide a powerful means for structure determination with such undersized crystals, as protein atoms diffract electrons four to five orders of magnitude more strongly than they do X-rays. Furthermore, as electron crystallography yields Coulomb potential maps rather than electron density maps, it could provide a unique method to visualize the charged states of amino acid residues and metals. Here we describe an attempt to develop a methodology for electron crystallography of ultrathin (only a few layers thick) 3D protein crystals and present the Coulomb potential maps at 3.4-Å and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, obtained from Ca(2+)-ATPase and catalase crystals. These maps demonstrate that it is indeed possible to build atomic models from such crystals and even to determine the charged states of amino acid residues in the Ca(2+)-binding sites of Ca(2+)-ATPase and that of the iron atom in the heme in catalase.

  1. Study of Fluid Flow Control in Protein Crystallization using Strong Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Leslie, Fred; Ciszak, Ewa

    2002-11-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in "microgravity", researchers have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. Whether this limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals is still a matter of conjecture that our research will address. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately

  2. Expression, purification and crystallization of the C-terminal LRR domain of Streptococcus pyogenes protein 0843

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haikarainen, Teemu; Loimaranta, Vuokko; Prieto-Lopez, Carlos; Battula, Pradeep; Finne, Jukka; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C.

    2013-01-01

    The C-terminal LRR domain of S. pyogenes protein 0843 was overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. A complete data set to 1.59 Å resolution was collected using synchrotron radiation. Streptococcus pyogenes protein 0843 (Spy0843) is a recently identified protein with a potential adhesin function. Sequence analysis has shown that Spy0843 contains two leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains that mediate interactions with the gp340 receptor. Here, the C-terminal LRR domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in the presence of 1.7–1.8 M ammonium sulfate pH 7.4 as precipitant. Data were collected from a single crystal to 1.59 Å resolution at 100 K at a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystal was found to belong to space group I4 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 121.4, c = 51.5 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Elucidation of the crystal structure will provide insights into the interactions of Spy0843 with the gp340 receptor and a better understanding of the role of Spy0843 in streptococcal infections

  3. Cloning, Expression, Purification, Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of Mycoplasma Genitalium Protein MG289

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippel, K.; Boehlein, S; Sakai, Y; Quirit, J; Agbandje-McKenna, M; Rosser, C; McKenna, R

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a human pathogen that is associated with nongonococcal urethritis in men and cervicitis in women. The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the protein MG289 from M. genitalium strain G37 are reported here. Crystals of MG289 diffracted X-rays to 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.7, b = 90.9, c = 176.1 {angstrom}. The diffraction data after processing had an overall R{sub merge} of 8.7%. The crystal structure of Cypl, the ortholog of MG289 from M. hyorhinis, has recently been determined, providing a reasonable phasing model; molecular replacement is currently under way.

  4. Interaction of cholesterol-crystallization-promoting proteins with vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, M. A.; Goldhoorn, B. G.; Zijlstra, A. I.; Tytgat, G. N.; Groen, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    In this study, the interaction of mucin and concanavalin A-binding proteins isolated from human bile with cholesterol/phospholipid vesicles was investigated. Using resonance energy transfer assays originally developed by Struck, Hoekstra and Pagano [(1981) Biochemistry 20, 4093-4099], no significant

  5. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    acid residues of different Cry proteins for identification of block 3 conserved residues is shown in figure 4B. Discussion. We have reported identification of a cryII gene (cry2Aa4) from a local isolate (HD549) of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kenyae, its cloning and expression in E. coli, and its nucleotide sequencing. This gene is ...

  6. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A 1.9-kb DNA fragment, PCR-amplified from HD549 using cryII-gene-specific primers, was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant protein produced 92% mortality in first-instar larvae of Spodoptera litura and 86% inhibition of adult emergence in Phthorimaea operculella, but showed very low toxicity against ...

  7. Single particle 3D reconstruction for 2D crystal images of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Sebastian; Arheit, Marcel; Kowal, Julia; Zeng, Xiangyan; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-03-01

    In cases where ultra-flat cryo-preparations of well-ordered two-dimensional (2D) crystals are available, electron crystallography is a powerful method for the determination of the high-resolution structures of membrane and soluble proteins. However, crystal unbending and Fourier-filtering methods in electron crystallography three-dimensional (3D) image processing are generally limited in their performance for 2D crystals that are badly ordered or non-flat. Here we present a single particle image processing approach, which is implemented as an extension of the 2D crystallographic pipeline realized in the 2dx software package, for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of membrane proteins. The algorithm presented, addresses the low single-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 2D crystal images by exploiting neighborhood correlation between adjacent proteins in the 2D crystal. Compared with conventional single particle processing for randomly oriented particles, the computational costs are greatly reduced due to the crystal-induced limited search space, which allows a much finer search space compared to classical single particle processing. To reduce the considerable computational costs, our software features a hybrid parallelization scheme for multi-CPU clusters and computer with high-end graphic processing units (GPUs). We successfully apply the new refinement method to the structure of the potassium channel MloK1. The calculated 3D reconstruction shows more structural details and contains less noise than the map obtained by conventional Fourier-filtering based processing of the same 2D crystal images. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging transport phenomena during lysozyme protein crystal growth by the hanging drop technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethia Gupta, Anamika; Gupta, Rajive; Panigrahi, P. K.; Muralidhar, K.

    2013-06-01

    The present study reports the transport process that occurs during the growth of lysozyme protein crystals by the hanging drop technique. A rainbow schlieren technique has been employed for imaging changes in salt concentration. A one dimensional color filter is used to record the deflection of the light beam. An optical microscope and an X-ray crystallography unit are used to characterize the size, tetragonal shape and Bravais lattice constants of the grown crystals. A parametric study on the effect of drop composition, drop size, reservoir height and number of drops on the crystal size and quality is reported. Changes in refractive index are not large enough to create a meaningful schlieren image in the air gap between the drop and the reservoir. However, condensation of fresh water over the reservoir solution creates large changes in the concentration of NaCl, giving rise to clear color patterns in the schlieren images. These have been analyzed to obtain salt concentration profiles near the free surface of the reservoir solution as a function of time. The diffusion of fresh water into the reservoir solution at the early stages of crystal growth followed by the mass flux of salt from the bulk solution towards the free surface has been recorded. The overall crystal growth process can be classified into two regimes, as demarcated by the changes in slope of salt concentration within the reservoir. The salt concentration in the reservoir equilibrates at long times when the crystallization process is complete. Thus, transport processes in the reservoir emerge as the route to monitor protein crystal growth in the hanging drop configuration. Results show that crystal growth rate is faster for a higher lysozyme concentration, smaller drops, and larger reservoir heights.

  9. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, Christian, E-mail: clin180@ec.auckland.ac.nz [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Caradoc-Davies, Tom T. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Proft, Thomas [School of Medical Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Baker, Edward N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2008-02-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution.

  10. Membrane's Eleven: heavy-atom derivatives of membrane-protein crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morth, Jens Preben; Sørensen, Thomas Lykke-Møller; Nissen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    A database has been assembled of heavy-atom derivatives used in the structure determination of membrane proteins. The database can serve as a guide to the design of experiments in the search for heavy-atom derivatives of new membrane-protein crystals. The database pinpoints organomercurials......, platinum(II) and trimethyllead compounds as being particularly useful. On the other hand, lanthanide and uranyl compounds are poorly represented, which may be a consequence of these compounds having aggressive effects in crystal-soaking procedures. Furthermore, the database highlights the variety...... of methods applied in the preparation of heavy-atom-derivatized crystals and in phasing. Cocrystallization can be further exploited. Phases have predominantly been obtained by SIRAS/MIRAS methods rather than SAD/MAD in recent structure determinations....

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, Christian; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Proft, Thomas; Baker, Edward N.

    2008-01-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution

  12. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals; Simulationsrechnungen zu Strahlenschaeden an Proteinkristallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehnder, M.

    2007-03-15

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  13. Resistance: a threat to the insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer

    1995-01-01

    Insecticidal crystal proteins (also known as d-endotoxins) synthesized by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) are the active ingredient of various environmentally friendly insecticides that are 1) highly compatible with natural enemies and other nontarget organisms due to narrow host specificity, 2) harmless to vertebrates, 3) biodegradable in the...

  14. Characterization of Baculovirus Insecticides Expressing Tailored Bacillus thuringiensis CryIA(b) Crystal Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, John W M; Knoester, Marga; Weijts, Franci; Groffen, Sander J A; Hu, Zhihong; Bosch, Dirk; Vlak, Just M.

    1995-01-01

    Full-length, truncated, and mature forms of the CryIA(b) insecticidal crystal protein gene of Bacillus thuringiensis were engineered into the p10 locus of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV). A signal sequence of Heliothis virescens juvenile hormone esterase was introduced at

  15. Fluid-crystal coexistence for proteins and inorganic nanocolloids : Dependence on ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, P.; Odijk, T.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the fluid-crystal coexistence of solutions of globular charged nanoparticles such as proteins and inorganic colloids. The thermodynamic properties of the fluid phase are computed via the optimized Baxter model P. Prinsen and T. Odijk [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 6525 (2004)].

  16. Three-Dimentional Structures of Autophosphorylation Complexes in Crystals of Protein Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Dumbrack, Roland

    2016-01-26

    Protein kinase autophosphorylation is a common regulatory mechanism in cell signaling pathways. Several autophosphorylation complexes have been identified in crystals of protein kinases, with a known serine, threonine, or tyrosine autophosphorylation site of one kinase monomer sitting in the active site of another monomer of the same protein in the crystal. We utilized a structural bioinformatics method to identify all such autophosphorylation complexes in X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by generating all unique kinase/kinase interfaces within and between asymmetric units of each crystal and measuring the distance between the hydroxyl oxygen of potential autophosphorylation sites and the oxygen atoms of the active site aspartic acid residue side chain. We have identified 15 unique autophosphorylation complexes in the PDB, of which 5 complexes have not previously been described in the relevant publications on the crystal structures (N-terminal juxtamembrane regions of CSF1R and EPHA2, activation loop tyrosines of LCK and IGF1R, and a serine in a nuclear localization signal region of CLK2. Mutation of residues in the autophosphorylation complex interface of LCK either severely impaired autophosphorylation or increased it. Taking the autophosphorylation complexes as a whole and comparing them with peptide-substrate/kinase complexes, we observe a number of important features among them. The novel and previously observed autophosphorylation sites are conserved in many kinases, indicating that by homology we can extend the relevance of these complexes to many other clinically relevant drug targets.

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalinski, Eva; Bange, Gert; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard, E-mail: irmi.sinning@bzh.uni-heidelberg.de [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, INF 328, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-09-01

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1 from Homo sapiens is provided. ErbB-3-binding protein 1 (Ebp1) is a member of the family of proliferation-associated 2G4 proteins (PA2G4s) and plays a role in cellular growth and differentiation. Ligand-induced activation of the transmembrane receptor ErbB3 leads to dissociation of Ebp1 from the receptor in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The non-associated protein is involved in transcriptional and translational regulation in the cell. Here, the overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Ebp1 from Homo sapiens are reported. Initially observed crystals were improved by serial seeding to single crystals suitable for data collection. The optimized crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å.

  18. Deuteration of human carbonic anhydrase for neutron crystallography: Cell culture media, protein thermostability, and crystallization behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koruza, K; Lafumat, B; Végvári, Á; Knecht, W; Fisher, S Z

    2018-05-01

    Deuterated proteins and other bio-derived molecules are important for NMR spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, small angle neutron scattering, and neutron protein crystallography. In the current study we optimized expression media and cell culture conditions to produce high levels of 3 different deuterated human carbonic anhydrases (hCAs). The labeled hCAs were then characterized and tested for deuterium incorporation by mass spectrometry, temperature stability, and propensity to crystallize. The results show that is possible to get very good yields (>10 mg of pure protein per liter of cell culture under deuterated conditions) and that protein solubility is unaffected at the crystallization concentrations tested. Using unlabeled carbon source and recycled heavy water, we were able to get 65-77% deuterium incorporation, sufficient for most neutron-based techniques, and in a very cost-effective way. For most deuterated proteins characterized in the literature, the solubility and thermal stability is reduced. The data reported here is consistent with these observations and it was clear that there are measurable differences between hydrogenous and deuterated versions of the same protein in T m and how they crystallize. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. EDM-DEDM and protein crystal structure solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliandro, Rocco; Carrozzini, Benedetta; Cascarano, Giovanni Luca; Giacovazzo, Carmelo; Mazzone, Anna Maria; Siliqi, Dritan

    2009-05-01

    Electron-density modification (EDM) procedures are the classical tool for driving model phases closer to those of the target structure. They are often combined with automated model-building programs to provide a correct protein model. The task is not always performed, mostly because of the large initial phase error. A recently proposed procedure combined EDM with DEDM (difference electron-density modification); the method was applied to the refinement of phases obtained by molecular replacement, ab initio or SAD phasing [Caliandro, Carrozzini, Cascarano, Giacovazzo, Mazzone & Siliqi (2009), Acta Cryst. D65, 249-256] and was more effective in improving phases than EDM alone. In this paper, a novel fully automated protocol for protein structure refinement based on the iterative application of automated model-building programs combined with the additional power derived from the EDM-DEDM algorithm is presented. The cyclic procedure was successfully tested on challenging cases for which all other approaches had failed.

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase-20 mediates dental enamel biomineralization by preventing protein occlusion inside apatite crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Saumya; Tao, Jinhui; Ruan, Qichao; De Yoreo, James J.; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of enamel-like materials is a central topic of research in dentistry and material sciences. The importance of precise proteolytic mechanisms in amelogenesis to form a hard tissue with more than 95% mineral content has already been reported. A mutation in the Matrix Metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) gene results in hypomineralized enamel that is thin, disorganized and breaks from the underlying dentin. We hypothesized that the absence of MMP-20 during amelogenesis results in the occlusion of amelogenin in the enamel hydroxyapatite crystals. We used spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze occluded proteins within the isolated enamel crystals from MMP-20 null and Wild type (WT) mice. Our results showed that the isolated enamel crystals of MMP-20 null mice had more organic macromolecules occluded inside them than enamel crystals from the WT. The crystal lattice arrangements of MMP-20 null enamel crystals analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) were found to be significantly different from those of the WT. Raman studies indicated that the crystallinity of the MMP-20 null enamel crystals was lower than that of the WT. In conclusion, we present a novel functional mechanism of MMP-20, specifically prevention of unwanted organic material entrapped in the forming enamel crystals, which occurs as the result of precise amelogenin cleavage. MMP-20 action guides the growth morphology of the forming hydroxyapatite crystals and enhances their crystallinity. Elucidating such molecular mechanisms can be applied in the design of novel biomaterials for future clinical applications in dental restoration or repair. PMID:26513418

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase-20 mediates dental enamel biomineralization by preventing protein occlusion inside apatite crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Saumya; Tao, Jinhui; Ruan, Qichao; De Yoreo, James J; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of enamel-like materials is a central topic of research in dentistry and material sciences. The importance of precise proteolytic mechanisms in amelogenesis to form a hard tissue with more than 95% mineral content has already been reported. A mutation in the Matrix Metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) gene results in hypomineralized enamel that is thin, disorganized and breaks from the underlying dentin. We hypothesized that the absence of MMP-20 during amelogenesis results in the occlusion of amelogenin in the enamel hydroxyapatite crystals. We used spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze occluded proteins within the isolated enamel crystals from MMP-20 null and Wild type (WT) mice. Our results showed that the isolated enamel crystals of MMP-20 null mice had more organic macromolecules occluded inside them than enamel crystals from the WT. The crystal lattice arrangements of MMP-20 null enamel crystals analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) were found to be significantly different from those of the WT. Raman studies indicated that the crystallinity of the MMP-20 null enamel crystals was lower than that of the WT. In conclusion, we present a novel functional mechanism of MMP-20, specifically prevention of unwanted organic material entrapped in the forming enamel crystals, which occurs as the result of precise amelogenin cleavage. MMP-20 action guides the growth morphology of the forming hydroxyapatite crystals and enhances their crystallinity. Elucidating such molecular mechanisms can be applied in the design of novel biomaterials for future clinical applications in dental restoration or repair. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Escherichia coli fusion carrier proteins act as solubilizing agents for recombinant uncoupling protein 1 through interactions with GroEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douette, Pierre; Navet, Rachel; Gerkens, Pascal; Galleni, Moreno; Levy, Daniel; Sluse, Francis E.

    2005-01-01

    Fusing recombinant proteins to highly soluble partners is frequently used to prevent aggregation of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Moreover, co-overexpression of prokaryotic chaperones can increase the amount of properly folded recombinant proteins. To understand the solubility enhancement of fusion proteins, we designed two recombinant proteins composed of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), a mitochondrial membrane protein, in fusion with MBP or NusA. We were able to express soluble forms of MBP-UCP1 and NusA-UCP1 despite the high hydrophobicity of UCP1. Furthermore, the yield of soluble fusion proteins depended on co-overexpression of GroEL that catalyzes folding of polypeptides. MBP-UCP1 was expressed in the form of a non-covalent complex with GroEL. MBP-UCP1/GroEL was purified and characterized by dynamic light scattering, gel filtration, and electron microscopy. Our findings suggest that MBP and NusA act as solubilizing agents by forcing the recombinant protein to pass through the bacterial chaperone pathway in the context of fusion protein

  3. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angelova, A.; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, R.; Lesieur, S.; Couvreur, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 2 (2011), s. 147-156 ISSN 0001-4842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/2078; GA ČR GAP208/10/1600 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : lipid-water phases * liquid crystals * multicompartment lipid nanostructures Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 21.640, year: 2011

  4. crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Huang, Yisheng; Zhang, Lizhen; Lin, Zhoubin; Sun, Shijia; Wang, Guofu

    2014-07-01

    A Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal with dimensions of ϕ 17 × 30 mm3 was grown by the Czochralski method. The thermal expansion coefficients of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal are 1.32 × 10-5 K-1 along c-axis and 1.23 × 10-5 K-1 along a-axis, respectively. The spectroscopic characteristics of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal were investigated. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied to calculate the spectral parameters. The absorption cross sections at 805 nm are 2.17 × 10-20 cm2 with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 15 nm for π-polarization, and 2.29 × 10-20 cm2 with a FWHM of 14 nm for σ-polarization. The emission cross sections are 3.19 × 10-20 cm2 for σ-polarization and 2.67 × 10-20 cm2 for π-polarization at 1,064 nm. The fluorescence quantum efficiency is 67 %. The quasi-cw laser of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal was performed. The maximum output power is 80 mW. The slope efficiency is 7.12 %. The results suggest Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal as a promising laser crystal fit for laser diode pumping.

