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Sample records for carob bean gum

  1. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), pp. 174-175, which is... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Locust (carob) bean gum. 184.1343 Section 184.1343 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  2. Effects of carob-bean gum thickened formulas on infants’ reflux and tolerance indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Miglena; Manios, Yannis; Rasheva, Niya; Pancheva, Ruzha; Dimitrova, Elena; Schaafsma, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of carob-bean gum (CBG) thickened-formulas on reflux and tolerance indices in infants with gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). METHODS: Fifty-six eligible infants (1-6 mo old) were randomly allocated to receive for two weeks a formula with either 0.33 g/100 mL (Formula A) or 0.45 g/100 mL (Formula B) of cold soluble CBG galactomannans respectively, or a formula with 0.45 g/100 mL of hot soluble CBG galactomannans (Formula C). No control group receiving standard formula was included in the study. Data on the following indices were obtained both at baseline and follow-up from all study participants: 24 h esophageal pH monitoring indices, anthropometrical indices (i.e., body weight and length) and tolerance indices (i.e., frequency of colics; type and frequency of defecations). From the eligible infants, forty seven were included in an intention-to-treat analysis to examine the effects of the two-week trial on esophageal 24 h pH monitoring, growth and tolerance indices. Repeated Measures ANOVA was used to examine the research hypothesis. RESULTS: Regarding changes in 24 h pH monitoring indices, significant decreases from baseline to follow-up were observed in the “Boix Ochoa Score” (i.e., an index of esophageal acid exposure), in the total number of visible refluxes and in all symptoms related indices due to acid reflux only for infants provided with Formula A, while no significant changes were observed for infants provided with Formulas B and C. In addition, the significant decreases observed in two symptoms related pH monitoring indices (i.e., “Symptom index for reflux” and “Percentage of all reflux”) for infants provided with Formula A were also found to differentiate significantly compared to the changes observed in the other two groups (P = 0.048 and P = 0.014 respectively). Concerning changes in anthropometric indices, body weight significantly increased among infants provided with Formulas A and C, but not for infants provided

  3. 21 CFR 582.7343 - Locust bean gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Locust bean gum. 582.7343 Section 582.7343 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... bean gum. (a) Product. Locust (carob) bean gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. Optimization of bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus using carob and haricot bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgi, Eyup; Bayir, Ece; Sendemir-Urkmez, Aylin; Hames, E Esin

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) can be used in medical, biomedical, electronic, food, and paper industries because of its unique properties distinguishing it from plant cellulose. BC production was statistically optimized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus strain using carob and haricot bean (CHb) medium. Eight parameters were evaluated by Plackett-Burman Design and significant three parameters were optimized by Central Composite Design. Optimal conditions for production of BC in static culture were found as: 2.5g/L carbon source, 2.75g/L protein source, 9.3% inoculum ratio, 1.15g/L citric acid, 2.7g/L Na2HPO4, 30°C incubation temperature, 5.5 initial pH, and 9days of incubation. This study reveals that BC production can be carried out using carob and haricot bean extracts as carbon and nitrogen sources, and CHb medium has higher buffering capacity compared to Hestrin and Schramm media. Model obtained from this study is used to predict and optimize BC production yield using CHb medium. PMID:26906562

  5. The effect of gamma irradiation on guar gum, locust bean gum, gum tragacanth and gum karaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in rheological properties, as measured by viscosity, of two galactomannans (guar gum and locust beam gum) and two acidic polysaccharides (gumtragacanth and gum karaya) were studied at a range of irradiation doses oC for 1 h was determined over a wide shear rate range. All samples showed pseudoplastic behaviour which approached Newtonian with increasing irradiation dose. Viscosities were calculated at a shear rate of 54 sec-1 to enable comparison across the samples. Both galactomannans showed a decrease in viscosity with increasing γ irradiation independent of temperature and a hypothesis is proposed that at low γ irradiation doses (<2 kGy) there is a reduction in polymer aggregation in solution, whereas at higher doses polymer hydrolysis occurs. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy data supports this hypothesis, with the detection of different free radicals at low and high irradiation doses. The viscosity of the acidic polysaccharides, gum karaya and gum tragacanth, following γ irradiation at low doses (<1 kGy) was unchanged or slightly higher when compared to the unirradiated control samples. Above 1 kGy dispersion viscosity decreased with increasing dose. For these polysaccharides chain hydrolysis seems to occur during irradiation at all doses resulting in an increase in the amount of soluble polymer and hence increased viscosity at low doses, whilst at high doses viscosity decreases due to extensive polymer hydrolysis. Similar electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra were obtained at low and high doses with a stronger signal at the higher dose. (Author)

  6. Inhalable Antitubercular Therapy Mediated by Locust Bean Gum Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Ana D; Cavaco, Joana S; Guerreiro, Filipa; Lourenço, João P; Rosa da Costa, Ana M; Grenha, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global health problem and alternative therapeutic approaches are needed. Considering the high prevalence of lung tuberculosis (80% of cases), the pulmonary delivery of antitubercular drugs in a carrier system capable of reaching the alveoli, being recognised and phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages (mycobacterium hosts), would be a significant improvement to current oral drug regimens. Locust bean gum (LBG) is a polysaccharide composed of galactose and mannose residues, which may favour specific recognition by macrophages and potentiate phagocytosis. LBG microparticles produced by spray-drying are reported herein for the first time, incorporating either isoniazid or rifabutin, first-line antitubercular drugs (association efficiencies >82%). Microparticles have adequate theoretical properties for deep lung delivery (aerodynamic diameters between 1.15 and 1.67 μm). The cytotoxic evaluation in lung epithelial cells (A549 cells) and macrophages (THP-1 cells) revealed a toxic effect from rifabutin-loaded microparticles at the highest concentrations, but we may consider that these were very high comparing with in vivo conditions. LBG microparticles further evidenced strong ability to be captured by macrophages (percentage of phagocytosis >94%). Overall, the obtained data indicated the potential of the proposed system for tuberculosis therapy. PMID:27240337

  7. Preparation and characterization of tragacanth-locust bean gum edible blend films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Fatemeh Sadat; Kadkhodaee, Rassoul; Emadzadeh, Bahareh; Koocheki, Arash

    2016-03-30

    The present work introduces the structure and physicomechanical properties of a novel blend film made from binary solutions of gum tragacanth (GT) and locust bean gum (LBG) at different mixing ratios. Apparent viscosities and surface tensions of individual and blend gum solutions were also investigated. The viscosity data indicated that there was a distinct synergism between the two gums at all mixing ratios. FTIR spectra showed the existence of noncovalent intermolecular interactions between gums. The surface tensions of binary solutions were significantly lower than those of individual gums which is advantageous for coating applications. All films had homogenous and smooth surface morphology and their transparency, water vapour barrier and mechanical properties were improved by incorporating LBG in blend. The results of this study suggest that GT-LBG blend film, owing to its desirable properties, has the potential to be used as a new degradable food packaging material. PMID:26794942

  8. Effect of guar gum and xanthan gum on pasting and noodle-making properties of potato, corn and mung bean starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amritpal; Shevkani, Khetan; Singh, Narpinder; Sharma, Parul; Kaur, Seeratpreet

    2015-12-01

    The effect of xanthan and guar-gum on pasting and noodle-making properties of potato, corn and mung bean starches was studied. Mung bean starch showed the highest amylose content (43.4 %) followed by potato (23.2 %) and corn starch (15.5 %). Potato starch showed the highest swelling power (19.0 g/g) and solubility index (17.5 %) and exhibited the highest paste viscosities. Addition of both gums improved peak viscosity, hot paste viscosity and final viscosity for mung and corn starches; while for potato starch, guar gum increased peak and final viscosities and decreased hot paste viscosity while xanthan gum increased hot paste and final viscosities and decreased peak viscosity. The noodles made from mung bean starch showed the most desirable characteristics in terms of the lowest-cooking loss and adhesiveness. The gums increased noodle cooking time and decreased cooking loss, firmness and cohesiveness. PMID:26604384

  9. Plasticiser Effect on Water Vapour Permeability Properties of Locust bean gum--Based Edible Films

    OpenAIRE

    BOZDEMİR, Özgür Altan; TUTAŞ, Mehmet

    2003-01-01

    The barrier properties of edible films prepared from polysaccharide polymer (locust bean gum) and various plasticisers (glycerol, propylene glycol, sorbitol, and polyethylene glycol 200) together with hydrophobic modifiers (stearopten and beeswax) were examined. It was determined that the films containing polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG 200) and sorbitol have the lowest water vapour permeability values and the films containing glycerol have the highest WVP values. It was found that the ...

  10. Rheological and structural characterization of gels from whey protein hydrolysates/locust bean gum mixed systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Cristina M. R.; Teixeira, J. A.; Hilliou, L.; Sampaio, Paula; M. P. Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    The gelling ability of whey proteins can be changed by limited hydrolysis and by the addition of other components such as polysaccharides. In this work the effect of the concentration of locust bean gum (LBG) on the heat-set gelation of aqueous whey protein hydrolysates (10% w/w) from pepsin and trypsin was assessed at pH 7.0. Whey protein concentrate (WPC) mild hydrolysis (up to 2.5% in the case of pepsin and 1.0% in the case of trypsin) ameliorates the gelling ability. The WPC synergism wit...

  11. Emulsifying properties of maillard conjugates produced from sodium caseinate and locust bean gum

    OpenAIRE

    F. A. Perrechil; Santana, R.C.; D. B. Lima; M. Z. Polastro; Cunha, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Emulsifying properties of sodium caseinate -locust bean gum Maillard conjugates produced at different temperatures (54 - 96 ºC), protein/polysaccharide ratios (0.3 - 1.0) and reaction times (1 - 24 hours) were evaluated. Conjugate formation was confirmed by formation of color and high molecular weight fractions and the decrease of the αs- and β-casein bands. The emulsions stabilized by Maillard conjugates showed good stability. The mean droplet diameter (d32) tended to decrease with the incre...

  12. Locust bean gum safety in neonates and young infants: An integrated review of the toxicological database and clinical evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meunier, L.; Garthoff, J.A.; Schaafsma, A.; Krul, L.; Schrijver, J.; Goudoever, J.B. van; Speijers, G.; Vandenplas, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Locust bean gum (LBG) is a galactomannan polysaccharide used as thickener in infant formulas with the therapeutic aim to treat uncomplicated gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Since its use in young infants below 12. weeks of age is not explicitly covered by the current scientific concept of the derivat

  13. Effect of carboxymethylation on rheological and drug release characteristics of locust bean gum matrix tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravorty, Amrita; Barman, Gouranga; Mukherjee, Sudipta; Sa, Biswanath

    2016-06-25

    This study was undertaken to investigate correlation between the carboxymethylation-induced rheological changes and drug release characteristics of locust bean gum (LBG) matrix tablets. LBG was derivatized to carboxymethyl LBG (CMLBG) and characterized by (13)C NMR, FTIR and elemental analyses. Rheological studies revealed that LBG, in contact with water, produced a strong elastic gel which swelled less due to lower penetration of water resulting in slower drug release. On the other hand, CMLBG formed a viscous polymer solution through which higher influx of water resulted in rapid swelling of the matrix and faster drug release. Although the release from a particular matrix was dependent on drugs' solubilities, CMLBG matrix tablet produced faster release of all the drugs than LBG matrix tablets. In conclusion, rheological study appeared to be an useful tool to predict release of drugs from polysaccharide matrix tablets. PMID:27083792

  14. The study on salt-resistant stability of sophora bean gum and mixed gum%槐豆胶及与黄原胶复配胶耐盐稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永利; 丁兰; 张继; 张玉兰; 姚健; 崔德锋

    2001-01-01

    The salt-resistant stability of sophora bean gum and mixed gum of sophora bean gum with xanthan gum were studied on the basis of primary study.The result shows that the salt-resistant of sophora bean gum and xanthan gum is different,the salt-resistant of xanthan gum is better than sopho ra bean gum,and it reached stabilization in five days,and descend extent is lowe r;sophora bean gum attained stabilization in 8 days,and drop range is upper.When sophora bean gum mixed with xanthan gum,on one hand viscosity is raised,on the other hand salt-resistant is raised remarkably,furthermore the cost is reduced. So sophora bean gum could be a ma tch gum of xanthan gum to be used in high-salt foodstuff.%在原有研究的基础上,对槐 豆胶、黄原胶及槐豆胶与黄原胶复配胶的耐盐特性进行了研究.结果显示:槐豆胶与黄原胶 单一胶耐盐性有所差异,其中黄原胶单一胶耐盐性较槐豆胶好,5 d内达到稳定,且粘度下 降幅度较低;槐豆胶8 d达到稳定,粘度下降幅度较大.槐豆胶与黄原胶配伍,其耐盐稳定 性明显提高,3 d达到稳定,且粘度下降幅度降低.因此,槐豆胶与黄原胶配伍后,一方面 可大幅度提高粘度,另一方面可显著提高耐盐稳定性, 使成本大幅度降低,达到用量少、 成本低和提高使用效果的目的.因此,槐豆胶作为黄原胶的复配食品胶应用于高盐食品中, 具有明显的优越性和广阔的应用前景.

  15. Emulsifying properties of maillard conjugates produced from sodium caseinate and locust bean gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Perrechil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Emulsifying properties of sodium caseinate -locust bean gum Maillard conjugates produced at different temperatures (54 - 96 ºC, protein/polysaccharide ratios (0.3 - 1.0 and reaction times (1 - 24 hours were evaluated. Conjugate formation was confirmed by formation of color and high molecular weight fractions and the decrease of the αs- and β-casein bands. The emulsions stabilized by Maillard conjugates showed good stability. The mean droplet diameter (d32 tended to decrease with the increase of incubation time and temperature, except at extreme conditions (24 hours and 90 ºC or 96 ºC when the partial degradation of the conjugates was probably favored, resulting in phase separation of emulsions. The emulsion viscosity decreased with the increase in the protein/polysaccharide ratio and with the degradation of the conjugates. The conditions used in the experimental design made the optimization of the conjugate production viable, which showed greater emulsifier properties than the pure protein under acid conditions.

  16. Rheological and kinetic study of the ultrasonic degradation of locust bean gum in aqueous saline and salt-free solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruoshi; Feke, Donald L

    2015-11-01

    The ultrasonic degradation of locust bean gum (LBG) in aqueous solutions has been studied at 25°C for ultrasonication times up to 120 min. Although LBG is not a polyelectrolyte, the degradation extent and kinetics were found to be somewhat sensitive to the ionic conditions in solution, and this is attributed to changes in molecular conformation that can occur in different salt environments. Ultrasonic degradation was tracked by rheological measurements that lead to the determination of intrinsic viscosity for the LBG molecules. A kinetic model was also developed and successfully applied to characterize and predict the degradation results. PMID:26186852

  17. Low-fat sodium-reduced sausages: Effect of the interaction between locust bean gum, potato starch and κ-carrageenan by a mixture design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Elizabeth; Totosaus, Alfonso

    2008-04-01

    A mixture design approach was used to evaluate interactions between potato starch, locust bean gum and κ-carrageenan and their effect on cooking yield, expressible moisture, texture and color in low-fat sodium-reduced sausages formulated with potassium and calcium chloride. Starch had a notable influence on cooking yield and texture, increasing product hardness and resilience as starch proportion increased. The added salt did not allow complete starch granule gelatinization and swelling, which negatively affected water retention, cohesiveness and lightness. Locust bean gum and κ-carrageenan improved cooking yield and reduced expressible moisture in formulations containing higher proportions of potato starch. The presence of other ions could have enhanced κ-carrageenan functionality and its synergistic interaction with locust bean gum, improving texture and water retention, with only minor effects on sausage color. At the lower tested proportions starch can be used as an extender in low-fat cooked meat products if κ-carrageenan and locust bean gum are included in similar proportions. PMID:22062459

  18. Rheological Properties of High-Methoxyl Pectin and Locust Bean Gum Solutions in Steady Shear

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, J. A. Lopes da; M. P. GONçALVES; Rao, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Cross and Carreau flow models described well the shear rate-apparent viscosity data. The coil overlap parameter, c[η], correlated well with the zero-shear rate specific viscosities of these mixtures. Experimental values of intrinsic viscosities of the mixtures were in good agreement with the prediction based on an additive model of the individual contributions of the gums. From the results obtained for the mixtures of both polysaccharide solutions at similar viscosity, pH and ionic streng...

  19. SIFAT FUNGSIONAL PRODUK INTERAKSI FRAKSI GLOBULIN 7S KOMAK (Dolichos lablab DAN GUM XANTAN [Functional Properties of the Interaction Product Between Globulin of 7S Fraction of Lablab Bean (Dolichos lablab with Xantan Gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukamto1*

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lablab bean (Dolichos lablab seeds is a potential source of protein globulin.The bean’s protein content is 20.86 %, and the amount of globulin was more than 60% from the total protein, having major fractions of 7S and 11S. The objectives of this research were to explore the 7S globulin fractions, to study interaction between 7S globulin fractions with xanthan gum, and to observe the functional properties of the product of the interaction. The research was conducted in 2 steps. The first step was to fractionate the 7S fractions from globulin. The second steps was to interact 7S globulin fraction with xanthan gum. The yield of these interaction were examined for its physicochemical and functional properties. The results showed that the 7S globulin fractions could be interacted by xanthan gum at pH 7. The interacted product of globulin 7S fraction 10 % with xanthan gum 0,75 % had good functional properties than globulin 7S fraction, such as oil holding capacity, foaming capacity, and emulsion activity. Water holding capacity could not be detected because the yield became soluble. However,the foaming and emulsifying stability were still lower than those of soybean protein isolates. The research concluded that xanthan gum could be used to improve the physicochemical and functional properties of globulin 7S fraction.

  20. Identification and Quantification of the Major Constituents in Egyptian Carob Extract by Liquid Chromatography–Electrospray Ionization-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Asmaa Ibrahim Owis; El-Motaz Bellah El-Naggar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carob - Ceratonia siliqua L., commonly known as St John's-bread or locust bean, family Fabaceae - is one of the most useful native Mediterranean trees. There is no data about the chromatography methods performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for determining polyphenols in Egyptian carob pods. Objective: To establish a sensitive and specific liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization (ESI)-tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) methodology for the identification of th...

  1. Locust bean gum as an alternative polymeric coating for embryonic stem cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perestrelo, Ana Rubina; Grenha, Ana; Rosa da Costa, Ana M; Belo, José António

    2014-07-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have self-renewal capacity and the potential to differentiate into any cellular type depending on specific cues (pluripotency) and, therefore, have become a vibrant research area in the biomedical field. ESCs are usually cultured in gelatin or on top of a monolayer of feeder cells such as mitotically inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFsi). The latter is the gold standard support to maintain the ESCs in the pluripotent state. Examples of versatile, non-animal derived and inexpensive materials that are able to support pluripotent ESCs are limited. Therefore, our aim was to find a biomaterial able to support ESC growth in a pluripotent state avoiding laborious and time consuming parallel culture of MEFsi and as simple to handle as gelatin. Many of the new biomaterials used to develop stem cell microenvironments are using natural polymers adsorbed or covalently attached to the surface to improve the biocompatibility of synthetic polymers. Locust beam gum (LBG) is a natural, edible polymer, which has a wide range of potential applications in different fields, such as food and pharmaceutical industry, due to its biocompatibility, adhesiveness and thickening properties. The present work brings a natural system based on the use of LBG as a coating for ESC culture. Undifferentiated mouse ESCs were cultured on commercially available LBG to evaluate its potential in maintaining pluripotent ESCs. In terms of morphology, ESC colonies in LBG presented the regular dome shape with bright borders, similar to the colonies obtained in co-cultures with MEFsi and characteristic of pluripotent ESC colonies. In short-term cultures, ESC proliferation in LBG coating was similar to ESC cultured in gelatin and the cells maintained their viability. The activity of alkaline phosphatase and Nanog, Sox2 and Oct4 expression of mouse ESCs cultured in LBG were comparable or in some cases higher than in ESCs cultured in gelatin. An in vitro

  2. Locust bean gum as an alternative polymeric coating for embryonic stem cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perestrelo, Ana Rubina [Regenerative Medicine Program, Departamento de Ciências Biomédicas e Medicina, Universidade do Algarve (Portugal); IBB - Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine (CBME), Universidade do Algarve (Portugal); PhD Program in Biomedical Sciences, Universidade do Algarve (Portugal); Grenha, Ana [IBB - Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine (CBME), Universidade do Algarve (Portugal); Rosa da Costa, Ana M. [Centro de Investigação em Química do Algarve (CIQA) and Departamento de Química e Farmácia, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade do Algarve (Portugal); Belo, José António, E-mail: jose.belo@fcm.unl.pt [Regenerative Medicine Program, Departamento de Ciências Biomédicas e Medicina, Universidade do Algarve (Portugal); IBB - Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine (CBME), Universidade do Algarve (Portugal); Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campo Mártires da Pátria 130, 1169-056 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-07-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have self-renewal capacity and the potential to differentiate into any cellular type depending on specific cues (pluripotency) and, therefore, have become a vibrant research area in the biomedical field. ESCs are usually cultured in gelatin or on top of a monolayer of feeder cells such as mitotically inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFsi). The latter is the gold standard support to maintain the ESCs in the pluripotent state. Examples of versatile, non-animal derived and inexpensive materials that are able to support pluripotent ESCs are limited. Therefore, our aim was to find a biomaterial able to support ESC growth in a pluripotent state avoiding laborious and time consuming parallel culture of MEFsi and as simple to handle as gelatin. Many of the new biomaterials used to develop stem cell microenvironments are using natural polymers adsorbed or covalently attached to the surface to improve the biocompatibility of synthetic polymers. Locust beam gum (LBG) is a natural, edible polymer, which has a wide range of potential applications in different fields, such as food and pharmaceutical industry, due to its biocompatibility, adhesiveness and thickening properties. The present work brings a natural system based on the use of LBG as a coating for ESC culture. Undifferentiated mouse ESCs were cultured on commercially available LBG to evaluate its potential in maintaining pluripotent ESCs. In terms of morphology, ESC colonies in LBG presented the regular dome shape with bright borders, similar to the colonies obtained in co-cultures with MEFsi and characteristic of pluripotent ESC colonies. In short-term cultures, ESC proliferation in LBG coating was similar to ESC cultured in gelatin and the cells maintained their viability. The activity of alkaline phosphatase and Nanog, Sox2 and Oct4 expression of mouse ESCs cultured in LBG were comparable or in some cases higher than in ESCs cultured in gelatin. An in vitro

  3. Locust bean gum as an alternative polymeric coating for embryonic stem cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have self-renewal capacity and the potential to differentiate into any cellular type depending on specific cues (pluripotency) and, therefore, have become a vibrant research area in the biomedical field. ESCs are usually cultured in gelatin or on top of a monolayer of feeder cells such as mitotically inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFsi). The latter is the gold standard support to maintain the ESCs in the pluripotent state. Examples of versatile, non-animal derived and inexpensive materials that are able to support pluripotent ESCs are limited. Therefore, our aim was to find a biomaterial able to support ESC growth in a pluripotent state avoiding laborious and time consuming parallel culture of MEFsi and as simple to handle as gelatin. Many of the new biomaterials used to develop stem cell microenvironments are using natural polymers adsorbed or covalently attached to the surface to improve the biocompatibility of synthetic polymers. Locust beam gum (LBG) is a natural, edible polymer, which has a wide range of potential applications in different fields, such as food and pharmaceutical industry, due to its biocompatibility, adhesiveness and thickening properties. The present work brings a natural system based on the use of LBG as a coating for ESC culture. Undifferentiated mouse ESCs were cultured on commercially available LBG to evaluate its potential in maintaining pluripotent ESCs. In terms of morphology, ESC colonies in LBG presented the regular dome shape with bright borders, similar to the colonies obtained in co-cultures with MEFsi and characteristic of pluripotent ESC colonies. In short-term cultures, ESC proliferation in LBG coating was similar to ESC cultured in gelatin and the cells maintained their viability. The activity of alkaline phosphatase and Nanog, Sox2 and Oct4 expression of mouse ESCs cultured in LBG were comparable or in some cases higher than in ESCs cultured in gelatin. An in vitro

  4. Biogenic green synthesis of monodispersed gum kondagogu (Cochlospermum gossypium) iron nanocomposite material and its application in germination and growth of mung bean (Vigna radiata) as a plant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Dugyala; Mehta, Urmil J; Beedu, Sashidhar Rao

    2016-06-01

    An eco-friendly green and one-pot synthesis of highly monodispersed iron (Fe) nanoparticles (NPs) by using a natural biopolymer, gum kondagogu (GK) as reducing and capping agent is proposed. The NPs synthesised were characterised by ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. As the concentration of gum and time increases, the intensity of NPs formation increased. The NPs were highly monodispersed with uniform circular shapes of 2-6 nm in size. The formed NPs were crystalline in nature which was confirmed by diffraction analysis. The conversion ratio of Fe ionic form to NPs was 21% which was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Fe is essential for plant growth and development. A study was conducted to examine the effect of these NPs on the growth of mung bean (Vigna radiata). The radical length and biomass was increased in seeds exposed to Fe NPs than the ions. The uptake of Fe NPs by the sprouts was also quantified by ICP-MS, in which Fe was more in mung bean seeds exposed to NPs. The α-amylase activity was increased in the seeds exposed to NPs. The observed increase in the biomass by Fe NPs and seed germination may facilitate its application in the agriculture as an important cost-effective method for plant growth. PMID:27256894

  5. Effect of high-pressure treatment on the structural and rheological properties of resistant corn starch/locust bean gum mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Raza; Vatankhah, Hamed; Singh, Ajaypal; Ramaswamy, Hosahalli S

    2016-10-01

    In this study, effects of a 30min high pressure (HP) treatment (200-600MPa) at room temperature on the rheological, thermal and morphological properties of resistant corn starch (RS) (5% w/w) and locust bean gum (LBG) (0.25, 0.50 and 1.0% w/v) dispersions were evaluated. Results showed that the storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G''), and apparent viscosity values of starch/gum (RS/LBG) mixtures were enhanced with an increase pressure level, and demonstrated a bi-phasic behavior. HP treated RS/LBG samples were predominantly either solid like (G'>G'') or viscous (G''>G'), depending on the pressure level and LBG concentrations. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis of the pressurized mixtures showed a major effect on gelatinization temperatures (To, Tp,), and it was observed that RS/LBG mixtures gelatinized completely at ≥400MPa with a 30min holding time. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images confirmed that at 600MPa, RS/LBG mixtures retained granular structures and their complete disintegration was not observed even at the endpoint of the gelatinization. PMID:27312641

  6. The effect of locust bean gum (LBG)-based edible coatings carrying biocontrol yeasts against Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum causal agents of postharvest decay of mandarin fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parafati, Lucia; Vitale, Alessandro; Restuccia, Cristina; Cirvilleri, Gabriella

    2016-09-01

    Strains belonging to Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Aureobasidium pullulans species were tested in vitro as biocontrol agents (BCAs) against the post-harvest pathogenic molds Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum. Moreover, studies aimed at screening the antifungal activity of selected yeast strains in vivo conditions against P. digitatum and P. italicum, and investigated the efficacy of a polysaccharidic matrix, locust bean gum (LBG), enriched with the tested BCAs, in controlling postharvest decays in artificially inoculated mandarins. The population dynamics of BCAs on wounds and the magnitude of peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in fruit tissues were also investigated after treatments of mandarins with antagonistic yeasts. W. anomalus BS91, M. pulcherrima MPR3 and A. pullulans PI1 provided excellent control of postharvest decays caused by P. digitatum and P. italicum on mandarins, both when the yeasts were used alone and in combination with LBG, which enhanced the yeast cell viability over time. Finally, the increased activity of POD and lower decrease in SOD activity in response to BCAs application in mandarin fruits confirmed their involvement in the biocontrol mechanism. PMID:27217363

  7. Nicotine Gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine chewing gum is used to help people stop smoking cigarettes. Nicotine chewing gum should be used together with a smoking cessation ... Nicotine gum is used by mouth as a chewing gum and should not be swallowed. Follow the directions ...

  8. Identification and quantification of the major constituents in Egyptian carob extract by liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa Ibrahim Owis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carob - Ceratonia siliqua L., commonly known as St John's-bread or locust bean, family Fabaceae - is one of the most useful native Mediterranean trees. There is no data about the chromatography methods performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC for determining polyphenols in Egyptian carob pods. Objective: To establish a sensitive and specific liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization (ESI-tandem mass spectrometry (MSn methodology for the identification of the major constituents in Egyptian carob extract. Materials and Methods: HPLC with diode array detector and ESI-mass spectrometry (MS was developed for the identification and quantification of phenolic acids, flavonoid glycosides, and aglycones in the methanolic extract of Egyptian C. siliqua. The MS and MSn data together with HPLC retention time of phenolic components allowed structural characterization of these compounds. Peak integration of ions in the MS scans had been used in the quantification technique. Results: A total of 36 compounds were tentatively identified. Twenty-six compounds were identified in the negative mode corresponding to 85.4% of plant dry weight, while ten compounds were identified in the positive mode representing 16.1% of plant dry weight, with the prevalence of flavonoids (75.4% of plant dry weight predominantly represented by two methylapigenin-O-pentoside isomers (20.9 and 13.7% of plant dry weight. Conclusion: The identification of various compounds present in carob pods opens a new door to an increased understanding of the different health benefits brought about by the consumption of carob and its products.

  9. Gum biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - gingiva (gums) ... used to close the opening created for the biopsy. ... to eat for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Risks for this procedure include: Bleeding from the biopsy site Infection of the gums Soreness

  10. Tragacanth gum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anne S.; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Gavlighi, Hassan Ahmadi

    2013-01-01

    Tragacanth gum is a plant derived hydrocolloid that has a long history of use in food, pharma, and cosmetics. The gum is mainly produced in the Middle East and permitted for food use in the US and Europe. Tragacanth gum consists of complex, heterogeneous polysaccharides, which contain different...... highly substituted pectin-like structural elements. Enzymatically produced low molecular- weight fractions of tragacanth gum exhibit potential prebiotic activity by promoting growth in vitro of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis strains. These findings may lead to new uses of this gum for production...... of value-added prebiotic compounds for functional foods....

  11. Gas chromatographic determination of polysaccharide gums in foods after hydrolysis and derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J F; Iyengar, J R

    1985-12-20

    A gas chromatographic method was evaluated for the determination of food grade gums in dairy products, salad dressings and meat sauces. The gums studied were tragacanth, karaya, ghatti, carob, guar, arabic and xanthan gum. The extraction method included removal of fat followed by starch degradation then precipitation of protein. The isolated gums were hydrolysed with trifluoroacetic acid and the resulting neutral monosaccharides converted to their aldonitrile acetate derivatives for determination by gas chromatography. Recoveries from thirteen different commodities averaged 85%. However, the recovery of guar gum from ice cream and cold pack cheese was 42 and 50%, respectively. In a comparison of enzyme hydrolysis and iodine complexation for the removal of starch the former was simpler and provided cleaner extracts than the iodine treatment. Both gave similar results. PMID:4093481

  12. Tragacanth gum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anne S.; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Gavlighi, Hassan Ahmadi

    2013-01-01

    highly substituted pectin-like structural elements. Enzymatically produced low molecular- weight fractions of tragacanth gum exhibit potential prebiotic activity by promoting growth in vitro of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis strains. These findings may lead to new uses of this gum for production...... of value-added prebiotic compounds for functional foods....

  13. Effects of various treatments on seed germination and growth of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) plays an important role in Mediterranean landscape. It is commercially propagated by grafting which requires the generation of seedlings. However, its seeds are very recalcitrant and need pretreatment for germination. In this study, carob seeds harvested from both wild a...

  14. Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration in carob ( Ceratonia siliqua L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Canhoto, Jorge; Rama, Sandra; Cruz, Gil

    2006-01-01

    Summary Somatic embryos of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) were induced from cotyledonary segments excised from immature seeds when cultured on Murashige and Skoog media supplemented with several combinations of 6-benzylaminopurine (BA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). The best frequencies of induction (33.8%) were obtained when 4.4 µM BA and 0.5 µM IBA were used. Shoots were also sporadically formed in the same media. When IBA was replaced by other auxins in the induction media, only a-naphtha...

  15. Investigation on carob seed germination under controlled conditions

    OpenAIRE

    GÜBBÜK, Hamide; GÜNEŞ, Esma; Dilek GÜVEN; Nafiye ADAK

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effects of some pre-treatments on seed germination of wild carob seeds were investigated under two different conditions (germination cabinet and greenhouse). Twenty two pre-treatments were applied to the seeds. Pre-treated and control seeds were placed under dark conditions at 25°C. All treated seeds were germinated at 27°C temperature in the germination cabinet and greenhouse conditions. Seed germination rate was determined according to the pre-treatments for both conditio...

  16. Gum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... embarrassing (like bad breath) to the serious — like pain and tooth loss (which is both embarrassing and serious!). What ... also feed the acids that eat into your tooth enamel. If you have braces, ... certain medicines increase the risk of gum disease. Running yourself ...

  17. Physicochemical and Sensory Evaluation of Sandwich Cookies Made with Carob Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Barroso

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the viability of replacing cocoa by carob powder in the development of sandwich cookies and to evaluate their physicochemical and sensory characteristics. Three formulations were tested: carob sandwich cookies, carob and Textured Soy Protein (TSP sandwich cookies and cocoa sandwich cookies. Some physical analysis was taken such as: weight and diameter, before and after baking. It was also evaluated protein, fatty-acids, fiber, ashes, moisture, carbohydrates and calories. Forty eight judges analyzed the cookies acceptability and purchase intention of the cookies. In physical analyses, a significant difference was observed in weight after baking between the carob cookies and cocoa cookies. Moisture, ash, protein, lipids, calories per portion showed similar chemical characteristics for all the samples. Cocoa cookies presented the highest content of crude fiber. Carob cookies presented highest content of carbohydrate; however Carob and TSP cookies showed the highest content of proteins and the lower content of lipids. The attributes appearance, texture, flavor and global acceptability showed similar characteristics for all the samples. The attributed color showed higher acceptability in Cocoa cookies, nevertheless the purchase intention was similar for all the samples.

  18. Natural Gums as Sustained Release Carriers: Development of Gastroretentive Drug Delivery System of Ziprasidone HCl

    OpenAIRE

    AJ Rajamma; HN, Yogesha; SB Sateesha

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Objective of this study is to show the potential use of natural gums in the development of drug delivery systems. Therefore in this work gastro retentive tablet formulations of ziprasidone HCl were developed using simplex lattice design considering concentration of okra gum, locust bean gum and HPMC K4M as independent variables. A response surface plot and multiple regression equations were used to evaluate the effect of independent variables on hardness, flag time, floati...

  19. What Happens to Swallowed Gum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is harmless. What Exactly Happens to the Gum? Chewing gum is made of either natural or synthetic materials ( ... Too much of anything can be a problem. Chewing gum is hard on dental work and most gums ...

  20. 21 CFR 133.178 - Pasteurized neufchatel cheese spread with other foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... foods. 133.178 Section 133.178 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... in paragraph (a) of this section are: (1)(i) One or any mixture of two or more of the following: Gum karaya, gum tragacanth, carob bean gum, gelatin, algin (sodium alginate), propylene glycol alginate,...

  1. Investigation on carob seed germination under controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamide GÜBBÜK

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of some pre-treatments on seed germination of wild carob seeds were investigated under two different conditions (germination cabinet and greenhouse. Twenty two pre-treatments were applied to the seeds. Pre-treated and control seeds were placed under dark conditions at 25°C. All treated seeds were germinated at 27°C temperature in the germination cabinet and greenhouse conditions. Seed germination rate was determined according to the pre-treatments for both conditions. The results showed that if the seeds were soaked in pure (98 % or diluted sulphuric acid (H2SO4, 40 %, 90 % for 30 minutes then kept in water for 2 days or just soaking the seeds in H2SO4 sulfuric acid for 30 minute gave the best results in terms of seed germination as the seed germination rate was over 90 %. The lowest germination rate under both conditions was observed in the control and soaking the seeds in 60 % H2SO4 for 30 minutes. On the other hands, seeds soaked in 60 % H2SO4 and then kept in water for 2 days did not germinate as they lost germination ability. The highest germination rates were recorded after ten days of pre-treatments in both conditions.

  2. Gum (Periodontal) Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forms of gum disease are gingivitis and periodontitis. Gingivitis and Periodontitis In gingivitis, the gums become red, swollen and can bleed easily. Gingivitis can usually be reversed with daily brushing and ...

  3. Gum Disease in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Periodontist Gum Disease In Children Chronic gingivitis. aggressive periodontitis and generalized aggressive periodontitis are types ... children. Types of periodontal diseases in children Chronic gingivitis is common in children. It usually causes gum ...

  4. Characterization of Confectionery Spreadable Creams Based on Roasted Sunflower Kernels and Cocoa or Carob Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Racolta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available CSpreadable creams are solid-oil suspensions, a mix of fats represents the oil phase, the dispersed phase consisting usually of sugar, cocoa powder, milled and roasted nuts, dried milk and whey. For improving the viscosity of the final product emulsifiers are used, most common being lecithin and mono and diglycerides. The present paper refers to a spreadable confectionery product group, creamy, proper to be eaten as it is, as well as spread on a bread slice or as a filling for cookies or chocolate cream. According to this work, the following ingredients were used: roasted sunflower kernels, sugar, palm oil, cocoa or carob powder and lecithin. The obtained product can be consumed also by persons who suffer from allergies, due the fact that sunflower seeds were replacing the peanuts or almond, the ingredients known as allergens and which are usually used in the technological process of obtaining these creams. The purpose of this study was to characterize the obtaining confectionery spreadable creams based on sunflower kernels, cocoa or carob powder. It was determined the chemical composition of the prototypes obtained, a spreadable cream having no cocoa or carob, one with cocoa and one with carob powder. The antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content of the obtained samples were also assessed.

  5. Optimization of low sulfur carob pulp liquor as carbon source for fossil fuels biodesulfurization

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Tiago P.; Paixão, Susana M.; Teixeira, A. V.; Roseiro, J. Carlos; Alves, Luís Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background:Biodesulfurization (BDS) is a complementary technology to hydrodesulfurization since it allows the removal of recalcitrant sulfur compounds present in fossil fuels. The cost of culture medium to produce the biocatalysts is still one limitation for BDS application. Carob pulp, as an alternative carbon source, can reduce this cost. However, the presence of sulfates is critical, since BDS is inhibited at very low concentrations. Thus, the goal of this work was to optimize the process ...

  6. Carob Pods (Ceratonia siliqua L.) as a Source of Polyphenolic Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitris P. Makris; Kefalas, Panagiotis

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of utilising chopped and deseeded carob pods (kibbles) as a source of polyphenolic antioxidants was examined by performing extractions with various solvent systems, in order to evaluate and optimize the conditions for the recovery of polyphenols. Maximum quantities of polyphenolic components were found in 80 % acetone extracts, as evaluated by measuring total polyphenol and total flavanol content. By contrast, ethyl acetate was inefficient in extracting polyphenols. The assess...

  7. The Economic Effect of a Daily Supplementation of carob pods (Ceratonia siliqua L.,) on Rumen Fermentation and Lactating Goats Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ayman A. Hassan; Mohamed H.Yacout; Mohamed S. Khalel; Turek Rahoveanu Adrian; Mocuta Dorina; Turek Rahoveanu Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effect of a daily supplementation of carob pods (Ceratonia siliqua L.,) on rumen fermentation and milk production of goats. Thirty two lactating does (weight ranged from 33�35 kg), aged 2-4 years old and from 2nd to 3th lactation season were randomly allocated into four similar groups (8 animals each). The animals were fed with isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets. Carob pods was daily supplemented at the rate of 0, 25, 50 or 100g /h/d. The la...

  8. Antibacterial activity of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) extracts against phytopathogenic bacteria Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziani, Saïda; Oomah, B Dave; Zaidi, Farid; Simon-Levert, Annabel; Bertrand, Cédric; Zaidi-Yahiaoui, Rachida

    2015-01-01

    Acetone and ethanol extracts of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) leaf and pods were evaluated for their in vitro inhibitory ability against the pectinolytic Gram negative Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pca, CFBP-5384) bacteria, the causal agent of potato soft rot. Potato (Solanum tuberosum, var nicola) tuber rot tissues obtained after 5 day bacterial inoculation was analyzed by LC-MS and GC-MS to study Pca pathogenicity. Trans/cis N-feruloylputrescine was identified in potato tuber after 5-day inoculation with Pca in a dark moist chamber. Although glycoalkoloid (α-chaconine and α-solanine) production increased due to Pca soft rot infection, it was not a resistance-determining factor. Many secondary metabolites were identified including the phytoalexins solavetivone and fatty acids responsible for plant defence responses. Acetone extract of carob leaf (FCA) exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect (IC50 = 1.5 mg/ml) and displayed synergistic antimicrobial effect in the presence of infected potato tuber extract (Pdt-Pca extract) against Pca. This synergy could be used in an integrated control program against potato soft rot pathogens, thereby reducing chemical treatments. PMID:25489722

  9. Effect of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) flour on the antioxidant potential, nutritional quality, and sensory characteristics of fortified durum wheat pasta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sęczyk, Łukasz; Świeca, Michał; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a study on the effect of carob flour addition from 1% to 5% (w/w) on phenolics content, antioxidant activity, nutritional quality, and sensory attributes of wheat pasta. An increase of about 2-folds, 18-folds and 3-folds in phenolics content, antiradical activity and reducing power for pasta fortified with 5% of carob flour was observed, respectively, compared to the control. Expected glycemic index (eGI) was increased proportionally to the substitution level and ranged between 72.2 and 83.9 for 1-5% of supplement, respectively. Furthermore, pasta fortification affected the in vitro bioaccessibility of nutrients. In case of 5% supplemented pasta, the digestibility of starch and protein decreased by about 9% compared to the control. The replacement of semolina with carob flour from 1% to 5% had no significant effect on pasta sensory attributes. In conclusion, carob flour seems to be a promising functional ingredient for pasta fortification. PMID:26471602

  10. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Xanthan gum. 172.695 Section 172.695 Food and Drugs..., Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.695 Xanthan gum. The food additive xanthan gum may be... 1.02 to 1.45. (3) Positive for xanthan gum when subjected to the following procedure: Locust...

  11. MEDICATED CHEWING GUMS- UPDATED REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Naik Heema

    2010-01-01

    Chewing gums are mobile drug delivery systems. It is a potentially useful means of administering drugs either locally or systemically via, the oral cavity. The medicated chewing gum has through the years gained increasing acceptance as a drug delivery system. Several ingredients are now incorporated in medicated chewing gum, e.g. Fluoride for prophylaxis of dental caries, chlorhexidine as local disinfectant, nicotine for smoking cessation, aspirin as an analgesic, and caffeine as a stay alert...

  12. Biological control against the carob moth Ectomyelois ceratoniae in oases and in packing houses in Tunisia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carob moth, Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller is abundant in the Mediterranean countries. It attacks various dry fruit in cultures or in stored products, notably pomegranate, Punica granatum L.; date palm, Phoenis dactylifera L. plantations; citrus, Citrus spp., apricot, Prunus armeniaca L. and pistachios, Pistachio vera. We can find E. ceratoniae in the north as well as in the south of Tunisia, especially in central zones and Saharan areas where caterpillar infestations can reach 90% of pomegranate fruit and 20% of dates (Dhouibi 1991). To reduce this damage, several control methods have been experimented. Chemical control is the most effective means of control against pests. However, against this species, insecticides seem to be difficult and randomly used, due to the endophytic behaviour of the pyralid and the position of the fruit on the pomegranate tree. Moreover, this method has very ominous repercussions on biological cadence. Besides, it is necessary to look for other control means to allow the preservation of the ecosystem. In Tunisia, several efforts have been directed at biological control, by using local parasitoids and through usage of the bio-insecticides mainly Bacillus thuringiensis (Dhouibi 1992, 1994, Dhouibi and Jemmasi 1993). In order to substitute the chemical control and to strengthen the integrated control, other possibilities can be envisaged, for example, the genetic method or the autocidal control, that is, based on mass rearing and the substerile male releases into the natural population. For the purpose, it provokes the sterility to ulterior generations and evaluates the impact of irradiation on the different biological parameters of emerged adults from treated nymphs and their competitiveness. Dhouibi and Omran (1995) and Dhouibi and Tijani (1996) have studied the mass rearing of the carob moth pyralid on an artificial diet and the effect of different irradiation doses, especially a substerilising dose, on E. ceratoniae pupae

  13. 21 CFR 184.1349 - Karaya gum (sterculia gum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), p. 157... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Karaya gum (sterculia gum). 184.1349 Section 184.1349 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  14. The Economic Effect of a Daily Supplementation of carob pods (Ceratonia siliqua L., on Rumen Fermentation and Lactating Goats Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman A. Hassan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was performed to investigate the effect of a daily supplementation of carob pods (Ceratonia siliqua L., on rumen fermentation and milk production of goats. Thirty two lactating does (weight ranged from 33�35 kg, aged 2-4 years old and from 2nd to 3th lactation season were randomly allocated into four similar groups (8 animals each. The animals were fed with isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets. Carob pods was daily supplemented at the rate of 0, 25, 50 or 100g /h/d. The lactating trial was extended for 75 days where goats were fed individually and fresh water was available at all time. Rumen fermentation parameters were monitored on three fistulated adult does. Results indicated that volatile fatty acids concentration, rumen volume, microbial protein synthesis and total bacteria counts were highest (P<0.05 with C50 group compared with other groups. While, ammonia-N concentration and protozoa count were lower (P<0.05 with C100 group compared with other groups. Milk production, protein and fat percentage were better (P<0.05 for C50 and C25 groups than those of C100 group. Supplementation of Carob pods at 50 g caused a marked (P<0.05 increase in the enzymatic antioxidant activity (SOD, CAT, GPx, and GSH but had a significant decrease (P<0.05 in TBARS compared to control group. Thus, it could be concluded that daily supplement of 50 g carob pods could be reasonable amount for goats performance without any adverse effect.

  15. Volatile Compounds and Sensory Evaluation of Spreadable Creams Based on Roasted Sunflower Kernels and Cocoa or Carob Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Racolța

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The known confectionery spreadable cream product category includes well-known cocoa - hazelnut pastes as well as peanut butter, products that became very popular in the last decades due to their pleasant taste and ease of eating. However, health constraints appeared both hazelnut and peanut are food allergens, while cocoa excites central nervous system (CNS and on everyday consumption causes dependence. The aim of this work was to characterize the aroma and sensory of an innovative product that belongs to the same confectionery spreadable cream product category. Six spreadable cream prototypes were produced by using sugar, roasted sunflower kernel, carob or cocoa powder, palm or coconut fat and, lecithin. The obtained samples were firstly analyzed by using the nine point hedonic scale test. The volatile compounds profile analysis (“In Tube Extraction”- GC-MS was performed on the best samples (in terms of sensory containing cocoa or carob powder, as well as a control. The main volatile compound of all three samples was pinene (42-51% which is a characteristic flavor of turpentine, wood. Acetophenone instead (20-25% gives flavors of almond, floral, sweetish. Benzaldehyde (8.11-9.73% is characteristic for almond flavor with hints of caramel. The study revealed that the analyzed spreadable creams have similar volatile profiles, even if carob and cocoa powder showed different volatile compounds profiles, with the major compound for both being Propanoic acid, 2-methyl. Thus, with similar taste to cocoa sample, carob-sunflower spreadable cream is an alternative that not include ingredients with allergic potential or CNS stimulants. 

  16. Chewing gums for optimal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Madan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article elaborates on the general aspects and health benefits of chewing gum. Chewing gums have been used since the time of prehistoric man as a source of entertainment and relaxation. It has also become a trendsetter with the teenagers. Currently, the health benefits of chewing gums are being studied and used in the treatment of various diseases. Certain medications have also been included in gums to act as an alternative drug delivery system. These gums have been found to be successful for the treatment of diseases, such as peptic ulcers, upper digestive tract cancer, oral candidiasis, and so on. It helps to relieve symptoms of xerostomia, Parkinsonism, tooth sensitivity after bleaching, and oral malodor. It helps in maintaining oral health, relieves stress, helps in weight loss, and improves alertness. Chewing gum may be distracting and irritating in numerous social environments, including schools, colleges, and the workplace. Research into the social effects of chewing gums is also necessary to further our knowledge into the psychosocial aspects of these gums.

  17. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Gum ghatti. 184.1333 Section 184.1333 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1333 Gum ghatti. (a) Gum ghatti (Indian gum) is an exudate from wounds...

  18. Production of Gum from Cashew Tree Latex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. AZEEZ

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at producing gum from cashew tree latex, which can act as substitute for gum Arabic. The method used include drying and size reduction of the exudates gum, sieving of the gum to remove impurities, dissolution of the gum in distilled water, filtration to remove polysaccharide waste and finally concentration and stability of the gum. Glycerine, starch and Zinc oxide are some of the additives used in stabilizing the gum. The pH and Viscosity on addition of various percentage concentration of stabilizing agent were determined. Gum of the best quality was obtained with viscosity and pH of 4.52 Ns/m2 and 4.2 respectively; this is because the natural pH of gum from Acacia Senegal ranges between 3.9 - 4.9. The gum can be used as an alternative for synthetic adhesive used presently for stamps and envelopes.

  19. Chlorhexidine-containing chewing gum. Clinical documentation

    OpenAIRE

    Imfeld, T

    2006-01-01

    A clinical documentation on chlorhexidine containing chewing gum is presented on the occasion of the launch of CHewX, a chewing gum containing 5 mg of chlorhexidine diacetate in Switzerland. Following an overview on functional chewing gum, the mechanism of action of chlorhexidine (CHX), its toxicity and safety are summarized and a review of clinical studies performed with CHX-containing chewing gum given. Indication, dosage, precautions and benefits of CHX chewing gum are described.

