WorldWideScience

Sample records for carlo planetary radiation

  1. PBMC: Pre-conditioned Backward Monte Carlo code for radiative transport in planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Muñoz, A.; Mills, F. P.

    2017-08-01

    PBMC (Pre-Conditioned Backward Monte Carlo) solves the vector Radiative Transport Equation (vRTE) and can be applied to planetary atmospheres irradiated from above. The code builds the solution by simulating the photon trajectories from the detector towards the radiation source, i.e. in the reverse order of the actual photon displacements. In accounting for the polarization in the sampling of photon propagation directions and pre-conditioning the scattering matrix with information from the scattering matrices of prior (in the BMC integration order) photon collisions, PBMC avoids the unstable and biased solutions of classical BMC algorithms for conservative, optically-thick, strongly-polarizing media such as Rayleigh atmospheres.

  2. Monte Carlo techniques in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Modern cancer treatment relies on Monte Carlo simulations to help radiotherapists and clinical physicists better understand and compute radiation dose from imaging devices as well as exploit four-dimensional imaging data. With Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tools now available from commercial vendors, a complete transition to Monte Carlo-based dose calculation methods in radiotherapy could likely take place in the next decade. Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiation Therapy explores the use of Monte Carlo methods for modeling various features of internal and external radiation sources, including light ion beams. The book-the first of its kind-addresses applications of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation technique in radiation therapy, mainly focusing on external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. It presents the mathematical and technical aspects of the methods in particle transport simulations. The book also discusses the modeling of medical linacs and other irradiation devices; issues specific...

  3. Parallel processing Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    Issues related to distributed-memory multiprocessing as applied to Monte Carlo radiation transport are discussed. Measurements of communication overhead are presented for the radiation transport code MCNP which employs the communication software package PVM, and average efficiency curves are provided for a homogeneous virtual machine

  4. Monte Carlo applications to radiation shielding problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbaiah, K.V.

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are a class of computational algorithms that rely on repeated random sampling of physical and mathematical systems to compute their results. However, basic concepts of MC are both simple and straightforward and can be learned by using a personal computer. Uses of Monte Carlo methods require large amounts of random numbers, and it was their use that spurred the development of pseudorandom number generators, which were far quicker to use than the tables of random numbers which had been previously used for statistical sampling. In Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport, the history (track) of a particle is viewed as a random sequence of free flights that end with an interaction event where the particle changes its direction of movement, loses energy and, occasionally, produces secondary particles. The Monte Carlo simulation of a given experimental arrangement (e.g., an electron beam, coming from an accelerator and impinging on a water phantom) consists of the numerical generation of random histories. To simulate these histories we need an interaction model, i.e., a set of differential cross sections (DCS) for the relevant interaction mechanisms. The DCSs determine the probability distribution functions (pdf) of the random variables that characterize a track; 1) free path between successive interaction events, 2) type of interaction taking place and 3) energy loss and angular deflection in a particular event (and initial state of emitted secondary particles, if any). Once these pdfs are known, random histories can be generated by using appropriate sampling methods. If the number of generated histories is large enough, quantitative information on the transport process may be obtained by simply averaging over the simulated histories. The Monte Carlo method yields the same information as the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation, with the same interaction model, but is easier to implement. In particular, the simulation of radiation

  5. Radiation protection for human interplanetary spaceflight and planetary surface operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, B.C. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[DLR Inst. of Aerospace Medicine, Cologne (Germany)]|[NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiation protection issues are reviewed for five categories of radiation exposure during human missions to the moon and Mars: trapped radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays, solar flare particle events, planetary surface emissions, and on-board radiation sources. Relative hazards are dependent upon spacecraft and vehicle configurations, flight trajectories, human susceptibility, shielding effectiveness, monitoring and warning systems, and other factors. Crew cabins, interplanetary mission modules, surface habitats, planetary rovers, and extravehicular mobility units (spacesuits) provide various degrees of protection. Countermeasures that may be taken are reviewed relative to added complexity and risks that they could entail, with suggestions for future research and analysis.

  6. Radiation Belts of Antiparticles in Planetary Magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugacheva, G. I.; Gusev, A. A.; Jayanthi, U. B.; Martin, I. M.; Spjeldvik, W. N.

    2007-05-01

    The Earth's radiation belts could be populated, besides with electrons and protons, also by antiparticles, such as positrons (Basilova et al., 1982) and antiprotons (pbar). Positrons are born in the decay of pions that are directly produced in nuclear reactions of trapped relativistic inner zone protons with the residual atmosphere at altitudes in the range of about 500 to 3000 km over the Earth's surface. Antiprotons are born by high energy (E > 6 GeV) cosmic rays in p+p - p+p+p+ pbar and in p+p - p+p+n+nbar reactions. The trapping and storage of these charged anti-particles in the magnetosphere result in radiation belts similar to the classical Van Allen belts of protons and electrons. We describe the mathematical techniques used for numerical simulation of the trapped positron and antiproton belt fluxes. The pion and antiproton yields were simulated on the basis of the Russian nuclear reaction computer code MSDM, a Multy Stage Dynamical Model, Monte Carlo code, (i.e., Dementyev and Sobolevsky, 1999). For estimates of positron flux there we have accounted for ionisation, bremsstrahlung, and synchrotron energy losses. The resulting numerical estimates show that the positron flux with energy >100 MeV trapped into the radiation belt at L=1.2 is of the order ~1000 m-2 s-1 sr-1, and that it is very sensitive to the shape of the trapped proton spectrum. This confined positron flux is found to be greater than that albedo, not trapped, mixed electron/positron flux of about 50 m-2 s-1 sr-1 produced by CR in the same region at the top of the geomagnetic field line at L=1.2. As we show in report, this albedo flux also consists mostly of positrons. The trapped antiproton fluxes produced by CR in the Earth's upper rarified atmosphere were calculated in the energy range from 10 MeV to several GeV. In the simulations we included a mathematic consideration of the radial diffusion process, both an inner and an outer antiproton source, losses of particles due to ionization process

  7. Monte Carlo method in radiation transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejonghe, G.; Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T.

    1986-11-01

    In neutral radiation transport problems (neutrons, photons), two values are important: the flux in the phase space and the density of particles. To solve the problem with Monte Carlo method leads to, among other things, build a statistical process (called the play) and to provide a numerical value to a variable x (this attribution is called score). Sampling techniques are presented. Play biasing necessity is proved. A biased simulation is made. At last, the current developments (rewriting of programs for instance) are presented due to several reasons: two of them are the vectorial calculation apparition and the photon and neutron transport in vacancy media [fr

  8. Monte Carlo calculations of channeling radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, S.D.; Berman, B.L.; Hamilton, D.C.; Alguard, M.J.; Barrett, J.H.; Datz, S.; Pantell, R.H.; Swent, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Results of classical Monte Carlo calculations are presented for the radiation produced by ultra-relativistic positrons incident in a direction parallel to the (110) plane of Si in the energy range 30 to 100 MeV. The results all show the characteristic CR(channeling radiation) peak in the energy range 20 keV to 100 keV. Plots of the centroid energies, widths, and total yields of the CR peaks as a function of energy show the power law dependences of γ 1 5 , γ 1 7 , and γ 2 5 respectively. Except for the centroid energies and power-law dependence is only approximate. Agreement with experimental data is good for the centroid energies and only rough for the widths. Adequate experimental data for verifying the yield dependence on γ does not yet exist

  9. Applications of the Monte Carlo method in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, R.N.; Prasad, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to the application of the Monte Carlo method in radiation protection. It may be noted that an exhaustive review has not been attempted. The special advantage of the Monte Carlo method has been first brought out. The fundamentals of the Monte Carlo method have next been explained in brief, with special reference to two applications in radiation protection. Some sample current applications have been reported in the end in brief as examples. They are, medical radiation physics, microdosimetry, calculations of thermoluminescence intensity and probabilistic safety analysis. The limitations of the Monte Carlo method have also been mentioned in passing. (author)

  10. Radiation Modeling with Direct Simulation Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Ann B.; Hassan, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    Improvements in the modeling of radiation in low density shock waves with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) are the subject of this study. A new scheme to determine the relaxation collision numbers for excitation of electronic states is proposed. This scheme attempts to move the DSMC programs toward a more detailed modeling of the physics and more reliance on available rate data. The new method is compared with the current modeling technique and both techniques are compared with available experimental data. The differences in the results are evaluated. The test case is based on experimental measurements from the AVCO-Everett Research Laboratory electric arc-driven shock tube of a normal shock wave in air at 10 km/s and .1 Torr. The new method agrees with the available data as well as the results from the earlier scheme and is more easily extrapolated to di erent ow conditions.

  11. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2011-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique. (author)

  12. Continental Ice Sheets and the Planetary Radiation Budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction between continental ice sheets and the planetary radiation budget is potentially important in climate-sensitivity studies. A simple ice-sheet model incorporated in an energybalance climate model provides a tool for studying this interaction in a quantitative way. Experiments in which

  13. Statistics of Monte Carlo methods used in radiation transport calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, D.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation transport calculation can be carried out by using either deterministic or statistical methods. Radiation transport calculation based on statistical methods is basic theme of the Monte Carlo methods. The aim of this lecture is to describe the fundamental statistics required to build the foundations of Monte Carlo technique for radiation transport calculation. Lecture note is organized in the following way. Section (1) will describe the introduction of Basic Monte Carlo and its classification towards the respective field. Section (2) will describe the random sampling methods, a key component of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation, Section (3) will provide the statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo estimates, Section (4) will describe in brief the importance of variance reduction techniques while sampling particles such as photon, or neutron in the process of radiation transport

  14. A radiating shock evaluated using Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, M.; Gentile, N.

    2013-01-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo [1] (IMC) has been shown to be very expensive when used to evaluate a radiation field in opaque media. Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (IMD) [2], which evaluates a spatial discretized diffusion equation using a Monte Carlo algorithm, can be used to reduce the cost of evaluating the radiation field in opaque media [2]. This work couples IMD to the hydrodynamics equations to evaluate opaque diffusive radiating shocks. The Lowrie semi-analytic diffusive radiating shock benchmark[a] is used to verify our implementation of the coupled system of equations. (authors)

  15. Problems in radiation shielding calculations with Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueki, Kohtaro

    1985-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is a very useful tool for solving a large class of radiation transport problem. In contrast with deterministic method, geometric complexity is a much less significant problem for Monte Carlo calculations. However, the accuracy of Monte Carlo calculations is of course, limited by statistical error of the quantities to be estimated. In this report, we point out some typical problems to solve a large shielding system including radiation streaming. The Monte Carlo coupling technique was developed to settle such a shielding problem accurately. However, the variance of the Monte Carlo results using the coupling technique of which detectors were located outside the radiation streaming, was still not enough. So as to bring on more accurate results for the detectors located outside the streaming and also for a multi-legged-duct streaming problem, a practicable way of ''Prism Scattering technique'' is proposed in the study. (author)

  16. A Monte Carlo transport code study of the space radiation environment using FLUKA and ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, T; Carminati, F; Brun, R; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Empl, A; MacGibbon, J

    2001-01-01

    We report on the progress of a current study aimed at developing a state-of-the-art Monte-Carlo computer simulation of the space radiation environment using advanced computer software techniques recently available at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland. By taking the next-generation computer software appearing at CERN and adapting it to known problems in the implementation of space exploration strategies, this research is identifying changes necessary to bring these two advanced technologies together. The radiation transport tool being developed is tailored to the problem of taking measured space radiation fluxes impinging on the geometry of any particular spacecraft or planetary habitat and simulating the evolution of that flux through an accurate model of the spacecraft material. The simulation uses the latest known results in low-energy and high-energy physics. The output is a prediction of the detailed nature of the radiation environment experienced in space as well a...

  17. Development of a space radiation Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsky, L; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Carminati, F; Brun, R

    2001-01-01

    This NASA funded project is proceeding to develop a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation of the radiation environment in space. With actual funding only initially in place at the end of May 2000, the study is still in the early stage of development. The general tasks have been identified and personnel have been selected. The code to be assembled will be based upon two major existing software packages. The radiation transport simulation will be accomplished by updating the FLUKA Monte Carlo program, and the user interface will employ the ROOT software being developed at CERN. The end-product will be a Monte Carlo-based code which will complement the existing analytic codes such as BRYNTRN/HZETRN presently used by NASA to evaluate the effects of radiation shielding in space. The planned code will possess the ability to evaluate the radiation environment for spacecraft and habitats in Earth orbit, in interplanetary space, on the lunar surface, or on a planetary surface such as Mars. Furthermore, it will be usef...

  18. Langmuir-like waves and radiation in planetary foreshocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    1995-01-01

    The basic objectives of this NASA Grant are to develop theoretical understandings (tested with spacecraft data) of the generation and characteristics of electron plasma waves, commonly known as Langmuir-like waves, and associated radiation near f(sub p) and 2f(sub p) in planetary foreshocks. (Here f(sub p) is plasma frequency.) Related waves and radiation in the source regions of interplanetary type III solar radio bursts provide a simpler observational and theoretical context for developing and testing such understandings. Accordingly, applications to type III bursts constitute a significant fraction of the research effort. The testing of the new Stochastic Growth Theory (SGT) for type III bursts, and its extension and testing for foreshock waves and radiation, constitutes a major longterm strategic goal of the research effort.

  19. AN ANALYTIC RADIATIVE-CONVECTIVE MODEL FOR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Catling, David C.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analytic one-dimensional radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power-law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric-pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries; (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunlight throughout the atmosphere, which we show can produce either shallow or deep radiative-convective boundaries, depending on the strength of sunlight attenuation; and (3) strongly irradiated giant planets (including hot Jupiters), where we explore the conditions under which these worlds acquire detached convective regions in their mid-tropospheres. Finally, we validate our model and demonstrate its utility through comparisons to the average observed thermal structure of Venus, Jupiter, and Titan, and by comparing computed flux profiles to more complex models.

  20. BACKWARD AND FORWARD MONTE CARLO METHOD IN POLARIZED RADIATIVE TRANSFER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Huang; Guo-Dong, Shi; Ke-Yong, Zhu, E-mail: huangy_zl@263.net [School of Aeronautical Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-03-20

    In general, the Stocks vector cannot be calculated in reverse in the vector radiative transfer. This paper presents a novel backward and forward Monte Carlo simulation strategy to study the vector radiative transfer in the participated medium. A backward Monte Carlo process is used to calculate the ray trajectory and the endpoint of the ray. The Stocks vector is carried out by a forward Monte Carlo process. A one-dimensional graded index semi-transparent medium was presented as the physical model and the thermal emission consideration of polarization was studied in the medium. The solution process to non-scattering, isotropic scattering, and the anisotropic scattering medium, respectively, is discussed. The influence of the optical thickness and albedo on the Stocks vector are studied. The results show that the U, V-components of the apparent Stocks vector are very small, but the Q-component of the apparent Stocks vector is relatively larger, which cannot be ignored.

  1. A residual Monte Carlo method for discrete thermal radiative diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.M.; Urbatsch, T.J.; Lichtenstein, H.; Morel, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    Residual Monte Carlo methods reduce statistical error at a rate of exp(-bN), where b is a positive constant and N is the number of particle histories. Contrast this convergence rate with 1/√N, which is the rate of statistical error reduction for conventional Monte Carlo methods. Thus, residual Monte Carlo methods hold great promise for increased efficiency relative to conventional Monte Carlo methods. Previous research has shown that the application of residual Monte Carlo methods to the solution of continuum equations, such as the radiation transport equation, is problematic for all but the simplest of cases. However, the residual method readily applies to discrete systems as long as those systems are monotone, i.e., they produce positive solutions given positive sources. We develop a residual Monte Carlo method for solving a discrete 1D non-linear thermal radiative equilibrium diffusion equation, and we compare its performance with that of the discrete conventional Monte Carlo method upon which it is based. We find that the residual method provides efficiency gains of many orders of magnitude. Part of the residual gain is due to the fact that we begin each timestep with an initial guess equal to the solution from the previous timestep. Moreover, fully consistent non-linear solutions can be obtained in a reasonable amount of time because of the effective lack of statistical noise. We conclude that the residual approach has great potential and that further research into such methods should be pursued for more general discrete and continuum systems

  2. Phase Diagram of Hydrogen and a Hydrogen-Helium Mixture at Planetary Conditions by Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Guglielmo; Helled, Ravit; Sorella, Sandro

    2018-01-01

    Understanding planetary interiors is directly linked to our ability of simulating exotic quantum mechanical systems such as hydrogen (H) and hydrogen-helium (H-He) mixtures at high pressures and temperatures. Equation of state (EOS) tables based on density functional theory are commonly used by planetary scientists, although this method allows only for a qualitative description of the phase diagram. Here we report quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) molecular dynamics simulations of pure H and H-He mixture. We calculate the first QMC EOS at 6000 K for a H-He mixture of a protosolar composition, and show the crucial influence of He on the H metallization pressure. Our results can be used to calibrate other EOS calculations and are very timely given the accurate determination of Jupiter's gravitational field from the NASA Juno mission and the effort to determine its structure.

  3. A Monte Carlo study of radiation trapping effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.B.; Williams, J.F.; Carter, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of radiative transfer in an atomic beam is carried out to investigate the effects of radiation trapping on electron-atom collision experiments. The collisionally excited atom is represented by a simple electric dipole, for which the emission intensity distribution is well known. The spatial distribution, frequency and free path of this and the sequential dipoles were determined by a computer random generator according to the probabilities given by quantum theory. By altering the atomic number density at the target site, the pressure dependence of the observed atomic lifetime, the angular intensity distribution and polarisation of the radiation field is studied. 7 refs., 5 figs

  4. Monte Carlo 2000 Conference : Advanced Monte Carlo for Radiation Physics, Particle Transport Simulation and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baräo, Fernando; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Távora, Luis; Vaz, Pedro

    2001-01-01

    This book focusses on the state of the art of Monte Carlo methods in radiation physics and particle transport simulation and applications, the latter involving in particular, the use and development of electron--gamma, neutron--gamma and hadronic codes. Besides the basic theory and the methods employed, special attention is paid to algorithm development for modeling, and the analysis of experiments and measurements in a variety of fields ranging from particle to medical physics.

  5. bhlight: GENERAL RELATIVISTIC RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS WITH MONTE CARLO TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, B. R.; Gammie, C. F.; Dolence, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    We present bhlight, a numerical scheme for solving the equations of general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamics using a direct Monte Carlo solution of the frequency-dependent radiative transport equation. bhlight is designed to evolve black hole accretion flows at intermediate accretion rate, in the regime between the classical radiatively efficient disk and the radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF), in which global radiative effects play a sub-dominant but non-negligible role in disk dynamics. We describe the governing equations, numerical method, idiosyncrasies of our implementation, and a suite of test and convergence results. We also describe example applications to radiative Bondi accretion and to a slowly accreting Kerr black hole in axisymmetry

  6. A study of Monte Carlo radiative transfer through fractal clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C.; Lavallec, D.; O`Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    An understanding of radiation transport (RT) through clouds is fundamental to studies of the earth`s radiation budget and climate dynamics. The transmission through horizontally homogeneous clouds has been studied thoroughly using accurate, discreet ordinates radiative transfer models. However, the applicability of these results to general problems of global radiation budget is limited by the plane parallel assumption and the fact that real clouds fields show variability, both vertically and horizontally, on all size scales. To understand how radiation interacts with realistic clouds, we have used a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute the details of the photon-cloud interaction on synthetic cloud fields. Synthetic cloud fields, generated by a cascade model, reproduce the scaling behavior, as well as the cloud variability observed and estimated from cloud satellite data.

  7. Radiative Transfer Modeling in Proto-planetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, David; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Kloster, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) are rich astronomical research environments. Planets form in circumstellar disks of gas and dust around YSOs. With ever increasing capabilities of the observational instruments designed to look at these proto-planetary disks, most notably GPI, SPHERE, and ALMA, more accurate interfaces must be made to connect modeling of the disks with observation. PaRTY (Parallel Radiative Transfer in YSOs) is a code developed previously to model the observable density and temperature structure of such a disk by self-consistently calculating the structure of the disk based on radiative transfer physics. We present upgrades we are implementing to the PaRTY code to improve its accuracy and flexibility. These upgrades include: creating a two-sided disk model, implementing a spherical coordinate system, and implementing wavelength-dependent opacities. These upgrades will address problems in the PaRTY code of infinite optical thickness, calculation under/over-resolution, and wavelength-independent photon penetration depths, respectively. The upgraded code will be used to better model disk perturbations resulting from planet formation.

  8. grmonty: A MONTE CARLO CODE FOR RELATIVISTIC RADIATIVE TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Gammie, Charles F.; Leung, Po Kin; Moscibrodzka, Monika

    2009-01-01

    We describe a Monte Carlo radiative transport code intended for calculating spectra of hot, optically thin plasmas in full general relativity. The version we describe here is designed to model hot accretion flows in the Kerr metric and therefore incorporates synchrotron emission and absorption, and Compton scattering. The code can be readily generalized, however, to account for other radiative processes and an arbitrary spacetime. We describe a suite of test problems, and demonstrate the expected N -1/2 convergence rate, where N is the number of Monte Carlo samples. Finally, we illustrate the capabilities of the code with a model calculation, a spectrum of the slowly accreting black hole Sgr A* based on data provided by a numerical general relativistic MHD model of the accreting plasma.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation treatment machine heads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, R.