  5. Energy Band Gap, Intrinsic Carrier Concentration and Fermi Level of CdTe Bulk Crystal between 304 K and 1067 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2007-01-01

    Optical transmission measurements were performed on CdTe bulk single crystal. It was found that when a sliced and polished CdTe wafer was used, a white film started to develop when the sample was heated above 530 K and the sample became opaque. Therefore, a bulk crystal of CdTe was first grown in the window area by physical vapor transport; the optical transmission was then measured and from which the energy band gap was derived between 304 and 1067 K. The band gaps of CdTe can be fit well as a function of temperature using the Varshini expression: Eg (e V) = 1.5860 - 5.9117xl0(exp -4) T(sup 2)/(T + 160). Using the band gap data, the high temperature electron-hole equilibrium was calculated numerically by assuming the Kane's conduction band structure and a heavy-hole parabolic valance band. The calculated intrinsic carrier concentrations agree well with the experimental data reported previously. The calculated intrinsic Fermi levels between 270 and 1200 K were also presented.

  6. Bioreducible poly(amidoamine)s as carriers for intracellular protein delivery to intestinal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, S.; Coué, G.M.J.P.C.; Beno, D.; Korenstein, R.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.

    2012-01-01

    An effective intracellular protein delivery system was developed based on linear poly(amidoamine)s (PAAs) that form self-assembled cationic nanocomplexes with oppositely charged proteins. Two differently functionalized PAAs were synthesized by Michael-type polyaddition of 4-amino-1-butanol (ABOL) to

  7. Growth kinetics of protein single crystals in the gel acupuncture technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Moreno, Abel

    1997-07-01

    The growth of single crystals of tetragonal HEW lysozyme and thaumatin I into glass capillaries was monitored by time lapse video-microscopy. The crystals were obtained by unidirectional transport of the precipitating agent through capillaries of internal diameter ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 mm, using the gel acupuncture technique. For crystals growing from true protein solutions, the measured average growth rates varies with capillary diameter from 1.7 to 3.7 Å/s for thaumatin and from 2.8 to 22 Å/s for lysozyme. The measured average growth rates for crystals growing into gelled protein solutions were 1.8 Å/s for thaumatin and 2.5 Å/s for lysozyme. The trend in the variation of the growth rate with time is similar and suggests that, for capillaries with internal radius lower than 0.8 mm, diffusion dominates the global mass transport control. However, the existence of convection rolls near the crystal-solution interface and close to zones with high density gradient cannot be discarded.

  8. Plant-specific DUF1110 protein from Oryza sativa: expression, purification and crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kenichi; Yamashita, Eiki; Inoue, Kento; Yamaguchi, Koji; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Tsutomu; Kojima, Chojiro

    2016-06-01

    The Os01T0156300 protein from Oryza sativa has been classified into the domain of unknown function (DUF) family DUF1110. DUF1110 family members exist in monocotyledons but not in dicotyledons, and share no sequence identity with proteins for which structures have been reported. In this study, the Os01T0156300 protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.84 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 89.9, b = 89.8, c = 107.1 Å, β = 106.6°. The asymmetric unit was estimated to contain 6-11 molecules.

  9. How to get the magic triangle and the MAD triangle into your protein crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Tobias; Cunha, Carlos Eduardo da; Sheldrick, George M.

    2009-01-01

    The handling of the phasing tools I3C and B3C is described, emphasizing practical aspects such as the preparation of solutions and incorporation of the compounds into protein crystals. The magic triangle 5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid (I3C) and the MAD triangle 5-amino-2,4,6-tribromoisophthalic acid (B3C) are two representatives of a novel class of compounds that combine heavy atoms for experimental phasing with functional groups for protein interactions. These compounds are readily available and provide easy access to experimental phasing. The preparation of stock solutions and the incorporation of the compounds into protein crystals are discussed. As an example of incorporation via cocrystallization, the incorporation of B3C into bovine trypsin, resulting in a single site with high occupancy, is described

  10. The adsorption features between insecticidal crystal protein and nano-Mg(OH)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaohong; Xu, Zhangyan; Zheng, Yilin; Huang, Tengzhou; Li, Lan; Chen, Zhi; Rao, Wenhua; Chen, Saili; Hong, Xianxian; Guan, Xiong

    2017-12-01

    Nano-Mg(OH) 2 , with low biological toxicity, is an ideal nano-carrier for insecticidal protein to improve the bioactivity. In this work, the adsorption features of insecticidal protein by nano-Mg(OH) 2 have been studied. The adsorption capacity could reach as high as 136 mg g -1 , and the adsorption isotherm had been fitted with Langmuir and Freundlich models. Moreover, the adsorption kinetics followed a pseudo-first or -second order rate model, and the adsorption was spontaneous and an exothermic process. However, high temperatures are not suitable for adsorption, which implies that the temperature would be a critical factor during the adsorption process. In addition, FT-IR confirmed that the protein was adsorbed on the nano-Mg(OH) 2 , zeta potential analysis suggested that insecticidal protein was loaded onto the nano-Mg(OH) 2 not by electrostatic adsorption but maybe by intermolecular forces, and circular dichroism spectroscopy of Cry11Aa protein before and after loading with nano-Mg(OH) 2 was changed. The study applied the adsorption information between Cry11Aa and nano-Mg(OH) 2 , which would be useful in the practical application of nano-Mg(OH) 2 as a nano-carrier.

  11. Crystal structure of a common GPCR-binding interface for G protein and arrestin

    OpenAIRE

    Szczepek, Michal; Beyrière, Florent; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Elgeti, Matthias; Kazmin, Roman; Rose, Alexander; Bartl, Franz J.; von Stetten, David; Heck, Martin; Sommer, Martha E.; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Scheerer, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    International audience; G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals to activate intracellular heterotrimeric G proteins (G alpha beta gamma) and arrestins. For G protein signalling, the G alpha C-terminus (G alpha CT) binds to a cytoplasmic crevice of the receptor that opens upon activation. A consensus motif is shared among GaCT from the G(i)/G(t) family and the 'finger loop' region (ArrFL1-4) of all four arrestins. Here we present a 2.75 angstrom crystal structure ofr...

  12. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Shibayama, Naoya; Okabe, Takahiro; Happo, Naohisa; Kimura, Koji; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Park, Sam-Yong; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α 2 β 2 tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm 3 ) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  13. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp; Shibayama, Naoya, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp; Okabe, Takahiro [Division of Biophysics, Department of Physiology, Jichi Medical University, Yakushiji, Shimotsuke 329-0498 (Japan); Happo, Naohisa [Department of Computer and Network Engineering, Graduate School of Information Sciences, Hiroshima City University, Asa-Minami-Ku, Hiroshima 731-3194 (Japan); Kimura, Koji [Department of Physical Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Matsushita, Tomohiro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Park, Sam-Yong [Drug Design Laboratory, Department of Medical Life Science, Yokohama City University, Suehiro, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Sasaki, Yuji C. [Department of Advanced Material Science, Graduate School of Frontier Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); Hayashi, Kouichi, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Frontier Research Institute for Materials Science, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α{sub 2}β{sub 2} tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm{sup 3}) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  14. An approach to membrane protein structure without crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgen, Paul L.; Hu, Yonglin; Guan, Lan; Kaback, H. Ronald; Girvin, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    The lactose permease of Escherichia coli catalyzes coupled translocation of galactosides and H+ across the cell membrane. It is the best-characterized member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily, a related group of membrane proteins with 12 transmembrane domains that mediate transport of various substrates across cell membranes. Despite decades of effort and their functional importance in all kingdoms of life, no high-resolution structures have been solved for any member of this family. However, extensive biochemical, genetic, and biophysical studies on lactose permease have established its transmembrane topology, secondary structure, and numerous interhelical contacts. Here we demonstrate that this information is sufficient to calculate a structural model at the level of helix packing or better. PMID:12391320

  15. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong

    2011-01-01

    -occupied receptor. The β(2) adrenergic receptor (β(2)AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β(2)AR and nucleotide-free Gs...... of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling...

  16. Lactose carrier protein of Escherichia coli. Structure and expression of plasmids carrying the Y gene of the lac operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teather, R M; Bramhall, J; Riede, I; Wright, J K; Fürst, M; Aichele, G; Wilhelm, U; Overath, P

    1980-01-01

    The previously described hybrid plasmid pC7 which carries lacI+O+delta(Z)Y+A+ on a 12.3 X 10(6)-Mr DNA fragment [Teather et al. (1978) Mol. Gen. Genet. 159, 239-248] was partially digested with the restriction endonuclease EcoRI under conditions reducing the recognition sequence to d(A-A-T-T) and ligated to the vector pB322. lac Y-carrying inserts of various sized (Mr 1.5-4.7 X 10(6)) were obtained. Hybrid plasmid pTE18 (2300-base-pair insert) carries part of the I (repressor) gene, the promotor-operator region, part of the Z (beta-galactosidase) gene, the Y (lactose carrier) gene and part of the A (transacetylase) gene. Upon induction of pTE18-harbouring strains the Y-gene product is expressed at a nearly constant rate for several generations and accumulates to a level of 12-16% of the total cytoplasmic membrane protein. Integration into the membrane leads to active carrier as judged by binding and transport measurements.

  17. New scientific equipment for protein crystallization in microgravity, BELKA, and its approbation on the Bion-M No. 1 spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskakova, S. S.; Kovalyov, S. I.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Zadorozhnaya, L. A.; Lyasnikova, M. S.; Dymshits, Y. M.; Shishkov, V. A.; Egorov, A. V.; Dolgin, A. M.; Voloshin, A. E.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    A space experiment on the crystallization of lisozyme and glucose isomerase proteins in UK-1 and UK-2 crystallizers on the scientific equipment BELKA on the Bion-M no. 1 spacecraft was performed in April-May 2013. A ground-based experiment was carried out simultaneously at the Institute of Crystallography of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IC RAS). Transparent crystals were obtained in both cases. The lisozyme crystals grown in microgravity are larger than their terrestrial analogs. An optical study of glucose isomerase crystals grown in space has shown that the coalescence of equally oriented crystallites leads to the formation of quasi-single-crystal blocks. An X-ray diffraction experiment on lisozyme crystals has revealed the resolutions for crystals obtained under terrestrial conditions and in space to be 1.74 and 1.58 Å, respectively.

  18. New scientific equipment for protein crystallization in microgravity, BELKA, and its approbation on the Bion-M No. 1 spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskakova, S. S., E-mail: svetlbaskakova@yandex.ru; Kovalyov, S. I.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Zadorozhnaya, L. A.; Lyasnikova, M. S.; Dymshits, Y. M.; Shishkov, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Egorov, A. V.; Dolgin, A. M. [Center for Operation of Space Ground Based Infrastructure (Russian Federation); Voloshin, A. E.; Kovalchuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    A space experiment on the crystallization of lisozyme and glucose isomerase proteins in UK-1 and UK-2 crystallizers on the scientific equipment BELKA on the Bion-M no. 1 spacecraft was performed in April–May 2013. A ground-based experiment was carried out simultaneously at the Institute of Crystallography of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IC RAS). Transparent crystals were obtained in both cases. The lisozyme crystals grown in microgravity are larger than their terrestrial analogs. An optical study of glucose isomerase crystals grown in space has shown that the coalescence of equally oriented crystallites leads to the formation of quasi-single-crystal blocks. An X-ray diffraction experiment on lisozyme crystals has revealed the resolutions for crystals obtained under terrestrial conditions and in space to be 1.74 and 1.58 Å, respectively.

  19. Crystal structure of a DNA binding protein from the hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon Methanococcus jannaschii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ganggang; Guo, Rong; Bartlam, Mark; Yang, Haitao; Xue, Hong; Liu, Yiwei; Huang, Li; Rao, Zihe

    2003-01-01

    The Sac10b family consists of a group of highly conserved DNA binding proteins from both the euryarchaeotal and the crenarchaeotal branches of Archaea. The proteins have been suggested to play an architectural role in the chromosomal organization in these organisms. Previous studies have mainly focused on the Sac10b proteins from the crenarchaeota. Here, we report the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of Mja10b from the euryarchaeon Methanococcus jannaschii. The model of Mja10b has been refined to an R-factor of 20.9%. The crystal structure of an Mja10b monomer reveals an α/β structure of four β-strands and two α-helices, and Mja10b assembles into a dimer via an extensive hydrophobic interface. Mja10b has a similar topology to that of its crenarchaeota counterpart Sso10b (also known as Alba). Structural comparison between the two proteins suggests that structural features such as hydrophobic inner core, acetylation sites, dimer interface, and DNA binding surface are conserved among Sac10b proteins. Structural differences between the two proteins were found in the loops. To understand the structural basis for the thermostability of Mja10b, the Mja10b structure was compared to other proteins with similar topology. Our data suggest that extensive ion-pair networks, optimized accessible surface area and the dimerization via hydrophobic interactions may contribute to the enhanced thermostability of Mja10b. PMID:14627741

  20. Potential protective immunogenicity of tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid and Cross Reacting Material 197 (CRM197) when used as carrier proteins in glycoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael

    2016-03-03

    When tetanus toxoid (TT), diphtheria toxoid (DT) or Cross Reacting Material 197 (CRM197), a non-toxic diphtheria toxin mutant protein, are used as carrier proteins in glycoconjugate vaccines, these carriers induce a protein specific antibody response as measured by in vitro assays. Here, it was evaluated whether or not glycoconjugates based on TT, DT or CRM197 can induce a protective immune response as measured by potency tests according to the European Pharmacopoeia. It could be shown, that the conjugate carriers TT and DT can induce a protective immune response against a lethal challenge by toxins in animals, while glycoconjugates based on CRM197 failed to induce a protective immune response. Opportunities for new applications of glycoconjugates are discussed.

  1. Thermal and Optical Modulation of the Carrier Mobility in OTFTs Based on an Azo-anthracene Liquid Crystal Organic Semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yantong; Li, Chao; Xu, Xiuru; Liu, Ming; He, Yaowu; Murtaza, Imran; Zhang, Dongwei; Yao, Chao; Wang, Yongfeng; Meng, Hong

    2017-03-01

    One of the most striking features of organic semiconductors compared with their corresponding inorganic counterparts is their molecular diversity. The major challenge in organic semiconductor material technology is creating molecular structural motifs to develop multifunctional materials in order to achieve the desired functionalities yet to optimize the specific device performance. Azo-compounds, because of their special photoresponsive property, have attracted extensive interest in photonic and optoelectronic applications; if incorporated wisely in the organic semiconductor groups, they can be innovatively utilized in advanced smart electronic applications, where thermal and photo modulation is applied to tune the electronic properties. On the basis of this aspiration, a novel azo-functionalized liquid crystal semiconductor material, (E)-1-(4-(anthracen-2-yl)phenyl)-2-(4-(decyloxy)phenyl)diazene (APDPD), is designed and synthesized for application in organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs). The UV-vis spectra of APDPD exhibit reversible photoisomerizaton upon photoexcitation, and the thin films of APDPD show a long-range orientational order based on its liquid crystal phase. The performance of OTFTs based on this material as well as the effects of thermal treatment and UV-irradiation on mobility are investigated. The molecular structure, stability of the material, and morphology of the thin films are characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), polarizing optical microscopy (POM), (differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-vis spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). This study reveals that our new material has the potential to be applied in optical sensors, memories, logic circuits, and functional switches.

  2. Growth-melt asymmetry in ice crystals under the influence of spruce budworm antifreeze protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertaya, Natalya [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Celik, Yeliz [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); DiPrinzio, Carlos L [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Wettlaufer, J S [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); Davies, Peter L [Department of Biochemistry, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Braslavsky, Ido [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

    2007-10-17

    Here we describe studies of the crystallization behavior of ice in an aqueous solution of spruce budworm antifreeze protein (sbwAFP) at atmospheric pressure. SbwAFP is an ice binding protein with high thermal hysteresis activity, which helps protect Choristoneura fumiferana (spruce budworm) larvae from freezing as they overwinter in the spruce and fir forests of the north eastern United States and Canada. Different types of ice binding proteins have been found in many other species. They have a wide range of applications in cryomedicine and cryopreservation, as well as the potential to protect plants and vegetables from frost damage through genetic engineering. However, there is much to learn regarding the mechanism of action of ice binding proteins. In our experiments, a solution containing sbwAFP was rapidly frozen and then melted back, thereby allowing us to produce small single crystals. These maintained their hexagonal shapes during cooling within the thermal hysteresis gap. Melt-growth-melt sequences in low concentrations of sbwAFP reveal the same shape transitions as are found in pure ice crystals at low temperature (-22 deg. C) and high pressure (2000 bar) (Cahoon et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 255502); while both growth and melt shapes display faceted hexagonal morphology, they are rotated 30 deg. relative to one another. Moreover, the initial melt shape and orientation is recovered in the sequence. To visualize the binding of sbwAFP to ice, we labeled the antifreeze protein with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and observed the sbwAFP-GFP molecules directly on ice crystals using confocal microscopy. When cooling the ice crystals, facets form on the six primary prism planes (slowest growing planes) that are evenly decorated with sbwAFP-GFP. During melting, apparent facets form on secondary prism planes (fastest melting planes), leaving residual sbwAFP at the six corners of the hexagon. Thus, the same general growth-melt behavior of an apparently

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matozo, Huita C.; Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Santos, Maria A. M.; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Fusco, Alfredo; Polikarpov, Igor

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the catalytic domain of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η (rPTPη) is a cysteine-dependent phosphatase which hydrolyzes phosphoester bonds in proteins and other molecules. rPTPη and its human homologue DEP-1 are involved in neoplastic transformations. Thus, expression of the protein is reduced in all oncogene-transformed thyroid cell lines and is absent in highly malignant thyroid cells. Moreover, consistent with the suggested tumour suppression role of PTPη, inhibition of the tumorigenic process occurs after its exogenous reconstitution, suggesting that PTPη might be important for gene therapy of cancers. In this study, the catalytic domain of rPTPη was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected to 1.87 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 46.46, b = 63.07, c = 111.64 Å, and contains one molecule per asymmetric unit