  20. Nanodisturbances in deformed Gum Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematic experiments have been performed to characterize defect structures in deformed Gum Metal, a special titanium alloy with high strength, low Young's modulus, excellent cold workability and low resistance to shear in certain crystallographic planes. Results from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy characterization reveal nanodisturbances (planar nanoscopic areas of local shear) as typical elements of defect structures in deformed Gum Metal. A theoretical model is suggested describing nanodisturbances as nanoscale dipoles of non-conventional partial dislocations with arbitrary, non-quantized Burgers vectors. It is shown theoretically that the homogeneous generation of nanodisturbances is energetically favorable in Gum Metal, where they effectively carry plastic flow

  1. Natural gums as sustained release carriers: development of gastroretentive drug delivery system of ziprasidone HCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Rajamma

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objective of this study is to show the potential use of natural gums in the development of drug delivery systems. Therefore in this work gastro retentive tablet formulations of ziprasidone HCl were developed using simplex lattice design considering concentration of okra gum, locust bean gum and HPMC K4M as independent variables. A response surface plot and multiple regression equations were used to evaluate the effect of independent variables on hardness, flag time, floating time and drug release for 1 h, 2 h, and 8 h and for 24 h. A checkpoint batch was also prepared by considering the constraints and desirability of optimized formulation to improve its in vitro performance. Significance of result was analyzed using ANOVA and p was considered statistically significant. Results Formulation chiefly contains locust bean gum found to be favorable for hardness and floatability but combined effect of three variables was responsible for the sustained release of drug. The in vitro drug release data of check point batch (F8 was found to be sustained well compared to the most satisfactory formulation (F7 of 7 runs. The ‘n’ value was found to be between 0.5 and 1 suggesting that release of drug follows anomalous (non-fickian diffusion mechanism indicating both diffusion and erosion mechanism from these natural gums. Predicted results were almost similar to the observed experimental values indicating the accuracy of the design. In vivo floatability test indicated non adherence to the gastric mucosa and tablets remain buoyant for more than 24 h. Conclusions Study showed these eco-friendly natural gums can be considered as promising SR polymers.

  2. Natural Gums as Sustained Release Carriers: Development of Gastroretentive Drug Delivery System of Ziprasidone HCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamma AJ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background:Objective of this study is to show the potential use of natural gums in the development of drug delivery systems. Therefore in this work gastro retentive tablet formulations of ziprasidone HCl were developed using simplex lattice design considering concentration of okra gum, locust bean gum and HPMC K4M as independent variables. A response surface plot and multiple regression equations were used to evaluate the effect of independentvariables on hardness, flag time, floating time and drug release for 1h, 2h, and 8h and for 24h.A checkpoint batch was also prepared by considering the constraints and desirability of optimized formulation to improve its in vitro performance. Significance of result was analyzed using ANOVA and p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results:Formulation chiefly contains locust bean gum found to be favorable for hardness and floatability but combined effect of three variables was responsible for the sustained release of drug. The in vitro drug release data of check point batch (F8 was found to be sustained well compared to the most satisfactory formulation (F7 of 7 runs. The „n‟ value was found to be between 0.5 and 1 suggesting that release of drug follows anomalous (non-fickian diffusionmechanism indicating both diffusion and erosion mechanism from these natural gums.Predicted results were almost similar to the observed experimental values indicating the accuracy of the design. In vivo floatability test indicated non adherence to the gastric mucosaand tablets remain buoyant for more than 24h.Conclusions:Study showed these eco-friendly natural gums can be considered as promising SR polymers.

  3. Growth kinetics and physiological behavior of co-cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis, fermenting carob sugars extracted with whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, B; Lima-Costa, M E; Constantino, A; Raposo, S; Felizardo, C; Gonçalves, D; Fernandes, T; Dionísio, L; Peinado, J M

    2016-10-01

    Alcoholic fermentation of carob waste sugars (sucrose, glucose and fructose) extracted with cheese whey, by co-cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis has been analyzed. Growth and fermentation of S. cerevisiae in the carob-whey medium showed an inhibition of about 30% in comparison with water-extracted carob. The inhibition of K. lactis on carob-whey was greater (70%) when compared with the whey medium alone, due to osmolarity problems. Oxygen availability was a very important factor for K. lactis, influencing its fermentation performance. When K. lactis was grown alone on carob-whey medium, lactose was always consumed first, and glucose and fructose were consumed afterwards, only at high aeration conditions. In co-culture with S. cerevisiae, K. lactis was completely inhibited and, at low aeration, died after 3 days; at high aeration this culture could survive but growth and lactose fermentation were only recovered after S. cerevisiae became stationary. To overcome the osmolarity and K. lactis' oxygen problems, the medium had to be diluted and a sequential fermentative process was designed in a STR-3l reactor. K. lactis was inoculated first and, with low aeration (0.13vvm), consumed all the lactose in 48h. Then S. cerevisiae was inoculated, consuming the total of the carob sugars, and producing ethanol in a fed-batch regime. The established co-culture with K. lactis increased S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerance. This fermentation process produced ethanol with good efficiency (80g/l final concentration and a conversion factor of 0.4g ethanol/g sugar), eliminating all the sugars of the mixed waste. These efficient fermentative results pointed to a new joint treatment of agro-industrial wastes which may be implemented successfully, with economic and environmental sustainability for a bioethanol industrial proposal. PMID:27542743

  4. Dispelling Myths about Gum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Leadership History Employment Opportunities Find a Periodontist Dispelling Myths about Gum Disease: The Truth Behind Healthy Teeth ... Dr. Low. “Unfortunately, there are a variety of myths surrounding periodontal disease and its repercussions.” In order ...

  5. Mannitol production by lactic acid bacteria grown in supplemented carob syrup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalheiro, Florbela; Moniz, Patrícia; Duarte, Luís C; Esteves, M Paula; Gírio, Francisco M

    2011-01-01

    Detailed kinetic and physiological characterisation of eight mannitol-producing lactic acid bacteria, Leuconostoc citreum ATCC 49370, L. mesenteroides subsp. cremoris ATCC19254, L. mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum ATCC 19255, L. ficulneum NRRL B-23447, L. fructosum NRRL B-2041, L. lactis ATCC 19256, Lactobacillus intermedius NRRL 3692 and Lb. reuteri DSM 20016, was performed using a carob-based culture medium, to evaluate their different metabolic capabilities. Cultures were thoroughly followed for 30 h to evaluate consumption of sugars, as well as production of biomass and metabolites. All strains produced mannitol at high yields (>0.70 g mannitol/g fructose) and volumetric productivities (>1.31 g/l h), and consumed fructose and glucose simultaneously, but fructose assimilation rate was always higher. The results obtained enable the studied strains to be divided mainly into two groups: one for which glucose assimilation rates were below 0.78 g/l h (strains ATCC 49370, ATCC 19256 and ATCC 19254) and the other for which they ranged between 1.41 and 1.89 g/l h (strains NRRL B-3692, NRRL B-2041, NRRL B-23447 and DSM 20016). These groups also exhibited different mannitol production rates and yields, being higher for the strains with faster glucose assimilation. Besides mannitol, all strains also produced lactic acid and acetic acid. The best performance was obtained for L. fructosum NRRL B-2041, with maximum volumetric productivity of 2.36 g/l h and the highest yield, stoichiometric conversion of fructose to mannitol. PMID:20820868

  6. Mind Your Mouth: Preventing Gum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Mind Your Mouth Preventing Gum Disease If you have ... day. search Features Can We Prevent Alzheimer's Disease? Mind Your Mouth Wise Choices Links To Prevent Gum ...

  7. Periodontal (Gum) Disease: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dental hygienist can remove tartar. Back to top Gingivitis The longer plaque and tartar are on teeth, ... cause inflammation of the gums that is called “gingivitis.” In gingivitis, the gums become red, swollen and ...

  8. Tips for Removing Gum without Cutting Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hair There is no need to worry if chewing gum gets stuck in your child’s hair. Simply follow ... butter, the oils in the product make the chewing gum base stiffer and less sticky. Wait a few ...

  9. 21 CFR 573.1010 - Xanthan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Xanthan gum. 573.1010 Section 573.1010 Food and... Listing § 573.1010 Xanthan gum. The food additive xanthan gum may be safely used in animal feed as follows: (a) The food additive is xanthan gum as defined in § 172.695 of this chapter and meets all of...

  10. A six-arm olfactometer for analysing olfactory responses of Goniozus legneri Gordh (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae, the larval ectoparasitoid of carob moth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aleosfoor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The behavioural responses of Goniozus legneri were investigated in a six-arm olfactometer. Among the different odours examined, carob moth (Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller frass elicited the highest olfactory responses, while Ephestisa larvae, which were less suitable hosts, elicited the lowest response. The different preferences to various odours suggest that Goniozus legneri can discriminate among suitable and less suitable insect hosts.

  11. Take Care of Your Teeth and Gums

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teeth and Gums Print This Topic En español Take Care of Your Teeth and Gums Browse Sections The ... The Basics The Basics: Overview It’s important to take care of your teeth and gums. You can prevent ...

  12. Oral health benefits of chewing gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades sugar-free chewing gum has developed in an oral healthcare product, next to the conventional products such as the toothbrush and mouthrinses. In this thesis we investigate the oral health benefits of chewing gum and the effects of additives to chewing gum, such as antimicrobials.

  13. 21 CFR 582.3336 - Gum guaiac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gum guaiac. 582.3336 Section 582.3336 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Gum guaiac. (a) Product. Gum guaiac. (b) Tolerance. 0.1 percent (equivalent antioxidant activity...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1351 - Gum tragacanth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Gum tragacanth. 184.1351 Section 184.1351 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1351 Gum tragacanth. (a) Gum tragacanth is the exudate from one of...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1339 - Guar gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Guar gum. 184.1339 Section 184.1339 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1339 Guar gum. (a) Guar gum is the natural substance obtained from...

  16. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gum arabic. 582.7330 Section 582.7330 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  17. Elastic properties of Gum Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ X-ray diffraction measurements under tensile loading and dynamic mechanical analysis were performed to investigate the mechanisms of elastic deformation in Gum Metal. Tensile stress-strain curves for Gum Metal indicate that cold working substantially decreases the elastic modulus while increasing the yield strength, thereby confirming nonlinearity in the elastic range. The gradient of each curve decreased continuously to about one-third its original value near the elastic limit. As a result of this decrease in elastic modulus and nonlinearity, elastic deformability reaches 2.5% after cold working. Superelasticity is attributed to stress-induced martensitic transformations, although the large elastic deformation in Gum Metal is not accompanied by a phase transformation

  18. The CT appearance of intraoral chewing gum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2008-12-15

    When imaged, intraoral chewing gum has the potential to be misdiagnosed. Chewing gum has a characteristic appearance on CT: it is ovoid in shape, hyperdense, and has small internal locules of air. Reports have described the appearance of gum on radiographs and abdominal CT images; however, no reports could be found detailing its appearance within the mouth. This report describes the appearance of intraoral chewing gum as well as the properties of the gum that lead to this appearance. Because of the potential for misdiagnosis, screening for intraoral foreign bodies should be considered prior to imaging. (orig.)

  19. The CT appearance of intraoral chewing gum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When imaged, intraoral chewing gum has the potential to be misdiagnosed. Chewing gum has a characteristic appearance on CT: it is ovoid in shape, hyperdense, and has small internal locules of air. Reports have described the appearance of gum on radiographs and abdominal CT images; however, no reports could be found detailing its appearance within the mouth. This report describes the appearance of intraoral chewing gum as well as the properties of the gum that lead to this appearance. Because of the potential for misdiagnosis, screening for intraoral foreign bodies should be considered prior to imaging. (orig.)

  20. The effect of sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) and carob pods (Ceratonia siliqua) feeding regimes on the control of lamb coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratsis, A; Voutzourakis, N; Theodosiou, T; Stefanakis, A; Sotiraki, S

    2016-06-01

    Recent research has suggested that plants containing condensed tannins may offer a promising alternative approach for the control of coccidiosis in lambs and goat kids. The present study aimed to examine the potential effect of condensed tannins in sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) and carob pods (Ceratonia siliqua) incorporated in sheep rations against lamb coccidiosis. The above tannin-rich sources were studied in three independent feeding trials in which the animals (naturally infected by Eimeria spp. ewes and their lambs) were allocated (i) in the control group and received a tannin-free diet (lucerne hay), or (ii) in the treatment groups and received a tannin-rich diet based on sainfoin hay (in trials 1 and 2), or in carob pod meal and a combination of carob pod meal and sainfoin hay (in trial 3). In total, 95 newborn lambs (and their 73 ewes) were enrolled in all trials which started a month before lambing and ended 8-10 weeks after lambs were born (at weaning). The course of coccidial infection was monitored in lambs by faecal oocyst counts and consistencies which were recorded at weekly intervals. Moreover, lambs total weight gain was evaluated at the end of each trial. During all trials, 100 % of the animals got naturally infected by Eimeria species and the infection burden was higher in trials 2 and 3 compared to trial 1 but in all cases, severe signs of diarrhoea were not observed. Tannin-rich diets were well accepted by the animals not affecting their feed intake and body weight gain when compared to the controls. The results suggest that incorporation of both tannin-rich resources (especially sainfoin) in sheep rations can reduce Eimeria oocyst excretion rates by the lambs, which can decrease subsequently the contamination of the farm environment with the parasite. However, the high variability noted on the results is not allowing us to draw any definite conclusions at least until the potential of those plants is further investigated. PMID:26920568

  1. Carbohydrate nutrition and anthocyanin accumulation in light grown and etiolated shoot cultures of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinterhalter Branka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of anthocyanins was studied in shoot cultures of carob at high (45.9 μmol s-1m-2 and low (9.2 μmol s-1m-2 irradiance levels and in darkness in relation to carbohydrate nutrition. Anthocyanin production was stimulated by light, but it also occurred in etiolated shoot cultures which developed in darkness. Anthocyanins were present in both leaves and shoot tips. The major factor affecting anthocyanin production was carbohydrate nutrition, with sucrose as a choice superior to fructose and glucose. The carbohydrate effect was clearly osmotic in nature, since anthocyanin production increased even at supraoptimal concentrations detrimental to the growth of shoot cultures. This conclusion was further confirmed in experiments in which sucrose was partly replaced with the sugar alcohols sorbitol and mannitol.

  2. Gum Chewing and Cognition: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Lara Tucha; Janneke Koerts

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there was a debate about the effects of gum chewing on various aspects of cognitive functioning. In this review, the results of previous studies are presented and summarized. There is a clear indication that gum chewing can improve various aspects of cognitive functioning including memory, attention and both executive and intellectual functioning. However, there is also clear evidence that chewing gum during cognitive tasks can adversely affect task performance. Therefore, it...

  3. Gum chewing affects academic performance in adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chewing gum may have an impact on improved memory during specific tasks of recognition and sustained attention. Research objective was to determine the effect of gum chewing on standardized test scores and math class grades of eighth grade students. Four math classes, 108 students, were randomized i...

  4. 21 CFR 582.7339 - Guar gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guar gum. 582.7339 Section 582.7339 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7339 Guar gum....

  5. 21 CFR 582.7333 - Gum ghatti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 582.7333 Section 582.7333 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7333 Gum...

  6. 黄原胶的结构与复配性质研究%Study on structure and complex effect of Xanthan gum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    商飞飞; 王强; 赵学平; 吴莉宇; 仇厚援

    2012-01-01

    Xanthan gum is a kind of widely used food thickeners which is compounded well with other food additives.Structure and properties of Xanthan gum and complex effect with konjac gum,locust bean gum,quar gum,gellan gum,agar etc were summarized.A good synergistic effect was produced by compounding,leading to the improvement of food stability.Besides,gelation's change from brittle to flexible was achieved.%黄原胶是一种用途非常广的食品增稠剂,并且与其他的食品添加剂有很好的复配效应,本文综述了黄原胶的结构与性质,黄原胶与魔芋胶、槐豆胶、瓜尔豆胶、结冷胶、琼脂单体的复配以及黄原胶与两种及两种以上食品增稠剂的复配应用研究。复配产生了良好的协同增效,协同凝胶效应,也使得食品稳定性大大提高,凝胶性由脆到富有弹性的任意转变。

  7. Can leek interfere with bean plant–bean fly interaction?

    OpenAIRE

    Bandara, PB; V Kumar; Ninkovic, Velemir; Ahmed, Elham; Pettersson, Jan; Glinwood, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Effects of volatile odors from leek, Allium porum L., on the behavior of bean ßy, Ophiomyia phaseoli (Tryon) (Diptera: Agromyzidae), were tested in laboratory olfactometer bioassays. Aqueous and solvent extracts (dichloromethane and methanol) of leek were repellent to adult ßies. Whole leek plants were repellent and prevented attraction to the host plant, beans. Beans that had been exposed to volatiles from living leek plants for 7 d became repellent to the ßy. Leek and several...

  8. Brief Report: Gum Chewing Affects Standardized Math Scores in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Craig A.; Tyler, Chermaine; Stansberry, Sandra A.; Moreno, Jennette P.; Foreyt, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Gum chewing has been shown to improve cognitive performance in adults; however, gum chewing has not been evaluated in children. This study examined the effects of gum chewing on standardized test scores and class grades of eighth grade math students. Math classes were randomized to a gum chewing (GC) condition that provided students with gum…

  9. GUAR GUM: PRESENT STATUS AND APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Tripathy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring excipients are currently getting prime importance among which the polysaccharides occupy a special position because of their easy availability, non-toxic, eco-friendly and biodegradable nature. The objective of this review was to explore the excipient profile of Guar gum which is obtained from Cyamopsis tetragonolobus (Linn. Leguminosae. The chief constituent of guar gum is a Gallactomannan which is composed of galactose and mannose in a ratio of 1:2 that provides the main physical phenomenon of gelling or thickening to this gum. The chemistry of this gallactomannan suggested the presence of multiple hydroxyl groups which are proved to be excellent for derivatization by grafting or cross-linking with other polymers to create new chemically modified entity of desired properties. The native as well as guar gum derivatives are found to have therapeutic importance in certain physiological disorders. Guar gum is used as suspending, emulsifying and stabilizing agent in the conventional dosage forms. In tablet dosage form it is used as a potential binding and disintegrating agent. The swelling property of guar gum is used for controlling the drug release rate in the novel pharmaceutical dosage forms. By virtue of its better thickening and stabilizing power accompanied by a sound safety profile, guar gum has acquired a wide acceptance in cosmetics and food industry.

  10. Oral health: Role of chewing gum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnuswamy MANIKANDAN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of dental caries in Brunei Darussalam is highly alarming and dental anxiety in general leads to avoidance of dental care. Since this is an era of preventive dentistry utilising a holistic approach, excellent results could be achieved if preventative methods are regularly used by people in day-to-day life. Gum chewing is increasing dramatically despite racial, cultural and religious taboos against them. Many previously considered chewing sugared gum might increase the cariogenic load. However with better understanding of cariology, it is now perceived by many that chewing sugared gum after meals is safe. Sugarless gum has an important role in preventive dentistry. Chewing gum with incorporation of anti-plaque agents and various drug delivery systems is distinctive as a special confectionary item. This article reviews the historical background of gum chewing, the role of various chewing gums in preventing oral diseases like dental caries and periodontal diseases, its role in the management of xerostomia, hypersensitive teeth and as an alternate to cigarette smoking habit.

  11. The effect of substerilizing doses of gamma radiation on the pupae of the carob moth Ectomyelois ceratoniae (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated various effects of gamma radiation on the carob moth, Ectomyelois ceratoniae, treated with 200-600 Gy at different pupal ages. Irradiation resulted in a decrease of adult emergence. This effect was both dose and age dependent. At 500 and 600 Gy, no pupae developed into normal adults when treated at the age of 4-5 days. Only 6% normal adults emerged when the pupae were treated at the age of 6-7 days with 500 Gy. When 8-9 d old pupae were irradiated with 500 and 600 Gy, 30% and 10% normal adults emerged, respectively. Other emerged moths exhibited various malformations, mostly wing deformities. When pupae were treated with 400 or 500 Gy, fecundity and fertility of both untreated females mated with irradiated males or irradiated females mated with untreated males were drastically reduced. When 9-10 d old pupae were irradiated with 200, 250 and 300 Gy, adult morphology, fecundity, fertility and egg hatch were slightly affected. Mating behaviour of irradiated males also was affected. Competitiveness of males irradiated with sub-sterilizing doses varied depending on irradiation dose and number of insects present in the mating cages. A significant reduction of competitiveness was observed in males treated with ≤300Gy. (author)

  12. Oral health benefits of chewing gum

    OpenAIRE

    Wessel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades sugar-free chewing gum has developed in an oral healthcare product, next to the conventional products such as the toothbrush and mouthrinses. In this thesis we investigate the oral health benefits of chewing gum and the effects of additives to chewing gum, such as antimicrobials. Herein, the focus is on oral bacteria and the oral biofilm, or dental plaque, which is a sticky layer of bacteria that forms on the teeth. Oral bacteria can be divided into good and bad bacteria, ...

  13. Gummed-up memory: Chewing gum impairs short-term recall

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlov, Michail D; Robert W Hughes; Jones, Dylan M.

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that short-term memory is generally improved by chewing gum. However, we report the first studies to show that chewing gum impairs short-term memory for both item order and item identity. Experiment 1 showed that chewing gum reduces serial recall of letter lists. Experiment 2 indicated that chewing does not simply disrupt vocal-articulatory planning required for order retention: Chewing equally impairs a matched task that required retention of list item identity...

  14. Take Care of Your Teeth and Gums

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This Topic En español Take Care of Your Teeth and Gums Browse Sections The Basics Overview Why ... Brushing Tips 4 of 6 sections Take Action: Dental Checkups Get regular checkups at the dentist. Visit ...

  15. Registration of 'Croissant' pinto bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Croissant’ (Reg. No. CV-299, PI 656597), a new medium-maturity (94–98 d) pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar was released by the Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station to provide dry bean producers in the USA with a high-yielding cultivar that combines resistance to rust [caused by Uromyc...

  16. Oral health: Role of chewing gum.

    OpenAIRE

    Ponnuswamy MANIKANDAN; Menaga VENTATACHALAM; Rajappan Raja Rajesh KUMAR

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of dental caries in Brunei Darussalam is highly alarming and dental anxiety in general leads to avoidance of dental care. Since this is an era of preventive dentistry utilising a holistic approach, excellent results could be achieved if preventative methods are regularly used by people in day-to-day life. Gum chewing is increasing dramatically despite racial, cultural and religious taboos against them. Many previously considered chewing sugared gum might increase the cariogenic...

  17. Irradiated cocoa beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groups of 40 male and 40 female CD rats were fed powdered rodent diet containing 25% (w/w) of either non-irradiated, irradiated or fumigated cocoa beans. The diets were supplemented with certain essential dietary constituents designed to satisfy normal nutritional requirements. An additional 40 male and 40 female rats received basal rodent diet alone (ground) and acted as an untreated control. After 70 days of treatment, 15 male and 15 female rats from each group were used to assess reproductive function of the F0 animals and growth and development of the F1 offspring up to weaning; the remaining animals were killed after 91 days of treatment. (orig.)

  18. Placebo controlled trial of nicotine chewing gum in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Jamrozik, K; Fowler, G; Vessey, M; Wald, N

    1984-01-01

    Of 2110 adult cigarette smokers originally recruited to a study of the effect of antismoking advice in general practice, 429 who reported at follow up after one year that they had tried unsuccessfully to stop smoking were offered "a special antismoking chewing gum," either nicotine gum or a placebo gum, in a double blind study. Of 200 who were willing to try the gum, 101 were randomly allocated to the nicotine gum and 99 to the placebo gum. They were followed up at six months by an unannounce...

  19. Rheological and interfacial properties at the equilibrium of almond gum tree exudate (Prunus dulcis) in comparison with gum arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudhi, Nesrine; Sessa, Mariarenata; Ferrari, Giovanna; Hamdi, Salem; Donsi, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Almond gum contains an arabinogalactan-type polysaccharide, which plays an important role in defining its interfacial and rheological properties. In this study, rheological and interfacial properties of almond gum and gum arabic aqueous dispersions were comparatively investigated. The interfacial tension of almond gum and gum arabic aqueous dispersions was measured using the pendant drop method in hexadecane. The asymptotic interfacial tension values for almond gum were significantly lower than the corresponding values measured for gum arabic, especially at high concentration. Rheological properties were characterized by steady and oscillatory tests using a coaxial geometry. Almond gum flow curves exhibited a shear thinning non-Newtonian behavior with a tendency to a Newtonian plateau at low shear rate, while gum arabic flow curves exhibited such behavior only at high shear rate. The influence of temperature (5-50  ℃) on the flow curves was studied at 4% (m/m) gum concentration and the Newtonian viscosities at infinite and at zero shear rate, for gum arabic and almond gum, respectively, were accurately fitted by an Arrhenius-type equation. The dynamic properties of the two gum dispersions were also studied. Both gum dispersions exhibited viscoelastic properties, with the viscous component being predominant in a wider range of concentrations for almond gum, while for gum arabic the elastic component being higher than the elastic one especially at higher concentrations.The rheological and interfacial tension properties of almond gum suggest that it may represent a possible substitute of gum arabic in different food applications. PMID:26163565

  20. Gummed-up memory: chewing gum impairs short-term recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Michail D; Hughes, Robert W; Jones, Dylan M

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that short-term memory is generally improved by chewing gum. However, we report the first studies to show that chewing gum impairs short-term memory for both item order and item identity. Experiment 1 showed that chewing gum reduces serial recall of letter lists. Experiment 2 indicated that chewing does not simply disrupt vocal-articulatory planning required for order retention: Chewing equally impairs a matched task that required retention of list item identity. Experiment 3 demonstrated that manual tapping produces a similar pattern of impairment to that of chewing gum. These results clearly qualify the assertion that chewing gum improves short-term memory. They also pose a problem for short-term memory theories asserting that forgetting is based on domain-specific interference given that chewing does not interfere with verbal memory any more than tapping. It is suggested that tapping and chewing reduce the general capacity to process sequences. PMID:22150606

  1. Characterization of k-carrageenan/Locust bean gumbased films with b-carotene emulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Joana; Silva, H. D.; Rojas, R; Aguilar, Cristóbal N.; Vicente, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    New bio-based materials have been exploited to develop biodegradable and edible films as an effort to extend shelf life and improve quality of food while reducing packaging waste. The objective of this study was to investigate physicochemical properties of k-carrageenan/locust bean gum (k-car/LBG) films with different bcarotene emulsion concentrations. To prepare oil-in-water emulsions, b-carotene (0.03% v/v) was dissolved in mediumchain triglycerides (MCTs), and the solution was mixed ...

  2. Reduction of serum cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic rats by Guar gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Samarghandian

    2011-07-01

    Conclusion: These results suggested that guar gum may be effective as hypocholesterolemic agent and may prevent hypercholesteromia in hypercholesteromic rats. The results also suggested that guar gum may be important for reducing body weight in hyperlipidemic rats.

  3. Medicated chewing gum, a novel drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Aslani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available New formulations and technologies have been developed through oral drug delivery systems′ researches. Such researches display significance of oral route amongst patients. We′ve reviewed all the features associated with medicated chewing gum as a modern drug delivery by introducing the history, advantages and disadvantages, methods of manufacturing, composition differences, evaluation tests and examples of varieties of medicated chewing gums. Acceptance of medicated chewing gum has been augmented through years. The advantages and therapeutic benefits of chewing gum support its development as we can see new formulations with new drugs contained have been produced from past and are going to find a place in market by formulation of new medicated chewing gums. Potential applications of medicated chewing gums are highly widespread as they will be recognized in future. Nowadays standards for qualifying chewing gums are the same as tablets. Patient-centered studies include medicated chewing gums as a delivery system too which creates compliance for patients.

  4. Medicated chewing gum, a novel drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Rostami, Farnaz

    2015-04-01

    New formulations and technologies have been developed through oral drug delivery systems' researches. Such researches display significance of oral route amongst patients. We've reviewed all the features associated with medicated chewing gum as a modern drug delivery by introducing the history, advantages and disadvantages, methods of manufacturing, composition differences, evaluation tests and examples of varieties of medicated chewing gums. Acceptance of medicated chewing gum has been augmented through years. The advantages and therapeutic benefits of chewing gum support its development as we can see new formulations with new drugs contained have been produced from past and are going to find a place in market by formulation of new medicated chewing gums. Potential applications of medicated chewing gums are highly widespread as they will be recognized in future. Nowadays standards for qualifying chewing gums are the same as tablets. Patient-centered studies include medicated chewing gums as a delivery system too which creates compliance for patients. PMID:26109999

  5. Design, formulation and evaluation of nicotine chewing gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Aslani

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Taste enhancement of nicotine gums was achieved where formulations comprised aspartame as the sweetener and cherry and eucalyptus as the flavoring agents. Nicotine gums of pleasant taste may, therefore, be used as NRT to assist smokers quit smoking.

  6. UTILIZATION OF GUM ARABIC FOR INDUSTRIES AND HUMAN HEALTH

    OpenAIRE

    Eqbal Dauqan; Aminah Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Gum Arabic, a natural polysaccharide derived from exudates of Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal trees, is a commonly used food hydrocolloid. The highlight of this study was to review the utilization of gum Arabic for industries and human health. Gum Arabic has a unique combination of excellent emulsifying properties and low solution viscosity. These properties make gum Arabic very useful in several industries but especially in the food industry where it is used as a flavor and stabilizer of cit...

  7. Design, formulation and evaluation of caffeine chewing gum

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfazl Aslani; Fatemeh Jalilian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Caffeine which exists in drinks such as coffee as well as in drug dosage forms in the global market is among the materials that increase alertness and decrease fatigue. Compared to other forms of caffeine, caffeine gum can create faster and more prominent effects. In this study, the main goal is to design a new formulation of caffeine gum with desirable taste and assess its physicochemical properties. Materials and Methods: Caffeine gum was prepared by softening of gum bases a...

  8. Quantification and Qualification of Bacteria Trapped in Chewed Gum

    OpenAIRE

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-...

  9. Locomotion of Mexican jumping beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mexican jumping bean, Laspeyresia saltitans, consists of a hollow seed housing a moth larva. Heating by the sun induces movements by the larva which appear as rolls, jumps and flips by the bean. In this combined experimental, numerical and robotic study, we investigate this unique means of rolling locomotion. Time-lapse videography is used to record bean trajectories across a series of terrain types, including one-dimensional channels and planar surfaces of varying inclination. We find that the shell encumbers the larva's locomotion, decreasing its speed on flat surfaces by threefold. We also observe that the two-dimensional search algorithm of the bean resembles the run-and-tumble search of bacteria. We test this search algorithm using both an agent-based simulation and a wheeled Scribbler robot. The algorithm succeeds in propelling the robot away from regions of high temperature and may have application in biomimetic micro-scale navigation systems. (paper)

  10. purple_bean_crithab_streams

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This linear coverage represents critical habitat deliniation for the Purple Bean in the Tennessee and Cumberland River Basins. Linear segments were digitized over a...

  11. Faba bean in cropping systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen Jensen, Erik; Peoples, Mark B.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    the plant–soil system associated with faba bean cropping via nitrate leaching or emissions of N2O to the atmosphere as a consequence of the rapid mineralization of N from its N-rich residues. It is important to develop improved preventive measures, such as catch crops, intercropping, or no-till technologies......The grain legume (pulse) faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is grown world-wide as a protein source for food and feed. At the same time faba bean offers ecosystem services such as renewable inputs of nitrogen (N) into crops and soil via biological N2 fixation, and a diversification of cropping systems. Even...... legumes to provide N to maintain soil N fertility, with industrialized, largely cereal-based systems that are heavily reliant upon fossil fuels (=N fertilizers, heavy mechanization) are some of the explanations for this decline in importance. Past studies of faba bean in cropping systems have tended...

  12. Rheological Modeling and Characterization of Ficus platyphylla Gum Exudates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnabuk O. Eddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ficus platyphylla gum exudates (FP gum have been analyzed for their physicochemical parameters and found to be ionic, mildly acidic, odourless, and yellowish brown in colour. The gum is soluble in water, sparingly soluble in ethanol, and insoluble in acetone and chloroform. The nitrogen (0.39% and protein (2.44% contents of the gum are relatively low. The concentrations of the cations were found to increase according to the following trend, Mn>Fe>Zn>Pb>Cu>Mg>Cd>Ca. Analysis of the FTIR spectrum of the gum revealed vibrations similar to those found in polysaccharides while the scanning electron micrograph indicated that the gum has irregular molecular shapes, arranged randomly. The intrinsic viscosity of FP gum estimated by extrapolating to zero concentrations in Huggins, Kraemer, Schulz-Blaschke, and Martin plots has an average value of 7 dL/g. From the plots of viscosity versus shear rate/speed of rotation and also that of shear stress versus shear rate, FP gum can be classified as a non-Newtonian gum with characteristics-plastic properties. Development of the Master_s curve for FP gum also indicated that the gum prefers to remain in a dilute domain (Cgum (calculated from Arrhenius-Frenkel-Eyring plot was relatively low and indicated the presence of fewer inter- and intramolecular interactions.

  13. Quantification and Qualification of Bacteria Trapped in Chewed Gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and r

  14. Design, formulation and evaluation of caffeine chewing gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Aslani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, 20 and 50 mg caffeine gums with suitable and desirable properties (i.e., good taste and satisfactory release were formulated. The best flavor for caffeine gum was cinnamon. Both kinds of 20 and 50 mg gums succeeded in content uniformity test.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1330 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acacia (gum arabic). 184.1330 Section 184.1330 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1330 Acacia (gum arabic). (a) Acacia (gum arabic) is the dried gummy exudate from stems and branches of trees of various species of the genus Acacia,...

  16. Flavor release measurement from gum model system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovejero-López, I.; Haahr, Anne-Mette; van den Berg, Frans W.J.;

    2004-01-01

    Flavor release from a mint-flavored chewing gum model system was measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectroscopy (APCI-MS) and sensory time-intensity (TI). A data analysis method for handling the individual curves from both methods is presented. The APCI-MS data are ratio......-scaled using the signal from acetone in the breath of subjects. Next, APCI-MS and sensory TI curves are smoothed by low-pass filtering. Principal component analysis of the individual curves is used to display graphically the product differentiation by APCI-MS or TI signals. It is shown that differences in gum...... composition can be measured by both instrumental and sensory techniques, providing comparable information. The peppermint oil level (0.5-2% w/w) in the gum influenced both the retronasal concentration and the perceived peppermint flavor. The sweeteners' (sorbitol or xylitol) effect is less apparent. Sensory...

  17. RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOUR OF PSYLLIUM GUM FRACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hojjatoleslamyi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Psyllium (Plantago psyllium is a native plant that grows widely in India, Iran and Pinjab. Studies showed psyllium gum has good rheological properties for using in wide range of food products. In this study, different fractions of psyllium gum extracted by water and alkali treatment. Rheological properties of these fractions determined by Brookfield rheometer (RV DVIII. Obtained data fitted in three temperatures 30, 60 and 80°C by Herschel-bulkly rheological model. Results showed that fractions have different behaviour during heating treatment. The most difference observed in AEG0.5 fraction.

  18. Waterflooding process using mucilage gum thickeners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummus, J.L.

    1967-08-29

    According to the described process, the viscosity of water in a water drive can be increased with a mucilage gum derived from flax meal. This substance has less tendency to be absorbed on clay surfaces than some high molecular weight polymers that have been studied. The water-extracted flax gum can be deactivated with clay to remove the absorbable fraction and the residual solution be used for the ''pusher flood.'' This is said to avoid decreasing permeability around the well bore and keep the solution in contact with the oil at essentially the same viscosity as the injected fluid. (7 claims)

  19. Use of Extracted Green Inhibitors as a Friendly Choice in Corrosion Protection of Low Alloy Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jano, A.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitigation of corrosion impact on environment is an important step in environmental protection. Use of environmentally friendly corrosion protection methods is very important. It is smart to choose cheap and safe to handle compounds as corrosion inhibitors. The use of green inhibitors (extracted inexpensively, from the seed endosperm of some Leguminosae plants, and investigation of their efficiency in corrosion protection is the aim of this study. As green inhibitor one kind of polysaccharides (galactomannan from locust bean gum (also known as carob gum, carob bean gum extracted from the seed of carob tree is used. Corrosion protection efficiency of these extracted green inhibitors was tested for carbon steel marked as: steel 39, steel 44, and iron B 500 (usually applied as reinforcing bars to concrete. Sulfuric acid solution in the presence of chloride ions was used as corrosion media. The composition of corrosion acid media used was 1 mol L-1 H2SO4 and 10-3 mol L-1 Cl- (in the form of NaCl. Electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization methods were used for inhibitor efficiency testing.

  20. The Effect of Xanthan Gum and Guar Gum on Enhancing the Quality and Preventing Lipid Rancidity in Yeast Bread Supplemented with Flaxseed

    OpenAIRE

    Souther, Brandy Jolene

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of guar gum and xanthan gum on flax supplemented breads through objective and sensory testing. Breads containing flaxseed and gums were found to have a significantly (p

  1. Evaluation of mechanical properties of unsaturated polyester-guar gum/hydroxypropyl guar gum composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Guar gum is a natural polysaccharide that has been explored for various applications. However, there is a limited number of studies in which guar gum has been used as a filler in a polymer. The effect of guar gum and its hydroxypropyl derivatives in unsaturated polyester composites were investigated with respect to their mechanical and chemical properties. The effect of hydroxypropylation and the degree of hydroxypropylation on the properties of resultant composites were also studied. It was observed that the inclusion of guar gum and its derivatives resulted in composites with increased solvent resistance and mechanical properties. An increase in the degree of substitution resulted in increased polymer-filler interaction reflected by a positive effect on the mechanical properties of the composites. These results open an avenue for the use of polysaccharides and their derivatives as eco-friendly fillers as a replacement of mineral fillers.

  2. 76 FR 16700 - Importation of French Beans and Runner Beans From the Republic of Kenya Into the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... ). The PRA, titled ``Importation of French Bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., and Runner Bean, Phaseolus... as follows: Sec. 319.56-51 French beans and runner beans from Kenya. French beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and runner beans (Phaseolus coccineus L.) may be imported into the United States from Kenya...

  3. Guar Gum, Xanthan Gum, and HPMC Can Define Release Mechanisms and Sustain Release of Propranolol Hydrochloride

    OpenAIRE

    Mughal, Muhammad Akhlaq; Iqbal, Zafar; Neau, Steven Henry

    2010-01-01

    The objectives were to characterize propranolol hydrochloride-loaded matrix tablets using guar gum, xanthan gum, and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) as rate-retarding polymers. Tablets were prepared by wet granulation using these polymers alone and in combination, and physical properties of the granules and tablets were studied. Drug release was evaluated in simulated gastric and intestinal media. Rugged tablets with appropriate physical properties were obtained. Empirical and semi-empiri...

  4. The effect of chewing gum on dental plaque accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karami Nogourani M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Studies show that sucrose containing chewing gums are cariogenic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two commercial chewing gums with and without sucrose on dental plaque accumulation compared with the control group. "nMaterials and Methods: In this clinical study, plaque accumulation during three 7-day periods (with two weeks interval was recorded (Sillness & Loe Index in a group of 23 volunteer male dental students who chewed in the first two periods sugar-free or sugar-containing chewing gums (Olips and Orbit, respectively and in the last period did not chew any gum. Participants were asked to chew daily five gum sticks after meals for about twenty minutes. The data were statistically analyzed using Repeated Measure ANOVA and paired-T test. "nResults: The results showed that chewing any gum even sucrose-containing gum decreased the level of dental plaque accumulation (P<0.001. However, the decreasing effect of sugar-free gums was significantly higher (P<0.001. "nConclusion: Although sugar free gum was more effective than sugar containing gum on reducing dental plaque accumulation, chewing even sugar containing gums could decrease the level of dental plaque.

  5. Addiction to the nicotine gum in never smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etter Jean-François

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Addiction to nicotine gum has never been described in never smokers or in never users of tobacco. Methods Internet questionnaire in 2004–2006 in a self-selected sample of 434 daily users of nicotine gum. To assess dependence on nicotine gum, we used modified versions of the Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale (NDSS, the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence and the Cigarette Dependence Scale. Results Five never smokers used the nicotine gum daily. They had been using the nicotine gum for longer than the 429 ever smokers (median = 6 years vs 0.8 years, p = 0.004, and they had higher NDSS-gum Tolerance scores (median = 0.73 vs = -1.0, p = 0.03, a difference of 1.5 standard deviation units. Two never smokers had never used smokeless tobacco, both answered "extremely true" to: "I use nicotine gums because I am addicted to them", both "fully agreed" with: "after a few hours without chewing a nicotine gum, I feel an irresistible urge to chew one" and: "I am a prisoner of nicotine gum". Conclusion This is to our knowledge the first report of addiction to nicotine gum in never users of tobacco. However, this phenomenon is rare, and although the long-term effect of nicotine gum is unknown, this product is significantly less harmful than tobacco.

  6. Chewing gum differentially affects aspects of attention in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucha, Oliver; Mecklinger, Lara; Maier, Kerstin; Hammerl, Marianne; Lange, Klaus W

    2004-06-01

    In a study published previously in this journal (Wilkinson et al., 2002), the effect of chewing gum on cognitive functioning was examined. The results of this study indicated that chewing a piece of gum results in an improvement of working memory and of both immediate and delayed recall of words but not of attention. In the present study, memory and a variety of attentional functions of healthy adult participants were examined under four different conditions: no chewing, mimicking chewing movements, chewing a piece of tasteless chewing gum and chewing a piece of spearmint flavoured chewing gum. The sequence of conditions was randomised across participants. The results showed that the chewing of gum did not improve participants' memory functions. Furthermore, chewing may differentially affect specific aspects of attention. While sustained attention was improved by the chewing of gum, alertness and flexibility were adversely affected by chewing. In conclusion, claims that the chewing a gum improves cognition should be viewed with caution. PMID:15183924

  7. Healthy food trends -- beans and legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peas, and lentils are all types of legumes. Vegetables such as beans and other legumes are an important source of protein. They are a key food in healthy diets and have many benefits. Beans, lentils, and ...

  8. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the... molecular weight polysaccharide gum produced from Pseudomonas elodea by a pure culture fermentation process..., held at 80 °C for 1 minute, and allowed to cool to room temperature without stirring. A firm gel...

  9. Enzymatic production of polysaccharides from gum tragacanth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Plant polysaccharides, relating to the field of natural probiotic components, can comprise structures similar to human milk oligosaccharides. A method for enzymatic hydrolysis of gum tragacanth from the bush-like legumes of the genus Astragalus, using a combination of pectin hydrolases and a...

  10. 21 CFR 582.7351 - Gum tragacanth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gum tragacanth. 582.7351 Section 582.7351 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7351...

  11. 21 CFR 582.7349 - Sterculia gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sterculia gum. 582.7349 Section 582.7349 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7349 Sterculia...

  12. The oral health benefits of chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Michael W J

    2012-01-01

    The use of sugar-free gum provides a proven anti-caries benefit, but other oral health effects are less clearly elucidated. Chewing sugar-free chewing gum promotes a strong flow of stimulated saliva, which helps to provide a number of dental benefits: first, the higher flow rate promotes more rapid oral clearance of sugars; second, the high pH and buffering capacity of the stimulated saliva help to neutralise plaque pH after a sugar challenge; and, lastly, studies have shown enhanced remineralisation of early caries-like lesions and ultimately prospective clinical trials have shown reduced caries incidence in children chewing sugar-free gum. This paper reviews the scientific evidence for these functional claims and discusses other benefits, including plaque and extrinsic stain reduction, along with the possibility of adding specific active agents, including fluoride, antimicrobials, urea and calcium phosphates, to enhance these inherent effects. The evidence for a specific effect of xylitol as a caries-therapeutic agent is also discussed. In conclusion, it is asserted that chewing gum has a place as an additional mode of dental disease prevention to be used in conjunction with the more traditional preventive methods. PMID:23573702

  13. Brief Encounter: The Girl Chewing Gum

    OpenAIRE

    Brydon, Lavinia

    2012-01-01

    When discussing his concept of literary chronotopes and that of the ‘encounter’, Mikhail Bahktin uses the road as an example where ‘the spatial and temporal paths of the most varied people intersect’. Using this framework, this paper will examine the narrative, aesthetic and thematic concerns of The Girl Chewing Gum.

  14. [Recommended or forbidden: focus on chewing gum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonesco-Benaiche, N; Muller, M; Jasmin, J R

    1990-03-01

    The use of chewing-gum may be beneficial to oral hygiene and become part of an anti-cavity prevention protocol. The conditions of use must be well defined: the sweetener should not be used by the bacterial plaque and fluoride, an anti-cavity agent, must enter into its composition. PMID:2386101

  15. NetBeans IDE 8 cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Salter, David

    2014-01-01

    If you're a Java developer of any level using NetBeans and want to learn how to get the most out of NetBeans, then this book is for you. Learning how to utilize NetBeans will provide a firm foundation for your Java application development.

  16. Chlorotic mottle of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayasinghe, W.U.

    1982-01-01

    For the past years there have been outbreaks of a disease of bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Colombia called bean chlorotic mottle. The etiology of bean chlorotic mottle was not known, but the disease was generally believed to be incited by the same whitefly-transmitted virus that causes variegatio

  17. Effect of GutsyGum(tm), A Novel Gum, on Subjective Ratings of Gastro Esophageal Reflux Following A Refluxogenic Meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel; Sam, Cecilia H Y; Green, Tim; Wood, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Chewing gum alleviates symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) following a refluxogenic meal. GutsyGum(tm), a chewing gum developed to alleviate the symptoms of GER contains calcium carbonate, with a proprietary blend of licorice extract, papain, and apple cider vinegar (GiGs®). The efficacy of GutsyGum(tm) was determined in alleviating the symptoms of GER after a refluxogenic meal compared to placebo gum. This double-blind, placebo-controlled-crossover trial with a one-week washout between treatments had 24 participants with a history of GER consume a refluxogenic meal and then chew GutsyGum(tm) or placebo gum. Participants completed GER symptom questionnaires, consisting of symptom based 10 cm Visual Analogue Scales, immediately following the meal and then at regular intervals out to four hours postmeal. Adjusted mean ± SEM heartburn score (15-min postmeal to 240 min) was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo gum treatment (0.81 ± 0.20 vs. 1.45 ± 0.20 cm; p = 0.034). Mean acid reflux score was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo treatment (0.72 ± 0.19 vs. 1.46 ± 0.19 cm; p = 0.013). There were no significant differences for any of the secondary outcomes. However, pain approached significance with less pain reported in GutsyGum(tm) versus placebo treatment (0.4 ± 0.2 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 cm; p = 0.081). Although nausea (p = 0.114) and belching (p = 0.154) were lower following GutsyGum(tm), the difference was not statistically significant. GutsyGum(tm) is more effective than a placebo gum in alleviating primary symptoms of heartburn and acid reflux (Clinical Trial Registration: ACTRN12612000973819). PMID:25144853

  18. Physico-chemical study on guar gum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guar plant is an annual summer plant and it can resist diseases, pests and drought. Guar gum is used in a lot of industries. The present study deals with some physical properties of two commercial grade samples of guar gum cyamopsis tetragonoloba which where produced in 1996 and 1997 seasons (S1 and S2 respectively). Our analytical data are compared with those of previous workers in this area and international quality. Guar gum (S2) is separated into water-insoluble components. Three fractions were obtained from the water-soluble components by fractional participation using acetone. Guar gum powder is yellowish white; the water-insoluble component is brownish white. Comparison study between gum samples (S1 and S2) and water-insoluble fraction (1) and water-soluble fractions are close to each other in their physico-properties. chemical All samples and fractions contain galactomannan polysaccharide as explained by infra-red spectra.Moisture contents for the gum samples were 5.2% and 7.8% and that for the water-insoluble fraction 4.7% while that for fraction samples were 5.2%-7.5% ash contents for the gum samples was 0.81% and 1.14% and for the water-insoluble component 0.88% while the contents in the fractions between 0.5%-0.66%. Nitrogen content determination showed that the gum samples had value of 0.678% and 0.732% and water -insoluble fraction had a value of 0.118%. The values decreased in the water-soluble fractions giving 0.049%, 0.053 and 0.056%. Water-soluble component and its fractions record the following results: pH measurements showed that the water-soluble component had pH 6.70 and 6.84 while its fractions had pH 5.90 and 7.00. Viscosity measurements showed that water-soluble fractions had intrinsic viscosity of 6.4 and 6.8 dL. g-1. The fractions derived from water-soluble fraction had intrinsic viscosity of 6.6, 7 and 7.5 dl. g-1. Using Mark-Howink equation, calculated average molecular weights for the water-soluble components were 7.01x105, and 7.62x

  19. Development of natural gum based fast disintegrating tablets of glipizide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antesh Kumar Jha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia and risk of choking are leading causes of patient non-compliance in the self-administration of conventional tablets. To overcome these limitations of conventional tablets fast-disintegrating tablets were developed, using natural gums. Natural gums were evaluated for bulk swelling capacity. Powder mix containing natural gums and glipizide was evaluated for water sorption, swelling index and capillary action. For faster onset and immediate hypoglycemic action, the fast disintegrating tablets were prepared with various types of natural gums using the direct compression technique. Formulations containing guar gum disintegrated within a minute and fulfilled the official requirements for dispersible tablets. As the amount of guar gum increased, the friability increased and hardness decreased, resulting in a shorter wetting and disintegration time. Gum acacia and gum tragacanth did the opposite. The glipizide-loaded fast disintegrating tablet prepared with 18 mg of guar gum gave a friability of 0.46 ± 0.02%, content uniformity of 99.34 ± 0.82%, drug content of 99.15 ± 1.16%, wetting time of 39.0 ± 1.04 sec, hardness of 5.70 ± 1.41 Kg and disintegration time less than 30 sec, suggesting that it was a practical product with a good tablet property. In conclusion, natural gum based patient-friendly fast disintegrating tablets of glipizide can be successfully formulated.

  20. Influence of the concentration of locust bean gum on the gelling ability of whey peptic hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Cristina M. R.; Hilliou, L.; Teixeira, J. A.; M. P. GONçALVES

    2008-01-01

    The gelling ability of whey proteins can be changed by limited hydrolysis and by the presence of other components such as polysaccharides; depending on the environmental conditions it can either be improved or impaired. In this work the effect of LBG on the heat-set gelation of aqueous whey protein hydrolysates (10 % w/w) from pepsin was assessed at pH 7.0 by small deformation rheology. Whey protein concentrate (WPC) and hydrolysates with a degree of hydrolysis (DH) of 1.5, ...