    1988-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of radiation treatment machine heads provide practical means for obtaining energy spectra and angular distributions of photons and electrons. So far, most of the work published in the literature has been limited to photons and the contaminant electrons knocked out by photons. This chapter will be confined to megavoltage photon beams produced by medical linear accelerators and 60 Co teletherapy units. The knowledge of energy spectra and angular distributions of photons and contaminant electrons emerging from such machines is important for a variety of applications in radiation dosimetry

  10. Monte Carlo radiation transport: A revolution in science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.

    1993-01-01

    When Enrico Fermi, Stan Ulam, Nicholas Metropolis, John von Neuman, and Robert Richtmyer invented the Monte Carlo method fifty years ago, little could they imagine the far-flung consequences, the international applications, and the revolution in science epitomized by their abstract mathematical method. The Monte Carlo method is used in a wide variety of fields to solve exact computational models approximately by statistical sampling. It is an alternative to traditional physics modeling methods which solve approximate computational models exactly by deterministic methods. Modern computers and improved methods, such as variance reduction, have enhanced the method to the point of enabling a true predictive capability in areas such as radiation or particle transport. This predictive capability has contributed to a radical change in the way science is done: design and understanding come from computations built upon experiments rather than being limited to experiments, and the computer codes doing the computations have become the repository for physics knowledge. The MCNP Monte Carlo computer code effort at Los Alamos is an example of this revolution. Physicians unfamiliar with physics details can design cancer treatments using physics buried in the MCNP computer code. Hazardous environments and hypothetical accidents can be explored. Many other fields, from underground oil well exploration to aerospace, from physics research to energy production, from safety to bulk materials processing, benefit from MCNP, the Monte Carlo method, and the revolution in science

  11. Radiative heat transfer by the Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett †, James P; Cho, Young I; Greene, George A; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Yang, Wen-Jei; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    1995-01-01

    This book presents the basic principles and applications of radiative heat transfer used in energy, space, and geo-environmental engineering, and can serve as a reference book for engineers and scientists in researchand development. A PC disk containing software for numerical analyses by the Monte Carlo method is included to provide hands-on practice in analyzing actual radiative heat transfer problems.Advances in Heat Transfer is designed to fill the information gap between regularly scheduled journals and university level textbooks by providing in-depth review articles over a broader scope than journals or texts usually allow.Key Features* Offers solution methods for integro-differential formulation to help avoid difficulties* Includes a computer disk for numerical analyses by PC* Discusses energy absorption by gas and scattering effects by particles* Treats non-gray radiative gases* Provides example problems for direct applications in energy, space, and geo-environmental engineering

  12. Radiation beamline testbeds for the simulation of planetary and spacecraft environments for human and robotic mission risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Richard

    The Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) at Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, Texas, USA, is establishing an integrated, multi-disciplinary research program on the scientific and engineering challenges faced by NASA and the inter-national space community caused by space radiation. CRESSE focuses on space radiation research directly applicable to astronaut health and safety during future long term, deep space missions, including Martian, lunar, and other planetary body missions beyond low earth orbit. The research approach will consist of experimental and theoretical radiation modeling studies utilizing particle accelerator facilities including: 1. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory; 2. Proton Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Med-ical Center; and 3. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Specifically, CRESSE investigators are designing, developing, and building experimental test beds that simulate the lunar and Martian radiation environments for experiments focused on risk assessment for astronauts and instrumentation. The testbeds have been designated the Bioastronautics Experimental Research Testbeds for Environmental Radiation Nostrum Investigations and Education (BERT and ERNIE). The designs of BERT and ERNIE will allow for a high degree of flexibility and adaptability to modify experimental configurations to simulate planetary surface environments, planetary habitats, and spacecraft interiors. In the nominal configuration, BERT and ERIE will consist of a set of experimental zones that will simulate the planetary atmosphere (Solid CO2 in the case of the Martian surface.), the planetary surface, and sub-surface regions. These experimental zones can be used for dosimetry, shielding, biological, and electronic effects radiation studies in support of space exploration missions. BERT and ERNIE are designed to be compatible with the

  13. Acceleration of a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochstedler, R.D.; Smith, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    Execution time for the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) Monte Carlo radiation transport code has been reduced by careful re-coding of computationally intensive subroutines. Three test cases for the TIGER (1-D slab geometry), CYLTRAN (2-D cylindrical geometry), and ACCEPT (3-D arbitrary geometry) codes were identified and used to benchmark and profile program execution. Based upon these results, sixteen top time-consuming subroutines were examined and nine of them modified to accelerate computations with equivalent numerical output to the original. The results obtained via this study indicate that speedup factors of 1.90 for the TIGER code, 1.67 for the CYLTRAN code, and 1.11 for the ACCEPT code are achievable. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. Dynamic Monte Carlo simulations of radiatively accelerated GRB fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhotray, Atul; Lazzati, Davide

    2018-05-01

    We present a novel Dynamic Monte Carlo code (DynaMo code) that self-consistently simulates the Compton-scattering-driven dynamic evolution of a plasma. We use the DynaMo code to investigate the time-dependent expansion and acceleration of dissipationless gamma-ray burst fireballs by varying their initial opacities and baryonic content. We study the opacity and energy density evolution of an initially optically thick, radiation-dominated fireball across its entire phase space - in particular during the Rph matter-dominated fireballs due to Thomson scattering. We quantify the new phases by providing analytical expressions of Lorentz factor evolution, which will be useful for deriving jet parameters.

  15. Advanced Monte Carlo methods for thermal radiation transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollaber, Allan B.

    During the past 35 years, the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) method proposed by Fleck and Cummings has been the standard Monte Carlo approach to solving the thermal radiative transfer (TRT) equations. However, the IMC equations are known to have accuracy limitations that can produce unphysical solutions. In this thesis, we explicitly provide the IMC equations with a Monte Carlo interpretation by including particle weight as one of its arguments. We also develop and test a stability theory for the 1-D, gray IMC equations applied to a nonlinear problem. We demonstrate that the worst case occurs for 0-D problems, and we extend the results to a stability algorithm that may be used for general linearizations of the TRT equations. We derive gray, Quasidiffusion equations that may be deterministically solved in conjunction with IMC to obtain an inexpensive, accurate estimate of the temperature at the end of the time step. We then define an average temperature T* to evaluate the temperature-dependent problem data in IMC, and we demonstrate that using T* is more accurate than using the (traditional) beginning-of-time-step temperature. We also propose an accuracy enhancement to the IMC equations: the use of a time-dependent "Fleck factor". This Fleck factor can be considered an automatic tuning of the traditionally defined user parameter alpha, which generally provides more accurate solutions at an increased cost relative to traditional IMC. We also introduce a global weight window that is proportional to the forward scalar intensity calculated by the Quasidiffusion method. This weight window improves the efficiency of the IMC calculation while conserving energy. All of the proposed enhancements are tested in 1-D gray and frequency-dependent problems. These enhancements do not unconditionally eliminate the unphysical behavior that can be seen in the IMC calculations. However, for fixed spatial and temporal grids, they suppress them and clearly work to make the solution more

  16. Academic Training - The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 27, 28, 29 June 11:00-12:00 - TH Conference Room, bldg. 4 The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry F. Salvat Gavalda,Univ. de Barcelona, A. FERRARI, CERN-AB, M. SILARI, CERN-SC Lecture 1. Transport and interaction of electromagnetic radiation F. Salvat Gavalda,Univ. de Barcelona Interaction models and simulation schemes implemented in modern Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport will be briefly reviewed. Different schemes for simulating electron transport will be discussed. Condensed algorithms, which rely on multiple-scattering theories, are comparatively fast, but less accurate than mixed algorithms, in which hard interactions (with energy loss or angular deflection larger than certain cut-off values) are simulated individually. The reliability, and limitations, of electron-interaction models and multiple-scattering theories will be analyzed. Benchmark comparisons of simu...

  17. Radiation entropy influx as a measure of planetary dissipative processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izakov, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    Dissipative processes including high flows of matter and energy occur at the planets. Radiation negentropy influx, resulting from difference of entropy fluxes of incoming solar and outgoing thermal radiation of the planet, is a measure of all these processes. Large share of radiation negentropy influx is spent in the vertical thermal fluxes which keep the planet temperature conditions. Next share of radiation negentropy consumption at the Earth is water evaporation. It's rest part is used for the dynamics, which is explained by the efficiency insignificant amount of heat engine, which generates movements in the atmosphere and ocean. Essentially higher share of radiation negentropy influx, than at the Earth, is spent at the Venus, where there are practically no water

  18. Non-analog Monte Carlo estimators for radiation momentum deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hykes, Joshua M.; Densmore, Jeffery D.

    2009-01-01

    The standard method for calculating radiation momentum deposition in Monte Carlo simulations is the analog estimator, which tallies the change in a particle's momentum at each interaction with the matter. Unfortunately, the analog estimator can suffer from large amounts of statistical error. In this paper, we present three new non-analog techniques for estimating momentum deposition. Specifically, we use absorption, collision, and track-length estimators to evaluate a simple integral expression for momentum deposition that does not contain terms that can cause large amounts of statistical error in the analog scheme. We compare our new non-analog estimators to the analog estimator with a set of test problems that encompass a wide range of material properties and both isotropic and anisotropic scattering. In nearly all cases, the new non-analog estimators outperform the analog estimator. The track-length estimator consistently yields the highest performance gains, improving upon the analog-estimator figure of merit by factors of up to two orders of magnitude.

  19. Monte Carlo analysis of radiative transport in oceanographic lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E.; Ferro, G. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, N. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ingegneria Energetica, Nucleare e del Controllo Ambientale

    2001-07-01

    The analysis of oceanographic lidar systems measurements is often carried out with semi-empirical methods, since there is only a rough understanding of the effects of many environmental variables. The development of techniques for interpreting the accuracy of lidar measurements is needed to evaluate the effects of various environmental situations, as well as of different experimental geometric configurations and boundary conditions. A Monte Carlo simulation model represents a tool that is particularly well suited for answering these important questions. The PREMAR-2F Monte Carlo code has been developed taking into account the main molecular and non-molecular components of the marine environment. The laser radiation interaction processes of diffusion, re-emission, refraction and absorption are treated. In particular are considered: the Rayleigh elastic scattering, produced by atoms and molecules with small dimensions with respect to the laser emission wavelength (i.e. water molecules), the Mie elastic scattering, arising from atoms or molecules with dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength (hydrosols), the Raman inelastic scattering, typical of water, the absorption of water, inorganic (sediments) and organic (phytoplankton and CDOM) hydrosols, the fluorescence re-emission of chlorophyll and yellow substances. PREMAR-2F is an extension of a code for the simulation of the radiative transport in atmospheric environments (PREMAR-2). The approach followed in PREMAR-2 was to combine conventional Monte Carlo techniques with analytical estimates of the probability of the receiver to have a contribution from photons coming back after an interaction in the field of view of the lidar fluorosensor collecting apparatus. This offers an effective mean for modelling a lidar system with realistic geometric constraints. The retrieved semianalytic Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been developed in the frame of the Italian Research Program for Antarctica (PNRA) and it is

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation streaming from a radioactive material shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Schwarz, R.A.; Tang, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Simulated detection of gamma radiation streaming from a radioactive material shipping cask have been performed with the Monte Carlo codes MCNP4A and MORSE-SGC/S. Despite inherent difficulties in simulating deep penetration of radiation and streaming, the simulations have yielded results that agree within one order of magnitude with the radiation survey data, with reasonable statistics. These simulations have also provided insight into modeling radiation detection, notably on location and orientation of the radiation detector with respect to photon streaming paths, and on techniques used to reduce variance in the Monte Carlo calculations. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Monte Carlo technique applications in field of radiation dosimetry at ENEA radiation protection institute: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualdrini, G.F.; Casalini, L.; Morelli, B.

    1994-12-01

    The present report summarizes the activities concerned with numerical dosimetry as carried out at the Radiation Protection Institute of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) on photon dosimetric quantities. The first part is concerned with MCNP Monte Carlo calculation of field parameters and operational quantities for the ICRU sphere with reference photon beams for the design of personal dosemeters. The second part is related with studies on the ADAM anthropomorphic phantom using the SABRINA and MCNP codes. The results of other Monte Carlo studies carried out on electron conversion factors for various tissue equivalent slab phantoms are about to be published in other ENEA reports. The report has been produced in the framework of the EURADOS WG4 (numerical dosimetry) activities within a collaboration between the ENEA Environmental Department and ENEA Energy Department

  2. BALTORO a general purpose code for coupling discrete ordinates and Monte-Carlo radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zazula, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The general purpose code BALTORO was written for coupling the three-dimensional Monte-Carlo /MC/ with the one-dimensional Discrete Ordinates /DO/ radiation transport calculations. The quantity of a radiation-induced /neutrons or gamma-rays/ nuclear effect or the score from a radiation-yielding nuclear effect can be analysed in this way. (author)

  3. A review of Monte Carlo techniques used in various fields of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koblinger, L.

    1987-06-01

    Monte Carlo methods and their utilization in radiation protection are overviewed. Basic principles and the most frequently used sampling methods are described. Examples range from the simulation of the random walk of photons and neutrons to neutron spectrum unfolding. (author)

  4. Application of Monte Carlo method in determination of secondary characteristic X radiation in XFA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roubicek, P.

    1982-01-01

    Secondary characteristic radiation is excited by primary radiation from the X-ray tube and by secondary radiation of other elements so that excitations of several orders result. The Monte Carlo method was used to consider all these possibilities and the resulting flux of characteristic radiation was simulated for samples of silicate raw materials. A comparison of the results of these computations with experiments allows to determine the effect of sample preparation on the characteristic radiation flux. (M.D.)

  5. Investigation of Radiation Protection Methodologies for Radiation Therapy Shielding Using Monte Carlo Simulation and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanny, Sean

    The advent of high-energy linear accelerators for dedicated medical use in the 1950's by Henry Kaplan and the Stanford University physics department began a revolution in radiation oncology. Today, linear accelerators are the standard of care for modern radiation therapy and can generate high-energy beams that can produce tens of Gy per minute at isocenter. This creates a need for a large amount of shielding material to properly protect members of the public and hospital staff. Standardized vault designs and guidance on shielding properties of various materials are provided by the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) Report 151. However, physicists are seeking ways to minimize the footprint and volume of shielding material needed which leads to the use of non-standard vault configurations and less-studied materials, such as high-density concrete. The University of Toledo Dana Cancer Center has utilized both of these methods to minimize the cost and spatial footprint of the requisite radiation shielding. To ensure a safe work environment, computer simulations were performed to verify the attenuation properties and shielding workloads produced by a variety of situations where standard recommendations and guidance documents were insufficient. This project studies two areas of concern that are not addressed by NCRP 151, the radiation shielding workload for the vault door with a non-standard design, and the attenuation properties of high-density concrete for both photon and neutron radiation. Simulations have been performed using a Monte-Carlo code produced by the Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), Monte Carlo Neutrons, Photons 5 (MCNP5). Measurements have been performed using a shielding test port designed into the maze of the Varian Edge treatment vault.

  6. Transport methods: general. 1. The Analytical Monte Carlo Method for Radiation Transport Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, William R.; Brown, Forrest B.

    2001-01-01

    We present an alternative Monte Carlo method for solving the coupled equations of radiation transport and material energy. This method is based on incorporating the analytical solution to the material energy equation directly into the Monte Carlo simulation for the radiation intensity. This method, which we call the Analytical Monte Carlo (AMC) method, differs from the well known Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) method of Fleck and Cummings because there is no discretization of the material energy equation since it is solved as a by-product of the Monte Carlo simulation of the transport equation. Our method also differs from the method recently proposed by Ahrens and Larsen since they use Monte Carlo to solve both equations, while we are solving only the radiation transport equation with Monte Carlo, albeit with effective sources and cross sections to represent the emission sources. Our method bears some similarity to a method developed and implemented by Carter and Forest nearly three decades ago, but there are substantive differences. We have implemented our method in a simple zero-dimensional Monte Carlo code to test the feasibility of the method, and the preliminary results are very promising, justifying further extension to more realistic geometries. (authors)

  7. Infrared studies of galactic nebulae. IV - Continuum and line radiation from planetary nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, F. C.; Merrill, K. M.; Stein, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Observations are reported of the detection of IR radiation from several planetary nebulae not previously known to be radiating at these wavelengths. Broad spectral bandwidth observations indicate that ir radiation in excess of that expected from atomic processes is a common phenomenon among these objects. Investigations with narrow spectral bandwidth show that in a few cases the energy in the 10.52-micron line is a significant fraction of the total energy observed in the broad-band measurements and in other cases a relatively small fraction of the total radiation. Other observations on two sources with narrow spectral bandwidth adjacent to the 10.52-micron line indicate that at these wavelengths a true continuum of radiation exists as well as lines. The results are discussed in relation to visual and radio-wavelength data.

  8. A hybrid transport-diffusion Monte Carlo method for frequency-dependent radiative-transfer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations in optically thick media. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many smaller Monte Carlo steps, thus improving the efficiency of the simulation. In this paper, we present an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold, as optical thickness is typically a decreasing function of frequency. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo, which results in a hybrid transport-diffusion scheme. With a set of frequency-dependent test problems, we confirm the accuracy and increased efficiency of our new DDMC method.

  9. Monte Carlo and analytic simulations in nanoparticle-enhanced radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paro AD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Autumn D Paro,1 Mainul Hossain,2 Thomas J Webster,1,3,4 Ming Su1,4 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2NanoScience Technology Center and School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, USA; 3Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Wenzhou Institute of Biomaterials and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Wenzhou Medical University, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Analytical and Monte Carlo simulations have been used to predict dose enhancement factors in nanoparticle-enhanced X-ray radiation therapy. Both simulations predict an increase in dose enhancement in the presence of nanoparticles, but the two methods predict different levels of enhancement over the studied energy, nanoparticle materials, and concentration regime for several reasons. The Monte Carlo simulation calculates energy deposited by electrons and photons, while the analytical one only calculates energy deposited by source photons and photoelectrons; the Monte Carlo simulation accounts for electron–hole recombination, while the analytical one does not; and the Monte Carlo simulation randomly samples photon or electron path and accounts for particle interactions, while the analytical simulation assumes a linear trajectory. This study demonstrates that the Monte Carlo simulation will be a better choice to evaluate dose enhancement with nanoparticles in radiation therapy. Keywords: nanoparticle, dose enhancement, Monte Carlo simulation, analytical simulation, radiation therapy, tumor cell, X-ray 

  10. The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Ferrari, Alfredo; Silari, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Transport and interaction of electromagnetic radiation Interaction models and simulation schemes implemented in modern Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport will be briefly reviewed. In these codes, photon transport is simulated by using the detailed scheme, i.e., interaction by interaction. Detailed simulation is easy to implement, and the reliability of the results is only limited by the accuracy of the adopted cross sections. Simulations of electron and positron transport are more difficult, because these particles undergo a large number of interactions in the course of their slowing down. Different schemes for simulating electron transport will be discussed. Condensed algorithms, which rely on multiple-scattering theories, are comparatively fast, but less accurate than mixed algorithms, in which hard interactions (with energy loss or angular deflection larger than certain cut-off values) are simulated individually. The reliability, and limitations, of electron-interacti...

  11. Backscattered radiation into a transmission ionization chamber: Measurement and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizumi, Maira T.; Yoriyaz, Helio; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2010-01-01

    Backscattered radiation (BSR) from field-defining collimators can affect the response of a monitor chamber in X-radiation fields. This contribution must be considered since this kind of chamber is used to monitor the equipment response. In this work, the dependence of a transmission ionization chamber response on the aperture diameter of the collimators was studied experimentally and using a Monte Carlo (MC) technique. According to the results, the BSR increases the chamber response of over 4.0% in the case of a totally closed collimator and 50 kV energy beam, using both techniques. The results from Monte Carlo simulation confirm the validity of the simulated geometry.

  12. Radiative Transfer of Solar Light in Dense Complex Media : Theoretical and Experimental Achievements by the Planetary Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doute, S.; Schmitt, B.

    2004-05-01

    Visible and near infrared imaging spectroscopy is one of the key techniques to detect, map and characterize mineral and volatile species existing at the surface of the planets. Indeed the chemical composition, granularity, texture, physical state, etc, of the materials determine the existence and morphology of the absorption bands. However the development of quantitative methods to analyze reflectance spectra requires mastering of a very challenging physics: the reflection of solar light by densely packed, absorbent and highly scattering materials that usually present a fantastic structural complexity at different spatial scales. Volume scattering of photons depends on many parameters like the intrinsic optical properties, the shapes, sizes and the packing density of the mineral or icy grains forming the natural media. Their discontinuous and stochastic nature plays a great role especially for reflection and shading by the top few grains of the surface. Over several decades, the planetary community has developed increasingly sophisticated tools to handle this problem of radiative transfer in dense complex media in order to fulfill its needs. Analytical functions with a small number of non physical adjusting parameters were first proposed to reproduce the photometry of the planets and satellites. Then reflectance models were built by implementing methods of radiative transfer in continuously absorbent and scattering medium. A number of very restricting hypothesis forms the basis of these methods, e.g. low particles density, scattering treated in the far field approximation. A majority of these assumptions does not stand when treating planetary regoliths or volatile deposits. In addition, the classical methods completely bypass effects due to the constructive interference of scattered waves for backscattering or specular geometries (e.g. the opposition effect). Different, sometimes competing, approaches have been proposed to overcome some of these limitations. In

  13. Cost effective distributed computing for Monte Carlo radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, K.N.; Webb, D.V.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: An inexpensive computing facility has been established for performing repetitive Monte Carlo simulations with the BEAM and EGS4/EGSnrc codes of linear accelerator beams, for calculating effective dose from diagnostic imaging procedures and of ion chambers and phantoms used for the Australian high energy absorbed dose standards. The facility currently consists of 3 dual-processor 450 MHz processor PCs linked by a high speed LAN. The 3 PCs can be accessed either locally from a single keyboard/monitor/mouse combination using a SwitchView controller or remotely via a computer network from PCs with suitable communications software (e.g. Telnet, Kermit etc). All 3 PCs are identically configured to have the Red Hat Linux 6.0 operating system. A Fortran compiler and the BEAM and EGS4/EGSnrc codes are available on the 3 PCs. The preparation of sequences of jobs utilising the Monte Carlo codes is simplified using load-distributing software (enFuzion 6.0 marketed by TurboLinux Inc, formerly Cluster from Active Tools) which efficiently distributes the computing load amongst all 6 processors. We describe 3 applications of the system - (a) energy spectra from radiotherapy sources, (b) mean mass-energy absorption coefficients and stopping powers for absolute absorbed dose standards and (c) dosimetry for diagnostic procedures; (a) and (b) are based on the transport codes BEAM and FLURZnrc while (c) is a Fortran/EGS code developed at ARPANSA. Efficiency gains ranged from 3 for (c) to close to the theoretical maximum of 6 for (a) and (b), with the gain depending on the amount of 'bookkeeping' to begin each task and the time taken to complete a single task. We have found the use of a load-balancing batch processing system with many PCs to be an economical way of achieving greater productivity for Monte Carlo calculations or of any computer intensive task requiring many runs with different parameters. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and

  14. ARTS, the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator - version 2.2, the planetary toolbox edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Stefan A.; Mendrok, Jana; Eriksson, Patrick; Perrin, Agnès; Larsson, Richard; Lemke, Oliver

    2018-04-01

    This article describes the latest stable release (version 2.2) of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS), a public domain software for radiative transfer simulations in the thermal spectral range (microwave to infrared). The main feature of this release is a planetary toolbox that allows simulations for the planets Venus, Mars, and Jupiter, in addition to Earth. This required considerable model adaptations, most notably in the area of gaseous absorption calculations. Other new features are also described, notably radio link budgets (including the effect of Faraday rotation that changes the polarization state) and the treatment of Zeeman splitting for oxygen spectral lines. The latter is relevant, for example, for the various operational microwave satellite temperature sensors of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) family.

  15. Methods for coupling radiation, ion, and electron energies in grey Implicit Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.M.; Densmore, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    We present three methods for extending the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) method to treat the time-evolution of coupled radiation, electron, and ion energies. The first method splits the ion and electron coupling and conduction from the standard IMC radiation-transport process. The second method recasts the IMC equations such that part of the coupling is treated during the Monte Carlo calculation. The third method treats all of the coupling and conduction in the Monte Carlo simulation. We apply modified equation analysis (MEA) to simplified forms of each method that neglects the errors in the conduction terms. Through MEA we show that the third method is theoretically the most accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of each method on a series of 0-dimensional, nonlinear benchmark problems where the accuracy of the third method is shown to be up to ten times greater than the other coupling methods for selected calculations

  16. The Monte Carlo photoionization and moving-mesh radiation hydrodynamics code CMACIONIZE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, B.; Wood, K.