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matozo, Huita C.; Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Santos, Maria A. M. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Departamento de Física e Informática, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense 400, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Iuliano, Rodolfo [Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università di Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro (Italy); Fusco, Alfredo [Dipartimento di Biologia e Patologia Cellulare e Molecolare, c/o Instituto di Endocrinologia ed Oncologia Sperimentale del CNR, Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università degli Studi di Napoli ‘Federico II’, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); NOGEC (Naples Oncogenomocs Center)-CEINGE, Biotecnologie Avanzate, Via Comunale Margherita 482, 80145 Naples (Italy); Polikarpov, Igor, E-mail: ipolikarpov@if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Departamento de Física e Informática, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense 400, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2006-09-01

    In this study, the catalytic domain of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η (rPTPη) is a cysteine-dependent phosphatase which hydrolyzes phosphoester bonds in proteins and other molecules. rPTPη and its human homologue DEP-1 are involved in neoplastic transformations. Thus, expression of the protein is reduced in all oncogene-transformed thyroid cell lines and is absent in highly malignant thyroid cells. Moreover, consistent with the suggested tumour suppression role of PTPη, inhibition of the tumorigenic process occurs after its exogenous reconstitution, suggesting that PTPη might be important for gene therapy of cancers. In this study, the catalytic domain of rPTPη was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected to 1.87 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.46, b = 63.07, c = 111.64 Å, and contains one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  5. Hydroxyapatite nanorod-assembled porous hollow polyhedra as drug/protein carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ya-Dong; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Qi, Chao; Jiang, Ying-Ying; Li, Heng; Wu, Jin

    2017-06-15

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) with a porous hollow structure is an ideal biomaterial owing to its excellent biocompatibility and unique architecture. In this study, HAP nanorod-assembled porous hollow polyhedra, consisting of nanorod building blocks, have been successfully prepared at room temperature or under hydrothermal circumstances using a self-sacrificing Ca(OH) 2 template strategy. The hydrothermal treatment (at 180°C for 1h) can promote the HAP nanorods to be arranged with their axial direction normal to the polyhedron surface. The HAP nanorod-assembled porous hollow polyhedra have been explored for the potential application in drug/protein delivery, using ibuprofen (IBU) as a model drug and hemoglobin (Hb) as a model protein. The experimental results indicate that the HAP nanorod-assembled porous hollow polyhedra have a relatively high drug loading capacity and protein adsorption ability, and sustained drug and protein release. The HAP nanorod-assembled porous hollow polyhedra have promising applications in various biomedical fields such as the drug and protein delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Crystallization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmrZ protein: development of a comprehensive method for obtaining and optimization of protein–DNA crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryor, Edward E. Jr; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Hollis, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Crystallization of the complex of the transcription factor AmrZ with DNA was accomplished through the combination of established and newly developed methods. Here, a general method to obtain and optimize crystals of protein–DNA complexes consisting of these combined procedures is described. The AmrZ protein from the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a transcription factor that activates and represses the genes for several potent virulence factors, which gives the bacteria a selective advantage in infection. AmrZ was crystallized in complex with DNA containing the amrZ1 repressor binding site. Obtaining crystals of the complex required the integration of a number of well known techniques along with the development of new methods. Here, these processes are organized and combined into a comprehensive method which yielded diffraction-quality crystals. Part of this method included thorough data mining of the crystallization conditions of protein–DNA complexes to create a new directed crystallization screen. An optimized technique for the verification of protein–DNA complexes in crystals is also presented. Taken together, the methods described in this article attempt to streamline the difficult process of obtaining diffraction-quality crystals of protein–DNA complexes through the organization of older methods combined with the introduction of new techniques

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of two β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I genes from Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wangdan; Wei, Qian; Wu, Pingzhi; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Jun; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2017-07-01

    The β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I (KASI) is involved in de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in many organisms. Two putative KASI genes, JcKASI-1 and JcKASI-2, were isolated from Jatropha curcas. The deduced amino acid sequences of JcKASI-1 and JcKASI-2 exhibit around 83.8% and 72.5% sequence identities with AtKASI, respectively, and both contain conserved Cys-His-Lys-His-Phe catalytic active sites. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that JcKASI-2 belongs to a clade with several KASI proteins from dicotyledonous plants. Both JcKASI genes were expressed in multiple tissues, most strongly in filling stage seeds of J. curcas. Additionally, the JcKASI-1 and JcKASI-2 proteins were both localized to the plastids. Expressing JcKASI-1 in the Arabidopsis kasI mutant rescued the mutant's phenotype and restored the fatty acid composition and oil content in seeds to wild-type, but expressing JcKASI-2 in the Arabidopsis kasI mutant resulted in only partial rescue. This implies that JcKASI-1 and JcKASI-2 exhibit partial functional redundancy and KASI genes play a universal role in regulating fatty acid biosynthesis, growth, and development in plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. The Two Functional Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductases of Enterococcus faecalis Do Not Mediate Triclosan Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Bi, Hongkai; Ma, Jincheng; Hu, Zhe; Zhang, Wenbin; Cronan, John E.; Wang, Haihong

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enoyl-acyl carrier protein (enoyl-ACP) reductase catalyzes the last step of the elongation cycle in the synthesis of bacterial fatty acids. The Enterococcus faecalis genome contains two genes annotated as enoyl-ACP reductases, a FabI-type enoyl-ACP reductase and a FabK-type enoyl-ACP reductase. We report that expression of either of the two proteins restores growth of an Escherichia coli fabI temperature-sensitive mutant strain under nonpermissive conditions. In vitro assays demonstrated that both proteins support fatty acid synthesis and are active with substrates of all fatty acid chain lengths. Although expression of E. faecalis fabK confers to E. coli high levels of resistance to the antimicrobial triclosan, deletion of fabK from the E. faecalis genome showed that FabK does not play a detectable role in the inherent triclosan resistance of E. faecalis. Indeed, FabK seems to play only a minor role in modulating fatty acid composition. Strains carrying a deletion of fabK grow normally without fatty acid supplementation, whereas fabI deletion mutants make only traces of fatty acids and are unsaturated fatty acid auxotrophs. PMID:24085780

  9. Identification of a mitochondrial target of thiazolidinedione insulin sensitizers (mTOT--relationship to newly identified mitochondrial pyruvate carrier proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry R Colca

    Full Text Available Thiazolidinedione (TZD insulin sensitizers have the potential to effectively treat a number of human diseases, however the currently available agents have dose-limiting side effects that are mediated via activation of the transcription factor PPARγ. We have recently shown PPARγ-independent actions of TZD insulin sensitizers, but the molecular target of these molecules remained to be identified. Here we use a photo-catalyzable drug analog probe and mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify a previously uncharacterized mitochondrial complex that specifically recognizes TZDs. These studies identify two well-conserved proteins previously known as brain protein 44 (BRP44 and BRP44 Like (BRP44L, which recently have been renamed Mpc2 and Mpc1 to signify their function as a mitochondrial pyruvate carrier complex. Knockdown of Mpc1 or Mpc2 in Drosophila melanogaster or pre-incubation with UK5099, an inhibitor of pyruvate transport, blocks the crosslinking of mitochondrial membranes by the TZD probe. Knockdown of these proteins in Drosophila also led to increased hemolymph glucose and blocked drug action. In isolated brown adipose tissue (BAT cells, MSDC-0602, a PPARγ-sparing TZD, altered the incorporation of (13C-labeled carbon from glucose into acetyl CoA. These results identify Mpc1 and Mpc2 as components of the mitochondrial target of TZDs (mTOT and suggest that understanding the modulation of this complex, which appears to regulate pyruvate entry into the mitochondria, may provide a viable target for insulin sensitizing pharmacology.

  10. Crystals in crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Schmidt, I.; Carlsson, A.

    2005-01-01

    A major factor governing the performance of catalytically active particles supported on a zeolite carrier is the degree of dispersion. It is shown that the introduction of noncrystallographic mesopores into zeolite single crystals (silicalite-1, ZSM-5) may increase the degree of particle dispersion...... of the zeolite particles, particularly after thermal treatment. When using mesoporous zeolites, the particles were evenly distributed throughout the mesopore system of the zeolitic support, even after calcination, leading to nanocrystals within mesoporous zeolite single crystals....

  11. Perdeuteration, purification, crystallization and preliminary neutron diffraction of an ocean pout type III antifreeze protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit-Haertlein, Isabelle; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Howard, Eduardo; Hazemann, Isabelle; Mitschler, Andre; Haertlein, Michael; Podjarny, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Perdeuterated type III antifreeze protein has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Preliminary neutron data collection showed diffraction to 1.85 Å resolution from a 0.13 mm 3 crystal. The highly homologous type III antifreeze protein (AFP) subfamily share the capability to inhibit ice growth at subzero temperatures. Extensive studies by X-ray crystallography have been conducted, mostly on AFPs from polar fishes. Although interactions between a defined flat ice-binding surface and a particular lattice plane of an ice crystal have now been identified, the fine structural features underlying the antifreeze mechanism still remain unclear owing to the intrinsic difficulty in identifying H atoms using X-ray diffraction data alone. Here, successful perdeuteration (i.e. complete deuteration) for neutron crystallographic studies of the North Atlantic ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus) AFP in Escherichia coli high-density cell cultures is reported. The perdeuterated protein (AFP D) was expressed in inclusion bodies, refolded in deuterated buffer and purified by cation-exchange chromatography. Well shaped perdeuterated AFP D crystals have been grown in D 2 O by the sitting-drop method. Preliminary neutron Laue diffraction at 293 K using LADI-III at ILL showed that with a few exposures of 24 h a very low background and clear small spots up to a resolution of 1.85 Å were obtained using a ‘radically small’ perdeuterated AFP D crystal of dimensions 0.70 × 0.55 × 0.35 mm, corresponding to a volume of 0.13 mm 3

  12. Crystallization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-mannosidase, a cargo protein of the Cvt pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yasunori; Noda, Nobuo N.; Honbou, Kazuya; Suzuki, Kuninori; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Vacuolar α-mannosidase, a cargo protein of the cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting pathway, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-mannosidase (Ams1) is a cargo protein that is transported to the vacuole by the cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway during conditions of growth and by autophagy during conditions of starvation. After transport to the vacuole, Ams1 functions as a resident hydrolase. Ams1 has been overexpressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, purified and crystallized in two crystal forms. Form I belongs to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 145.7, b = 127.7, c = 164.0 Å, β = 101.5°. Form II belongs to space group I222 or I2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 127.9, b = 163.7, c = 291.5 Å. Diffraction data were collected from these crystals to a resolution of 3.3 Å for form I and of 2.6 Å for form II using synchrotron radiation

  13. Food protein aggregates as vitamin-matrix carriers: impact of processing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relkin, Perla; Shukat, Rizwan

    2012-10-15

    We studied the ability of protein aggregates for loading and protection of α-tocopherol, a model of heat- and light-sensitive bioactive compounds. Aqueous dispersions of whey proteins (4.5 wt.%, pH 6.7) in the absence and presence of α-tocopherol (4 wt.%) were prepared using an ultradisperser (10,000 rpm for 10 min and 65 °C), and then submitted to further high-pressure homogenisation (HPH) at 300 or 1200 bar for 12 cycles. Relative to free-vitamin dispersions, increasing HPH conditions in the presence of vitamin led to higher protein denaturation, more tryptophan quenching and wavelength blue-shift (by 10nm), in parallel with increased zeta potential values (by -10 mV), particle sizes (by 50%), and newly formed protein dimers, trimers and high molecular weight aggregates. As a result, the degree of vitamin degradation under increasing HPH and long-term storage was shown to decrease from 66% (ultradisper) to 50%, or to 30% (subject to further treatments at 300 or 1200 bar, respectively). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Automatic classification of sub-microlitre protein-crystallization trials in 1536-well plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbaa, Christian A; Lauricella, Angela; Fehrman, Nancy; Veatch, Christina; Collins, Robert; Luft, Joe; DeTitta, George; Jurisica, Igor

    2003-09-01

    A technique for automatically evaluating microbatch (400 nl) protein-crystallization trials is described. This method addresses analysis problems introduced at the sub-microlitre scale, including non-uniform lighting and irregular droplet boundaries. The droplet is segmented from the well using a loopy probabilistic graphical model with a two-layered grid topology. A vector of 23 features is extracted from the droplet image using the Radon transform for straight-edge features and a bank of correlation filters for microcrystalline features. Image classification is achieved by linear discriminant analysis of its feature vector. The results of the automatic method are compared with those of a human expert on 32 1536-well plates. Using the human-labeled images as ground truth, this method classifies images with 85% accuracy and a ROC score of 0.84. This result compares well with the experimental repeatability rate, assessed at 87%. Images falsely classified as crystal-positive variously contain speckled precipitate resembling microcrystals, skin effects or genuine crystals falsely labeled by the human expert. Many images falsely classified as crystal-negative variously contain very fine crystal features or dendrites lacking straight edges. Characterization of these misclassifications suggests directions for improving the method.

  15. An Hfq-like protein in archaea: crystal structure and functional characterization of the Sm protein from Methanococcus jannaschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jesper S; Bøggild, Andreas; Andersen, Christian B F; Nielsen, Gorm; Boysen, Anders; Brodersen, Ditlev E; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2007-12-01

    The Sm and Sm-like proteins are conserved in all three domains of life and have emerged as important players in many different RNA-processing reactions. Their proposed role is to mediate RNA-RNA and/or RNA-protein interactions. In marked contrast to eukaryotes, bacteria appear to contain only one distinct Sm-like protein belonging to the Hfq family of proteins. Similarly, there are generally only one or two subtypes of Sm-related proteins in archaea, but at least one archaeon, Methanococcus jannaschii, encodes a protein that is related to Hfq. This archaeon does not contain any gene encoding a conventional archaeal Sm-type protein, suggesting that Hfq proteins and archaeal Sm-homologs can complement each other functionally. Here, we report the functional characterization of M. jannaschii Hfq and its crystal structure at 2.5 A resolution. The protein forms a hexameric ring. The monomer fold, as well as the overall structure of the complex is similar to that found for the bacterial Hfq proteins. However, clear differences are seen in the charge distribution on the distal face of the ring, which is unusually negative in M. jannaschii Hfq. Moreover, owing to a very short N-terminal alpha-helix, the overall diameter of the archaeal Hfq hexamer is significantly smaller than its bacterial counterparts. Functional analysis reveals that Escherichia coli and M. jannaschii Hfqs display very similar biochemical and biological properties. It thus appears that the archaeal and bacterial Hfq proteins are largely functionally interchangeable.

  16. Male Sterile2 Encodes a Plastid-Localized Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Required for Pollen Exine Development in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.; Shanklin, J.; Yu, X.-H.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; De Oliveira, S.; Schreiber, L.; Zhang, D.

    2011-10-01

    Male Sterile2 (MS2) is predicted to encode a fatty acid reductase required for pollen wall development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Transient expression of MS2 in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves resulted in the accumulation of significant levels of C16 and C18 fatty alcohols. Expression of MS2 fused with green fluorescent protein revealed that an amino-terminal transit peptide targets the MS2 to plastids. The plastidial localization of MS2 is biologically important because genetic complementation of MS2 in ms2 homozygous plants was dependent on the presence of its amino-terminal transit peptide or that of the Rubisco small subunit protein amino-terminal transit peptide. In addition, two domains, NAD(P)H-binding domain and sterile domain, conserved in MS2 and its homologs were also shown to be essential for MS2 function in pollen exine development by genetic complementation testing. Direct biochemical analysis revealed that purified recombinant MS2 enzyme is able to convert palmitoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein to the corresponding C16:0 alcohol with NAD(P)H as the preferred electron donor. Using optimized reaction conditions (i.e. at pH 6.0 and 30 C), MS2 exhibits a K{sub m} for 16:0-Acyl Carrier Protein of 23.3 {+-} 4.0 {mu}m, a V{sub max} of 38.3 {+-} 4.5 nmol mg{sup -1} min{sup -1}, and a catalytic efficiency/K{sub m} of 1,873 m{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Based on the high homology of MS2 to other characterized fatty acid reductases, it was surprising that MS2 showed no activity against palmitoyl- or other acyl-coenzyme A; however, this is consistent with its plastidial localization. In summary, genetic and biochemical evidence demonstrate an MS2-mediated conserved plastidial pathway for the production of fatty alcohols that are essential for pollen wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

  17. Towards protein crystallization as a process step in downstream processing of therapeutic antibodies: screening and optimization at microbatch scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguo Zang

    Full Text Available Crystallization conditions of an intact monoclonal IgG4 (immunoglobulin G, subclass 4 antibody were established in vapor diffusion mode by sparse matrix screening and subsequent optimization. The procedure was transferred to microbatch conditions and a phase diagram was built showing surprisingly low solubility of the antibody at equilibrium. With up-scaling to process scale in mind, purification efficiency of the crystallization step was investigated. Added model protein contaminants were excluded from the crystals to more than 95%. No measurable loss of Fc-binding activity was observed in the crystallized and redissolved antibody. Conditions could be adapted to crystallize the antibody directly from concentrated and diafiltrated cell culture supernatant, showing purification efficiency similar to that of Protein A chromatography. We conclude that crystallization has the potential to be included in downstream processing as a low-cost purification or formulation step.

  18. Radiation stability of protein crystals grown by nanostructured templates: synchrotron microfocus analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechkova, Eugenia; Tropiano, Giuseppe; Riekel, Christian; Nicolini, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    X-ray radiation damage of lysozyme single crystals by an intense monochromatic beam from a focussed third-generation synchrotron radiation source has been studied. The preliminary results show a significantly higher resistance to synchrotron radiation of lysozyme microcrystals produced by means of nanotechnology-based template with respect to those prepared by classical methodology. The implications of this finding for protein crystallography are discussed

  19. The Biological Activity of alpha-Mangostin, a Larvicidal Botanic Mosquito Sterol Carrier Protein-2 Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    consider- ingG.mangostana is a tropical evergreen that ismainly found in India , Myanmar, Sri Lanka, and Thailand (Jung et al. 2006). Almost a decade...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 ferase ( GST ) activities (Bullangpoti et al...Thermo ScientiÞc, Rockford, IL). The esterase activity was expressed as mol/mg protein/min substrate hydrolyzed. GST Activity. GST activity samples

  20. Cancer therapy using viral- and bacterial proteins, as vectors for vaccines or as carriers of cytostatics

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Mathilda

    2012-01-01

    New cancer therapies are urgently needed, since available treatment options today have negative side effects, and cure only about half of the patients with invasive cancer. One, relatively new, option is to vaccinate against cancer, by introducing an antigen that is present on the tumor cells into the patient to stimulate specific immunity against the tumor. For this purpose viral capsid proteins, which can self-assemble into so called virus-like particles (VLPs), can be e...