  1. Locust bean gum as an alternative polymeric coating for embryonic stem cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    Perestrelo, Ana Rubina; Grenha, Ana; Costa, Ana M. Rosa da; Belo, José

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have self-renewal capacity and the potential to differentiate into any cellular type depending on specific cues (pluripotency) and, therefore, have become a vibrant research area in the biomedical field. ESCs are usually cultured in gelatin or on top of a monolayer of feeder cells such as mitotically inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFsi). The latter is the gold standard support to maintain the ESCs in the pluripotent state. Examples of versati...

  2. Effect of hydrophilic natural gums in formulation of oral-controlled release matrix tablets of propranolol hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, K S; Venkataraju, M P; Gowda, D V

    2009-04-01

    In order to develop a controlled delivery of highly water-soluble propranolol hydrochloride (PPHCl) using hydrophilic natural gums (xanthan gum [X] and locust bean gum [LBG]) as cost-effective, nontoxic, easily available. The granules of PPHCl were prepared by wet granulation method using a different ratios drug: gum ratios of X, LBG and XLBG(X and LBG in 1:1 ratios). To increase the flowability and compressibility of the granules, and to prevent its adhesion to punch and die, magnesium stearate and talc were added to the granules in 1:2 ratios before punching. The tablet was analysed to determine hardness, friability, % assay and invitro release study was carried out. The release of PPHCl from a gelatinous swollen mass, which controls the diffusion of drug molecules through the polymeric material into aqueous medium. The XLBG matrice shows precise controlled release than the X and LBG matrice because of burst effect and fast release in case of X and LBG matrice respectively and there was no chemical interaction between drug and polymer in XLBG formulation as confirmed by FTIR studies. First pass effect of PPHCl can be avoided by these formulations. Matrices with XLBG show zero-order release via swelling, diffusion and relaxation mechanism. The XLBG matrice leads to more precise result than X and LBG alone by the utilization of synergistic interaction between two biopolymers and uniformity in the hydration layer in dissolution media. However, according to the similarity factor (f(2)) XLBG3 were the most similar formulations to Lol-SR as the reference standard. PMID:19339235

  3. Direct photography of the Gum Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, J. C.; Roosen, R. G.; Thompson, J.; Ludden, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses a series of wide-angle photographs taken of the Gum Nebula in the traditional region including H-alpha with the aid of a 40-cm and an 80-cm lens in both the red and the green. The photographs support the large dimensions (75 deg in galactic longitude by 40 deg in galactic latitude) of the Gum Nebula suggested earlier, and the appearance is consistent with an origin due to photons from a supernova outburst. The relatively high-density gas has cooled and is visible on the red plates. The low-density gas has remained at a high temperature and may be visible as diffuse emission on the green plates.

  4. Interaction between beans and objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between the X-ray beans and objects are studied, with the modification in the intensity. The kilovolt, the bundle filtration, the structure and composition of the patient and the quantity of scattered radiation are also described, as the main parameters for the contrast and for the dose of the patient. (C.G.C.)

  5. Relationships Between Gum-Chewing and Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Michiyo; Takeda, Tomotaka; Kawakami, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Kazunori; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi; Takemura, Naohiro; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that chewing is thought to affect stress modification in humans. Also, studies in animals have demonstrated that active chewing of a wooden stick during immobilization stress ameliorates the stress-impaired synaptic plasticity and prevents stress-induced noradrenaline release in the amygdala. On the other hand, studies have suggested that the right prefrontal cortex (PFC) dominates the regulation of the stress response system, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The International Affective Digitized Sounds-2 (IADS) is widely used in the study of emotions and neuropsychological research. Therefore, in this study, the effects of gum-chewing on physiological and psychological (including PFC activity measured by NIRS) responses to a negative stimulus selected from the IADS were measured and analyzed. The study design was approved by the Ethics Committee of Tokyo Dental College (No. 436). We studied 11 normal adults using: cerebral blood oxygenation in the right medial PFC by multi-channel NIRS; alpha wave intensity by EEG; autonomic nervous function by heart rate; and emotional conditions by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) test and the 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Auditory stimuli selected were fewer than 3.00 in Pleasure value. Sounds were recorded in 3 s and reproduced at random using software. Every task session was designed in a block manner; seven rests: Brown Noise (30 s) and six task blocks: auditory stimuli or auditory stimuli with gum-chewing (30 s). During the test, the participants' eyes were closed. Paired Student's t-test was used for the comparison (Pphysiological and psychological responses including PFC activity. This PFC activation change might influence the HPA axis and ANS activities. In summary, within the limitations of this study, the findings suggest that gum-chewing reduced stress-related responses. Gum-chewing might have a possible effect on stress coping. PMID:26782231

  6. Development of natural gum based fast disintegrating tablets of glipizide

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia and risk of choking are leading causes of patient non-compliance in the self-administration of conventional tablets. To overcome these limitations of conventional tablets fast-disintegrating tablets were developed, using natural gums. Natural gums were evaluated for bulk swelling capacity. Powder mix containing natural gums and glipizide was evaluated for water sorption, swelling index and capillary action. For faster onset and immediate hypoglycemic action, the fast disintegrating ...

  7. ORAL DOSAGES FORM: MEDICINE CONTAINING CHEWIMG GUM: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Asija; Shreya Patel; Sangeeta Asija

    2012-01-01

    Chewing gums are mobile drug delivery systems. It is a potentially useful means of administering drugs either locally or systemically via, the oral cavity. Several ingredients are now incorporated in medicated chewing gum, e.g. Fluoride for prophylaxis of dental caries, chlorhexidine as local disinfectant, nicotine for smoking cessation, aspirin as an analgesic, and caffeine as a stay alert preparation. It was concluded that chewing gum is an excellent drug delivery system for self-medication...

  8. Medicated chewing gum, a novel drug delivery system

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfazl Aslani; Farnaz Rostami

    2015-01-01

    New formulations and technologies have been developed through oral drug delivery systems′ researches. Such researches display significance of oral route amongst patients. We′ve reviewed all the features associated with medicated chewing gum as a modern drug delivery by introducing the history, advantages and disadvantages, methods of manufacturing, composition differences, evaluation tests and examples of varieties of medicated chewing gums. Acceptance of medicated chewing gum has been augmen...

  9. Medicated chewing gum, a novel drug delivery system

    OpenAIRE

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Rostami, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    New formulations and technologies have been developed through oral drug delivery systems’ researches. Such researches display significance of oral route amongst patients. We’ve reviewed all the features associated with medicated chewing gum as a modern drug delivery by introducing the history, advantages and disadvantages, methods of manufacturing, composition differences, evaluation tests and examples of varieties of medicated chewing gums. Acceptance of medicated chewing gum has been augmen...

  10. Quantification and qualification of bacteria trapped in chewed gum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W Wessel

    Full Text Available Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR, yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 10(8 bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing

  11. Quantification and qualification of bacteria trapped in chewed gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Stefan W; van der Mei, Henny C; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE)-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR), yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 10(8) bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing of gum can trap

  12. Addiction to the nicotine gum in never smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Etter Jean-François

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Addiction to nicotine gum has never been described in never smokers or in never users of tobacco. Methods Internet questionnaire in 2004–2006 in a self-selected sample of 434 daily users of nicotine gum. To assess dependence on nicotine gum, we used modified versions of the Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale (NDSS), the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence and the Cigarette Dependence Scale. Results Five never smokers used the nicotine gum daily. They had been using the...

  13. Protein Quality of Irradiated Brazilian Beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beans are a major source of dietary protein in Brazil. However, high losses due to insect infestation occur after each harvest. To combat these losses, radiation processing of beans offers promise as an alternative to chemical treatment, provided the nutritional quality of beans is not impaired by the radiation treatment. Conflicting results have been published about the effect of radiation on the biological value of legume proteins. Therefore, two varieties of Brazilian beans were studied: 1) Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. carioca and 2) Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp, var. macacar. The beans were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10 kGy. Since irradiated beans will be consumed after appropriate storage, the beans under study were stored for 6 months at ambient temperature. Protein quality was measured by a biological assay employing the nitrogen balance approach in weanling rats. The animals were fed with optimally cooked beans, which were the only source of protein (∼10%). Nitrogen contents of legumes, diets, animal urine and faeces were determined by Kjeldahl analysis. The indices for apparent protein quality: net protein utilisation, digestibility and biological value were not influenced by irradiation. Thus, radiation treatment of Brazilian beans offers considerable promise as an effective insect disinfestation process, without impairing the biological quality of the valuable bean protein

  14. Protein Quality of Irradiated Brazilian Beans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delincee, Henry; Villavicencio, Anna-Lucia C.H.; Mancini-Filho, Jorge

    1998-06-01

    Beans are a major source of dietary protein in Brazil. However, high losses due to insect infestation occur after each harvest. To combat these losses, radiation processing of beans offers promise as an alternative to chemical treatment, provided the nutritional quality of beans is not impaired by the radiation treatment. Conflicting results have been published about the effect of radiation on the biological value of legume proteins. Therefore, two varieties of Brazilian beans were studied: 1) Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. carioca and 2) Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp, var. macacar. The beans were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10 kGy. Since irradiated beans will be consumed after appropriate storage, the beans under study were stored for 6 months at ambient temperature. Protein quality was measured by a biological assay employing the nitrogen balance approach in weanling rats. The animals were fed with optimally cooked beans, which were the only source of protein ({approx}10%). Nitrogen contents of legumes, diets, animal urine and faeces were determined by Kjeldahl analysis. The indices for apparent protein quality: net protein utilisation, digestibility and biological value were not influenced by irradiation. Thus, radiation treatment of Brazilian beans offers considerable promise as an effective insect disinfestation process, without impairing the biological quality of the valuable bean protein.

  15. Protein Quality of Irradiated Brazilian Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delincée, Henry; Villavicencio, Anna-Lucia C. H.; Mancini-Filho, Jorge

    1998-06-01

    Beans are a major source of dietary protein in Brazil. However, high losses due to insect infestation occur after each harvest. To combat these losses, radiation processing of beans offers promise as an alternative to chemical treatment, provided the nutritional quality of beans is not impaired by the radiation treatment. Conflicting results have been published about the effect of radiation on the biological value of legume proteins. Therefore, two varieties of Brazilian beans were studied: 1) Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. carioca and 2) Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp, var. macaçar. The beans were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10 kGy. Since irradiated beans will be consumed after appropriate storage, the beans under study were stored for 6 months at ambient temperature. Protein quality was measured by a biological assay employing the nitrogen balance approach in weanling rats. The animals were fed with optimally cooked beans, which were the only source of protein (˜10%). Nitrogen contents of legumes, diets, animal urine and faeces were determined by Kjeldahl analysis. The indices for apparent protein quality: net protein utilisation, digestibility and biological value were not influenced by irradiation. Thus, radiation treatment of Brazilian beans offers considerable promise as an effective insect disinfection process, without impairing the biological quality of the valuable bean protein.

  16. Formulation development and evaluation of metformin chewing gum with bitter taste masking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Abolfazl Mostafavi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Metfornin chewing gum had suitable appearance and appropriate invitro characteristics that fallow the pharmacopeia suggestions. This chewable gum showed bitterness suppression with a suitable release rate.

  17. Karakteristik Egg Replacer Dari Isolat Protein Kedelai, Isolat Protein Susu, Pati Jagung, Pati Kentang, Guar Gum, Dan Xanthan Gum

    OpenAIRE

    Ario, Juni

    2015-01-01

    The research was aimed to study the physicochemical and functional characterization of egg replacer from soy protein isolate, whey protein isolate, corn starch, potato starch, guar gum, and xanthan gum. The research had been performed using factorial completely randomized design, with one factor i.e the ratio of: soy protein isolate, whey protein isolate, corn starch, potato starch, guar gum, and xanthan gum (E): 62,5%:0%:18,75%:18,125%:0,625%:0% (E1); (62,5%:0%:18,75%:17,5%: 1,25%:0% (E2); 6...

  18. Stabilization of emulsions by gum tragacanth (Astragalus spp.) correlates to the galacturonic acid content and methoxylation degree of the gum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi Gavlighi, Hassan; Meyer, Anne S.; Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz;

    2013-01-01

    –270 mg/g), and galactose (∼40–140 mg/g), and also contained fucose, rhamnose, and glucose. The ability of the gums to act as stabilizers in whey protein isolate based emulsions varied. The best emulsion stabilization effect, measured as lowest creaming index ratio after 20 days, was obtained with the A....... fluccosus gum. The emulsion stabilization effect correlated linearly and positively to the methoxylation degree, and galacturonic acid content of the gums, but not to acetyl or fucose content. A particularly high correlation was found between methoxyl level in the soluble gum part and emulsion stabilization...

  19. Reflective Polyethylene Mulch Reduces Mexican Bean Beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Densities and Damage in Snap Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, L B; Kuhar, T P

    2016-08-01

    Mexican bean beetle, Epilachna varivestis Mulsant, is a serious pest of snap beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L., in the eastern United States. These beetles are intolerant to direct sunlight, explaining why individuals are typically found on the undersides of leaves and in the lower portion of the plant canopy. We hypothesized that snap beans grown on reflective, agricultural polyethylene (plastic mulch) would have fewer Mexican bean beetles and less injury than those grown on black plastic or bare soil. In 2014 and 2015, beans were seeded into beds of metallized, white, and black plastic, and bare soil, in field plots near Blacksburg, VA. Mexican bean beetle density, feeding injury, predatory arthropods, and snap bean yield were sampled. Reflected light intensity, temperature, and humidity were monitored using data loggers. Pyranometer readings showed that reflected light intensity was highest over metallized plastic and second highest over white plastic; black plastic and bare soil were similarly low. Temperature and humidity were unaffected by treatments. Significant reductions in Mexican bean beetle densities and feeding injury were observed in both metallized and white plastic plots compared to black plastic and bare soil, with metallized plastic having the fewest Mexican bean beetle life stages and injury. Predatory arthropod densities were not reduced by reflective plastic. Metallized plots produced the highest yields, followed by white. The results of this study suggest that growing snap beans on reflective plastic mulch can suppress the incidence and damage of Mexican bean beetle, and increase yield in snap beans. PMID:27341891

  20. Kinetics model development of cocoa bean fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresnowati, M. T. A. P.; Gunawan, Agus Yodi; Muliyadini, Winny

    2015-12-01

    Although Indonesia is one of the biggest cocoa beans producers in the world, Indonesian cocoa beans are oftenly of low quality and thereby frequently priced low in the world market. In order to improve the quality, adequate post-harvest cocoa processing techniques are required. Fermentation is the vital stage in series of cocoa beans post harvest processing which could improve the quality of cocoa beans, in particular taste, aroma, and colours. During the fermentation process, combination of microbes grow producing metabolites that serve as the precursors for cocoa beans flavour. Microbial composition and thereby their activities will affect the fermentation performance and influence the properties of cocoa beans. The correlation could be reviewed using a kinetic model that includes unstructured microbial growth, substrate utilization and metabolic product formation. The developed kinetic model could be further used to design cocoa bean fermentation process to meet the expected quality. Further the development of kinetic model of cocoa bean fermentation also serve as a good case study of mixed culture solid state fermentation, that has rarely been studied. This paper presents the development of a kinetic model for solid-state cocoa beans fermentation using an empirical approach. Series of lab scale cocoa bean fermentations, either natural fermentations without starter addition or fermentations with mixed yeast and lactic acid bacteria starter addition, were used for model parameters estimation. The results showed that cocoa beans fermentation can be modelled mathematically and the best model included substrate utilization, microbial growth, metabolites production and its transport. Although the developed model still can not explain the dynamics in microbial population, this model can sufficiently explained the observed changes in sugar concentration as well as metabolic products in the cocoa bean pulp.

  1. Phenotyping common beans for adaptation to drought

    OpenAIRE

    Beebe, Stephen E.; Rao, Idupulapati M.; Blair, Matthew W.; Acosta-Gallegos, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) originated in the New World and are the grain legume of greatest production for direct human consumption. Common bean production is subject to frequent droughts in highland Mexico, in the Pacific coast of Central America, in northeast Brazil, and in eastern and southern Africa from Ethiopia to South Africa. This article reviews efforts to improve common bean for drought tolerance, referring to genetic diversity for drought response, the physiology of droug...

  2. Gum Sensor: A Stretchable, Wearable, and Foldable Sensor Based on Carbon Nanotube/Chewing Gum Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, Mohammad Ali; Khosrozadeh, Ali; Wang, Quan; Xing, Malcolm

    2015-12-01

    Presented in this work is a novel and facile approach to fabricate an elastic, attachable, and cost-efficient carbon nanotube (CNT)-based strain gauge which can be efficiently used as bodily motion sensors. An innovative and unique method is introduced to align CNTs without external excitations or any complicated procedure. In this design, CNTs are aligned and distributed uniformly on the entire chewing gum by multiple stretching and folding technique. The current sensor is demonstrated to be a linear strain sensor for at least strains up to 200% and can detect strains as high as 530% with a high sensitivity ranging from 12 to 25 and high durability. The gum sensor has been used as bodily motion sensors, and outstanding results are achieved; the sensitivity is quite high, capable of tracing slow breathing. Since the gum sensor can be patterned into various forms, it has wide applications in miniaturized sensors and biochips. Interestingly, we revealed that our gum sensor has the ability to monitor humidity changes with high sensitivity and fast resistance response capable of monitoring human breathing. PMID:26524110

  3. Propoxur residues in cocoa beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pod-bearing Amazon and Amelonado cocoa plants were sprayed with Unden 20% (propoxur, arprocarb, baygon) at the recommended rate of 210 g a.i./ha and twice the recommended rate at monthly intervals from July to October, 1976, and cured beans from the ripe pods analysed for propoxur residues by gas chromatography. In a radiotracer study with 14C-labelled propoxur, the effect of processing methods on residues and systemic uptake of propoxur from insecticide deposits on pod surfaces were also investigated. Residues did not exceed 0.03 ppm. There was no relationship between residues and harvesting time, cocoa type or rate of application. Contamination of beans with insecticide deposits on the pod surface during processing, and systemic uptake of insecticide from pod surfaces were negligible. (author)

  4. Impact of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Lei, E-mail: malei198713@163.com; Zhao Qinglin, E-mail: zhaoqinglin@whut.edu.cn; Yao Chukang; Zhou Mingkai

    2012-02-15

    The retarding effect of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration, as a partial system of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydration, was investigated with several methods. The tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration behavior in the presence or absence of welan gum was researched by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analysis. Meanwhile, we studied the surface electrochemical properties and adsorption characteristics of welan gum by utilizing a zeta potential analyzer and UV-VIS absorption spectrophotometer. By adding welan gum, the morphology change of ettringite and retardation of hydration stages in tricalcium aluminate-gypsum system was observed. Moreover, we detected the adsorption behavior and zeta potential inversion of tricalcium aluminate and ettringite, as well as a rapid decrease in the zeta potential of tricalcium aluminate-gypsum system. The reduction on nucleation rate of ettringite and hydration activity of C{sub 3}A was also demonstrated. Thus, through the adsorption effect, welan gum induces a retarding behavior in tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption characteristics of welan gum on C{sub 3}A and ettringite have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C{sub 3}A-gypsum hydration behavior and the hydration products are examined in L/S = 3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welan gum retards the process of C{sub 3}A-gypsum hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of welan gum changes the nucleation growth of ettringite.

  5. Impact of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retarding effect of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration, as a partial system of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydration, was investigated with several methods. The tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration behavior in the presence or absence of welan gum was researched by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analysis. Meanwhile, we studied the surface electrochemical properties and adsorption characteristics of welan gum by utilizing a zeta potential analyzer and UV–VIS absorption spectrophotometer. By adding welan gum, the morphology change of ettringite and retardation of hydration stages in tricalcium aluminate–gypsum system was observed. Moreover, we detected the adsorption behavior and zeta potential inversion of tricalcium aluminate and ettringite, as well as a rapid decrease in the zeta potential of tricalcium aluminate–gypsum system. The reduction on nucleation rate of ettringite and hydration activity of C3A was also demonstrated. Thus, through the adsorption effect, welan gum induces a retarding behavior in tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration. Highlights: ► Adsorption characteristics of welan gum on C3A and ettringite have been studied. ► C3A–gypsum hydration behavior and the hydration products are examined in L/S = 3. ► Welan gum retards the process of C3A–gypsum hydration. ► The addition of welan gum changes the nucleation growth of ettringite.

  6. 77 FR 43857 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... publishing the notice in the Federal Register of July 12, 2012 (77 FR 34997). The conference was held in... COMMISSION Xanthan Gum From Austria and China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... Austria and China of xanthan gum, provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the Harmonized Tariff...

  7. 78 FR 43226 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... Register of February 27, 2013 (78 FR 13379). The hearing was held in Washington, DC, on May 23, 2013, and... COMMISSION Xanthan Gum From Austria and China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... Austria of xanthan gum provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of...

  8. Gum Arabic as a Cause of Occupational Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arja Viinanen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gum arabic is a potential sensitizer in food industry. Methods. We examined 11 candy factory workers referred to examinations due to respiratory and skin symptoms paying attention to exposure and sensitization to gum arabic. Skin tests, pulmonary function tests, and respiratory provocation tests were carried out as indicated by the symptoms and findings. Results. Occupational asthma, caused by gum arabic was diagnosed in 4/11 candy factory workers and two of them had also occupational contact urticaria and one had occupational rhinitis. One of them had oral symptoms associated with ingestion of products containing gum arabic. Conclusions. Airborne exposure to gum arabic may cause sensitization leading to allergic rhinitis, asthma, and urticaria.

  9. Molecular Weight and Aggregation of Erwinia Gum in Aqueous Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Erwinia(E) gum is composed of glucose, fucose, galactose and glucuronic acid. The weight-average molecular weights Mw, number-average molecular weights Mn and intrinsic viscosities[η] of the four fractions and the unfractionated E gum in aqueous solutions at desired temperatures were studied by light scattering, membrane osmometry, size exclusion chromatography(SEC) and viscometry. The experimental results prove that E gum formed aggregates in the aqueous solution at 25 ℃ and the aggregates were broken gradually with increasing temperature. The dissociation of the aggregates of E gum in the aqueous solution started at 36 ℃, and was completed at around 90 ℃. The [η] values of E gum and its fractions are much higher than those of the conventional polymers with the similar molecular weights, and decrease with increasing NaCl concentration.

  10. Deformation Mechanisms of Gum Metals Under Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Rohini Priya

    Gum Metal is a set of multi-component beta-Ti alloys designed and developed by Toyota Central R&D Labs in 2003 to have a nearly zero shear modulus in the direction. After significant amounts of cold-work (>90%), these alloys were found to have yield strengths at a significant fraction of the predicted ideal strengths and exhibited very little work hardening. It has been speculated that this mechanical behavior may be realized through an ideal shear mechanism as opposed to conventional plastic deformation mechanisms, such as slip, and that such a mechanism may be realized through a defect structure termed "nanodisturbance". It is furthermore theorized that for near ideal strength to be attained, dislocations need to be pinned at sufficiently high stresses. It is the search for these defects and pinning points that motivates the present study. However, the mechanism of plastic deformation and the true origin of specific defect structures unique to gum metals is still controversial, mainly due to the complexity of the beta-Ti alloy system and the heavily distorted lattice exhibited in cold worked gum metals, rendering interpretation of images difficult. Accordingly, the first aim of this study is to clarify the starting as-received microstructures of gum metal alloys through conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and aberration-corrected high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy with high-angle annular dark field detector (HAADF-HRSTEM) imaging. To elucidate the effects of beta-stability and starting microstructure on the deformation behavior of gum metals and thus to provide adequate context for potentially novel deformation structures, we investigate three alloy conditions: gum metal that has undergone solution heat treatment (STGM), gum metal that has been heavily cold worked (CWGM), and a solution treated alloy of nominal gum metal composition, but leaner in beta-stabilizing content (ST Ref-1). In order to directly relate observed

  11. MARKET CHAIN ANALYSIS OF GUM ARABIC TRADE IN KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Muga

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Quality, quantity, availability and economics are the key factors that affect the marketing of any product, irrespective of whether it is for domestic, national or international market. The consumer requires the product to be available in time, be of desired quality and quantity. The market of gum arabic is a good example of how the interplay of quality, quantity, availability and economics affect a product market. In Kenya, trade in gum arabic has remained informal due to inadequate marketing arrangements attributed to limited participation of gum arabic collectors in the development of the sector and a non-conducive business environment, which does not favor private sector expansion. This paper looked at the market chains of gum arabic, the stakeholders participating in the management and marketing of A. senegal products and the constraints to gum arabic production and collection within the Kenyan drylands. The results confirmed that the market chain of gum arabic was and is still poorly organized with only one company and a few individual traders being the major buyers. Wildlife related factors and price were the key constraints to gum arabic collection while production was limited by unreliable rainfall due prolonged droughts. Quality of the gum and road network determined the price with different grades attracting different rates per kilogram in different areas. SALTLICK and AWF were the chief stakeholders involved in A. senegal tree resources management. The study has shown that there is willingness of the locals to engage in full time gum collection if ready market can be availed to them. Nevertheless, numerous constraints need to be addressed to make gum arabic collection an attractive venture to the local communities’ key among them being the purchase price.

  12. 21 CFR 201.319 - Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids (including, but not limited to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., carboxymethylcellulose sodium, carrageenan, chondrus, glucomannan ((B-1,4 linked) polymannose acetate), guar gum, karaya..., carboxymethylcellulose sodium, carrageenan, chondrus, glucomannan ((B-1,4 linked) polymannose acetate), guar gum, karaya... including, but not limited to, agar, alginic acid, calcium polycarbophil, carboxymethylcellulose......

  13. Developing the F1 sterility technique for the management of the carob moth ectomyelois ceratoniae zeller (Lepidoptera: pyralidae) in a pomegranate orchards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot sterile insect release program was initiated for the control of the date moth ectromyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in a pomegranate orchard near Tunisia. The F1 sterility technique was tested against pest for four successive seasons. Moth adults were irradiated with an effective gamma dose of 400 Gy using a 60Co irradiator (dose rate of 46 Gy/min). Releases were done from June to September each year with a release ratio of 5 to 1 (irradiated to non-irradiated). The release assessment was measured in the treated field as the reduction of the percentage of fruit damage and the reduction of percentage of larvae in rotten fruits at harvest. Results showed that F1 sterility could be a potential method for the control of carob in pomegranate orcharch. In the treated field, the percent damage of pomegranates at harvest declined from 28% in first year to 6.5% last year in the treated plot against 32% and 33% in the control plots. The percent of rotten fruits in the treated area was respectively 26%, 5.5%, 3.25% and 1.25% against 32%, 30.5% 30% and 30.5% in the control area during 4 years. The percentage of larvae in rotten fruit was respectively 20%, 5.5%, 3.25% and 1.25% compared to 32%, 30.5%, 30% and 30.5% in the controls. (Author)

  14. Flavor-Enhanced Modulation of Cerebral Blood Flow during Gum Chewing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Hasegawa

    Full Text Available Flavor perception, the integration of taste and odor, is a critical factor in eating behavior. It remains unclear how such sensory signals influence the human brain systems that execute the eating behavior.WE TESTED CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW (CBF IN THE FRONTAL LOBES BILATERALLY WHILE SUBJECTS CHEWED THREE TYPES OF GUM WITH DIFFERENT COMBINATIONS OF TASTE AND ODOR: no taste/no odor gum (C-gum, sweet taste/no odor gum (T-gum, and sweet taste/lemon odor gum (TO-gum. Simultaneous recordings of transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD and near infrared spectrometer (NIRS were used to measure CBF during gum chewing in 25 healthy volunteers. Bilateral masseter muscle activity was also monitored.We found that subjects could discriminate the type of gum without prior information. Subjects rated the TO-gum as the most flavorful gum and the C-gum as the least flavorful. Analysis of masseter muscle activity indicated that masticatory motor output during gum chewing was not affected by taste and odor. The TCD/NIRS measurements revealed significantly higher hemodynamic signals when subjects chewed the TO-gum compared to when they chewed the C-gum and T-gum.These data suggest that taste and odor can influence brain activation during chewing in sensory, cognitive, and motivational processes rather than in motor control.

  15. Flavor-Enhanced Modulation of Cerebral Blood Flow during Gum Chewing

    OpenAIRE

    Hasegawa, Yoko; Tachibana, Yoshihisa; Sakagami, Joe; Zhang, Min; Urade, Masahiro; Ono, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Background Flavor perception, the integration of taste and odor, is a critical factor in eating behavior. It remains unclear how such sensory signals influence the human brain systems that execute the eating behavior. Methods We tested cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the frontal lobes bilaterally while subjects chewed three types of gum with different combinations of taste and odor: no taste/no odor gum (C-gum), sweet taste/no odor gum (T-gum), and sweet taste/lemon odor gum (TO-gum). Simultaneo...

  16. Weed management strategies for castor bean crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Guerreiro Fontoura Costa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Castor bean crops are agriculturally relevant due to the quality and versatility of their oil, both for the chemical industry and for biodiesel production. Proper weed management is important for both the cultivation and the yield of castor bean crops; therefore, the intention of the present work is to review pertinent information regarding weed management, including the studies regarding weed interference periods, chemical controls for use in different crop production systems and herbicide selectivity, for castor bean crops. Weed science research for castor bean crops is scarce. One of the main weed management challenges for castor bean crops is the absence of herbicides registered with the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (MALFS. Research for viable herbicides for weed control in castor bean crops should be directed by research and/or rural extension institutions, associations and farmers cooperatives, as well as by manufactures, for the registration of these selective herbicides, which would be primarily used to control eudicotyledons in castor bean crops. New studies involving the integration of weed control methods in castor bean also may increase the efficiency of weed management, for both small farmers using traditional crop methods in the Brazilian Northeast region, as well as for areas with the potential for large scale production, using conservation tillage systems, such as the no-tillage crop production system.

  17. Performance of the Bean-protein Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩光亭; 杜宁; 孙亚宁

    2003-01-01

    The methods in testing the bean-protein fiber and the standards used were simply introduced. The fiber's mechanical and chemical performances were further analyzed. And the correlative performance of the bean-protein fibers and other natural fibers have been compared, then full knowledge of the fiber's performance was concluded.

  18. Common beans, diseases: ecology and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, is one of the most important edible legume crops worldwide, nutritionally and economically. Diseases caused by pathogens that affect beans can have catastrophic effects, destroying entire crops in some instances. There are more than 200 pathogens (bacterial, fungal,...

  19. Nutritional and health benefits of dried beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Virginia

    2014-07-01

    Dried beans (often referred to as grain legumes) may contribute to some of the health benefits associated with plant-based diets. Beans are rich in a number of important micronutrients, including potassium, magnesium, folate, iron, and zinc, and are important sources of protein in vegetarian diets. In particular, they are among the only plant foods that provide significant amounts of the indispensable amino acid lysine. Commonly consumed dried beans are also rich in total and soluble fiber as well as in resistant starch, all of which contribute to the low glycemic index of these foods. They also provide ample amounts of polyphenols, many of which are potent antioxidants. Intervention and prospective research suggests that diets that include beans reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, favorably affect risk factors for metabolic syndrome, and reduce risk of ischemic heart disease and diabetes. The relatively low bean intakes of North Americans and northern Europeans can be attributed to a negative culinary image as well as to intestinal discomfort attributable to the oligosaccharide content of beans. Cooking practices such as sprouting beans, soaking and discarding soaking water before cooking, and cooking in water with a more alkaline pH can reduce oligosaccharide content. Promotional efforts are needed to increase bean intake. PMID:24871476

  20. Promoter analysis of the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris gum operon directing biosynthesis of the xanthan polysaccharide.

    OpenAIRE

    Katzen, F; Becker, A.; Zorreguieta, A; Pühler, A; Ielpi, L

    1996-01-01

    The Xanthomonas campestris gum gene cluster is composed of 12 genes designated gumB, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, -H, -I, -J, -K, -L, and -M. The transcriptional organization of this gene cluster was analyzed by the construction of gum-lacZ transcriptional fusions in association with plasmid integration mutagenesis. This analysis, coupled with primer extension assays, indicated that the gum region was mainly expressed as an operon from a promoter located upstream of the first gene, gumB.

  1. Preliminary investigation of in-vitro bioadhesive properties of selected natural gums

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir Hayat Khan; Yusrida Darwis; Peh Kok Khiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to investigate the suitability of hydrophilic natural gums, namely - konjac glucomannan gum (KG), Tara gallactomannan gum (TG) andxanthan gum (XG); and their combination, as bioadhesive polymers. Materials and Methods: Bioadhesive strength of the gums and their combination was investigated using texture analyzer employing chicken pouch as biological membrane. Results: It was observed that the bioadhesive strength was enhanced by the increase in contact time betw...

  2. Gums' based delivery systems: Review on cashew gum and its derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, António J; de Souza, Flávia R Lucena; Bezerra, Janira M N A; Oliveira, Claudia; Nadvorny, Daniela; de La Roca Soares, Monica F; Nunes, Lívio C C; Silva-Filho, Edson C; Veiga, Francisco; Soares Sobrinho, José L

    2016-08-20

    The development of delivery systems using natural polymers such as gums offers distinct advantages, such as, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and cost effectiveness. Cashew gum (CG) has rheological and mucoadhesive properties that can find many applications, among which the design of delivery systems for drugs and other actives such as larvicide compounds. In this review CG is characterized from its source through to the process of purification and chemical modification highlighting its physicochemical properties and discussing its potential either for micro and nanoparticulate delivery systems. Chemical modifications of CG increase its reactivity towards the design of delivery systems, which provide a sustained release effect for larvicide compounds. The purification and, the consequent characterization of CG either original or modified are of utmost importance and is still a continuing challenge when selecting the suitable CG derivative for the delivery of larvicide compounds. PMID:27178924

  3. Enterprise JavaBeans 31

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinger, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Learn how to code, package, deploy, and test functional Enterprise JavaBeans with the latest edition of this bestselling guide. Written by the developers of JBoss EJB 3.1, this book not only brings you up to speed on each component type and container service in this implementation, it also provides a workbook with several hands-on examples to help you gain immediate experience with these components. With version 3.1, EJB's server-side component model for building distributed business applications is simpler than ever. But it's still a complex technology that requires study and lots of practi

  4. Efficacy of bupropion alone and in combination with nicotine gum

    OpenAIRE

    Piper, Megan E.; Federman, E. Belle; McCarthy, Danielle E.; Bolt, Daniel M.; Smith, Stevens S.; Fiore, Michael C.; Baker, Timothy B.

    2007-01-01

    In this double-blind placebo-controlled smoking cessation treatment study, 608 participants were randomly assigned to receive active bupropion and active 4-mg gum (AA, n = 228), active bupropion and placebo gum (AP, n = 224), or placebo bupropion and placebo gum (PP, n = 156). Relative to the PP group, the AA and AP groups were each significantly more likely to be abstinent at one week, end of treatment and six months, but not twelve months post-quit. After the first week post-quit there were...

  5. Electron beam irradiation effects on xanthan gum, rheological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Food ingredients to be used for food processing should be decontaminated in order to prevent food spoilage and food-borne diseases. Xanthan gum is a well-known microbial polysaccharide produced by Xanthomonas campestris used in the hydrocolloid market. This paper describes the application of electron beam (EB) irradiation to xanthan gum as used as ingredient by the food or cosmetics industry in order to establish their radiosensitivity. Viscosity of 1% xanthan gum solutions prepared with the irradiated powder decreased with the increase of the EB irradiation dose. The radiation-induced viscosity detriment of this additive must be considered for practical applications. (author)

  6. In vitro tooth whitening effect of two medicated chewing gums compared to a whitening gum and saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroea Geoffrey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extrinsic staining of teeth may result from the deposition of a variety of pigments into or onto the tooth surface, which originate mainly from diet or from tobacco use. More recently, clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of some chewing gums in removing extrinsic tooth staining. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of two nicotine medicated chewing gums (A and B on stain removal in an in vitro experiment, when compared with a confectionary whitening chewing gum (C and human saliva (D. Methods Bovine incisors were stained by alternating air exposure and immersion in a broth containing natural pigments such as coffee, tea and oral microorganisms for 10 days. Stained enamel samples were exposed to saliva alone or to the test chewing gums under conditions simulating human mastication. The coloration change of the enamel samples was measured using a spectrophotometer. Measurements were obtained for each specimen (average of three absorbances using the L*a*b scale: lightness (L*, red-green (a and yellow-blue (b. Results Medicated chewing gums (A and B removed a greater amount of visible extrinsic stain, while the confectionary chewing gum with a whitening claim (C had a milder whitening effect as evaluated by quantitative and qualitative assessment. Conclusion The tested Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT chewing gums were more effective in the removal of the extrinsic tooth stain. This visible improvement in tooth whitening appearance could strengthen the smokers' motivation to quit smoking.

  7. What do GUM physicians think should be taught in a modern undergraduate GUM module? A qualitative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, I

    2015-10-01

    Traditional undergraduate Genitourinary Medicine (GUM) teaching in the UK concentrated on the management of individual sexually transmitted infections. There is significant variation, however, in the GUM teaching provided by different medical schools today. I undertook a qualitative interview study to gather views of GUM and other sexual health clinicians regarding what should be taught within a modern undergraduate GUM module. Nine GUM clinicians and two Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) clinicians participated in the study; all were directly involved in undergraduate teaching. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with study participants by a single interviewer, focusing on three key topics: their individual opinions regarding important learning outcomes (LOs) for a modern model GUM curriculum, their preferred teaching methods and the total recommended teaching time required. Interviews were audio-recorded with consent and professionally transcribed. Data were analysed by the content analysis method. Interviewees frequently stressed skill and attitudinal LOs, even above knowledge. Recommended important skills included sexual history taking, HIV risk assessment and testing, and male and female genital examination. Recommended attitudinal LOs were developing an open and non-judgemental approach to sexual health issues and understanding sexual well-being to be an important component of general health. Respondents were keen for a mixture of teaching methods, but generally agreed that clinic attendance and experiential learning were beneficial. They preferred that GUM teaching should be delivered in the latter years of the undergraduate curriculum. PMID:25427405

  8. Evaluation of a Treatment Approach Combining Nicotine Gum with Self-Guided Behavioral Treatments for Smoking Relapse Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Joel D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Randomly assigned 1,218 smokers to cells in 4 (nicotine gum delivered ad lib, fixed regimen nicotine gum, placebo gum, no gum) x 3 (self-selected relapse prevention modules, randomly administered modules, no modules) design. Subjects receiving nicotine gum were more likely to be abstinent at 2- and 6-month followups. Fixed regimen accounted for…

  9. Radiation disinfestation of grains and cocoa beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments has been performed by Ghanaian scientists from 1977 to 1987 to evaluate the seriousness of infestation and to establish effective doses for radiation disinfestation against insects and fungi which cause deterioration in grains and cocoa beans. Supporting investigations have been done on the effect of radiation disinfestation on some quality parameters and wholesomeness of grains (with maize as the test grain) and cocoa beans. A minimum dose of 0.8 kGy was established for effective control of insects present in stored grains and cocoa beans. For the decontamination against fungi and yeasts, a combination of moist heat (85% RH) applied to 60 deg. C for 30 min followed by a dose of 4 kGy was effective for maize and moist heat (85% RH) applied 80 deg. C and a dose of 4 kGy was recommended for cocoa beans. No significant difference was found between the organoleptic qualities of the products from maize and cocoa that had been treated with moist heat and radiation and the untreated samples. The cooling (solidifying) curves of cocoa butter prepared from untreated and treated cocoa beans were very similar. Irradiated cocoa beans were found to be wholesome. The prospects of radiation disinfestation of grains and cocoa beans have also been discussed. (author). 27 refs, 4 tabs

  10. Preparation and evaluation of soft gellan gum gel containing paracetamol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gohel M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop soft paracetamol gel using gellan gum as a gelling agent and sodium citrate as a source of cation. Different batches were prepared using three different concentrations of gellan gum (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5%, each with two different sodium citrate concentrations (0.3 and 0.5%. The consistency of the paracetamol gel was dependent on the concentration of gellan gum, sodium citrate and co-solute. The results of dissolution study of soft gel containing 0.3% gellan gum and 0.3% sodium citrate revealed that paracetamol was completely released in 30 min. Polyethylene glycol 400 worked as a solubilizer for paracetamol. All the gels possessed acceptable sensory characteristics when evaluated by human volunteers. Short term stability study carried out for four weeks at different temperatures revealed no considerable changes in performance characteristics of developed optimized formulation.

  11. Xylitol gum and maternal transmission of mutans streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Y; Shinga-Ishihara, C; Kaji, M; Moriya, K; Murakami-Yamanaka, K; Takimura, M

    2010-01-01

    An important caries prevention strategy for children includes measures to interfere with transmission of mutans streptococci (MS). This study confirmed the effectiveness of maternal early exposure to xylitol chewing gum on mother-child transmission of MS. After screening, 107 pregnant women with high salivary MS were randomized into two groups: xylitol gum (Xylitol; n = 56) and no gum (Control; n = 51) groups. Maternal chewing started at the sixth month of pregnancy and terminated 13 months later in the Xylitol group. Outcome measures were the presence of MS in saliva or plaque of the children until age 24 months. The Xylitol-group children were significantly less likely to show MS colonization than Control-group children aged 9-24 months. The Control-group children acquired MS 8.8 months earlier than those in the Xylitol group, suggesting that maternal xylitol gum chewing in Japan shows beneficial effects similar to those demonstrated in Nordic countries. PMID:19948944

  12. Imported parasitic wasp helps control red gum lerp psyllid

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlsten, Donald L.; Daane, Kent M.; Paine, Timothy D.; Sime, Karen R.; Andrew B. Lawson; Rowney, David L.; Roltsch, William J.; Andrews Jr., John W.; Kabashima, John N.; Shaw, David A.; Robb, Karen L.; Geisel, Pamela M.; Chaney, William E.; Ingels, Chuck A.; Varela, Lucia G.

    2005-01-01

    The red gum lerp psyllid is an insect native to Australia, where it feeds upon eucalyptus species. Since 1998 this psyllid has spread throughout California, resulting in millions of dollars in damage and control costs. To help suppress the red gum lerp psyllid, a biological control program was initiated and a psyllid-specific parasitic wasp was imported from Australia in 1999 and released in 2000. In most coastal regions this biological control agent has provided substantial control, but in s...

  13. Medicated Chewing Gum: A Novel Oral Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Hitesh Jain*1, Mansi Shah1, Bhoomi Shah1, T. Y. Pasha2

    2010-01-01

    The selection of right drug delivery system is critical to the success of a pharmaceutical product.A novel drug delivery system creates additional patient benefits that will add new competitiveadvantages for a drug . Oral route is most convenient for the patient that’s why it is very popularin the society. Chewing gum delivery system is convenient, easy to administer - anywhere,anytime - and is pleasantly tasting making it patient acceptable. Medicated chewing gum offers awide range of advant...

  14. Design, formulation and evaluation of green tea chewing gum

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfazl Aslani; Alireza Ghannadi; Zeinab Khalafi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The main purpose of this study is to design, formulate and evaluate the green tea gums with a suitable taste and quality in order to produce an anti-oxidant chewing gum. Materials and Methods: Fresh green tea leaves obtained from Northern Iran for extraction. Maceration is the extraction method that is used in this study. The contents of caffeine, catechin and flavonoids of the hydro alcoholic extract were measured. Various formulations of the 120 mg green tea extract chewing ...

  15. Safety Assessment of Microbial Polysaccharide Gums as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2016-07-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel assessed the safety of 34 microbial polysaccharide gums for use in cosmetics, finding that these ingredients are safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentration. The microbial polysaccharide gums named in this report have a variety of reported functions in cosmetics, including emulsion stabilizer, film former, binder, viscosity-increasing agent, and skin-conditioning agent. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data in making its determination of safety. PMID:27383198

  16. The effect of chewing gum on dental plaque accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Karami Nogourani M.; Banihashemi M

    2010-01-01

    "nBackground and Aims: Studies show that sucrose containing chewing gums are cariogenic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two commercial chewing gums with and without sucrose on dental plaque accumulation compared with the control group. "nMaterials and Methods: In this clinical study, plaque accumulation during three 7-day periods (with two weeks interval) was recorded (Sillness & Loe Index) in a group of 23 volunteer male dental students who chewed in th...

  17. ISOLATED PROTEIN FROM CASTOR BEAN, PEANUT, SOY BEAN AND SAFFLOWER MEALS

    OpenAIRE

    B.Tavasolian; S.Nikpour; B.Makanvand

    1981-01-01

    Castor bean, peanut, Soy bean and safflower protein isolates were prepared. The amino acid content of each of the protein isolates was analysed and the essential amino acid contents were compared with the FAO human requirements. The results indicated that castor bean has the highest oil and the protein content of defatted meal. Safflower 3148 (Marand, Iran) has the highest amount of essential amino acids. Peanut (Gilan Iran) has the lowest content of essential amino acids, however, in compari...

  18. Oxidized Xanthan Gum and Chitosan as Natural Adhesives for Cork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Paiva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural cork stopper manufacturing produces a significant amount of cork waste, which is granulated and combined with synthetic glues for use in a wide range of applications. There is a high demand for using biosourced polymers in these composite materials. In this study, xanthan gum (XG and chitosan (CS were investigated as possible natural binders for cork. Xanthan gum was oxidized at two different aldehyde contents as a strategy to improve its water resistance. This modification was studied in detail by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, and the degree of oxidation was determined by the hydroxylamine hydrochloride titration method. The performance of the adhesives was studied by tensile tests and total soluble matter (TSM determinations. Xanthan gum showed no water resistance, contrary to oxidized xanthan gum and chitosan. It is hypothesized that the good performance of oxidized xanthan gum is due to the reaction of aldehyde groups—formed in the oxidation process—with hydroxyl groups on the cork surface during the high temperature drying. Combining oxidized xanthan gum with chitosan did not yield significant improvements.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of gum Arabic bonded Rhizophora spp. particleboards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Exploring gum Arabic as a binder for Rhizophora sp. particleboards. • The addition of gum Arabic improved overall properties. • Gum Arabic could be added to manufacture particleboards. - Abstract: Gum Arabic (GA) was used as a binder for the fabrication of Rhizophora spp. particleboards. The physical and mechanical properties of the bioadhesive bonded particleboards, including moisture content, internal bond (IB) strength, thickness swelling (TS), water absorption (WA) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were used to characterize the manufactured particleboards. Three different particle sizes of the Rhizophora spp. with four adhesive levels were utilized. Results revealed that the addition of GA into the particleboards noticeably improved panel overall properties. The GA bonded particleboards resulted in smoother surfaces, more rigid texture and better internal bonding strength compared to binderless particleboards made without using any adhesive. All specimens had internal bond strength of more than the minimum requirement of the Japanese Industrial Standard JIS A-5908 Type-8 of 0.15 N/mm2 and were noticed to increase by increasing the adhesive level. However the GA bonded particleboards had higher percentage of WA and the TS compared with the binderless boards. Microscopic study also revealed that particleboards bonded with the gum had better contact compared to the binderless boards. Based on these results, it could be concluded that gum Arabic is an effective natural substance that could be added to manufacture particleboards to improve some of panels’ physical and mechanical properties

  20. Pathogenicity of EPS-deficient mutants (gumB-, gumD and gumE - ) of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Three extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) -deficient mutants of the pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, gumB - , gumD - and gumE- were constructed by Tn5 gusA5 mutagenesis in this study. The results of pathogenicity bioassay showed that three mutants had the obviously decreased pathogenicity on radish ( Raphanus sativus L. ) leaves. Because dead body of the bacteria still caused symptoms, it seemed that some unknown factors on the bac terial cell surface might play certain roles in the pathogenicity of the pathogen. The extracted raw EPS could lead to the chlorotic symptom on radish leaves, and its virulence was increased with the increase of EPS dosage, which suggested that EPS was a main component that caused the danage on radish leaves.

  1. Rheological properties and some applications for rhamsan and xanthan gum solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podolsak, A.K.; Tiu, C.; Saeki, T.; Usui, H. [Monash University, Clayton, Vic. (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-07-01

    The rheological properties of solutions of xanthan gum (Kelzan D) and three rhamsan gums, S-60, S-130 and S-194, are examined. Effects studied include those of temperature, concentration and (for the rhamsan gums) extent of side chain branching. Solutions of greater viscosity and elasticity at most shear rates result as the degree of branching increases. When compared with xanthan gum, S-194 is found to be less temperature sensitive and more stable to excess shear. The use of these polymers in two commercial applications, (coal-water mixtures and timber preservative emulsions) is examined. Several advantages are identified when rhamsan gums are used instead of xanthan gum in both cases.

  2. Analytical studies on the gum exudate from Anogeissus leiocarpus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anogeissus leiocarpus gum samples were collected as natural exudate nodules, from three different location. Physicochemical properties of gum samples were studied. results showed significant differences within each location in most parameters studied except refractive index value which was found to be constant in all samples. The effect of location on the properties of gum samples was also studied and the analysis of variance showed insignificant differences (P≤0.05) in all properties studied except in ash content. Inter nodule variations of gum from two different location were studied individually. Results showed significant differences for each parameter studied except for the refractive index value. The properties studied of all gum samples were as follows: 9.2% moisture, 3.4% ash, 0.72% nitrogen, 4.74% protein, -35.5 specific rotation, 1.68 relative viscosity, 4.2 pH, 1.334 refractive index, 14.3 uronic acid, 0.44% reducing sugar, 1336.0 equivalent weight and 0.68% tannin content. UV absorption spectra of gum samples and gum nodules were determined. Cationic composition of gum samples was also determined and the results showed that (Mg) has highest value in all samples studied followed by Fe, Na, K, Ca, Zn and trace amount of Mn, Co, Ni, Cd and Pb. The water holding capacity was found to be 65.5% and emulsifying stability was found to be 1.008. The component sugars of gum were examined by different methods followed by qualitative and quantitative analysis. Analysis of hydrolysate crude gum sample by HPLC show L-rhamnose (6.82), L-arabinose (48.08), D-galactose (11.26) and two unknown oligosaccharides having values (0.22 and 32.61). Some physicochemical properties were studied. Results showed significant differences in nitrogen and protein contents, specific rotation, relative viscosity, equivalent weight and pH of fractions, where as insignificant differences were observed in uronic acid content and refractive index values

  3. Weed management strategies for castor bean crops

    OpenAIRE

    Augusto Guerreiro Fontoura Costa; Valdinei Sofiatti; Cleber Daniel de Góes Maciel; Juliana Parisotto Poletine; João Igor de Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Castor bean crops are agriculturally relevant due to the quality and versatility of their oil, both for the chemical industry and for biodiesel production. Proper weed management is important for both the cultivation and the yield of castor bean crops; therefore, the intention of the present work is to review pertinent information regarding weed management, including the studies regarding weed interference periods, chemical controls for use in different crop production systems and herbicide s...