    2018-04-01

    We present the public Monte Carlo photoionization and moving-mesh radiation hydrodynamics code CMACIONIZE, which can be used to simulate the self-consistent evolution of HII regions surrounding young O and B stars, or other sources of ionizing radiation. The code combines a Monte Carlo photoionization algorithm that uses a complex mix of hydrogen, helium and several coolants in order to self-consistently solve for the ionization and temperature balance at any given type, with a standard first order hydrodynamics scheme. The code can be run as a post-processing tool to get the line emission from an existing simulation snapshot, but can also be used to run full radiation hydrodynamical simulations. Both the radiation transfer and the hydrodynamics are implemented in a general way that is independent of the grid structure that is used to discretize the system, allowing it to be run both as a standard fixed grid code, but also as a moving-mesh code.

  17. Implicit Monte Carlo methods and non-equilibrium Marshak wave radiative transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Two enhancements to the Fleck implicit Monte Carlo method for radiative transport are described, for use in transparent and opaque media respectively. The first introduces a spectral mean cross section, which applies to pseudoscattering in transparent regions with a high frequency incident spectrum. The second provides a simple Monte Carlo random walk method for opaque regions, without the need for a supplementary diffusion equation formulation. A time-dependent transport Marshak wave problem of radiative transfer, in which a non-equilibrium condition exists between the radiation and material energy fields, is then solved. These results are compared to published benchmark solutions and to new discrete ordinate S-N results, for both spatially integrated radiation-material energies versus time and to new spatially dependent temperature profiles. Multigroup opacities, which are independent of both temperature and frequency, are used in addition to a material specific heat which is proportional to the cube of the temperature. 7 refs., 4 figs

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation environment for the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallows, S., E-mail: sophie.mallows@cern.ch [KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I. [IHEP, Protvino (Russian Federation); Bergstrom, I.; Cooijmans, T.; Dabrowski, A.; Glöggler, L.; Guthoff, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kurochkin, I. [IHEP, Protvino (Russian Federation); Vincke, H.; Tajeda, S. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-07-11

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are used by the CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity (BRIL) project to estimate the radiation levels due to proton–proton collisions and machine induced background. Results are used by the CMS collaboration for various applications: comparison with detector hit rates, pile-up studies, predictions of radiation damage based on various models (Dose, NIEL, DPA), shielding design, estimations of residual dose environment. Simulation parameters, and the maintenance of the input files are summarized, and key results are presented. Furthermore, an overview of additional programs developed by the BRIL project to meet the specific needs of CMS community is given.

  19. Monte Carlo study of radiation-induced demagnetization using the two-dimensional Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samin, Adib; Cao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    A simple radiation-damage model based on the Ising model for magnets is proposed to study the effects of radiation on the magnetism of permanent magnets. The model is studied in two dimensions using a Monte Carlo simulation, and it accounts for the radiation through the introduction of a localized heat pulse. The model exhibits qualitative agreement with experimental results, and it clearly elucidates the role that the coercivity and the radiation particle’s energy play in the process. A more quantitative agreement with experiment will entail accounting for the long-range dipole–dipole interactions and the crystalline anisotropy.

  20. Monte Carlo study of radiation-induced demagnetization using the two-dimensional Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samin, Adib; Cao, Lei

    2015-10-01

    A simple radiation-damage model based on the Ising model for magnets is proposed to study the effects of radiation on the magnetism of permanent magnets. The model is studied in two dimensions using a Monte Carlo simulation, and it accounts for the radiation through the introduction of a localized heat pulse. The model exhibits qualitative agreement with experimental results, and it clearly elucidates the role that the coercivity and the radiation particle’s energy play in the process. A more quantitative agreement with experiment will entail accounting for the long-range dipole–dipole interactions and the crystalline anisotropy.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation environment for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068566; Bayshev, I.; Bergstrom, I.; Cooijmans, T.; Dabrowski, A.; Glöggler, L.; Guthoff, M.; Kurochkin, I.; Vincke, H.; Tajeda, S.

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are used by the CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity (BRIL) project to estimate the radiation levels due to proton-proton collisions and machine induced background. Results are used by the CMS collaboration for various applications: comparison with detector hit rates, pile-up studies, predictions of radiation damage based on various models (Dose, NIEL, DPA), shielding design, estimations of residual dose environment. Simulation parameters, and the maintenance of the input files are summarised, and key results are presented. Furthermore, an overview of additional programs developed by the BRIL project to meet the specific needs of CMS community is given.

  2. Monte Carlo Calculation of the Radiation Field at Aircraft Altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesler, Stefan

    2001-08-24

    Energy spectra of secondary cosmic rays are calculated for aircraft altitudes and a discrete set of solar modulation parameters and rigidity cutoff values covering all possible conditions. The calculations are based on the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and on the most recent information on the interstellar cosmic ray flux including a detailed model of solar modulation. Results are compared to a large variety of experimental data obtained on ground and aboard of aircrafts and balloons, such as neutron, proton, and muon spectra and yields of charged particles. Furthermore, particle fluence is converted into ambient dose equivalent and effective dose and the dependence of these quantities on height above sea level, solar modulation, and geographic location is studied. Finally, calculated dose equivalent is compared to results of comprehensive measurements performed aboard of aircrafts.

  3. Combining four Monte Carlo estimators for radiation momentum deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hykes, Joshua M.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2011-01-01

    Using four distinct Monte Carlo estimators for momentum deposition - analog, absorption, collision, and track-length estimators - we compute a combined estimator. In the wide range of problems tested, the combined estimator always has a figure of merit (FOM) equal to or better than the other estimators. In some instances the FOM of the combined estimator is only a few percent higher than the FOM of the best solo estimator, the track-length estimator, while in one instance it is better by a factor of 2.5. Over the majority of configurations, the combined estimator's FOM is 10 - 20% greater than any of the solo estimators' FOM. The numerical results show that the track-length estimator is the most important term in computing the combined estimator, followed far behind by the analog estimator. The absorption and collision estimators make negligible contributions. (author)

  4. Material motion corrections for implicit Monte Carlo radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, N.A.; Morel, Jim E.

    2011-01-01

    We describe changes to the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) algorithm to include the effects of material motion. These changes assume that the problem can be embedded in a global Lorentz frame. We also assume that the material in each zone can be characterized by a single velocity. With this approximation, we show how to make IMC Lorentz invariant, so that the material motion corrections are correct to all orders of v/c. We develop thermal emission and face sources in moving material and discuss the coupling of IMC to the non- relativistic hydrodynamics equations via operator splitting. We discuss the effect of this coupling on the value of the 'Fleck factor' in IMC. (author)

  5. Radiative corrections and Monte Carlo generators for physics at flavor factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montagna Guido

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available I review the state of the art of precision calculations and related Monte Carlo generators used in physics at flavor factories. The review describes the tools relevant for the measurement of the hadron production cross section (via radiative return, energy scan and in γγ scattering, luminosity monitoring, searches for new physics and physics of the τ lepton.

  6. Asymptotic equilibrium diffusion analysis of time-dependent Monte Carlo methods for grey radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2004-01-01

    The equations of nonlinear, time-dependent radiative transfer are known to yield the equilibrium diffusion equation as the leading-order solution of an asymptotic analysis when the mean-free path and mean-free time of a photon become small. We apply this same analysis to the Fleck-Cummings, Carter-Forest, and N'kaoua Monte Carlo approximations for grey (frequency-independent) radiative transfer. Although Monte Carlo simulation usually does not require the discretizations found in deterministic transport techniques, Monte Carlo methods for radiative transfer require a time discretization due to the nonlinearities of the problem. If an asymptotic analysis of the equations used by a particular Monte Carlo method yields an accurate time-discretized version of the equilibrium diffusion equation, the method should generate accurate solutions if a time discretization is chosen that resolves temperature changes, even if the time steps are much larger than the mean-free time of a photon. This analysis is of interest because in many radiative transfer problems, it is a practical necessity to use time steps that are large compared to a mean-free time. Our asymptotic analysis shows that: (i) the N'kaoua method has the equilibrium diffusion limit, (ii) the Carter-Forest method has the equilibrium diffusion limit if the material temperature change during a time step is small, and (iii) the Fleck-Cummings method does not have the equilibrium diffusion limit. We include numerical results that verify our theoretical predictions

  7. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF RADIATION DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN TUNGSTEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the accumulation of radiation damage created by primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) of various energies, at 300 K and for a dose rate of 10-4 dpa/s in bulk tungsten using the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) method.

  8. Local dose enhancement in radiation therapy: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Laura E. da; Nicolucci, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The development of nanotechnology has boosted the use of nanoparticles in radiation therapy in order to achieve greater therapeutic ratio between tumor and healthy tissues. Gold has been shown to be most suitable to this task due to the high biocompatibility and high atomic number, which contributes to a better in vivo distribution and for the local energy deposition. As a result, this study proposes to study, nanoparticle in the tumor cell. At a range of 11 nm from the nanoparticle surface, results have shown an absorbed dose 141 times higher for the medium with the gold nanoparticle compared to the water for an incident energy spectrum with maximum photon energy of 50 keV. It was also noted that when only scattered radiation is interacting with the gold nanoparticles, the dose was 134 times higher compared to enhanced local dose that remained significant even for scattered radiation. (author)

  9. SKIRT: The design of a suite of input models for Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baes, M.; Camps, P.

    2015-09-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most popular technique to perform radiative transfer simulations in a general 3D geometry. The algorithms behind and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo radiative transfer are discussed extensively in the literature, and many different Monte Carlo codes are publicly available. On the contrary, the design of a suite of components that can be used for the distribution of sources and sinks in radiative transfer codes has received very little attention. The availability of such models, with different degrees of complexity, has many benefits. For example, they can serve as toy models to test new physical ingredients, or as parameterised models for inverse radiative transfer fitting. For 3D Monte Carlo codes, this requires algorithms to efficiently generate random positions from 3D density distributions. We describe the design of a flexible suite of components for the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The design is based on a combination of basic building blocks (which can be either analytical toy models or numerical models defined on grids or a set of particles) and the extensive use of decorators that combine and alter these building blocks to more complex structures. For a number of decorators, e.g. those that add spiral structure or clumpiness, we provide a detailed description of the algorithms that can be used to generate random positions. Advantages of this decorator-based design include code transparency, the avoidance of code duplication, and an increase in code maintainability. Moreover, since decorators can be chained without problems, very complex models can easily be constructed out of simple building blocks. Finally, based on a number of test simulations, we demonstrate that our design using customised random position generators is superior to a simpler design based on a generic black-box random position generator.

  10. A NEW MONTE CARLO METHOD FOR TIME-DEPENDENT NEUTRINO RADIATION TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; O'Connor, Evan; Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.; Löffler, Frank; Schnetter, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo approaches to radiation transport have several attractive properties such as simplicity of implementation, high accuracy, and good parallel scaling. Moreover, Monte Carlo methods can handle complicated geometries and are relatively easy to extend to multiple spatial dimensions, which makes them potentially interesting in modeling complex multi-dimensional astrophysical phenomena such as core-collapse supernovae. The aim of this paper is to explore Monte Carlo methods for modeling neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae. We generalize the Implicit Monte Carlo photon transport scheme of Fleck and Cummings and gray discrete-diffusion scheme of Densmore et al. to energy-, time-, and velocity-dependent neutrino transport. Using our 1D spherically-symmetric implementation, we show that, similar to the photon transport case, the implicit scheme enables significantly larger timesteps compared with explicit time discretization, without sacrificing accuracy, while the discrete-diffusion method leads to significant speed-ups at high optical depth. Our results suggest that a combination of spectral, velocity-dependent, Implicit Monte Carlo and discrete-diffusion Monte Carlo methods represents a robust approach for use in neutrino transport calculations in core-collapse supernovae. Our velocity-dependent scheme can easily be adapted to photon transport.

  11. A NEW MONTE CARLO METHOD FOR TIME-DEPENDENT NEUTRINO RADIATION TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; O' Connor, Evan [TAPIR, California Institute of Technology, MC 350-17, 1200 E California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Loeffler, Frank; Schnetter, Erik, E-mail: abdik@tapir.caltech.edu [Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, 216 Johnston Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Monte Carlo approaches to radiation transport have several attractive properties such as simplicity of implementation, high accuracy, and good parallel scaling. Moreover, Monte Carlo methods can handle complicated geometries and are relatively easy to extend to multiple spatial dimensions, which makes them potentially interesting in modeling complex multi-dimensional astrophysical phenomena such as core-collapse supernovae. The aim of this paper is to explore Monte Carlo methods for modeling neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae. We generalize the Implicit Monte Carlo photon transport scheme of Fleck and Cummings and gray discrete-diffusion scheme of Densmore et al. to energy-, time-, and velocity-dependent neutrino transport. Using our 1D spherically-symmetric implementation, we show that, similar to the photon transport case, the implicit scheme enables significantly larger timesteps compared with explicit time discretization, without sacrificing accuracy, while the discrete-diffusion method leads to significant speed-ups at high optical depth. Our results suggest that a combination of spectral, velocity-dependent, Implicit Monte Carlo and discrete-diffusion Monte Carlo methods represents a robust approach for use in neutrino transport calculations in core-collapse supernovae. Our velocity-dependent scheme can easily be adapted to photon transport.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation for radiation dose in children radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Hitalo R.; Tomal, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The dosimetry in pediatric radiology is essential due to the higher risk that children have in comparison to adults. The focus of this study is to present how the dose varies depending on the depth in a 10 year old and a newborn, for this purpose simulations are made using the Monte Carlo method. Potential differences were considered 70 and 90 kVp for the 10 year old and 70 and 80 kVp for the newborn. The results show that in both cases, the dose at the skin surface is larger for smaller potential value, however, it decreases faster for larger potential values. Another observation made is that because the newborn is less thick the ratio between the initial dose and the final is lower compared to the case of a 10 year old, showing that it is possible to make an image using a smaller entrance dose in the skin, keeping the same level of exposure at the detector. (author)

  13. Interface methods for hybrid Monte Carlo-diffusion radiation-transport simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.

    2006-01-01

    Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations in diffusive media. An important aspect of DDMC is the treatment of interfaces between diffusive regions, where DDMC is used, and transport regions, where standard Monte Carlo is employed. Three previously developed methods exist for treating transport-diffusion interfaces: the Marshak interface method, based on the Marshak boundary condition, the asymptotic interface method, based on the asymptotic diffusion-limit boundary condition, and the Nth-collided source technique, a scheme that allows Monte Carlo particles to undergo several collisions in a diffusive region before DDMC is used. Numerical calculations have shown that each of these interface methods gives reasonable results as part of larger radiation-transport simulations. In this paper, we use both analytic and numerical examples to compare the ability of these three interface techniques to treat simpler, transport-diffusion interface problems outside of a more complex radiation-transport calculation. We find that the asymptotic interface method is accurate regardless of the angular distribution of Monte Carlo particles incident on the interface surface. In contrast, the Marshak boundary condition only produces correct solutions if the incident particles are isotropic. We also show that the Nth-collided source technique has the capacity to yield accurate results if spatial cells are optically small and Monte Carlo particles are allowed to undergo many collisions within a diffusive region before DDMC is employed. These requirements make the Nth-collided source technique impractical for realistic radiation-transport calculations

  14. Ultraviolet radiation from F and K stars and implications for planetary habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.; Whittet, D. C.; Sheldon, W. R.

    1997-01-01

    Now that extrasolar planets have been found, it is timely to ask whether some of them might be suitable for life. Climatic constraints on planetary habitability indicate that a reasonably wide habitable zone exists around main sequence stars with spectral types in the early-F to mid-K range. However, it has not been demonstrated that planets orbiting such stars would be habitable when biologically-damaging energetic radiation is also considered. The large amounts of UV radiation emitted by early-type stars have been suggested to pose a problem for evolving life in their vicinity. But one might also argue that the real problem lies with late-type stars, which emit proportionally less radiation at the short wavelengths (lambda < 200 nm) required to split O2 and initiate ozone formation. We show here that neither of these concerns is necessarily fatal to the evolution of advanced life: Earth-like planets orbiting F and K stars may well receive less harmful UV radiation at their surfaces than does the Earth itself.

  15. Overview and applications of the Monte Carlo radiation transport kit at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sale, K. E.

    1999-01-01

    Modern Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can be applied to model most applications of radiation, from optical to TeV photons, from thermal neutrons to heavy ions. Simulations can include any desired level of detail in three-dimensional geometries using the right level of detail in the reaction physics. The technology areas to which we have applied these codes include medical applications, defense, safety and security programs, nuclear safeguards and industrial and research system design and control. The main reason such applications are interesting is that by using these tools substantial savings of time and effort (i.e. money) can be realized. In addition it is possible to separate out and investigate computationally effects which can not be isolated and studied in experiments. In model calculations, just as in real life, one must take care in order to get the correct answer to the right question. Advancing computing technology allows extensions of Monte Carlo applications in two directions. First, as computers become more powerful more problems can be accurately modeled. Second, as computing power becomes cheaper Monte Carlo methods become accessible more widely. An overview of the set of Monte Carlo radiation transport tools in use a LLNL will be presented along with a few examples of applications and future directions

  16. Advantages of Analytical Transformations in Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, M S; Brooks III, E D; Daffin, F

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods for radiation transport typically attempt to solve an integral by directly sampling analog or weighted particles, which are treated as physical entities. Improvements to the methods involve better sampling, probability games or physical intuition about the problem. We show that significant improvements can be achieved by recasting the equations with an analytical transform to solve for new, non-physical entities or fields. This paper looks at one such transform, the difference formulation for thermal photon transport, showing a significant advantage for Monte Carlo solution of the equations for time dependent transport. Other related areas are discussed that may also realize significant benefits from similar analytical transformations

  17. PEREGRINE: An all-particle Monte Carlo code for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Chandler, W.P.; Rathkopf, J.A.; Svatos, M.M.; White, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver a lethal dose to the tumor while minimizing the dose to normal tissues. To carry out this task, it is critical to calculate correctly the distribution of dose delivered. Monte Carlo transport methods have the potential to provide more accurate prediction of dose distributions than currently-used methods. PEREGRINE is a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the specific purpose of modeling the effects of radiation therapy. PEREGRINE transports neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles, including protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, and alpha particles. This paper describes the PEREGRINE transport code and some preliminary results for clinically relevant materials and radiation sources

  18. Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation of a cavity solar reactor for the reduction of cerium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villafan-Vidales, H.I.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C.A.; Dehesa-Carrasco, U. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco s/n, Col. Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico); Romero-Paredes, H. [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No.186, Col. Vicentina, A.P. 55-534, Mexico D.F 09340 (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    Radiative heat transfer in a solar thermochemical reactor for the thermal reduction of cerium oxide is simulated with the Monte Carlo method. The directional characteristics and the power distribution of the concentrated solar radiation that enters the cavity is obtained by carrying out a Monte Carlo ray tracing of a paraboloidal concentrator. It is considered that the reactor contains a gas/particle suspension directly exposed to concentrated solar radiation. The suspension is treated as a non-isothermal, non-gray, absorbing, emitting, and anisotropically scattering medium. The transport coefficients of the particles are obtained from Mie-scattering theory by using the optical properties of cerium oxide. From the simulations, the aperture radius and the particle concentration were optimized to match the characteristics of the considered concentrator. (author)

  19. EGS-Ray, a program for the visualization of Monte-Carlo calculations in the radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinschmidt, C.

    2001-01-01

    A Windows program is introduced which allows a relatively easy and interactive access to Monte Carlo techniques in clinical radiation physics. Furthermore, this serves as a visualization tool of the methodology and the results of Monte Carlo simulations. The program requires only little effort to formulate and calculate a Monte Carlo problem. The Monte Carlo module of the program is based on the well-known EGS4/PRESTA code. The didactic features of the program are presented using several examples common to the routine of the clinical radiation physicist. (orig.) [de

  20. A hybrid transport-diffusion method for Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Urbatsch, Todd J.; Evans, Thomas M.; Buksas, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo particle-transport simulations in diffusive media. If standard Monte Carlo is used in such media, particle histories will consist of many small steps, resulting in a computationally expensive calculation. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many small Monte Carlo steps, thus increasing the efficiency of the simulation. In addition, given that DDMC is based on a diffusion equation, it should produce accurate solutions if used judiciously. In practice, DDMC is combined with standard Monte Carlo to form a hybrid transport-diffusion method that can accurately simulate problems with both diffusive and non-diffusive regions. In this paper, we extend previously developed DDMC techniques in several ways that improve the accuracy and utility of DDMC for nonlinear, time-dependent, radiative-transfer calculations. The use of DDMC in these types of problems is advantageous since, due to the underlying linearizations, optically thick regions appear to be diffusive. First, we employ a diffusion equation that is discretized in space but is continuous in time. Not only is this methodology theoretically more accurate than temporally discretized DDMC techniques, but it also has the benefit that a particle's time is always known. Thus, there is no ambiguity regarding what time to assign a particle that leaves an optically thick region (where DDMC is used) and begins transporting by standard Monte Carlo in an optically thin region. Also, we treat the interface between optically thick and optically thin regions with an improved method, based on the asymptotic diffusion-limit boundary condition, that can produce accurate results regardless of the angular distribution of the incident Monte Carlo particles. Finally, we develop a technique for estimating radiation momentum deposition during the

  1. Sky-Radiance Models for Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, I.; Dalimonte, D.; Santos, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Photon-tracing can be initialized through sky-radiance (Lsky) distribution models when executing Monte Carlo simulations for ocean color studies. To be effective, the Lsky model should: 1) properly represent sky-radiance features of interest; 2) require low computing time; and 3) depend on a limited number of input parameters. The present study verifies the satisfiability of these prerequisite by comparing results from different Lsky formulations. Specifically, two Lsky models were considered as reference cases because of their different approach among solutions presented in the literature. The first model, developed by the Harrisson and Coombes (HC), is based on a parametric expression where the sun geometry is the unique input. The HC model is one of the sky-radiance analytical distribution applied in state-of-art simulations for ocean optics. The coefficients of the HC model were set upon broad-band field measurements and the result is a model that requires a few implementation steps. The second model, implemented by Zibordi and Voss (ZV), is based on physical expressions that accounts for the optical thickness of permanent gases, aerosol, ozone and water vapour at specific wavelengths. Inter-comparisons between normalized ^LskyZV and ^LskyHC (i.e., with unitary scalar irradiance) are discussed by means of individual polar maps and percent difference between sky-radiance distributions. Sky-radiance cross-sections are presented as well. Considered cases include different sun zenith values and wavelengths (i.e., λ=413, 490 and 665 nm, corresponding to selected center-bands of the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer MERIS). Results have shown a significant convergence between ^LskyHC and ^LskyZV at 665 nm. Differences between models increase with the sun zenith and mostly with wavelength. For Instance, relative differences up to 50% between ^ L skyHC and ^ LskyZV can be observed in the antisolar region for λ=665 nm and θ*=45°. The effects of these

  2. Application of OMEGA Monte Carlo codes for radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Jiang, Steve B.

    1998-01-01

    The accuracy of conventional dose algorithms for radiosurgery treatment planning is limited, due to the inadequate consideration of the lateral radiation transport and the difficulty of acquiring accurate dosimetric data for very small beams. In the present paper, some initial work on the application of Monte Carlo method in radiation treatment planning in general, and in radiosurgery treatment planning in particular, has been presented. Two OMEGA Monte Carlo codes, BEAM and DOSXYZ, are used. The BEAM code is used to simulate the transport of particles in the linac treatment head and radiosurgery collimator. A phase space file is obtained from the BEAM simulation for each collimator size. The DOSXYZ code is used to calculate the dose distribution in the patient's body reconstructed from CT slices using the phase space file as input. The accuracy of OMEGA Monte Carlo simulation for radiosurgery dose calculation is verified by comparing the calculated and measured basic dosimetric data for several radiosurgery beams and a 4 x 4 cm 2 conventional beam. The dose distributions for three clinical cases are calculated using OMEGA codes as the dose engine for an in-house developed radiosurgery treatment planning system. The verification using basic dosimetric data and the dose calculation for clinical cases demonstrate the feasibility of applying OMEGA Monte Carlo code system to radiosurgery treatment planning. (author)

  3. Monte Carlo closure for moment-based transport schemes in general relativistic radiation hydrodynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucart, Francois

    2018-04-01

    General relativistic radiation hydrodynamic simulations are necessary to accurately model a number of astrophysical systems involving black holes and neutron stars. Photon transport plays a crucial role in radiatively dominated accretion discs, while neutrino transport is critical to core-collapse supernovae and to the modelling of electromagnetic transients and nucleosynthesis in neutron star mergers. However, evolving the full Boltzmann equations of radiative transport is extremely expensive. Here, we describe the implementation in the general relativistic SPEC code of a cheaper radiation hydrodynamic method that theoretically converges to a solution of Boltzmann's equation in the limit of infinite numerical resources. The algorithm is based on a grey two-moment scheme, in which we evolve the energy density and momentum density of the radiation. Two-moment schemes require a closure that fills in missing information about the energy spectrum and higher order moments of the radiation. Instead of the approximate analytical closure currently used in core-collapse and merger simulations, we complement the two-moment scheme with a low-accuracy Monte Carlo evolution. The Monte Carlo results can provide any or all of the missing information in the evolution of the moments, as desired by the user. As a first test of our methods, we study a set of idealized problems demonstrating that our algorithm performs significantly better than existing analytical closures. We also discuss the current limitations of our method, in particular open questions regarding the stability of the fully coupled scheme.