  1. Harvesting and cryo-cooling crystals of membrane proteins grown in lipidic mesophases for structure determination by macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dianfan; Boland, Coilín; Aragao, David; Walsh, Kilian; Caffrey, Martin

    2012-09-02

    An important route to understanding how proteins function at a mechanistic level is to have the structure of the target protein available, ideally at atomic resolution. Presently, there is only one way to capture such information as applied to integral membrane proteins (Figure 1), and the complexes they form, and that method is macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX). To do MX diffraction quality crystals are needed which, in the case of membrane proteins, do not form readily. A method for crystallizing membrane proteins that involves the use of lipidic mesophases, specifically the cubic and sponge phases(1-5), has gained considerable attention of late due to the successes it has had in the G protein-coupled receptor field(6-21) (www.mpdb.tcd.ie). However, the method, henceforth referred to as the in meso or lipidic cubic phase method, comes with its own technical challenges. These arise, in part, due to the generally viscous and sticky nature of the lipidic mesophase in which the crystals, which are often micro-crystals, grow. Manipulating crystals becomes difficult as a result and particularly so during harvesting(22,23). Problems arise too at the step that precedes harvesting which requires that the glass sandwich plates in which the crystals grow (Figure 2)(24,25) are opened to expose the mesophase bolus, and the crystals therein, for harvesting, cryo-cooling and eventual X-ray diffraction data collection. The cubic and sponge mesophase variants (Figure 3) from which crystals must be harvested have profoundly different rheologies(4,26). The cubic phase is viscous and sticky akin to a thick toothpaste. By contrast, the sponge phase is more fluid with a distinct tendency to flow. Accordingly, different approaches for opening crystallization wells containing crystals growing in the cubic and the sponge phase are called for as indeed different methods are required for harvesting crystals from the two mesophase types. Protocols for doing just that have been

  2. Crystal structure of the Epithiospecifier Protein, ESP from Arabidopsis thaliana provides insights into its product specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Wenhe; Liu, Zihe; Xie, Yongchao; Wang, Hao; Mu, Yajuan; Huang, Yao; Feng, Yue

    2016-09-16

    Specifier proteins are important components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system, which mediate plant defense against herbivory and pathogen attacks. Upon tissue disruption, glucosinolates are hydrolyzed to instable aglucones by myrosinases, and then aglucones will rearrange to form defensive isothiocyanates. Specifier proteins can redirect this reaction to form other products, such as simple nitriles, epithionitriles and organic thiocyanates instead of isothiocyanates based on the side chain structure of glucosinolate and the type of the specifier proteins. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism underlying the different product spectrums of various specifier proteins was not fully understood. Here in this study, we solved the crystal structure of the Epithiospecifier Protein, ESP from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtESP) at 2.3 Å resolution. Structural comparisons with the previously solved structure of thiocyanate forming protein, TFP from Thlaspi arvense (TaTFP) reveal that AtESP shows a dimerization pattern different from TaTFP. Moreover, AtESP harbors a slightly larger active site pocket than TaTFP and several residues around the active site are different between the two proteins, which might account for the different product spectrums of the two proteins. Together, our structural study provides important insights into the molecular mechanisms of specifier proteins and shed light on the basis of their different product spectrums. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Crystal Structure of Menin Reveals Binding Site for Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murai, Marcelo J.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Reddy, Gireesh; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz (Michigan); (UV)

    2014-10-02

    Menin is a tumor suppressor protein that is encoded by the MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia 1) gene and controls cell growth in endocrine tissues. Importantly, menin also serves as a critical oncogenic cofactor of MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) fusion proteins in acute leukemias. Direct association of menin with MLL fusion proteins is required for MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemogenesis in vivo, and this interaction has been validated as a new potential therapeutic target for development of novel anti-leukemia agents. Here, we report the first crystal structure of menin homolog from Nematostella vectensis. Due to a very high sequence similarity, the Nematostella menin is a close homolog of human menin, and these two proteins likely have very similar structures. Menin is predominantly an {alpha}-helical protein with the protein core comprising three tetratricopeptide motifs that are flanked by two {alpha}-helical bundles and covered by a {beta}-sheet motif. A very interesting feature of menin structure is the presence of a large central cavity that is highly conserved between Nematostella and human menin. By employing site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that this cavity constitutes the binding site for MLL. Our data provide a structural basis for understanding the role of menin as a tumor suppressor protein and as an oncogenic co-factor of MLL fusion proteins. It also provides essential structural information for development of inhibitors targeting the menin-MLL interaction as a novel therapeutic strategy in MLL-related leukemias.

  4. Structural and dynamic characterization of a freestanding acyl carrier protein involved in the biosynthesis of cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Subrata; Ishida, Hiroaki; Nguyen, Leonard T; Liu, Zhihong; Vogel, Hans J

    2017-05-01

    Friulimicin is a cyclic lipodecapeptide antibiotic that is produced by Actinoplanes friuliensis. Similar to the related lipopeptide drug daptomycin, the peptide skeleton of friulimicin is synthesized by a large multienzyme nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) system. The LipD protein plays a major role in the acylation reaction of friulimicin. The attachment of the fatty acid group promotes its antibiotic activity. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that LipD is most closely related to other freestanding acyl carrier proteins (ACPs), for which the genes are located near to NRPS gene clusters. Here, we report that the solution NMR structure of apo-LipD is very similar to other four-helix bundle forming ACPs from fatty acid synthase (FAS), polyketide synthase, and NRPS systems. By recording NMR dynamics data, we found that the backbone motions in holo-LipD are more restricted than in apo-LipD due to the attachment of phosphopantetheine moiety. This enhanced stability of holo-LipD was also observed in differential scanning calorimetry experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, unlike several other ACPs, the folding of LipD does not depend on the presence of divalent cations, although the presence of Mg 2+ or Ca 2+ can increase the protein stability. We propose that small structural rearrangements in the tertiary structure of holo-LipD which lead to the enhanced stability are important for the cognate enzyme recognition for the acylation reaction. Our results also highlight the different surface charges of LipD and FAS-ACP from A. friuliensis that would allow the acyl-CoA ligase to interact preferentially with the LipD instead of binding to the FAS-ACP. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  5. Properties of the mitochondrial carrier of adenine-nucleotide after purification. Study of the transport protein under isolated form and reincorporated form in phospho-lipidic vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandolin, Gerard

    1983-01-01

    The first part of this research thesis addresses the reconstitution of the ADP/ATP transport by incorporation of the specific carrier, isolated in presence of detergent, in phospholipids vesicles. Fundamental properties of the reconstituted transport are identical to that of transport in mitochondria, notably as far as the exchange stoichiometry, the turn over and the transport Km are concerned, as well as the asymmetric orientation of the carrier in the membrane. The second part of this research addresses the study of interactions of specific ligands with the ADP/ATP transport protein in presence of detergent. The study of the variations of the intrinsic fluorescence of the isolated ADP/ATP carrier highlights conformational changes exclusively induced by the presence of transportable nucleotides which are modulated in a different manner by carboxy-atractyloside or bongkrekic acid. Moreover, by using the isolated protein, a detailed analysis of binding parameters of fluorescent analogues of ATP is reported [fr

  6. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermannová, Lada, E-mail: lada.biedermannova@ibt.cas.cz; Schneider, Bohdan [Institute of Biotechnology CAS, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  7. Laboratory information management system for membrane protein structure initiative--from gene to crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Petr V; Morris, Chris; Prince, Stephen M; Papiz, Miroslav Z

    2008-12-01

    Membrane Protein Structure Initiative (MPSI) exploits laboratory competencies to work collaboratively and distribute work among the different sites. This is possible as protein structure determination requires a series of steps, starting with target selection, through cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and finally structure determination. Distributed sites create a unique set of challenges for integrating and passing on information on the progress of targets. This role is played by the Protein Information Management System (PIMS), which is a laboratory information management system (LIMS), serving as a hub for MPSI, allowing collaborative structural proteomics to be carried out in a distributed fashion. It holds key information on the progress of cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. PIMS is employed to track the status of protein targets and to manage constructs, primers, experiments, protocols, sample locations and their detailed histories: thus playing a key role in MPSI data exchange. It also serves as the centre of a federation of interoperable information resources such as local laboratory information systems and international archival resources, like PDB or NCBI. During the challenging task of PIMS integration, within the MPSI, we discovered a number of prerequisites for successful PIMS integration. In this article we share our experiences and provide invaluable insights into the process of LIMS adaptation. This information should be of interest to partners who are thinking about using LIMS as a data centre for their collaborative efforts.

  8. Hyaluronan microgel as a potential carrier for protein sustained delivery by tailoring the crosslink network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Chunhong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhao, Jianhao, E-mail: jhzhao@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Tu, Mei; Zeng, Rong; Rong, Jianhua [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) microgels with different crosslink network, i.e. HGPs-1, HGPs-1.5, HGPs-3, HGPs-6 and HGPs-15, were synthesized using divinyl sulfone (DVS) as the crosslinker in an inverse microemulsion system for controlling the sustained delivery of bovine serum albumin (BSA). With increasing the crosslinker content, the average particle size slightly increased from 1.9 ± 0.3 μm to 3.6 ± 0.5 μm by dynamic laser scattering analysis. However, the crosslinker content had no significant effect on the morphology of HA microgels by scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis proved more sulfur participated in the crosslink reaction when raising the crosslinker amount. The water swelling test confirmed the increasing crosslink density with the crosslinker content by calculating the average molecular weight between two crosslink points to be 8.25 ± 2.51 × 10{sup 5}, 1.26 ± 0.43 × 10{sup 5}, 0.96 ± 0.09 × 10{sup 5}, 0.64 ± 0.03 × 10{sup 5}, and 0.11 ± 0.01 × 10{sup 5} respectively. The degradation of HA microgels by hyaluronidase slowed down by enhancing the crosslink density, only about 5% of HGPs-15 was degraded as opposed to over 90% for HGPs-1. BSA loading had no obvious influence on the surface morphology of HA microgels but seemed to induce their aggregation. The increase of crosslink density decreased the BSA loading capacity but facilitated its long-term sustained delivery. When the molar ratio of DVS to repeating unit of HA reached 3 or higher, similar delivery profiles were obtained. Among all these HA microgels, HGPs-3 was the optimal carrier for BSA sustained delivery in this system because it possessed both high BSA loading capacity and long-term delivery profile simultaneously. - Highlights: • HA microgels with different crosslink densities were prepared. • The crosslinker content had little effect on the morphology and size of HA microgels. • The crosslink density

  9. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of two crystal forms of stationary-phase survival E protein from Campylobacter jejuni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, A. M. D.; Rêgo, A. T. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Thomaz, M. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica, Apartado 12, 2748-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Enguita, F. J., E-mail: fenguita@fm.ul.pt [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisboa (Portugal); Carrondo, M. A. [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República, Apartado 127, 2781-901 Oeiras (Portugal)

    2008-03-01

    Survival E (SurE) protein from Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative mesophile, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein, successfully purified and crystallized in two distinct crystal forms. Survival E (SurE) protein from Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative mesophile, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein, successfully purified and crystallized in two distinct crystal forms. The first form belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with a tetramer in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 80.5, b = 119.0, c = 135.3 Å. The second form belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 121.4, b = 47.1, c = 97.8 Å, and contains a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data have been collected from these crystal forms to 2.5 and 2.95 Å resolution, respectively.

  10. Resistance Mechanisms and the Future of Bacterial Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (FabI) Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-01

    Missense mutations leading to clinical antibiotic resistance are a liability of single-target inhibitors. The enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) inhibitors have one intracellular protein target and drug resistance is increased by the acquisition of single-base-pair mutations that alter drug binding. The spectrum of resistance mechanisms to FabI inhibitors suggests criteria that should be considered during the development of single-target antibiotics that would minimize the impact of missense mutations on their clinical usefulness. These criteria include high-affinity, fast on/off kinetics, few drug contacts with residue side chains, and no toxicity. These stringent criteria are achievable by structure-guided design, but this approach will only yield pathogen-specific drugs. Single-step acquisition of resistance may limit the clinical application of broad-spectrum, single-target antibiotics, but appropriately designed pathogen-specific antibiotics have the potential to overcome this liability. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Tetanus Toxoid carrier protein induced T-helper cell responses upon vaccination of middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heiden, Marieke; Duizendstra, Aafke; Berbers, Guy A M; Boots, Annemieke M H; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2017-10-09

    Vaccines frequently induce suboptimal immune responses in the elderly, due to immunological ageing. Timely vaccination may be a strategy to overcome this problem, which classifies middle-aged adults asan interesting target group for future vaccine interventions. However, the immunological fitness of the middle-aged population is ill-defined. It is currently unknown whether effective T-cell help towards B-cells is initiated by conjugate-carrier vaccines at middle-age. We characterized systemic Tetanus Toxoid (TT) specific T-helper cell responses in the circulation of middle-aged adults (50-65years of age, n=31) having received the MenACWY-TT vaccination. Blood samples were taken pre- as well as 7days, 28days, and 1year post-vaccination. TT-specific T-cell responses were determined by IFNγ Elispot and by the secretion of IFNγ, IL13, IL10, IL17, and IL21 in cell culture supernatants. Circulating CD4+CXCR5+ICOS+IL21+ cells were analyzed by flow cytometry, and meningococcal and TT-specific IgG responses by bead-based immunoassays. The correlation between the T-cell help and humoral responses was evaluated. Vaccination with a TT-carrier protein induced a mixed TT-specific Th1 (IFNγ), Th2 (IL13, IL10), and Th17 (IL17) response in most participants. Additionally, circulating CD4+CXCR5+ICOS+IL21+ cells were significantly increased 7days post-vaccination. Pre-vaccination TT-specific cytokine production and post-vaccination Th2 responses correlated positively with the increase of CD4+CXCR5+ICOS+IL21+ cells. No correlation between T-cell help and antibody responses was found. The characteristics of the T-cell response upon a TT-carrier vaccination suggests effective T-cell help towards B-cells in response to meningococcal polysaccharides, although the absence of a correlation with the antibody responses warrants further clarification. However, the robust T-helper cell response in middle-aged adults, decades after previous TT vaccinations, strengthens the classification of

  12. Gag Protein Epitopes Recognized by CD4+ T-Helper Lymphocytes from Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Infected Carrier Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonning, S. M.; Zhang, W.; McGuire, T. C.

    1999-01-01

    Antigen-specific T-helper (Th) lymphocytes are critical for the development of antiviral humoral responses and the expansion of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Identification of relevant Th lymphocyte epitopes remains an important step in the development of an efficacious subunit peptide vaccine against equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a naturally occurring lentivirus of horses. This study describes Th lymphocyte reactivity in EIAV carrier horses to two proteins, p26 and p15, encoded by the relatively conserved EIAV gag gene. Using partially overlapping peptides, multideterminant and possibly promiscuous epitopes were identified within p26. One peptide was identified which reacted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from all five EIAV-infected horses, and three other peptides were identified which reacted with PBMC from four of five EIAV-infected horses. Four additional peptides containing both CTL and Th lymphocyte epitopes were also identified. Multiple epitopes were recognized in a region corresponding to the major homology region of the human immunodeficiency virus, a region with significant sequence similarity to other lentiviruses including simian immunodeficiency virus, puma lentivirus, feline immunodeficiency virus, Jembrana disease virus, visna virus, and caprine arthritis encephalitis virus. PBMC reactivity to p15 peptides from EIAV carrier horses also occurred. Multiple p15 peptides were shown to be reactive, but not all infected horses had Th lymphocytes recognizing p15 epitopes. The identification of peptides reactive with PBMC from outbred horses, some of which encoded both CTL and Th lymphocyte epitopes, should contribute to the design of synthetic peptide or recombinant vector vaccines for EIAV. PMID:10196322

  13. Biophysical characterization and crystal structure of the Feline Immunodeficiency Virus p15 matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrière, Jennifer; Robert, Xavier; Perez, Magali; Gouet, Patrice; Guillon, Christophe

    2013-06-24

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a viral pathogen that infects domestic cats and wild felids. During the viral replication cycle, the FIV p15 matrix protein oligomerizes to form a closed matrix that underlies the lipidic envelope of the virion. Because of its crucial role in the early and late stages of viral morphogenesis, especially in viral assembly, FIV p15 is an interesting target in the development of potential new therapeutic strategies. Our biochemical study of FIV p15 revealed that it forms a stable dimer in solution under acidic conditions and at high concentration, unlike other retroviral matrix proteins. We determined the crystal structure of full-length FIV p15 to 2 Å resolution and observed a helical organization of the protein, typical for retroviral matrix proteins. A hydrophobic pocket that could accommodate a myristoyl group was identified, and the C-terminal end of FIV p15, which is mainly unstructured, was visible in electron density maps. As FIV p15 crystallizes in acidic conditions but with one monomer in the asymmetric unit, we searched for the presence of a biological dimer in the crystal. No biological assembly was detected by the PISA server, but the three most buried crystallographic interfaces have interesting features: the first one displays a highly conserved tryptophan acting as a binding platform, the second one is located along a 2-fold symmetry axis and the third one resembles the dimeric interface of EIAV p15. Because the C-terminal end of p15 is involved in two of these three interfaces, we investigated the structure and assembly of a C-terminal-truncated form of p15 lacking 14 residues. The truncated FIV p15 dimerizes in solution at a lower concentration and crystallizes with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The EIAV-like dimeric interface is the only one to be retained in the new crystal form. The dimeric form of FIV p15 in solution and its extended C-terminal end are characteristic among lentiviral matrix proteins

  14. Carbohydrate particles as protein carriers and scaffolds: physico-chemical characterization and collagen stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Ivone; Rocha, Sandra; Loureiro, Joana A.; Carmo Pereira, Maria do [University of Porto, LEPAE, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering (Portugal); Ivanova, Galya [Universidade do Porto, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias (Portugal); Coelho, Manuel, E-mail: mcoelho@fe.up.pt [University of Porto, LEPAE, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering (Portugal)

    2012-09-15

    The preservation of protein properties after entrapping into polymeric matrices and the effects of drying the emulsions still remains uncertain and controversial. Carbohydrate particles were designed and prepared by homogenization of gum arabic and maltodextrin mixture, with collagen hydrolysate (CH) followed by spray-drying. The encapsulation of CH in the carbohydrate matrix was achieved with an efficiency of 85 {+-} 2 %. The morphology and the size of the particles, before (40-400 nm) and after spray-drying (<20 {mu}m), were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Measurements of the nuclear relaxation times and application of diffusion ordered spectroscopy, obtained through pulsed field gradient NMR experiments, have been performed to determine the structure of the CH-polysaccharide conjugates and to clarify the mechanism of CH immobilization in the polysaccharide matrix. In vitro release profiles in ultrapure water and in cellular medium reveal that the diffusion rate of CH from the polymeric matrix to the dialysis solution decreases in average 30-50 % over time, compared to free CH molecules. In cellular medium at 37 Degree-Sign C, the complete release of CH from the particles is achieved only after 24 h, demonstrating a significant decrease in the CH mass transfer process when compared with free CH. The findings of this study outline the ability of gum arabic/maltodextrin matrices to entrap and preserve CH original properties after the spray-drying process and support the potential of the polymeric scaffold for protein delivery and tissue engineering.