  4. POLYSACCHARIDE GUM (KONDAGOGU GUM) MATRIX TABLETS FOR ORAL SUSTAINED DELIVERY OF METOPROLOL SUCCINATE

    OpenAIRE

    N. Aswani; Vinay, S.; T. M. Pramod Kumar; Valluru Ravi; N Srujana

    2011-01-01

    The present study has been undertaken to develop a sustained-release tablet dosage form for metoprolol succinate using kondagugu gum as the rate-controlling polymer. The prepared tablets were coated will shellac as an enteric coat polymer and evaluated for tablet properties. In vitro release studies of prepared tablets were carried out for 2 hrs in pH 1.2 HCl buffer and 22 hrs in pH 6.8phosphate buffer. In addition, swelling, kinetics of drug release from the matrices and stability of the tab...

  5. Ultrasound assisted enzymatic depolymerization of aqueous guar gum solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapat, Amrutlal L; Subhedar, Preeti B; Gogate, Parag R

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the effectiveness of application of low intensity ultrasonic irradiation for the intensification of enzymatic depolymerization of aqueous guar gum solution. The extent of depolymerization of guar gum has been analyzed in terms of intrinsic viscosity reduction. The effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters related to the enzyme activity as well as the intrinsic viscosity reduction of guar gum using enzymatic approach has been evaluated. The kinetic rate constant has been found to increase with an increase in the temperature and cellulase loading. It has been observed that application of ultrasound not only enhances the extent of depolymerization but also reduces the time of depolymerization as compared to conventional enzymatic degradation technique. In the presence of cellulase enzyme, the maximum extent of depolymerization of guar gum has been observed at 60 W of ultrasonic rated power and ultrasonic treatment time of 30 min. The effect of ultrasound on the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters as well as the molecular structure of cellulase enzyme was evaluated with the help of the chemical reaction kinetics model and fluorescence spectroscopy. Application of ultrasound resulted in a reduction in the thermodynamic parameters of activation energy (Ea), enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS) and free energy (ΔG) by 47%, 50%, 65% and 1.97%, respectively. The changes in the chemical structure of guar gum treated using ultrasound assisted enzymatic approach in comparison to the native guar gum were also characterized by FTIR. The results revealed that enzymatic depolymerization of guar gum resulted in a polysaccharide with low degree of polymerization, viscosity and consistency index without any change in the core chemical structure which could make it useful for incorporation in food products. PMID:26584988

  6. Superelastic load cycling of Gum Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The superelastic beta titanium alloy, Gum Metal, has been found to accumulate plastic strain during tensile load cycling in the superelastic regime. This is evident from the positive drift of the macroscopic stress vs. strain hysteresis curve parallel to the strain axis and the change in its geometry subsequent to every load–unload cycle. In addition, there is a progressive reduction in the hysteresis loop width and in the stress at which the superelastic transition occurs. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction has shown that the lattice strain exhibited the same behaviour as that observed in macroscopic measurements and identified further evidence of plastic strain accumulation. The mechanisms responsible for the observed behaviour have been evaluated using transmission electron microscopy, which revealed a range of different defects that formed during load cycling. The formation of these defects is consistent with the classical mathematical theory for the bcc to orthorhombic martensitic transformation. It is the accumulation of these defects over time that alters its superelastic behaviour

  7. Microencapsulation of saffron petal anthocyanins with cress seed gum compared with Arabic gum through freeze drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Mahdavi-Khazaei, Katayoun; Hemmati-Kakhki, Abbas

    2016-04-20

    In this research, encapsulation efficiency of cress seed gum (CSG) as a native hydrocolloid was compared with Arabic gum (AG) and maltodextrin (dextrose equivalent of 20 (M20), and 7 (M7)) for saffron (Crocus sativus) petal's extract by freeze drying method. Combinations of CSG-M20, AG-M20, and M7-M20 with ratios of 50:50 and M20 alone (100%) were used as wall materials. A mixture of 1:5 (based on dry matter) between core (concentrated anthocyanin extract of saffron petal) and wall materials were freeze dried and stability of encapsulated anthocyanins along with color parameters (a*, b*, L*, C, H° and TCD) of final powders were measured during 10 weeks of storage (at 35°C as an accelerated method). Total anthocyanins were determined through pH differential method every week. Four prepared formulations of encapsulated powders didn't show any significant differences (P>0.01) in terms of total anthocyanin content measured immediately after production and after 10 weeks storage. AG-M20 mixture and M20 alone showed the highest and lowest TCD, respectively. The mixture of CSG-M20 in comparison with AG-M20 and M20 had the same protecting effect (P<0.01) but showed a relatively high TCD (9.33). PMID:26876823

  8. Effect of partial replacement of gum arabic with carbohydrates on its microencapsulation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, B F; White, L E; O'Riordan, E D; O'Sullivan, M

    2001-07-01

    Gum arabic solutions (10% w/v) were emulsified with soy oil at oil/gum ratios of 0.25-5.0. At oil/gum ratios spray-dried emulsions of soy oil and mixed solutions (10% w/v) of gum arabic and a range of carbohydrate wall materials (oil/gum = 0.5) were prepared and analyzed. Maize starch and glucose were ineffective as partial replacers of gum arabic, but maltodextrins of various dextrose equivalence values (5.5-38) successfully replaced 50% of the gum arabic. The microencapsulation efficiency of the gum arabic/maltodextrin stabilized powders was further increased by increasing total solids of the feed to the dryer and by increasing the atomizer nozzle diameter. PMID:11453779

  9. STUDIES ON SOME PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF LEUCAENA LEUCOCEPHALA BARK GUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha Pendyala

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Gum exudates from Leucaena Leucocephala (Family: Fabaceae plants grown all over India were investigated for its physicochemical properties such as pH, swelling capacity and viscosities at different temperatures using standard methods. Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum appeared to be colorless to reddish brown translucent tears. 5 % w/v mucilage has pH of 7.5 at 28°C. The gum is slightly soluble in water and practically insoluble in ethanol, acetone and chloroform. It swells to about 5 times its original weight in water. A 5 %w/v mucilage concentration gave a viscosity value which was unaffected at temperature ranges (28-40°C. At concentrations of 2 and 5 %w/v, the gum exhibited pseudo plastic flow pattern while at 10 %w/v concentration the flow behaviour was thixotropic. The results indicate that the swelling ability of Leucaena Leucocephala (LL bark gum may provide potentials for its use as a disintegrant in tablet formulation, as a hydro gel in modified release dosage forms and the rheological flow properties may also provide potentials for its use as suspending and emulsifying agents owing to its pseudo plastic and thixotropic flow patterns.

  10. Studies on gum of Moringa oleifera for its emulsifying properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibya Sundar Panda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emulsion has been a form of presenting water insoluble substances for a long period of time. Now a day, it has been a way of presenting various intravenous additives and diagnostic agents in X-ray examinations. Various substances can be used as emulsifying agent, which can be operationally defined as a stabilizer of the droplets formed of the internal phase. Materials and Methods: Gum from Moringa oleifera was evaluated for its emulsifying properties. Castor oil emulsions 30 percent (o/w, containing 2 to 4% Moringa oleifera gum was prepared. Emulsions containing equivalent concentration of acacia were also prepared for comparison. All the emulsions prepared were stored at room temperature and studied for stability at various time intervals for 8 weeks. The prepared emulsions were evaluated for creaming rate, globule size and rate of coalescence. 23 factorial design was chosen to investigate the effects of centrifugation, pH, temperature changes and electrolytes on the creaming rate and globule size. Results: The results of the investigations show that the gum of Moringa oleifera possesses better emulsifying properties as compared to gum acacia. Conclusion: Gum of Moringa oleifera could be used in pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical preparation.

  11. RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR OF ERWINIA GUM IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na Zhang; Mei Zhang; Jing-hua Chen; Hideki Iijima; Hiromichi Tsuchiya

    1999-01-01

    Erwinia (E) gum, an extracellular polysaccharide, is composed of fucose, galatose, glucose and glucuronic acid. Its viscosity behavior was investigated by a low-shear-rate multiball viscometer and a rotational viscometer. Its weight-average molecular weight Mw and intrinsic viscosity [η] in 0.2 mol/L NaCl aqueous solution were measured by light scattering method at 35℃ and viscometry at 25℃ and found to be 1.06 × 106 g/mol and 1050 mL/g, respectively, and its aggregates in aqueous solution were proved by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). These results indicated that E gum in water has exceedingly high viscosity and exhibits Binham fluid behavior, owing to its aggregation. The viscosity of E gum decreased with increasing temperature, and the turning point appeared at 38℃ for dilute solution and 80℃ for concentrated solution suggesting that the aggregates of E gum in water started to disaggregate under these temperatures. In addition, the aggregates can be disrupted by adding either acid or base. The experimental results indicated that the E gum is a good thickening agent, and its fluid behavior is similar to xanthan.

  12. Studies on some physicochemical properties of Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha Pendyala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gum exudates from Leucaena Leucocephala (Family: Fabaceae plants grown all over India were investigated for its physicochemical properties such as pH, swelling capacity and viscosities at different temperatures using standard methods. Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum appeared to be colorless to reddish brown translucent tears. 5 % w/v mucilage has pH of 7.5 at 28°C. The gum is slightly soluble in water and practically insoluble in ethanol, acetone and chloroform. It swells to about 5 times its original weight in water. A 5 %w/ v mucilage concentration gave a viscosity value which was unaffected at temperature ranges (28-40°C. At concentrations of 2 and 5 %w/v, the gum exhibited pseudo plastic flow pattern while at 10 %w/v concentration the flow behaviour was thixotropic. The results indicate that the swelling ability of Leucaena Leucocephala (LL bark gum may provide potentials for its use as a disintegrant in tablet formulation, as a hydro gel in modified release dosage forms and the rheological flow properties may also provide potentials for its use as suspending and emulsifying agents owing to its pseudo plastic and thixotropic flow patterns.

  13. Formulation of Eco-friendly Medicated Chewing Gum to Prevent Motion Sickness

    OpenAIRE

    Shete, Rahul B.; Muniswamy, Vimalkumar J.; Ashlesha P. Pandit; Khandelwal, Kishanchandra R.

    2015-01-01

    An attempt was made to formulate medicated chewing gum to prevent motion sickness using natural gum base for faster onset of action and easy administration, anywhere and anytime, without access to water. To avoid the discard issue of gum cud, natural gum base of Triticum aestivum (wheat grain) was explored because of its biodegradable and biocompatible nature and easy availability. Prolamin, extracted from wheat, showed good chewing capacity, elasticity, high water retention capacity, antifun...

  14. Java EE 7 development with NetBeans 8

    CERN Document Server

    Heffelfinger, David R

    2015-01-01

    The book is aimed at Java developers who wish to develop Java EE applications while taking advantage of NetBeans functionality to automate repetitive tasks. Familiarity with NetBeans or Java EE is not assumed.

  15. Study on the Preparation Technology of Red Bean Set Yoghurt%红豆凝固型酸奶制备工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冰

    2014-01-01

    以红豆、脱脂牛乳为主要原料制作红豆凝固型酸奶,研究了红豆的最佳预处理条件,并以感官评定为指标确定了果胶和黄原胶的最佳复配比例。结果表明,红豆浸泡8h、蒸煮1h效果最佳。经感官评分确定,果胶添加量为2.0%、黄原胶添加量为1.5%时制备的凝固型酸奶评分最高。%The red bean and skim milk was used as the main raw material to make set yogurt, the optimal pretreatment conditions and the optimum proportion of pectin and xanthan gum were studied. The results showed that red beans soaked for 8h and boiled for 1h, the effect was best. By the sensory evaluation, when pectin content was 2%and xanthan gum addition was 1.5%, the score for producing yoghurt was highest.

  16. Fluoride and urea chewing gums in an intra-oral experimental caries model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjogren, K; Ruben, J; Lingstrom, P; Lundberg, AB; Birkhed, D

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of sugar-free chewing gums containing fluoride (F) and urea in an intra-oral experimental caries model. Placebo chewing gums (without any active ingredient) and no gum served as controls. Fifteen subjects participated in a cross-over, s

  17. The role of time on task performance in modifying the effects of gum chewing on attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucha, Lara; Simpson, William

    2011-01-01

    Recent research examined the effects of chewing gum on attention and reported a significant interaction of gum chewing with time. Using a crossover within-subject design, the present study examined the effect of gum chewing on sustained attention in healthy adults over a period of 30 min. The result

  18. Severe Gum Disease May Boost Death Rate of Kidney Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gum disease and kidney disease, and whether treating gum disease and maintaining dental health could improve the overall health of kidney disease ... Chronic Kidney Disease Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Chronic Kidney Disease Gum Disease About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us ...

  19. Cetirizine release from cyclodextrin formulated compressed chewing gum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojanov, Mladen; Larsen, Kim Lambertsen

    2012-01-01

    Beside the efficient effect on masking cetirizine bitter taste, the cyclodextrins (CDs) as well could have influence on the release from the formulation. In vitro release profiles of cetirizine from compressed chewing gums containing α-, β- and γ-CD were investigated using a three cell chewing...... apparatus. Different cetirizine/CD formulations were produced and analysed with respect to type of CD (α-, β- and γ-CD), the molar ratio between cetirizine and CD and the formulation of cetirizine (complex or physical mixture). Release experiments from all compressed chewing gum formulations gave similar...... release patterns, but with variations in the total amount released. Chewing gum formulated with cetirizine alone, demonstrated a release of 75% after 8 min of chewing. The presence of CDs resulted in increased cetirizine release. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that parameters with the most...

  20. [Tooth protecting chewing gum tablets for lessening caries risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhmann, A G; Brösch, C; Riethe, P

    1991-12-01

    This study examines whether the regular use of sugar-free chewing gum can improve oral hygiene and therefore reduce the risk of caries. During a four-week test, twenty subjects chewed a piece of gum twice a day for thirty minutes after meals. At the start, after two weeks, and at the end of the test period, the plaque and gingiva indices were recorded and the buffer capacity and secretion rate of the saliva determined. At the end of the test, a substantial reduction in the plaque and gingiva indices, an increase in the secretion rate and an improvement in buffer capacity were found, in comparison with the start levels. The changes were statistically significant. Sugar-free chewing gum alone is no substitute for regular dental care, but its use can be recommended as a way of supplementing traditional methods of oral hygiene. PMID:1818604

  1. Effects of fermented soya bean on digestion, absorption and diarrhoea

    OpenAIRE

    Kiers, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    For many centuries Asian people have consumed soya beans in various forms of traditional fermented soya bean foods. Major desirable aspects of fermented soya bean foods are their attractive flavour and texture, certain nutritional properties, and possible health promoting effects. This study describes effects of fermented soya beans on gastrointestinal physiology and addresses digestion, absorption and diarrhoea.Using an in vitro digestion model it appeared that fermentation increased solubil...

  2. On the Specification of Components - the JavaBeans Example

    OpenAIRE

    Heisel, Maritta; Santen, Thomas; Souquières, Jeanine

    2002-01-01

    We specify the JavaBean component model and concrete beans using a combination of UML class diagrams, an extension of Object-Z, and life sequence charts. We extend Object-Z by keywords that allow one to concisely describe the interface of a bean by an Object-Z class specification. The component model specification provides specification templates consisting of class diagrams, Object-Z fragments, and life sequence charts that precisely capture the functional behavior of beans in general, inclu...

  3. The Antibacterial Effect of CMCTS-Containing Chewing Gum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dagang Miao; Dan Blom; Hongmei Zhao; Xuefei Luan; Tongzhi Chen; Xiaohui Wu; Ning Song

    2009-01-01

    Objective:This paper was designed to confirm the efficacy of chewing carboxymethyl chitosan(CMCTS)-containing gum in suppressing the growth of oral bacteria when compared to a CMCTS-containing mouth rinse.Methods:Fourteen healthy subjects were recruited from among the staff and students of Qingdao University Dentistry Department.Before the experiments saliva was collected from all subjects and bacteria counts determined.For the gum study,the subjects chewed CMCTS-containing gum for 5 rain and then rested for 5 min.When testing the CMCTS mouth rinse,the subjects gargled with 10 mL of solution for 30 s,followed by resting for 9min 30 s.These protocols were repeated five times over a 50 rain period on the same day.Post-experiment saliva samples were then collected at the following times:0,30 and 60 min.Results:Chewing gum containing CMCTS or rinsing with a CMCTS-containing rinse significantly decreased oral bacteria counts.The total bacteria counts,total Streptococci counts,and mutans streptococci counts of saliva from subjects who chewed CMCTS-containing gum were significantly lower than saliva from subjects in the rinse group in all three sampling periods,except in the case of the total bacteria count in the 60 min samples.Conclusion:CMCTS-containing gum chewing has a greater antibac-terial effect than using a CMCTS-containing mouth rinse.The present findings strongly indicate that the application of natural materials such as chitosan and its derivatives is useful for better oral health.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF OKRA GUM AS A TABLET BINDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Tavakoli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The type and amount of binders decisively influence the characteristics of tablets prepared by wet granulation procedure. Commonly used binders like acacia, gelatin, starch and hydrolyzed starch have natural origin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new binder extracted from Hibiscus esculentus (Okra gum in tabletting. Okra gum was extracted from the pods of Okra fruit by maceration in distilled water followed by filtration of viscous solution as well as precipitation of gum extract by using acetone. To evaluate the binder effectiveness, two models, including a placebo formulation (lactose and a drug formulation (Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen, and/or Calcium acetate were evaluated. Granules were prepared by different concentrations (0.5-6 %w/w of Okra gum and tabletted using a Kilian single punch press. Cornstarch (12.5 % w/w and P.V.P (22 %w/w were employed as the standard binders for comparison. The physical properties of the granulates and those of the tablets including disintegration time and dissolution rate were studied. The properties of placebo granulates (bulk and tapped density, granule strength, flowability as well as those of tablets (hardness, friability, disintegration time were generally good. Moreover, the physical properties of Ibuprofen and Calcium acetate tablets containing Okra gum showed sufficient hardness, desirable disintegration time and low friability. The percent of drug released after 45 minutes were 15 %, 44 % and 96 % for Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen and Calcium acetate tablets, respectively..Okra gum produces some tablet formulations with good hardness and friability. However, this binder prolongs the dissolution rate of some slightly soluble drugs and hence may be good candidate for sustained release formulations.

  5. The Efficacy of Green Tea Chewing Gum on Gingival Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behfarnia, Parichehr; Aslani, Ahmad; Jamshidian, Foroogh; Noohi, Soheil

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem According to previous studies, the components of green tea extracts can inhibit the growth of a wide range of gram-pos-itive and -negative bacterial species and might be useful in controlling oral infections. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the effect of green tea chewing gum on the rate of plaque and gingival inflammation in subjects with gingivitis. Materials and Method In this double-blind randomize controlled clinical trial, 45 patients with generalized marginal gingivitis were selected and divided into two groups of green tea (23) and placebo (22) chewing gum. The patients chewed two gums for 15 minutes daily for three weeks. Sulcus bleeding index (SBI) and approximal plaque index (API) were studied at the baseline, 7 and 21 days later. Saliva sampling was conducted before and after 21 days for evaluation of IL-1β. The results were analyzed and compared by using repeated measures ANOVA, paired t test, and independent two-sample t test (α=0.05). Result The results showed that chewing gum significantly affected the SBI and API (p< 0.001). Paired t test showed that the two groups were significantly different regarding the mean changes of SBI and API at different periods of 1-7, 1-21, and 7-21 (p< 0.001). Concerning IL-1β, the repeated measures ANOVA revealed that the effect of chewing gum was significant (p<0.001). Moreover, paired t-test represented no significant difference between the mean changes of IL-1β within 1-21 day (p= 0.086). Conclusion The green tea chewing gum improved the SBI and API and effectively reduced the level of IL-1β. PMID:27284561

  6. Evaluation of the recycle of nitrogen in a succession bean - corn -bean By means of the isotopic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the recycle of Nitrogen in a succession bean - corn - bean a was developed I experience under field conditions, on Red Ferralitic soils (Rhodic Ferrasols) with the one I use of the stable isotope 15 Nitrogen

  7. Effects of fermented soya bean on digestion, absorption and diarrhoea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    For many centuries Asian people have consumed soya beans in various forms of traditional fermented soya bean foods. Major desirable aspects of fermented soya bean foods are their attractive flavour and texture, certain nutritional properties, and possible health promoting effects. This study describ

  8. Chewing gum and lozenges as delivery systems for noscapine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard Jensen, L.; Christrup, Lona Louring; Menger, N.;

    1991-01-01

    Chewing gum and lozenges were evaluated as delivery systems for noscapine with the aim of developing improved antitussive preparations. The formulations studied were prepared with both the water-soluble hydrochloride salt of noscapine and with the poorly soluble embonate salt and noscapine free...... base. The release characteristics of the preparations were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo, and their taste properties examined. Only the formulations containing noscapine base were without any appreciable taste. Chewing gum containing this compound showed, however, a low level of drug release both...

  9. Randomised controlled trial of nicotine chewing-gum.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, M. J.; Raw, M.; Russell, M A; Feyerabend, C

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of 2 mg nicotine chewing-gum as an aid to stopping smoking was compared with a placebo containing 1 mg nicotine, but unbuffered, in a double-blind randomised trial. Of 58 subjects given the active gum, 27 (47%) were not smoking at one-year follow-up compared with 12 (21%) of the 58 subjects treated with placebo (p less than 0.025). By the most stringent criterion of outcome, 18 (31%) subjects in the active treatment group and eight (14%) in the placebo group had not smoked a...

  10. Methyl bromide residues in fumigated cocoa beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 14C activity in unroasted [14C]-methyl bromide fumigated cocoa beans was used to study the fate and persistence of CH3Br in the stored beans. About 70% of the residues occurred in the shells. Unchanged CH3Br could not be detected, all the sorbed CH3Br having reacted with bean constituents apparently to form 14C-methylated derivatives and inorganic bromide. No 14C activity was found in the lipid fraction. Roasting decreased the bound (non-volatile) residues, with corresponding changes in the activities and amounts of free sugars, free and protein amino acids. Roasted nibs and shells showed a two-fold increase in the volatile fraction of the 14C residue. This fraction may be related to the volatile aroma compounds formed by Maillard-type reactions. (author)

  11. Fluorescence spectral studies of Gum Arabic: Multi-emission of Gum Arabic in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhenadhayalan, Namasivayam, E-mail: ndhena@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Mythily, Rajan, E-mail: rajanmythily@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India); Kumaran, Rajendran, E-mail: kumaranwau@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Gum Arabic (GA), a food hydrocolloid is a natural composite obtained from the stems and branches of Acacia Senegal and Acacia Seyal trees. GA structure is made up of highly branched arabinogalactan polysaccharides. Steady-state absorption, fluorescence, and time-resolved fluorescence spectral studies of acid hydrolyzed GA solutions were carried out at various pH conditions. The fluorescence in GA is predominantly attributed to the presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine amino acids. The presence of multi-emissive peaks at different pH condition is attributed to the exposure of the fluorescing amino acids to the aqueous phase, which contains several sugar units, hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of GA exhibits a multi-exponential decay with different fluorescence lifetime of varying amplitude which confirms that tyrosine is confined to a heterogeneous microenvironment. The existence of multi-emissive peaks with large variation in the fluorescence intensities were established by 3D emission contour spectral studies. The probable location of the fluorophore in a heterogeneous environment was further ascertained by constructing a time-resolved emission spectrum (TRES) and time-resolved area normalized emission spectrum (TRANES) plots. Fluorescence spectral technique is used as an analytical tool in understanding the photophysical properties of a water soluble complex food hydrocolloid containing an intrinsic fluorophore located in a multiple environment is illustrated. - Highlights: • The Manuscript deals with the steady state absorption, emission, fluorescence lifetime and time-resolved emission spectrum studies of Gum Arabic in aqueous medium at various pH conditions. • The fluorescence emanates from the tyrosine amino acid present in GA. • Change in pH results in marked variation in the fluorescence spectral properties of tyrosine. • Fluorescence spectral techniques are employed as a tool in establishing the

  12. Fluorescence spectral studies of Gum Arabic: Multi-emission of Gum Arabic in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gum Arabic (GA), a food hydrocolloid is a natural composite obtained from the stems and branches of Acacia Senegal and Acacia Seyal trees. GA structure is made up of highly branched arabinogalactan polysaccharides. Steady-state absorption, fluorescence, and time-resolved fluorescence spectral studies of acid hydrolyzed GA solutions were carried out at various pH conditions. The fluorescence in GA is predominantly attributed to the presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine amino acids. The presence of multi-emissive peaks at different pH condition is attributed to the exposure of the fluorescing amino acids to the aqueous phase, which contains several sugar units, hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of GA exhibits a multi-exponential decay with different fluorescence lifetime of varying amplitude which confirms that tyrosine is confined to a heterogeneous microenvironment. The existence of multi-emissive peaks with large variation in the fluorescence intensities were established by 3D emission contour spectral studies. The probable location of the fluorophore in a heterogeneous environment was further ascertained by constructing a time-resolved emission spectrum (TRES) and time-resolved area normalized emission spectrum (TRANES) plots. Fluorescence spectral technique is used as an analytical tool in understanding the photophysical properties of a water soluble complex food hydrocolloid containing an intrinsic fluorophore located in a multiple environment is illustrated. - Highlights: • The Manuscript deals with the steady state absorption, emission, fluorescence lifetime and time-resolved emission spectrum studies of Gum Arabic in aqueous medium at various pH conditions. • The fluorescence emanates from the tyrosine amino acid present in GA. • Change in pH results in marked variation in the fluorescence spectral properties of tyrosine. • Fluorescence spectral techniques are employed as a tool in establishing the

  13. Stability analysis of primary emulsion using a new emulsifying agent gum odina

    OpenAIRE

    Amalesh Samanta; Durbadal Ojha; Biswajit Mukherjee

    2010-01-01

    Gum odina and various parts of the plant Odina wodier are traditionally used in Indian folk me- dicine. Here an effort was made to investigate the efficacy of gum odina as new pharmaceutical excipients, in particular, as an emulsifying agent. Primary emulsion was prepared using wet gum method taking oil: water: gum (4:2:1) with gum acacia powder as an emulsifying agent. This was used as a standard control formulation. In case of experimental emulsions the primary emulsion was prepared by same...

  14. Extrudates of starch-xanthan gum mixtures as affected by chemical agents and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixtures of starch, xanthan gum and either polyvinyl alcohol, epichlorohydrin, valeric acid or adipoyl chloride were extruded. Properties of extrudates including apparent viscosity, water solubility, water absorption indices and extrudate expansion were measured for different proportions of xanthan gum, 70% amylose starch (with or without irradiation) and chemical agents. Extrusion with chemical agents and irradiation changed physical properties of both starch and xanthan gum. Expansions of extrudates were higher than that of starch. Viscosity of extrudates increased with xanthan gum concentration. The addition of 1% (w/w) polyvinyl alcohol had the greatest effect of the chemical agents. Irradiation increased the apparent viscosity of starch-xanthan gum mixtures

  15. Stem Anatomy of Country Bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Touhidul Islam

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical investigation has been made on the stem of country bean (Lablab purpureus (L. Sweet at different stages of growth following the standard paraffin method of microtechnique. The epidermis is single layered with multicellular hairs and glandular trichomes. Beneath the epidermis there are 5-10 layers of cortical cells. The primary vascular tissue appears after the elongation of the first internode of the stem. The vascular bundles are collateral and arranged in a ring. There are two types of vascular bundles, large and small. There are one or more small vascular bundles in between two large bundles. The large vascular bundle contains xylem and phloem but small bundle may or may not contain both xylem and phloem. There are several poles of primary phloem outside the primary xylem. The pericycle is discontinuous. Two adjacent groups of sclerenchyma are connected by one or two layers of sclerenchymatous cells. The cambium initiates in the primary vascular bundle between xylem and phloem at the basal part of the stem of 4 days old plant. Gradually it extends towards the upper part. The cambium is at first confined to the fascicular region. Subsequently it extends into the interfascicular region forming a complete cambial ring. After the formation of the fascicular cambium it gives rise to the secondary xylem adaxially and secondary phloem abaxially. In the mature stem, most of the vessels are multiple, some are paired while the others are solitary. Most of the fibre cells in the phloem region are found in groups. The fibre cells are arranged in such a way that the structure looks like a pyramid. Tannin cells are present in the phloem region of younger and mature stem. The secretory cells devoid of tanniniferous contents have been observed in the secondary phloem region of the mature stem. The phellogen appears in the deeper cortex and produces periderm with lenticel. The periderm consists of 3-5 layers of cork cells abaxially and 2-3 layers

  16. 响应面法优化黄原胶发酵生产培养基%Optimizing fermentation medium of xanthan gum by response surface method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严伟; 李群良; 杨克迪; 龙云飞; 文衍宣

    2012-01-01

    Xanthan gum, a heteropolysaccharide produced by Xahthomonas campasteris, is widely used in food and oil industries. The main components of the medium were determined by single-factor experiment, and their concentrations were determined by response surface method of Box-Behnken Design. The results showed that under the condition of 4.66% sucrose,0.5% bean flour,0.33% calcium carbonate concentration, xanthan gum concentration reached 2. 18% , increased by 80. 16% compared to the control.%通过单因素实验确定了黄原胶发酵生产培养基的主要成分,采用Box-Behnken Design响应面法确定了培养基各成分浓度:蔗糖浓度为4.66%,黄豆粉浓度为0.50%,碳酸钙浓度为0.33%时,发酵液中黄原胶浓度达到2.18%,黄原胶产量比优化前提高了80.16%.

  17. Formulation of controlled release gellan gum macro beads of amoxicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, R Jayachandra; Sathigari, Sateesh; Kumar, M Thilek; Pandit, J K

    2010-01-01

    Gellan gum has been reported to have wide pharmaceutical applications such as tablet binder, disintegrant, gelling agent and as a controlled release polymer. Multiparticulate delivery systems spread out more uniformly in the gastrointestinal tract and reduce the local irritation. The purpose of this study is to explore possible applicability of gellan macro beads as an oral controlled release system of a sparingly soluble drug, amoxicillin. Gellan gum beads were prepared by ionotropic gelation with calcium ions. The effect of drug loading, stirring time, polymer concentration, electrolyte (CaCl2) concentration, curing time etc. influencing the preparation of the gellan gum macro beads and the drug release from gellan gum beads were investigated in this study. Optimal preparation conditions allowed very high incorporation efficiency for amoxicillin (91%) The release kinetics of amoxicillin from gellan beads followed the diffusion model for an inert porous matrix in the order: 0.1 N HCl > phosphate buffer > distilled water. Change in curing time did not significantly affect the release rate constant, but drug concentration, polymer concentration and electrolyte concentration significantly affect the release rate of amoxicillin from the beads. The gellan macro beads may be suitable for gastro retentive controlled delivery of amoxicillin. PMID:19863487

  18. 75 FR 44251 - Wood Oils and Gums, and Streptomyces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    .... In the United States, cedarwood oil is mainly extracted from Juniperus virginiana (Eastern red cedar or Virginia cedar), Juniperus ashei or mexicana (Texas cedar), and Thuja plicata (Western red cedar... AGENCY EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-0441; FRL-8829-8 Wood Oils and Gums, and Streptomyces Strain K61;...

  19. Identification from a bitemark in a wad of chewing gum

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, P.; Carson, G; Taylor, J.A.; Brown, K. A.

    2001-01-01

    A wad of used chewing gum recovered from the scene of a burglary contained impressions of human teeth. Casts of these impressions displayed unique morphological characteristics which were found to show concordance with corresponding features present on casts of the posterior teeth of a suspect.

  20. Nitrogen mineralization in soils amended with sunnhemp, velvet bean and common bean residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrosano Edmilson José

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (15N released from sunnhemp (Crotalaria juncea, velvet bean (Mucuna aterrima and from Phaseolus bean residues was evaluated after incubation of the plant material in an Eutrudox and a Paleudalf, in a greenhouse experiment with pots containing 6 kg of air dried soil. Dry matter equivalent to 13 Mg ha-1 of Phaseolus bean residues and the same amount of above ground parts of the leguminous species, associated to 2.7 and 2.2 Mg ha-1 of roots of sunnhemp and velvet bean respectively, were incorporated into the soil. A completely randomized experimental design was adopted, with treatments arranged in a 2 3 + 1 factorial, replicated three times. The treatments were the following: two soils (Eutrudox and Paleudalf and three plant materials: two green-manures (sunnhemp or velvet bean, and Phaseolus bean residues, besides one control without plant incorporation into the soil. For the green-manure treatments there were two sub-treatments for each legume species, with 15N labeling of either shoots or roots. Soil moisture was maintained relatively constant during the experiment al period and the treatments were sampled weekly during 49 days. Total mineral nitrogen in the soil, as well as that derived from the legume plants were determined by isotope dilution. Nitrogen from the velvet bean accounted for a greater proportion of the soil inorganic N; shoots were responsible for most of N accumulated. Dry bean residues caused immobilization of inorganic N. The leguminous species added were intensively and promptly mineralized preserving the soil native nitrogen. Mineralization of the legume plant N was greater in the Paleudalf soil than in the Eutrudox.

  1. Nitrogen mineralization in soils amended with sunnhemp, velvet bean and common bean residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen (15N) released from sunnhemp (Crotalaria juncea), velvet bean (Mucuna aterrima) and from Phaseolus bean residues was evaluated after incubation of the plant material in an Eutrudox and a Paleudalf, in a greenhouse experiment with pots containing 6 kg of air dried soil. Dry matter equivalent to 13 Mg ha-1 of Phaseolus bean residues and the same amount of above ground arts of the leguminous species, associated to 2.7 and 2.2 Mg ha-1 of roots of sunnhemp and velvet bean respectively, were incorporated into the soil. A completely randomized experimental design was adopted, with treatments arranged in a 2 x 3 + 1 factorial, replicated three times. The treatments were the following: two soils (Eutrudox and Paleudalf) and three plant materials: two green-manures (sunnhemp or velvet bean), and Phaseolus bean residues, besides one control without plant incorporation into the soil. For the green-manure treatments there were two sub-treatments for each legume species, with 15N labeling of either shoots or roots. Soil moisture was maintained relatively constant during the experimental period and the treatments were sampled weekly during 49 days. Total mineral nitrogen in the soil, as well as that derived from the legume plants were determined by isotope dilution. Nitrogen from the velvet bean accounted for a greater proportion of the soil inorganic N; shoots were responsible for most of N accumulated. Dry bean residues caused immobilization of inorganic N. The leguminous species added were intensively and promptly mineralized preserving the soil native nitrogen. Mineralization of the legume plant N was greater in the Paleudalf soil than in the Eutrudox. (author)

  2. Virus diseases of peas, beans, and faba bean in the Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkouk, Khaled; Pappu, Hanu; Kumari, Safaa G

    2012-01-01

    In the Mediterranean region, pea, bean, and faba bean production is affected by around 17 major viruses. These viruses do not have the same ecology and consequently require a variety of different preventive measures to control them. Some of these viruses have a narrow host range, such as Faba bean necrotic yellows virus (FBNYV), and others, such as Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), a very wide host range. Such features are important when identifying sources of virus inoculum in a region, and the vectors can transmit viruses from natural reservoirs to the crop plants. Some of these viruses are seed borne and, consequently, can be disseminated long distances through infected seeds. Crop losses caused by these viruses are variable, depending on the sensitivity and susceptibility of the crop to infection. Host resistance genes have been identified for some of these viruses, but in others, such as FBNYV, no resistance genes in faba bean have been identified yet. Significant progress was made in developing precise methods for the identification of these viruses, and new virus problems are being identified every year. This chapter is not intended to be a review for pea, bean, and faba bean viruses, but rather focuses on the major viruses which affect these crops in the Mediterranean basin with focus on the progress made over the past two decades. PMID:22682174

  3. Use of xylitol chewing gum among Finnish schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkala, S; Honkala, E; Tynjälä, J; Kannas, L

    1999-12-01

    The preventive, and partly the remineralizing, effect of xylitol was shown in Finland in the Turku Sugar Studies in 1971-73. Since then, several clinical trials in many countries have confirmed these results. In Finland, oral health personnel have recommended daily use of xylitol chewing gum in their dental health education. Moreover, commercial companies have advertised xylitol, emphasizing in particular its caries preventive effects. All Nordic dental associations have given their recommendations for xylitol use. The aim of this study was to describe how this health habit has been adopted by Finnish schoolchildren. The study was part of the comprehensive cross-national survey on Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC Study)--a WHO Collaborative Study. The data were collected using standardized questionnaires to which pupils in grades 5 (11 years), 7 (13 years) and 9 (15 years) responded anonymously in school classrooms during the spring term 1998. The response rate varied between 87% (15-year-old boys) and 94% (11- and 13-year-old girls). Among boys, the percentages of daily users of xylitol chewing gum were 47% (11 years), 46% (13 years), and 44% (15 years), and among girls, 57% (11 years), 65% (13 years), and 69% (15 years), respectively. Use of sugar-sweetened chewing gum was very rare (1%), as also was use of chewing gum with other artificial sweeteners (1%). It may be concluded that since 1991 the use of xylitol chewing gum has further increased in Finland and currently more than a half of all schoolchildren benefit from it. PMID:10777132

  4. Chewing gum increases energy expenditure before and after controlled breakfasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresge, Daniel L; Melanson, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    Chewing has been associated with improved satiation and satiety, but little is known about the metabolic impact of gum chewing. We tested the hypothesis that gum chewing would increase energy expenditure (EE) and reduce respiratory exchange ratio (RER) before and after a controlled test meal. Seventeen males and 13 females (age 21.5 ± 6.6 years, body mass index 23.9 ± 2.8 kg/m(2)) participated in a randomized crossover study in which subjects chewed sugar-free gum for a total of 1 h (3 sessions of 20 min) on the test day (GC) and did not chew gum on a control day (NG). EE and RER were measured by indirect calorimetry after an overnight fast. Subjects consumed a breakfast shake containing 30% of their measured energy needs, and then postprandial EE and RER were measured for 3 h. Blood glucose (GLC) was measured in the fasting and postprandial states at regular intervals. Fasting EE was higher during GC (1.23 ± 0.04 kcal/min; 1 kcal = 4.2 kJ) than during NG (1.17 ± 0.04 kcal/min; p = 0.016). Postprandial EE was also higher during GC (1.46 ± 0.05 kcal/min) than during NG (1.42 ± 0.05 kcal/min; p = 0.037). Fasting and postprandial RER and GLC did not differ between GC and NG. The findings demonstrate that GC is associated with higher fasting and postprandial EE without altering blood glucose or substrate oxidation as measured by RER. These data suggest that gum chewing potentially could influence short-term energy balance in this population; however, longer-term research is needed. PMID:25794237

  5. Genetic divergence of common bean cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, J S; Silva, W; Pinheiro, L R; Dos Santos, J B; Fonseca, N S; Euzebio, M P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate genetic divergence in the 'Carioca' (beige with brown stripes) common bean cultivar used by different institutions and in 16 other common bean cultivars used in the Rede Cooperativa de Pesquisa de Feijão (Cooperative Network of Common Bean Research), by using simple sequence repeats associated with agronomic traits that are highly distributed in the common bean genome. We evaluated 22 polymorphic loci using bulks containing DNA from 30 plants. There was genetic divergence among the Carioca cultivar provided by the institutions. Nevertheless, there was lower divergence among them than among the other cultivars. The cultivar used by Instituto Agronômico do Paraná was the most divergent in relation to the Carioca samples. The least divergence was observed among the samples used by Universidade Federal de Lavras and by Embrapa Arroz e Feijão. Of all the cultivars, 'CNFP 10104' and 'BRSMG Realce' showed the greatest dissimilarity. The cultivars were separated in two groups of greatest similarity using the Structure software. Genetic variation among cultivars was greater than the variation within or between the groups formed. This fact, together with the high estimate of heterozygosity observed and the genetic divergence of the samples of the Carioca cultivar in relation to the original provided by Instituto Agronômico de Campinas, indicates a mixture of cultivars. The high divergence among cultivars provides potential for the utilization of this genetic variability in plant breeding. PMID:26400359

  6. Healthy food trends -- beans and legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... beans (15 oz.) ½ medium onion 2 garlic cloves 2 tablespoons vegetable oil ½ teaspoon cumin (ground) ½ teaspoon salt ¼ ... pieces. Set the onions aside. Peel the garlic cloves and mince ... heat your cooking oil over medium high heat. Add the onions and ...

  7. Castor bean response to zinc fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaves, Lucia Helena Garofalo; Cunha, Tassio Henrique Cavalcanti da Silva; Lima, Vinicius Mota; Cabral, Paulo Cesar Pinto; Barros Junior, Genival; Lacerda, Rogerio Dantas de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEAg/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Agricola

    2008-07-01

    Zinc is a trace element and it is absolutely essential for the normal healthy growth of plants. This element plays a part of several enzyme systems and other metabolic functions in the plants. Castor beans (Ricinus communis L.) crop is raising attention as an alternative crop for oil and biodiesel production. Despite the mineral fertilization is an important factor for increasing castor beans yield, few researches has been made on this issue, mainly on the use of zinc. In order to evaluate the effects of zinc on growth of this plant an experiment was carried out in a greenhouse, in Campina Grande, Paraiba State, Brazil, from July to December 2007. The substrate for the pot plants was a 6 mm-sieved surface soil (Neossolo Quartzarenico). The experimental design was a completely randomized with three replications. The treatments were composed of five levels of Zn (0; 2; 4; 6 and 8 mg dm{sup -3}), which were applied at the time of planting. One plant of castor bean, cultivar BRS 188 - Paraguacu, was grown per pot after thinning and was irrigated whenever necessary. Data on plant height, number and length of leaves and stem diameter were measured at 21, 34, 77 and 103 days after planting. Under conditions that the experiment was carried out the results showed that the Zn levels used, did not affect the castor bean plants growth. (author)

  8. Common bean and cowpea improvement in Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    During 2014 and 2015, the Instituto de Investigação Agronómica (IIA) evaluated the performance of common bean (Phaselolus vulgaris L.) breeding lines and improved cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) varieties. The field experiments were planted in the lowlands at Mazozo and in the highlands at Chian...

  9. Seed coat darkening in Cowpea bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed coat of cowpea bean (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) slowly browns to a darker color during storage. High temperature and humidity during storage might contribute to this color change. Variation in browning rate among seeds in a lot leads to a mixture of seed colors creating an unacceptable product...

  10. Registration of ‘Eldorado’ pinto bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Eldorado’ (Reg. No. CV-302, PI 665012) pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), which was developed by Michigan State University AgBioResearch, was released in 2012 as an upright, full-season,disease-resistant cultivar. Eldorado, tested as MSU breeding line P07863, was developed using the single-seed-de...

  11. Beans (Phaseolus spp.) - model food legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Globally, 800 million people are malnourished. Heavily subsidised farmers in rich countries produce sufficient surplus food to feed the hungry, but not at a price the poor can afford. Even donating the rich world's surplus to the poor would not solve the problem. Most poor people earn their living from agriculture, so a deluge of free food would destroy their livelihoods. Thus, the only answer to world hunger is to safeguard and improve the productivity of farmers in poor countries. Diets of subsistence level farmers in Africa and Latin America often contain sufficient carbohydrates (through cassava, corn/maize, rice, wheat, etc.), but are poor in proteins. Dietary proteins can take the form of scarce animal products (eggs, milk, meat, etc.), but are usually derived from legumes (plants of the bean and pea family). Legumes are vital in agriculture as they form associations with bacteria that 'fix-nitrogen' from the air. Effectively this amounts to internal fertilisation and is the main reason that legumes are richer in proteins than all other plants. Thousands of legume species exist but more common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are eaten than any other. In some countries such as Mexico and Brazil, beans are the primary source of protein in human diets. As half the grain legumes consumed worldwide are common beans, they represent the species of choice for the study of grain legume nutrition. Unfortunately, the yields of common beans are low even by the standards of legumes, and the quality of their seed proteins is sub-optimal. Most probably this results from millennia of selection for stable rather than high yield, and as such, is a problem that can be redressed by modem genetic techniques. We have formed an international consortium called 'Phaseomics' to establish the necessary framework of knowledge and materials that will result in disease-resistant, stress-tolerant, high-quality protein and high-yielding beans. Phaseomics will be instrumental in improving

  12. Saffron and beetroot extracts encapsulated in maltodextrin, gum Arabic, modified starch and chitosan: Incorporation in a chewing gum system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chranioti, Charikleia; Nikoloudaki, Aspasia; Tzia, Constantina

    2015-08-20

    Maltodextrin (MD-21DE), gum Arabic (GA), gum Arabic-modified starch (GA-MS), modified starch-chitosan (MS-CH) and modified starch-maltodextrin-chitosan (MS-MD-CH) were used as agents for beetroot and saffron coloring-extracts microencapsulation by freeze drying. The produced powders were evaluated in terms of coloring strength (E) during storage at 40°C for 10 weeks and a first-order kinetic was applied. Color parameters (L(*), a(*), b(*), C(*) and ΔE(*)) and water sorption behavior was also studied. Moreover, incorporation of the powders in a chewing gum model system was conducted. The type of encapsulating agent significantly (PGA>GA-MS>MS-CH>MS-MD-CH. The water sorption study revealed that MD and GA kept their structural integrity up to water activities of 0.66 and 0.82, respectively. The chewing gum samples produced with coloring extracts encapsulated in GA-MS showed the greatest a(*)(for beetroot) and b(*) (for saffron) values indicating a better protection. PMID:25965482

  13. Contribution of lipids, phenolic acids, and protein rich components to emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum and acacia gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) is an arabinoxylan enriched fraction obtained by the extraction of corn bran/fiber using a proprietary alkaline hydrogen peroxide process. When purified CFG prepared by this process was hydrolyzed with concentrated base (1.5 N methanolic KOH at 70 °C for one hour) considerable ...

  14. Zinc supplementation, production and quality of coffee beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminia Emilia Prieto Martinez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Besides its importance in the coffee tree nutrition, there is almost no information relating zinc nutrition and bean quality. This work evaluated the effect of zinc on the coffee yield and bean quality. The experiment was conducted with Coffea arabica L. in "Zona da Mata" region, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Twelve plots were established at random with 4 competitive plants each. Treatments included plants supplemented with zinc (eight plots and control without zinc supplementation (four plots. Plants were subjected to two treatments: zinc supplementation and control. Yield, number of defective beans, beans attacked by berry borers, bean size, cup quality, beans zinc concentration, potassium leaching, electrical conductivity, color index, total tritable acidity, pH, chlorogenic acids contents and ferric-reducing antioxidant activity of beans were evaluated. Zinc positively affected quality of coffee beans, which presented lower percentage of medium and small beans, lower berry borer incidence, lower potassium leaching and electrical conductivity, higher contents of zinc and chlorogenic acids and higher antioxidant activity in comparison with control beans.

  15. POLYSACCHARIDE GUM (KONDAGOGU GUM MATRIX TABLETS FOR ORAL SUSTAINED DELIVERY OF METOPROLOL SUCCINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Aswani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study has been undertaken to develop a sustained-release tablet dosage form for metoprolol succinate using kondagugu gum as the rate-controlling polymer. The prepared tablets were coated will shellac as an enteric coat polymer and evaluated for tablet properties. In vitro release studies of prepared tablets were carried out for 2 hrs in pH 1.2 HCl buffer and 22 hrs in pH 6.8phosphate buffer. In addition, swelling, kinetics of drug release from the matrices and stability of the tablet formulations were also investigated. Mathematical analysis of the release kinetics showed that the nature of drug release from the matrix tablets has followed super case II transport. FTIR and DSC studies have shown that no chemical interaction occurred between the drug and polymers used. The optimized formulation (F4 showed negligible difference in release mechanism as well as release kinetics when stability study was done for three months at 40±20 C and 75±5% RH.

  16. PENGGUNAN GUM XANTHAN PADA SUBSTITUSI PARSIAL TERIGU DENGAN TEPUNG JAGUNG DALAM PEMBUATAN ROTI [Use of Xanthan Gum in Partial Substitusion of Corn Flour for Wheat Flour in Breadmaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posman Sibuea

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to examine the capabilities of composite flour (i.e. corn flour and wheat flour and xanthan gum in breadmaking. Breads were produced using mixture of wheat and corn flour at varios ratio with addition of xanthan gum at different level (0.0% to 0.75%. The result showed that the composite flour had significant effect on all measured parameters. As the wheat flour descreaseed down to 65% the dought length, texture, reducing sugar content increased, but the sensory values descresed, xanthan gum had significant effect on the texture, reducing sugar content, the sensory values and the dough length. As the xanthan gum increased, the dough length, the reducing sugar content increased, whereas the texture increased at 0.50% the descreased at 0.75%. the bread of good acceptability was produced from the floaur mixture of wheat flour (70% and corn flour (30% using 0.75% of xanthan gum.

  17. Effects of Carrageenan and Xanthan Gum on Texture of Processed Acid-coagulated Cheese%卡拉胶和黄原胶对酸性凝胶型再制干酪质构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖杨; 苗君莅; 郑远荣; 刘振民

    2012-01-01

    The effects of carrageenan and xanthan gum on the texture and sensory quality of processed acid-coagulated cheese were studied.Under the acidic condition of pH 4.25,addition of carrageenan,along with 0.2% locust bean gum,could increase the hardness of cheese and result in the formation of hard and sticky gels.The presence of xanthan gum was effective in enhancing the springiness and chewiness of processed acid-coagulated cheese and soft,smooth and elastic gels were formed.Combined addition of carageenan and xanthan gum to processed acid-coagulated cheese can meet various texture requirements.%通过质构仪分析和感官评定,研究卡拉胶和黄原胶对酸性再制干酪质构的影响。结果表明:在pH4.25的酸性条件下,在添加0.2%刺槐豆胶的基础上,添加卡拉胶能增强再制干酪的硬度,形成的凝胶硬实且黏厚;添加黄原胶能增强再制干酪的弹性和咀嚼性,形成的凝胶柔滑且富有弹性。可按不同质构需求将两者复配起来运用于酸性凝胶型再制干酪的加工。

  18. Purification of cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum: Physicochemical characterization and functional properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali;

    2016-01-01

    purification methods reduced ash and protein content and molecular weight of cress seed gum. The main decomposition of the purified samples started above 200º C and initial decomposition temperature of the crude gum was 190.21º C. DSC thermograms of the purified gums showed two exothermic events at 257......The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of different purification methods (ethanol, isopropanol and ethanol-isopropanol) on the physicochemical and functional characteristics of cress seed gum. Sugar composition and molecular weight of the samples varied significantly. All the...... emulsifying properties of cress seed gum and there was no significant difference among the purified samples. Crude gum showed the lowest foaming properties, while samples I and E (purified using ethanol) showed the highest foaming capacity and foam stability, respectively. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...