  4. On Monte Carlo estimation of radiation damage in light water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, Edward A.; Oliveira, Cassiano R.E. de

    2010-01-01

    There has been a growing need in recent years for the development of methodologies to calculate damage factors, namely displacements per atom (dpa), of structural components for Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The aim of this paper is discuss and highlight the main issues associated with the calculation of radiation damage factors utilizing the Monte Carlo method. Among these issues are: particle tracking and tallying in complex geometries, dpa calculation methodology, coupled fuel depletion and uncertainty propagation. The capabilities of the Monte Carlo code Serpent such as Woodcock tracking and burnup are assessed for radiation damage calculations and its capability demonstrated and compared to those of the MCNP code for dpa calculations of a typical LWR configuration involving the core vessel and the downcomer. (author)

  5. Survey of ionizing radiations to workers in Carlos Andrade Hospital during March 1998 and December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Pino Albuja, Norma Josefina

    2005-01-01

    Ionizing radiation represents a daily risk for the people who work occupationally exposed to radiations at Carlos Andrade Marin hospital. For that reason, the knowledge of the basic concepts of the physical phenomenon of ionizing radiation and the study of dosimetry that is carried out to occupationally exposed workers at Carlos Andrade Marin hospital are very important to manage ionizing radiations as a risk factor. This study shows the system of dosimetry of Carlos Andrade Marin hospital. Moreover, it includes an analysis between the doses received by workers occupationally exposed of Carlos Andrade Marin hospital and the limit dose internationally recommended. For this investigation, it was used bibliographical revision, descriptive, historical, and inductive study, and descriptive statistics with the software Microsoft Office Excel 2003. The hypothesis of this research is that the workplaces exposed to ionizing radiations at Carlos Andrade Marin hospital have an appropriate dosimetry system. Furthermore, it considers superficial and deep doses of occupationally exposed workers of both genders and age. The obtained results of the studied period 1998 to 2000 are: i) The 99% of the occupationally exposed workers used the dosimeter. ii) The higher superficial dose -13,34mSv - corresponds to a Hemodynamic doctor. iii) The higher deep dose -7,1mSv - corresponds to a Nuclear Medicine medical technologist. iv) The higher doses mentioned above are under the limits internationally recommended by the International Commission on International Protection. These limits are 20mSv per year and 100mSv per 5 years respectively. The conclusions of the investigation are: i) Carlos Andrade Marin hospital has an adequate Dosimetry system and the occupationally exposed workers are permanently monitored with the dosimeter. ii) The Nuclear Medicine workers have the higher doses of exposition related to the other areas of Carlos Andrade Marin hospital. iii) The most exposed

  6. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Some specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000 ® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results

  7. Clouds-radiation interactions in a general circulation model - Impact upon the planetary radiation balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura D.; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Simultaneously conducted observations of the earth radiation budget and the cloud amount estimates, taken during the June 1979 - May 1980 Nimbus 7 mission were used to show interactions between the cloud amount and raidation and to verify a long-term climate simulation obtained with the latest version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM). The parameterization of the radiative, dynamic, and thermodynamic processes produced the mean radiation and cloud quantities that were in reasonable agreement with satellite observations, but at the expense of simulating their short-term fluctuations. The results support the assumption that the inclusion of the cloud liquid water (ice) variable would be the best mean to reduce the blinking of clouds in NCAR CCM.

  8. FTREE. Single-history Monte Carlo analysis for radiation detection and measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, M.P.W.

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces FTREE, which describes radiation cascades following impingement of a source particle on matter. The ensuing radiation field is characterised interaction by interaction, accounting for each generation of secondaries recursively. Each progeny is uniquely differentiated and catalogued into a family tree; the kinship is identified without ambiguity. This mode of observation, analysis and presentation goes beyond present-day detector technologies, beyond conventional Monte Carlo simulations and beyond standard pedagogy. It is able to observe rare events far out in the Gaussian tail which would have been lost in averaging-events less probable, but no less correct in physics. (author)

  9. Machine and radiation protection challenges of high energy/intensity accelerators: the role of Monte Carlo calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerutti F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Monte Carlo calculations in addressing machine protection and radiation protection challenges regarding accelerator design and operation is discussed, through an overview of different applications and validation examples especially referring to recent LHC measurements.

  10. Machine and radiation protection challenges of high energy/intensity accelerators: the role of Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, F.

    2017-09-01

    The role of Monte Carlo calculations in addressing machine protection and radiation protection challenges regarding accelerator design and operation is discussed, through an overview of different applications and validation examples especially referring to recent LHC measurements.

  11. Radiation shielding design for DECY-13 cyclotron using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasito T; Bunawas; Taufik; Sunardi; Hari Suryanto

    2016-01-01

    DECY-13 is a 13 MeV proton cyclotron with target H_2"1"8O. The bombarding of 13 MeV protons on target H_2"1"8O produce large amounts of neutrons and gamma radiation. It needs the efficient radiation shielding to reduce the level of neutrons and gamma rays to ensure safety for workers and public. Modeling and calculations have been carried out using Monte Carlo method with MCNPX code to optimize the thickness for the radiation shielding. The calculations were done for radiation shielding of rectangular space room type with the size of 5.5 m x 5 m x 3 m and thickness of 170 cm made from lightweight concrete types of portland. It was shown that with this shielding the dose rate outside the wall was reduced to 1 μSv/h. (author)

  12. The effect on radiation damage of structural material in a hybrid system by using a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günay, Mehtap; Şarer, Başar; Kasap, Hızır

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of some fluids on gas production rates in structural material were investigated. • The MCNPX-2.7.0 Monte Carlo code was used for three-dimensional calculations. • It was found that biggest contribution to gas production rates comes from Fe isotope of the. • The desirable values for 5% SFG-PuO 2 with respect to radiation damage were specified. - Abstract: In this study, the molten salt-heavy metal mixtures 99–95% Li20Sn80-1-5% SFG-Pu, 99–95% Li20Sn80-1-5% SFG-PuF4, 99-95% Li20Sn80-1-5% SFG-PuO2 were used as fluids. The fluids were used in the liquid first-wall, blanket and shield zones of the designed hybrid reactor system. 9Cr2WVTa ferritic steel with the width of 4 cm was used as the structural material. The parameters of radiation damage are proton, deuterium, tritium, He-3 and He-4 gas production rates. In this study, the effects of the selected fluid on the radiation damage, in terms of individual as well as total isotopes in the structural material, were investigated for 30 full power years (FPYs). Three-dimensional analyses were performed using the most recent version of the MCNPX-2.7.0 Monte Carlo radiation transport code and the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library

  13. AREVA Developments for an Efficient and Reliable use of Monte Carlo codes for Radiation Transport Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapoutier, Nicolas; Mollier, François; Nolin, Guillaume; Culioli, Matthieu; Mace, Jean-Reynald

    2017-09-01

    In the context of the rising of Monte Carlo transport calculations for any kind of application, AREVA recently improved its suite of engineering tools in order to produce efficient Monte Carlo workflow. Monte Carlo codes, such as MCNP or TRIPOLI, are recognized as reference codes to deal with a large range of radiation transport problems. However the inherent drawbacks of theses codes - laboring input file creation and long computation time - contrast with the maturity of the treatment of the physical phenomena. The goals of the recent AREVA developments were to reach similar efficiency as other mature engineering sciences such as finite elements analyses (e.g. structural or fluid dynamics). Among the main objectives, the creation of a graphical user interface offering CAD tools for geometry creation and other graphical features dedicated to the radiation field (source definition, tally definition) has been reached. The computations times are drastically reduced compared to few years ago thanks to the use of massive parallel runs, and above all, the implementation of hybrid variance reduction technics. From now engineering teams are capable to deliver much more prompt support to any nuclear projects dealing with reactors or fuel cycle facilities from conceptual phase to decommissioning.

  14. AREVA Developments for an Efficient and Reliable use of Monte Carlo codes for Radiation Transport Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapoutier Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the rising of Monte Carlo transport calculations for any kind of application, AREVA recently improved its suite of engineering tools in order to produce efficient Monte Carlo workflow. Monte Carlo codes, such as MCNP or TRIPOLI, are recognized as reference codes to deal with a large range of radiation transport problems. However the inherent drawbacks of theses codes - laboring input file creation and long computation time - contrast with the maturity of the treatment of the physical phenomena. The goals of the recent AREVA developments were to reach similar efficiency as other mature engineering sciences such as finite elements analyses (e.g. structural or fluid dynamics. Among the main objectives, the creation of a graphical user interface offering CAD tools for geometry creation and other graphical features dedicated to the radiation field (source definition, tally definition has been reached. The computations times are drastically reduced compared to few years ago thanks to the use of massive parallel runs, and above all, the implementation of hybrid variance reduction technics. From now engineering teams are capable to deliver much more prompt support to any nuclear projects dealing with reactors or fuel cycle facilities from conceptual phase to decommissioning.

  15. A practical look at Monte Carlo variance reduction methods in radiation shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsher, Richard H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States)

    2006-04-15

    With the advent of inexpensive computing power over the past two decades, applications of Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques have proliferated dramatically. At Los Alamos, the Monte Carlo codes MCNP5 and MCNPX are used routinely on personal computer platforms for radiation shielding analysis and dosimetry calculations. These codes feature a rich palette of Variance Reduction (VR) techniques. The motivation of VR is to exchange user efficiency for computational efficiency. It has been said that a few hours of user time often reduces computational time by several orders of magnitude. Unfortunately, user time can stretch into the many hours as most VR techniques require significant user experience and intervention for proper optimization. It is the purpose of this paper to outline VR strategies, tested in practice, optimized for several common radiation shielding tasks, with the hope of reducing user setup time for similar problems. A strategy is defined in this context to mean a collection of MCNP radiation transport physics options and VR techniques that work synergistically to optimize a particular shielding task. Examples are offered the areas of source definition, skyshine, streaming, and transmission.

  16. A practical look at Monte Carlo variance reduction methods in radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsher, Richard H.

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of inexpensive computing power over the past two decades, applications of Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques have proliferated dramatically. At Los Alamos, the Monte Carlo codes MCNP5 and MCNPX are used routinely on personal computer platforms for radiation shielding analysis and dosimetry calculations. These codes feature a rich palette of Variance Reduction (VR) techniques. The motivation of VR is to exchange user efficiency for computational efficiency. It has been said that a few hours of user time often reduces computational time by several orders of magnitude. Unfortunately, user time can stretch into the many hours as most VR techniques require significant user experience and intervention for proper optimization. It is the purpose of this paper to outline VR strategies, tested in practice, optimized for several common radiation shielding tasks, with the hope of reducing user setup time for similar problems. A strategy is defined in this context to mean a collection of MCNP radiation transport physics options and VR techniques that work synergistically to optimize a particular shielding task. Examples are offered the areas of source definition, skyshine, streaming, and transmission

  17. A numerical analysis of antithetic variates in Monte Carlo radiation transport with geometrical surface splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, P.K.; Prasad, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical study for effective implementation of the antithetic variates technique with geometric splitting/Russian roulette in Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations is presented. The study is based on the theory of Monte Carlo errors where a set of coupled integral equations are solved for the first and second moments of the score and for the expected number of flights per particle history. Numerical results are obtained for particle transmission through an infinite homogeneous slab shield composed of an isotropically scattering medium. Two types of antithetic transformations are considered. The results indicate that the antithetic transformations always lead to reduction in variance and increase in efficiency provided optimal antithetic parameters are chosen. A substantial gain in efficiency is obtained by incorporating antithetic transformations in rule of thumb splitting. The advantage gained for thick slabs (∼20 mfp) with low scattering probability (0.1-0.5) is attractively large . (author). 27 refs., 9 tabs

  18. Milagro Version 2 An Implicit Monte Carlo Code for Thermal Radiative Transfer: Capabilities, Development, and Usage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.J. Urbatsch; T.M. Evans

    2006-02-15

    We have released Version 2 of Milagro, an object-oriented, C++ code that performs radiative transfer using Fleck and Cummings' Implicit Monte Carlo method. Milagro, a part of the Jayenne program, is a stand-alone driver code used as a methods research vehicle and to verify its underlying classes. These underlying classes are used to construct Implicit Monte Carlo packages for external customers. Milagro-2 represents a design overhaul that allows better parallelism and extensibility. New features in Milagro-2 include verified momentum deposition, restart capability, graphics capability, exact energy conservation, and improved load balancing and parallel efficiency. A users' guide also describes how to configure, make, and run Milagro2.

  19. Model planetary nebulae: the effect of shadowed filaments on low ionization potential ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, A.

    1977-01-01

    Previous homogeneous model planetary nebulae calculations No. 4 have yielded emission strengths for low ionization potential No. 4 ions which are considerably lower than those observed. Several attempts were to correct this problem by the inclusion of optically thin condensations, the use of energy flux distributions from stellar model calculations instead of blackbody spectrum stars, and the inclusion of dust in the nebulae. The effect that shadowed filaments have on the ionization and thermal structure of model nebulae and the resultant line strengths are considered. These radial filaments are shielded from the direct stellar ionizing radiation by optically thick condensations in the nebula. Theoretical observational evidence exists for the presence of condensations and filaments. Since the only source of ionizing photons in the shadowed filaments is due to diffuse photons produced by recombination, ions of lower ionization potential are expected to exist there in greater numbers than those found in the rest of the nebula. This leads to increased line strengths from these ions and increases their values to match the observational values. It is shown that these line strengths in the filaments increase by over one to two orders of magnitude relative to values found in homogeneous models. This results in an increase of approximately one order of magnitude for these lines when contributions from both components of the nebula are considered. The parameters that determine the exact value of the increase are the radial location of the filaments in the nebula and the fraction of the nebular volume occupied by the filaments

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of ultra high vacuum and synchrotron radiation for particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082330; Leonid, Rivkin

    With preparation of Hi-Lumi LHC fully underway, and the FCC machines under study, accelerators will reach unprecedented energies and along with it very large amount of synchrotron radiation (SR). This will desorb photoelectrons and molecules from accelerator walls, which contribute to electron cloud buildup and increase the residual pressure - both effects reducing the beam lifetime. In current accelerators these two effects are among the principal limiting factors, therefore precise calculation of synchrotron radiation and pressure properties are very important, desirably in the early design phase. This PhD project shows the modernization and a major upgrade of two codes, Molflow and Synrad, originally written by R. Kersevan in the 1990s, which are based on the test-particle Monte Carlo method and allow ultra-high vacuum and synchrotron radiation calculations. The new versions contain new physics, and are built as an all-in-one package - available to the public. Existing vacuum calculation methods are overvi...

  1. CMacIonize: Monte Carlo photoionisation and moving-mesh radiation hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, Bert; Wood, Kenneth

    2018-02-01

    CMacIonize simulates the self-consistent evolution of HII regions surrounding young O and B stars, or other sources of ionizing radiation. The code combines a Monte Carlo photoionization algorithm that uses a complex mix of hydrogen, helium and several coolants in order to self-consistently solve for the ionization and temperature balance at any given time, with a standard first order hydrodynamics scheme. The code can be run as a post-processing tool to get the line emission from an existing simulation snapshot, but can also be used to run full radiation hydrodynamical simulations. Both the radiation transfer and the hydrodynamics are implemented in a general way that is independent of the grid structure that is used to discretize the system, allowing it to be run both as a standard fixed grid code and also as a moving-mesh code.

  2. Use of Monte Carlo method in low-energy gamma radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulc, J.

    1982-01-01

    Modelling based on the Monte Carlo method is described in detail of the interaction of low-energy gamma radiation resulting in characteristic radiation of the K series of a pure element. The modelled system corresponds to the usual configuration of the measuring part of a radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analyzer. The accuracy of determination of the mean probability of impingement of characteristic radiation on the detector increases with the number of events. The number of events was selected with regard to the required accuracy, the demand on computer time and the accuracy of input parameters. The results of a comparison of computation and experiment are yet to be published. (M.D.)

  3. Review of the Monte Carlo and deterministic codes in radiation protection and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagziria, H.

    2000-02-01

    Modelling a physical system can be carried out either stochastically or deterministically. An example of the former method is the Monte Carlo technique, in which statistically approximate methods are applied to exact models. No transport equation is solved as individual particles are simulated and some specific aspect (tally) of their average behaviour is recorded. The average behaviour of the physical system is then inferred using the central limit theorem. In contrast, deterministic codes use mathematically exact methods that are applied to approximate models to solve the transport equation for the average particle behaviour. The physical system is subdivided in boxes in the phase-space system and particles are followed from one box to the next. The smaller the boxes the better the approximations become. Although the Monte Carlo method has been used for centuries, its more recent manifestation has really emerged from the Manhattan project of the Word War II. Its invention is thought to be mainly due to Metropolis, Ulah (through his interest in poker), Fermi, von Neuman and Richtmeyer. Over the last 20 years or so, the Monte Carlo technique has become a powerful tool in radiation transport. This is due to users taking full advantage of richer cross section data, more powerful computers and Monte Carlo techniques for radiation transport, with high quality physics and better known source spectra. This method is a common sense approach to radiation transport and its success and popularity is quite often also due to necessity, because measurements are not always possible or affordable. In the Monte Carlo method, which is inherently realistic because nature is statistical, a more detailed physics is made possible by isolation of events while rather elaborate geometries can be modelled. Provided that the physics is correct, a simulation is exactly analogous to an experimenter counting particles. In contrast to the deterministic approach, however, a disadvantage of the

  4. Evaluation of radiation dose to patients in intraoral dental radiography using Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Il; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Oh, Seung Chul; Song, Ji Young

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental radiographic examinations is common although radiation dose resulting from the dental radiography is relatively small. Therefore, it is required to evaluate radiation dose from the dental radiography for radiation safety purpose. The objectives of the present study were to develop dosimetry method for intraoral dental radiography using a Monte Carlo method based radiation transport code and to calculate organ doses and effective doses of patients from different types of intraoral radiographies. Radiological properties of dental radiography equipment were characterized for the evaluation of patient radiation dose. The properties including x-ray energy spectrum were simulated using MCNP code. Organ doses and effective doses to patients were calculated by MCNP simulation with computational adult phantoms. At the typical equipment settings (60 kVp, 7 mA, and 0.12 sec), the entrance air kerma was 1.79 mGy and the measured half value layer was 1.82 mm. The half value layer calculated by MCNP simulation was well agreed with the measurement values. Effective doses from intraoral radiographies ranged from 1 μSv for maxilla premolar to 3 μSv for maxilla incisor. Oral cavity layer (23⁓82 μSv) and salivary glands (10⁓68 μSv) received relatively high radiation dose. Thyroid also received high radiation dose (3⁓47 μSv) for examinations. The developed dosimetry method and evaluated radiation doses in this study can be utilized for policy making, patient dose management, and development of low-dose equipment. In addition, this study can ultimately contribute to decrease radiation dose to patients for radiation safety

  5. Evaluation of radiation dose to patients in intraoral dental radiography using Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Il; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Oh, Seung Chul; Song, Ji Young [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The use of dental radiographic examinations is common although radiation dose resulting from the dental radiography is relatively small. Therefore, it is required to evaluate radiation dose from the dental radiography for radiation safety purpose. The objectives of the present study were to develop dosimetry method for intraoral dental radiography using a Monte Carlo method based radiation transport code and to calculate organ doses and effective doses of patients from different types of intraoral radiographies. Radiological properties of dental radiography equipment were characterized for the evaluation of patient radiation dose. The properties including x-ray energy spectrum were simulated using MCNP code. Organ doses and effective doses to patients were calculated by MCNP simulation with computational adult phantoms. At the typical equipment settings (60 kVp, 7 mA, and 0.12 sec), the entrance air kerma was 1.79 mGy and the measured half value layer was 1.82 mm. The half value layer calculated by MCNP simulation was well agreed with the measurement values. Effective doses from intraoral radiographies ranged from 1 μSv for maxilla premolar to 3 μSv for maxilla incisor. Oral cavity layer (23⁓82 μSv) and salivary glands (10⁓68 μSv) received relatively high radiation dose. Thyroid also received high radiation dose (3⁓47 μSv) for examinations. The developed dosimetry method and evaluated radiation doses in this study can be utilized for policy making, patient dose management, and development of low-dose equipment. In addition, this study can ultimately contribute to decrease radiation dose to patients for radiation safety.