  15. Correlation of acidic and basic carrier ampholyte and immobilized pH gradient two-dimensional gel electrophoresis patterns based on mass spectrometric protein identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawrocki, A; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Podtelejnikov, A V

    1998-01-01

    Separation of proteins on either carrier ampholyte-based or immobilized pH gradient-based two-dimensional (2-D) gels gives rise to electrophoretic patterns that are difficult to compare visually. In this paper we have used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI...

  16. Surface (glyco-)proteins: primary structure and crystallization under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, H.; Akca, E.; Schultz, N.; Karbach, G.; Schlott, B.; Debaerdemaeker, T.; De Clercq, J.-P.; König, H.

    2001-08-01

    The Archaea comprise microorganisms that live under environmental extremes, like high temperature, low pH value or high salt concentration. Their cells are often covered by a single layer of (glyco)protein subunits (S-layer) in hexagonal arrangement. In order to get further hints about the molecular mechanisms of protein stabilization we compared the primary and secondary structures of archaeal S-layer (glyco)proteins. We found an increase of charged amino acids in the S-layer proteins of the extreme thermophilic species compared to their mesophilic counterparts. Our data and those of other authors suggest that ionic interactions, e.g., salt bridges seem to be played a major role in protein stabilization at high temperatures. Despite the differences in the growth optima and the predominance of some amino acids the primary structures of S-layers revealed also a significant degree of identity between phylogenetically related archaea. These obervations indicate that protein sequences of S-layers have been conserved during the evolution from extremely thermophilic to mesophilic life. To support these findings the three-dimensional structure of the S-layer proteins has to be elucidated. Recently, we described the first successful crystallization of an extreme thermophilic surface(glyco)protein under microgravity conditions.

  17. Responsive Photonic Crystal Carbohydrate Hydrogel Sensor Materials for Selective and Sensitive Lectin Protein Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhongyu; Sasmal, Aniruddha; Liu, Xinyu; Asher, Sanford A

    2017-10-27

    Lectin proteins, such as the highly toxic lectin protein, ricin, and the immunochemically important lectin, jacalin, play significant roles in many biological functions. It is highly desirable to develop a simple but efficient method to selectively detect lectin proteins. Here we report the development of carbohydrate containing responsive hydrogel sensing materials for the selective detection of lectin proteins. The copolymerization of a vinyl linked carbohydrate monomer with acrylamide and acrylic acid forms a carbohydrate hydrogel that shows specific "multivalent" binding to lectin proteins. The resulting carbohydrate hydrogels are attached to 2-D photonic crystals (PCs) that brightly diffract visible light. This diffraction provides an optical readout that sensitively monitors the hydrogel volume. We utilize lactose, galactose, and mannose containing hydrogels to fabricate a series of 2-D PC sensors that show strong selective binding to the lectin proteins ricin, jacalin, and concanavalin A (Con A). This binding causes a carbohydrate hydrogel shrinkage which significantly shifts the diffraction wavelength. The resulting 2-D PC sensors can selectively detect the lectin proteins ricin, jacalin, and Con A. These unoptimized 2-D PC hydrogel sensors show a limit of detection (LoD) of 7.5 × 10 -8 M for ricin, a LoD of 2.3 × 10 -7 M for jacalin, and a LoD of 3.8 × 10 -8 M for Con A, respectively. This sensor fabrication approach may enable numerous sensors for the selective detection of numerous lectin proteins.

  18. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of insecticidal crystal protein genes in native Bacillus thuringiensis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeva Swamy, H M; Asokan, R; Mahmood, Riaz; Nagesha, S N

    2013-04-01

    The Western Ghats of Karnataka natural ecosystem are among the most diverse and is one of the eight hottest hotspots of biological diversity in the world, that runs along the western part of India through four states including Karnataka. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains were isolated from soils of Western Ghats of Karnataka and characterized by molecular and analytical methods as a result of which 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Bt strains were isolated from soil samples using sodium acetate selection method. The morphology of crystals was studied using light and phase contrast microscopy. Isolates were further characterized for insecticidal cry gene by PCR, composition of toxins in bacterial crystals by SDS-PAGE cloning, sequencing and evaluation of toxicity was done. As a result 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Majority of the isolates showed the presence of a 55 kDa protein bands on SDS-PAGE while the rest showed 130, 73, 34, and 25 kDa bands. PCR analysis revealed predominance of Coleopteran-active cry genes in these isolates. The variations in the nucleotide sequences, crystal morphology, and mass of crystal protein(s) purified from the Bt isolates revealed genetic and molecular diversity. Three strains containing Coleopteran-active cry genes showed higher activity against larvae Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) than B. thuringiensis subsp. Morrisoni. Results indicated that Bt isolates could be utilized for bioinsecticide production, aiming to reduce the use of chemical insecticide which could be useful to use in integrated pest management to control agriculturally important pests for sustainable crop production.

  19. Carrier Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance of Hemophilia Definitions & Terminology Bleeding Symptoms Carrier Diagnosis When to Test for Carrier Status Family Planning and Pregnancy Conception Options Prenatal Diagnosis Fetal Sex ...

  20. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular carriers for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, Matthew W; Kaczocha, Martin; Berger, William T; Leung, KwanNok; Ralph, Brian P; Wang, Liqun; Sweeney, Joseph M; Miyauchi, Jeremy T; Tsirka, Stella E; Ojima, Iwao; Deutsch, Dale G

    2015-04-03

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) occur naturally in marijuana (Cannabis) and may be formulated, individually or in combination in pharmaceuticals such as Marinol or Sativex. Although it is known that these hydrophobic compounds can be transported in blood by albumin or lipoproteins, the intracellular carrier has not been identified. Recent reports suggest that CBD and THC elevate the levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) when administered to humans, suggesting that phytocannabinoids target cellular proteins involved in endocannabinoid clearance. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular proteins that mediate AEA transport to its catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By computational analysis and ligand displacement assays, we show that at least three human FABPs bind THC and CBD and demonstrate that THC and CBD inhibit the cellular uptake and catabolism of AEA by targeting FABPs. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to rodent FAAH, CBD does not inhibit the enzymatic actions of human FAAH, and thus FAAH inhibition cannot account for the observed increase in circulating AEA in humans following CBD consumption. Using computational molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis we identify key residues within the active site of FAAH that confer the species-specific sensitivity to inhibition by CBD. Competition for FABPs may in part or wholly explain the increased circulating levels of endocannabinoids reported after consumption of cannabinoids. These data shed light on the mechanism of action of CBD in modulating the endocannabinoid tone in vivo and may explain, in part, its reported efficacy toward epilepsy and other neurological disorders. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins (FABPs) Are Intracellular Carriers for Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, Matthew W.; Kaczocha, Martin; Berger, William T.; Leung, KwanNok; Ralph, Brian P.; Wang, Liqun; Sweeney, Joseph M.; Miyauchi, Jeremy T.; Tsirka, Stella E.; Ojima, Iwao; Deutsch, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) occur naturally in marijuana (Cannabis) and may be formulated, individually or in combination in pharmaceuticals such as Marinol or Sativex. Although it is known that these hydrophobic compounds can be transported in blood by albumin or lipoproteins, the intracellular carrier has not been identified. Recent reports suggest that CBD and THC elevate the levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) when administered to humans, suggesting that phytocannabinoids target cellular proteins involved in endocannabinoid clearance. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are intracellular proteins that mediate AEA transport to its catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). By computational analysis and ligand displacement assays, we show that at least three human FABPs bind THC and CBD and demonstrate that THC and CBD inhibit the cellular uptake and catabolism of AEA by targeting FABPs. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to rodent FAAH, CBD does not inhibit the enzymatic actions of human FAAH, and thus FAAH inhibition cannot account for the observed increase in circulating AEA in humans following CBD consumption. Using computational molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis we identify key residues within the active site of FAAH that confer the species-specific sensitivity to inhibition by CBD. Competition for FABPs may in part or wholly explain the increased circulating levels of endocannabinoids reported after consumption of cannabinoids. These data shed light on the mechanism of action of CBD in modulating the endocannabinoid tone in vivo and may explain, in part, its reported efficacy toward epilepsy and other neurological disorders. PMID:25666611

  2. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong; Kruse, Andrew C; Chung, Ka Young; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Chae, Pil Seok; Pardon, Els; Calinski, Diane; Mathiesen, Jesper M; Shah, Syed T.A.; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin; Gellman, Samuel H; Steyaert, Jan; Skiniotis, Georgios; Weis, William I; Sunahara, Roger K; Kobilka, Brian K [Brussels; (Trinity); (Michigan); (Stanford-MED); (Michigan-Med); (UW)

    2011-12-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist-occupied receptor. The β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β2AR and nucleotide-free Gs heterotrimer. The principal interactions between the β2AR and Gs involve the amino- and carboxy-terminal α-helices of Gs, with conformational changes propagating to the nucleotide-binding pocket. The largest conformational changes in the β2AR include a 14Å outward movement at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling by a GPCR.

  3. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of YjcG protein from Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Chan, Chiomui; Liang, Yu-He; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Li, Lanfen; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2005-01-01

    B. subtilis YjcG protein was expressed, purified and crystallized. A complete diffraction data set was collected at BSRF beamline 3W1A and processed to 2.3 Å resolution. Bacillus subtilis YjcG is a functionally uncharacterized protein with 171 residues that has no structural homologue in the Protein Data Bank. However, it shows sequence homology to bacterial and archaeal 2′–5′ RNA ligases. In order to identify its exact function via structural studies, the yjcG gene was amplified from B. subtilis genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET21-DEST. The protein was expressed in a soluble form in Escherichia coli and was purified to homogeneity. Crystals suitable for X-ray analysis were obtained that diffracted to 2.3 Å and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 99.66, b = 73.93, c = 61.77 Å, β = 113.56°

  4. Two studies of colloidal interactions: electric polarizability and protein crystallization. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraden, Seth; Hu, Yue

    2001-08-06

    (I)Electric polarizability. During this grant period, the focus was on five topics concerning electric field effects on colloids. The first topic focuses on electric interactions between charged colloids in the absence of external fields, and the remaining four deal with colloids in the presence of external fields. The topics are (1) calculation of the effect of confinement on the pair-potential between like-charged colloids, (2) experimental determination of the interparticle potential under the conditions of dielectric polarization, (3) measurement of the evolution of structure of ER fluids, (4) synthesis of novel colloids designed for ER studies, and (5) computer modeling of polarization of surface charge. (II) Protein crystallization. Studies of the phase behavior of mixtures of proteins and polymers were initiated. The motivation was to test recent theories that suggested that optimal conditions for protein crystallization could be obtained using such mixtures. Combined light scattering measurements of the virial coefficients and determination of the phase diagram of protein/polymer mixtures revealed that the theoretical picture needs to be substantially modified.

  5. ContaMiner and ContaBase: a webserver and database for early identification of unwantedly crystallized protein contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungler, Arnaud; Momin, Afaque; Diederichs, Kay; Arold, Stefan, T.

    2016-01-01

    Solving the phase problem in protein X-ray crystallography relies heavily on the identity of the crystallized protein, especially when molecular replacement (MR) methods are used. Yet, it is not uncommon that a contaminant crystallizes instead of the protein of interest. Such contaminants may be proteins from the expression host organism, protein fusion tags or proteins added during the purification steps. Many contaminants co-purify easily, crystallize and give good diffraction data. Identification of contaminant crystals may take time, since the presence of the contaminant is unexpected and its identity unknown. A webserver (ContaMiner) and a contaminant database (ContaBase) have been established, to allow fast MR-based screening of crystallographic data against currently 62 known contaminants. The web-based ContaMiner (available at http://strube.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/contaminer/) currently produces results in 5 min to 4 h. The program is also available in a github repository and can be installed locally. ContaMiner enables screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for ‘crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis’ publications. Thus, in addition to potentially saving X-ray crystallographers much time and effort, ContaMiner might considerably lower the risk of publishing erroneous data. PMID:27980519

  6. Interchangeability of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccines with different carrier proteins in the United Kingdom infant immunisation schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Andrews, Nick J; Waight, Pauline; Hallis, Bassam; Matheson, Mary; England, Anna; Findlow, Helen; Bai, Xilian; Borrow, Ray; Burbidge, Polly; Pearce, Emma; Goldblatt, David; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-01-29

    An open, non-randomised study was undertaken in England during 2011-12 to evaluate vaccine antibody responses in infants after completion of the routine primary infant immunisation schedule, which included two doses of meningococcal group C (MenC) conjugate (MCC) vaccine at 3 and 4 months. Any of the three licensed MCC vaccines could be used for either dose, depending on local availability. Healthy term infants registered at participating general practices (GPs) in Hertfordshire and Gloucestershire, UK, were recruited prospectively to provide a single blood sample four weeks after primary immunisation, which was administered by the GP surgery. Vaccination history was obtained at blood sampling. MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) and IgG antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib), pertussis toxin (PT), diphtheria toxoid (DT), tetanus toxoid (TT) and thirteen pneumococcal serotypes were analysed according to MCC vaccines received. MenC SBA responses differed significantly (Pvaccine schedule as follows: MenC SBA geometric mean titres (GMTs) were significantly lower in infants receiving a diphtheria cross-reacting material-conjugated MCC (MCC-CRM) vaccine followed by TT-conjugated MCC (MCC-TT) vaccine (82.0; 95% CI, 39-173; n=14) compared to those receiving two MCC-CRM (418; 95% CI, 325-537; n=82), two MCC-TT (277; 95% CI, 223-344; n=79) or MCC-TT followed by MCC-CRM (553; 95% CI, 322-949; n=18). The same group also had the lowest Hib geometric mean concentrations (0.60 μg/mL, 0.27-1.34) compared to 1.85 μg/mL (1.23-2.78), 2.86 μg/mL (2.02-4.05) and 4.26 μg/mL (1.94-9.36), respectively. Our results indicate that MCC vaccines with different carrier proteins are not interchangeable. When several MCC vaccines are available, children requiring more than one dose should receive MCC vaccines with the same carrier protein or, alternatively, receive MCC-TT first wherever possible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein nanocoatings on synthetic polymeric nanofibrous membranes designed as carriers for skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacakova, Marketa; Pajorova, Julia; Stranska, Denisa; Hadraba, Daniel; Lopot, Frantisek; Riedel, Tomas; Brynda, Eduard; Zaloudkova, Margit; Bacakova, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    Protein-coated resorbable synthetic polymeric nanofibrous membranes are promising for the fabrication of advanced skin substitutes. We fabricated electrospun polylactic acid and poly(lactide- co -glycolic acid) nanofibrous membranes and coated them with fibrin or collagen I. Fibronectin was attached to a fibrin or collagen nanocoating, in order further to enhance the cell adhesion and spreading. Fibrin regularly formed a coating around individual nanofibers in the membranes, and also formed a thin noncontinuous nanofibrous mesh on top of the membranes. Collagen also coated most of the fibers of the membrane and randomly created a soft gel on the membrane surface. Fibronectin predominantly adsorbed onto a thin fibrin mesh or a collagen gel, and formed a thin nanofibrous structure. Fibrin nanocoating greatly improved the attachment, spreading, and proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts, whereas collagen nanocoating had a positive influence on the behavior of human HaCaT keratinocytes. In addition, fibrin stimulated the fibroblasts to synthesize fibronectin and to deposit it as an extracellular matrix. Fibrin coating also showed a tendency to improve the ultimate tensile strength of the nanofibrous membranes. Fibronectin attached to fibrin or to a collagen coating further enhanced the adhesion, spreading, and proliferation of both cell types.

  8. Non-carrier nanoparticles adjuvant modular protein vaccine in a particle-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Seth

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles are increasingly used to adjuvant vaccine formulations due to their biocompatibility, ease of manufacture and the opportunity to tailor their size, shape, and physicochemical properties. The efficacy of similarly-sized silica (Si-OH, poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA and poly caprolactone (PCL nanoparticles (nps to adjuvant recombinant capsomere presenting antigenic M2e modular peptide from Influenza A virus (CapM2e was investigated in vivo. Formulation of CapM2e with Si-OH or PLGA nps significantly boosted the immunogenicity of modular capsomeres, even though CapM2e was not actively attached to the nanoparticles prior to injection (i.e., formulation was by simple mixing. In contrast, PCL nps showed no significant adjuvant effect using this simple-mixing approach. The immune response induced by CapM2e alone or formulated with nps was antibody-biased with very high antigen-specific antibody titer and less than 20 cells per million splenocytes secreting interferon gamma. Modification of silica nanoparticle surface properties through amine functionalization and pegylation did not lead to significant changes in immune response. This study confirms that simple mixing-based formulation can lead to effective adjuvanting of antigenic protein, though with antibody titer dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties.

  9. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  10. The use of small-molecule structures to complement protein-ligand crystal structures in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Colin R; Cole, Jason C

    2017-03-01

    Many ligand-discovery stories tell of the use of structures of protein-ligand complexes, but the contribution of structural chemistry is such a core part of finding and improving ligands that it is often overlooked. More than 800 000 crystal structures are available to the community through the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). Individually, these structures can be of tremendous value and the collection of crystal structures is even more helpful. This article provides examples of how small-molecule crystal structures have been used to complement those of protein-ligand complexes to address challenges ranging from affinity, selectivity and bioavailability though to solubility.