  19. Protein-free cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum: Physicochemical characterization and rheological properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin;

    2016-01-01

    Protein-free cress seed gum (PFCSG) was obtained by precipitation of crude cress seed gum (CSG) withethanol followed by treatment with protease. Molecular weight, moisture, ash and uronic acids contentdecreased after elimination of protein. Elimination of protein improved significantly rheological...... proper-ties and thermal stability of cress seed gum. Mechanical spectra of the CSG and PFCSG were classified asweak gels and PFCSG showed stronger and more elastic network structure. The gum dispersions exhib-ited strong shear-thinning behavior which was described satisfactory by the Herschel-Bulkley and...... Mooremodels. Protein-free cress seed gum had higher apparent and intrinsic viscosities than the crude gum.CSG indicated lower hysteresis loop area, but degree of structural recovery of the samples showed no sig-nificant difference. The main decomposition of PFCSG started above 213◦C with two peaks (at 261...

  20. Purification of cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum: A comprehensive rheological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2016-01-01

    temperature. Crude cress seed gum and EI showed the highest and the lowest activation energy, respectively. The crude and purified gums indicated thixotropic behavior and CSG exhibited the lowest hysteresis loop area and the highest structural recovery. All the samples revealed random coil conformation in......In this paper, the effects of different purification methods (ethanol (sample E), isopropanol (sample I) and ethanol-isopropanol (sample EI)) on intrinsic viscosity, steady and dynamic rheological properties of cress seed gum were investigated. The gum dispersions exhibited viscoelastic properties......, the storage modulus (G′) was higher than the loss modulus (G″), and mechanical spectra of the crude and purified cress seed gums were classified as weak gels. The purified samples had stronger and more elastic network structure than the crude gum (CSG) and the gel network got stronger along the series...

  1. Efficacy of baking soda-containing chewing gum in removing natural tooth stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, S M; Conforti, N; Berkowitz, H

    2001-07-01

    A 14-week, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted with 126 healthy volunteers to compare the efficacy of twice-daily use of 3 baking soda-containing chewing gums in removing natural tooth stain when used in conjunction with a program of regular oral hygiene. All 3 chewing gums significantly reduced extrinsic stain (P improved the whitened appearance of teeth (P Gum (AHDC) reduced dental stain by 70.8%, compared to reductions of 71.9% and 65.3%, after use of 2 experimental gum formulations. Whitened appearance improved by 1.73 shade tabs using AHDC gum, and up to 2.49 shade tabs with the experimental formulations. These results suggest that the use of baking soda-containing gum after meals, in conjunction with good oral hygiene, can improve both extrinsic dental staining and the whitened appearance of teeth. PMID:11913307

  2. Chemical and Functional Properties of Chia Seed (Salvia hispanica L.) Gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Campos, Maira Rubi; Ciau-Solís, Norma; Rosado-Rubio, Gabriel; Chel-Guerrero, Luis; Betancur-Ancona, David

    2014-01-01

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) constitutes a potential alternative raw material and ingredient in food industry applications due to its dietary fiber content. Gum can be extracted from its dietary fiber fractions for use as an additive to control viscosity, stability, texture, and consistency in food systems. The gum extracted from chia seeds was characterized to determine their quality and potential as functional food additives. The extracted chia gum contained 26.2% fat and a portion was submitted to fat extraction, producing two fractions: gum with fat (FCG) and gum partly defatted (PDCG). Proximal composition and physicochemical characterization showed these fractions to be different (P behavior, specifically shear thinning or pseudoplastic type. PDCG had more viscosity than FCG. Chia seed is an excellent natural source of gum with good physicochemical and functional qualities, and is very promising for use in food industry. PMID:26904622

  3. Functionality of maize, wheat, teff and cassava starches with stearic acid and xanthan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maphalla, Thabelang Gladys; Emmambux, Mohammad Naushad

    2016-01-20

    Consumer concerns to synthetic chemicals have led to strong preference for 'clean' label starches. Lipid and hydrocolloids are food friendly chemicals. This study determines the effects of stearic acid and xanthan gum alone and in combination on the functionality of maize, wheat, teff and cassava starches. An increase in viscosity was observed for all starches with stearic acid and xanthan gum compared to the controls with cassava having the least increase. A further increase in viscosity was observed for the cereal starches with combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum. Stearic acid reduced retrogradation, resulting in soft textured pastes. Combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum reduced the formation of type IIb amylose-lipid complexes, syneresis, and hysteresis in cereal starches compared to stearic acid alone. A combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum produce higher viscosity non-gelling starches and xanthan gum addition increases physical stability to freezing and better structural recovery after shear. PMID:26572436

  4. Bean Common Mosaic Virus and Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus: Relationships, Biology, and Prospects for Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Elizabeth A; Wamonje, Francis O; Mukeshimana, Gerardine; Harvey, Jagger J W; Carr, John P; Mitter, Neena

    2015-01-01

    The closely related potyviruses Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are major constraints on common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) production. Crop losses caused by BCMV and BCMNV impact severely not only on commercial scale cultivation of this high-value crop but also on production by smallholder farmers in the developing world, where bean serves as a key source of dietary protein and mineral nutrition. In many parts of the world, progress has been made in combating BCMV through breeding bean varieties possessing the I gene, a dominant gene conferring resistance to most BCMV strains. However, in Africa, and in particular in Central and East Africa, BCMNV is endemic and this presents a serious problem for deployment of the I gene because this virus triggers systemic necrosis (black root disease) in plants possessing this resistance gene. Information on these two important viruses is scattered throughout the literature from 1917 onward, and although reviews on resistance to BCMV and BCMNV exist, there is currently no comprehensive review on the biology and taxonomy of BCMV and BCMNV. In this chapter, we discuss the current state of our knowledge of these two potyviruses including fundamental aspects of classification and phylogeny, molecular biology, host interactions, transmission through seed and by aphid vectors, geographic distribution, as well as current and future prospects for the control of these important viruses. PMID:26111585

  5. Safety assessment of the biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Ding, Xiaowen; Qin, Yingrui; Zeng, Yitao

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the safety of biogenic amines, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to evaluate the levels of biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd. In fermented soya beans, the total biogenic amines content was in a relatively safe range in many samples, although the concentration of histamine, tyramine, and β-phenethylamine was high enough in some samples to cause a possible safety threat, and 8 of the 30 samples were deemed unsafe. In fermented bean curd, the total biogenic amines content was more than 900 mg/kg in 19 white sufu amples, a level that has been determined to pose a safety hazard; putrescine was the only one detected in all samples and also had the highest concentration, which made samples a safety hazard; the content of tryptamine, β-phenethylamine, tyramine, and histamine had reached the level of threat to human health in some white and green sufu samples, and that may imply another potential safety risk; and 25 of the 33 samples were unsafe. In conclusion, the content of biogenic amines in all fermented soya bean products should be studied and appropriate limits determined to ensure the safety of eating these foods. PMID:25029555

  6. Antioxidant activity of black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. protein hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarine Amaral do EVANGELHO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this work was to study the effect of enzymatic hydrolysis of black bean protein concentrate using different enzymes. Bean proteins were extracted and hydrolyzed over a period of 120 min using the enzymes pepsin or alcalase. The protein hydrolysates’ molecular weight was assayed by electrophoresis and the antioxidant activity was evaluated by the capturing methods of free radicals ABTS●+ and DPPH. Electrophoretic results showed that the bands above 50 kDa disappeared, when the beans protein was subjected to hydrolysis with pepsin. The bean protein hydrolysate obtained by hydrolysis with alcalase enzyme, showed higher antioxidant activity for inhibition of the radical ABTS●+. However, the hydrolysates obtained by hydrolysis with pepsin had higher antioxidant activity for inhibition of the radical DPPH. The use of pepsin and alcalase enzymes, under the same reaction time, produced black bean protein hydrolysates with different molecular weight profiles and superior antioxidant activity than the native bean protein.

  7. Ion beam analysis of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The way that coffee is prepared (using roasted ground coffee or roasted coffee beans) may influence the quality of beverage. Therefore, the aim of this work is to use ion beam techniques to perform a full elemental analysis of packed roasted ground coffee and packed roasted coffee beans, as well as green coffee beans. The samples were analyzed by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission). Light elements were measured through RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) experiments. Micro-PIXE experiments were carried out in order to check the elemental distribution in the roasted and green coffee beans. In general, the elements found in ground coffee were Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr. A comparison between ground coffee and grinded roasted beans shows significant differences for several elements. Elemental maps reveal that P and K are correlated and practically homogeneously distributed over the beans

  8. Ion beam analysis of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debastiani, R., E-mail: rafa_debas@yahoo.com.br; Santos, C.E.I. dos; Yoneama, M.L.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    The way that coffee is prepared (using roasted ground coffee or roasted coffee beans) may influence the quality of beverage. Therefore, the aim of this work is to use ion beam techniques to perform a full elemental analysis of packed roasted ground coffee and packed roasted coffee beans, as well as green coffee beans. The samples were analyzed by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission). Light elements were measured through RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) experiments. Micro-PIXE experiments were carried out in order to check the elemental distribution in the roasted and green coffee beans. In general, the elements found in ground coffee were Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr. A comparison between ground coffee and grinded roasted beans shows significant differences for several elements. Elemental maps reveal that P and K are correlated and practically homogeneously distributed over the beans.

  9. Preparation and evaluation of gels from gum of Moringa oleifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panda D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken with an objective to find out the gelling potentials of a natural gum obtained from plant Moringa oleifera . The gum was extracted by using water as solvent and precipitated using acetone as non-solvent. Physical characteristics such as, solubility, swelling index, loss on drying, and pH were studied. Diclofenac sodium was used as model drug for the formulation of gels. Seven batches of drug loaded gels with concentration of mucilage ranging from 5.5, 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, 7.5, 8.0, and 8.5 were formulated by using glycerin as plasticizer and methyl paraben as preservative. The pH, viscosity, and in vitro diffusion profiles were studied. The gels prepared with 8.0% of mucilage were found to be ideal and comparable with a commercial preparation.

  10. CHEWING GUM: A MODERN ERA OF DRUG DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savaliya Pratik

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chewing gum as a drug delivery system has many advantages over other oral dosage forms and oral route is the most preferred route amongst the patient and clinicians because the first pass metabolism can be avoided by the absorption of drug through buccal mucosa in the systemic circulation. It can be applied to cure and prevent the dental caries, pain, smoking cessation, obesity, xerostomia, motion sickness, acidity and specially diabetes. It has many advantages like fast onset of action, no first pass metabolism, patient compliance, taste masking, reduced risk of erosion of gastric mucosa, overdose and some marketing advantages. This review indicates that further study on medicated chewing gum can be used to improve it as a modern drug delivery.

  11. Sulfomethylated graft copolymers of xanthan gum and polyacrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, I.W.; Empey, R.A.; Racciato, J.S.

    1978-08-08

    A water-soluble anionic graft copolymer of xanthan gum and polyacrylamide is described in which at least part of the amide function of the acrylamide portion of the copolymer is sulfomethylated and the xanthan gum portion of the copolymer is unreacted with formaldehyde. The copolymer is sulfomethylated by reaction with formaldehyde and sodium metabisulfite. The formaldehyde does not cause any appreciable cross-linking between hydroxyl groups of the xanthan moieties. The sulfomethylation of the acrylamido group takes place at temperatures from 35 to 70 C. The pH is 10 or higher, typically from 12 to 13. The degree of anionic character may be varied by adjusting the molar ratio of formaldehyde and sodium metabisulfite with respect to the copolymer. 10 claims.

  12. Synthesis and Aqueous Solution Viscosity of Hydrophobically Modified Xanthan Gum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Xiao-lin; WU Wen-hui; YU Pei-zhi; WANG Jian-quan

    2007-01-01

    Two xanthan gum derivatives hydrophobically modified by 4 or 8 tetradecyl chains per 100 xanthan gum structure units were synthesized. The derivatives were studied by scanning electron microscope and pyrene fluorescence spectrometry. And the aqueous solution apparent viscosity of the derivatives was investigated. The results indicate that the network of the derivatives with more hydrophobic groups is closer and tighter. With increasing of alkyl chain substitution degree, the hydrophobically associating interactions enhance in aqueous solution. Aqueous solution apparent viscosity of the derivatives increases with increasing of polymer concentration and alkyl substitution degree, and decreases with the increase of temperature. In the brine solution, the strong viscosity enhancement phenomenon appears. The interaction between the derivatives and surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate is strong.

  13. The Efficacy of Green Tea Chewing Gum on Gingival Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Parichehr Behfarnia; Ahmad Aslani; Foroogh Jamshidian; Soheil Noohi

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: According to previous studies, the components of green tea extracts can inhibit the growth of a wide range of gram-pos-itive and -negative bacterial species and might be useful in controlling oral infections. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of green tea chewing gum on the rate of plaque and gingival inflammation in subjects with gingivitis. Materials and Method: In this double-blind randomize controlled clinical trial, 45 patients wit...

  14. Bleeding from gums: Can it be a dengue

    OpenAIRE

    Rajat Bansal; Purnita Goyel; Dinesh. C. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Bleeding from gums is a common feature in periodontitis patient. But abnormal bleeding from the gingiva or other areas of the oral mucosa that is difficult to control is an important clinical sign suggesting a hematological disorder. Case Report: A-40-year old male patient reported to our clinic with the chief complaint of acute gingival bleeding. There was continuous bleeding, fever since 3-4 days with weakness, retro orbital pain, and severe backache. Patient gave a history of...

  15. Antioxidant Activity of Pistacia vera Fruits, Leaves and Gum Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Sajadi Tabassi, Sayyed Abolghasem; Milani Moghadam, Negar; Rashedinia, Marzieh; Mehri, Soghra

    2012-01-01

    The side effects of synthetic antioxidants have been considered in different studies. Accordingly, there is an increasing interest toward the use of natural substances instead of the synthetic ones. In this study, the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Pistacia vera leaves and fruits as well as hydroalcoholic extract of gum were tested for a possible antioxidant activity using in vitro methods. Deoxyribose assay, erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation and liver misrosomal non- enzymatic lipid...

  16. CHEWING GUM: A MODERN ERA OF DRUG DELIVERY

    OpenAIRE

    Savaliya Pratik; Karigar Asif; Ramana MV; Patel Mitul; Kalathiya Mahesh

    2011-01-01

    Chewing gum as a drug delivery system has many advantages over other oral dosage forms and oral route is the most preferred route amongst the patient and clinicians because the first pass metabolism can be avoided by the absorption of drug through buccal mucosa in the systemic circulation. It can be applied to cure and prevent the dental caries, pain, smoking cessation, obesity, xerostomia, motion sickness, acidity and specially diabetes. It has many advantages like fast onset of action, no f...

  17. Cryoextraction: A novel approach to remove aspirated chewing gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmundo Rubio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of aspirated foreign bodies can prove challenging at times, requiring even rigid bronchoscopy. Cryotherapy probes have been reported to help with extraction of foreign bodies. We present a case where successful "cryoextraction" was performed on an aspirated chewing gum. The case highlights the fact that this technique is useful to extract all materials that have water content. This technique can be performed through flexible bronchoscopy and can save patients from more aggressive approaches.

  18. Radiation induced degradation of xanthan gum in the solid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Murat; Hayrabolulu, Hande; Taşkın, Pınar; Torun, Murat; Demeter, Maria; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Güven, Olgun

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the effect of ionizing radiation on xanthan gum was investigated. Xanthan samples were irradiated with gamma rays in air at ambient temperature in the solid state at different dose rates and doses. Change in their molecular weights was followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Chain scission yield (G(S)), and degradation rate constants (k) were calculated. The calculated G(S) values are 0.0151±0.0015, 0.0144±0.0020, 0.0098±0.0010 μmol/J and k values are 1.4×10-8±1.4×10-9, 1.3×10-8±2.0×10-9, 8.7×10-9±1.0×10-9 Gy-1 for 0.1, 3.3 and 7.0 kGy/h dose rates, respectively. It was observed that the dose rate was an important factor controlling the G(S) and degradation rate of xanthan gum. Considering its use in food industry, the effect of irradiation on rheological properties of xanthan gum solutions was also investigated and flow model parameters were determined for all dose rates and doses. Rheological analysis showed that xanthan solution showed non-Newtonian shear thinning behaviour and ionizing radiation does not change the non-Newtonian and shear thinning flow behaviour of xanthan gum solutions in concentration ranges of this work. It was determined that, Power Law model well described the flow behaviour of unirradiated and irradiated xanthan solutions.

  19. Hypolipidemic activity of gum ghatti of Anogeissus latifolia

    OpenAIRE

    K. M. M. PARVATHI; C. K. Ramesh; Krishna, V; M Paramesha; I J Kuppast

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are becoming an increasing problem worldwide and hypercholesterolemia has been correlated for coronary heart diseases. Currently available hypolipidemic drugs have been associated with number of side effects. Herbal treatment for hyperlipidemia poses no side effects and is relatively cheap and locally available. In view of this, the present study was carried out to investigate the effect of gum ghatti of Anogeissus lalifolia on serum lipid levels of albino rats. Rats w...

  20. Irrigation and planting density affect river red gum growth

    OpenAIRE

    Cockerham, Stephen T.

    2004-01-01

    In a 6-year study, production of river red gum, an excellent fuel-wood source, was evaluated for responses to three levels of irrigation, fertilization and planting density. Irrigation and planting density had the greatest influence on tree growth. Irrigation in the fifth and sixth years produced greater wood volume and weight per tree. Tree size was greatest in the wide spacing of the lower planting density. Fertilizer had no effect on any of the treatments. Per acre volume and weight yields...

  1. Enhancement of electrical conductivity in the Gum Arabica complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gum Arabica is a natural biopolymer obtained from plant Acacia Arabica. In this present study the electro-active nature of its complex has been investigated. The complexes were developed using pure Gum Arabica and pure Citric acid by the sol-gel process. The scope of complex formation has been investigated and their natures were examined experimentally. The experiments which were carried out in this work are namely d.c V-I characteristics, d.c Arrhenius, ion transference number measurement, UV-VIS and IR photo-absorption. Solid specimen of the complex at various concentration of Citric acid has been developed for d.c experiments and adequate specimens were also developed for UV-VIS experiment. The result of d.c V-I characteristics on specimens at different Citric acid concentrations shows that d.c conductivity increases with concentration of the acid. The said enhancement is observed to be about 100 times that of pure hosts. The ion transference number measurement shows that the total conductivity increases with external acid concentration of which d.c conductivity enhance many times compared to that of ionic part. The result from d.c Arrhenius study shows that electro-thermal activation energy decreases with increasing acid concentration leading to enhancement of electronic conductivity of the complex. The result of UV-VIS study confirms the formation of the acid complex of Gum Arabica. The nature of photo-absorption indicates very clearly that main absorption region shows gradual shifts towards longer wavelength with increase of acid concentration. The result of FTIR absorption shows the structural concepts of electro-activity and complex formation indication of pure Gum Arabica. The overall analysis shows that the electro-activity of the mentioned biopolymer may be tailored.

  2. Studies on gum of Moringa oleifera for its emulsifying properties

    OpenAIRE

    Dibya Sundar Panda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emulsion has been a form of presenting water insoluble substances for a long period of time. Now a day, it has been a way of presenting various intravenous additives and diagnostic agents in X-ray examinations. Various substances can be used as emulsifying agent, which can be operationally defined as a stabilizer of the droplets formed of the internal phase. Materials and Methods: Gum from Moringa oleifera was evaluated for its emulsifying properties. Castor oil emulsions 30 perce...

  3. Gellan gum : hydroxyapatite composite hydrogels for bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Manda-guiba, G. M.; Oliveira, Mariana B.; Mano, J. F.; Marques, A. P.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Correlo, V.M.; Reis, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    The modification of polymeric matrices by adding calcium-phosphate derivatives has been proven an effective strategy for tailoring the properties of scaffolds employed in bone tissue engineering. In this regard and, considering the biomechanics of bone as well as the durotactic response of osteoblasts, this study builds on the hypothesis that the preparation of novel Gellan Gum (GG)-Hydroxyapatite (HA) hydrogel composites could benefit the mechanical profile of matrices as well as the cell-su...

  4. Enhancement of electrical conductivity in the Gum Arabica complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, Sourav S. [Department of Physics, B. K. Girls' College, 5/3 M. G. Road, Howrah 711101 (India); Sarkar, A., E-mail: alokesarkar@vsnl.net [Department of Physics, B. K. Girls' College, 5/3 M. G. Road, Howrah 711101 (India)

    2009-08-01

    Gum Arabica is a natural biopolymer obtained from plant Acacia Arabica. In this present study the electro-active nature of its complex has been investigated. The complexes were developed using pure Gum Arabica and pure Citric acid by the sol-gel process. The scope of complex formation has been investigated and their natures were examined experimentally. The experiments which were carried out in this work are namely d.c V-I characteristics, d.c Arrhenius, ion transference number measurement, UV-VIS and IR photo-absorption. Solid specimen of the complex at various concentration of Citric acid has been developed for d.c experiments and adequate specimens were also developed for UV-VIS experiment. The result of d.c V-I characteristics on specimens at different Citric acid concentrations shows that d.c conductivity increases with concentration of the acid. The said enhancement is observed to be about 100 times that of pure hosts. The ion transference number measurement shows that the total conductivity increases with external acid concentration of which d.c conductivity enhance many times compared to that of ionic part. The result from d.c Arrhenius study shows that electro-thermal activation energy decreases with increasing acid concentration leading to enhancement of electronic conductivity of the complex. The result of UV-VIS study confirms the formation of the acid complex of Gum Arabica. The nature of photo-absorption indicates very clearly that main absorption region shows gradual shifts towards longer wavelength with increase of acid concentration. The result of FTIR absorption shows the structural concepts of electro-activity and complex formation indication of pure Gum Arabica. The overall analysis shows that the electro-activity of the mentioned biopolymer may be tailored.

  5. Physical Properties of Gum Karaya-Starch-Essential Oil Patches

    OpenAIRE

    Shcherbina, Yulia; Roth, Zvi; Nussinovitch, Amos

    2010-01-01

    Essential oils are used in foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. Despite the recent marketing of novel essential-oil-containing patches, there is no information on their production, constituents, or physical properties. The objectives of this study were to produce essential-oil patches and characterize their physical properties. The essential oil of Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) was included at concentrations of 2.5% to 10% in patches manufactured from the exudate gum karaya, propylene g...

  6. Characterization of grewia gum, a potential pharmaceutical excipient

    OpenAIRE

    Nep, Elijah I.; Barbara R. Conway

    2010-01-01

    Grewia gum was extracted from the inner stem bark of Grewia mollis and characterized by several techniques such as gas chromatography (GC), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dilute solution viscometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogrametric analysis of the extracted samples. Spectroscopic techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and ...

  7. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 5th Ed. (2004), pp. 210 and 211... incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acacia (gum arabic). 172.780 Section 172.780...

  8. Cryoextraction: A novel approach to remove aspirated chewing gum

    OpenAIRE

    Edmundo Rubio; Prag Gupta; Susanti Ie; Michael Boyd

    2013-01-01

    The extraction of aspirated foreign bodies can prove challenging at times, requiring even rigid bronchoscopy. Cryotherapy probes have been reported to help with extraction of foreign bodies. We present a case where successful "cryoextraction" was performed on an aspirated chewing gum. The case highlights the fact that this technique is useful to extract all materials that have water content. This technique can be performed through flexible bronchoscopy and can save patients from more aggressi...

  9. Design, formulation and evaluation of Aloe vera chewing gum

    OpenAIRE

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Raddanipour, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aloe vera has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, healing, antiseptic, anticancer and antidiabetic effects. The aim of the present study was to design and evaluate the formulation of Aloe vera chewing gum with an appropriate taste and quality with the indications for healing oral wounds, such as lichen planus, mouth sores caused by cancer chemotherapy and mouth abscesses as well as reducing mouth dryness caused by chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: In Aloe vera powder, the carbohydra...

  10. Evaluation of the flow properties of xanthan gum solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duda, J.L.; Klaus, E.E.; Leung, W.C.

    1981-02-01

    In this study, the solution properties of two forms of xanthan gum, a powder and a broth, which are commercially available were evaluated. As previous studies have shown, the solutions prepared from the broth do exhibit better injectivity properties. However, this investigation also shows that other properties of these solutions are not equivalent. In its natural state, xanthane gum exists as a multistranded helix. This ordered confirmation can be destroyed and in a denatured state, the xanthan gum exhibits a more random configuration and consequently higher viscosity. One of the major conclusions of this study is that the xanthan powder is partially denatured when compared to the xanthan molecules which exist in the broth. This denaturing may occur during the drying process in which the xanthan solids are removed from the broth. Solutions prepared from the broth in the absence of the added salt show a transition in the viscosity-temperature relationship at approximately 40 to 50/sup 0/C. This is consistent with the behavior of native xanthan gum solutions. At approximately 50/sup 0/C, the molecules in solution go into a more random state and consequently, an abrupt rise in the viscosity is observed. However, solutions prepared from the polymer powder do not show any evidence of such a transition. The solutions prepared from the broth can be thermally denatured, and this denaturing results in viscosities which are equivalent to the viscosities realized with the powdered polymer. Before denaturing, the broth solution showed a lower viscosity. Further, intrinsic viscosity measurements indicate that the hydrodynamic volume of the polymer solutions prepared from the borth are smaller than the hydrodynamic volumes of solutions prepared from the powder.

  11. Gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants: effects on lipid oxidation of peanuts

    OpenAIRE

    Haq, Muhammad Abdul; Azam, Mahmood; Hasnain, Abid

    2013-01-01

    Performance of antioxidants is improved by incorporating them into polymer matrix such as polysaccharides based edible coatings. Gum cordia, an anionic polysaccharide extracted from the fruits of Cordia.myxa could be used as carrier of antioxidants by virtue of its strong adhering and emulsifying properties. This study aimed to explore the potential of gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants when applied as edible coating on peanuts. Gum Cordia was compared with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in...

  12. Effects of Chewing Different Flavored Gums on Salivary Flow Rate and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Karami Nogourani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chewing gum increases salivary flow rate (SFR and pH, but differences in preferences of gum flavor may influence SFR and pH. The aim of this paper was to assess the effect of five different flavors of sucrose-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate and pH in healthy dental students in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen (7 men and 8 women healthy dental student volunteers collected unstimulated saliva and then chewed one of five flavored gums for 6 min. The whole saliva was collected and assessed for 6 consecutive days. After unstimulated saliva was collected, stimulated saliva was collected at interval of 0-1, 1–3, and 3–6 minutes after the start of different flavored chewing gums. The SFR and salivary pH were measured. The SFR increased in all five flavored gums at 1, 3, and 6 minutes after start of chewing gums (<0.001. The flow rate of all products reached peak in the 1st minute of stimulation, except spearmint-flavored gums which reached peak in the 6th minute. In the 1st minute, the strawberry-flavored gums showed the highest SFR. During 1–3 minutes, strawberry- and apple-flavored gums showed higher SFR, respectively. Only the spearmint- and cinnamon-flavored gum significantly increased salivary pH. Gum flavored can affect the SFR and pH and special flavors can be advised for different individuals according to their oral conditions.

  13. In vitro evaluation of Moringa oleifera gum for colon-specific drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, Anil Kumar; Jarald, Edwin E; Showkat, Ahmad; Daud, Anwar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Moringa gum obtained from stem of the plant Moringa oleifera Lam. belonging to family Moringaceae. Number of naturally occurring polysaccharides obtained from plant (guar gum, inulin), animal (chitosan, chondrotin sulphate), algal (alginates) or microbial (dextran) origin. Objective: The present study was evaluated Moringa oleifera gum as a carrier for colon specific drug delivery using in vitro drug release studies. Materials and Methods: Six formulations of curcumin were prepare...

  14. Application and Characterization of Gum from Bombax buonopozense Calyxesas an Excipient in Tablet Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Uwaezuoke, Onyinye J.; Ngwuluka, Ndidi C.; Jehu Kyari; John Taplong

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore gum from Bombax buonopozense calyxes as a binding agent in formulation of immediate release dosage forms using wet granulation method. The granules were characterized to assess the flow and compression properties and when compressed, non-compendial and compendial tests were undertaken to assess the tablet properties for tablets prepared with bombax gum in comparison with those prepared with tragacanth and acacia gums. Granules prepared...

  15. Evaluation of Gum of Moringa oleifera as a Binder and Release Retardant in Tablet Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Panda, D. S.; Choudhury, N. S. K.; Yedukondalu, M.; S. Si; Gupta, R.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to find out the potential of gum from Moringa oleifera to act as a binder and release retardant in tablet formulations. The effect of calcium sulphate dihydrate (water insoluble) and lactose (water soluble) diluent on the release of propranolol hydrochloride was studied. The DSC thermograms of drug, gum and mixture of gum/drug indicated no chemical interaction. Tablets (F1, F2, F3, and F4) were prepared containing calcium sulphate dihydrate as diluent, propran...

  16. Effect of Regular Gum Chewing on Levels of Anxiety, Mood, and Fatigue in Healthy Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki-Otomaru, Akiyo; Sakuma, Yumiko; Mochizuki, Yoshiko; Ishida, Sadayo; Kanoya, Yuka; Sato, Chifumi

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The effect of regular gum chewing on psychological status is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of gum chewing for fourteen days on psychological status and physical and mental fatigue in healthy young adults. Methods: We assigned 50 volunteers randomly to an intervention group (n = 26) and a control group (n = 24). Participants in the intervention group were requested to chew the gum twice per a day for fourteen days. The volunteers were required to co...

  17. Effect of Gum Chewing on the Recovery From Laparoscopic Colorectal Cancer Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Duk Yeon; Kim, Ho Young; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, In Gyu; Kim, Jun Ki; Oh, Seung Taek; Lee, Yoon Suk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to examine the effect of gum chewing after laparoscopic colorectal cancer surgery. Methods We reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal cancer surgery in Incheon St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine. We divided the patients into 2 groups: group A consisted of 67 patients who did not chew gum; group B consisted of 65 patients who chewed gum. We analyzed the short-term clinical outcomes between the two gro...

  18. Chewing Gum: Cognitive Performance, Mood, Well-Being, and Associated Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Andrew P; Smith, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that chewing gum can enhance attention, as well as promoting well-being and work performance. Four studies (two experiments and two intervention studies) examined the robustness of and mechanisms for these effects. Study 1 investigated the acute effect of gum on mood in the absence of task performance. Study 2 examined the effect of rate and force of chewing on mood and attention performance. Study 3 assessed the effects of chewing gum during one working day on w...

  19. CHEWING GUM AS A TREATMENT FOR RUMINATION IN A CHILD WITH AUTISM

    OpenAIRE

    Rhine, Denise; Tarbox, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Rumination involves regurgitation of previously ingested food, rechewing the food, and reswallowing it. In the current study, a child with autism displayed chronic rumination, resulting in the decay and subsequent removal of several teeth. After several treatments failed, including thickened liquids and starch satiation, the participant was taught to chew gum. His rumination decreased significantly when gum was made available. Results suggest that access to chewing gum may be an effective tre...

  20. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress

    OpenAIRE

    Márcia de Mello Luvielmo; Caroline Dellinghausen Borges; Daniela de Oliveira Toyama; Claire Tondo Vendruscolo; Adilma Regina Pippa Scamparini

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95. Although greater xanthan production was observed after a 24 h-alkali stress process, a lower viscosity was observed when compared to the alkali stress-free gum, regardless of the alkali stress time. However, this outcome is not conclusive as further studies on g...

  1. Obtaining process of interpolymeric complexes from lactalbumin, xanthan gum and pectin

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Coimbra Zuvanov; Edwin Elard Garcia-rojas; Clitor Júnior Fernandes de Souza; Eliana da Silva Gulão; Luciano José Barreto Pereira

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the optimization process of interpolymeric complexes formation between lactalbumin and the polysaccharides xanthan gum and pectin was studied in order to define the optimum conditions for the complexes formation. For the experimental design, response surface methodology (RSM) for three independent variables was used. The optimum conditions for the complexes formation between lactalbumin and xanthan gum were: pH 6.6, NaCl concentration of 0.6 mol/L and xanthan gum concentration 0...

  2. Removal of antinutritional factors from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Bollini R.; Carnovale E.; Campion B.

    1999-01-01

    Phytohemagglutinin and the lectin-related proteins present in bean seeds are toxic to monogastric animals and lower the nutritional value of beans. Since these antimetabolites are present in substantial amounts, a breeding program aimed to the removal ofphytohemagglutinin was developed. The character ""absence of phytohemagglutinin"" was transferred into a bean cultivar by backcrossing. The lines obtained maintained the agronomic performance of the recurrent parent. Preliminary results show t...

  3. Two distinct nanovirus species infecting faba bean in Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Adane; Bencharki, Bouchaib; Torok, Valeria; Katul, Lina; Varrelmann, Mark; Josef Vetten, H.

    2009-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies raised against a Faba bean necrotic yellows virus (FBNYV) isolate from Egypt and a Faba bean necrotic stunt virus (FBNSV) isolate from Ethiopia, a striking serological variability among nanovirus isolates from faba bean in Morocco was revealed. To obtain a better understanding of this nanovirus variability in Morocco, the entire genomes of two serologically contrasting isolates referred to as Mor5 and Mor23 were sequenced. The eight circular ssDNA components, each ...

  4. Biology of the Coconut Bug, Pseudotheraptus wayi, on French Beans

    OpenAIRE

    Egonyu, James Peter; Ekesi, Sunday; Kabaru, Jacques; Irungu, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    The coconut bug, Pseudotheraptus wayi Brown (Heteroptera: Coreidae), is a major pest of a wide range of economically important crops in Eastern and Southern Africa. The suitability of French beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabales: Fabaceae) as an alternative food for mass rearing of P. wayi was determined by elucidating its development, survival, and reproduction on French bean pods in the laboratory. Development and survival of immatures on French beans was comparable to what is reported with...

  5. Castor Bean Organelle Genome Sequencing and Worldwide Genetic Diversity Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Rivarola, Maximo; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Chan, Agnes P.; Williams, Amber L.; Rice, Danny W; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M. J.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Allan, Gerard J; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and for...

  6. Intermittent drying of beans in a spouted bed

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, C A; S.C.S. Rocha

    2007-01-01

    Carioca beans are a highly nutritious grain, in terms of the amount of protein, iron and potassium as well as carbohydrates and fiber and as a source of vitamins. The moisture content of recently picked beans is too high for good preservation and storage, resulting in the need for drying before packaging. In this work, the drying of Carioca beans in a laboratory scale spouted bed under intermittent conditions of the drying air was experimentally analyzed. Experiments carried out consisted of ...

  7. Effect of bean polyphenols on iron absorption in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia are major public health problems in many developing countries. Common beans are a staple food in various Eastern African countries. Beans contain high amounts of iron, but the iron is poorly absorbed due to the presence of the iron absorption inhibitors polyphenols and phytic acid. With the overall aim of increasing the intake of bioavailable iron from beans by plant breeding strategies, this study evaluates the importance bean polyphenols on iron absorption. In common beans the polyphenols are concentrated in the bean hulls. Therefore bean hulls were used as a source of natural bean polyphenols and added in three different amounts to a non-inhibitory test meal (phytic acid free bread rolls). Iron absorption from the test meals was measured in three groups of 16 apparently healthy female volunteers using stable iron isotope techniques. Each volunteer consumed a test meal with and a test meal without bean polyphenols extrinsically labeled with 57Fe and 58Fe respectively. Iron absorption was determined based on the incorporation of iron stable isotopes into red blood cells 14 days after administration. Isotopic analysis was performed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The results of the absorption studies showed a dose dependent negative effect of bean polyphenols on iron absorption in humans. At the lowest polyphenol content tested (20 mg per test meal) no impact on iron absorption was found (p 0.92). A polyphenol content of 50 mg reduced the mean iron absorption significantly from 20.3% to 17.3% (p 0.044). The highest polyphenol content of 200 mg significantly reduced the mean iron absorption from 14.3% to 7.9% (p 0.0001). Further studies are planned to evaluate the relative effect of polyphenols and phytic acid on iron absorption from beans to provide guidance for breeding beans with improved iron bioavailability. (author)

  8. Impact of gelation period on modified locust bean-alginate interpenetrating beads for oral glipizide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Paramita; Sa, Biswanath; Maiti, Sabyasachi

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the effect of hydrogelation period in the design of glipizide-loaded biopolymer-based interpenetrating network (IPN) beads was investigated. Carboxymethyl locust bean gum and sodium alginate IPN beads were prepared by ionic crosslinking method using aqueous aluminium chloride salt solution as gelation medium. The longer exposure of the IPN beads in the gelation medium caused a considerable loss of the drug (∼ 8%), and also affected their surface morphology and drug release performance. Spherical shape of the IPN beads was observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The diameter of IPN beads increased with increasing gelation time. The IPNs cured for 0.5h exhibited slower drug release kinetics in HCl (pH 1.2) and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) solution than those incubated for 1-2h. The drug release occurred at a faster rate in phosphate buffer solution and continued for a minimum period of 8h. The IPNs cured for the lowest period obeyed polymer chain-relaxation phenomenon as dominating mechanism for drug release. However, all the IPNs followed anomalous mechanism of drug transport. The drug release corroborated well with pH-dependent swelling behaviors of the IPNs. Thus, IPN beads cured for 0.5h were found most suitable for controlled delivery of BCS class II anti-diabetic drug glipizide. PMID:25745842

  9. Effect of chewing gum on the bowel motility after cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadije Yazdi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative ileus is common after cholecystectomy, causes gas retension, distention, nausea, vomiting, and even pain. Chewing gum is a type of sham feeding that may reduce the duration of postoperative ileus. This study determines the effect of chewing gum in the immediate postoperative period to facilitate ileus recovery following cholecystectomy. Material & Methods: This is a randomized controlled trial in 2009. Twenty-four patients undergoing cholecystectomy and they divided in to two equal groups (n=12. Patients in group A chewed sugarless gum there time after surgery, each time 20 miniutes in 4, 10 and 18 hours after finishing sugery. Demographics, intraoperative, and postoperative care data did not reveal any significant difference between two groups. The data resending the first passage of flatus, defecation and bowel sound in every 2 hours for each patient completed in questioning. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version-13.5 and student t-test. Results: The first bowel sound heard 3 ±1.3 and 2.8 ±1.3 hours post-operatively in cases and controls, respectively. The above findings were not significant between two groups. Furthermore gas passing reported at 18.3±10.5 and 36.28±12.6 hours post-operation in case and control groups respectively. The first defecation was occured at 36.8 ±21.7 and 69.5 ±19.2 hours after operation in case and control groups, respectively

  10. THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE GUM AND OF THE DESMODONTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. NICULESCU

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The gum and the desmodontium are constituent parts of the morpho-functional complex of the parodontium. Depending on its topographic situation, we can describe three portions of the gum: alveolar, marginal and interdental, each one having its features. Within the gum, the collagen fibres from the subepihtelial net are grouped in alveologingival, dentogingival, circular and interdental, the last ones being seen by us as a single group, called peridental fibres. The desmodontium or the alveolodental ligament or the parodontal ligament makes the relation between the alveolar bone and the radicular cement within the dentoalveolar articulation, articulation known under the name of gomphosis, a syndesmose that does not allow any movement to the tooth. Depending on their topographic situation, the collagen fibres in the constitution of the alveolodental ligament, also called cemento-alveolar fibres, can be divided in marginal, intermediary and apical. The alveolodental ligament has the important role in the transmission of the chewing forces to the resistance structures within the functional architectonics of the cranium.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse copper nanoparticles using gum acacia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chunfa; Cai, Hao; Zhang, Xianglin; Cao, Chuanliang

    2014-03-01

    A simple method was put forward in this paper for preparing colloidal copper nanoparticles in aqueous solutions using copper sulfate, gum acacia and hydrazine hydrate as copper precursor, capping agents and reducing agents, respectively, without any inert gas. The formation of nanosized copper was confirmed by its characteristic surface plasmon absorption peak at 604 nm in UV-vis spectra. The transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that the as-synthesized copper fine spherical particles are distributed uniformly with a narrow distribution from 3 nm to 9 nm. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) demonstrated that the obtained metallic nanoparticles are single crystalline copper nanoparticles. Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopic data suggested that the copper nanoparticles are coated with gum acacia. The effects of the quantity of gum acacia on the particle size were investigated by the UV-vis spectra and TEM images. The growth process of the nanoparticles was monitored by the UV-vis spectra. The mechanism of the formation copper nanoparticles was discussed. The process raised in this study can be served as an excellent candidate for the preparation of copper nanoparticles in a large scale production.

  12. Electron beam irradiation effects on xanthan gum. Rheological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the application of electron beam irradiation to xanthum gum as used as ingredient by the food or cosmetics industry in order to establish their radiosensitivity. The edible powder of xanthum gum samples were irradiated in 1mm thick layers of Petri dishes covered by a transparent PVC of films using an EB accelerator Dynamitron (Radiation Dynamics Inc.) model JOB 188, dose rate 11.17 kGy/s, 0.637 MeV, 1.78 mA, 5 kGy per passage, 3.36 m min-1 with doses of 5, 10, 20 and 50kGy. One % aqueous solutions from irradiated and non-irradiated xanthum gum were prepared and the radiation effects were measured following viscosity changes at 25 deg. C using a Brookfield viscometer; model DVIII, spindel L, with Rheocalc software. Viscosity measurements were performed according to our previous experience and the results are the mean of at least 3 experiments

  13. Crushing of roasted arabica coffee beans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nedomová, Š.; Trnka, Jan; Severa, L.; Stoklasová, Pavla; Buchar, J.

    Vol. 1. Nitra: Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, 2010 - (Vozárová, V.). s. 24-25 ISBN 978-80-552-0463-5. [International Conference on Food Physics ICFP 2010 /9./. 20.10.2010-21.10.2010, Nitra] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA201990701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : strain gauges * impactor * roasted beans Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing

  14. Pb-210 in beans grown in normal background environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingote, Raquel M.; Nogueira, Regina A., E-mail: mingote@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: rnogueira@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro-Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A survey was carried out on the activity concentration of {sup 210}Pb in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown in normal background environments in Brazil. The Carioca beans and the black type were analyzed, which contribute with 90% of the Brazilian market share of the common beans. To this study 18 bean samples sowing in the Middle-Western and Southern regions of Brazil during the years 2010-2011 were analyzed. The proportion per bean type was similar to the national production: most of the Carioca beans (n=13; 72%) and black beans (n=5; 28%). Other 17 values of {sup 210}Pb activity concentration in beans grown in Southeastern region available in the GEORAD, a dataset of radioactivity in Brazil, were added to the statistic analysis of the data. Considering the information contained in censored observations (60%), representative value of {sup 210}Pb activity concentration in beans was estimated by using robust ROS, a censored data analysis method. The value 0.047 Bq kg{sup -1} fresh wt. obtained here is according to {sup 210}Pb activity concentration in grains reported by UNSCEAR 0.05 Bq kg{sup -1}. (author)

  15. The Effective Design of Bean Bag as a Vibroimpact Damper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Q. Liu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of a bean bag damper has been effectively applied in many engineering fields to control the vibroimpact of a structural system. In this study, the basic parameters responsible for the design of an effective bean bag: the size of beans, the mass ratio of the bean bag to the structure to which it is attached, the clearance distance and the position of the bag, are studied by both theoretical and experimental analyses. These will provide a better understanding of the performance of the bean bag for optimisation of damper design. It was found that reducing the size of beans would increase the exchange of momentum in the system due to the increase in the effective contact areas. Within the range of mass ratios studied, the damping performance of the damper was found to improve with higher mass ratios. There was an optimum clearance for any specific damper whereby the maximum attenuation could be achieved. The position of the bag with respect to nodes and antipodes of the primary structure determined the magnitude of attenuation attainable. Furthermore, the limitations of bean bags have been identified and a general criteria for the design of a bean bag damper has been formulated based on the study undertaken. It was shown that an appropriately configured bean bag damper was capable of reducing the amplitude of vibration by 80% to 90%.

  16. Elemental characterization of Brazilian beans using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beans are important for many developing countries as a source of protein and mineral nutrients. Here, ten commercial types of Brazilian beans, from the species Phaseolus vulgaris (common beans) and Vigna unguiculata (cowpeas), were analyzed by neutron activation analysis for the determination of Br, Ca, Co, Cs, Fe, K, Mo, Na, Rb, Sc and Zn. There were statistical differences (p/0.05) amongst the commercial types, except for Br, Rb and Sc. In general, non-essential elements showed high variability, indicating that the origin of beans had a strong influence on the mass fraction of such elements. (author)

  17. EVALUATION OF MORINGA OLEIFERA GUM AS A BINDER IN TABLET FORMULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Patil Basawaraj S.; Soodam Srinivas R.; Kulkarni Upendra; Korwar Prakassh G.

    2010-01-01

    Various plant gums have been used as binders in tablet formulations. But still finding novel binder for the manufacture of tablets, in pharmaceutical industry. The Moringa oleifera gum was found its binding property. In the present study Moringa oleifera gum was employed as a binding agent in Chloroquine phosphate tablets at concentrations of 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 % w/w, in comparison with potato starch. The properties of Moringa oleifera gum were evaluated for angle of repose, bulk density, tappe...

  18. Whole and crushed nutlets of chia (Salvia hispanica) from Mexico as a source of functional gums

    OpenAIRE

    Maira Segura-Campos; Zaidy Acosta-Chi; Gabriel Rosado-Rubio; Luis Chel-Guerrero; David Betancur-Ancona

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and functional properties of Mexican chia (Salvia hispanica) gums extracted from defatted whole and crushed nutlets using the Soxhlet and SFE-CO2 methods. Chia gums have interesting chemical and functional properties for the food industry. The oil and gum yields were in the range of 1.98-16.42% and 5.81-12.60%, respectively. The defatting procedure did not affect significantly the oil and gum extraction; the nutlet type (whole or cr...

  19. Rapid screening of guar gum using portable Raman spectral identification methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Hirsch K; Wolfgang, Steven; Rodriguez, Jason D

    2016-01-25

    Guar gum is a well-known inactive ingredient (excipient) used in a variety of oral pharmaceutical dosage forms as a thickener and stabilizer of suspensions and as a binder of powders. It is also widely used as a food ingredient in which case alternatives with similar properties, including chemically similar gums, are readily available. Recent supply shortages and price fluctuations have caused guar gum to come under increasing scrutiny for possible adulteration by substitution of cheaper alternatives. One way that the U.S. FDA is attempting to screen pharmaceutical ingredients at risk for adulteration or substitution is through field-deployable spectroscopic screening. Here we report a comprehensive approach to evaluate two field-deployable Raman methods--spectral correlation and principal component analysis--to differentiate guar gum from other gums. We report a comparison of the sensitivity of the spectroscopic screening methods with current compendial identification tests. The ability of the spectroscopic methods to perform unambiguous identification of guar gum compared to other gums makes them an enhanced surveillance alternative to the current compendial identification tests, which are largely subjective in nature. Our findings indicate that Raman spectral identification methods perform better than compendial identification methods and are able to distinguish guar gum from other gums with 100% accuracy for samples tested by spectral correlation and principal component analysis. PMID:26609678

  20. Fabrication of electrospun almond gum/PVA nanofibers as a thermostable delivery system for vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Atefe; Tavanai, Hossein; Nasirpour, Ali

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the fabrication of vanillin incorporated almond gum/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers through electrospinning has been investigated. Electrospinning of only almond gum was proved impossible. It was found that the aqueous solution of almond gum/PVA (80:20, concentration=7% (w/w)) containing 3% (w/w) vanillin could have successfully electrospun to uniform nanofibers with diameters as low as 77nm. According to the thermal analysis, incorporated vanillin in almond gum/PVA nanofibers showed higher thermal stability than free vanillin, making this composite especially suitable for high temperature applications. XRD and FTIR analyses proved the presence of vanillin in the almond gum/PVA nanofibers. It was also found that vanillin was dispersed as big crystallites in the matrix of almond gum/PVA nanofibers. FTIR analysis showed almond gum and PVA had chemical cross-linking by etheric bonds between COH groups of almond gum and OH groups of PVA. Also, in the nanofibers, there were no major interaction between vanillin and either almond gum or PVA. PMID:27267574

  1. Formulation of Eco-friendly Medicated Chewing Gum to Prevent Motion Sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shete, Rahul B; Muniswamy, Vimalkumar J; Pandit, Ashlesha P; Khandelwal, Kishanchandra R

    2015-10-01

    An attempt was made to formulate medicated chewing gum to prevent motion sickness using natural gum base for faster onset of action and easy administration, anywhere and anytime, without access to water. To avoid the discard issue of gum cud, natural gum base of Triticum aestivum (wheat grain) was explored because of its biodegradable and biocompatible nature and easy availability. Prolamin, extracted from wheat, showed good chewing capacity, elasticity, high water retention capacity, antifungal activity, and compatibility with the drug. Formulations were prepared based on a two-factor and three-level factorial design. Amount of calcium carbonate (texturizer) and gum base were selected as independent variables. Elasticity and drug release were considered as the dependent variables. All batches were evaluated for the content uniformity, elasticity study, texture study, in vitro drug release study, and chewiness study. Results revealed that medicated chewing gum containing 80 mg of calcium carbonate and 500 mg of gum base showed good elasticity and more than 90% drug release within 16 min. Thus, this study suggested that both good elasticity and chew ability and abundant availability of wheat grain can act as a potential gum base for medicated chewing gum. PMID:25652732

  2. Chemical and Physical Properties, Safety and Application of Partially Hydrolized Guar Gum as Dietary Fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Seon-Joo; Chu, Djong-Chi; Raj Juneja, Lekh

    2007-01-01

    The ideal water-soluble dietary fiber for the fiber-enrichment of foods must be very low in viscosity, tasteless, odorless, and should produce clear solutions in beverages. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) produced from guar gum by enzymatic process has the same chemical structure with intact guar gum but less than one-tenth the original molecular length of guar gum, which make available to be used as film former, foam stabilizer and swelling agent. The viscosity of PHGG is about 10 mPa·s...