  6. Monte Carlo method for polarized radiative transfer in gradient-index media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.M.; Tan, J.Y.; Liu, L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Light transfer in gradient-index media generally follows curved ray trajectories, which will cause light beam to converge or diverge during transfer and induce the rotation of polarization ellipse even when the medium is transparent. Furthermore, the combined process of scattering and transfer along curved ray path makes the problem more complex. In this paper, a Monte Carlo method is presented to simulate polarized radiative transfer in gradient-index media that only support planar ray trajectories. The ray equation is solved to the second order to address the effect induced by curved ray trajectories. Three types of test cases are presented to verify the performance of the method, which include transparent medium, Mie scattering medium with assumed gradient index distribution, and Rayleigh scattering with realistic atmosphere refractive index profile. It is demonstrated that the atmospheric refraction has significant effect for long distance polarized light transfer. - Highlights: • A Monte Carlo method for polarized radiative transfer in gradient index media. • Effect of curved ray paths on polarized radiative transfer is considered. • Importance of atmospheric refraction for polarized light transfer is demonstrated

  7. Monte Carlo calculation of scattered radiation from applicators in low energy clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabbari, N.; Hashemi-Malayeri, B.; Farajollahi, A. R.; Kazemnejad, A.

    2007-01-01

    In radiotherapy with electron beams, scattered radiation from an electron applicator influences the dose distribution in the patient. The contribution of this radiation to the patient dose is significant, even in modern accelerators. In most of radiotherapy treatment planning systems, this component is not explicitly included. In addition, the scattered radiation produced by applicators varies based on the applicator design as well as the field size and distance from the applicators. The aim of this study was to calculate the amount of scattered dose contribution from applicators. We also tried to provide an extensive set of calculated data that could be used as input or benchmark data for advanced treatment planning systems that use Monte Carlo algorithms for dose distribution calculations. Electron beams produced by a NEPTUN 10PC medical linac were modeled using the BEAMnrc system. Central axis depth dose curves of the electron beams were measured and calculated, with and without the applicators in place, for different field sizes and energies. The scattered radiation from the applicators was determined by subtracting the central axis depth dose curves obtained without the applicators from that with the applicator. The results of this study indicated that the scattered radiation from the electron applicators of the NEPTUN 10PC is significant and cannot be neglected in advanced treatment planning systems. Furthermore, our results showed that the scattered radiation depends on the field size and decreases almost linearly with depth. (author)

  8. Applying graphics processor units to Monte Carlo dose calculation in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiari M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential in using of using a graphics processor unit (GPU for Monte-Carlo (MC-based radiation dose calculations. The percent depth dose (PDD of photons in a medium with known absorption and scattering coefficients is computed using a MC simulation running on both a standard CPU and a GPU. We demonstrate that the GPU′s capability for massive parallel processing provides a significant acceleration in the MC calculation, and offers a significant advantage for distributed stochastic simulations on a single computer. Harnessing this potential of GPUs will help in the early adoption of MC for routine planning in a clinical environment.

  9. Optical roughness BRDF model for reverse Monte Carlo simulation of real material thermal radiation transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Peiran; Eri, Qitai; Wang, Qiang

    2014-04-10

    Optical roughness was introduced into the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model to simulate the reflectance characteristics of thermal radiation. The optical roughness BRDF model stemmed from the influence of surface roughness and wavelength on the ray reflectance calculation. This model was adopted to simulate real metal emissivity. The reverse Monte Carlo method was used to display the distribution of reflectance rays. The numerical simulations showed that the optical roughness BRDF model can calculate the wavelength effect on emissivity and simulate the real metal emissivity variance with incidence angles.

  10. Comparison of scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Mueller, P.; Ulm, G.

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are powerful tools to simulate the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. One of the most widespread simulation program packages is Geant4. Almost all physical interaction processes can be included. However, it is not evident what accuracy can be obtained by a simulation. In this work, results of scattering experiments using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the X-ray regime are quantitatively compared to the results of simulations using Geant4. Experiments were performed for various scattering foils made of different materials such as copper and gold. For energy-dispersive measurements of the scattered radiation, a cadmium telluride detector was used. The detector was fully characterized and calibrated with calculable undispersed as well as monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The obtained quantum efficiency and the response functions are in very good agreement with the corresponding Geant4 simulations. At the electron storage ring BESSY II the number of incident photons in the scattering experiments was measured with a photodiode that had been calibrated against a cryogenic radiometer, so that a direct comparison of scattering experiments with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 was possible. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photoeffect, including fluorescence as well as the Compton and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy, resulting in a deviation of typically less than 20%. Even polarization effects are widely covered by Geant4, and for Doppler broadening of Compton-scattered radiation the extension G4LECS can be included, but the fact that both features cannot be combined is a limitation. For most polarization-dependent simulations, good agreement with the experimental results was found, except for some orientations where Rayleigh scattering was overestimated in the simulation.

  11. Comparison of scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Müller, P.; Ulm, G.

    2009-09-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are powerful tools to simulate the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. One of the most widespread simulation program packages is Geant4. Almost all physical interaction processes can be included. However, it is not evident what accuracy can be obtained by a simulation. In this work, results of scattering experiments using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the X-ray regime are quantitatively compared to the results of simulations using Geant4. Experiments were performed for various scattering foils made of different materials such as copper and gold. For energy-dispersive measurements of the scattered radiation, a cadmium telluride detector was used. The detector was fully characterized and calibrated with calculable undispersed as well as monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The obtained quantum efficiency and the response functions are in very good agreement with the corresponding Geant4 simulations. At the electron storage ring BESSY II the number of incident photons in the scattering experiments was measured with a photodiode that had been calibrated against a cryogenic radiometer, so that a direct comparison of scattering experiments with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 was possible. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photoeffect, including fluorescence as well as the Compton and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy, resulting in a deviation of typically less than 20%. Even polarization effects are widely covered by Geant4, and for Doppler broadening of Compton-scattered radiation the extension G4LECS can be included, but the fact that both features cannot be combined is a limitation. For most polarization-dependent simulations, good agreement with the experimental results was found, except for some orientations where Rayleigh scattering was overestimated in the simulation.

  12. Comparison of scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Krumrey, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Michael.Krumrey@ptb.de; Cibik, L.; Mueller, P.; Ulm, G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-09-11

    Monte Carlo techniques are powerful tools to simulate the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. One of the most widespread simulation program packages is Geant4. Almost all physical interaction processes can be included. However, it is not evident what accuracy can be obtained by a simulation. In this work, results of scattering experiments using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the X-ray regime are quantitatively compared to the results of simulations using Geant4. Experiments were performed for various scattering foils made of different materials such as copper and gold. For energy-dispersive measurements of the scattered radiation, a cadmium telluride detector was used. The detector was fully characterized and calibrated with calculable undispersed as well as monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The obtained quantum efficiency and the response functions are in very good agreement with the corresponding Geant4 simulations. At the electron storage ring BESSY II the number of incident photons in the scattering experiments was measured with a photodiode that had been calibrated against a cryogenic radiometer, so that a direct comparison of scattering experiments with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 was possible. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photoeffect, including fluorescence as well as the Compton and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy, resulting in a deviation of typically less than 20%. Even polarization effects are widely covered by Geant4, and for Doppler broadening of Compton-scattered radiation the extension G4LECS can be included, but the fact that both features cannot be combined is a limitation. For most polarization-dependent simulations, good agreement with the experimental results was found, except for some orientations where Rayleigh scattering was overestimated in the simulation.

  13. Monte Carlo design, dosimetry and radiation protection studies for a new mobile electron accelerator for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysocka-Rabin, A.

    2013-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) delivers a large, single fraction dose of radiation to a surgically exposed tumor or tumor bed. This presentation reviews the design concept and dosimetry characteristics of an electron beam forming system for an IORT accelerator, with special emphasis on beam flatness, X-ray contamination and protecting personnel from dose delivered outside the treatment field. The Monte Carlo code, BEAMnrc/EGSnrc, was used to design, verify and optimize the electron beam forming system for two different docking methods with circular metallic applicators. Calculations of therapeutic beam characteristics were performed at the patient surface. Findings were obtained for initially mono-energetic electron beams with an energy range from 4 to 12 MeV, SSD equal to 60 cm, and circular applicators with diameters from 3 to 12 cm. The aim was to build an electron beam forming system (collimators, scattering-flattening foils, applicators) that is universal for all beam energy and field diameters described above

  14. MONTE CARLO RADIATION TRANSFER SIMULATIONS OF PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION IN LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzati, Davide [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, 301 Weniger Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    We present MCRaT, a Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer code for self-consistently computing the light curves and spectra of the photospheric emission from relativistic, unmagnetized jets. We apply MCRaT to a relativistic hydrodynamic simulation of a long-duration gamma-ray burst jet, and present the resulting light curves and time-dependent spectra for observers at various angles from the jet axis. We compare our results to observational results and find that photospheric emission is a viable model to explain the prompt phase of long-duration gamma-ray bursts at the peak frequency and above, but faces challenges when reproducing the flat spectrum below the peak frequency. We finally discuss possible limitations of these results both in terms of the hydrodynamics and the radiation transfer and how these limitations could affect the conclusions that we present.

  15. Vectorization and parallelization of Monte-Carlo programs for calculation of radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, R.

    1995-01-01

    The versatile MCNP-3B Monte-Carlo code written in FORTRAN77, for simulation of the radiation transport of neutral particles, has been subjected to vectorization and parallelization of essential parts, without touching its versatility. Vectorization is not dependent on a specific computer. Several sample tasks have been selected in order to test the vectorized MCNP-3B code in comparison to the scalar MNCP-3B code. The samples are a representative example of the 3-D calculations to be performed for simulation of radiation transport in neutron and reactor physics. (1) 4πneutron detector. (2) High-energy calorimeter. (3) PROTEUS benchmark (conversion rates and neutron multiplication factors for the HCLWR (High Conversion Light Water Reactor)). (orig./HP) [de

  16. Applications Of Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Simulation Techniques For Predicting Single Event Effects In Microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Kevin; Reed, Robert; Weller, Robert; Mendenhall, Marcus; Sierawski, Brian; Schrimpf, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    MRED (Monte Carlo Radiative Energy Deposition) is Vanderbilt University's Geant4 application for simulating radiation events in semiconductors. Geant4 is comprised of the best available computational physics models for the transport of radiation through matter. In addition to basic radiation transport physics contained in the Geant4 core, MRED has the capability to track energy loss in tetrahedral geometric objects, includes a cross section biasing and track weighting technique for variance reduction, and additional features relevant to semiconductor device applications. The crucial element of predicting Single Event Upset (SEU) parameters using radiation transport software is the creation of a dosimetry model that accurately approximates the net collected charge at transistor contacts as a function of deposited energy. The dosimetry technique described here is the multiple sensitive volume (MSV) model. It is shown to be a reasonable approximation of the charge collection process and its parameters can be calibrated to experimental measurements of SEU cross sections. The MSV model, within the framework of MRED, is examined for heavy ion and high-energy proton SEU measurements of a static random access memory.

  17. Review of the Monte Carlo and deterministic codes in radiation protection and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagziria, H

    2000-02-01

    Modelling a physical system can be carried out either stochastically or deterministically. An example of the former method is the Monte Carlo technique, in which statistically approximate methods are applied to exact models. No transport equation is solved as individual particles are simulated and some specific aspect (tally) of their average behaviour is recorded. The average behaviour of the physical system is then inferred using the central limit theorem. In contrast, deterministic codes use mathematically exact methods that are applied to approximate models to solve the transport equation for the average particle behaviour. The physical system is subdivided in boxes in the phase-space system and particles are followed from one box to the next. The smaller the boxes the better the approximations become. Although the Monte Carlo method has been used for centuries, its more recent manifestation has really emerged from the Manhattan project of the Word War II. Its invention is thought to be mainly due to Metropolis, Ulah (through his interest in poker), Fermi, von Neuman andRichtmeyer. Over the last 20 years or so, the Monte Carlo technique has become a powerful tool in radiation transport. This is due to users taking full advantage of richer cross section data, more powerful computers and Monte Carlo techniques for radiation transport, with high quality physics and better known source spectra. This method is a common sense approach to radiation transport and its success and popularity is quite often also due to necessity, because measurements are not always possible or affordable. In the Monte Carlo method, which is inherently realistic because nature is statistical, a more detailed physics is made possible by isolation of events while rather elaborate geometries can be modelled. Provided that the physics is correct, a simulation is exactly analogous to an experimenter counting particles. In contrast to the deterministic approach, however, a disadvantage of the

  18. Monte Carlo based treatment planning for modulated electron beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Michael C. [Radiation Physics Division, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)]. E-mail: mclee@reyes.stanford.edu; Deng Jun; Li Jinsheng; Jiang, Steve B.; Ma, C.-M. [Radiation Physics Division, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2001-08-01

    A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system for modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) is presented. This new variation of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) utilizes an electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) to deliver non-uniform intensity maps at several electron energies. In this way, conformal dose distributions are delivered to irregular targets located a few centimetres below the surface while sparing deeper-lying normal anatomy. Planning for MERT begins with Monte Carlo generation of electron beamlets. Electrons are transported with proper in-air scattering and the dose is tallied in the phantom for each beamlet. An optimized beamlet plan may be calculated using inverse-planning methods. Step-and-shoot leaf sequences are generated for the intensity maps and dose distributions recalculated using Monte Carlo simulations. Here, scatter and leakage from the leaves are properly accounted for by transporting electrons through the eMLC geometry. The weights for the segments of the plan are re-optimized with the leaf positions fixed and bremsstrahlung leakage and electron scatter doses included. This optimization gives the final optimized plan. It is shown that a significant portion of the calculation time is spent transporting particles in the leaves. However, this is necessary since optimizing segment weights based on a model in which leaf transport is ignored results in an improperly optimized plan with overdosing of target and critical structures. A method of rapidly calculating the bremsstrahlung contribution is presented and shown to be an efficient solution to this problem. A homogeneous model target and a 2D breast plan are presented. The potential use of this tool in clinical planning is discussed. (author)

  19. Toolkit for high performance Monte Carlo radiation transport and activation calculations for shielding applications in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serikov, A.; Fischer, U.; Grosse, D.; Leichtle, D.; Majerle, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most suitable computational technique of radiation transport for shielding applications in fusion neutronics. This paper is intended for sharing the results of long term experience of the fusion neutronics group at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in radiation shielding calculations with the MCNP5 code for the ITER fusion reactor with emphasizing on the use of several ITER project-driven computer programs developed at KIT. Two of them, McCad and R2S, seem to be the most useful in radiation shielding analyses. The McCad computer graphical tool allows to perform automatic conversion of the MCNP models from the underlying CAD (CATIA) data files, while the R2S activation interface couples the MCNP radiation transport with the FISPACT activation allowing to estimate nuclear responses such as dose rate and nuclear heating after the ITER reactor shutdown. The cell-based R2S scheme was applied in shutdown photon dose analysis for the designing of the In-Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) and the Glow Discharge Cleaning (GDC) unit in ITER. Newly developed at KIT mesh-based R2S feature was successfully tested on the shutdown dose rate calculations for the upper port in the Neutral Beam (NB) cell of ITER. The merits of McCad graphical program were broadly acknowledged by the neutronic analysts and its continuous improvement at KIT has introduced its stable and more convenient run with its Graphical User Interface. Detailed 3D ITER neutronic modeling with the MCNP Monte Carlo method requires a lot of computation resources, inevitably leading to parallel calculations on clusters. Performance assessments of the MCNP5 parallel runs on the JUROPA/HPC-FF supercomputer cluster permitted to find the optimal number of processors for ITER-type runs. (author)

  20. Premar-2: a Monte Carlo code for radiative transport simulation in atmospheric environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupini, E.

    1999-01-01

    The peculiarities of the PREMAR-2 code, aimed at radiation transport Monte Carlo simulation in atmospheric environments in the infrared-ultraviolet frequency range, are described. With respect to the previously developed PREMAR code, besides plane multilayers, spherical multilayers and finite sequences of vertical layers, each one with its own atmospheric behaviour, are foreseen in the new code, together with the refraction phenomenon, so that long range, highly slanted paths can now be more faithfully taken into account. A zenithal angular dependence of the albedo coefficient has moreover been introduced. Lidar systems, with spatially independent source and telescope, are allowed again to be simulated, and, in this latest version of the code, sensitivity analyses to be performed. According to this last feasibility, consequences on radiation transport of small perturbations in physical components of the atmospheric environment may be analyze and the related effects on searched results estimated. The availability of a library of physical data (reaction coefficients, phase functions and refraction indexes) is required by the code, providing the essential features of the environment of interest needed of the Monte Carlo simulation. Variance reducing techniques have been enhanced in the Premar-2 code, by introducing, for instance, a local forced collision technique, especially apt to be used in Lidar system simulations. Encouraging comparisons between code and experimental results carried out at the Brasimone Centre of ENEA, have so far been obtained, even if further checks of the code are to be performed [it

  1. Development and validation of Monte Carlo dose computations for contrast-enhanced stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vautrin, M.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) is an innovative technique based on localized dose-enhancement effects obtained by reinforced photoelectric absorption in the tumor. Medium energy monochromatic X-rays (50 - 100 keV) are used for irradiating tumors previously loaded with a high-Z element. Clinical trials of SSRT are being prepared at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), an iodinated contrast agent will be used. In order to compute the energy deposited in the patient (dose), a dedicated treatment planning system (TPS) has been developed for the clinical trials, based on the ISOgray TPS. This work focuses on the SSRT specific modifications of the TPS, especially to the PENELOPE-based Monte Carlo dose engine. The TPS uses a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation of medium energy polarized photons to compute the deposited energy in the patient. Simulations are performed considering the synchrotron source, the modeled beamline geometry and finally the patient. Specific materials were also implemented in the voxelized geometry of the patient, to consider iodine concentrations in the tumor. The computation process has been optimized and parallelized. Finally a specific computation of absolute doses and associated irradiation times (instead of monitor units) was implemented. The dedicated TPS was validated with depth dose curves, dose profiles and absolute dose measurements performed at the ESRF in a water tank and solid water phantoms with or without bone slabs. (author) [fr

  2. Quantitative comparisons between experimentally measured 2-D carbon radiation and Monte Carlo impurity (MCI) code simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.; Leonard, A.W.; West, W.P.; Finkenthal, D.F.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Porter, G.D.

    1998-08-01

    Experimentally measured carbon line emissions and total radiated power distributions from the DIII-D divertor and Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) are compared to those calculated with the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) model. A UEDGE background plasma is used in MCI with the Roth and Garcia-Rosales (RG-R) chemical sputtering model and/or one of six physical sputtering models. While results from these simulations do not reproduce all of the features seen in the experimentally measured radiation patterns, the total radiated power calculated in MCI is in relatively good agreement with that measured by the DIII-D bolometric system when the Smith78 physical sputtering model is coupled to RG-R chemical sputtering in an unaltered UEDGE plasma. Alternatively, MCI simulations done with UEDGE background ion temperatures along the divertor target plates adjusted to better match those measured in the experiment resulted in three physical sputtering models which when coupled to the RG-R model gave a total radiated power that was within 10% of measured value

  3. Evaluation of light Collection in Radiation Portal Monitor with Multi PMTs using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chang Hwy; Park, Jong Won; Lee, Junghee; Moon, Myung Kook; Kim, Jongyul; Lee, Suhyun

    2015-01-01

    A plastic scintillator in the RPM is suited for the γ-ray detection of various-range energy and is the cost effective radiation detection material. In order to well inspect emitted radiation from the container cargo, the radiation detection area of a plastic scintillator should be larger than other general purpose radiation detector. However, the large size plastic scintillator affects the light collection efficiency at the photo-sensitive sensor due to the long light transport distance and light collisions in a plastic scintillator. Therefore, the improvement of light collection efficiency in a RPM is one of the major issues for the high performance RPM development. We calculated the change of the number of collected light according to changing of the attachment position and number of PMT. To calculate the number of collected light, the DETECT2000 and MCNP6 Monte Carlo simulation software tool was used. Response signal performance of RPM system is affected by the position of the incident radiation. If the distance between the radiation source and a PMT is long, the number of loss signal is larger. Generally, PMTs for signal detection in RPM system has been attached on one side of plastic scintillator. In contrast, RPM model in the study have 2 PMTs, which attached at the two side of plastic scintillator. We estimated difference between results using the old method and our method. According to results, uniformity of response signal was better than method using one side. If additive simulation and experiment is performed, it will be possible to develop the improved RPM system. In the future, we will perform additive simulation about many difference RPM model

  4. Evaluation of light Collection in Radiation Portal Monitor with Multi PMTs using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chang Hwy; Park, Jong Won; Lee, Junghee [Korea Research Institute of Ships and Ocean Engineering, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myung Kook; Kim, Jongyul; Lee, Suhyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A plastic scintillator in the RPM is suited for the γ-ray detection of various-range energy and is the cost effective radiation detection material. In order to well inspect emitted radiation from the container cargo, the radiation detection area of a plastic scintillator should be larger than other general purpose radiation detector. However, the large size plastic scintillator affects the light collection efficiency at the photo-sensitive sensor due to the long light transport distance and light collisions in a plastic scintillator. Therefore, the improvement of light collection efficiency in a RPM is one of the major issues for the high performance RPM development. We calculated the change of the number of collected light according to changing of the attachment position and number of PMT. To calculate the number of collected light, the DETECT2000 and MCNP6 Monte Carlo simulation software tool was used. Response signal performance of RPM system is affected by the position of the incident radiation. If the distance between the radiation source and a PMT is long, the number of loss signal is larger. Generally, PMTs for signal detection in RPM system has been attached on one side of plastic scintillator. In contrast, RPM model in the study have 2 PMTs, which attached at the two side of plastic scintillator. We estimated difference between results using the old method and our method. According to results, uniformity of response signal was better than method using one side. If additive simulation and experiment is performed, it will be possible to develop the improved RPM system. In the future, we will perform additive simulation about many difference RPM model.