  11. Microseeding – A Powerful Tool for Crystallizing Proteins Complexed with Hydrolyzable Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Schmitt

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis is an often-encountered obstacle in the crystallization of proteins complexed with their substrates. As the duration of the crystallization process, from nucleation to the growth of the crystal to its final size, commonly requires several weeks, non-enzymatic hydrolysis of an “unstable” ligand occurs frequently. In cases where the crystallization conditions exhibit non neutral pH values this hydrolysis phenomenon may be even more pronounced. ChoX, the substrate binding protein of a choline ABC-importer, produced crystals with its substrate acetylcholine after one month. However, these crystals exhibited only choline, an acetylcholine hydrolysis product, in the binding site. To overcome this obstacle we devised a microseeding protocol leading to crystals of ChoX with bound acetylcholine within 24 hours. One drawback we encountered was the high twinning fraction of the crystals, possibly was due to the rapid crystal growth.

  12. Photoaffinity labeling of the dopamine reuptake carrier protein with 3-azido 3H GBR-12935

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, S.P.; Martenson, R.E.; Laing, P.; Thurkauf, A.; Decosta, B.; Rice, K.C.; Paul, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    A high affinity tritiated azido-diphenylpiperazine derivative, 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935, was synthesized as a potential photoaffinity probe of the dopamine transporter. Initially, the reversible binding of 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 to crude synaptosomal membranes from the rat striatum was characterized. Specific binding was sodium dependent and inhibited by a variety of drugs that are known to potently inhibit dopamine uptake. Other neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors, as well as cis-flupenthixol, a potent inhibitor of 3 H GBR-12935 binding to piperazine binding sites, failed to inhibit specific binding at concentrations of less than or equal to 10 microM. A good correlation was observed between the relative potencies of these drugs in inhibiting dopamine uptake into synaptosomes and in inhibiting specific 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 binding to rat striatal membranes. These data suggest that 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935, like other diphenylpiperazines such as 3 H GBR-12935 and 3 H GBR-12909, binds primarily to the dopamine transporter under defined assay conditions. After UV photolysis of crude synaptosomal membranes preincubated with 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 (1-2 nM), a single radiolabeled polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 80 kDa was observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Photoincorporation of 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 into this polypeptide was inhibited selectively by compounds that inhibit the uptake of dopamine and was completely dependent on the presence of Na+. No photolabeled proteins were observed when cerebellar membranes were substituted for striatal membranes. Essentially complete adsorption of the radiolabeled 80-kDa polypeptide to wheat germ agglutinin and elution with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine strongly suggest that the dopamine transporter polypeptide photolabeled by 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 is glycosylated

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain mutant proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, Daisy W.; Borek, Dominika; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Nix, Jay C.; Wang, Tianjiao; Prins, Kathleen C.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Honzatko, Richard B.; Helgeson, Luke A.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2010-01-01

    Three mutant forms of Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain were crystallized in three different space groups. VP35 is one of seven structural proteins encoded by the Ebola viral genome and mediates viral replication, nucleocapsid formation and host immune suppression. The C-terminal interferon inhibitory domain (IID) of VP35 is critical for dsRNA binding and interferon inhibition. The wild-type VP35 IID structure revealed several conserved residues that are important for dsRNA binding and interferon antagonism. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Zaire Ebola VP35 IID mutants R312A, K319A/R322A and K339A in space groups P6 1 22, P2 1 2 1 2 1 and P2 1 , respectively, are described. Diffraction data were collected using synchrotron sources at the Advanced Light Source and the Advanced Photon Source

  14. Optimization of crystals from nanodrops: crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of a pheromone-binding protein from the honeybee Apis mellifera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartigue, Audrey; Gruez, Arnaud; Briand, Loïc; Pernollet, Jean-Claude; Spinelli, Silvia; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2003-05-01

    Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) are small helical proteins ( approximately 13-17 kDa) present in various sensory organs from moths and other insect species. They are involved in the transport of pheromones from the sensillar lymph to the olfactory receptors. Here, crystals of a PBP (Amel-ASP1) originating from honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) antennae and expressed as recombinant protein using the yeast Pichia pastoris are reported. Crystals of Amel-ASP1 have been obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using a nanodrop-dispensing robot under the following conditions: 200 nl of 40 mg ml(-1) protein solution in 10 mM Tris, 25 mM NaCl pH 8.0 was mixed with 100 nl of well solution containing 0.15 M sodium citrate, 1.5 M ammonium sulfate pH 5.5. The protein crystallizes in space group C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 74.8, b = 85.8, c = 50.2 A. With one molecule in the asymmetric unit, V(M) is 3.05 A(3) Da(-1) and the solvent content is 60%. A complete data set has been collected at 1.6 A resolution on beamline ID14-2 (ESRF, Grenoble). The nanodrop crystallization technique used with a novel optimization procedure made it possible to consume small amounts of protein and to obtain a unique crystal per nanodrop, suitable directly for data collection in-house or at a synchrotron-radiation source.

  15. Crystal structures of the apo and ATP bound Mycobacterium tuberculosis nitrogen regulatory PII protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shetty, Nishant D.; Reddy, Manchi C.M.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Owen, Joshua L.; Sacchettini, James C. (TAM)

    2010-10-11

    PII constitutes a family of signal transduction proteins that act as nitrogen sensors in microorganisms and plants. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has a single homologue of PII whose precise role has as yet not been explored. We have solved the crystal structures of the Mtb PII protein in its apo and ATP bound forms to 1.4 and 2.4 {angstrom} resolutions, respectively. The protein forms a trimeric assembly in the crystal lattice and folds similarly to the other PII family proteins. The Mtb PII:ATP binary complex structure reveals three ATP molecules per trimer, each bound between the base of the T-loop of one subunit and the C-loop of the neighboring subunit. In contrast to the apo structure, at least one subunit of the binary complex structure contains a completely ordered T-loop indicating that ATP binding plays a role in orienting this loop region towards target proteins like the ammonium transporter, AmtB. Arg38 of the T-loop makes direct contact with the {gamma}-phosphate of the ATP molecule replacing the Mg{sup 2+} position seen in the Methanococcus jannaschii GlnK1 structure. The C-loop of a neighboring subunit encloses the other side of the ATP molecule, placing the GlnK specific C-terminal 3{sub 10} helix in the vicinity. Homology modeling studies with the E. coli GlnK:AmtB complex reveal that Mtb PII could form a complex similar to the complex in E. coli. The structural conservation and operon organization suggests that the Mtb PII gene encodes for a GlnK protein and might play a key role in the nitrogen regulatory pathway.

  16. Crystal structure of an eIF4G-like protein from Danio rerio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; McCoy, Jason G.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-04-18

    The gene LOC 91917 Danio rerio (zebrafish) encodes a protein annotated in the UniProt knowledgebase as the middle domain of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G domain containing protein b (MIF4Gdb). Its molecular weight is 25.8 kDa, and it comprises 222 amino acid residues. BLAST searches revealed homologues of D. rerio MIF4Gdb in many eukaryotes including humans. The homologue sand MIF4Gdb were identified as members of the Pfam family, MIF4G (PF2854), which is named after the middle domain of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G). eIF4G is a component of eukaryotic translational initiation complex, and contains binding sites for other initiation factors, suggesting its critical role in translational initiation. The MIF4G domain also occurs in several other proteins involved in RNA metabolism, including the Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay 2 protein (NMD2/UPF2), and the nuclear cap-binding protein 80-kDa subunit (CBP80). Sequence and structure analysis of the MIF4G domains in many proteins indicate that the domain assumes an all helical fold and has tandem repeated motifs. The zebrafish protein described here has homology to domains of other proteins variously referred to as NIC-containing proteins (NMD2, eIF4G, CBP80). The biological function of D. rerio MIF4Gdb has not yet been experimentally characterized, and the annotation is based on amino acid sequence comparison. D. rerio MIF4Gdb did not share more than 25% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known and was selected as a target for structure determination by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG). Here, they report the crystal structure of D. rerio MIF4Gdb (UniGene code Dr.79360, UniProt code Q5EAQ1, CESG target number GO.79294).

  17. Solute carrier protein family 11 member 1 (Slc11a1) activation efficiently inhibits Leishmania donovani survival in host macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nisha; Gedda, Mallikarjuna Rao; Tiwari, Neeraj; Singh, Suya P; Bajpai, Surabhi; Singh, Rakesh K

    2017-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar), a life threatening disease caused by L. donovani , is a latent threat to more than 147 million people living in disease endemic South East Asia region of the Indian subcontinent. The therapeutic option to control leishmanial infections are very limited, and at present comprise only two drugs, an antifungal amphotericin B and an antitumor miltefosine, which are also highly vulnerable for parasitic resistance. Therefore, identification and development of alternate control measures is an exigent requirement to control leishmanial infections. In this study, we report that functionally induced expression of solute carrier protein family 11 member 1 ( Slc11a1), a transmembrane divalent cationic transporter recruited on the surface of phagolysosomes after phagocytosis of parasites, effectively inhibits Leishmania donovani growth in host macrophages. Further, the increased Slc11a1 functionality also resulted in increased production of NOx, TNF-α and IL-12 by activated macrophages. The findings of this study signify the importance of interplay between Slc11a1 expression and macrophages activation that can be effectively used to control of Leishmania growth and survival.

  18. Defective Pollen Wall is Required for Anther and Microspore Development in Rice and Encodes a Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, J.; Shanklin, J.; Tan, H.; Yu, X.-H.; Liu, Y.; Liang, W.; Ranathunge, K.; Franke, R. B.; Schreiber, L.; Wang, Y.; Kai, G.; Ma, H.; Zhang, D.

    2011-06-01

    Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots.

  19. Modification of Triclosan Scaffold in Search of Improved Inhibitors for Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) Reductase in Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Jozef; Fomovska, Alina; Afanador, Gustavo A.; Muench, Stephen P.; Zhou, Ying; Lai, Bo-Shiun; Bissati, Kamal El; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patty J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Sommervile, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig W.; Rice, David; Prigge, Sean T.; McLeod, Rima; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2013-01-01

    Through our focused effort to discover new and effective agents against toxoplasmosis, a structure-based drug design approach was utilized to develop a series of potent inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (ENR) enzyme in Toxoplasma gondii (TgENR). Modifications to positions 5 and 4′ of the well-known ENR inhibitor triclosan afforded a series of 29 new analogs. Among the resulting compounds, many showed high potency and improved physicochemical properties in comparison with the lead. The most potent compounds 16a and 16c have IC50 values of 250 nM against Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites without apparent toxicity to the host cells. Their IC50 values against the recombinant TgENR were 43 and 26 nM, respectively. Additionally, 11 other analogs in this series had IC50 values ranging from 17 to 130 nM in the enzyme-based assay. With respect to their excellent in vitro activity as well as improved drug-like properties, the lead compounds 16a and 16c are deemed to be an excellent starting point for the development of new medicines to effectively treat Toxoplasma gondii infections. PMID:23776166

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the effector protein PevD1 from Verticillium dahliae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Lei; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Xinqi; Qiu, Dewen

    2012-01-01

    The overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of protein elicitor PevD1 from Verticillium dahliae are reported. The effector protein PevD1 from the pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae was purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Native crystals appeared in a solution consisting of 4.0 M sodium formate. A native data set was collected at 1.9 Å resolution at 100 K using an in-house X-ray source. Because of the absence of useful methinione in the protein sequence, derivative crystals that contained iodine were obtained by soaking in 1.25 M potassium iodide, and a data set that contained anomalous signal was collected using the same X-ray facility at a wavelength of 1.54 Å. The single-wavelength anomalous dispersion method was used to successfully solve the structure based on the anomalous signal generated from iodine

  1. X-ray-excited optical luminescence of protein crystals: a new tool for studying radiation damage during diffraction data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robin L; Yorke, Briony A; Pearson, Arwen R

    2012-05-01

    During X-ray irradiation protein crystals radiate energy in the form of small amounts of visible light. This is known as X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL). The XEOL of several proteins and their constituent amino acids has been characterized using the microspectrophotometers at the Swiss Light Source and Diamond Light Source. XEOL arises primarily from aromatic amino acids, but the effects of local environment and quenching within a crystal mean that the XEOL spectrum of a crystal is not the simple sum of the spectra of its constituent parts. Upon repeated exposure to X-rays XEOL spectra decay non-uniformly, suggesting that XEOL is sensitive to site-specific radiation damage. However, rates of XEOL decay were found not to correlate to decays in diffracting power, making XEOL of limited use as a metric for radiation damage to protein crystals. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of human ribosomal protein L10 core domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Kawazoe, Masahito; Shirouzu, Mikako; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    A truncated variant of human ribosomal protien L10 was prepared and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Eukaryotic ribosomal protein L10 is an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit, which organizes the architecture of the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site. The human L10 protein is also called the QM protein and consists of 214 amino-acid residues. For crystallization, the L10 core domain (L10CD, Phe34–Glu182) was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. A hexagonal crystal of L10CD was obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The L10CD crystal diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belongs to space group P3 1 21 or P3 2 21

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the extrinsic PsbP protein of photosystem II from Spinacia oleracea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohoutová, J.; Kutá Smatanová, I.; Brynda, J.; Lapkouski, M.; Revuelta, J. L.; Arellano, J. B.; Ettrich, R.

    2009-01-01

    Degradation-free crystalization of thrombin-digested recombinant His-tagged PsbP protein of photosystem II from Spinacia oleracea resulting in crystals diffracting to 2.06 Å. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the extrinsic PsbP protein of photosystem II from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was performed using N-terminally His-tagged recombinant PsbP protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PsbP protein (thrombin-digested recombinant His-tagged PsbP) stored in bis-Tris buffer pH 6.00 was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique with PEG 550 MME as a precipitant and zinc sulfate as an additive. SDS–PAGE analysis of a dissolved crystal showed that the crystals did not contain the degradation products of recombinant PsbP protein. PsbP crystals diffracted to 2.06 Å resolution in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 38.68, b = 46.73, c = 88.9 Å

  4. Inhibition of the Staphylococcus aureus NADPH-dependent enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase by triclosan and hexachlorophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, R J; Li, J; Roland, G E; Rock, C O

    2000-02-18

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) plays a determinant role in completing cycles of elongation in type II fatty acid synthase systems and is an important target for antibacterial drugs. The FabI component of Staphylococcus aureus (saFabI) was identified, and its properties were compared with Escherichia coli FabI (ecFabI). ecFabI and saFabI had similar specific activities, and saFabI expression complemented the E. coli fabI(Ts) mutant, illustrating that the Gram-positive FabI was interchangeable with the Gram-negative FabI enzyme. However, ecFabI was specific for NADH, whereas saFabI exhibited specific and positive cooperative binding of NADPH. Triclosan and hexachlorophene inhibited both ecFabI and saFabI. The triclosan-resistant ecFabI(G93V) protein was also refractory to hexachlorophene inhibition, illustrating that both drugs bind at the FabI active site. Both the introduction of a plasmid expressing the safabI gene or a missense mutation in the chromosomal safabI gene led to triclosan resistance in S. aureus; however, these strains did not exhibit cross-resistance to hexachlorophene. The replacement of the ether linkage in triclosan by a carbon bridge in hexachlorophene prevented the formation of a stable FabI-NAD(P)(+)-drug ternary complex. Thus, the formation of this ternary complex is a key determinant of the antibacterial activity of FabI inhibitors.

  5. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axford, Danny [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Foadi, James [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hu, Nien-Jen; Choudhury, Hassanul Ghani [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Iwata, So [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Beis, Konstantinos [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Alguel, Yilmaz, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-14

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines.

  6. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, Danny; Foadi, James; Hu, Nien-Jen; Choudhury, Hassanul Ghani; Iwata, So; Beis, Konstantinos; Evans, Gwyndaf; Alguel, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines

  7. Ordering of protein and water molecules at their interfaces with chitin nano-crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde Serrano, Clara; Leemreize, Hanna; Bar-On, Benny; Barth, Friedrich G; Fratzl, Peter; Zolotoyabko, Emil; Politi, Yael

    2016-02-01

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to study the structure of biogenic α-chitin crystals composing the tendon of the spider Cupiennius salei. Measurements were carried out on pristine chitin crystals stabilized by proteins and water, as well as after their deproteinization and dehydration. We found substantial shifts (up to Δq/q=9% in the wave vector in q-space) in the (020) diffraction peak position between intact and purified chitin samples. However, chitin lattice parameters extracted from the set of reflections (hkl), which did not contain the (020)-reflection, showed no systematic variation between the pristine and the processed samples. The observed shifts in the (020) peak position are discussed in terms of the ordering-induced modulation of the protein and water electron density near the surface of the ultra-thin chitin fibrils due to strong protein/chitin and water/chitin interactions. The extracted modulation periods can be used as a quantitative parameter characterizing the interaction length. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ContaMiner and ContaBase: a webserver and database for early identification of unwantedly crystallized protein contaminants

    KAUST Repository

    Hungler, Arnaud

    2016-11-02

    Solving the phase problem in protein X-ray crystallography relies heavily on the identity of the crystallized protein, especially when molecular replacement (MR) methods are used. Yet, it is not uncommon that a contaminant crystallizes instead of the protein of interest. Such contaminants may be proteins from the expression host organism, protein fusion tags or proteins added during the purification steps. Many contaminants co-purify easily, crystallize and give good diffraction data. Identification of contaminant crystals may take time, since the presence of the contaminant is unexpected and its identity unknown. A webserver (ContaMiner) and a contaminant database (ContaBase) have been established, to allow fast MR-based screening of crystallographic data against currently 62 known contaminants. The web-based ContaMiner (available at http://strube.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/contaminer/) currently produces results in 5 min to 4 h. The program is also available in a github repository and can be installed locally. ContaMiner enables screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for \\'crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis\\' publications. Thus, in addition to potentially saving X-ray crystallographers much time and effort, ContaMiner might considerably lower the risk of publishing erroneous data. A web server, titled ContaMiner, has been established, which allows fast molecular-replacement-based screening of crystallographic data against a database (ContaBase) of currently 62 potential contaminants. ContaMiner enables systematic screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for \\'crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis\\' publications. © Arnaud Hungler et al. 2016.

  9. Crystal Structure of VC0702 at 2.0 Angstrom: Conserved Hypothetical Protein from Vibrio Cholerae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni,S.; Forouhar, F.; Bussiere, D.; Robinson, H.; Kennedy, M.