  3. The Moche Lima beans recording system, revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi S. Melka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One matter that has raised sufficient uncertainties among scholarsin the study of the Old Moche culture is a system that comprises patterned Lima beans. The marked beans, plus various associated effigies, appear painted by and large with a mixture of realism and symbolism on the surface of ceramic bottles and jugs, with many of them showing an unparalleled artistry in the great area of the South American subcontinent. A range of accounts has been offered as to what the real meaning of these items is: starting from a recreationaland/or a gambling game, to a divination scheme, to amulets, to an application for determining the length and order of funerary rites, to a device close to an accountancy and data storage medium, ending up with an ‘ideographic’, or even a ‘pre-alphabetic’ system.The investigation brings together structural, iconographic and cultural aspects, and indicates that we might be dealing with an original form of mnemotechnology, contrived to solve the problems of medium and long-distance communication among the once thriving Moche principalities. Likewise, by reviewing the literature, by searching for new material, and exploring the structure and combinatory properties of the marked Lima beans, as well as by placing emphasis on joint scholarly efforts, may enhance the studies.

  4. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using gum polysaccharide of Cochlospermum religiosum (katira gum) and study of catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Saikat; Kumar Sen, Ipsita; Sirajul Islam, Syed

    2012-08-01

    A green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) using aqueous solution of a hetero-polysaccharide, extracted from the gum of Cochlospermum religiosum (katira gum), has been demonstrated in this work. The hetero-polysaccharide plays the role of both reducing and stabilizing agent. The synthesized Au NPs were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, HR-TEM, XRD and FT-IR experiments. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of UV-vis spectrum around 528 nm confirmed the formation of Au NPs. Transmission electron microscopic analysis showed an average size of Au NPs of 6.9 nm. The fcc crystalline nature of these particles was identified by XRD analysis and SAED pattern. These Au NPs also function as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP). The reduction of 4-NP follows pseudo-first-order kinetics with rate constant 2.67×10-2 min-1.

  5. Antinutritional factors in anasazi and other pinto beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weder, J K; Telek, L; Vozári-Hampe, M; Saini, H S

    1997-01-01

    Antinutritional factors of anasazi bean were compared to traditional pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Anasazi beans contained less (p0.05) in stachyose and raffinose content were found between the two bean types; verbascose was not detected at all. Significant (plectin content were observed between anasazi and pinto bean. The lectins of anasazi beans were classified as non toxic and those of the pinto beans as toxic types. No differences (p>0.05) in inhibitor activity against human and bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin were found between the two bean types. PMID:9527344

  6. Export and Competitiveness of Indonesian Coffee Bean in International Market: Strategic Implication for the Development of Organic Coffee Bean

    OpenAIRE

    Bambang Drajat; Adang Agustian; Ade Supriatna

    2007-01-01

    The performance of Indonesian coffee bean export from 1995 to 2004was not satisfactory. This implied that there were problems of the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export. This study was expected to come up withsome views related with the problem. This study was aimed to analyze the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export in international markets. Somepolicy implication would be derived following the conclusions. In addition,this study was aimed to deliver some arguments r...

  7. Antiectoparasitic activity of the gum resin, gum haggar, from the East African plant, Commiphora holtziana

    OpenAIRE

    Birkett, Michael A.; Al Abassi, Sate; Kröber, Thomas; Chamberlain, Keith; Hooper, Antony M.; Guerin, Patrick M.; Pettersson, Jan; Pickett, John A.; Slade, Robin; Wadhams, Lester J.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of ixodid tick (Acari: Ixodidae) repellency by gum haggar, a resin produced by Commiphora holtziana (Burseraceae), was investigated by evaluating activity against the cattle tick, Boophilus microplus. In an arena bioassay, a hexane extract of the resin of C. holtziana exhibited a repellent effect lasting up to 5 h. The hydrocarbon fraction of the resin extract was shown to account for the repellent activity, and was analysed by coupled gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS...

  8. Susceptibility of pea, horse bean and bean to viruses in dependence on the age of the inoculated plants

    OpenAIRE

    Władysław Błaszczak; Grażyna Ellmann-Wąsik; Renata Lesiak-Jerzyk

    2013-01-01

    Three cultivars of pea did not differ in their susceptibility to Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) notwithstanding the age of the inoculated plants. But their susceptibility to infection with Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus (BYMV) differed. Horse bean cultivars 'Nadwiślański' and 'Major' proved to be less susceptible to Broad Bean True Mosaic Virus (BBTMV) when older plants were-inoculated. Two bean cultivars 'Złota Saxa' and 'Earle' appeared to be susceptible to BBTMV only in the phase of developing prim...

  9. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences

  10. Physical and chemical stability of gum arabic-stabilized conjugated linoleic acid oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaolin; Xu, Qiong; Tian, Dazhi; Wang, Nana; Fang, Yapeng; Deng, Zhongyang; Phillips, Glyn O; Lu, Jiang

    2013-05-15

    Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions have been used as a delivery system to protect conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid, from oxidation. Conventional gum arabic (GA) and two matured gum arabic samples (EM2 and EM10) were used as emulsifiers to prepare CLA-in-water emulsions. The emulsions have optimal physical and chemical stability at gum concentrations of 5% for all three gums. Emulsions with higher gum concentrations are more susceptible to lipid oxidation. This is attributed to reduced physical stability at higher gum concentrations because of the coalescence and depletion-induced flocculation of the emulsion droplets. The prooxidants iron and copper intrinsically contained in the gums could also contribute to this instability. Among the three gums, EM10 provides the most effective protection for CLA both physically and chemically, because of its superior interfacial properties over GA and EM2. PMID:23614832

  11. IRON, ZINC, AND FERRITIN ACCUMULATION IN COMMON BEANS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanski, Dorian Fabian; Sørensen, Kirsten; Jurkiewicz, Anna Malgorzata;

    common beans. We used micro-PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) and proton backscattering analysis to localize and quantify zinc and iron in mature bean seeds. In addition the iron distribution in different P. vulgaris genotypes was studied using Perl's Prussian blue staining. We show  that the...

  12. Incentives for cocoa bean production in Ghana: Does quality matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quarmine, W.; Haagsma, R.; Sakyi-Dawson, O.; Asante, F.; Huis, van A.; Obeng-Ofori, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the institutional factors that constrain farmers’ incentives to enhance the quality of cocoa beans in Ghana. Data were collected at three levels of aggregation in the cocoa bean value chain: village, district, and national level. Multi-stage cluster sampling was employed to s

  13. Root rots of common and tepary beans in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root rots are a disease complex affecting common bean and can be severe in bean growing areas in the tropics and subtropics. The presence of several pathogens makes it difficult to breed for resistance because of the synergistic effect of the pathogens in the host and the interaction of soil factors...

  14. Evaluation of Genetic Diversity of Castor Bean for Biodiesel Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castor bean (Ricinus communis L., 2n=20) is a cross-pollinated diploid species belonging to the family Euphorbiaceae instead of the Leguminosae. It is a native of Africa but may have originated in India. Castor bean plants grow as annual or perennial, depending on geographical locations, climate a...

  15. The composition of wax and oil in green coffee beans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folstar, P.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for the isolation of wax and oil from green coffee beans were studied and a method for the quantitative extraction of coffee oil from the beans was introduced. Coffee wax, coffee oil and wax-free coffee oil as well as the unsaponifiable matter prepared from each were fractionated by column c

  16. Diversity for cooking time in Andean dry beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L) are a nutrient dense, low cost food and therefore are an excellent value for consumers (Drewnowski and Rehm, 2013). In spite of this value, long cooking times limit bean consumption. This is true in developing countries where cooking fuel is sometimes scarce and in d...

  17. Compliance with Xylitol and Sorbitol Chewing Gum Regimens in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    BRETZ, WALTER A.; ROSA, ODILA P. S.; SILVA, SALETE M. B.; CORBY, PATRICIA M. A.; MILANDA, MARCELO; LOESCHE, WALTER J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate compliance of long-term xylitol and sorbitol chewing gum regimens in adult women participating in a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. Design The participants included 122 mothers (age range: 16–35 years) residing in the city of Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil. Compliance with the xylitol and sorbitol chewing gum regimens was assessed by weighing, with a precision balance, all used gums returned in zip-lock bags during the study period of 33 months. The total number of returned bags in both chewing gum groups was computed and the differences between groups were determined by one-way ANOVA. Compliance was further categorized into excellent, good, fair or poor based on the distribution of the combined data for both groups by quartiles. These distributions for the xylitol and sorbitol groups were subjected to chi-square analysis. Results Compliance was always superior for the xylitol group in all categories. These distributions were, however, not significantly different in statistical terms. Average compliance in the xylitol chewing gum group was significantly higher when compared to the sorbitol chewing gum group (p=0.0481). Conclusions The results suggest that compliance, and possibly acceptance in this population, was superior for xylitol chewing gum than for sorbitol chewing gum. PMID:22241940

  18. Gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants: effects on lipid oxidation of peanuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Muhammad Abdul; Azam, Mahmood; Hasnain, Abid

    2015-04-01

    Performance of antioxidants is improved by incorporating them into polymer matrix such as polysaccharides based edible coatings. Gum cordia, an anionic polysaccharide extracted from the fruits of Cordia.myxa could be used as carrier of antioxidants by virtue of its strong adhering and emulsifying properties. This study aimed to explore the potential of gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants when applied as edible coating on peanuts. Gum Cordia was compared with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in delivering of antioxidants: butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and ascorbic acid (AA). Coated and uncoated peanuts were stored at 35 °C for 126 days and coating carrier effectiveness was measured by following lipid oxidation using chemical parameters (peroxide value and thiobarbituric acid reactive species) and sensory evaluation (oxidized flavor). Significant differences (p < 0.05) between coated and uncoated samples were observed. Gum cordia was found better than CMC to deliver the antioxidants. Gum cordia based coating in combination with BHA/BHT exhibited highest protection (290 % higher shelf life than control) based on peroxide value (40 meq.O2 kg(-1)) followed by gum codia plus BHT (244 %), gum cordia plus BHA (232 %), CMC plus BHA/BHT (184 %), CMC plus BHA (139 %), CMC plus BHT (119 %), gum cordia plus AA (96 %) and CMC plus AA (46 %). PMID:25829621

  19. Effect of chewing gums containing the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri on oral malodour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Mette K; Bardow, Allan; Jensdottir, Thorbjörg;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of chewing gums containing probiotic bacteria on oral malodour. The null hypothesis was that no difference would be displayed compared with placebo gums. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five healthy young adults with self-reported malodorous morning breath complete...

  20. Compositional analysis and rheological characterization of gum tragacanth exudates from six species of Iranian Astragalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaghi, Sima; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Zargaraan, Azizollaah;

    2011-01-01

    The sugar composition and viscoelastic behaviour of Iranian gum tragacanth exuded by six species of Astragalus was investigated at a concentration of 1.3% and varying ionic strength using a controlled shear-rate rheometer. Compositional analysis of the six species of gum tragacanth by high...

  1. Unveiling the Sources of Chromium in Pictorialist Photographs: Gum-Dichromate Process or Paper Sizing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vila, Anna; Centeno, Silvia A; Kennedy, Nora W; Barro, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    For this issue of Hand Papermaking devoted to paper sizing, we offer a review and extension of pertinent results obtained in our investigations of the gum-dichromate photographic process, commonly known as the gum-bichromate process.1 We have published three articles to date on our findings; this...

  2. Adverse Reaction to Nicotine Gum in Malay Female Smoker: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorzurani, Md Haris Robson; Bond, Alyson; Wolff, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) are prescribed in smoking cessation programmes to help smokers stop smoking. The ideal dosage of NRT should control cravings and withdrawal symptoms but avoid adverse reactions. This report describes a case of adverse reaction to nicotine gum in a female Malay smoker. Assays taken 2 h after the gum, showed that…

  3. 76 FR 44811 - Carboxymethyl Guar Gum Sodium Salt and Carboxymethyl-Hydroxypropyl Guar; Exemption From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ..., entitled Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks (62 FR 19885, April 23... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Carboxymethyl Guar Gum Sodium Salt and Carboxymethyl- Hydroxypropyl Guar... residues of carboxymethyl guar gum sodium salt (CAS Reg. No. 39346-76-4) and...

  4. Recent advances in Rosaceae gum exudates: From synthesis to food and non-food applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaziz, Fatma; Koubaa, Mohamed; Ellouz Ghorbel, Raoudha; Ellouz Chaabouni, Semia

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, great interest has been devoted to the development of new applications for natural gums. These molecules were used for a variety of purposes since they are chemically inert, non-toxic, less expensive, biodegradable and widely available. They represent one of the most abundant raw materials used not only in commercial food products, but also in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Plant gums take their advantages compared to other gums (e.g., from animal and microbial sources) mainly because of their acceptance by consumers. Despite of the well description given in literature for the features of plant gum exudates, there is a lack distinguishing the different families that are producing gums, and their potential applications. Among these gums, the ones produced by Rosaceae family (e.g., almond, apricot, cherry, peach, and plum plants) have been taking special attention. Thus, the aim of this review is to report the recent advances in Rosaceae gum exudates. An emphasis is given for the formation mechanisms of these gums, their chemical composition, functional properties and structures, beneficial properties, as well as their food/non-food applications. PMID:26836615

  5. Characterisation and molecular association of Nigerian and Sudanese Acacia gum exudates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical and physicochemical characteristics of gum exudate samples harvested from mature trees of Acacia senegal at two specific locations in Nigeria have been investigated together with gum samples harvested from Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal originating from Sudan. The monosaccharide sugar ...

  6. Determination of optimum tapping date for gum arabic production South Kordofan State, Sudan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Idris Musa Adam; Kamal E.M. Fadl

    2011-01-01

    Acacia senegal,the gum arabic producing tree,is the most important tree species for the livelihood of the people in South Kordofan State,Sudan.The objective of this study was to determine the optimum tapping date for gum arabic production in the study area.A randomized complete block design experiment with three replications was conducted at (Meari) area for two continuous growing seasons 2008/2009 -2009/2010.The treatments comprised six tapping dates (1 Oct,15 Oct,1Nov,15 Nov,1 Dec,and 15 Dec).Results showed highly significant differences (p < 0.001) in gum arabic yield (g\\tree) in all pickings and in the total gum yield between the tapping dates.The results also showed that tapping of trees on 15 October and 1 November gave a higher yield compared to the other dates.The highest gum yield of 1086.6 and 661.2g/tree was recorded on 15 October and 15 November,while the lowest gum yield of 297.9 g/tree was recorded when the trees were tapped on 1 October.The two highest-yield dates of tapping (15 Oct and 1 Nov) are recommended as the best time for tapping for gum arabic production in South Kordofan State.These results can be used to increase gum arabic production and farmer income in South Kordofan State.

  7. Gum chewing improves adolescents’ math performance in an SAT preparatory course

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of gum chewing on students’ performance in a preparatory course for the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). A total of 182 adolescents enrolled in an SAT preparatory class were randomized into one of two treatments: 1) gum chewing condition (G...

  8. Terminological aspects of the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Charles

    2014-08-01

    The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) provided for the first time an international consensus on how to approach the widespread difficulties associated with conveying information about how reliable the value resulting from a measurement is thought to be. This paper examines the evolution in thinking and its impact on the terminology that accompanied the development of the GUM. Particular emphasis is put on the very clear distinction in the GUM between measurement uncertainty and measurement error, and on the reasons that even though ‘true value’ and ‘error’ are considered in the GUM to be ‘unknowable’ and, sometimes by implication, of little (or even no) use in measurement analysis, they remain as key concepts, especially when considering the objective of measurement. While probability theory in measurement analysis from a frequentist perspective was in widespread use prior to the publication of the GUM, a key underpinning principle of the GUM was to instead consider probability as a ‘degree of belief.’ The terminological changes necessary to make this transition are also covered. Even twenty years after the publication of the GUM, the scientific and metrology literatures sometimes contain uncertainty analyses, or discussions of measurement uncertainty, that are not terminologically consistent with the GUM, leading to the inability of readers to fully understand what has been done and what is intended in the associated measurements. This paper concludes with a discussion of the importance of using proper methodology and terminology for reporting measurement results.

  9. Genome Sequence of Xanthomonas campestris JX, an Industrially Productive Strain for Xanthan Gum

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Fei; Wang, Xia; Ma, Cuiqing; Yang, Chunyu; Tang, Hongzhi; Gai, Zhonghui; Xu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris JX, a soil bacterium, is an industrially productive strain for xanthan gum. Here we present a 5.0-Mb assembly of its genome sequence. We have annotated 12 coding sequences (CDSs) responsible for xanthan gum biosynthesis, 346 CDSs encoding carbohydrate metabolism, and 69 CDSs related to virulence, defense, and plant disease.

  10. 77 FR 34997 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China; Institution of Antidumping Duty Investigations and Scheduling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... amended. The amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6, 2011) and the newly... COMMISSION Xanthan Gum From Austria and China; Institution of Antidumping Duty Investigations and Scheduling... from Austria and/or China of xanthan gum, provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the...

  11. Small scale production and characterization of xanthan gum synthesized by local isolates of Xanthomonas campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Rajesh; Alam, Md Jahangir; Salim, Mohammad; Ashrafee, Tamzida Shamim

    2016-02-01

    Xanthan gum is a commercially important microbial exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by Xanthomonas campestris. X. campestris is a plant pathogen causing various plant diseases such as black rot of crucifers, bacterial leaf blight and citrus canker disease resulting in crop damage. In this study, we isolated efficient local bacterial isolates which are capable to produce xanthan gum utilizing different sources of carbon (maltose, sucrose and glucose). Bacterial isolates from different plant leaves and fruits were identified as Xanthomonas campestris based on their morphological and biochemical characteristics. Among the 23 isolates, 70% were capable of producing gum. Taro plant, considered as new bacterial host, also have the capability to produce xanthan gum. Production conditions of xanthan gum and their relative viscosity by these bacterial isolates were optimized using basal medium containing commercial carbon and nitrogen sources and various temperature and rotation. Highest level of xanthan gum (18.286 g/l) with relative viscosity (7.2) was produced (Host, Citrus macroptera) at 28 degrees C, pH 7.0, 150 rpm using sucrose as a carbon source at orbital shaker. Whereas, in lab fermenter, same conditions gave best result (19.587 g/l gum) with 7.8 relative viscosity. Chilled alcohol (96%) was used to recover the xanthan gum. FTIR studies also carried out for further confirmation of compatibility by detecting the chemical groups. PMID:26934783

  12. Biology of the coconut bug, Pseudotheraptus wayi, on French beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egonyu, James Peter; Ekesi, Sunday; Kabaru, Jacques; Irungu, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    The coconut bug, Pseudotheraptus wayi Brown (Heteroptera: Coreidae), is a major pest of a wide range of economically important crops in Eastern and Southern Africa. The suitability of French beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabales: Fabaceae) as an alternative food for mass rearing of P. wayi was determined by elucidating its development, survival, and reproduction on French bean pods in the laboratory. Development and survival of immatures on French beans was comparable to what is reported with two hosts previously used for rearing this species, namely coconut and cashew. Adults survived thrice longer and laid almost twice more eggs on the French beans than was reported for the two hosts above. These findings suggest that French beans are more suitable for mass rearing of this species than coconut and cashew, which have been used previously but can be scarce and too costly. PMID:25373191

  13. Biology of the Coconut Bug, Pseudotheraptus wayi, on French Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egonyu, James Peter; Ekesi, Sunday; Kabaru, Jacques; Irungu, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    The coconut bug, Pseudotheraptus wayi Brown (Heteroptera: Coreidae), is a major pest of a wide range of economically important crops in Eastern and Southern Africa. The suitability of French beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabales: Fabaceae) as an alternative food for mass rearing of P. wayi was determined by elucidating its development, survival, and reproduction on French bean pods in the laboratory. Development and survival of immatures on French beans was comparable to what is reported with two hosts previously used for rearing this species, namely coconut and cashew. Adults survived thrice longer and laid almost twice more eggs on the French beans than was reported for the two hosts above. These findings suggest that French beans are more suitable for mass rearing of this species than coconut and cashew, which have been used previously but can be scarce and too costly. PMID:25373191

  14. Occurrence and distribution of viruses infecting the bean in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the incidence and distribution of the most important bean viruses in Serbia: Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV, Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV, Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV and Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV. The viral isolates were characterized serologically and biologically. BCMV was found in the largest number of plants (30.53%, followed by BCMNV (2.67%, CMV (5.34%, and AMV (3.41%, since BYMV was not determined. Mixed viral infections were found in several samples. The RT-PCR method was used to prove that the tested isolates belong to the BCMV, family Potyviridae and strains Russian and NL-3 D. Results obtained in this work will enable further studies of the genetic variability of bean virus isolates from Serbia. .

  15. The effect of chewing gum flavor on the negative affect associated with tobacco abstinence among dependent cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lee M; Collins, Frank L; Vanderveen, Joseph W; Weaver, Cameron C

    2010-11-01

    Many smokers relapse during cessation attempts due to increases in negative affect. Previous research has shown that chewing confectionary chewing gum appears to lessen the severity of acute nicotine withdrawal symptoms and help individuals who are trying to reduce smoking in part due to the flavor of the gum chewed. The current study compared the effects of three flavored gums to a No Gum Control during 48-hour cessation periods for young dependent smokers. Forty-nine smokers participated in three experimental conditions (peppermint, vanilla, and baked apple cardamom flavored gum) as well as a No Gum Control across four weeks while abstaining from smoking for 48-hours each week. Compared to the No Gum Control, participants in the Gum conditions reported lower levels of anxiety, dysphoria, and tension. Vanilla and baked apple cardamom flavored gum resulted in lower levels of negative affect while peppermint flavored gum was not different from the No Gum Control. These findings indicate that some flavors of gum are effective in reducing the negative affect associated with nicotine withdrawal and may serve as a valuable tool in helping smokers quit. PMID:20598808

  16. 78 FR 13379 - Xanthan Gum from Austria and China; Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... COMMISSION Xanthan Gum from Austria and China; Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation... imports from Austria and/or China of xanthan gum, provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the Harmonized... Commerce has defined the subject merchandise as Adry xanthan gum, whether or not coated or blended...

  17. KARAKTERISTIK MI BASAH JAGUNG AKIBAT PENGARUH LAJU PENGUMPANAN DAN PENAMBAHAN GUAR GUM [Characteristics of Wet Corn Noodle: Effect of Feeding Rate and Guar Gum Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjahja Muhandri*

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to (1 investigate the effect of feeding rate on elongation, cooking loss, and microstructure of wet corn noodle properties and (2 investigate the effect of guar gum on elongation, cooking loss, hardness, and sensory quality of wet corn noodle. Corn noodles were made with pasta extruder. Two levels of feeding rate, i.e. 2.10 g/second and 1.87 g/second and three levels of guar gum (0, 1, 2% based on flour weight were applied during wet corn noodle processing. Increase in feeding rate resulted in increased elongation, decreased cooking loss, and corn noodles microstructure similar to wheat noodle. Addition of guar gum increased elongation, but decreased hardness and cooking loss of the corn noodle. Additionally, guar gum decreased the preference scores.

  18. Comparative Study on Rheology of Welan Gum and Xanthan Gum%韦兰胶与黄原胶流变性比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吉武科; 赵双枝; 严希海; 徐桂英

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,rheology (including viscoelasticity,temperature stability,and salt tolerance) of we-lan gum and xanthan gum was compared. The results showed that,compared with xanthan gum, welan gum had better viscoelasticity at same concentration,more stability at low temperature,and better salt tolerance.%对韦兰胶和黄原胶的流变性(包括粘弹性、温度稳定性和耐盐性)进行了比较研究.结果表明,与黄原胶相比,韦兰胶在相同浓度下具有更好的粘弹性、在低温下更稳定、具有较好的耐盐性.

  19. Pressure production in oral vestibule during gum chewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, M; Ono, T; Yoshinaka, M; Fujiwara, S; Yoshinaka, M; Maeda, Y

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to record oral vestibule pressure (OVP) by the lip and cheek contraction during gum chewing, to examine the characteristics of these pressures and coordination between the OVP and jaw movement. The subjects were eight healthy adult men (mean age of 29·3 ± 3·3 years). An experimental plate that incorporated four pressure sensors on the midline of the upper jaw (Ch. 1), upper right canine (Ch. 2), upper right first molar (Ch. 3) and upper left first molar (Ch. 4) was used for measuring OVP. The right masseter electromyogram (EMG) was recorded simultaneously. Subjects chewed gum on the right side 20 times, and eight consecutive strokes were used for the analysis of the sequential order, maximal magnitude and duration of each OVP. Onset of OVP was observed at the molar on the non-chewing side (Ch. 4) before chewing side (Ch. 3), and offset was largely simultaneous at each site. On the chewing side (Chs. 1-3), OVP onset during the interval of EMG activity reached to the peak around the end of interval and offset in the duration of EMG activity. The maximal pressure was significantly larger at Chs. 1-3 than at Ch. 4, but no significant differences were observed in duration of pressure among each site. These results suggest that OVP is coordinated with jaw movement during gum chewing, and larger pressure is produced on the chewing side than on the non-chewing side. Our findings are quantitative indices for the evaluation of lip and cheek function during mastication. PMID:26147313

  20. Antioxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds from Fava Bean Sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Koharu; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kawarazaki, Kai; Izawa, Norihiko; Kumazawa, Shigenori

    2016-06-01

    Fava beans are eaten all over the world and recently, marketing for their sprouts began in Japan. Fava bean sprouts contain more polyphenols and l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) than the bean itself. Our antioxidant screening program has shown that fava bean sprouts also possess a higher antioxidant activity than other commercially available sprouts and mature beans. However, the individual constituents of fava bean sprouts are not entirely known. In the present study, we investigated the phenolic compounds of fava bean sprouts and their antioxidant activity. Air-dried fava bean sprouts were treated with 80% methanol and the extract was partitioned in water with chloroform and ethyl acetate. HPLC analysis had shown that the ethyl acetate-soluble parts contained phenolic compounds, separated by preparative HPLC to yield 5 compounds (1-5). Structural analysis using NMR and MS revealed that the compounds isolated were kaempferol glycosides. All isolated compounds had an α-rhamnose at the C-7 position with different sugars attached at the C-3 position. Compounds 1-5 had β-galactose, β-glucose, α-rhamnose, 6-acetyl-β-galactose and 6-acetyl-β-glucose, respectively, at the C-3 position. The amount of l-DOPA in fava bean sprouts was determined by the quantitative (1) H NMR technique. The l-DOPA content was 550.45 mg ± 11.34 /100 g of the raw sprouts. The antioxidant activities of compounds 2-5 and l-DOPA were evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging assay. l-DOPA showed high antioxidant activity, but the isolated kaempferol glycosides showed weak activity. Therefore, it can be suggested that l-DOPA contributed to the antioxidant activity of fava bean sprouts. PMID:27155370

  1. Konjac/gellan gum mixed gels improve the quality of reduced-fat frankfurters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuo-Wei; Huang, Hsien-Yi

    2003-10-01

    Mixed gels of konjac (1%, 2%) and gellan gum (0.25%, 0.5%) were incorporated into reduced-fat (18%) frankfurters and compared with reduced-fat and high-fat (28%) controls for physicochemical, textural, sensory properties and storage stability. C28 (control at 28% fat) had the highest (Pkonjac/gellan gum mixed gels were not different from C28 in sensory overall acceptability, among them K1G5 (1% konjac/0.5% gellan gum) was numerically higher. C18 had the highest TPC (∼7.8 log CFU/g) after 12 weeks of storage, followed by gum-containing treatments. In conclusion, it appears feasible to incorporate konjac/gellan gum mixed gel at current levels to reduced-fat frankfurter for acceptable sensory merits with reasonable shelf life. PMID:22063436

  2. [Analysis of constituents of ester-type gum bases used as natural food additives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Atsuko; Masuda, Aino; Sugimoto, Naoki; Yamagata, Kazuo; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Tanamoto, Kenichi

    2007-12-01

    The differences in the constituents of ten ester-type gum bases used as natural food additives in Japan (urushi wax, carnauba wax, candelilla wax, rice bran wax, shellac wax, jojoba wax, bees wax, Japan wax, montan wax, and lanolin) were investigated. Several kinds of gum bases showed characteristic TLC patterns of lipids. In addition, compositions of fatty acid and alcohol moieties of esters in the gum bases were analyzed by GC/MS after methanolysis and hydrolysis, respectively. The results indicated that the varieties of fatty acids and alcohols and their compositions were characteristic for each gum base. These results will be useful for identification and discrimination of the ester-type gum bases. PMID:18203503

  3. Immunochromatographic purification of Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujarski, J J; Wiatroszak, I

    1981-01-01

    The method of immunoadsorptional purification of Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus has been worked out. Immunosorbents were obtained by coupling the antibody (IgG) fraction isolated from anti-BYMV and anti-pea leaf protein antisera with CNBr-activated 1% agarose beads. Conditions for preparation of immunosorbents, for BYMV adsorption and elution as well as the method of plant protein separation from BYMV were pointed out. The purity of BYMV was checked by double immunodiffusion as well as by SDS-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Also biological activity was determined. TMV was used as the model virus for further BYMV studies. PMID:7025790

  4. Chemical and spectroscopic studies of Cercidium praecox gum exudate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León de Pinto, G; Martínez, M; Rivas, C

    1994-07-01

    The structure of the polysaccharide from Cercidium praecox (R&P) Harms gum exudate has been studied by Smith degradation, by sugar and methylation analyses, and by 13C NMR spectroscopy. The results showed a (1-->4)-xylan core. Some xylose residues are substituted at O-2 by alpha-D-glucuronic acid and 4-O-methyl-alpha-D-glucuronic acid residues. beta-D-Glucuronic acid is present, probably as terminal residues. The arabinose is present as alpha-L-furanose and beta-L-pyranose. PMID:8062287

  5. Mutans Streptococci Dose Response to Xylitol Chewing Gum

    OpenAIRE

    Milgrom, P.; Ly, K.A.; Roberts, M C; Rothen, M; Mueller, G.; Yamaguchi, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    Xylitol is promoted in caries-preventive strategies, yet its effective dose range is unclear. This study determined the dose-response of mutans streptococci in plaque and unstimulated saliva to xylitol gum. Participants (n = 132) were randomized: controls (G1) (sorbitol/maltitol), or combinations giving xylitol 3.44 g/day (G2), 6.88 g/day (G3), or 10.32 g/day (G4). Groups chewed 3 pellets/4 times/d. Samples were taken at baseline, 5 wks, and 6 mos, and were cultured on modified Mitis Salivari...

  6. Gum Base Candy%胶基糖(1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵发基

    2007-01-01

    胶基糖(Gum Base Candy)又称胶姆糖,是一种含水不溶性树胶、添加甜味和香味料的耐咀嚼性糖果,几个世纪以来深受人们的喜爱。胶基糖有口香糖(Chewing Gum)和泡泡糖(Bubble Gum)两大类,约占全球糖果巧克力销售量的5%,约为60~70万吨。

  7. Gum and Nose Bleeding as a Presentation of Pediatric Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseininasab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Brucellosis symptoms are nonspecific; the most common complaints include fever, sweats, anorexia, headache, malaise, and arthralgia. Hematological manifestations of active brucellosis vary from mild anemia and leukopenia to thrombocytopenia and rarely pancytopenia. Case Presentation We report on an eight-year-old boy who presented epistaxis and gum bleeding. The physical examination revealed petechiae, purpura, ecchymosis, and cervical while inguinal lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly were noted. Brucella agglutinin titer was positive. After five days of specific therapy for brucellosis, fever was controlled, clinical signs and symptoms were improved and platelet count was dramatically increased. Conclusions Sever thrombocytopenia and bleeding may be the presentation of brucellosis.

  8. The mechanism of strength and deformation in Gum Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gum Metal” refers to β-Ti alloys that achieve exceptional elastic elongation and, with a specific alloy composition, appear to deform via a dislocation-free mechanism involving elastic instability at the limit of strength. This paper describes the current status of research on its strength, deformation mechanism and the possible role of stress-induced martensite. The theoretical basis for deformation at ideal strength is presented. The relevant experimental data is then discussed, including ex situ nanoindentation behavior and in situ pillar compression observed by transmission electron microscopy

  9. Bolus materials mainly made of chewing gum base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors preliminarily report useful bolus materials for therapy with high energy electrons and photons. The substances are made of mainly chewing gum base (CGB), and have thermoplasticity around 400C. Two bolus materials (CGB-3 and -4) are available, and these radiological properties are as follows (1) effective atomic number -7.51 for both, (2) electron density relative to water -1.05 for CGB-3, 1.00 for CGB-4. The basic studies, process to make bolus, clinical uses and indications are described. The characteristics of these bolus materials in radiotherapy planning with CT scanner and in high energy electron beam therapy are discussed. (author)

  10. Insulin chewing gum: Need of the day for diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mateti, Uday Venkat; Adla, Nagesh; Rajakannan, Thiyagu; Valakkathala, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Chewing gum is an excellent drug delivery system for self medication as it is convenient, can be administered discreetly without water and offers the removal of ‘needle fear’ for the patients. As it releases insulin orally, it helps in tackling of the deprivation of insulin by digestive enzyme without adding digestive enzyme inhibitor. This can be done by binding of vitamin B12 and insulin. The vitamin B12 is protected with haptocorrin which is a salivary protein. Another chemical pathway tak...

  11. Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in porous media (part 1): porous medium rheology and guar gum-induced clogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-10-01

    The present work is the first part of a comprehensive study on the use of guar gum to improve delivery of microscale zero-valent iron particles in contaminated aquifers. Guar gum solutions exhibit peculiar shear thinning properties, with high viscosity in static conditions and lower viscosity in dynamic conditions: this is beneficial both for the storage of MZVI dispersions, and also for the injection in porous media. In the present paper, the processes associated with guar gum injection in porous media are studied performing single-step and multi-step filtration tests in sand-packed columns. The experimental results of single-step tests performed by injecting guar gum solutions prepared at several concentrations and applying different dissolution procedures evidenced that the presence of residual undissolved polymeric particles in the guar gum solution may have a relevant negative impact on the permeability of the porous medium, resulting in evident clogging. The most effective preparation procedure which minimizes the presence of residual particles is dissolution in warm water (60°C) followed by centrifugation (procedure T60C). The multi-step tests (i.e. injection of guar gum at constant concentration with a step increase of flow velocity), performed at three polymer concentrations (1.5, 3 and 4g/l) provided information on the rheological properties of guar gum solutions when flowing through a porous medium at variable discharge rates, which mimic the injection in radial geometry. An experimental protocol was defined for the rheological characterization of the fluids in porous media, and empirical relationships were derived for the quantification of rheological properties and clogging with variable injection rate. These relationships will be implemented in the second companion paper (Part II) in a radial transport model for the simulation of large-scale injection of MZVI-guar gum slurries. PMID:25065767

  12. KARAKTERISTIK EMULSI SANTAN DAN MINYAK KEDELAI YANG DITAMBAH GUM ARAB DAN SUKROSA ESTER [Emulsion Characteristics of Coconut Milk and Soybean Oil Added with Gum Arabic and Sucrose Ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laksmi Hartayanie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available High saturated fatty acid content in coconut milk can be reduced by adding unsaturated fat. Pretreatment such as pasteurisation, homogenization or stabilizer and emulsifier addition are essential to prevent emulsion deterioration that could happen in few hours. This study aimed to determine the most appropriate combination of gum arabic and sucrose ester to produce good emulsion stability based on its physical and chemical characteristics. Furthermore this study also aimed to determine correlation between creaming index and other characteristics of coconut milk emulsion. Emulsion stability of mixed coconut milk in sterile glass bottles was observed for 7 days under 23-24°C. Stabilizer and emulsifier added were gum arabic and sucrose ester in five combinations, i.e. 6% gum arabic, 0.3% sucrose ester, 6% gum arabic + 0.3% sucrose ester, 3% gum arabic + 0.15% sucrose ester and 4.5% gum arabic + 0.225% sucrose ester. The physical characteristics evaluated were creaming index, total color change, viscosity and droplet distribution, while the chemical characteristics observed included pH, TBA value, and protein content. Data were analyzed by One Way Anova at 95% significant level to determine the differences among treatments. Bivariate Pearson Correlation was used in order to determine the interaction among sample characteristics. The data showed that, gum arabic and sucrose ester can maintain the emulsion stability. A combination of 4.5% gum arabic and 0.225% sucrose ester provided the best physicochemical characteristics with the lowest creaming index and decreased viscosit, and uniform droplet distribution.

  13. In vitro tooth whitening effect of two medicated chewing gums compared to a whitening gum and saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Saroea Geoffrey; Hasler-Nguyen Nathalie; Moore Michael

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Extrinsic staining of teeth may result from the deposition of a variety of pigments into or onto the tooth surface, which originate mainly from diet or from tobacco use. More recently, clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of some chewing gums in removing extrinsic tooth staining. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of two nicotine medicated chewing gums (A and B) on stain removal in an in vitro experiment, when compared with a confectionary whi...

  14. Effects of bioprocessed antinutritional factors on bean protein quality, with special emphasis on Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelkoul, F.H.M.G.

    1994-01-01

    Legumes, e.g. beans and peas, can contain antinutritional factors. Some varieties of faba beans (Vicia faba), soya beans (Glycine max ) and white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) can contain in their raw state antinutritional factors such as tannins, trypsin inhibitors and lectins respectively whic

  15. Proteomic analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The modern cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) has evolved from wild common beans distributed in Central America, Mexico and the Andean region of South America. It has been reported that wild common bean accessions have higher levels of protein content than the domesticated dry bean cultiva...

  16. 野油菜黄单胞菌中gumD基因的过表达对产黄原胶的影响%Effect of by overexpressing gumD in Xanthomonas campestris on the xanthan gum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王桂兰; 张晓元; 陈晓燕; 朱希强; 凌沛学

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To improve the yield and quality of xanthan gum by overexpressing gumD in Xanthomonas campestris 58 ( Xc58 ). Methods By PCR amplification, plasmid construction, triparental conjugation and other methods,pBBR-gumD was transformed into the original strain Xc58. Results Compared with Xc58,the recombinant strain Xc58-D has increased by 11. 19% in the yield of xanthan gum, by 6.31% increased in viscosity,by 20. 21 % increased in molecular weight,and by 77. 07% increased in acetyl content, but 6. 34% decreased in pyruvate content. Conclusion The recombinant strain has a higher yield and improves the quality of xanthan gum.%目的 在野油菜黄单胞茵58(Xc58)中过量表达产胶基因gumD,提高黄原胶发酵产量和质量.方法 通过PCR扩增、重组质粒构建、三亲本接合等方法,将重组质粒pBBR-gumD转入原始茵Xc58.结果 工程茵与原始茵相比,黄原胶产量提高11.19%,黏度提高6.31%,重均分子质量提高20.21%,乙酰基含量提高77.07%,丙酮酸含量下降6.34%.结论 改造后的菌株的黄原胶发酵产量和质量都较原始茵株有所提高.

  17. Variability of Colletotrichum spp in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, S F; Barcelos, Q L; Dias, M A; Souza, E A

    2016-01-01

    The Colletotrichum genus presents large genetic variability, as demonstrated by the occurrence of several pathogenic races and phenotypic traits. The objective of this study was to characterize 22 strains of C. lindemuthianum and Colletotrichum spp recovered from anthracnose lesions and bean scab, and to verify the relationship between species of the Colletotrichum genus, which inhabit anthracnose and scab lesions. Colony morphology, conidium size, the presence of septa, germination, sporulation, and mycelium growth rates, were analyzed in addition to the presence of mating-type genes, IRAP markers, and pathogenicity. Strains of Colletotrichum spp presented wide variation for all evaluated traits, indicating the presence of different species. Pathogenicity tests verified that the severity of the disease caused by strains of Colletotrichum spp must be evaluated 17 days after inoculation. Molecular analysis showed that only the C. lindemuthianum strains were grouped by the IRAP markers. For the physiological traits, we observed that C. lindemuthianum mycelium growth is slower than that of Colletotrichum spp strains. The information generated in this study confirms variability in the evaluated species of Colletotrichum and may direct future basic and applied studies aiming to control these diseases in common bean. PMID:27173211

  18. Bleeding from gums: Can it be a dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bleeding from gums is a common feature in periodontitis patient. But abnormal bleeding from the gingiva or other areas of the oral mucosa that is difficult to control is an important clinical sign suggesting a hematological disorder. Case Report: A-40-year old male patient reported to our clinic with the chief complaint of acute gingival bleeding. There was continuous bleeding, fever since 3-4 days with weakness, retro orbital pain, and severe backache. Patient gave a history of bleeding from gums for last 24 hrs. His blood profile revealed; platelet count of 36,000, total wite blood cell (WBC count of 6000/cumm, differential leukocyte count (DLC (P45, L53, E2, and hemoglobin 12 g/dL. Patient sera was positive for dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen, anti-dengue immunoglobulin M (IgM, and anti-dengue immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies. Discussion: Here is a case report capable of changing our vision that acute gingival bleeding can also occur in dengue fever. Dengue fever can also be considered as one of the differential diagnosis for the acute gingival bleeding.

  19. Antioxidant Activity of Pistacia vera Fruits, Leaves and Gum Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Sajadi Tabassi, Sayyed Abolghasem; Milani Moghadam, Negar; Rashedinia, Marzieh; Mehri, Soghra

    2012-01-01

    The side effects of synthetic antioxidants have been considered in different studies. Accordingly, there is an increasing interest toward the use of natural substances instead of the synthetic ones. In this study, the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Pistacia vera leaves and fruits as well as hydroalcoholic extract of gum were tested for a possible antioxidant activity using in vitro methods. Deoxyribose assay, erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation and liver misrosomal non- enzymatic lipid peroxidation tests were used as an in-vitro model for determination antioxidant activity. The extract were evaluated at different concentratios: 25,100, 250, 500 and 1000 μg/mL. In all procedures, all extracts showed free radical scavenging activity. The effect of ethanolic extract of P. vera fruit at 1000 μg/mL was quite similar to positive control (DMSO 20 mM) in deoxyribose method. In two other tests, the ethanolic extracts of fruits and leaves were more effective than the aqueous extracts to inhibit malondialdehyde generation. Phytochemical tests showed the presence of flavonoids and tannins in Pistocia vera extracts. The present study showed that extracts of different part of P. vera have antioxidant activity in different in vitro methods. The ethanolic extracts of leaves and fruits showed more roles for antioxidant properties and gum hydroalcoholic extract demonstrated less antioxidant effect. PMID:24250515

  20. Mechanically modified xanthan gum: Rheology and polydispersity aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Necla Mine; Santos, Paulo H S; Campanella, Osvaldo

    2015-12-10

    Xanthan gum solutions were treated with high-pressure homogenization (HPH) in order to provide alternative treatments to enzymatic and chemical modification of this carbohydrate. Rheological properties of the treated and control samples were investigated in detail to gain an understanding of functional consequences of physical modification. The molecular structural properties were investigated via Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with Multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) and Circular dichroism (CD). Structured network of xanthan gum solutions was lost gradually depending on the severity of the HPH treatment as evidenced by the observed changes in the viscosity and viscoelasticity of the treated solutions. Reduction in molecular weight and a significant increase in polydispersity of the polymer were the expected causes of these rheological changes. Observed increase in hydrodynamic volume upon HPH treatment was not surprising and attributed to the loss of structured networks. Changes in the rheological and structural characteristics of biopolymer were irreversible and significant recovery was not detected over a period of 11 weeks. PMID:26428149

  1. Hypolipidemic activity of gum ghatti of Anogeissus latifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.M.M Parvathi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are becoming an increasing problem worldwide and hypercholesterolemia has been correlated for coronary heart diseases. Currently available hypolipidemic drugs have been associated with number of side effects. Herbal treatment for hyperlipidemia poses no side effects and is relatively cheap and locally available. In view of this, the present study was carried out to investigate the effect of gum ghatti of Anogeissus lalifolia on serum lipid levels of albino rats. Rats were made hyperlipidemic by the oral administration of cholesterol (400mg/kg body weight/day along with cholic acid (50mg/kg in coconut oil. The hypolipidemic effect was compared with control. The rats were divided into six groups of six animals each. In atherogenic diet induced hyperlipidemic model, the rats receiving treatment with gum ghatti at 250 mg/kg dosage showed significant reduction in serum triglyceride (82.75±0.63 only and there was no significant changes either in serum total cholesterol or elevation in HDL. Whereas, at 500 and 750 mg/kg dosage showed significant reduction in serum total cholesterol (72.85±0.60, 68.17±0.95 and serum triglyceride (78.92±0.34, 75.93±1.05. Further, the 750 mg/kg dose has also exhibited significant elevation in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (41.13±0.37.

  2. Rheological and drag reduction properties of hydroxypropyl xanthan gum solutions☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Tian; Bo Fang; Leiping Jin; Yongjun Lu; Xiaohui Qiu; Hao Jin; Kejing Li

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxypropyl xanthan gum (HXG) was prepared from xanthan gum (XG) and propylene oxide under alkaline condition. Rheological and drag reduction properties of different concentrations of aqueous HXG and XG solution were studied. The micro-structure network of HXG and XG solutions was investigated by Cryo-FESEM. The re-sults showed that HXG and XG solutions could exhibit shear thinning property. The apparent viscosity of 6 g·L−1 HXG solution was 1.25 times more than that of 6 g·L−1 XG solution. The storage modulus G′and the loss modulus G″of HXG solutions were greater than those of XG solutions, and thixotropic and viscoelastic prop-erties were more significant in HXG solutions. The HXG and XG solutions reduced the pressure drop of straight pipe, and the maximum drag reduction of 1 g·L−1 HXG and XG in smooth tube reached 72.8%and 68.1%, respec-tively. Drag reduction rate was increased as the concentration increased. The HXG solution may become a new polymeric drag reducer.

  3. Low-Income US Women Under-informed of the Specific Health Benefits of Consuming Beans

    OpenAIRE

    Winham, Donna M; Armstrong Florian, Traci L.; Thompson, Sharon V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bean consumption can reduce chronic disease risk and improve nutrition status. Consumer knowledge of bean health benefits could lead to increased intakes. Low-income women have poorer health and nutrition, but their level of knowledge about bean health benefits is unknown. Beans are a familiar food of reasonable cost in most settings and are cultural staples for Hispanics and other ethnicities. Study objectives were to assess awareness of bean health benefits among low-income women...

  4. Study of chemical and physical properties of irradiated Guar Gum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of different gamma radiation doses to decontamination of micro-organisms present in Guar Gum powder. As well as to study the effect of radiation on the chemical and physical properties of the carbohydrate components of the Gum's material. Two types of samples were used in this study (powder and liquid). All samples were collected from commercially available Guar Gum (G G), which were obtained from the company (Sudanese Guar Gum ltd). Samples putted in polyethylene tightly closed container, then irradiated by applying different doses (2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 20,30,40,and 50 kGy) from Co-60 source at room temperature in air. And take zero kGy as control. Irradiated powder samples of (2.5, 5, 7.5, 10 kGy) were investigated for contamination by using growth media agar and the result showed that 2.5 kGy is appropriate dose to remove the contamination of the samples. And then analyzed using fourier transform infrared (FTTR) x-ray fluorescence (X RF) and spectroscopy. The FTIR spectroscopy results suggested that there were no major chemical functional group transformation during irradiation. No change occurs by using low dose as 2.5 kGy. Also evaluation impact of radiation on liquid Samples (Aqueous solutions prepared in tow concentration of 1% and 5% wv that is by exposing the samples to the same dose of gamma rays) the effect of irradiation on it were investigated by using ultra violet spectroscopy ( UV.Vis), results showed that low dose has steeply effect in solutions specially in low concentration, it was more pronoun than that in high concentration, high dose has made change similar to that it made in powder. Also for both concentrations of liquid samples and for solutions made of irradiated powder pH measured and viscosity which used in investigations of molecular weight of liquid and powder, comparing the results of impact in the form of powder with the results of effects in the solutions found that the effects of

  5. Diversification and population structure in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Blair

    Full Text Available Wild accessions of crops and landraces are valuable genetic resources for plant breeding and for conserving alleles and gene combinations in planta. The primary genepool of cultivated common beans includes wild accessions of Phaseolus vulgaris. These are of the same species as the domesticates and therefore are easily crossable with cultivated accessions. Molecular marker assessment of wild beans and landraces is important for the proper utilization and conservation of these important genetic resources. The goal of this research was to evaluate a collection of wild beans with fluorescent microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers and to determine the population structure in combination with cultivated beans of all known races. Marker diversity in terms of average number of alleles per marker was high (13 for the combination of 36 markers and 104 wild genotypes that was similar to the average of 14 alleles per marker found for the 606 cultivated genotypes. Diversity in wild beans appears to be somewhat higher than in cultivated beans on a per genotype basis. Five populations or genepools were identified in structure analysis of the wild beans corresponding to segments of the geographical range, including Mesoamerican (Mexican, Guatemalan, Colombian, Ecuadorian-northern Peruvian and Andean (Argentina, Bolivia and Southern Peru. The combined analysis of wild and cultivated accessions showed that the first and last of these genepools were related to the cultivated genepools of the same names and the penultimate was found to be distinct but not ancestral to the others. The Guatemalan genepool was very novel and perhaps related to cultivars of race Guatemala, while the Colombian population was also distinct. Results suggest geographic isolation, founder effects or natural selection could have created the different semi-discrete populations of wild beans and that multiple domestications and introgression were involved in creating the diversity of

  6. Comparison of the Effect of Xylitol Gum- and Masticchewing on the Remineralization Rate of Caries-like Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Biria

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The use of sugar-free chewing gums has been reported to be highly effective in the prevention of dental caries. This study carried out to compare the effect of mastic gum and a xylitol chewing gum on remineralization of caries-like lesions.Materials and Methods: In this cross-over, single blinded, in situ study, first, artificial caries-like lesions were created in six extracted human premolars. Then axial sections were cut from each tooth to the thickness of approximately 100 microns. Fifteen adult subjects participated in the study. Lower removable appliances with rectangular boxes in the lingual surfaces were fabricated for them. One tooth section was placed in each of these boxes. The appliances were worn for two separate periods of three weeks each. The subjectschewed five sticks of gum (mastic gum and or xylitol chewing gum per day, each for 20 minutes. In the second period, the sections were replaced with new ones and the participants were instructed to change their gums. The sections were examined by polarized light microscope and the difference between the size of demineralized areas before and after intervention were recorded. Paired t-test and LSD test served for statistical analyses.Results: The decrease in demineralized surfaces in both groups was statistically significant(mastic gum: P=0.018, xylitol gum: P0.05.Conclusion: Chewing both mastic gum and xylitol chewing gum improved the remineralization of caries-like lesions but their effects were similar.