  5. Monte Carlo simulations for the space radiation superconducting shield project (SR2S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuolo, M; Giraudo, M; Musenich, R; Calvelli, V; Ambroglini, F; Burger, W J; Battiston, R

    2016-02-01

    Astronauts on deep-space long-duration missions will be exposed for long time to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE). The exposure to space radiation could lead to both acute and late effects in the crew members and well defined countermeasures do not exist nowadays. The simplest solution given by optimized passive shielding is not able to reduce the dose deposited by GCRs below the actual dose limits, therefore other solutions, such as active shielding employing superconducting magnetic fields, are under study. In the framework of the EU FP7 SR2S Project - Space Radiation Superconducting Shield--a toroidal magnetic system based on MgB2 superconductors has been analyzed through detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 interface GRAS. Spacecraft and magnets were modeled together with a simplified mechanical structure supporting the coils. Radiation transport through magnetic fields and materials was simulated for a deep-space mission scenario, considering for the first time the effect of secondary particles produced in the passage of space radiation through the active shielding and spacecraft structures. When modeling the structures supporting the active shielding systems and the habitat, the radiation protection efficiency of the magnetic field is severely decreasing compared to the one reported in previous studies, when only the magnetic field was modeled around the crew. This is due to the large production of secondary radiation taking place in the material surrounding the habitat. Copyright © 2016 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation doses in volume-of-interest breast computed tomography—A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chao-Jen, E-mail: cjlai3711@gmail.com; Zhong, Yuncheng; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C. [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cone beam breast computed tomography (breast CT) with true three-dimensional, nearly isotropic spatial resolution has been developed and investigated over the past decade to overcome the problem of lesions overlapping with breast anatomical structures on two-dimensional mammographic images. However, the ability of breast CT to detect small objects, such as tissue structure edges and small calcifications, is limited. To resolve this problem, the authors proposed and developed a volume-of-interest (VOI) breast CT technique to image a small VOI using a higher radiation dose to improve that region’s visibility. In this study, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to estimate average breast dose and average glandular dose (AGD) for the VOI breast CT technique. Methods: Electron–Gamma-Shower system code-based Monte Carlo codes were used to simulate breast CT. The Monte Carlo codes estimated were validated using physical measurements of air kerma ratios and point doses in phantoms with an ion chamber and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. The validated full cone x-ray source was then collimated to simulate half cone beam x-rays to image digital pendant-geometry, hemi-ellipsoidal, homogeneous breast phantoms and to estimate breast doses with full field scans. 13-cm in diameter, 10-cm long hemi-ellipsoidal homogeneous phantoms were used to simulate median breasts. Breast compositions of 25% and 50% volumetric glandular fractions (VGFs) were used to investigate the influence on breast dose. The simulated half cone beam x-rays were then collimated to a narrow x-ray beam with an area of 2.5 × 2.5 cm{sup 2} field of view at the isocenter plane and to perform VOI field scans. The Monte Carlo results for the full field scans and the VOI field scans were then used to estimate the AGD for the VOI breast CT technique. Results: The ratios of air kerma ratios and dose measurement results from the Monte Carlo simulation to those from the physical

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of muon radiation environment in China Jinping Underground Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Jian; Zeng Zhi; Liu Yue; Yue Qian; Ma Hao; Cheng Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Muon radiation background of China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL) was simulated by Monte Carlo method. According to the Gaisser formula and the MUSIC soft, the model of cosmic ray muons was established. Then the yield and the average energy of muon-induced photons and muon-induced neutrons were simulated by FLUKA. With the single-energy approximation, the contribution to the radiation background of shielding structure by secondary photons and neutrons was evaluated. The estimation results show that the average energy of residual muons is 369 GeV and the flux is 3.17 × 10 -6 m -2 · s -1 . The fluence rate of secondary photons is about 1.57 × 10 -4 m -2 · s -1 , and the fluence rate of secondary neutrons is about 8.37 × 10 -7 m -2 · s -1 . The muon radiation background of CJPL is lower than those of most other underground laboratories in the world. (authors)

  8. Accelerating execution of the integrated TIGER series Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.M.; Hochstedler, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    Execution of the integrated TIGER series (ITS) of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport codes has been accelerated by modifying the FORTRAN source code for more efficient computation. Each member code of ITS was benchmarked and profiled with a specific test case that directed the acceleration effort toward the most computationally intensive subroutines. Techniques for accelerating these subroutines included replacing linear search algorithms with binary versions, replacing the pseudo-random number generator, reducing program memory allocation, and proofing the input files for geometrical redundancies. All techniques produced identical or statistically similar results to the original code. Final benchmark timing of the accelerated code resulted in speed-up factors of 2.00 for TIGER (the one-dimensional slab geometry code), 1.74 for CYLTRAN (the two-dimensional cylindrical geometry code), and 1.90 for ACCEPT (the arbitrary three-dimensional geometry code)

  9. Biological effect produced by ionizing radiations on occupational workers in Carlos Andrade Marin Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias Pullaguari, Ines Yolanda

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the biological effects on occupational workers. In this study, have made a bibliographic review of the changes on skin of 217 professionals; between 21 and 70 years radiologists, X-ray technicians, radioisotope workers, nurses and others, which were exposed to ionizing radiation, in the departments of Diagnosis and Treatment of the Hospital Carlos Andrade Marin of the Quito city. From this universe 133 workers were excluded of the analysis. From the totality of lesions produced on the skin; the depilation constituted 40.18%, hyper pigmentation 19.34%, hypo pigmentation 9 %, capillary fragility 13.39%, erythema 13.39%, alopecia 5.37%. From the totality of lesions produced in blood: the leukopenia constituted 20.23% between all workers. The percentage method was used for statical calculation. A bibliographic update is done and the most relevant clinical aspects are reviewed. (The author)

  10. Accelerating execution of the integrated TIGER series Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. M.; Hochstedler, R. D.

    1997-02-01

    Execution of the integrated TIGER series (ITS) of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport codes has been accelerated by modifying the FORTRAN source code for more efficient computation. Each member code of ITS was benchmarked and profiled with a specific test case that directed the acceleration effort toward the most computationally intensive subroutines. Techniques for accelerating these subroutines included replacing linear search algorithms with binary versions, replacing the pseudo-random number generator, reducing program memory allocation, and proofing the input files for geometrical redundancies. All techniques produced identical or statistically similar results to the original code. Final benchmark timing of the accelerated code resulted in speed-up factors of 2.00 for TIGER (the one-dimensional slab geometry code), 1.74 for CYLTRAN (the two-dimensional cylindrical geometry code), and 1.90 for ACCEPT (the arbitrary three-dimensional geometry code).

  11. Monte Carlo modeling of fiber-scintillator flow-cell radiation detector geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, T.L.; Ross, H.H.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville; Schweitzer, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    A Monte Carlo computer calculation is described which models the geometric efficiency of a fiber-scintillator flow-cell radiation detector designed to detect radiolabeled compounds in liquid chromatography eluates. By using special mathematical techniques, an efficiency prediction with a precision of 1% is obtained after generating only 1000 random events. Good agreement is seen between predicted and experimental efficiency except for very low energy beta emission where the geometric limitation on efficiency is overcome by pulse height limitations which the model does not consider. The modeling results show that in the test system, the detection efficiency for low energy beta emitters is limited primarily by light generation and collection rather than geometry. (orig.)

  12. Uncertainties in personal dosimetry for external radiation: A Monte Carlo approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dijk, J. W. E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the possibilities of numerical methods for uncertainty analysis of personal dosimetry systems. Using a numerical method based on Monte Carlo sampling the probability density function (PDF) of the dose measured using a personal dosemeter can be calculated using type-test measurements. From this PDF the combined standard uncertainty in the measurements with the dosemeter and the confidence interval can be calculated. The method calculates the output PDF directly from the PDFs of the inputs of the system such as the spectral distribution of the radiation and distributions of detector parameters like sensitivity and zero signal. The method can be used not only in its own right but also for validating other methods because it is not limited by restrictions that apply to using the Law of Propagation of Uncertainty and the Central Limit Theorem. The use of the method is demonstrated using the type-test data of the NRG-TLD. (authors)

  13. Description of a neutron field perturbed by a probe using coupled Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zazula, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    This work concerns calculation of a neutron response, caused by a neutron field perturbed by materials surrounding the source or the detector. Solution of a problem is obtained using coupling of the Monte Carlo radiation transport computation for the perturbed region and the discrete ordinates transport computation for the unperturbed system. (author). 62 refs

  14. Evaluation of absorbed radiation dose in mammography using Monte Carlo simulation; Avaliacao da dose absorvida em mamografia usando simulacao Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Bruno L.; Tomal, Alessandra [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin

    2016-07-01

    Mammography is the main tool for breast cancer diagnosis, and it is based on the use of X-rays to obtain images. However, the glandular tissue present within the breast is highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, and therefore requires strict quality control in order to minimize the absorbed dose. The quantification of the absorbed dose in the breast tissue can be done by using Monte Carlo simulation, which allows a detailed study of the deposition of energy in different regions of the breast. Besides, the results obtained from the simulation can be associated with experimental data and provide values of dose interest, such as the dose deposited in glandular tissue. (author)

  15. A novel radiation detector for removing scattered radiation in chest radiography: Monte Carlo simulation-based performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Y. H.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, K.; Kim, J.; Kim, J.; Morishita, J.

    2016-10-01

    Scattered radiation is the main reason for the degradation of image quality and the increased patient exposure dose in diagnostic radiology. In an effort to reduce scattered radiation, a novel structure of an indirect flat panel detector has been proposed. In this study, a performance evaluation of the novel system in terms of image contrast as well as an estimation of the number of photons incident on the detector and the grid exposure factor were conducted using Monte Carlo simulations. The image contrast of the proposed system was superior to that of the no-grid system but slightly inferior to that of the parallel-grid system. The number of photons incident on the detector and the grid exposure factor of the novel system were higher than those of the parallel-grid system but lower than those of the no-grid system. The proposed system exhibited the potential for reduced exposure dose without image quality degradation; additionally, can be further improved by a structural optimization considering the manufacturer's specifications of its lead contents.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of the sequential probability ratio test for radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coop, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program simulates the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) using Monte Carlo techniques. The program, SEQTEST, performs random-number sampling of either a Poisson or normal distribution to simulate radiation monitoring data. The results are in terms of the detection probabilities and the average time required for a trial. The computed SPRT results can be compared with tabulated single interval test (SIT) values to determine the better statistical test for particular monitoring applications. Use of the SPRT in a hand-and-foot alpha monitor shows that the SPRT provides better detection probabilities while generally requiring less counting time. Calculations are also performed for a monitor where the SPRT is not permitted to the take longer than the single interval test. Although the performance of the SPRT is degraded by this restriction, the detection probabilities are still similar to the SIT values, and average counting times are always less than 75% of the SIT time. Some optimal conditions for use of the SPRT are described. The SPRT should be the test of choice in many radiation monitoring situations. 6 references, 8 figures, 1 table

  17. Monte Carlo treatment of resonance-radiation imprisonment in fluorescent lamps—revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James B.

    2016-12-01

    We reported in 1985 a Monte Carlo treatment of the imprisonment of the 253.7 nm resonance radiation from mercury in the mercury-argon discharge of fluorescent lamps. The calculated spectra of the emitted radiation were found in good agreement with measured spectra. The addition of the isotope mercury-196 to natural mercury was found, also in agreement with experiments, to increase lamp efficiency. In this paper we report the extension of the earlier work with increased accuracy, analysis of photon exit-time distributions, recycling of energy released in quenching, analysis of dynamic similarity for different lamp sizes, variation of Mrozowski transfer rates, prediction and analysis of the hyperfine ultra-violet spectra, and optimization of tailored mercury isotope mixtures for increased lamp efficiency. The spectra were found insensitive to the extent of quenching and recycling. The optimized mixtures were found to increase efficiencies by as much as 5% for several lamp configurations. Optimization without increasing the mercury-196 fraction was found to increase efficiencies by nearly 1% for several configurations.

  18. Monte Carlo treatment of resonance-radiation imprisonment in fluorescent lamps—revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, James B

    2016-01-01

    We reported in 1985 a Monte Carlo treatment of the imprisonment of the 253.7 nm resonance radiation from mercury in the mercury–argon discharge of fluorescent lamps. The calculated spectra of the emitted radiation were found in good agreement with measured spectra. The addition of the isotope mercury-196 to natural mercury was found, also in agreement with experiments, to increase lamp efficiency. In this paper we report the extension of the earlier work with increased accuracy, analysis of photon exit-time distributions, recycling of energy released in quenching, analysis of dynamic similarity for different lamp sizes, variation of Mrozowski transfer rates, prediction and analysis of the hyperfine ultra-violet spectra, and optimization of tailored mercury isotope mixtures for increased lamp efficiency. The spectra were found insensitive to the extent of quenching and recycling. The optimized mixtures were found to increase efficiencies by as much as 5% for several lamp configurations. Optimization without increasing the mercury-196 fraction was found to increase efficiencies by nearly 1% for several configurations. (paper)

  19. Estimation of snow albedo reduction by light absorbing impurities using Monte Carlo radiative transfer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, D.; Gao, L.; Wilcox, E. M.; Beres, N. D.; Moosmüller, H.; Khlystov, A.

    2017-12-01

    Radiative forcing and climate change greatly depends on earth's surface albedo and its temporal and spatial variation. The surface albedo varies greatly depending on the surface characteristics ranging from 5-10% for calm ocean waters to 80% for some snow-covered areas. Clean and fresh snow surfaces have the highest albedo and are most sensitive to contamination with light absorbing impurities that can greatly reduce surface albedo and change overall radiative forcing estimates. Accurate estimation of snow albedo as well as understanding of feedbacks on climate from changes in snow-covered areas is important for radiative forcing, snow energy balance, predicting seasonal snowmelt, and run off rates. Such information is essential to inform timely decision making of stakeholders and policy makers. Light absorbing particles deposited onto the snow surface can greatly alter snow albedo and have been identified as a major contributor to regional climate forcing if seasonal snow cover is involved. However, uncertainty associated with quantification of albedo reduction by these light absorbing particles is high. Here, we use Mie theory (under the assumption of spherical snow grains) to reconstruct the single scattering parameters of snow (i.e., single scattering albedo ῶ and asymmetry parameter g) from observation-based size distribution information and retrieved refractive index values. The single scattering parameters of impurities are extracted with the same approach from datasets obtained during laboratory combustion of biomass samples. Instead of using plane-parallel approximation methods to account for multiple scattering, we have used the simple "Monte Carlo ray/photon tracing approach" to calculate the snow albedo. This simple approach considers multiple scattering to be the "collection" of single scattering events. Using this approach, we vary the effective snow grain size and impurity concentrations to explore the evolution of snow albedo over a wide

  20. Elaboration of collisional–radiative models for flows related to planetary entries into the Earth and Mars atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultel, Arnaud; Annaloro, Julien

    2013-01-01

    The most relevant way to predict the excited state number density in a nonequilibrium plasma is to elaborate a collisional–radiative (CR) model taking into account most of the collisional and radiative elementary processes. Three examples of such an elaboration are given in this paper in the case of various plasma flows related to planetary atmospheric entries. The case of theoretical determination of nitrogen atom ionization or recombination global rate coefficients under electron impact is addressed first. The global rate coefficient can be implemented in multidimensional computational fluid dynamics calculations. The case of relaxation after a shock front crossing a gas of N 2 molecules treated in the framework of the Rankine–Hugoniot assumptions is also studied. The vibrational and electronic specific CR model elaborated in this case allows one to understand how the plasma reaches equilibrium and to estimate the role of the radiative losses. These radiative losses play a significant role at low pressure in the third case studied. This case concerns CO 2 plasma jets inductively generated in high enthalpy wind tunnels used as ground test facilities. We focus our attention on the behaviour of CO and C 2 electronic excited states, the radiative signature of which can be particularly significant in this type of plasma. These three cases illustrate the elaboration of CR models and their coupling with balance equations. (paper)

  1. Determination of peripheral underdosage at the lung-tumor interface using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Michael; Dunn, Leon; Kron, Tomas; Height, Felicity; Franich, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of dose distributions in close proximity to interfaces is difficult. In the context of radiotherapy of lung tumors, this may affect the minimum dose received by lesions and is particularly important when prescribing dose to covering isodoses. The objective of this work is to quantify underdosage in key regions around a hypothetical target using Monte Carlo dose calculation methods, and to develop a factor for clinical estimation of such underdosage. A systematic set of calculations are undertaken using 2 Monte Carlo radiation transport codes (EGSnrc and GEANT4). Discrepancies in dose are determined for a number of parameters, including beam energy, tumor size, field size, and distance from chest wall. Calculations were performed for 1-mm 3 regions at proximal, distal, and lateral aspects of a spherical tumor, determined for a 6-MV and a 15-MV photon beam. The simulations indicate regions of tumor underdose at the tumor-lung interface. Results are presented as ratios of the dose at key peripheral regions to the dose at the center of the tumor, a point at which the treatment planning system (TPS) predicts the dose more reliably. Comparison with TPS data (pencil-beam convolution) indicates such underdosage would not have been predicted accurately in the clinic. We define a dose reduction factor (DRF) as the average of the dose in the periphery in the 6 cardinal directions divided by the central dose in the target, the mean of which is 0.97 and 0.95 for a 6-MV and 15-MV beam, respectively. The DRF can assist clinicians in the estimation of the magnitude of potential discrepancies between prescribed and delivered dose distributions as a function of tumor size and location. Calculation for a systematic set of “generic” tumors allows application to many classes of patient case, and is particularly useful for interpreting clinical trial data.

  2. Determination of peripheral underdosage at the lung-tumor interface using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Michael, E-mail: michael.taylor@rmit.edu.au [School of Applied Sciences, College of Science, Engineering and Health, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Dunn, Leon; Kron, Tomas; Height, Felicity; Franich, Rick [School of Applied Sciences, College of Science, Engineering and Health, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2012-04-01

    Prediction of dose distributions in close proximity to interfaces is difficult. In the context of radiotherapy of lung tumors, this may affect the minimum dose received by lesions and is particularly important when prescribing dose to covering isodoses. The objective of this work is to quantify underdosage in key regions around a hypothetical target using Monte Carlo dose calculation methods, and to develop a factor for clinical estimation of such underdosage. A systematic set of calculations are undertaken using 2 Monte Carlo radiation transport codes (EGSnrc and GEANT4). Discrepancies in dose are determined for a number of parameters, including beam energy, tumor size, field size, and distance from chest wall. Calculations were performed for 1-mm{sup 3} regions at proximal, distal, and lateral aspects of a spherical tumor, determined for a 6-MV and a 15-MV photon beam. The simulations indicate regions of tumor underdose at the tumor-lung interface. Results are presented as ratios of the dose at key peripheral regions to the dose at the center of the tumor, a point at which the treatment planning system (TPS) predicts the dose more reliably. Comparison with TPS data (pencil-beam convolution) indicates such underdosage would not have been predicted accurately in the clinic. We define a dose reduction factor (DRF) as the average of the dose in the periphery in the 6 cardinal directions divided by the central dose in the target, the mean of which is 0.97 and 0.95 for a 6-MV and 15-MV beam, respectively. The DRF can assist clinicians in the estimation of the magnitude of potential discrepancies between prescribed and delivered dose distributions as a function of tumor size and location. Calculation for a systematic set of 'generic' tumors allows application to many classes of patient case, and is particularly useful for interpreting clinical trial data.

  3. Modelling massive-star feedback with Monte Carlo radiation hydrodynamics: photoionization and radiation pressure in a turbulent cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmad; Harries, Tim J.; Douglas, Thomas A.

    2018-04-01

    We simulate a self-gravitating, turbulent cloud of 1000M⊙ with photoionization and radiation pressure feedback from a 34M⊙ star. We use a detailed Monte Carlo radiative transfer scheme alongside the hydrodynamics to compute photoionization and thermal equilibrium with dust grains and multiple atomic species. Using these gas temperatures, dust temperatures, and ionization fractions, we produce self-consistent synthetic observations of line and continuum emission. We find that all material is dispersed from the (15.5pc)3 grid within 1.6Myr or 0.74 free-fall times. Mass exits with a peak flux of 2× 10-3M⊙yr-1, showing efficient gas dispersal. The model without radiation pressure has a slight delay in the breakthrough of ionization, but overall its effects are negligible. 85 per cent of the volume, and 40 per cent of the mass, become ionized - dense filaments resist ionization and are swept up into spherical cores with pillars that point radially away from the ionizing star. We use free-free emission at 20cm to estimate the production rate of ionizing photons. This is almost always underestimated: by a factor of a few at early stages, then by orders of magnitude as mass leaves the volume. We also test the ratio of dust continuum surface brightnesses at 450 and 850μ to probe dust temperatures. This underestimates the actual temperature by more than a factor of 2 in areas of low column density or high line-of-sight temperature dispersion; the HII region cavity is particularly prone to this discrepancy. However, the probe is accurate in dense locations such as filaments.

  4. Monte Carlo-based dose reconstruction in a rat model for scattered ionizing radiation investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Anna; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-09-01

    In radiation biology, rats are often irradiated, but the precise dose distributions are often lacking, particularly in areas that receive scatter radiation. We used a non-dedicated set of resources to calculate detailed dose distributions, including doses to peripheral organs well outside of the primary field, in common rat exposure settings. We conducted a detailed dose reconstruction in a rat through an analog to the conventional human treatment planning process. The process consisted of: (i) Characterizing source properties of an X-ray irradiator system, (ii) acquiring a computed tomography (CT) scan of a rat model, and (iii) using a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine to generate the dose distribution within the rat model. We considered cranial and liver irradiation scenarios where the rest of the body was protected by a lead shield. Organs of interest were the brain, liver and gonads. The study also included paired scenarios where the dose to adjacent, shielded rats was determined as a potential control for analysis of bystander effects. We established the precise doses and dose distributions delivered to the peripheral organs in single and paired rats. Mean doses to non-targeted organs in irradiated rats ranged from 0.03-0.1% of the reference platform dose. Mean doses to the adjacent rat peripheral organs were consistent to within 10% those of the directly irradiated rat. This work provided details of dose distributions in rat models under common irradiation conditions and established an effective scenario for delivering only scattered radiation consistent with that in a directly irradiated rat.

  5. GPU-BASED MONTE CARLO DUST RADIATIVE TRANSFER SCHEME APPLIED TO ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heymann, Frank; Siebenmorgen, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional parallel Monte Carlo (MC) dust radiative transfer code is presented. To overcome the huge computing-time requirements of MC treatments, the computational power of vectorized hardware is used, utilizing either multi-core computer power or graphics processing units. The approach is a self-consistent way to solve the radiative transfer equation in arbitrary dust configurations. The code calculates the equilibrium temperatures of two populations of large grains and stochastic heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Anisotropic scattering is treated applying the Heney-Greenstein phase function. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the object is derived at low spatial resolution by a photon counting procedure and at high spatial resolution by a vectorized ray tracer. The latter allows computation of high signal-to-noise images of the objects at any frequencies and arbitrary viewing angles. We test the robustness of our approach against other radiative transfer codes. The SED and dust temperatures of one- and two-dimensional benchmarks are reproduced at high precision. The parallelization capability of various MC algorithms is analyzed and included in our treatment. We utilize the Lucy algorithm for the optical thin case where the Poisson noise is high, the iteration-free Bjorkman and Wood method to reduce the calculation time, and the Fleck and Canfield diffusion approximation for extreme optical thick cells. The code is applied to model the appearance of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at optical and infrared wavelengths. The AGN torus is clumpy and includes fluffy composite grains of various sizes made up of silicates and carbon. The dependence of the SED on the number of clumps in the torus and the viewing angle is studied. The appearance of the 10 μm silicate features in absorption or emission is discussed. The SED of the radio-loud quasar 3C 249.1 is fit by the AGN model and a cirrus component to account for the far-infrared emission.

  6. Treating voxel geometries in radiation protection dosimetry with a patched version of the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and MCNPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, K W; Daffara, C; Gualdrini, G; Pierantoni, M; Ferrari, P

    2007-01-01

    The question of Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in voxel geometries is addressed. Patched versions of the MCNP and MCNPX codes are developed aimed at transporting radiation both in the standard geometry mode and in the voxel geometry treatment. The patched code reads an unformatted FORTRAN file derived from DICOM format data and uses special subroutines to handle voxel-to-voxel radiation transport. The various phases of the development of the methodology are discussed together with the new input options. Examples are given of employment of the code in internal and external dosimetry and comparisons with results from other groups are reported.