    2006-01-01

    VC0702, a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function from Vibrio cholerae, resides in a three-gene operon containing the MbaA gene that encodes for a GGDEF and EAL domain-containing protein which is involved in regulating formation of the extracellular matrix of biofilms in Vibrio cholerae. The VC0702 crystal structure has been determined at 2.0 Angstroms and refined to R{sub work} = 22.8% and R{sub free} = 26.3%. VC0702 crystallized in an orthorhombic crystal lattice in the C2221 space group with dimensions of a = 66.61 Angstroms, b = 88.118 Angstroms, and c = 118.35 Angstroms with a homodimer in the asymmetric unit. VC0702, which forms a mixed {alpha} + {beta} three-layered {alpha}{beta}{alpha} sandwich, belongs to the Pfam DUF84 and COG1986 families of proteins. Sequence conservation within the DUF84 and COG1986 families was used to identify a conserved patch of surface residues that define a cleft and potential substrate-binding site in VC0702. The three-dimensional structure of VC0702 is similar to that of Mj0226 from Methanococcus janeschii, which has been identified as a novel NTPase that binds NTP in a deep cleft similarly located to the conserved patch of surface residues that define an analogous cleft in VC0702. Collectively, the data suggest that VC0702 may have a biochemical function that involves NTP binding and phosphatase activity of some kind, and is likely involved in regulation of the signaling pathway that controls biofilm formation and maintenance in Vibrio cholerae.

  10. Crystal Structure of VC0702 at 2.0 Angstrom: Conserved Hypothetical Protein from Vibrio Cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, S.; Forouhar, F.; Bussiere, D.; Robinson, H.; Kennedy, M.

    2006-01-01

    VC0702, a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function from Vibrio cholerae, resides in a three-gene operon containing the MbaA gene that encodes for a GGDEF and EAL domain-containing protein which is involved in regulating formation of the extracellular matrix of biofilms in Vibrio cholerae. The VC0702 crystal structure has been determined at 2.0 Angstroms and refined to R work = 22.8% and R free = 26.3%. VC0702 crystallized in an orthorhombic crystal lattice in the C2221 space group with dimensions of a = 66.61 Angstroms, b = 88.118 Angstroms, and c = 118.35 Angstroms with a homodimer in the asymmetric unit. VC0702, which forms a mixed α + β three-layered αβα sandwich, belongs to the Pfam DUF84 and COG1986 families of proteins. Sequence conservation within the DUF84 and COG1986 families was used to identify a conserved patch of surface residues that define a cleft and potential substrate-binding site in VC0702. The three-dimensional structure of VC0702 is similar to that of Mj0226 from Methanococcus janeschii, which has been identified as a novel NTPase that binds NTP in a deep cleft similarly located to the conserved patch of surface residues that define an analogous cleft in VC0702. Collectively, the data suggest that VC0702 may have a biochemical function that involves NTP binding and phosphatase activity of some kind, and is likely involved in regulation of the signaling pathway that controls biofilm formation and maintenance in Vibrio cholerae

  11. Crystal structure of AFV3-109, a highly conserved protein from crenarchaeal viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quevillon-Cheruel Sophie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The extraordinary morphologies of viruses infecting hyperthermophilic archaea clearly distinguish them from bacterial and eukaryotic viruses. Moreover, their genomes code for proteins that to a large extend have no related sequences in the extent databases. However, a small pool of genes is shared by overlapping subsets of these viruses, and the most conserved gene, exemplified by the ORF109 of the Acidianus Filamentous Virus 3, AFV3, is present on genomes of members of three viral familes, the Lipothrixviridae, Rudiviridae, and "Bicaudaviridae", as well as of the unclassified Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus, STIV. We present here the crystal structure of the protein (Mr = 13.1 kD, 109 residues encoded by the AFV3 ORF 109 in two different crystal forms at 1.5 and 1.3 Å resolution. The structure of AFV3-109 is a five stranded β-sheet with loops on one side and three helices on the other. It forms a dimer adopting the shape of a cradle that encompasses the best conserved regions of the sequence. No protein with a related fold could be identified except for the ortholog from STIV1, whose structure was deposited at the Protein Data Bank. We could clearly identify a well bound glycerol inside the cradle, contacting exclusively totally conserved residues. This interaction was confirmed in solution by fluorescence titration. Although the function of AFV3-109 cannot be deduced directly from its structure, structural homology with the STIV1 protein, and the size and charge distribution of the cavity suggested it could interact with nucleic acids. Fluorescence quenching titrations also showed that AFV3-109 interacts with dsDNA. Genomic sequence analysis revealed bacterial homologs of AFV3-109 as a part of a putative previously unidentified prophage sequences in some Firmicutes.

  12. G-Jitter Effects in Protein Crystal Growth - A Numerical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Baugher, C. R.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of spacecraft acceleration environment on Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) is studied. A brief overview of the Space Shuttle acceleration environment is provided followed by a simple scaling procedure used to obtain estimates of the flow and concentration field characteristics in PCG. A detailed two-dimensional numerical model is then used to simulate the PCG system response to different disturbance scenarios; viz. residual g effects, impulse type disturbances and oscillatory inputs. The results show that PCG is susceptible to g-jitter and is a good candidate for vibration isolation.

  13. A technique for high-throughput protein crystallization in ionically cross-linked polysaccharide gel beads for X-ray diffraction experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Sugahara

    Full Text Available A simple technique for high-throughput protein crystallization in ionically cross-linked polysaccharide gel beads has been developed for contactless handling of crystals in X-ray crystallography. The method is designed to reduce mechanical damage to crystals caused by physical contact between crystal and mount tool and by osmotic shock during various manipulations including cryoprotection, heavy-atom derivatization, ligand soaking, and diffraction experiments. For this study, protein crystallization in alginate and κ-carrageenan gel beads was performed using six test proteins, demonstrating that proteins could be successfully crystallized in gel beads. Two complete diffraction data sets from lysozyme and ID70067 protein crystals in gel beads were collected at 100 K without removing the crystals; the results showed that the crystals had low mosaicities. In addition, crystallization of glucose isomerase was carried out in alginate gel beads in the presence of synthetic zeolite molecular sieves (MS, a hetero-epitaxic nucleant; the results demonstrated that MS can reduce excess nucleation of this protein in beads. To demonstrate heavy-atom derivatization, lysozyme crystals were successfully derivatized with K2PtBr6 within alginate gel beads. These results suggest that gel beads prevent serious damage to protein crystals during such experiments.

  14. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane protein OmpW from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, Reinhard; Zeth, Kornelius; Söding, Johannes; Lupas, Andrei; Linke, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The outer membrane protein OmpW from E. coli was overexpressed in inclusion bodies and refolded with the help of detergent. The protein has been crystallized and the crystals diffract to 3.5 Å resolution. OmpW is an eight-stranded 21 kDa molecular-weight β-barrel protein from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. It is a major antigen in bacterial infections and has implications in antibiotic resistance and in the oxidative degradation of organic compounds. OmpW from Escherichia coli was cloned and the protein was expressed in inclusion bodies. A method for refolding and purification was developed which yields properly folded protein according to circular-dichroism measurements. The protein has been crystallized and crystals were obtained that diffracted to a resolution limit of 3.5 Å. The crystals belong to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 122.5, c = 105.7 Å. A homology model of OmpW is presented based on known structures of eight-stranded β-barrels, intended for use in molecular-replacement trials

  15. Co-ordinated functions of Mms proteins define the surface structure of cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Atsushi; Yamagishi, Ayana; Fukuyo, Ayumi; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria synthesize magnetosomes comprised of membrane-enveloped single crystalline magnetite (Fe3 O4 ). The size and morphology of the nano-sized magnetite crystals (Mms (Mms5, Mms6, Mms7, and Mms13), was previously isolated from the surface of cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1. Analysis of an mms6 gene deletion mutant suggested that the Mms6 protein plays a major role in the regulation of magnetite crystal size and morphology. In this study, we constructed various mms gene deletion mutants and characterized the magnetite crystals formed by the mutant strains. Comparative analysis showed that all mms genes were involved in the promotion of crystal growth in different manners. The phenotypic characterization of magnetites also suggested that these proteins are involved in controlling the geometries of the crystal surface structures. Thus, the co-ordinated functions of Mms proteins regulate the morphology of the cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Anna J; Armour, Wes; Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Hall, David R; Horrell, Sam; McAuley, Katherine E; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2013-07-01

    The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Diamond Light Source. The technique is particularly useful for microcrystals and for crystals mounted in opaque materials such as lipid cubic phase. X-ray diffraction raster scanning can be used in combination with radiography to allow informed decision-making at the beamline prior to diffraction data collection. It is demonstrated that the X-ray dose required for a full tomography measurement is similar to that for a diffraction grid-scan, but for sample location and shape estimation alone just a few radiographic projections may be required.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of human PACSIN 1 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Xiaoyun; Meng, Geng; Li, Guoming; Luo, Ming; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2009-01-01

    A C-terminal truncation construct of human PACSIN 1 (1–344) has been purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 3.0 Å resolution. PACSIN 1, which is mainly detected in brain tissue, is one of the PACSIN-family proteins involved in endocytosis and recruitment of synaptic vesicles. It binds to dynamin, synaptojanin 1 and N-WASP, and functions in vesicle formation and transport. However, the mechanisms of action of PACSIN 1 in these processes are largely unknown. Here, full-length and five C-terminal truncation constructs of human PACSIN 1 have been successfully expressed and purified in Escherichia coli. PACSIN 1 (1–344) was crystallized and diffracted to a resolution of 3.0 Å. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 158.65, b = 87.38, c = 91.76 Å, α = 90.00, β = 113.61, γ = 90.00°. There were two molecules in the asymmetric unit and the solvent content was estimated to be about 70.47%

  18. High-throughput protein crystallization on the World Community Grid and the GPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotseruba, Yulia; Cumbaa, Christian A; Jurisica, Igor

    2012-01-01

    We have developed CPU and GPU versions of an automated image analysis and classification system for protein crystallization trial images from the Hauptman Woodward Institute's High-Throughput Screening lab. The analysis step computes 12,375 numerical features per image. Using these features, we have trained a classifier that distinguishes 11 different crystallization outcomes, recognizing 80% of all crystals, 94% of clear drops, 94% of precipitates. The computing requirements for this analysis system are large. The complete HWI archive of 120 million images is being processed by the donated CPU cycles on World Community Grid, with a GPU phase launching in early 2012. The main computational burden of the analysis is the measure of textural (GLCM) features within the image at multiple neighbourhoods, distances, and at multiple greyscale intensity resolutions. CPU runtime averages 4,092 seconds (single threaded) on an Intel Xeon, but only 65 seconds on an NVIDIA Tesla C2050. We report on the process of adapting the C++ code to OpenCL, optimized for multiple platforms.

  19. Production, crystallization and neutron diffraction of fully deuterated human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Blakeley, Matthew P; Raasakka, Arne; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Kursula, Petri

    2015-11-01

    The molecular details of the formation of the myelin sheath, a multilayered membrane in the nervous system, are to a large extent unknown. P2 is a peripheral membrane protein from peripheral nervous system myelin, which is believed to play a role in this process. X-ray crystallographic studies and complementary experiments have provided information on the structure-function relationships in P2. In this study, a fully deuterated sample of human P2 was produced. Crystals that were large enough for neutron diffraction were grown by a ten-month procedure of feeding, and neutron diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å from a crystal of 0.09 mm(3) in volume. The neutron crystal structure will allow the positions of H atoms in P2 and its fatty-acid ligand to be visualized, as well as shedding light on the fine details of the hydrogen-bonding networks within the P2 ligand-binding cavity.

  20. Crystal structures of catrocollastatin/VAP2B reveal a dynamic, modular architecture of ADAM/adamalysin/reprolysin family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Tomoko; Araki, Satohiko; Mori, Hidezo; Takeda, Soichi

    2007-05-29

    Catrocollastatin/vascular apoptosis-inducing protein (VAP)2B is a metalloproteinase from Crotalus atrox venom, possessing metalloproteinase/disintegrin/cysteine-rich (MDC) domains that bear the typical domain architecture of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)/adamalysin/reprolysin family proteins. Here we describe crystal structures of catrocollastatin/VAP2B in three different crystal forms, representing the first reported crystal structures of a member of the monomeric class of this family of proteins. The overall structures show good agreement with both monomers of atypical homodimeric VAP1. Comparison of the six catrocollastatin/VAP2B monomer structures and the structures of VAP1 reveals a dynamic, modular architecture that may be important for the functions of ADAM/adamalysin/reprolysin family proteins.

  1. [Genes of insecticidal crystal proteins with dual specificity in Bacillus thuringiensis strains, isolated in the Crimea territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymar, S Iu; Isakova, I A; Kuznietsova, L M; Kordium, V A

    2006-01-01

    The insecticidal crystal proteins of 15 B. thuringiensis strains, isolated in the Crimea territory that are toxical for some Lepidoptera and Colorado potato beetle larvae were identified by PAGE electrophoresis. Ten strains produced the crystal proteins with high molecular weight (> 120 kD). PCR with use of broad specificity primers and DNA of these B. thuringiensis strains as template demonstrated the specific PCR products (1000 bp). Amplified DNA fragments were cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the genomes of ten strains of B. thuringiensis carried Cry1B genes, which are responsible for production of the insecticidal crystal proteins with dual specificity. The influence of the solubilization conditions on the structure and toxicity of Cry1B protein for Colorado potato beetle larvae was shown. The dual toxicity of studied B. thuringiensis strains is explained by the Cry1B genes presence in their genomes. These strains may be used to develop the broad specificity bioinsecticides.

  2. Crystal structure of the tumor-promoter okadaic acid bound to protein phosphatase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynes, J T; Bateman, K S; Cherney, M M; Das, A K; Luu, H A; Holmes, C F; James, M N

    2001-11-23

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) plays a key role in dephosphorylation in numerous biological processes such as glycogen metabolism, cell cycle regulation, smooth muscle contraction, and protein synthesis. Microorganisms produce a variety of inhibitors of PP1, which include the microcystin class of inhibitors and okadaic acid, the latter being the major cause of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning and a powerful tumor promoter. We have determined the crystal structure of the molecular complex of okadaic acid bound to PP1 to a resolution of 1.9 A. This structure reveals that the acid binds in a hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site of the protein and interacts with basic residues within the active site. Okadaic acid exhibits a cyclic structure, which is maintained via an intramolecular hydrogen bond. This is reminiscent of other macrocyclic protein phosphatase inhibitors. The inhibitor-bound enzyme shows very little conformational change when compared with two other PP1 structures, except in the inhibitor-sensitive beta12-beta13 loop region. The selectivity of okadaic acid for protein phosphatases-1 and -2A but not PP-2B (calcineurin) may be reassessed in light of this study.

  3. Crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human myelin protein zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Sohi, Jasloveleen; Kamholz, John; Kovari, Ladislau C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2012-03-27

    different mutations in the MPZ gene leading to peripheral neuropathy in patients have been reported worldwide (http://www.molgen. ua.ac.be/CMTMutations). All identified mutations resulting in a change or deletion of amino acid residues in MPZ give rise to neuropathy with the exception of R215L, which instead causes a benign polymorphism. Furthermore, more detailed analysis has classified the MPZ mutations into two major groups. In the first group, the mutations disrupt the intracellular processing of MPZ and are primarily associated with early onset neuropathy. It has been proposed that the mutated MPZ is trapped inside the cell rather than being transported to the plasma membrane. However, other evidence suggests that the mutated MPZ protein is expressed on the plasma membrane, but dominant-negatively disrupts the structure of myelin. In the second group, the MPZ mutations are associated with late onset neuropathy as these mutations cause only mild demyelination. The underlying mechanism is elusive with the hypothesis being that the second group of mutations cause minor abnormalities in the myelin sheath that over time may lead to aberrant Schwann cell-axon interactions and subsequently to axonal degeneration. The crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human MPZ (hP0ex) fused with maltose binding protein (MBP) is reported at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. While the crystal structure of rat MPZ extracellular domain (rP0ex) is available, the crystal structure of the human counterpart is useful for the analysis of the two homologs as well as a comparison between the two species. The hP0ex molecule reveals subtle structural variations between two homologs allowing comparison of the human myelin protein zero to that of the rat protein. The alignment of these homologs is shown in Figure 1(a).

  4. Carotenoid crystal formation in Arabidopsis and carrot roots caused by increased phytoene synthase protein levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Maass

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As the first pathway-specific enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis, phytoene synthase (PSY is a prime regulatory target. This includes a number of biotechnological approaches that have successfully increased the carotenoid content in agronomically relevant non-green plant tissues through tissue-specific PSY overexpression. We investigated the differential effects of constitutive AtPSY overexpression in green and non-green cells of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. This revealed striking similarities to the situation found in orange carrot roots with respect to carotenoid amounts and sequestration mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Arabidopsis seedlings, carotenoid content remained unaffected by increased AtPSY levels although the protein was almost quantitatively imported into plastids, as shown by western blot analyses. In contrast, non-photosynthetic calli and roots overexpressing AtPSY accumulated carotenoids 10 and 100-fold above the corresponding wild-type tissues and contained 1800 and 500 microg carotenoids per g dry weight, respectively. This increase coincided with a change of the pattern of accumulated carotenoids, as xanthophylls decreased relative to beta-carotene and carotene intermediates accumulated. As shown by polarization microscopy, carotenoids were found deposited in crystals, similar to crystalline-type chromoplasts of non-green tissues present in several other taxa. In fact, orange-colored carrots showed a similar situation with increased PSY protein as well as carotenoid levels and accumulation patterns whereas wild white-rooted carrots were similar to Arabidopsis wild type roots in this respect. Initiation of carotenoid crystal formation by increased PSY protein amounts was further confirmed by overexpressing crtB, a bacterial PSY gene, in white carrots, resulting in increased carotenoid amounts deposited in crystals. CONCLUSIONS: The sequestration of carotenoids into crystals can be driven by the

  5. Crystal Structure of the Membrane Fusion Protein CusB from Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chih-Chia; Yang, Feng; Long, Feng; Reyon, Deepak; Routh, Mathew D.; Kuo, Dennis W.; Mokhtari, Adam K.; Van Ornam, Jonathan D.; Rabe, Katherine L.; Hoy, Julie A.; Lee, Young Jin; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Yu, Edward W.; (Cornell); (Iowa State)

    2010-03-29

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently utilize tripartite efflux complexes belonging to the resistance-nodulation-division family to expel diverse toxic compounds from the cell. These systems contain a periplasmic membrane fusion protein (MFP) that is critical for substrate transport. We here present the x-ray structures of the CusB MFP from the copper/silver efflux system of E. coli. This is the first structure of any MFPs associated with heavy-metal efflux transporters. CusB bridges the inner-membrane efflux pump CusA and outer-membrane channel CusC to mediate resistance to Cu{sup +} and Ag{sup +} ions. Two distinct structures of the elongated molecules of CusB were found in the asymmetric unit of a single crystal, which suggests the flexible nature of this protein. Each protomer of CusB can be divided into four different domains, whereby the first three domains are mostly {beta}-strands and the last domain adopts an entirely helical architecture. Unlike other known structures of MFPs, the {alpha}-helical domain of CusB is folded into a three-helix bundle. This three-helix bundle presumably interacts with the periplasmic domain of CusC. The N- and C-termini of CusB form the first {beta}-strand domain, which is found to interact with the periplasmic domain of the CusA efflux pump. Atomic details of how this efflux protein binds Cu{sup +} and Ag{sup +} were revealed by the crystals of the CusB-Cu(I) and CusB-Ag(I) complexes. The structures indicate that CusB consists of multiple binding sites for these metal ions. These findings reveal novel structural features of an MFP in the resistance-nodulation-division efflux system and provide direct evidence that this protein specifically interacts with transported substrates.