  7. Removal of antinutritional factors from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bollini R.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytohemagglutinin and the lectin-related proteins present in bean seeds are toxic to monogastric animals and lower the nutritional value of beans. Since these antimetabolites are present in substantial amounts, a breeding program aimed to the removal ofphytohemagglutinin was developed. The character ""absence of phytohemagglutinin"" was transferred into a bean cultivar by backcrossing. The lines obtained maintained the agronomic performance of the recurrent parent. Preliminary results show that removal of phytohemagglutinin results in a higher true protein digestibility. Further modification in the composition of the lectin-related protein family is now under way.

  8. The Paleobiolinguistics of the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecil H. Brown

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Paleobiolinguistics is used to determine when and where the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. developed significance for prehistoric groups of Native America. Dates and locations of proto-languages for which common bean terms reconstruct generally accord with crop-origin and dispersal information from plant genetics and archaeobotany. Paleobiolinguistic and other lines of evidence indicate that human interest in the common bean became significant primarily with the widespread development of a village‐farming way of life in the New World rather than earlier when squash and maize and a few other crops became important.

  9. Modeling for gellan gum production by Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461 in a simplified medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping; Yuan, Yong; Liu, Changlong; Zhang, Dezhong; Yang, Zhengting; Yang, Chunyu; Ma, Cuiqing

    2006-05-01

    Gellan gum production was carried out by Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461 in a simplified medium with a short incubation time, and a kinetic model for understanding, controlling, and optimizing the fermentation process was proposed. The results revealed that glucose was the best carbon source and that the optimal concentration was 30 g liter(-1). As for the fermenting parameters, considerably large amounts of gellan gum were yielded by an 8-h-old culture and a 4% inoculum at 200 rpm on a rotary shaker. Under the optimized conditions, the maximum level of gellan gum (14.75 g liter(-1)) and the highest conversion efficiency (49.17%) were obtained in a 30-liter fermentor in batch fermentation. Logistic and Luedeking-Piret models were confirmed to provide a good description of gellan gum fermentation, which gave some support for the study of gellan gum fermentation kinetics. Additionally, this study is the first demonstration that gellan gum production is largely growth associated by analysis of kinetics in its batch fermentation process. Based on model prediction, higher gellan gum production (17.71 g liter(-1)) and higher conversion efficiency (57.12%) were obtained in fed-batch fermentation at the same total glucose concentration (30 g liter(-1)). PMID:16672479

  10. Viscosity of gums in vitro and their ability to reduce postprandial hyperglycemia in normal subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Brenelli

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out in vitro with three viscous polysaccharides (guar gum, pectin, and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC of similar initial viscosity submitted to conditions that mimic events occurring in the stomach and duodenum, and their viscosity in these situations was compared to their actions on postprandial hyperglycemia in normal human subjects. Guar gum showed greater viscosity than the other gums during acidification and/or alkalinization and also showed larger effects on plasma glucose levels (35% reduction in maximum rise in plasma glucose and on the total area under the curve of plasma glucose (control: 20,314 ± 1007 mg dl-1 180 min-1 vs guar gum: 18,277 ± 699 mg dl-1 180 min-1, P<0.01. Pectin, which showed a marked reduction in viscosity at 37oC and after events mimicking those that occur in the stomach and duodenum, did not have a significant effect on postprandial hyperglycemia. The performance of viscosity and the glycemia response to CMC were at an intermediate level between guar gum and pectin. In conclusion, these data suggest that temperature, the process of acidification, alkalinization and exposure to intestinal ions induce different viscosity changes in gums having similar initial viscosity, establishing a direct relationship between a minor decrease of gum viscosity in vitro and a reduction of postprandial hyperglycemia

  11. Chewing Gum: Cognitive Performance, Mood, Well-Being, and Associated Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Allen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has indicated that chewing gum can enhance attention, as well as promoting well-being and work performance. Four studies (two experiments and two intervention studies examined the robustness of and mechanisms for these effects. Study 1 investigated the acute effect of gum on mood in the absence of task performance. Study 2 examined the effect of rate and force of chewing on mood and attention performance. Study 3 assessed the effects of chewing gum during one working day on well-being and performance, as well as postwork mood and cognitive performance. In Study 4, performance and well-being were reported throughout the workday and at the end of the day, and heart rate and cortisol were measured. Under experimental conditions, gum was associated with higher alertness regardless of whether performance tasks were completed and altered sustained attention. Rate of chewing and subjective force of chewing did not alter mood but had some limited effects on attention. Chewing gum during the workday was associated with higher productivity and fewer cognitive problems, raised cortisol levels in the morning, and did not affect heart rate. The results emphasise that chewing gum can attenuate reductions in alertness, suggesting that chewing gum enhances worker performance.

  12. Evaluation of gum damar as a novel microencapsulating material for ibuprofen and diltiazem hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morkhade D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A natural gum, damar was investigated as a novel microencapsulating material for sustained drug delivery. Microparticles were prepared by oil-in-oil emulsion solvent evaporation method. Ibuprofen and diltiazem hydrochloride were used as model drugs. Microparticles were evaluated for particle size, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release kinetics. Images of the microparticles were obtained by bright field microscopy. The effect of different gum:drug ratios and solubility of drug on microparticle properties was principally investigated. Gum damar could produce discrete and spherical microparticles with both drugs. With a freely water soluble drug (diltiazem hydrochloride, gum damar produced bigger (45-50 µm and fast drug releasing microparticles with low encapsulation efficiencies (44-57%. Contrary, with a slightly water soluble drug (ibuprofen, gum damar produced small (24-33 µm microparticles with better drug encapsulation (85-91% and sustained drug delivery. The increase in gum:drug ratio showed an increase in particle size, encapsulation efficiency and decrease in drug release rate in all cases. Drug release profiles of all microparticles followed zero order kinetics. In conclusion, gum damar can be used successfully to produce discrete and spherical microparticles of ibuprofen and diltiazem hydrochloride.

  13. Purification of cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum: Physicochemical characterization and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Ale, Marcel Tutor

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of different purification methods (ethanol, isopropanol and ethanol-isopropanol) on the physicochemical and functional characteristics of cress seed gum. Sugar composition and molecular weight of the samples varied significantly. All the purification methods reduced ash and protein content and molecular weight of cress seed gum. The main decomposition of the purified samples started above 200°C and initial decomposition temperature of the crude gum was 190.21°C. DSC thermograms of the purified gums showed two exothermic events at 257.81-261.95°C and 302.46-311.57°C. Crude gum displayed an exothermic peak at 259.42°C. Sample I (purified using isopropanol) imparted the best surface activity among the purified samples as it had the highest protein and uronic acid contents and the lowest Mw. All the purification methods could improve emulsifying properties of cress seed gum and there was no significant difference among the purified samples. Crude gum showed the lowest foaming properties, while samples I and E (purified using ethanol) showed the highest foaming capacity and foam stability, respectively. PMID:26877009

  14. GUAR GUM EFFECTS ON BLOOD SERUM LIPIDS AND GLUCOSE CONCENTRATIONS OF WISTAR DIABETIC RATS1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DARIO FRIAS Andrea

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of guar gum derived from the endosperm of Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (75% soluble fiber, 7.6% insoluble fiber, 2.16% crude protein, 0.78% total lipids, 0.54% ash and 9.55% moisture on diabetic rats were studied concerning food intake, body weight gain, blood serum cholesterol, triacylglycerols, glucose, LDL-, and HDL-cholesterol concentrations. The effect of gum on indexes of protein absorption and utilization was also investigated. Diets containing 0%, 10% and 20% (w/w guar gum were fed to diabetic rats for 28 days. In spite of the fact that diabetes elevated blood lipids in all animals, guar gum diet significantly decreased (p <0.05 serum concentrations of cholesterol and triacylglycerols. Furthermore, a concomitant increase in HDL-cholesterol with a substancial elevation of the HDL/LDL cholesterol ratio was found. The most significant result in this assay was the drastic reduction of blood glucose in diabetic rats treated with guar gum diet. The gum promoted a general improvement in the condition of the diabetic rats, in body weight gain and indexes of protein absorption and utilization. The results of this research suggest that guar gum, at concentrations equal to or higher than 10%, should be effective in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and diabetes, in humans.

  15. Chewing gum: cognitive performance, mood, well-being, and associated physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew P; Smith, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that chewing gum can enhance attention, as well as promoting well-being and work performance. Four studies (two experiments and two intervention studies) examined the robustness of and mechanisms for these effects. Study 1 investigated the acute effect of gum on mood in the absence of task performance. Study 2 examined the effect of rate and force of chewing on mood and attention performance. Study 3 assessed the effects of chewing gum during one working day on well-being and performance, as well as postwork mood and cognitive performance. In Study 4, performance and well-being were reported throughout the workday and at the end of the day, and heart rate and cortisol were measured. Under experimental conditions, gum was associated with higher alertness regardless of whether performance tasks were completed and altered sustained attention. Rate of chewing and subjective force of chewing did not alter mood but had some limited effects on attention. Chewing gum during the workday was associated with higher productivity and fewer cognitive problems, raised cortisol levels in the morning, and did not affect heart rate. The results emphasise that chewing gum can attenuate reductions in alertness, suggesting that chewing gum enhances worker performance. PMID:26075253

  16. Detrimental effects of gum chewing on vigilance in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucha, Lara; Simpson, William; Evans, Lynsay; Birrel, Laura; Sontag, Thomas A; Lange, Klaus W; Tucha, Oliver

    2010-12-01

    Impairments of attention are cardinal features of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and can seriously affect the daily life of children with ADHD. Despite effective treatment strategies, there is a need of further treatment options that can be added to available and well established treatments. Further treatment options are needed since available treatments are often time consuming, expensive and limited regarding their external validity. Recent research demonstrated that gum chewing has beneficial effects on cognition including certain aspects of attention. Therefore, gum chewing may benefit children with ADHD in situations requiring particular cognitive efforts. In a crossover study, attentional functioning of 32 children with ADHD and 32 children without the condition was examined. All participants were assessed with chewing gum and without chewing gum. A computerized test was used for the assessment of vigilance and sustained attention. The findings of the present study suggest that gum chewing during task execution has detrimental effects on vigilance of both healthy children and children with ADHD. Sustained attention was not affected by gum chewing. Chewing gum, therefore, appears not to improve attentional performance in children with ADHD. PMID:20933558

  17. Rheological Behavior of Xanthan Gum Solution Related to Shear Thinning Fluid Delivery for Subsurface Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Szecsody, James E.

    2013-01-15

    Xanthan gum, a biopolymer, forms shear thinning fluids which can be used as delivery media to improve the distribution of remedial amendments injected into heterogeneous subsurface environments. The rheological behavior of the shear thinning solution needs to be known to develop an appropriate design for field injection. In this study, the rheological properties of xanthan gum solutions were obtained under various chemical and environmental conditions relevant to delivery of remedial amendments to groundwater. Higher xanthan concentration raised the absolute solution viscosity and increased the degree of shear thinning. Addition of remedial amendments (e.g., phosphate, sodium lactate, ethyl lactate) caused the dynamic viscosity of xanthan gum to decrease, but the solutions maintained shear-thinning properties. Use of simple salt (e.g. Na+, Ca2+) to increase the solution ionic strength also decreased the dynamic viscosity of xanthan and the degree of shear thinning, although the effect is a function of xanthan gum concentration and diminished as the xanthan gum concentration was increased. At high xanthan concentration, addition of salt to the solution increased dynamic viscosity. In the absence of sediments, xanthan gum solutions maintain their viscosity properties for months. However, xanthan gum solutions were shown to lose dynamic viscosity over a period of days to weeks when contacted with saturated site sediment. Loss of viscosity is attributed to physical and biodegradation processes.

  18. The optimum time to initiate habitual xylitol gum-chewing for obtaining long-term caries prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujoel, P P; Mäkinen, K K; Bennett, C A; Isotupa, K P; Isokangas, P J; Allen, P; Mäkinen, P L

    1999-03-01

    Habitual xylitol gum-chewing may have a long-term preventive effect by reducing the caries risk for several years after the habitual chewing has ended. The goal of this report was (1) to determine if sorbitol and sorbitol/xylitol mixtures provide a long-term benefit, and (2) to determine which teeth benefit most from two-year habitual gum-chewing - those erupting before, during, or after habitual gum-chewing. Children, on average 6 years old, chewed gums sweetened with xylitol, sorbitol, or xylitol/sorbitol mixtures. There was a "no-gum" control group. Five years after the two-year program of habitual gum-chewing ended, 288 children were re-examined. Compared with the no-gum group, sorbitol gums had no significant long-term effect (relative risk [RR], 0.65; 95% confidence interval [c.i.], 0.39 to 1.07; p Xylitol gum and, to a lesser extent, xylitol/sorbitol gum had a long-term preventive effect. During the 5 years after habitual gum-chewing ended, xylitol gums reduced the caries risk 59% (RR, 0.41; 95% c.i., 0.23 to 0.75; p Xylitol-sorbitol gums reduced the caries risk 44% (RR, 0.56; 95% c.i., 0.36 to 0.89; p xylitol strongly depended on when teeth erupted (p xylitol gum-chewing should be started at least one year before permanent teeth erupt. PMID:10096456

  19. Binding of the substrate UDP-glucuronic acid induces conformational changes in the xanthan gum glucuronosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, S R; Petruk, A A; Brukman, N G; Bianco, M I; Jacobs, M; Marti, M A; Ielpi, L

    2016-06-01

    GumK is a membrane-associated glucuronosyltransferase of Xanthomonas campestris that is involved in xanthan gum biosynthesis. GumK belongs to the inverting GT-B superfamily and catalyzes the transfer of a glucuronic acid (GlcA) residue from uridine diphosphate (UDP)-GlcA (UDP-GlcA) to a lipid-PP-trisaccharide embedded in the membrane of the bacteria. The structure of GumK was previously described in its apo- and UDP-bound forms, with no significant conformational differences being observed. Here, we study the behavior of GumK toward its donor substrate UDP-GlcA. Turbidity measurements revealed that the interaction of GumK with UDP-GlcA produces aggregation of protein molecules under specific conditions. Moreover, limited proteolysis assays demonstrated protection of enzymatic digestion when UDP-GlcA is present, and this protection is promoted by substrate binding. Circular dichroism spectroscopy also revealed changes in the GumK tertiary structure after UDP-GlcA addition. According to the obtained emission fluorescence results, we suggest the possibility of exposure of hydrophobic residues upon UDP-GlcA binding. We present in silico-built models of GumK complexed with UDP-GlcA as well as its analogs UDP-glucose and UDP-galacturonic acid. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we also show that a relative movement between the domains appears to be specific and to be triggered by UDP-GlcA. The results presented here strongly suggest that GumK undergoes a conformational change upon donor substrate binding, likely bringing the two Rossmann fold domains closer together and triggering a change in the N-terminal domain, with consequent generation of the acceptor substrate binding site. PMID:27099353

  20. Advances in Faba Bean Genetics and Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Donal M; Angra, Deepti

    2016-01-01

    Vicia faba L, is a globally important grain legume whose main centers of diversity are the Fertile Crescent and Mediterranean basin. Because of its small number (six) of exceptionally large and easily observed chromosomes it became a model species for plant cytogenetics the 70s and 80s. It is somewhat ironic therefore, that the emergence of more genomically tractable model plant species such as Arabidopsis and Medicago coincided with a marked decline in genome research on the formerly favored plant cytogenetic model. Thus, as ever higher density molecular marker coverage and dense genetic and even complete genome sequence maps of key crop and model species emerged through the 1990s and early 2000s, genetic and genome knowledge of Vicia faba lagged far behind other grain legumes such as soybean, common bean and pea. However, cheap sequencing technologies have stimulated the production of deep transcriptome coverage from several tissue types and numerous distinct cultivars in recent years. This has permitted the reconstruction of the faba bean meta-transcriptome and has fueled development of extensive sets of Simple Sequence Repeat and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Genetics of faba bean stretches back to the 1930s, but it was not until 1993 that DNA markers were used to construct genetic maps. A series of Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-based genetic studies mainly targeted at quantitative loci underlying resistance to a series of biotic and abiotic stresses were conducted during the 1990's and early 2000s. More recently, SNP-based genetic maps have permitted chromosome intervals of interest to be aligned to collinear segments of sequenced legume genomes such as the model legume Medicago truncatula, which in turn opens up the possibility for hypotheses on gene content, order and function to be translated from model to crop. Some examples of where knowledge of gene content and function have already been productively exploited are discussed. The

  1. Relative bioavailability of methadone hydrochloride administered in chewing gum and tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christrup, Lona Louring; Angelo, H.R.; Bonde, J.;

    1990-01-01

    Methadone administered in chewing gum in doses of 16.7-22.6 mg to seven patients in a study using an open balanced cross-over design, was compared with 20 mg of methadone given perorally as tablets. There was no significant difference in the AUC/D obtained after administration of chewing gum and...... tablets (p>0.05). It is concluded that the chewing gum formulation should be considered for further testing with respect to suppression of abstinence syndrome in narcotic addicts....

  2. Evaluation of Albizia procera gum as compression coating material for colonic delivery of budesonide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachuau, Lalduhsanga; Mazumder, Bhaskar

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and evaluate Albizia procera gum as compression-coating polymer for colonic delivery of budesonide. Tablets were prepared by direct compression method using spray-dried lactose and microcrystalline cellulose as filler binders. The compatibility between the drug and the polymer was studied through TGA and FTIR spectroscopy. In vitro drug release were studied in dissolution media with or without 2% rat cecal contents while in vivo X-ray study was conducted on rabbits. The results indicate that procera gum and the drug were compatible with each other and tablet coated with procera gum was suitable for colonic delivery of drugs. PMID:23916644

  3. Trace element evaluation of different varieties of chewing gum by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive use of chewing gums, by children in particular, entails the evaluation of trace element contents in them. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) was successfully employed to determine the concentration of 35 trace elements (essential, toxic and nonessential) in eight different brands of chewing gum generally consumed in Rawalpindi/Islamabad area. Comparison of trace element data of our work with literature has been presented. None of the elements detected in the brands of chewing gum examined was found to be present at a level representing a substantial contribution to the total dietary intake of the element. (author)

  4. Enzymatic depolymerization of gum Tragacanth: Bifidogenic potential of low molecular weight oligosaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi Gavlighi, Hassan; Michalak, Malwina; Meyer, Anne S.;

    2013-01-01

    Gum tragacanth derived from the plant “goat’s horn” (Astragalus sp.) has a long history of use as a stabilizing, viscosity-enhancing agent in food emulsions. The gum contains pectinaceous arabinogalactans and fucose-substituted xylogalacturonans. In this work, gum tragacanth from Astragalus...... these three fractions also varied with respect to composition and structural elements: HAG1 and HAG2 were enriched in arabinose, galactose, and galacturonic acid, but low in fucose and xylose; whereas HAG3 was high in (terminal) xylose, fucose and 1,4-bonded galacturonic acid, but low in arabinose and...

  5. Evaluation of some important physicochemical properties of starch free grewia gum

    OpenAIRE

    Nep, Elijah I.; Sims, I. M.; Kontogiorgos, Vassilis; Morris, Gordon; Smith, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Gums obtained by extraction from the inner bark of stems can be found in association with starch, which must be digested in order to obtain a refined polysaccharide isolate. In the present study, grewia gum obtained from the inner bark of the stems of Grewia mollis was shown to co-exist with starch and the effect of starch digestion on the physicochemical properties of the resultant polysaccharide was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration of the inner bark in deionized water and ...

  6. Kinetic models for xanthan gum production using Xanthomonas campestris from molasses

    OpenAIRE

    S.L. GILANI; Najafpour, G.D.; H.D. HEYDARZADEH; H Zare

    2011-01-01

    The effects of media temperature, agitation rate and molasses concentration on the yield of fermentation in xanthan gum production process were investigated. Xanthan gum was produced in batch fermentation by Xanthomonas campestris PTCC 1473 from molasses. At 32 C, 500 rpm and media with 30 g/l of total sugar, maximum production of xanthan gum (17.1 g/l) was achieved. For the purity of the xanthan FTIR spectrum was obtained. The identified spectrum was compared with the commercial product. In...

  7. Pengaruh Konsentrasi Xanthan Gum Dan Lama Penyimpanan Terhadap Mutu Sirup Asam Jawa (Tamarindus indica L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Silitonga, Palti

    2012-01-01

    The vary of concentration of xanthan gum and the prolonged storage time had been applied to the asam jawa syrup. The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of the xanthan gum concentration and storage time on the quality of asam jawa syrup. The research had been performed using Factorial Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with two factors, i.e. Xanthan Gum Concentration (K) : 0.00%, 0.05%, 0.10% and 0.15% and Storage Time (W) : 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. Parameters analysed were...

  8. Pengaruh Konsentrasi Xanthan Gum Penyimpanan Terhadap Sirup Rukam (Flacourtia rukam Zoll. & Moritzi)

    OpenAIRE

    Hutabarat, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The effect of concentration of xanthan gum and the prolonged storage time had been performed to the rukam syrup. The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of the xanthan gum concentration and storage time on the rukam syrup. The experiment using factorial Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with two factors, i.e. xanthan gum concentration ( S0 = 0.00 %, Si= 0.05 %, S2 = 0.10 %, S3 = 0.15 %) and storage time (Tj = 2 weeks, T2 = 4 weeks, T3= 6 weeks, T4 = 8 weeks). Analysed of...

  9. Heat-Induced Structural Changes in Faba Bean Starch Paste: The Effect of Steaming Faba Bean Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Kaczynska, B.; Autio, K.; J. Fornal

    1993-01-01

    Heat-induced structural changes of faba bean starch dispersions were examined at a concentration range of 8-10% as a function of heat treatment. Faba bean starch was isolated from raw (RF-starch) and steamed (SF-starch) faba bean seeds. Hydrothermal treatment resulted in an increase in the amount of non-starch components in the isolated starch. Microstructure of low-sheared 8% starch suspensions heated at 75, 90 and 98°C (for 10 minutes) was studied by light microscopy. Heating induced huge s...

  10. Carotenemia associated with green bean ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Tanya A; Stratman, Erik

    2004-01-01

    Carotenemia is a condition characterized by yellow discoloration of the skin and elevated blood carotene levels. Excessive and prolonged ingestion of carotene-rich, yellow- or orange-colored foods such as carrots and winter squash is the most common cause, but more rarely it may be associated with consumption of other foods as well as with hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, anorexia nervosa, liver disease, or kidney disease. Though not uncommon in children, there are few reports in the pediatric literature since its early descriptions in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Awareness of carotenemia can help the provider resolve confusion with jaundice and avoid unnecessary worry and costly tests. Herein we describe carotenemia in an 8-month-old Caucasian girl secondary to increased consumption of commercial infant food green beans. PMID:15575851

  11. Emulsification properties of soy bean protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WENPU CHEN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chen W, Li X, Rahman MRT, Al-Hajj NQM, Dey KC, Raqib SM. 2014. Emulsification properties of soy bean protein. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 196-202. Emulsion stability and emulsifying ability are two important factors in food industry. Soy protein has the great of interest because of its amphilic structure. β-Conglycinnin and glycinin are main components in soy protein which can be used as emulsifiers in food processing. However, due to its size and molecular weight, the emulsifying ability of soy protein is limited. By chemical, physical and enzymatic modification, the emulsifying ability of soy protein can be improved. The addition of polysaccharides in emulsion is common. The interaction of polysaccharides and proteins are being discussed in this review. In some complex food emulsion, the function of soy protein molecules and emulsifier at the interface need to be investigated in the future study.

  12. Induced mutants in beans and peas resistant to rust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and peas (Pisum sativum) are important leguminous vegetable crops in Egypt. The area planted with beans is about 40,000 acres and peas 22,000 acres. These crops suffer from several diseases, particularly rusts, (Uromyces phaseoli/Uromyces pisi), which are mainly spread in northern Egypt. In our mutation induction programme we used 60 Co gamma rays and ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS). Bean and pea seeds were soaked in water for two hours before exposure to 8, 10 and 12 krad. For chemical treatments, bean and pea seeds were soaked in water for eight hours and then treated with 0.5 and 1.5% EMS for four hours. The M1 was cultivated in 1978

  13. Simulated radiation disinfestation of infested cocoa beans in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four major insect pests persistently affect the cocoa industry in Ghana, the world's leading exporter of cocoa, despite the conventional methods of chemical control in practice. The Ghana Atomic Energy Commission currently is investigating the possible use of radiation for the control of both insect attack and microbial spoilage of cocoa beans in storage. Radiation response studies of the four major insect pests that significantly affect the quality of dried cocoa beans in storage have been evaluated. Results herein reported were based on simulated bulk infestation radiation disinfestation of dried cocoa under field and laboratory conditions at ambient temperature (25 to 320C). The comparative efficiency of locally available packaging materials best suited for bagging of the dried cocoa beans at and after irradiation have been assessed concurrently. The author concludes by identifying and discussing possible factors that could affect the technology of radiation disinfestation of cocoa beans under the Ghanaian context. (author)

  14. The onset of faba bean farming in the Southern Levant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracuta, Valentina; Barzilai, Omry; Khalaily, Hamudi; Milevski, Ianir; Paz, Yitzhak; Vardi, Jacob; Regev, Lior; Boaretto, Elisabetta

    2015-10-01

    Even though the faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is among the most ubiquitously cultivated crops, very little is known about its origins. Here, we report discoveries of charred faba beans from three adjacent Neolithic sites in the lower Galilee region, in the southern Levant, that offer new insights into the early history of this species. Biometric measurements, radiocarbon dating and stable carbon isotope analyses of the archaeological remains, supported by experiments on modern material, date the earliest farming of this crop to ~10,200 cal BP. The large quantity of faba beans found in these adjacent sites indicates intensive production of faba beans in the region that can only have been achieved by planting non-dormant seeds. Selection of mutant-non-dormant stock suggests that the domestication of the crop occurred as early as the 11th millennium cal BP. Plant domestication| Vicia faba L.| Pre-Pottery Neolithic B| radiocarbon dating| Δ13C analysis.

  15. Intermittent drying of beans in a spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Carioca beans are a highly nutritious grain, in terms of the amount of protein, iron and potassium as well as carbohydrates and fiber and as a source of vitamins. The moisture content of recently picked beans is too high for good preservation and storage, resulting in the need for drying before packaging. In this work, the drying of Carioca beans in a laboratory scale spouted bed under intermittent conditions of the drying air was experimentally analyzed. Experiments carried out consisted of two types of intermittent regime: intermittence in the spout regime, referred to as spouted/fixed bed and intermittence of the air supply to the bed, called spouted bed/rest. The results were compared to those for bean drying in a spouted bed dryer without intermittence.

  16. Effectiveness of rapid neutrons on small hoarse bean seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small hoarse bean seeds were irradiated. The radiation doses 100-300 rads were used. The obtained mutants were applied in the breeding. The use of fast neutrons was successful and shortened the breeding cycle. (A.S.)

  17. Insects diversity in lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WIWIN SETIAWATI

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus is a vegetable which usually made as a home yard plant for Indonesian people to fulfill their daily needs. This plant has not been produced in the large number by the farmer. So it is hard to find in the market. Lima bean is light by many kind of insect. Inventory, identification and the study of insect taxon to this plant is being done to collect some information about the insect who life in the plant. The research was done in Balitsa experiment garden in the district of Lembang in Bandung regency on November 2003-February 2004, the experiment start at 4 weeks age, at the height of 1260 m over the sea level. The observation was made systematically by absolute method (D-vac macine and relative method (sweeping net. The research so that there were 26 species of phytofagous insect, 9 species of predator insect, 6 species of parasitoid insect, 4 species of pollinator and 14 species of scavenger insect. According to the research the highest species number was got in the 8th week (3rd sampling, which had 27 variety of species, so the highest diversity was also got in this with 2,113 point. Aphididae and Cicadellidae was the most insect found in roay plant. The research also had high number of species insect so the diversity of insect and evenness become high. A community will have the high stability if it is a long with the high diversity. High evenness in community that has low species dominance and high species number of insect so the high of species richness.

  18. Magnet systems for ''Bean-Shaped'' tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean-shaping of tokamak plasmas offers a method of reaching stable operation at (beta) > 10%. In order to establish the indentation of the ''bean'', a set of high- current ''pushing coils'' (> 5 MA in a reactor) must be located at the midplane as close as possible to the inboard edge of the plasma. If located in the bore of the TF coils, then maintenance of the pushing coils may be impossible, and the interlocking coils may prevent reactor modularity. If located outside, the required pushing-coil current may be unacceptably large. This dilemma is overcome with a unique TF coil design in which the inboard leg is bent outward in the form of an arc. The pushing coils are housed in the midplane indentation of this arc, just outside the TF coils but adequately close to the plasma. The arched coil transfers forces to the top and bottom legs, where it can be reacted by a clamp structure if necessary. This technique would allow demountable joints to be placed near the inoard leg (for copper TF coils). Another design approach to the pushing coils is to use liquid Li or Na as the conductor and coolant. The liquid metal ''coils'' can be placed immediately adjacent to the plasma, giving optimal control of the plasma shape with minimal coil current, although modularity of the reactor may have to be surrendered. Conceptual designs are presented of PF and TF coil systems for an ignition test reactor with about 14% and for a full-scale demonstration reactor with about 20%, both using copper TF coils

  19. Effects of extrusion cooking on the chemical composition and functional properties of dry common bean powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yongfeng; Cichy, Karen A; Harte, Janice B; Kelly, James D; Ng, Perry K W

    2016-11-15

    The impact of extrusion cooking on the chemical composition and functional properties of bean powders from four common bean varieties was investigated. The raw bean powders were extruded under eight different conditions, and the extrudates were then dried and ground (particle size⩽0.5mm). Compared with corresponding non-extruded (raw) bean powders (particle size⩽0.5mm), the extrusion treatments did not substantially change the protein and starch contents of the bean powders and showed inconsistent effects on the sucrose, raffinose and stachyose contents. The extrusion cooking did cause complete starch gelatinization and protein denaturation of the bean powders and thus changed their pasting properties and solvent-retention capacities. The starch digestibilities of the cooked non-extruded and cooked extruded bean powders were comparable. The extruded bean powders displayed functional properties similar to those of two commercial bean powders. PMID:27283664

  20. Weed Control in White Bean with Various Halosulfuron Tankmixes

    OpenAIRE

    Nader Soltani; Robert E. Nurse; Christy Shropshire; Peter H. Sikkema

    2014-01-01

    Four field trials were conducted over a three-year period (2011–2013) in southwestern Ontario to evaluate the level of weed control provided by various halosulfuron tankmixes applied preplant incorporated (PPI) in white bean. Trifluralin, s-metolachlor, halosulfuron, and imazethapyr applied alone or in combination caused 4% or less visible injury 1 and 4 weeks after emergence (WAE) in white bean. Trifluralin, s-metolachlor, halosulfuron, and imazethapyr applied PPI provided 80–96%, 84–95%, 83...

  1. Zinc supplementation, production and quality of coffee beans

    OpenAIRE

    Herminia Emilia Prieto Martinez; Yonara Poltronieri; Adriana Farah; Daniel Perrone

    2013-01-01

    Besides its importance in the coffee tree nutrition, there is almost no information relating zinc nutrition and bean quality. This work evaluated the effect of zinc on the coffee yield and bean quality. The experiment was conducted with Coffea arabica L. in "Zona da Mata" region, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Twelve plots were established at random with 4 competitive plants each. Treatments included plants supplemented with zinc (eight plots) and control without zinc supplementation (four plots). Pla...

  2. Antioxidant activity of black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Jarine Amaral do EVANGELHO; Jose de J. BERRIOS; Vânia Zanella PINTO; Mariana Dias ANTUNES; Nathan Levien VANIER; Elessandra da Rosa ZAVAREZE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this work was to study the effect of enzymatic hydrolysis of black bean protein concentrate using different enzymes. Bean proteins were extracted and hydrolyzed over a period of 120 min using the enzymes pepsin or alcalase. The protein hydrolysates’ molecular weight was assayed by electrophoresis and the antioxidant activity was evaluated by the capturing methods of free radicals ABTS●+ and DPPH. Electrophoretic results showed that the bands above 50 kDa disappeared,...

  3. Watershed responses to Amazon soya bean cropland expansion and intensification

    OpenAIRE

    Neill, Christopher; Coe, Michael T.; Riskin, Shelby H.; Krusche, Alex V.; Elsenbeer, Helmut; Macedo, Marcia N.; McHorney, Richard; Lefebvre, Paul; Davidson, Eric A.; Scheffler, Raphael; Figueira, Adelaine Michela e Silva; Porder, Stephen; Deegan, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    The expansion and intensification of soya bean agriculture in southeastern Amazonia can alter watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry by changing the land cover, water balance and nutrient inputs. Several new insights on the responses of watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry to deforestation in Mato Grosso have emerged from recent intensive field campaigns in this region. Because of reduced evapotranspiration, total water export increases threefold to fourfold in soya bean watersheds compar...

  4. The polyphenolic profiles of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Long-Ze; HARNLY, JAMES M.; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial S.; Luthria, Devanand L.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the phenolic profiles obtained by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS), 24 common bean samples, representing 17 varieties and 7 generic off-the-shelf items, belonging to ten US commercial market classes can be organized into six different groups. All of them contained the same hydroxycinnaminic acids, but the flavonoid components showed distinct differences. Black beans contained primarily the 3-O-glucosides of delphinidin...

  5. Toxicity of ricin present in castor bean seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Nayanna Brunna da Silva Fonseca; Benito Soto-Blanco

    2014-01-01

    The castor bean (Ricinus communis) is a bush from Euphorbiacea family cultivated for obtaining oil from the seeds. This oil has broad industrial employment, particularly for biodiesel. However, castor bean seeds exhibit a potent toxin, ricin. It is a glycoprotein with highly toxic action of inactivating ribosomes. The toxic action of ricin is due to inhibition of protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells, causing cell death. Only one molecule of ricin that enters the cytosol is able to inactivate...

  6. Preparation and characterization of a chemically sulfated cashew gum polysaccharide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura Neto, Erico de; Maciel, Jeanny da S.; Cunha, Pablyana L. R.; Paula, Regina Celia M. de; Feitosa, Judith P.A., E-mail: judith@dqoi.ufc.br [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Cashew gum (CG) was sulfated in pyridine:formamide using chlorosulfonic acid as the reagent. Confirmation of sulfation was obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy through the presence of an asymmetrical S=O stretching vibration at 1259 cm{sup -1}. The degrees of substitution were 0.02, 0.24 and 0.88 determined from the sulfur percentage. 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data showed that the sulfation occurred at primary carbons. An increase of at least 4% of the solution viscosity was observed due to sulfation. The thermal gravimetric curves (TGA) indicate that the derivatives are stable up to ca. 200 deg C. The sulfated CG is compared to carboxymethylated CG in order to verify the possibility of the use of the former in the preparation of polyelectrolyte complexes; the latter is already being used for this application. (author)

  7. Resistence of Eucalyptus clones to the red gum lerp psyllid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelma Melissa Malherbe Camargo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the different resistance of commercial E. camaldulensis and E. urophylla clones to the attack of (Glycaspis brimblecombei Moore (Hemiptera: Aphalaridae. The experiment was carried out between May of 2007 and April of 2008, in João Pinheiro, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, with 5 clones of E. camaldulensis and 5 of E. urophylla. The experimental design was randomized blocks, with 25 plants per plot, and four replications. Four leaves of nine plants were collected in the center of each plot to quantify the number of eggs and nymphs. The highest averages for eggs and nymphs were observed in E. camaldulensis clones, which were classified as highly susceptible to the red-gum-lerp-psyllid attack. Clones of E. urophylla had lower averages for eggs and nymphs, and it was classified as resistant.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of cashew gum/acrylic acid nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Durcilene A. da; Feitosa, Judith P.A. [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidade Federal do Ceara - C. Postal 6021, 60.455-760, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Paula, Haroldo C.B. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica, Universidade Federal do Ceara - C. Postal 6021, 60.455-760, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Paula, Regina C.M. de [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidade Federal do Ceara - C. Postal 6021, 60.455-760, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)], E-mail: rpaula@dqoi.ufc.br

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes the preparation of nanoparticles from cashew gum (CG) and acrylic acid (AA) by free radical polymerization using cerium (IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) as an initiator. The yields of the nanoparticles (NP) obtained by varying the R{sub CG/AA} from 0.5 to 2.0 were between 65 and 40%. The FT-IR spectra of the NP samples showed bands characteristic of the cashew gum spectrum and a new band at 1560 cm{sup -1} assigned to the stretching vibration of COO{sup -} groups of polyacrylic acid. On increasing the R{sub CG/AA} from 0.5 to 2.0 an increase in particle size was observed. The NP with an R{sub CG/AA} of 0.5 were smaller and had higher storage stability than the NP with an R{sub CG/AA} of 1.0 or 2.0. The increase in R{sub CG/AA} had no significant effect on the zeta potential of the NP in water. The NP were dried and re-dissolved in water to observe the effect of freeze-drying on particle size. For the NP with an R{sub CG/AA} of 0.5 an increase in particle size was observed from 71 to 402 nm, however, for the NP with an R{sub CG/AA} of 1.0 or 2.0 a small variation in particle diameter was noted. The behavior of the CG/AA NP was also found to be pH sensitive.

  9. Watershed responses to Amazon soya bean cropland expansion and intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Christopher; Coe, Michael T; Riskin, Shelby H; Krusche, Alex V; Elsenbeer, Helmut; Macedo, Marcia N; McHorney, Richard; Lefebvre, Paul; Davidson, Eric A; Scheffler, Raphael; Figueira, Adelaine Michela e Silva; Porder, Stephen; Deegan, Linda A

    2013-06-01

    The expansion and intensification of soya bean agriculture in southeastern Amazonia can alter watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry by changing the land cover, water balance and nutrient inputs. Several new insights on the responses of watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry to deforestation in Mato Grosso have emerged from recent intensive field campaigns in this region. Because of reduced evapotranspiration, total water export increases threefold to fourfold in soya bean watersheds compared with forest. However, the deep and highly permeable soils on the broad plateaus on which much of the soya bean cultivation has expanded buffer small soya bean watersheds against increased stormflows. Concentrations of nitrate and phosphate do not differ between forest or soya bean watersheds because fixation of phosphorus fertilizer by iron and aluminium oxides and anion exchange of nitrate in deep soils restrict nutrient movement. Despite resistance to biogeochemical change, streams in soya bean watersheds have higher temperatures caused by impoundments and reduction of bordering riparian forest. In larger rivers, increased water flow, current velocities and sediment flux following deforestation can reshape stream morphology, suggesting that cumulative impacts of deforestation in small watersheds will occur at larger scales. PMID:23610178

  10. Chewing gum in the preoperative fasting period: an analysis of de-identified incidents reported to webAIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, S; Goulding, G; Gibbs, N M; Taraporewalla, K; Culwick, M

    2016-03-01

    The role of preoperative fasting is well established in current anaesthetic practice with different guidelines for clear fluids and food. However, chewing gum may not be categorised as either food or drink by some patients, and may not always be specified in instructions given to patients about preoperative fasting. The aim of this paper was to review anaesthesia incidents involving gum chewing reported to webAIRS to obtain information on the risks, if any, of gum chewing during the preoperative fasting period. There were nine incidents involving chewing gum reported between late 2009 and early 2015. There were no adverse outcomes from the nine incidents other than postponement of surgery in three cases and cancellation in one. In particular, there were no reports of aspiration or airway obstruction. Nevertheless, there were five cases in which the gum was not detected preoperatively and was found in the patient's mouth either intraoperatively or postoperatively. These cases of undetected gum occurred despite patient and staff compliance with their current preoperative checklists. While the risk of increased gastric secretions related to chewing gum preoperatively are not known, the potential for airway obstruction if the gum is not detected and removed preoperatively is very real. We recommend that patients should be specifically advised to avoid gum chewing once fasting from clear fluids is commenced, and that a specific question regarding the presence of chewing gum should be added to all preoperative checklists. PMID:27029662

  11. 76 FR 68057 - Importation of French Beans and Runner Beans From the Republic of Kenya Into the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... (76 FR 16700-16703, Docket No. APHIS-2010-0101) a proposal \\1\\ to amend the regulations by allowing... (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and runner beans (Phaseolus coccineus L.) may be imported into the United States...

  12. Biological nitrogen fixation in common bean and faba bean using N-15 methodology and two reference crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field was conducted on a Typic ustropepts soil located at 'La Tola', the experimental campus of the Agricultural Sciences Faculty at Tumbaco, Ecuador. The objectives were to quantify faba bean (Vicia faba) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) biological nitrogen fixation, using quinoa (chenopodium quinoa) and maize (Zea mays) as reference crops. The average values were 80 and 70 per cent for faba bean and 42 and 14 per cent for common bean, respectively. It was assumed that nitrogen use eficiency was the same for fixing crops but observed that a crop with high nitrogen use efficiency overestimates legume biological nitrogen fixation. Results suggests that greater caution is needed when selecting reference crops for legumes with nitrogen fixation

  13. The Quantitative Determination of Butylated Hydroxytoluene in Chewing Gum Using GC--MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, A. E.

    2005-01-01

    The experiment to measure concentration of Photophysical Characterization(BHT) and determine percent recovery in chewing gum is described. The results demonstrated that over time, the concentration of BHT in the extract decreased owing to aerial oxidation.

  14. Long-Term Pot Use Tied to Gum Disease in Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead researcher Madeline Meier, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University. Besides gum health, the ... in every way," said Caspi, a professor of psychology at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. "We ...

  15. Preparation of Acetylated Guar Gum – Unsaturated Polyester Composites & Effect of Water on Their Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D’Melo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Guar gum has seen extensive use in blends, however, its application as a filler in thermoset composites has as yet not been investigated. The effect of the addition of guar gum and its acetyl derivatives on the kinetics of water diffusion in unsaturated polyester composites was studied. The effect of water on the mechanical properties of the composites was studied with respect to the nature of filler, filler concentration and time of immersion. All the mechanical properties were observed to decrease on exposure to water. Further, it was observed that acetylated guar gum, with a degree of substitution of 0.21, showed the best mechanical properties, surpassing the other filled composites and that of the pure unsaturated polyester. Thus, acetylated guar gum showed promise as eco-friendly filler in composite formulation.

  16. Effect of chewing gum on the postoperative recovery of gastrointestinal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wei; Chen, Gang; Ding, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction remains a source of morbidity and the major determinant of length of stay after abdominal operation. There are many different reasons for postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction such as stress response, perioperative interventions, bowel manipulation and so on. The mechanism of enhanced recovery from postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction with the help of chewing gum is believed to be the cephalic-vagal stimulation of digestion which increases the promotability of neural and humoral factors that act on different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, there were a series of randomized controlled trials to confirm the role of chewing gum in the recovery of gastrointestinal function. The results suggested that chewing gum enhanced early recovery of bowel function following abdominal surgery expect the gastrointestinal surgery. However, the effect of chewing gum in gastrointestinal surgery was controversial. PMID:26550107

  17. Tragacanth Gum: Structural Composition, Natural Functionality and Enxymatic Conversion as Source of Potential Prebiotic Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi Gavlighi, Hassan

    very high viscosities when in aqueous solution, and is described as a complex, highly branched, heterogeneous hydrophilic polysaccharide. The gum contains pectinaceous arabinogalactans and fucose-substituted xylogalacturonans. The objective of this PhD study were to evaluate tragacanth samples from six...... species of Iranian Astragalus for their emulsion stabilizing effects and their detailed chemical composition in order to examine any possible correlation between the make-up and the emulsion stabilizing properties of gum tragacanth. Also, enzymatic modification of highly fucose content of tragacanth gum...... in emulsion and without emulsion showed shear thinning properties in allgums. The emulsion stabilization effect correlated linearly and positively to the methoxylation degree, and galacturonic acid content of the gums, but not to acetyl or fucose content. A particularly high correlation was found...

  18. Effect of various fertilization levels on the crack resistance of horse beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorzelany J.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Static compression tests were carried out on horse bean seeds within the scope of tests on micro tensile tester, Model Zwick 1425. The maximum value of force [N] causing bean crack and sample deformation [mm] up to the bean crack moment, were determined. The variation of predetermined mechanical indicators was analysed depending on the mode of varied fertilization, bean moisture content and loading direction. It was shown that varied fertilizer dose has significant effect on value of force causing bean damage and bean deformation up to crack.

  19. ROLE OF XANTHAN GUM (XANTHOMONAS COMPESTRIS) IN GASTRORETENTIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Uday Prakash; Lalit Singh; Vijay Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Floating drug delivery system is the form of gastro-retentive drug delivery system. That controls kinetic release rate of drug to a specific site for its pharmacological action. These are achieved by use of various polymeric substances including natural polymer such as xanthan gum. This delivery system prolongs the retention time of the drug in the stomach as compared to conventional dosage form. The present article highlights the use of xanthan gum for the formulation of the gastro-retentive...

  20. Effect of Chewing Gum on the Acid-Base and Mineral Balance in the Oral Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitriy Vaido; Elena Raspolina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite chewing gum (CG) is widespread, discussion about its harm and benefits is still in progress. It is unknown whether the CG effect on the teeth depends on the type of sugar substitute. The aim of the present research was to study the effect of chewing gums containing aspartame and sucralose on the acidbase balance and content of mineral components in mixed saliva after carbohydrate-containing food. METHODS The oral fluid, or “mixed” saliva had been ...

  1. Evaluation of the uncertainty of electrical impedance measurements: the GUM and its Supplement 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical impedance is not a scalar but a complex quantity. Thus, evaluation of the uncertainty of its value involves a model whose output is a complex. In this paper the comparison of the evaluation of the uncertainty of the measurement of the electrical impedance of a simple electric circuit using the GUM and using a Monte Carlo method according to the Supplement 2 of the GUM is presented

  2. Guar gum--its acceptability to diabetic patients when incorporated into baked food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredger, J; Ransley, J

    1978-12-01

    Guar gum was incorporated into 10 g carbohydrate portions of cheese biscuits and 20 g carbohydrate portions of pizza and egg and bacon flan. Their acceptability to diabetic patients was assessed by means of a taste panel. The results were favourable. Other diabetic patients were asked to judge three cheese biscuits of varying guar gum content. The biscuit with the lowest content was most favoured. PMID:731029

  3. The Effect of Three Gums on the Retrogradation of Indica Rice Starch

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Li; Bin Zhou; Rukun Song; Min Huang

    2012-01-01

    Retrograded starch (RS3) was produced from indica rice starch with three kinds of gums (konjac glucomannan, KGM; carrageenan, CA, USA; and gellan, GA, USA) by autoclaving, respectively, and the effect of the gums on the retrogradation behavior of starch was estimated. The influences of polysaccharide concentration, sodium chloride concentration, autoclaving time, refrigerated time, and pH value on RS3 formation were discussed. Except for sodium ch...

  4. Colon Targeted Guar Gum Compression Coated Tablets of Flurbiprofen: Formulation, Development, and Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Sateesh Kumar Vemula; Vijaya Kumar Bontha

    2013-01-01

    The rationale of the present study is to formulate flurbiprofen colon targeted compression coated tablets using guar gum to improve the therapeutic efficacy by increasing drug levels in colon, and also to reduce the side effects in upper gastrointestinal tract. Direct compression method was used to prepare flurbiprofen core tablets, and they were compression coated with guar gum. Then the tablets were optimized with the support of in vitro dissolution studies, and further it was proved by pha...

  5. FEASIBILITY OF KONDAGOGU GUM AS A CARRIER FOR COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Srujana N.; Valluru Ravi; Pramod Kumar T.M; Vinay S; Kulkarni R. Ajay

    2011-01-01

    The present study has been undertaken to develop colon targeted drug delivery system for metoprolol succinate using kondagogu gum as a polymer. Matrix tablets of metoprolol were prepared using PVP K-30 as binder and kondagogu gum as a rate controlling polymer. The prepared tablets were evaluated for properties such as hardness, thickness, friability etc. The prepared tablets were coated with shellac as an enteric coat polymer and evaluated for enteric coat test. In vitro release studies of we...

  6. Want to block earworms from conscious awareness?B(u)y gum!

    OpenAIRE

    Beaman, C. Philip; Powell, Kitty; Rapley, Ellie

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments examine the role of articulatory motor planning in experiencing an involuntary musical recollection (an “earworm”). Experiment 1 shows that interfering with articulatory motor programming by chewing gum reduces both the number of voluntary and the number of involuntary—unwanted—musical thoughts. This is consistent with other findings that chewing gum interferes with voluntary processes such as recollections from verbal memory, the interpretation of ambiguous auditory images,...

  7. Pengaruh Perbandingan Sari Buah Sirsak dengan Markisa dan Konsentrasi Gum Arab terhadap Mutu Sorbet Air Kelapa

    OpenAIRE

    Silalahi, Ririn Carolina

    2014-01-01

    RIRIN CAROLINA SILALAHI. The effect of ratio of Soursop Juice with Passion Fruit Juice and Concentration of Arabic Gum on The Quality of Coconut Water Sorbet, supervised by Ismed Suhaidi and Lasma Nora Limbong Research was conducted to determine the effect of ratio of soursop juice with passion fruit juice and concentration of arabic gum on the quality of coconut water sorbet. Research was conducted in February-March 2013 at The Laboratory of Food Chemical Analysis, Faculty of Agriculture,...