  7. A New Radio Spectral Line Survey of Planetary Nebulae: Exploring Radiatively Driven Heating and Chemistry of Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Jesse

    Planetary nebulae contain shells of cold gas and dust whose heating and chemistry is likely driven by UV and X-ray emission from their central stars and from wind-collision-generated shocks. We present the results of a survey of molecular line emissions in the 88 - 235 GHz range from nine nearby (Radioastronomie Millimetrique. Rotational transitions of nine molecules, including the well-studied CO isotopologues and chemically important trace species, were observed and the results compared with and augmented by previous studies of molecular gas in PNe. Lines of the molecules HCO+, HNC, HCN, and CN, which were detected in most objects, represent new detections for five planetary nebulae in our study. Flux ratios were analyzed to identify correlations between the central star and/or nebular ultraviolet/X-ray luminosities and the molecular chemistries of the nebulae. Analysis reveals the apparent dependence of the HNC/HCN line ratio on PN central star UV luminosity. There exists no such clear correlation between PN X-rays and various diagnostics of PN molecular chemistry. The correlation between HNC/HCN ratio and central star UV luminosity hints at the potential of molecular emission line studies of PNe for improving our understanding of the role that high-energy radiation plays in the heating and chemistry of photodissociation regions.

  8. Cherenkov radiation-based three-dimensional position-sensitive PET detector: A Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Ryosuke; Yamada, Ryoko; Moriya, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Tomoyuki

    2018-05-01

    Cherenkov radiation has recently received attention due to its prompt emission phenomenon, which has the potential to improve the timing performance of radiation detectors dedicated to positron emission tomography (PET). In this study, a Cherenkov-based three-dimensional (3D) position-sensitive radiation detector was proposed, which is composed of a monolithic lead fluoride (PbF 2 ) crystal and a photodetector array of which the signals can be readout independently. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate the performance of the proposed detector. The position- and time resolution were evaluated under various practical conditions. The radiator size and various properties of the photodetector, e.g., readout pitch and single photon timing resolution (SPTR), were parameterized. The single photon time response of the photodetector was assumed to be a single Gaussian for the simplification. The photo detection efficiency of the photodetector was ideally 100% for all wavelengths. Compton scattering was included in simulations, but partly analyzed. To estimate the position at which a γ-ray interacted in the Cherenkov radiator, the center-of-gravity (COG) method was employed. In addition, to estimate the depth-of-interaction (DOI) principal component analysis (PCA), which is a multivariate analysis method and has been used to identify the patterns in data, was employed. The time-space distribution of Cherenkov photons was quantified to perform PCA. To evaluate coincidence time resolution (CTR), the time difference of two independent γ-ray events was calculated. The detection time was defined as the first photon time after the SPTR of the photodetector was taken into account. The position resolution on the photodetector plane could be estimated with high accuracy, by using a small number of Cherenkov photons. Moreover, PCA showed an ability to estimate the DOI. The position resolution heavily depends on the pitch of the photodetector array and the radiator

  9. Monte Carlo calculations of resonance radiative transfer through a semi-infinite atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, G.; Salpeter, E.E.; Wasserman, I.

    1982-01-01

    The results of Monte Carlo calculations of radiative transfer through a semi-infinite plane-parallel atmosphere of resonant scatterers are presented. With a photon source at optical depth tau/sub ES/ we model the semi-infinite geometry by embedding a perfectly reflecting mirror at depth tau/sub MS/+tau/sub ES/. Although some quantities characterizing the emergent photons diverge as tau/sub MS/→infinity, the mean number of scatters, N/sub ES/, and path length, L/sub ES/, accumulated between the source and the edge of the atmosphere converge. Accurate results of N/sub ES/, L/sub ES/, X/sub pk/, the most probable frequency shift of the escaping photons, and tau/sub LAST/, the mean optical depth at which they last scatter, are obtained by choosing tau/sub MS/ = 4tau/sub ES/. Approximate analytic calculations of N/sub ES/, L/sub ES/, N, the mean total number of scatters undergone by escaping photons, L, their mean total path length, and , their mean (absolute) frequency shift, are presented for a symmetric slab with αtau/sub ES/>>1 and tau/sub MS/>>tau/sub ES/. Analogous calculations for an asymmetric slab are discussed. Analytic fitting formulae for N/sub ES/, L/sub ES/, X/sub pk/, and tau/sub LAST/ are given

  10. Radiation field characterization of a BNCT research facility using Monte Carlo method - code MCNP-4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, Antonio Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - BNCT - is a selective cancer treatment and arises as an alternative therapy to treat cancer when usual techniques - surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy - show no satisfactory results. The main proposal of this work is to project a facility to BNCT studies. This facility relies on the use of an Am Be neutron source and on a set of moderators, filters and shielding which will provide the best neutron/gamma beam characteristic for these Becton studies, i.e., high intensity thermal and/or epithermal neutron fluxes and with the minimum feasible gamma rays and fast neutrons contaminants. A computational model of the experiment was used to obtain the radiation field in the sample irradiation position. The calculations have been performed with the MCNP 4B Monte Carlo Code and the results obtained can be regarded as satisfactory, i.e., a thermal neutron fluencyN T = 1,35x10 8 n/cm , a fast neutron dose of 5,86x10 -10 Gy/N T and a gamma ray dose of 8,30x10 -14 Gy/N T . (author)

  11. Radiation field characterization of a BNCT research facility using Monte Carlo Method - Code MCNP-4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandes, Antonio Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - BNCT- is a selective cancer treatment and arises as an alternative therapy to treat cancer when usual techniques - surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy - show no satisfactory results. The main proposal of this work is to project a facility to BNCT studies. This facility relies on the use of an AmBe neutron source and on a set of moderators, filters and shielding which will provide the best neutron/gamma beam characteristic for these BNCT studies, i.e., high intensity thermal and/or epithermal neutron fluxes and with the minimum feasible gamma rays and fast neutrons contaminants. A computational model of the experiment was used to obtain the radiation field in the sample irradiation position. The calculations have been performed with the MCNP 4B Monte Carlo Code and the results obtained can be regarded as satisfactory, i.e., a thermal neutron fluency Ν Τ = 1,35x10 8 n/cm 2 , a fast neutron dose of 5,86x -1 0 Gy/Ν Τ and a gamma ray dose of 8,30x -14 Gy/Ν Τ . (author)

  12. Calculation of isodose curves from initial neutron radiation of a hypothetical nuclear explosion using Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Marcos P.C.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Andrade, Edson R.; Silva, Ademir X.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear explosions are usually described in terms of its total yield and associated shock wave, thermal radiation and nuclear radiation effects. The nuclear radiation produced in such events has several components, consisting mainly of alpha and beta particles, neutrinos, X-rays, neutrons and gamma rays. For practical purposes, the radiation from a nuclear explosion is divided into i nitial nuclear radiation , referring to what is issued within one minute after the detonation, and 'residual nuclear radiation' covering everything else. The initial nuclear radiation can also be split between 'instantaneous or 'prompt' radiation, which involves neutrons and gamma rays from fission and from interactions between neutrons and nuclei of surrounding materials, and 'delayed' radiation, comprising emissions from the decay of fission products and from interactions of neutrons with nuclei of the air. This work aims at presenting isodose curves calculations at ground level by Monte Carlo simulation, allowing risk assessment and consequences modeling in radiation protection context. The isodose curves are related to neutrons produced by the prompt nuclear radiation from a hypothetical nuclear explosion with a total yield of 20 KT. Neutron fluency and emission spectrum were based on data available in the literature. Doses were calculated in the form of ambient dose equivalent due to neutrons H*(10) n - . (author)

  13. Calculation of isodose curves from initial neutron radiation of a hypothetical nuclear explosion using Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Marcos P.C.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Andrade, Edson R., E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: daltongirao@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br [Corrdenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Egenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear explosions are usually described in terms of its total yield and associated shock wave, thermal radiation and nuclear radiation effects. The nuclear radiation produced in such events has several components, consisting mainly of alpha and beta particles, neutrinos, X-rays, neutrons and gamma rays. For practical purposes, the radiation from a nuclear explosion is divided into {sup i}nitial nuclear radiation{sup ,} referring to what is issued within one minute after the detonation, and 'residual nuclear radiation' covering everything else. The initial nuclear radiation can also be split between 'instantaneous or 'prompt' radiation, which involves neutrons and gamma rays from fission and from interactions between neutrons and nuclei of surrounding materials, and 'delayed' radiation, comprising emissions from the decay of fission products and from interactions of neutrons with nuclei of the air. This work aims at presenting isodose curves calculations at ground level by Monte Carlo simulation, allowing risk assessment and consequences modeling in radiation protection context. The isodose curves are related to neutrons produced by the prompt nuclear radiation from a hypothetical nuclear explosion with a total yield of 20 KT. Neutron fluency and emission spectrum were based on data available in the literature. Doses were calculated in the form of ambient dose equivalent due to neutrons H*(10){sub n}{sup -}. (author)

  14. Summary and recommendations of a National Cancer Institute workshop on issues limiting the clinical use of Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms for megavoltage external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.; Smathers, James; Deye, James

    2003-01-01

    Due to the significant interest in Monte Carlo dose calculations for external beam megavoltage radiation therapy from both the research and commercial communities, a workshop was held in October 2001 to assess the status of this computational method with regard to use for clinical treatment planning. The Radiation Research Program of the National Cancer Institute, in conjunction with the Nuclear Data and Analysis Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, gathered a group of experts in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning and Monte Carlo dose calculations, and examined issues involved in clinical implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation methods in clinical radiotherapy. The workshop examined the current status of Monte Carlo algorithms, the rationale for using Monte Carlo, algorithmic concerns, clinical issues, and verification methodologies. Based on these discussions, the workshop developed recommendations for future NCI-funded research and development efforts. This paper briefly summarizes the issues presented at the workshop and the recommendations developed by the group

  15. Commissioning of a Monte Carlo treatment planning system for clinical use in radiation therapy; Evaluacion de un sistema de planificacion Monte Carlo de uso clinico para radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca Aparcio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrila, J.

    2016-10-01

    The commissioning procedures of a Monte Carlo treatment planning system (MC) for photon beams from a dedicated stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) unit has been reported in this document. XVMC has been the MC Code available in the treatment planning system evaluated (BrainLAB iPlan RT Dose) which is based on Virtual Source Models that simulate the primary and scattered radiation, besides the electronic contamination, using gaussian components for whose modelling are required measurements of dose profiles, percentage depth dose and output factors, performed both in water and in air. The dosimetric accuracy of the particle transport simulation has been analyzed by validating the calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous media versus measurements made under the same conditions as the dose calculation, and checking the stochastic behaviour of Monte Carlo calculations when using different statistical variances. Likewise, it has been verified how the planning system performs the conversion from dose to medium to dose to water, applying the stopping power ratio water to medium, in the presence of heterogeneities where this phenomenon is relevant, such as high density media (cortical bone). (Author)

  16. Efficient Radiation Simulation in Complex Geometries with Applications to Planetary Entry, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA aerocapture missions require an accurate evaluation of radiative thermal transport in order to simulate the aerothermal environment around space vehicles....

  17. A comprehensive system for dosimetric commissioning and Monte Carlo validation for the small animal radiation research platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryggestad, E; Armour, M; Iordachita, I; Verhaegen, F; Wong, J W

    2009-09-07

    Our group has constructed the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) for delivering focal, kilo-voltage radiation to targets in small animals under robotic control using cone-beam CT guidance. The present work was undertaken to support the SARRP's treatment planning capabilities. We have devised a comprehensive system for characterizing the radiation dosimetry in water for the SARRP and have developed a Monte Carlo dose engine with the intent of reproducing these measured results. We find that the SARRP provides sufficient therapeutic dose rates ranging from 102 to 228 cGy min(-1) at 1 cm depth for the available set of high-precision beams ranging from 0.5 to 5 mm in size. In terms of depth-dose, the mean of the absolute percentage differences between the Monte Carlo calculations and measurement is 3.4% over the full range of sampled depths spanning 0.5-7.2 cm for the 3 and 5 mm beams. The measured and computed profiles for these beams agree well overall; of note, good agreement is observed in the profile tails. Especially for the smallest 0.5 and 1 mm beams, including a more realistic description of the effective x-ray source into the Monte Carlo model may be important.

  18. A comprehensive system for dosimetric commissioning and Monte Carlo validation for the small animal radiation research platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tryggestad, E; Armour, M; Wong, J W [Deptartment of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Iordachita, I [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Verhaegen, F [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Physics), GROW School, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2009-09-07

    Our group has constructed the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) for delivering focal, kilo-voltage radiation to targets in small animals under robotic control using cone-beam CT guidance. The present work was undertaken to support the SARRP's treatment planning capabilities. We have devised a comprehensive system for characterizing the radiation dosimetry in water for the SARRP and have developed a Monte Carlo dose engine with the intent of reproducing these measured results. We find that the SARRP provides sufficient therapeutic dose rates ranging from 102 to 228 cGy min{sup -1} at 1 cm depth for the available set of high-precision beams ranging from 0.5 to 5 mm in size. In terms of depth-dose, the mean of the absolute percentage differences between the Monte Carlo calculations and measurement is 3.4% over the full range of sampled depths spanning 0.5-7.2 cm for the 3 and 5 mm beams. The measured and computed profiles for these beams agree well overall; of note, good agreement is observed in the profile tails. Especially for the smallest 0.5 and 1 mm beams, including a more realistic description of the effective x-ray source into the Monte Carlo model may be important.

  19. Estimation of whole-body radiation exposure from brachytherapy for oral cancer using a Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Y.; Watanabe, H.; Kaida, A.; Miura, M.; Nakagawa, K.; Toda, K.; Yoshimura, R.; Sumi, Y.; Kurabayashi, T.

    2017-01-01

    Early stage oral cancer can be cured with oral brachytherapy, but whole-body radiation exposure status has not been previously studied. Recently, the International Commission on Radiological Protection Committee (ICRP) recommended the use of ICRP phantoms to estimate radiation exposure from external and internal radiation sources. In this study, we used a Monte Carlo simulation with ICRP phantoms to estimate whole-body exposure from oral brachytherapy. We used a Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) to model oral brachytherapy with 192 Ir hairpins and 198 Au grains and to perform a Monte Carlo simulation on the ICRP adult reference computational phantoms. To confirm the simulations, we also computed local dose distributions from these small sources, and compared them with the results from Oncentra manual Low Dose Rate Treatment Planning (mLDR) software which is used in day-to-day clinical practice. We successfully obtained data on absorbed dose for each organ in males and females. Sex-averaged equivalent doses were 0.547 and 0.710 Sv with 192 Ir hairpins and 198 Au grains, respectively. Simulation with PHITS was reliable when compared with an alternative computational technique using mLDR software. We concluded that the absorbed dose for each organ and whole-body exposure from oral brachytherapy can be estimated with Monte Carlo simulation using PHITS on ICRP reference phantoms. Effective doses for patients with oral cancer were obtained.

  20. ETRAN, Electron Transport and Gamma Transport with Secondary Radiation in Slab by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A - Nature of physical problem solved: ETRAN computes the transport of electrons and photons through plane-parallel slab targets that have a finite thickness in one dimension and are unbound in the other two-dimensions. The incident radiation can consist of a beam of either electrons or photons with specified spectral and directional distribution. Options are available by which all orders of the electron-photon cascade can be included in the calculation. Thus electrons are allowed to give rise to secondary knock-on electrons, continuous Bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-rays; and photons are allowed to produce photo-electrons, Compton electrons, and electron- positron pairs. Annihilation quanta, fluorescence radiation, and Auger electrons are also taken into account. If desired, the Monte- Carlo histories of all generations of secondary radiations are followed. The information produced by ETRAN includes the following items: 1) reflection and transmission of electrons or photons, differential in energy and direction; 2) the production of continuous Bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-rays by electrons and the emergence of such radiations from the target (differential in photon energy and direction); 3) the spectrum of the amounts of energy left behind in a thick target by an incident electron beam; 4) the deposition of energy and charge by an electron beam as function of the depth in the target; 5) the flux of electrons, differential in energy, as function of the depth in the target. B - Method of solution: A programme called DATAPAC-4 takes data for a particular material from a library tape and further processes them. The function of DATAPAC-4 is to produce single-scattering and multiple-scattering data in the form of tabular arrays (again stored on magnetic tape) which facilitate the rapid sampling of electron and photon Monte Carlo histories in ETRAN. The photon component of the electron-photon cascade is calculated by conventional random sampling that imitates

  1. Premar-2: a Monte Carlo code for radiative transport simulation in atmospheric environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna, (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    The peculiarities of the PREMAR-2 code, aimed at radiation transport Monte Carlo simulation in atmospheric environments in the infrared-ultraviolet frequency range, are described. With respect to the previously developed PREMAR code, besides plane multilayers, spherical multilayers and finite sequences of vertical layers, each one with its own atmospheric behaviour, are foreseen in the new code, together with the refraction phenomenon, so that long range, highly slanted paths can now be more faithfully taken into account. A zenithal angular dependence of the albedo coefficient has moreover been introduced. Lidar systems, with spatially independent source and telescope, are allowed again to be simulated, and, in this latest version of the code, sensitivity analyses to be performed. According to this last feasibility, consequences on radiation transport of small perturbations in physical components of the atmospheric environment may be analyze and the related effects on searched results estimated. The availability of a library of physical data (reaction coefficients, phase functions and refraction indexes) is required by the code, providing the essential features of the environment of interest needed of the Monte Carlo simulation. Variance reducing techniques have been enhanced in the Premar-2 code, by introducing, for instance, a local forced collision technique, especially apt to be used in Lidar system simulations. Encouraging comparisons between code and experimental results carried out at the Brasimone Centre of ENEA, have so far been obtained, even if further checks of the code are to be performed. [Italian] Nel presente rapporto vengono descritte le principali caratteristiche del codice di calcolo PREMAR-2, che esegue la simulazione Montecarlo del trasporto della radiazione elettromagnetica nell'atmosfera, nell'intervallo di frequenza che va dall'infrarosso all'ultravioletto. Rispetto al codice PREMAR precedentemente sviluppato, il codice

  2. Numerical simulations of a coupled radiative?conductive heat transfer model using a modified Monte Carlo method

    KAUST Repository

    Kovtanyuk, Andrey E.

    2012-01-01

    Radiative-conductive heat transfer in a medium bounded by two reflecting and radiating plane surfaces is considered. This process is described by a nonlinear system of two differential equations: an equation of the radiative heat transfer and an equation of the conductive heat exchange. The problem is characterized by anisotropic scattering of the medium and by specularly and diffusely reflecting boundaries. For the computation of solutions of this problem, two approaches based on iterative techniques are considered. First, a recursive algorithm based on some modification of the Monte Carlo method is proposed. Second, the diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer equation is utilized. Numerical comparisons of the approaches proposed are given in the case of isotropic scattering. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated protons: a Monte Carlo dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourkal, E; Li, J S; Xiong, W; Nahum, A; Ma, C-M

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo studies of intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated proton beams. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. Through the introduction of a spectrometer-like particle selection system that delivers small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra it is feasible to use laser-accelerated protons for intensity modulated radiotherapy. The method presented in this paper is a three-dimensional modulation in which the proton energy spectrum and intensity of each individual beamlet are modulated to yield a homogeneous dose in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. As an evaluation of the efficacy of this method, it has been applied to two prostate cases using a variety of beam arrangements. We have performed a comparison study between intensity modulated photon plans and those for laser-accelerated protons. For identical beam arrangements and the same optimization parameters, proton plans exhibit superior coverage of the target and sparing of neighbouring critical structures. Dose-volume histogram analysis of the resulting dose distributions shows up to 50% reduction of dose to the critical structures. As the number of fields is decreased, the proton modality exhibits a better preservation of the optimization requirements on the target and critical structures. It is shown that for a two-beam arrangement (parallel-opposed) it is possible to achieve both superior target coverage with 5% dose inhomogeneity within the target and excellent sparing of surrounding tissue

  4. Radiation protection studies for medical particle accelerators using FLUKA Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infantino, Angelo; Mostacci, Domiziano; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Lucconi, Giulia; Pancaldi, Davide; Vichi, Sara; Zagni, Federico; Marengo, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Radiation protection (RP) in the use of medical cyclotrons involves many aspects both in the routine use and for the decommissioning of a site. Guidelines for site planning and installation, as well as for RP assessment, are given in international documents; however, the latter typically offer analytic methods of calculation of shielding and materials activation, in approximate or idealised geometry set-ups. The availability of Monte Carlo (MC) codes with accurate up-to-date libraries for transport and interaction of neutrons and charged particles at energies below 250 MeV, together with the continuously increasing power of modern computers, makes the systematic use of simulations with realistic geometries possible, yielding equipment and site-specific evaluation of the source terms, shielding requirements and all quantities relevant to RP at the same time. In this work, the well-known FLUKA MC code was used to simulate different aspects of RP in the use of biomedical accelerators, particularly for the production of medical radioisotopes. In the context of the Young Professionals Award, held at the IRPA 14 conference, only a part of the complete work is presented. In particular, the simulation of the GE PETtrace cyclotron (16.5 MeV) installed at S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital evaluated the effective dose distribution around the equipment; the effective number of neutrons produced per incident proton and their spectral distribution; the activation of the structure of the cyclotron and the vault walls; the activation of the ambient air, in particular the production of "4"1Ar. The simulations were validated, in terms of physical and transport parameters to be used at the energy range of interest, through an extensive measurement campaign of the neutron environmental dose equivalent using a rem-counter and TLD dosemeters. The validated model was then used in the design and the licensing request of a new Positron Emission Tomography facility. (authors)

  5. Benchmarking and validation of a Geant4-SHADOW Monte Carlo simulation for dose calculations in microbeam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Iwan; Guatelli, Susanna; Fournier, Pauline; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Sanchez Del Rio, Manuel; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Lerch, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron-based radiotherapy modality that uses high-intensity beams of spatially fractionated radiation to treat tumours. The rapid evolution of MRT towards clinical trials demands accurate treatment planning systems (TPS), as well as independent tools for the verification of TPS calculated dose distributions in order to ensure patient safety and treatment efficacy. Monte Carlo computer simulation represents the most accurate method of dose calculation in patient geometries and is best suited for the purpose of TPS verification. A Monte Carlo model of the ID17 biomedical beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has been developed, including recent modifications, using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit interfaced with the SHADOW X-ray optics and ray-tracing libraries. The code was benchmarked by simulating dose profiles in water-equivalent phantoms subject to irradiation by broad-beam (without spatial fractionation) and microbeam (with spatial fractionation) fields, and comparing against those calculated with a previous model of the beamline developed using the PENELOPE code. Validation against additional experimental dose profiles in water-equivalent phantoms subject to broad-beam irradiation was also performed. Good agreement between codes was observed, with the exception of out-of-field doses and toward the field edge for larger field sizes. Microbeam results showed good agreement between both codes and experimental results within uncertainties. Results of the experimental validation showed agreement for different beamline configurations. The asymmetry in the out-of-field dose profiles due to polarization effects was also investigated, yielding important information for the treatment planning process in MRT. This work represents an important step in the development of a Monte Carlo-based independent verification tool for treatment planning in MRT.