  6. Ectodomain of plasmodesmata-localized protein 5 in Arabidopsis: expression, purification, crystallization and crystallographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaocui; Zhu, Peiyan; Qu, Shanshan; Zhao, Jie; Singh, Prashant K; Wang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodesmata-localized protein 5 (PDLP5) is a cysteine-rich receptor-like protein which is localized on the plasmodesmata of Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpression of PDLP5 can reduce the permeability of the plasmodesmata and further affect the cell-to-cell movement of viruses and macromolecules in plants. The ectodomain of PDLP5 contains two DUF26 domains; however, the function of these domains is still unknown. Here, the ectodomain of PDLP5 from Arabidopsis was cloned and overexpressed using an insect expression system and was then purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution and were indexed in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.9, b = 48.1, c = 62.2 Å, α = 97.3, β = 103.1, γ = 99.7°. Analysis of the crystal content indicated that there are two molecules in the asymmetric unit, with a Matthews coefficient of 2.51 Å 3  Da -1 and a solvent content of 50.97%.

  7. Evaluation of Semi-supervised Learning for Classification of Protein Crystallization Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigdel, Madhav; Dinç, İmren; Dinç, Semih; Sigdel, Madhu S; Pusey, Marc L; Aygün, Ramazan S

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of two wrapper methods for semi-supervised learning algorithms for classification of protein crystallization images with limited labeled images. Firstly, we evaluate the performance of semi-supervised approach using self-training with naïve Bayesian (NB) and sequential minimum optimization (SMO) as the base classifiers. The confidence values returned by these classifiers are used to select high confident predictions to be used for self-training. Secondly, we analyze the performance of Yet Another Two Stage Idea (YATSI) semi-supervised learning using NB, SMO, multilayer perceptron (MLP), J48 and random forest (RF) classifiers. These results are compared with the basic supervised learning using the same training sets. We perform our experiments on a dataset consisting of 2250 protein crystallization images for different proportions of training and test data. Our results indicate that NB and SMO using both self-training and YATSI semi-supervised approaches improve accuracies with respect to supervised learning. On the other hand, MLP, J48 and RF perform better using basic supervised learning. Overall, random forest classifier yields the best accuracy with supervised learning for our dataset.

  8. Routine phasing of coiled-coil protein crystal structures with AMPLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jens M H; Keegan, Ronan M; Bibby, Jaclyn; Winn, Martyn D; Mayans, Olga; Rigden, Daniel J

    2015-03-01

    Coiled-coil protein folds are among the most abundant in nature. These folds consist of long wound α-helices and are architecturally simple, but paradoxically their crystallographic structures are notoriously difficult to solve with molecular-replacement techniques. The program AMPLE can solve crystal structures by molecular replacement using ab initio search models in the absence of an existent homologous protein structure. AMPLE has been benchmarked on a large and diverse test set of coiled-coil crystal structures and has been found to solve 80% of all cases. Successes included structures with chain lengths of up to 253 residues and resolutions down to 2.9 Å, considerably extending the limits on size and resolution that are typically tractable by ab initio methodologies. The structures of two macromolecular complexes, one including DNA, were also successfully solved using their coiled-coil components. It is demonstrated that both the ab initio modelling and the use of ensemble search models contribute to the success of AMPLE by comparison with phasing attempts using single structures or ideal polyalanine helices. These successes suggest that molecular replacement with AMPLE should be the method of choice for the crystallo-graphic elucidation of a coiled-coil structure. Furthermore, AMPLE may be able to exploit the presence of a coiled coil in a complex to provide a convenient route for phasing.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of a novel haem-binding protein of Streptomyces reticuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Peijian [EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Groves, Matthew R. [EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra D.; Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío, E-mail: ortiz@biologie.uni-osnabrueck.de [Universität Osnabrück, FB Biologie/Chemie, Angewandte Genetik der Mikroorganismen, Barbarastrasse 13, 49069 Osnabrück (Germany); EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-05-01

    The haem-binding protein HbpS from Streptomyces reticuli was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å. Streptomyces reticuli is a soil-growing Gram-positive bacteria that has been shown to secrete a novel haem-binding protein known as HbpS. Sequence analysis reveals that homologues of HbpS are found in a wide variety of bacteria, including different Actinobacteria and the Gram-negative Vibrio cholera and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The in vivo production of HbpS is greatly increased when S. reticuli is cultured in the presence of the natural antibiotic haemin (Fe{sup 3+} oxidized form of haem). Mutational analysis demonstrated that HbpS significantly increases the resistance of S. reticuli to toxic concentrations of haemin. Previous data show that the presence of the newly identified two-component sensor system SenS–SenR also considerably enhances the resistance of S. reticuli to haemin and the redox-cycling compound plumbagin, suggesting a role in the sensing of redox changes. Specific interaction between HbpS and SenS–SenR, which regulates the expression of the catalase–peroxidase CpeB, as well as HbpS, has been demonstrated in vitro. HbpS has been recombinantly overexpressed, purified and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}3, with a cell edge of 152.5 Å. Diffraction data were recorded to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å and phases were obtained using the SAD method from crystals briefly soaked in high concentrations of sodium bromide.

  10. Stearoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Desaturase Mutations Uncover an Impact of Stearic Acid in Leaf and Nodule Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhssassi, Naoufal; Colantonio, Vincent; Flowers, Nicholas D; Zhou, Zhou; Henry, Jason; Liu, Shiming; Meksem, Khalid

    2017-07-01

    Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase (SACPD-C) has been reported to control the accumulation of seed stearic acid; however, no study has previously reported its involvement in leaf stearic acid content and impact on leaf structure and morphology. A subset of an ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenized population of soybean ( Glycine max ) 'Forrest' was screened to identify mutants within the GmSACPD-C gene. Using a forward genetics approach, one nonsense and four missense Gmsacpd-c mutants were identified to have high levels of seed, nodule, and leaf stearic acid content. Homology modeling and in silico analysis of the GmSACPD-C enzyme revealed that most of these mutations were localized near or at conserved residues essential for diiron ion coordination. Soybeans carrying Gmsacpd-c mutations at conserved residues showed the highest stearic acid content, and these mutations were found to have deleterious effects on nodule development and function. Interestingly, mutations at nonconserved residues show an increase in stearic acid content yet retain healthy nodules. Thus, random mutagenesis and mutational analysis allows for the achievement of high seed stearic acid content with no associated negative agronomic characteristics. Additionally, expression analysis demonstrates that nodule leghemoglobin transcripts were significantly more abundant in soybeans with deleterious mutations at conserved residues of GmSACPD-C. Finally, we report that Gmsacpd-c mutations cause an increase in leaf stearic acid content and an alteration of leaf structure and morphology in addition to differences in nitrogen-fixing nodule structure. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Functional characterization of triclosan-resistant enoyl-acyl-carrier protein reductase (FabV in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Heng Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is extremely resistant to triclosan. Previous studies have shown that P. aeruginosa encodes a triclosan-resistant enoyl-acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR, FabV, and that deletion of fabV causes P. aeruginosa to be extremely sensitive to triclosan. In this report, we complemented a P. aeruginosa fabV deletion strain with several triclosan-resistant ENR encoding genes, including Vibrio cholera fabV, Bacillus subtilis fabL and Enterococcus faecalis fabK. All complemented strains restored triclosan resistance to the level of the wild-type strain, which confirmed that triclosan-resistant ENR allows P. aeruginosa to be extremely resistant to triclosan. Moreover, fabV exhibits pleiotropic effects. Deletion of fabV led P. aeruginosa to show attenuated swarming motility, decreased rhamnolipid, pyoverdine and acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs production. Complementation of the fabV mutant with any one ENR encoding gene could restore these features to some extent, in comparison with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we found that addition of exogenous AHLs could restore to the fabV mutant strain the ability to swarm on semisolid plates and to produce more virulence factors than the fabV mutant strain. These findings indicate that deletion of fabV reduced the activity of ENR in P. aeruginosa, decreased fatty acid synthesis, and subsequently depressed the production of AHLs and other virulence factors, which finally may led to a reduction in the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. Therefore, fabV should be an ideal target for the control of P. aeruginosa infectivity.

  12. Characterization of a stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene family from chocolate tree, Theobroma cacao L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufan; Maximova, Siela N; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    In plants, the conversion of stearoyl-ACP to oleoyol-ACP is catalyzed by a plastid-localized soluble stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD). The activity of SAD significantly impacts the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and is thus a major determinant of fatty acid composition. The cacao genome contains eight putative SAD isoforms with high amino acid sequence similarities and functional domain conservation with SAD genes from other species. Sequence variation in known functional domains between different SAD family members suggested that these eight SAD isoforms might have distinct functions in plant development, a hypothesis supported by their diverse expression patterns in various cacao tissues. Notably, TcSAD1 is universally expressed across all the tissues, and its expression pattern in seeds is highly correlated with the dramatic change in fatty acid composition during seed maturation. Interestingly, TcSAD3 and TcSAD4 appear to be exclusively and highly expressed in flowers, functions of which remain unknown. To test the function of TcSAD1 in vivo, transgenic complementation of the Arabidopsis ssi2 mutant was performed, demonstrating that TcSAD1 successfully rescued all AtSSI2 related phenotypes further supporting the functional orthology between these two genes. The identification of the major SAD gene responsible for cocoa butter biosynthesis provides new strategies for screening for novel genotypes with desirable fatty acid compositions, and for use in breeding programs to help pyramid genes for quality and other traits such as disease resistance.

  13. Characterization of a stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene family from chocolate tree, Theobroma cacao L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufan; Maximova, Siela N.; Guiltinan, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    In plants, the conversion of stearoyl-ACP to oleoyol-ACP is catalyzed by a plastid-localized soluble stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD). The activity of SAD significantly impacts the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and is thus a major determinant of fatty acid composition. The cacao genome contains eight putative SAD isoforms with high amino acid sequence similarities and functional domain conservation with SAD genes from other species. Sequence variation in known functional domains between different SAD family members suggested that these eight SAD isoforms might have distinct functions in plant development, a hypothesis supported by their diverse expression patterns in various cacao tissues. Notably, TcSAD1 is universally expressed across all the tissues, and its expression pattern in seeds is highly correlated with the dramatic change in fatty acid composition during seed maturation. Interestingly, TcSAD3 and TcSAD4 appear to be exclusively and highly expressed in flowers, functions of which remain unknown. To test the function of TcSAD1 in vivo, transgenic complementation of the Arabidopsis ssi2 mutant was performed, demonstrating that TcSAD1 successfully rescued all AtSSI2 related phenotypes further supporting the functional orthology between these two genes. The identification of the major SAD gene responsible for cocoa butter biosynthesis provides new strategies for screening for novel genotypes with desirable fatty acid compositions, and for use in breeding programs to help pyramid genes for quality and other traits such as disease resistance. PMID:25926841

  14. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of recombinant human C1ORF123 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Siti Nurulnabila A; Mat Yusop, Jastina; Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Ho, Kok Lian; Teh, Aik-Hong; Waterman, Jitka; Ng, Chyan Leong

    2016-03-01

    C1ORF123 is a human hypothetical protein found in open reading frame 123 of chromosome 1. The protein belongs to the DUF866 protein family comprising eukaryote-conserved proteins with unknown function. Recent proteomic and bioinformatic analyses identified the presence of C1ORF123 in brain, frontal cortex and synapses, as well as its involvement in endocrine function and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), indicating the importance of its biological role. In order to provide a better understanding of the biological function of the human C1ORF123 protein, the characterization and analysis of recombinant C1ORF123 (rC1ORF123), including overexpression and purification, verification by mass spectrometry and a Western blot using anti-C1ORF123 antibodies, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the protein crystals, are reported here. The rC1ORF123 protein was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method with a reservoir solution comprised of 20% PEG 3350, 0.2 M magnesium chloride hexahydrate, 0.1 M sodium citrate pH 6.5. The crystals diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution and belonged to an orthorhombic space group with unit-cell parameters a = 59.32, b = 65.35, c = 95.05 Å. The calculated Matthews coefficient (VM) value of 2.27 Å(3) Da(-1) suggests that there are two molecules per asymmetric unit, with an estimated solvent content of 45.7%.

  15. Large-scale purification and crystallization of the endoribonuclease XendoU: troubleshooting with His-tagged proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renzi, Fabiana; Panetta, Gianna; Vallone, Beatrice; Brunori, Maurizio; Arceci, Massimo; Bozzoni, Irene; Laneve, Pietro; Caffarelli, Elisa

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant His-tagged XendoU, a eukaryotic endoribonuclease, appeared to aggregate in the presence of divalent cations. Monodisperse protein which yielded crystals diffracting to 2.2 Å was obtained by addition of EDTA. XendoU is the first endoribonuclease described in higher eukaryotes as being involved in the endonucleolytic processing of intron-encoded small nucleolar RNAs. It is conserved among eukaryotes and its viral homologue is essential in SARS replication and transcription. The large-scale purification and crystallization of recombinant XendoU are reported. The tendency of the recombinant enzyme to aggregate could be reversed upon the addition of chelating agents (EDTA, imidazole): aggregation is a potential drawback when purifying and crystallizing His-tagged proteins, which are widely used, especially in high-throughput structural studies. Purified monodisperse XendoU crystallized in two different space groups: trigonal P3 1 21, diffracting to low resolution, and monoclinic C2, diffracting to higher resolution

  16. A new manual dispensing system for in meso membrane protein crystallization with using a stepping motor-based dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hato, Masakatsu; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Hiroaki; Kitsunai, Tokuji; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-09-01

    A reliable and easy to use manual dispensing system has been developed for the in meso membrane protein crystallization method. The system consists of a stepping motor-based dispenser with a new microsyringe system for dispensing, which allows us to deliver any desired volume of highly viscous lipidic mesophase in the range from ~50 to at least ~200 nl. The average, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation of 20 repeated deliveries of 50 nl cubic phase were comparable to those of a current robotic dispensing. Moreover, the bottom faces of boluses delivered to the glass crystallization plate were reproducibly circular in shape, and their centers were within about 100 μm from the center of the crystallization well. The system was useful for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins in meso.

  17. Crystal Engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nangia (2002). “Today, research areas under the wide umbrella of crystal engineering include: supramolecular synthesis; nanotechnology; separation science and catalysis; supramolecular materials and devices; polymorphism; cocrystals, crystal structure prediction; drug design and ligand–protein binding.”

  18. Small-angle X-ray scattering study of conditions for the formation of growth units of protein crystals in lysozyme solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakova, Yu. A.; Ilina, K. B.; Konarev, P. V.; Kryukova, A. E.; Marchenkova, M. A.; Blagov, A. E.; Volkov, V. V.; Pisarevsky, Yu. V.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2017-05-01

    The structural composition of lysozyme solutions favorable for the formation of the tetragonal form of protein crystals was studied by synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering depending on the protein concentration and the temperature. Along with lysozyme monomers, dimers and octamers are found in crystallization solutions; the octamer content increases with an increase in the protein concentration.

  19. Triclosan Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Is Due to FabV, a Triclosan-Resistant Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lei; Lin, Jinshui; Ma, Jincheng; Cronan, John E.; Wang, Haihong

    2009-01-01

    Triclosan, a very widely used biocide, specifically inhibits fatty acid synthesis by inhibition of enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase. Escherichia coli FabI is the prototypical triclosan-sensitive enoyl-ACP reductase, and E. coli is extremely sensitive to the biocide. However, other bacteria are resistant to triclosan, because they encode triclosan-resistant enoyl-ACP reductase isozymes. In contrast, the triclosan resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 has been attributed to active...

  20. Size control of in vitro synthesized magnetite crystals by the MamC protein of Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde-Tercedor, C; Montalbán-López, M; Perez-Gonzalez, T; Sanchez-Quesada, M S; Prozorov, T; Pineda-Molina, E; Fernandez-Vivas, M A; Rodriguez-Navarro, A B; Trubitsyn, D; Bazylinski, Dennis A; Jimenez-Lopez, C

    2015-06-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of prokaryotes that share the unique ability of biomineralizing magnetosomes, which are intracellular, membrane-bounded crystals of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). Magnetosome biomineralization is mediated by a number of specific proteins, many of which are localized in the magnetosome membrane, and thus is under strict genetic control. Several studies have partially elucidated the effects of a number of these magnetosome-associated proteins in the control of the size of magnetosome magnetite crystals. However, the effect of MamC, one of the most abundant proteins in the magnetosome membrane, remains unclear. In this present study, magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized inorganically in free-drift experiments at 25 °C in the presence of different concentrations of the iron-binding recombinant proteins MamC and MamCnts (MamC without its first transmembrane segment) from the marine, magnetotactic bacterium Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1 and three commercial proteins [α-lactalbumin (α-Lac), myoglobin (Myo), and lysozyme (Lyz)]. While no effect was observed on the size of magnetite crystals formed in the presence of the commercial proteins, biomimetic synthesis in the presence of MamC and MamCnts at concentrations of 10-60 μg/mL resulted in the production of larger and more well-developed magnetite crystals (~30-40 nm) compared to those of the control (~20-30 nm; magnetite crystals grown protein-free). Our results demonstrate that MamC plays an important role in the control of the size of magnetite crystals and could be utilized in biomimetic synthesis of magnetite nanocrystals.