  8. Pengaruh Perbandingan Bubur Buah Sirsak dan Pepaya Serta Penambahan Gum Arab terhadap Mutu Fruit Leather

    OpenAIRE

    Harahap, Edy Syahputra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to find the effect of ratio of soursop with papaya pulps and several arabic gum addition on the quality of mixture of soursop and papaya fruit leather. This research was conducted at the Laboratory of Food Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Sumatera Utara, Medan, using completely randomized design with two factors, i.e. :ratio of soursop with papaya pulps (S) : (70% : 30% ; 60% : 40% ; 50% : 50% ; 40% : 60% ; 30% : 70%) and arabic gum concentration ...

  9. GCMS, FTIR, SEM, Physiochemical and Rheological Studies on Albizia zygia Gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnabuk Okon EDDY

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available GCMS (Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry, FTIR (Fourier Transformed Infra-Red Spectroscopy, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy, physiochemical and rheological analysis of Albizia zygia gum have been carried out. Albizia zygia exudate is a brownish in colour, acidic and ionic gum. GCMS spectra of the gum indicated the presence of (E-methyl octadec-7-enoate (41.18 %, methyl palmitate (18.64 %, methyl stearate (19.13 %, (9E,12E-methyl octadeca-9,12-dienoate (11.88 %, methyl icosanoate (1.85 %, 2,3-dihydroxypropyl oleate (2.05 %, (Z-octadec-13-enal (1.63 %, 2-hydroxy-3-(palmitoyloxypropyl stearate (1.55 %, 2,3-dihydroxypropyl stearate (0.82 %, dimethyl phthalate (0.58 % and 3-((aminomethoxy (hydroxyphosphoryloxypropane-1,2-diyl dipalmitate (0.70 %. The FTIR spectrum of the gum indicated several functional groups, including –OH, C-O and C=O. From the scanning electron micrograph, the morphology of the gum shows irregular shapes embedded on the surface. Rheological studies indicated that the viscosity of the gum increased with increasing pH but decreased with an increase in temperature. Application of Huggins, Kraemer and Tanglertpaibul and Rao models indicated that the intrinsic viscosity of the gum is in the range of 0.5 - 0.8. Plots obtained for the variation of viscosity with shear rate and shear rate with shear stress confirmed that Albizia zygia gum is a non Newtonian dilatant polymer with a characteristic shear thickening property.

  10. Determination of trace elements in chewing gum by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six trace elements of nutritional or toxicological interest (Al, Ca, Cl, Mn, Na and Sr) were determined in three different brands of chewing gum by instrumental neutron activation analysis. For the particular brands of gum examined, none of the detected elements was found to be present at a level representing a substantial contribution to the total dietary intake of the element for an American adult. (author) 11 refs.; 3 tabs

  11. Mutanase-containing chewing gum: A new potential approach for prevention of dental caries

    OpenAIRE

    Jafar Kolahi; Mohamadreza Abrishami

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Study on the effect of topically applied mutanase on plaque formation and caries in rats showed strong inhibition of dental caries. Furthermore, it has been shown that the presence of mutanase in dental plaque may affect the synthesis and structure of sticky, extracellular glucans. The Hypothesis: Mutanase can be easily added to gum base. After chewing of mutanase-containing chewing gum, the enzyme will be released into the oral cavity. Mutanase will hydrolyze sticky, extracellu...

  12. Effects of chewing gum against postoperative ileus after pancreaticoduodenectomy – a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Thomas; Bjerså, Kristofer; Falk, Kristin; Fagevik Olsén, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative ileus is common after surgery. One non-pharmacological intervention that has shown promising results in reducing the duration of postoperative ileus is chewing gum after surgery. However, this has not been investigated in upper gastrointestinal surgery such as pancreatic surgery. Hence the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chewing gum treatment on patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple due to pancreatic or periampullary cancer. ...

  13. Formulation development and evaluation of metformin chewing gum with bitter taste masking

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed Abolfazl Mostafavi; Jaleh Varshosaz; Saber Arabian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medicated gums are intended to be chewed and act either locally, absorbed via the buccal mucosa or swallowed with saliva. We prepared the metformin gum to overcome its side effects including vomiting, diarrhea, and abdomen discomfort. Furthermore, it could be useful for those who have swallowing problems. Materials and Methods: Metformin hydrochloride (250 mg) with suitable sweeteners was mixed manually for 5 min. This mixture was spray dried, freeze dried, or directly mixed w...

  14. Comparison of nicotine chewing-gum and psychological treatments for dependent smokers.

    OpenAIRE

    Raw, M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Feyerabend, C; Russell, M A

    1980-01-01

    The results of using nicotine chewing-gum to treat dependent smokers attending a withdrawal clinic were compared with the results of psychological treatment. At one-year follow-up 26 (38%) out of 69 people who received nicotine gum were abstinent compared with seven (14%) out of 49 who received psychological treatment (p < 0.01). Abstinence was confirmed by the measurement of carboxyhaemoglobin concentrations or expired air carbon monoxide. Blood nicotine concentrations when patients used the...

  15. Testing nicotine gum for ulcerative colitis patients. Experience with single-patient trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashner, B A; Hanauer, S B; Silverstein, M D

    1990-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies have documented an association between nonsmoking and ulcerative colitis and case reports have demonstrated that symptoms improve with smoking and worsen with removal of a nicotine source. A double-blind randomized crossover trial for individual ulcerative colitis patients (single-patient trial, or N of 1 clinical trial) was designed to study the safety, patient acceptance, and the effectiveness of nicotine gum in improving patient symptoms and proctoscopic appearance of involved colon. Seven nonsmoking patients chewed up to 10 squares/day (20 mg) of nicotine gum or placebo gum for two weeks. Therapy was crossed-over every two weeks over the eight-week trial. Effectiveness was judged from comparisons between nicotine-gum and placebo-gum periods of patient self-reported symptoms at the conclusion of each two-week period using visual analog scales and proctoscopic appearance using ordered categorical scales. Three of seven patients, all three of whom were former smokers, demonstrated sufficient improvement without adverse effects to warrant institution of nicotine gum into their drug treatment regimens. Three patients demonstrated an uncertain response, despite tolerating the drug, and have not had nicotine gum added to their regimens. One patient could not tolerate the medication and was withdrawn from the study. No serious side effects were noted. We conclude that a randomized trial for an individual patient is a useful method for evaluating treatment regimens for ulcerative colitis and that nicotine gum may be effective therapy for individual patients with ulcerative colitis who demonstrate an objective response with few adverse effects. PMID:2194767

  16. Effect of Edible Gums on the Qualities of Sausage of Pleurotus eryngii

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Lu; Lei Luo; Xinxue Li; Bo Li

    2014-01-01

    Pleurotus eryngii also named king oyster mushroom, is a fast developing mushroom in recent years. This study employed P. eryngii as the main material to make sausage-like gel food. The effects of the kinds, addition method and amount and compound of edible gums on the qualities of P. eryngii sausage were investigated. The results showed that adding optimal edible gum can improve textural and sensory properties, increase water holding capacity and reduce cooking loss of P. eryngii sausage. Dur...

  17. Effect of Acacia Gum, NaCl, and Sucrose on Physical Properties of Lotus Stem Starch

    OpenAIRE

    Ritika Puri; Balmeet Singh Gill; Yogesh Khetra

    2014-01-01

    Consumer preferences in east Asian part of the world pave the way for consumption of lotus stem starch (LSS) in preparations such as breakfast meals, fast foods, and traditional confectioneries. The present study envisaged the investigation and optimization of additives, that is, acacia gum, sodium chloride (NaCl), and sucrose, on water absorption (WA), water absorption index (WAI), and water solubility index (WSI) of LSS employing response surface methodology (RSM). Acacia gum resulted in in...

  18. Pengaruh Perbandingan Nenas Dengan Pepaya Dan Konsentrasi Gum Arab Terhadap Mutu Fruit Leather

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Mei Sya Putri

    2014-01-01

    Influence ratio of pineapple with papaya and arabic gum concentration on the quality of fruit leather supervised by RONA J. NAINGGOLAN and ERA YUSRAINI. The aim of this research was to find the effect of ratio pineapple with papaya pulps and several arabic gum concentration on the quality of pineapple with papaya of mixture fruit leather. This research was conducted at the Laboratory of Food Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Sumatera Utara, Medan, using completely randomize...

  19. Physicochemical characteristics of soy protein isolate and fenugreek gum dispersed systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hefnawy, Hefnawy Taha Mansour; Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy

    2011-01-01

    Protein–polysaccharide interactions play an important role in the structure and stability of many processed foods. In this study the effect of fenugreek gum (FG) on solubility and emulsifying properties of soy protein isolate (SPI) was evaluated. Generally, the solubility of SPI ions was increased by adding FG. The emulsifying activity of SPI with fenugreek gum (SPI-FG) was 4 times higher than that of SPI or FG alone and similar to that of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The emulsifying stability...

  20. Film coating potential of okra gum using paracetamol tablets as a model drug

    OpenAIRE

    Ogaji Ikoni; Nnoli Obiageli

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the film coating potential of okra gum extracted from pods of Abelmoschus esculentus plant using paracetamol as a model drug. Core tablets of paracetamol were obtained from a pharmacy shop in the locality and the physicochemical properties such as weight, hardness, friability, and disintegration time were evaluated. Aqueous coating suspensions of okra gum and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (0.6%w/v) were prepared and used to coat the tablets in Hi-co...

  1. Application of Neem Gum for Aqueous Film Coating of Ciprofloxacin Tablets

    OpenAIRE

    A P Kulkarni; Y R Shaikh; MH GR Dehghan

    2013-01-01

    Summary. At present the pharmaceutical industry and academia are focusing on the use of natural materials and resources for development of pharmaceutical product. In previous study, neem gum (NG), obtained from Azadirachata indica plant revealed satisfactory film forming ability. The present study evaluates the application potential of neem gum, as an aqueous film coating material, using ciprofloxacin hydrchloride (drug) as a model drug. Initial study of physical mixture indicated absence of ...

  2. Clustering of Mutations Blocking Synthesis of Xanthan Gum by Xanthomonas campestris

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, L.; Tansey, L.; Pollock, T J

    1987-01-01

    Mutations that block the synthesis of xanthan gum by Xanthomonas campestris B1459S-4L-II were isolated as nonmucoid colonies after treatment with ethyl methanesulfonate. Complete libraries of DNA fragments from wild-type X. campestris were cloned into Escherichia coli by using a broad-host-range cosmid vector and then transferred into each mutant strain by conjugal mating. Cloned fragments that restored xanthan gum synthesis (Xgs+; mucoidy) were compared according to restriction pattern, DNA ...

  3. Pengaruh Perbandingan Konsentrat Cabai, Tomat Serta Pepaya Dan Konsentrasi Xanthan Gum Terhadap Mutu Saos Cabai

    OpenAIRE

    Aryo Sigit

    2009-01-01

    Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui adanya pengaruh perbandingan konsentrat cabai, tomat serta pepaya dan konsentrasi xanthan gum terhadap mutu saos cabai. Penelitian ini menggunakan rancangan acak lengkap dengan dua faktor, yaitu perbandingan konsentrat cabai, tomat dan pepaya (B) : ) : (50 : 50 : 00, 50 : 40 : 10, 50 : 30 : 20, and 50 : 20 : 30 %) dan konsentrasi xanthan gum (K) : (0,2, 0,3, 0,4, and 0,5 %). Parameter yang dianalisa adalah total padatan, total asam, total padatan ter...

  4. Cell Free Xanthan Gum Production Using Continuous Recycled Packed Fibrous-bed Bioreactor-membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalam, S.; Krishnaiah, D.; Bono, A.

    2008-01-01

    Although the xanthan gum has been produced as a commercial commodity, the biomass isolation and its recovery are still challenging. This study revealed the xanthan gum production by fermentation of Xanthomonas campestris DSMZ using glucose as a carbon source in an immobilised batch and a continuous recycled packed fibrous-bed bioreactor-membrane (CRPBFBM). The pure cotton fibre was used to immobilise the microbial cell biomass and to isolate from the liquid phase containing medium and xantha...

  5. Bioadhesive Controlled Metronidazole Release Matrix Based on Chitosan and Xanthan Gum

    OpenAIRE

    Ala’a F. Eftaiha; Nidal Qinna; Rashid, Iyad S.; Mayyas M. Al Remawi; Al Shami, Munther R.; Tawfiq A. Arafat; Badwan, Adnan A

    2010-01-01

    Metronidazole, a common antibacterial drug, was incorporated into a hydrophilic polymer matrix composed of chitosan xanthan gum mixture. Hydrogel formation of this binary chitosan-xanthan gum combination was tested for its ability to control the release of metronidazole as a drug model. This preparation (MZ-CR) was characterized by in vitro, ex vivo bioadhesion and in vivo bioavailability study. For comparison purposes a commercial extended release formulation of metronidazole (CMZ) was used ...

  6. Effect of virulence and serial transfers of Xanthomonas campestris on xanthan gum production

    OpenAIRE

    Nitschke Marcia; Rodrigues Vanessa

    2000-01-01

    The virulence of six Xanthomonas campestris isolates was evaluated using the percentage of lesion area of leaves in Brassica oleraceae host plant, compared to diameter of colonies, xanthan production and gum viscosity. In terms of virulence, the isolates belonged to two statistically different groups: isolates B, UPF and C7 showed values between 52 and 69%, while isolates CF, C and strain B-1459 gave 0-30% of lesion area. Final xanthan concentration, gum viscosity and colony diameter did not ...

  7. Miscibility Studies of Cashew Gum and Khaya Gum Exudates in Dilute Solution by Viscometry and FTIR Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Arthur

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The FTIR and coefficient of viscosity for Cashew/Khaya blends in deionized water were measured, the changes in specific viscosity of the blends with corresponding effect of temperature and ionic salts, i.e. KCl, KBr and AlCl3 were modeled. The measured parameters were used to estimate other related physical quantities using Huggins, Tanglertpaibul and Rao, Frankel-eyring and Arrhenuis-frankel models etc. these quantities includes the intrinsic viscosity (η, conformation parameter (blaw, standard Enthalpy and Energy change of blend flow (∆H and ∆E, Huggins parameter (K, Interaction parameter (bm1 were proposed by Higiro et al., to identify the molecular conformation and the interaction arising in solution of gum blends. The peculiar deviation confirmed the structural changes in the solution of the blends, while the FTIR confirmed the formation of physical blends

  8. Susceptibility of pea, horse bean and bean to viruses in dependence on the age of the inoculated plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Władysław Błaszczak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Three cultivars of pea did not differ in their susceptibility to Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV notwithstanding the age of the inoculated plants. But their susceptibility to infection with Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus (BYMV differed. Horse bean cultivars 'Nadwiślański' and 'Major' proved to be less susceptible to Broad Bean True Mosaic Virus (BBTMV when older plants were-inoculated. Two bean cultivars 'Złota Saxa' and 'Earle' appeared to be susceptible to BBTMV only in the phase of developing primary leaves and the age-dependent resistance to infection increased faster in plants of the cv. 'Złota Saxa'. Both cultivars of bean showed also age-dependent resistance to infection by BYMV. All these viruses restricted growth and yield of plants. The decreases were greater when younger plants were inoculated. These dependences appeared most distinctly in pea cv. 'Sześciotygodniowy' infected with CMV and in two cultivars of bean infected with BYMV.

  9. Implications of Partial Conjugation of Whey Protein Isolate to Durian Seed Gum through Maillard Reactions: Foaming Properties, Water Holding Capacity and Interfacial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Tabatabaee Amid

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the conjugation of durian seed gum (DSG with whey protein isolate (WPI through Maillard reactions. Subsequently, the functional properties of durian seed gum in the non-conjugated (control sample and conjugated forms were compared with several commercial gums (i.e., Arabic gum, sodium alginate, kappa carrageenan, guar gum, and pectin. The current study revealed that the conjugation of durian seed gum with whey protein isolate significantly (p < 0.05 improved its foaming properties. In this study, the conjugated durian seed gum produced the most stable foam among all samples. On the other hand, the emulsion stabilized with the conjugated durian seed gum also showed more uniform particles with a larger specific surface area than the emulsion containing the non-conjugated durian seed gum. The conjugated durian seed gum showed significant different foaming properties, specific surface area, particle uniformity and water holding capacity (WHC as compared to the target polysaccharide gums. The conjugated durian seed gum showed more similar functional properties to Arabic gum rather than other studied gums.

  10. Modified gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work deals with development of modified gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold for cell culture. A new biocompatible scaffold was developed by cross-linking gelatin (Gel) with gum arabic, a polysaccharide. Gum arabic was subjected to periodate oxidation to obtain gum arabic aldehyde (GAA). GAA was reacted with gelatin under appropriate pH to prepare the cross-linked hydrogel. Cross-linking occurred due to Schiff's base reaction between aldehyde groups of oxidized gum arabic and amino groups of gelatin. The scaffold prepared from the hydrogel was characterized by swelling properties, degree of cross-linking, in vitro degradation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cytocompatibility evaluation using L-929 and HepG2 cells confirmed non-cytotoxic and non-adherent nature of the scaffold. These properties are essential for generating multicellular spheroids and hence the scaffold is proposed to be a suitable candidate for spheroid cell culture. - Highlights: • Gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold was developed for tissue engineering. • Cross-linking was achieved by Schiff's base reaction. • The scaffold is non-cytotoxic and non adherent to fibroblast and hepatocytes. • The scaffolds are potential candidates for spheroid cell culture

  11. GUM ARABIC PRODUCTION POTENTIAL OF NATURALLY GROWING ACACIA SENEGAL VARIETIES IN KENYAN DRYLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Wekesa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken between 2008 and 2010 to assess annual gum production potential per tree for different varieties of Acacia senegal (var. kerensis; var. senegal and var. leiorhachis growing naturally in Kenyan drylands. Eight sample plots of 1.0 hectare were established, one at each site. All trees in each sample plot were measured for basal diameter and classified into three diameter size classes (3.0-6.0 cm, 6.1-9.0 cm and > 9.0 cm. Ten trees from each diameter class were selected for tapping while another ten trees left untapped as control. Results indicate that gum yield by different varieties of A. senegal varied with basal diameter (BD size classes. A. senegal var. senegal yielded high quantities of gum compared to the other two varieties. Tapping increased yield by 47.1%, 91.8% and 85.7% for trees in diameter classes 3.0-6.0cm, 6.1-9.0cm and >9.0 cm respectively. On average, tapping increased gum production by 74.9%. These results can be used for estimating gum yield potential of naturally growing A. senegal in relation to the variety, tree size and site conditions. Besides, the upshot of these findings offers new management guidelines that can improve gum production through tapping for the economic, social and environmental benefits of local communities living in the drylands of Kenya.

  12. EVALUATION OF MORINGA OLEIFERA GUM AS A BINDER IN TABLET FORMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Basawaraj S.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Various plant gums have been used as binders in tablet formulations. But still finding novel binder for the manufacture of tablets, in pharmaceutical industry. The Moringa oleifera gum was found its binding property. In the present study Moringa oleifera gum was employed as a binding agent in Chloroquine phosphate tablets at concentrations of 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 % w/w, in comparison with potato starch. The properties of Moringa oleifera gum were evaluated for angle of repose, bulk density, tapped density, carr’s compressibility index and hausner’s ratio. The granules were evaluated for moisture content, angle of repose, bulk and tapped densities. The tablets were evaluated for thickness, weight variation, hardness, friability, disintegration time and dissolution profiles. Studies showed that increase in binding concentration of Moringa oleifera gum, increases the hardness, increases the disintegration time, decreases the percentage friability and decreases % cumulative release. Results obtained indicated that Moringa oleifera gum performed as good as potato starch as a binder to Chloroquine phosphate tablets.

  13. Prosopis alba exudate gum as excipient for improving fish oil stability in alginate-chitosan beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Franco Emanuel; Romero, Ana María; Judis, María Alicia; Mazzobre, María Florencia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to employ an exudate gum obtained from a South American wild tree (Prosopis alba), as wall material component to enhance the oxidative stability of fish oil encapsulated in alginate-chitosan beads. For this purpose, beads were vacuum-dried and stored under controlled conditions. Oxidation products, fatty acid profiles and lipid health indices were measured during storage. Alginate-chitosan interactions and the effect of gum were manifested in the FT-IR spectra. The inclusion of the gum in the gelation media allowed decreasing the oxidative damage during storage in comparison to the free oil and alginate-chitosan beads. The gum also improved wall material properties, providing higher oil retention during the drying step and subsequent storage. Fatty acids quality and lipid health indices were widely preserved in beads containing the gum. Present results showed a positive influence of the gum on oil encapsulation and stability, being the main mechanism attributed to a physical barrier effect. PMID:26213081

  14. Antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects of guar gum on streptozotocin-induced diabetes in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarghandian Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herbal medicine is widely used in the treatment of diseases like diabetes mellitus. We investigated the effects of guar gum in diabetic rats for the reduction of the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Dietary pattern emphasizing foods high in complex carbohydrates and fiber are associated with low blood glucose and cholesterol levels. Materials and Methods: Diet containing 0%, 5%, 10% and 20% (w/w guar gum was fed to diabetic rats for 28 days. Blood serum glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, atherogenic index levels, body weights and food intake were monitored at 0, 7.14 and 28 days after induction of diabetes. Results: In spite of the fact that diabetes elevated blood lipids in all rats after 14 days, the guar gum diet significantly decreased the serum concentration of cholesterol, triacylglicerols and LDL-C and atherogenic index. The most significant result in this study was the reduction of blood glucose in diabetic rats treated with the guar gum diet after 28 days versus non- and glibenclamide-treated rats. The gum promoted a general improvement in the condition of the diabetic rats in body weight and food intake in comparison with nontreated rats. Conclusion: The results of this research suggest that guar gum was significantly effective in comparison with glibenclamide in the treatment of hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia in diabetes rats. Therefore, it may be suggested as a reliable fiber in diabetic regimes in diabetic patients.

  15. Gum-Chewing and Headache: An Underestimated Trigger of Headache Pain in Migraineurs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Tension-type headache and migraine are currently considered the second and third most frequent human diseases. Since a variety of conditions that involve the temporomandibular joint and chewing muscles are frequent causes of orofacial pain, the aim of this article was to review current published evidence about the potential relationship between gum-chewing and headache. A systematic electronic search performed on Medline, Scopus and Web of Science using the keywords "headache" or "migraine" and "chewing" allowed to finally identify 1 cross-sectional, 1 observational and 3 randomized studies, along with 3 case reports about the potential association between gum-chewing and headache. Despite the limited evidence, it seems reasonable to suggest that headache attacks may be triggered by gum-chewing in migraineurs and in patients with tension-type headache. Opposite results were obtained in non-migraineurs, since in none of these studies an increased prevalence of headache pain was reported after gum-chewing. Although larger randomized studies will be necessary to definitely establish the relationship between gum-chewing and headache across different populations, it seems cautionary to suggest that subjects with migraine or tension-type headache should avoid or limit gum-chewing in their lifestyle. PMID:25714969

  16. Effects of caffeinated chewing gum on muscle pain during submaximal isometric exercise in individuals with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Masataka; Kempka, Laura; Weatherby, Amy; Greenlee, Brennan; Mansion, Kimberly

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity is important to manage symptom of fibromyalgia (FM); however, individuals with FM typically experience augmented muscle pain during exercise. This study examined the effects of caffeinated chewing gum on exercise-induced muscle pain in individuals with FM. This study was conducted with a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Twenty-three patients with FM completed a caffeine condition where they consumed a caffeinated chewing gum that contains 100mg of caffeine, and a placebo condition where they consumed a non-caffeinated chewing gum. They completed isometric handgrip exercise at 25% of their maximal strength for 3min, and muscle pain rating (MPR) was recorded every 30s during exercise. Clinical pain severity was assessed in each condition using a pain questionnaire. The order of the two conditions was randomly determined. MPR increased during exercise, but caffeinated chewing gum did not attenuate the increase in MPR compared to placebo gum. Clinical pain severity was generally associated with the average MPR and the caffeine effects on MPR, calculated as difference in the average MPR between the two conditions. The results suggest that more symptomatic individuals with FM may experience greater exercise-induced muscle pain, but benefit more from caffeinated chewing gum to reduce exercise-induced muscle pain. PMID:26855267

  17. Modified gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarika, P.R. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 547 (India); Cinthya, Kuriakose [Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 012 (India); Jayakrishnan, A. [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Anilkumar, P.R., E-mail: anilkumarpr@sctimst.ac.in [Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 012 (India); James, Nirmala Rachel, E-mail: nirmala@iist.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 547 (India)

    2014-10-01

    The present work deals with development of modified gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold for cell culture. A new biocompatible scaffold was developed by cross-linking gelatin (Gel) with gum arabic, a polysaccharide. Gum arabic was subjected to periodate oxidation to obtain gum arabic aldehyde (GAA). GAA was reacted with gelatin under appropriate pH to prepare the cross-linked hydrogel. Cross-linking occurred due to Schiff's base reaction between aldehyde groups of oxidized gum arabic and amino groups of gelatin. The scaffold prepared from the hydrogel was characterized by swelling properties, degree of cross-linking, in vitro degradation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cytocompatibility evaluation using L-929 and HepG2 cells confirmed non-cytotoxic and non-adherent nature of the scaffold. These properties are essential for generating multicellular spheroids and hence the scaffold is proposed to be a suitable candidate for spheroid cell culture. - Highlights: • Gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold was developed for tissue engineering. • Cross-linking was achieved by Schiff's base reaction. • The scaffold is non-cytotoxic and non adherent to fibroblast and hepatocytes. • The scaffolds are potential candidates for spheroid cell culture.

  18. The feasibility of Cassia fistula gum with polyaluminium chloride for the decolorization of reactive dyeing wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perng Yuan Shing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to find a new environmental-friendly coagulant that can partially replace conventional polyaluminium chloride (PAC which was shown to be toxic to aquatic environment, gum extracted from seeds of Cassia fistula Linn. (CF was investigated in decolorization of reactive dyes Blue 19 (RB19 and Black 5 (RB5 using jar-test experiments. The optimal results showed that crude CF gum (at pH 10, initial dye concentrations (IDC of 100 and 50 mg L-1, gum dosages 200 and 300 mg L-1, reaction time 30 and 45 min, and agitation speed 60 rpm did not achieve high degrees of decolorization in RB5 and RB19 (55.7 and 62.0 %, respectively as compared with PAC coagulant (97.2 and 94.4 %, respectively at the same IDC and reaction time. Whereas when CF gum was used in combination with PAC, decolorization efficiencies of both dyes reached over 92 % at 40 % volume fraction of gum. These results indicated the potential of using CF gum as a “green” coagulant or as a contributing factor to color removal of textile wastewater.

  19. KARAKTERISTIK MI BASAH JAGUNG AKIBAT PENGARUH LAJU PENGUMPANAN DAN PENAMBAHAN GUAR GUM [Characteristics of Wet Corn Noodle: Effect of Feeding Rate and Guar Gum Addition

    OpenAIRE

    Tjahja Muhandri; Subarna*; Nurheni Sri Palupi2)

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to (1) investigate the effect of feeding rate on elongation, cooking loss, and microstructure of wet corn noodle properties and (2) investigate the effect of guar gum on elongation, cooking loss, hardness, and sensory quality of wet corn noodle. Corn noodles were made with pasta extruder. Two levels of feeding rate, i.e. 2.10 g/second and 1.87 g/second and three levels of guar gum (0, 1, 2% based on flour weight) were applied during wet corn noodle process...

  20. PENGGUNAN GUM XANTHAN PADA SUBSTITUSI PARSIAL TERIGU DENGAN TEPUNG JAGUNG DALAM PEMBUATAN ROTI [Use of Xanthan Gum in Partial Substitusion of Corn Flour for Wheat Flour in Breadmaking

    OpenAIRE

    Posman Sibuea

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the experiment was to examine the capabilities of composite flour (i.e. corn flour and wheat flour) and xanthan gum in breadmaking. Breads were produced using mixture of wheat and corn flour at varios ratio with addition of xanthan gum at different level (0.0% to 0.75%). The result showed that the composite flour had significant effect on all measured parameters. As the wheat flour descreaseed down to 65% the dought length, texture, reducing sugar content increased, but the s...

  1. Effects of combined traditional processing methods on the nutritional quality of beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakitto, Aisha M; Muyonga, John H; Nakimbugwe, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of dry beans is limited by long cooking times thus high fuel requirement. The bioavailability of nutrients in beans is also limited due to presence of antinutrients such as phytates and tannins. Little research has been done on combined processing methods for production of nutritious fast cooking bean flour and the effect of combined treatments on nutritional quality of beans has not previously determined. The aim of this study was to reduce cooking time and enhance the nutritional value of dry beans. Specifically to: develop protocols for production of fast cooking bean flours and assess the effect of processing on the nutritional characteristics of the flours. Dry beans (K131 variety) were soaked for 12 h; sprouted for 48 h; dehulled and steamed for 25 and 15 min for whole and dehulled beans respectively or roasted at 170°C for 45 and 15 min for whole and dehulled beans respectively. Dehulling eliminated phytates and tannins and increased protein digestibility. In vitro protein digestibility and mineral (iron and zinc) extractability were negatively correlated with tannin and phytate content. Total available carbohydrates were highest in moist heat-treated bean flours. Overall, combined processing of beans improved the nutritional quality of dry beans and the resulting precooked flours need less cooking time compared to whole dry beans. PMID:25987998

  2. Nutritional response of growing rats to faba beans (Vicia faba L., minor) and faba bean fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, L A; Grant, G; Bardocz, S; Dewey, P; Pusztai, A

    1991-11-01

    The effects of raw faba bean (Vicia faba L., minor) meal (VFM) and its fractions on the growth and nitrogen utilization of rats have been determined in two experiments. Two commercial varieties of VFM were tested, local VFM (409-439 g/kg diet) and Troy VFM (439 g/kg diet). The bean fractions tested were V. faba lectin-depleted protein (VFDP), V. faba lectin (VFL) and V. faba cotyledon residue (VFCR). All diets were supplemented with amino acids to target requirements. Body-weight, body N and lipid contents of rats fed on VFM were reduced significantly in comparison with control rats fed on lactalbumin. This was due, in part, to the lower digestibility of the protein, lipid and dry matter (DM) of VFM diets. As a result, net protein utilization (NPU) and biological value (BV) of faba bean proteins were less than expected. Urine and urea-N outputs of the VFM-fed rats were also elevated in both experiments. Increasing the energy content of local VFM diets led to significantly higher dry body-weight, body N and lipid contents, with the result that the NPU and BV values of the protein also increased. However, the NPU values for VFM-fed rats were still significantly lower than those for the controls in both experiments. In contrast, true N, lipid and DM digestibilities in rats given local VFM were not significantly affected by the difference in the energy content of the diets. The replacement of two-thirds of the lactalbumin in the diet with VFDP (65 g/kg) reduced dry body-weight, N and lipid contents, NPU and BV compared with the control rats, even though N, lipid and DM digestibilities were not significantly different. The nutritional performance of rats fed on lactalbumin-based diets containing 7 g VFL/kg was similar to that of the controls. Similarly, the inclusion of the cotyledon residue (237 g VFCR/kg diet) had no appreciable effect on any of the variables studied. As VFL and VFCR had no antinutritional effects in these rats, it appears that the low nutritional

  3. Spontaneous synthesis of gold nanoparticles on gum arabic-modified iron oxide nanoparticles as a magnetically recoverable nanocatalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chien-Chen; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2012-01-01

    A novel magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst was fabricated by spontaneous green synthesis of Au nanoparticles on the surface of gum arabic-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles. A layer of Au nanoparticles with thickness of about 2 nm was deposited on the surface of gum arabic-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles, because gum arabic acted as a reducing agent and a stabilizing agent simultaneously. The resultant magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst exhibited good catalytic activity for the reduction o...

  4. X-ray fluorescence in Member States: Argentina. Synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence study of gums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Over the years, the term gums has been used for a wide range of compounds including polysaccharides, terpenes, proteins, and synthetic polymers. In the 1990s, the term more specifically denotes a group of industrially useful polysaccharides or their derivatives that hydrate in hot or cold water to form viscous solutions, dispersions, or gels. Gums are used in industry because their aqueous solutions or dispersions have suspending and stabilizing properties. In addition, gums may produce gels or act as emulsifiers, adhesives, flocculants, binders, film formers, lubricants, or friction reducers, depending on the shape and chemical nature of the particular gum. They have increasingly been used in recent years by industry due to their controlled, reproducible and economical biosynthesis, and their biodegradability. Gums are classified as natural or modified. Natural gums include seaweed extracts, plant exudates, gums from seed or root, and gums obtained by microbial fermentation. Modified (semi-synthetic) gums include cellulose and starch derivatives and certain synthetic gums such as low methoxyl pectin, propylene glycol alginate, and carboxymethyl and hydroxypropyl guar gum. Selected polymers from the different groups were characterised in this work. Specifications of these polymers have to be controlled by European Community, Mercosur, etc. especially for toxic metals in food and pharmaceutical products. Synchrotron Radiation (SR) induced Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (SRTXRF) analysis expands the possibilities of conventional TXRF based on X-ray tube excitation. In this study the SRTXRF technique was successfully applied for the quantification of F, Na, Mg, S, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As and Pb in high-viscosity gum aqueous solutions. The results were analysed from both toxic and alimentary point of view. (author)

  5. The Use of Hibiscus esculentus (Okra) Gum in Sustaining the Release of Propranolol Hydrochloride in a Solid Oral Dosage Form

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of Okra gum in sustaining the release of propranolol hydrochloride in a tablet was studied. Okra gum was extracted from the pods of Hibiscus esculentus using acetone as a drying agent. Dried Okra gum was made into powder form and its physical and chemical characteristics such as solubility, pH, moisture content, viscosity, morphology study using SEM, infrared study using FTIR, crystallinity study using XRD, and thermal study using DSC and TGA were carried out. The powder was...

  6. FORMULATION AND IN VITRO EVALUATION OF ARAUCARIA BIDWILLI GUM-BASED SUSTAIN RELEASE MATRIX TABLETS OF DICLOFENAE SODIUM

    OpenAIRE

    J. ASHOK KUMAR, M.RAJESH, S.MYTHIESH KUMAR,T. GIRIRAJ KULKARNI, V.GOPAL

    2013-01-01

    A gel forming Polysaccharide gum obtained form the bark of Araucaria bidwilli was employed as a matrix sustained release tablet formulation of Diclofenac sodium (a non steroidal anti inflammatory agent). The effect of Araucaria bidwilli gum (Natural) and Synthetic polymer Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC K4 M) on the release of Diclofenac sodium was studied. The FT-IR spectroscopic studies of drug, gum and mixture indicated no chemical interaction. Six formulations were prepared by wet gr...

  7. Evaluation of gum of Moringa oleifera as a binder and release retardant in tablet formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Panda D; Choudhury N.S.K; Yedukondalu M; Si S; Gupta R

    2008-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to find out the potential of gum from Moringa oleifera to act as a binder and release retardant in tablet formulations. The effect of calcium sulphate dihydrate (water insoluble) and lactose (water soluble) diluent on the release of propranolol hydrochloride was studied. The DSC thermograms of drug, gum and mixture of gum/drug indicated no chemical interaction. Tablets (F1, F2, F3, and F4) were prepared containing calcium sulphate dihydrate as diluent, propr...

  8. Chewing Sugar-Free Gum Reduces Ileus After Cesarean Section in Nulliparous Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsenzadeh Ledari, Farideh; Barat, Shanaz; Delavar, Mouloud Agajani; Banihosini, Seyed Zahra; Khafri, Soriya

    2013-01-01

    Background Gum chewing after cesarean section may stimulate bowel motility and decrease duration of postoperative ileus. Objectives The current study assessed the effect of chewing sugar-free gum on the return of bowel function, where cesarean section had been performed in nulliparous women. Materials and Methods In a randomized clinical trial, 60 patients, scheduled for cesarean section were randomly divided in to 2 groups gum-chewing group (n = 30) and control group (n = 30) postoperatively...

  9. Results of preliminary investigations at radio sensitivity of bean (Vicia faba L.) on fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seeds of bean (Vicia faba L.) were irradiated with fast neutrons. The radiation doses applied ranged from 40 to 600 rads. Then irradiated seeds were sowed. During bean vegetation radiation effects were observed. (A.S.)

  10. Short-term effects of chewing gum on satiety and afternoon snack intake in healthy weight and obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunyoung; Edirisinghe, Indika; Inui, Taichi; Kergoat, Sophie; Kelley, Michael; Burton-Freeman, Britt

    2016-05-15

    Afternoon snacking contributes significantly to total energy intake. Strategies to enhance the satiety value of lunch and reduce afternoon snacking are of interest for body weight management. To assess whether between-meal gum chewing would enhance the satiety response to a fixed lunch meal; and assess the role of cholecystokinin (CCK) as a potential mediator of the response in non-obese healthy weight and obese women. Fifty unrestrained obese (n=25) and non-obese healthy weight (n=25) women participated in a two-arm cross-over study assessing multiple (15min per hour×3h) gum chewing (GUM) occurrences or no gum (Control) on subjective ratings of satiety, subsequent sweet and salty snack intake, CCK and general metabolic responses. GUM compared to Control resulted in significant suppression of hunger, desire to eat and prospective consumption (pGUM, but not significantly different from Control (p=0.08). However, overall carbohydrate intake was reduced by GUM (p=0.03). This was consistent with a reduction in snacks characterized as high carbohydrate, low fat (p=0.02). BMI specific effects indicated GUM reduced pretzel intake in obese women (p=0.05) and Oreo cookie intake in healthy weight women (p=0.03) 3h after lunch. Metabolic responses and CCK did not differ between experimental conditions. Chewing gum intermittently post-lunch enhances perceptions of satiety and may have important implications in reducing afternoon high carbohydrate-snack intake. PMID:26948161

  11. FORMULATION AND IN VITRO EVALUATION OF ARAUCARIA BIDWILLI GUM-BASED SUSTAIN RELEASE MATRIX TABLETS OF DICLOFENAE SODIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. ASHOK KUMAR, M.RAJESH, S.MYTHIESH KUMAR,T. GIRIRAJ KULKARNI, V.GOPAL

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A gel forming Polysaccharide gum obtained form the bark of Araucaria bidwilli was employed as a matrix sustained release tablet formulation of Diclofenac sodium (a non steroidal anti inflammatory agent. The effect of Araucaria bidwilli gum (Natural and Synthetic polymer Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC K4 M on the release of Diclofenac sodium was studied. The FT-IR spectroscopic studies of drug, gum and mixture indicated no chemical interaction. Six formulations were prepared by wet granulation method containing Araucaria bidwilli gum powder concentration 10% 20% & 30% w\\w and 10% 20% &30% w\\w of HPMC K4 M with sufficient volume of granulating agent Polyvinyl pyrrolene (PVP K 30, Avicel pH101 as diluents, Magnesium stearate and Aerosil is used lubricant and glidant respectively.This study was carried out to find out the difference between synthetic and natural gum and whether synthetic gum can be replaced by natural gums. Physical and technological studies of granules and tablets were compliance with Pharmacopoial standards.The drug release increased with Araucaria bidwilli gum when compared to synthetics polymer concentration .The value of release exponent were found to be almost straight line and regression coefficient value between 0.938 and 0.998.This implies that the release mechanism is diffusion. Formulation F3 ( contained 30% w\\w Araucaria bidwilli gum met the desired requirements for a sustained release dosage form.

  12. Irradiation disinfestation of stored cocoa beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between effective dosages to induce mortality and sterility in several important storage beetles was investigated. To induce 100% mortality, doses ranging from 0.05 to 0.1 kGy require 4-7 weeks, 0.2-1.0 kGy need 1.5-3 weeks and 2.0 kGy require 1 week for Tribolium castaneum, Oryzaephilus surinamensis and Lasioderma serricorne, respectively. Only at 5.0 kGy did instant mortality occur in the insects tested. Total prevention of F1 progeny was achieved at the lowest dosage (0.05 kGy) for T. castaneum and O. surinamensis; for L. serricorne, the sterility level achieved was 92-99% for doses ranging from 0.05 to 1.0 kGy. Semi-pilot scale tests (12 months) were carried out to evaluate the efficacy of gamma irradiation to control insects (artificially infested L. serricorne and T. castaneum) and moulds in cocoa beans packed in either jute or laminated polypropylene or unlaminated polypropylene bags. Good control against insect infestations was achieved for the whole duration of storage. Laminated polypropylene afforded the best protection against insect reinfestation. Other than a change in moisture content, no changes in the physicochemical properties were observed in the flavour or in the total protein, soluble protein, amino acid and free fatty acid contents. 15 refs, 10 tabs

  13. Melhoramento do feijoeiro Breeding of dry beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim O. Abrahão

    1960-01-01

    Full Text Available Os ensaios de variedades e linhagens de feijão, realizados no período de 1948 a 1957 pelo Seção de Genética e resumidamente aqui apresentados, vieram indicar que as variedades e linhagens do grupo Mulatinho e Chumbinho eram as mais produtivas. A partir dêste ano agrícola, novos ensaios comparativos de produção foram realizados, a fim de verificar o comportamento das variedades e linhagens existentes com as variedades recém-introduzidas e as novas linhagens selecionadas. As variedades comerciais e suas linhagens, estudadas neste trabalho, foram classificadas em oito grupos, com base nas observações realizadas principalmente sôbre o tipo de planta e característicos dos sementes, o saber: Mulatinho, Chumbinho, Rosinha, Roxinho, Manteiga, Prêto, Bico-de-Ouro e diversos. Dos oito ensaios analisados em detalhes e realizados em Campinas, chegou-se à conclusão de que as variedades dos grupos Prêta e Rosinha são as de maior capacidade produtiva, devendo ser intensificado o aproveitamento dêsses grupos no plano de melhoramento em execução. As do grupo Roxinho apresentam-se menos produtivas. A comparação das análises dos ensaios como látice e blocos ao acaso revelou uma eficiência média de ordem de 30% para o tipo látice nos oito ensaios analisados. A fim de observar se o pêso total de plantas por ocasião da colheita mostra correlação com a produção de grãos, determinou-se, para cada grupo, o índice entre essas duas variáveis. Observou-se que êstes índices são proporcionais à produção, servindo, assim, para melhor caracterizar os diversos grupos de variedades e linhagens de feijão.In spite of the fact that dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris are one of the main sources of protein in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, they are considered a secondary crop and grown only in small patches or intercropped with coffee, sugar cane, or corn. The development of high yielding strains resistant to the most prevailing diseases, has

  14. Jumping mechanisms in gum treehopper insects (Hemiptera, Eurymelinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Malcolm

    2013-07-15

    Jumping in a species of Australian gum treehopper was analysed from high-speed images. Pauroeurymela amplicincta adults and nymphs lived together in groups that were tended by ants, but only adults jumped. The winged adults with a body mass of 23 mg and a body length of 7 mm had some morphological characteristics intermediate between those of their close relatives the leafhoppers (Cicadellidae) and the treehoppers (Membracidae). They, like leafhoppers, lacked the prominent prothoracic helmets of membracid treehoppers, and their large hind coxae were linked by press studs (poppers), that are present in leafhoppers but not treehoppers. The hindlegs were only 30-40% longer than the other legs and 67% of body length. They are thus of similar proportion to the hindlegs of treehoppers but much shorter than those of most leafhoppers. Jumping was propelled by the hindlegs, which moved in the same plane as each other beneath and almost parallel to the longitudinal axis of the body. A jump was preceded by full levation of the coxo-trochanteral joints of the hindlegs. In its best jumps, the rapid depression of these joints then accelerated the insect in 1.4 ms to a take-off velocity of 3.8 m s(-1) so that it experienced a force of almost 280 g. In 22% of jumps, the wings opened before take-off but did not flap until the gum treehopper was airborne, when the body rotated little in any plane. The energy expended was 170 μJ, the power output was 122 mW and the force exerted was 64 mN. Such jumps are predicted to propel the insect forwards 1450 mm (200 times body length) and to a height of 430 mm if there is no effect of wind resistance. The power output per mass of jumping muscle far exceeded the maximum active contractile limit of muscle and indicates that a catapult-like action must be used. This eurymelid therefore out-performs both leafhoppers and treehoppers in i ts faster acceleration and in its higher take-off velocity. PMID:23619401

  15. Trait associations in common bean genotypes grown under drought stress and field infestation by BSM bean fly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ambachew

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding functional relations among plant traits and their modulation by growing conditions is imperative in designing selection strategies for breeding programs. This study assessed trait relationships among 196 common bean genotypes exposed to stresses for drought and field infestation of bean fly or bean stem maggot (BSM. The study was carried out at two locations and data was analyzed with linear correlation, path coefficient and genotype × trait biplot analyses. Multiple trait data related to mechanisms of drought and bean fly tolerance were collected on 196 genotypes grown under i water deficit at mid-pod fill, or ii unprotected against bean fly; iii irrigated, well watered conditions, or iv bean fly protection with chemicals. Seed yield exhibited positive and significant correlations with leaf chlorophyll content, vertical root pulling resistance, pod harvest index, pods per plant and seeds per pod at both phenotypic and genotypic levels under stress and non-stress conditions. Genotypic correlations of traits with seed yield were greater than their respective phenotypic correlations across environments indicating the greater contribution of genotypic factors to the trait correlation. Pods per plant and seeds per pod had high positive direct effects on seed yield both under stress and non-stress whereas pods per plant had the highest indirect effect on seed yield through pod harvest index under stress. In general, our results suggest that vertical root pulling resistance and pod harvest index are important selection objectives for improving seed yield in common beans under non-stress and stress conditions, and particularly useful for drought and BSM tolerance evaluation.

  16. Trait associations in common bean genotypes grown under drought stress and field infestation by BSM bean fly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Ambachew; Firew Mekbib; Asrat Asfaw; Stephen E. Beebe; Matthew W. Blaird

    2015-01-01

    Understanding functional relations among plant traits and their modulation by growing conditions is imperative in designing selection strategies for breeding programs. This study assessed trait relationships among 196 common bean genotypes exposed to stresses for drought and field infestation of bean fly or bean stem maggot (BSM). The study was carried out at two locations and data was analyzed with linear correlation, path coefficient and genotype × trait biplot analyses. Multiple trait data related to mechanisms of drought and bean fly tolerance were collected on 196 genotypes grown under i) water deficit at mid-pod fill, or ii) unprotected against bean fly;iii) irrigated, well watered conditions, or iv) bean fly protection with chemicals. Seed yield exhibited positive and significant correlations with leaf chlorophyll content, vertical root pulling resistance, pod harvest index, pods per plant and seeds per pod at both phenotypic and genotypic levels under stress and non-stress conditions. Genotypic correlations of traits with seed yield were greater than their respective phenotypic correlations across environments indicating the greater contribution of genotypic factors to the trait correlation. Pods per plant and seeds per pod had high positive direct effects on seed yield both under stress and non-stress whereas pods per plant had the highest indirect effect on seed yield through pod harvest index under stress. In general, our results suggest that vertical root pulling resistance and pod harvest index are important selection objectives for improving seed yield in common beans under non-stress and stress conditions, and particularly useful for drought and BSM tolerance evaluation.

  17. Trait associations in common bean genotypes grown under drought stress and field infestation by BSM bean fly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel; Ambachew; Firew; Mekbib; Asrat; Asfaw; Stephen; E.Beebe; Matthew; W.Blair

    2015-01-01

    Understanding functional relations among plant traits and their modulation by growing conditions is imperative in designing selection strategies for breeding programs. This study assessed trait relationships among 196 common bean genotypes exposed to stresses for drought and field infestation of bean fly or bean stem maggot(BSM). The study was carried out at two locations and data was analyzed with linear correlation, path coefficient and genotype × trait biplot analyses. Multiple trait data related to mechanisms of drought and bean fly tolerance were collected on 196 genotypes grown under i) water deficit at mid-pod fill, or ii) unprotected against bean fly; iii) irrigated, well watered conditions, or iv) bean fly protection with chemicals. Seed yield exhibited positive and significant correlations with leaf chlorophyll content, vertical root pulling resistance, pod harvest index, pods per plant and seeds per pod at both phenotypic and genotypic levels under stress and non-stress conditions. Genotypic correlations of traits with seed yield were greater than their respective phenotypic correlations across environments indicating the greater contribution of genotypic factors to the trait correlation. Pods per plant and seeds per pod had high positive direct effects on seed yield both under stress and non-stress whereas pods per plant had the highest indirect effect on seed yield through pod harvest index under stress.In general, our results suggest that vertical root pulling resistance and pod harvest index are important selection objectives for improving seed yield in common beans under non-stress and stress conditions, and particularly useful for drought and BSM tolerance evaluation.

  18. Effects of combined traditional processing methods on the nutritional quality of beans

    OpenAIRE

    Nakitto, Aisha M; Muyonga, John H.; Nakimbugwe, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of dry beans is limited by long cooking times thus high fuel requirement. The bioavailability of nutrients in beans is also limited due to presence of antinutrients such as phytates and tannins. Little research has been done on combined processing methods for production of nutritious fast cooking bean flour and the effect of combined treatments on nutritional quality of beans has not previously determined. The aim of this study was to reduce cooking time and enhance the nutritiona...

  19. Effects of bioprocessed antinutritional factors on bean protein quality, with special emphasis on Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    OpenAIRE

    Savelkoul, F.H.M.G.

    1994-01-01

    Legumes, e.g. beans and peas, can contain antinutritional factors. Some varieties of faba beans (Vicia faba), soya beans (Glycine max ) and white kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) can contain in their raw state antinutritional factors such as tannins, trypsin inhibitors and lectins respectively which negatively effect the protein digestibility by nonruminants e.g. pigs. Also the storage protein is not easily digested by nonruminants. The main aim of the present study was to find a reasonable ...

  20. Reduction of Microbe Contamination through Steaming Process to Cocoa Beans Using Steaming Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Hendy Firmanto

    2014-01-01

    Dry cocoa bean quality is also determined by its microbe contamination level. Steaming process for dried cocoa beans as a pretreatment process was selected because of less effect on organic compound inside the dried cocoa bean. This experiment aim was to study microbial contamination level of cocoa beans using steaming process, determining its microbial population and evaluate its chemical changes. Experiment was carried out in Postharvest Laboratory of Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research In...