  6. Dust in planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, S.

    1980-01-01

    A two-component dust model is suggested to explain the infrared emission from planetary nebulae. A cold dust component located in the extensive remnant of the red-giant envelope exterior to the visible nebula is responsible for the far-infrared emission. A ward dust component, which is condensed after the formation of the planetary nebula and confined within the ionized gas shell, emits most of the near- and mid-infrared radiation. The observations of NGC 7027 are shown to be consisten with such a model. The correlation of silicate emission in several planetary nebulae with an approximately +1 spectral index at low radio frequencies suggests that both the silicate and radio emissions originate from the remnant of the circumstellar envelope of th precursor star and are observable only while the planetary nebula is young. It is argued that oxygen-rich stars as well as carbon-rich stars can be progenitors of planetary nebulae

  7. FitSKIRT: genetic algorithms to automatically fit dusty galaxies with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geyter, G.; Baes, M.; Fritz, J.; Camps, P.

    2013-02-01

    We present FitSKIRT, a method to efficiently fit radiative transfer models to UV/optical images of dusty galaxies. These images have the advantage that they have better spatial resolution compared to FIR/submm data. FitSKIRT uses the GAlib genetic algorithm library to optimize the output of the SKIRT Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Genetic algorithms prove to be a valuable tool in handling the multi- dimensional search space as well as the noise induced by the random nature of the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. FitSKIRT is tested on artificial images of a simulated edge-on spiral galaxy, where we gradually increase the number of fitted parameters. We find that we can recover all model parameters, even if all 11 model parameters are left unconstrained. Finally, we apply the FitSKIRT code to a V-band image of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 4013. This galaxy has been modeled previously by other authors using different combinations of radiative transfer codes and optimization methods. Given the different models and techniques and the complexity and degeneracies in the parameter space, we find reasonable agreement between the different models. We conclude that the FitSKIRT method allows comparison between different models and geometries in a quantitative manner and minimizes the need of human intervention and biasing. The high level of automation makes it an ideal tool to use on larger sets of observed data.

  8. Monte Carlo generator ELRADGEN 2.0 for simulation of radiative events in elastic ep-scattering of polarized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akushevich, I.; Filoti, O. F.; Ilyichev, A.; Shumeiko, N.

    2012-07-01

    The structure and algorithms of the Monte Carlo generator ELRADGEN 2.0 designed to simulate radiative events in polarized ep-scattering are presented. The full set of analytical expressions for the QED radiative corrections is presented and discussed in detail. Algorithmic improvements implemented to provide faster simulation of hard real photon events are described. Numerical tests show high quality of generation of photonic variables and radiatively corrected cross section. The comparison of the elastic radiative tail simulated within the kinematical conditions of the BLAST experiment at MIT BATES shows a good agreement with experimental data. Catalogue identifier: AELO_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELO_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1299 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11 348 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 Computer: All Operating system: Any RAM: 1 MB Classification: 11.2, 11.4 Nature of problem: Simulation of radiative events in polarized ep-scattering. Solution method: Monte Carlo simulation according to the distributions of the real photon kinematic variables that are calculated by the covariant method of QED radiative correction estimation. The approach provides rather fast and accurate generation. Running time: The simulation of 108 radiative events for itest:=1 takes up to 52 seconds on Pentium(R) Dual-Core 2.00 GHz processor.

  9. Environmental microbiology as related to planetary quarantine. [synergetic effect of heat and radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflug, I. J.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanistic basis of the synergetic effect of combined heat and radiation on microbial destruction was analyzed and results show that radiation intensity, temperature, and relative humidity are the determining factors. Dry heat resistance evaluation for selected bacterial spore crops indicates that different strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus demonstrate marked differences in resistance. Preliminary work to determine the effects of storage time, suspending medium, storage temperature and spore crop cleaning procedures on dry heat survival characteristics of Bacillus subtilis var. Niger, and dry heat resistance of natural microflora in soil particles is also reported.

  10. Status of the Monte Carlo library least-squares (MCLLS) approach for non-linear radiation analyzer problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Robin P.; Xu, Libai

    2009-10-01

    The Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR) has been working for over a decade on the Monte Carlo library least-squares (MCLLS) approach for treating non-linear radiation analyzer problems including: (1) prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for bulk analysis, (2) energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analyzers, and (3) carbon/oxygen tool analysis in oil well logging. This approach essentially consists of using Monte Carlo simulation to generate the libraries of all the elements to be analyzed plus any other required background libraries. These libraries are then used in the linear library least-squares (LLS) approach with unknown sample spectra to analyze for all elements in the sample. Iterations of this are used until the LLS values agree with the composition used to generate the libraries. The current status of the methods (and topics) necessary to implement the MCLLS approach is reported. This includes: (1) the Monte Carlo codes such as CEARXRF, CEARCPG, and CEARCO for forward generation of the necessary elemental library spectra for the LLS calculation for X-ray fluorescence, neutron capture prompt gamma-ray analyzers, and carbon/oxygen tools; (2) the correction of spectral pulse pile-up (PPU) distortion by Monte Carlo simulation with the code CEARIPPU; (3) generation of detector response functions (DRF) for detectors with linear and non-linear responses for Monte Carlo simulation of pulse-height spectra; and (4) the use of the differential operator (DO) technique to make the necessary iterations for non-linear responses practical. In addition to commonly analyzed single spectra, coincidence spectra or even two-dimensional (2-D) coincidence spectra can also be used in the MCLLS approach and may provide more accurate results.

  11. An analysis of exposure dose on hands of radiation workers using a Monte Carlo simulation in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Dong Gun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences Cancer Center, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, SeSik; Kim, Jung Hoon; KIm, Chang Soo [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Workers in nuclear medicine have performed various tasks such as production, distribution, preparation and injection of radioisotope. This process could cause high radiation exposure to workers’ hand. The purpose of this study was to investigate shielding effect for r-rays of 140 and 511 keV by using Monte-Carlo simulation. As a result, it was effective, regardless of lead thickness for radiation shielding in 140 keV r-ray. However, it was effective in shielding material with thickness of more than only 1.1 mm in 511 keV r-ray. And also it doesn’t effective in less than 1.1 mm due to secondary scatter ray and exposure dose was rather increased. Consequently, energy of radionuclide and thickness of shielding materials should be considered to reduce radiation exposure.

  12. A new Monte Carlo-based treatment plan optimization approach for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongbao; Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Song, Ting; Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2015-04-07

    Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) plan optimization needs beamlet dose distributions. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of their high computational speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions may mislead the optimization process and hinder the resulting plan quality. To solve this problem, the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method has been used to compute all beamlet doses prior to the optimization step. The conventional approach samples the same number of particles from each beamlet. Yet this is not the optimal use of MC in this problem. In fact, there are beamlets that have very small intensities after solving the plan optimization problem. For those beamlets, it may be possible to use fewer particles in dose calculations to increase efficiency. Based on this idea, we have developed a new MC-based IMRT plan optimization framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculation and plan optimization. At each dose calculation step, the particle numbers for beamlets were adjusted based on the beamlet intensities obtained through solving the plan optimization problem in the last iteration step. We modified a GPU-based MC dose engine to allow simultaneous computations of a large number of beamlet doses. To test the accuracy of our modified dose engine, we compared the dose from a broad beam and the summed beamlet doses in this beam in an inhomogeneous phantom. Agreement within 1% for the maximum difference and 0.55% for the average difference was observed. We then validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one lung IMRT case. It was found that the conventional scheme required 10(6) particles from each beamlet to achieve an optimization result that was 3% difference in fluence map and 1% difference in dose from the ground truth. In contrast, the proposed scheme achieved the same level of accuracy with on average 1.2 × 10(5) particles per beamlet. Correspondingly, the computation

  13. On Radiative Factors in Planetary Rings: New Insight Derived from Cassini CIRS Observations at Saturn Equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S. M.; Spilker, L. J.; Pilorz, S.; Edgington, S. G.; Deau, E.; Morishima, R.

    2012-12-01

    Since arriving at Saturn in 2004, Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer has recorded tens of millions of spectra of Saturn's rings (personal communication, M. Segura). CIRS records far infrared radiation (16.7-1000 microns) at focal plane 1 (FP1). Thermal emission from Saturn's rings peaks at FP1 wavelengths. CIRS spectra are well characterized as blackbody emission at an effective temperature Te, multiplied by a scalar factor related to ring emissivity (Spilker et al. [2005, 2006]). CIRS can therefore characterize the rings' temperature and study the thermal environment to which the ring particles are subject. We focus on CIRS data from the 2009 Saturnian equinox. As the Sun's disk crossed the ring plane, CIRS obtained several radial scans of the rings at a variety of phase angles, local hour angles and distances. With the Sun's rays striking the rings at an incidence angle of zero, solar heating is virtually absent, and thermal radiation from Saturn and sunlight reflected by Saturn dominate the thermal environment. These observations appear to present a paradox. Equinox data show that the flux of thermal energy radiated by the rings can even exceed the energy incident upon them as prescribed by thermal models, particularly in the C ring and Cassini Division (Ferrari and Leyrat [2006], Morishima et al. [2009, 2010]). Conservation principles suggest that such models underestimate heating of the rings in these cases, as it is clearly unphysical for the rings to radiate significantly more energy than is incident upon them. In this presentation, we will describe our efforts to resolve this paradox and determine what doing so can teach us about Saturn's rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2012 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  14. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system calculation engine for microbeam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Rovira, I; Sempau, J; Prezado, Y

    2012-05-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron radiotherapy technique that explores the limits of the dose-volume effect. Preclinical studies have shown that MRT irradiations (arrays of 25-75-μm-wide microbeams spaced by 200-400 μm) are able to eradicate highly aggressive animal tumor models while healthy tissue is preserved. These promising results have provided the basis for the forthcoming clinical trials at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The first step includes irradiation of pets (cats and dogs) as a milestone before treatment of human patients. Within this context, accurate dose calculations are required. The distinct features of both beam generation and irradiation geometry in MRT with respect to conventional techniques require the development of a specific MRT treatment planning system (TPS). In particular, a Monte Carlo (MC)-based calculation engine for the MRT TPS has been developed in this work. Experimental verification in heterogeneous phantoms and optimization of the computation time have also been performed. The penelope/penEasy MC code was used to compute dose distributions from a realistic beam source model. Experimental verification was carried out by means of radiochromic films placed within heterogeneous slab-phantoms. Once validation was completed, dose computations in a virtual model of a patient, reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, were performed. To this end, decoupling of the CT image voxel grid (a few cubic millimeter volume) to the dose bin grid, which has micrometer dimensions in the transversal direction of the microbeams, was performed. Optimization of the simulation parameters, the use of variance-reduction (VR) techniques, and other methods, such as the parallelization of the simulations, were applied in order to speed up the dose computation. Good agreement between MC simulations and experimental results was achieved, even at the interfaces between two

  15. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system calculation engine for microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sempau, J.; Prezado, Y. [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain) and ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Laboratoire Imagerie et modelisation en neurobiologie et cancerologie, UMR8165, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Universites Paris 7 et Paris 11, Bat 440., 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron radiotherapy technique that explores the limits of the dose-volume effect. Preclinical studies have shown that MRT irradiations (arrays of 25-75-{mu}m-wide microbeams spaced by 200-400 {mu}m) are able to eradicate highly aggressive animal tumor models while healthy tissue is preserved. These promising results have provided the basis for the forthcoming clinical trials at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The first step includes irradiation of pets (cats and dogs) as a milestone before treatment of human patients. Within this context, accurate dose calculations are required. The distinct features of both beam generation and irradiation geometry in MRT with respect to conventional techniques require the development of a specific MRT treatment planning system (TPS). In particular, a Monte Carlo (MC)-based calculation engine for the MRT TPS has been developed in this work. Experimental verification in heterogeneous phantoms and optimization of the computation time have also been performed. Methods: The penelope/penEasy MC code was used to compute dose distributions from a realistic beam source model. Experimental verification was carried out by means of radiochromic films placed within heterogeneous slab-phantoms. Once validation was completed, dose computations in a virtual model of a patient, reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, were performed. To this end, decoupling of the CT image voxel grid (a few cubic millimeter volume) to the dose bin grid, which has micrometer dimensions in the transversal direction of the microbeams, was performed. Optimization of the simulation parameters, the use of variance-reduction (VR) techniques, and other methods, such as the parallelization of the simulations, were applied in order to speed up the dose computation. Results: Good agreement between MC simulations and experimental results was achieved, even at

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of radiative transfer in scattering, emitting, absorbing slab with gradient index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yong; Liang Xingang; Xia Xinlin

    2005-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the thermal emission of absorbing-emitting-scattering slab with gradient index. Three Monte Carlo ray-tracing strategies are considered. The first strategy is keeping the real distribution of the refractive index and to trace bundles in a curve route. The second strategy is discretizing the slab into sub-layers, each having constant refractive index. The bundle is traced in a straight route in each sub-layer and the reflection at the inner interface is taken into account. The third strategy is similar to the second one but only the total reflection at the inner interface is computed. Little difference is observed among the results of apparent thermal emission by these three different Monte Carlo ray tracing strategies. The results also show that the apparent hemispherical emissivity non-monotonously varies with increasing optical thickness of the slab with strong scattering gradient index. Many parameters can influence the apparent thermal emission greatly

  17. Monte Carlo method for calculating the radiation skyshine produced by electron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong Chaocheng [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: kongchaocheng@tsinghua.org.cn; Li Quanfeng [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University Beijing 100084 (China); Chen Huaibi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University Beijing 100084 (China); Du Taibin [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University Beijing 100084 (China); Cheng Cheng [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University Beijing 100084 (China); Tang Chuanxiang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University Beijing 100084 (China); Zhu Li [Laboratory of Radiation and Environmental Protection, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang Hui [Laboratory of Radiation and Environmental Protection, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Pei Zhigang [Laboratory of Radiation and Environmental Protection, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ming Shenjin [Laboratory of Radiation and Environmental Protection, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2005-06-01

    Using the MCNP4C Monte Carlo code, the X-ray skyshine produced by 9 MeV, 15 MeV and 21 MeV electron linear accelerators were calculated respectively with a new two-step method combined with the split and roulette variance reduction technique. Results of the Monte Carlo simulation, the empirical formulas used for skyshine calculation and the dose measurements were analyzed and compared. In conclusion, the skyshine dose measurements agreed reasonably with the results computed by the Monte Carlo method, but deviated from computational results given by empirical formulas. The effect on skyshine dose caused by different structures of accelerator head is also discussed in this paper.

  18. Investigation of radiation effects in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using a general Monte Carlo-discrete ordinates coupling scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, S.N.; Slater, C.O.

    1990-01-01

    A general adjoint Monte Carlo-forward discrete ordinates radiation transport calculational scheme has been created to study the effects of the radiation environment in Hiroshima and Nagasaki due to the bombing of these two cities. Various such studies for comparison with physical data have progressed since the end of World War II with advancements in computing machinery and computational methods. These efforts have intensified in the last several years with the U.S.-Japan joint reassessment of nuclear weapons dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Three principal areas of investigation are: (1) to determine by experiment and calculation the neutron and gamma-ray energy and angular spectra and total yield of the two weapons; (2) using these weapons descriptions as source terms, to compute radiation effects at several locations in the two cities for comparison with experimental data collected at various times after the bombings and thus validate the source terms; and (3) to compute radiation fields at the known locations of fatalities and surviving individuals at the time of the bombings and thus establish an absolute cause-and-effect relationship between the radiation received and the resulting injuries to these individuals and any of their descendants as indicated by their medical records. It is in connection with the second and third items, the determination of the radiation effects and the dose received by individuals, that the current study is concerned

  19. A Monte Carlo Method for the Analysis of Gamma Radiation Transport from Distributed Sources in Laminated Shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leimdoerfer, M.

    1964-02-01

    A description is given of a method for calculating the penetration and energy deposition of gamma radiation, based on Monte Carlo techniques. The essential feature is the application of the exponential transformation to promote the transport of penetrating quanta and to balance the steep spatial variations of the source distributions which appear in secondary gamma emission problems. The estimated statistical errors in a number of sample problems, involving concrete shields with thicknesses up to 500 cm, are shown to be quite favorable, even at relatively short computing times. A practical reactor shielding problem is also shown and the predictions compared with measurements

  20. A Monte Carlo Method for the Analysis of Gamma Radiation Transport from Distributed Sources in Laminated Shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leimdoerfer, M

    1964-02-15

    A description is given of a method for calculating the penetration and energy deposition of gamma radiation, based on Monte Carlo techniques. The essential feature is the application of the exponential transformation to promote the transport of penetrating quanta and to balance the steep spatial variations of the source distributions which appear in secondary gamma emission problems. The estimated statistical errors in a number of sample problems, involving concrete shields with thicknesses up to 500 cm, are shown to be quite favorable, even at relatively short computing times. A practical reactor shielding problem is also shown and the predictions compared with measurements.

  1. Modelling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shieldings by the Monte Carlo method - Version 2

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaite, A; Plukiene, R; Plukis, A

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC and ISIS-800 – high energy neutrons (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The results were then compared with experimental data.

  2. A comparison study for dose calculation in radiation therapy: pencil beam Kernel based vs. Monte Carlo simulation vs. measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Suh, Tae-Suk; Lee, Hyoung-Koo; Choe, Bo-Young [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoi-Nam; Yoon, Sei-Chul [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Accurate dose calculation in radiation treatment planning is most important for successful treatment. Since human body is composed of various materials and not an ideal shape, it is not easy to calculate the accurate effective dose in the patients. Many methods have been proposed to solve inhomogeneity and surface contour problems. Monte Carlo simulations are regarded as the most accurate method, but it is not appropriate for routine planning because it takes so much time. Pencil beam kernel based convolution/superposition methods were also proposed to correct those effects. Nowadays, many commercial treatment planning systems have adopted this algorithm as a dose calculation engine. The purpose of this study is to verify the accuracy of the dose calculated from pencil beam kernel based treatment planning system comparing to Monte Carlo simulations and measurements especially in inhomogeneous region. Home-made inhomogeneous phantom, Helax-TMS ver. 6.0 and Monte Carlo code BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used in this study. In homogeneous media, the accuracy was acceptable but in inhomogeneous media, the errors were more significant. However in general clinical situation, pencil beam kernel based convolution algorithm is thought to be a valuable tool to calculate the dose.

  3. Planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amnuehl', P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The history of planetary nebulae discovery and their origin and evolution studies is discussed in a popular way. The problem of planetary nebulae central star is considered. The connection between the white-draft star and the planetary nebulae formulation is shown. The experimental data available acknowledge the hypothesis of red giant - planetary nebula nucleus - white-draft star transition process. Masses of planetary nebulae white-draft stars and central stars are distributed practically similarly: the medium mass is close to 0.6Msub(Sun) (Msub(Sun) - is the mass of the Sun)

  4. Advanced Monte Carlo for radiation physics, particle transport simulation and applications. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kling, A.; Barao, F.J.C.; Nakagawa, M.; Tavora, L.

    2001-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Electron and photon interactions and transport mechanisms, random number generation, applications in medical physisc, microdosimetry, track structure, radiobiological modeling, Monte Carlo method in radiotherapy, dosimetry, and medical accelerator simulation, neutron transport, high-energy hadron transport. (HSI)

  5. Automatic commissioning of a GPU-based Monte Carlo radiation dose calculation code for photon radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B; Graves, Yan Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is commonly considered as the most accurate method for radiation dose calculations. Commissioning of a beam model in the MC code against a clinical linear accelerator beam is of crucial importance for its clinical implementation. In this paper, we propose an automatic commissioning method for our GPU-based MC dose engine, gDPM. gDPM utilizes a beam model based on a concept of phase-space-let (PSL). A PSL contains a group of particles that are of the same type and close in space and energy. A set of generic PSLs was generated by splitting a reference phase-space file. Each PSL was associated with a weighting factor, and in dose calculations the particle carried a weight corresponding to the PSL where it was from. Dose for each PSL in water was pre-computed, and hence the dose in water for a whole beam under a given set of PSL weighting factors was the weighted sum of the PSL doses. At the commissioning stage, an optimization problem was solved to adjust the PSL weights in order to minimize the difference between the calculated dose and measured one. Symmetry and smoothness regularizations were utilized to uniquely determine the solution. An augmented Lagrangian method was employed to solve the optimization problem. To validate our method, a phase-space file of a Varian TrueBeam 6 MV beam was used to generate the PSLs for 6 MV beams. In a simulation study, we commissioned a Siemens 6 MV beam on which a set of field-dependent phase-space files was available. The dose data of this desired beam for different open fields and a small off-axis open field were obtained by calculating doses using these phase-space files. The 3D γ-index test passing rate within the regions with dose above 10% of d max dose for those open fields tested was improved averagely from 70.56 to 99.36% for 2%/2 mm criteria and from 32.22 to 89.65% for 1%/1 mm criteria. We also tested our commissioning method on a six-field head-and-neck cancer IMRT plan. The

  6. Radiation characteristics of water droplets in a fire-inspired environment: A Monte Carlo ray tracing study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bifen; Zhao, Xinyu

    2018-06-01

    The effects of radiation of water mists in a fire-inspired environment are numerically investigated for different complexities of radiative media in a three-dimensional cubic enclosure. A Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) method is employed to solve the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The anisotropic scattering behaviors of water mists are modeled by a combination of the Mie theory and the Henyey-Greestein relation. A tabulation method considering the size and wavelength dependencies is established for water droplets, to reduce the computational cost associated with the evaluation of the nongray spectral properties of water mists. Validation and verification of the coupled MCRT solver are performed using a one-dimensional slab with gray gas in comparison with the analytical solutions. Parametric studies are then performed using a three-dimensional cubic box to examine radiation of two monodispersed and one polydispersed water mist systems. The tabulation method can reduce the computational cost by a factor of one hundred. Results obtained without any scattering model better conform with results obtained from the anisotropic model than the isotropic scattering model, when a highly directional emissive source is applied. For isotropic emissive sources, isotropic and anisotropic scattering models predict comparable results. The addition of different volume fractions of soot shows that soot may have a negative impact on the effectiveness of water mists in absorbing radiation when its volume fraction exceeds certain threshold.

  7. Voxel2MCNP: a framework for modeling, simulation and evaluation of radiation transport scenarios for Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pölz, Stefan; Laubersheimer, Sven; Eberhardt, Jakob S; Harrendorf, Marco A; Keck, Thomas; Benzler, Andreas; Breustedt, Bastian

    2013-01-01

    The basic idea of Voxel2MCNP is to provide a framework supporting users in modeling radiation transport scenarios using voxel phantoms and other geometric models, generating corresponding input for the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, and evaluating simulation output. Applications at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are primarily whole and partial body counter calibration and calculation of dose conversion coefficients. A new generic data model describing data related to radiation transport, including phantom and detector geometries and their properties, sources, tallies and materials, has been developed. It is modular and generally independent of the targeted Monte Carlo code. The data model has been implemented as an XML-based file format to facilitate data exchange, and integrated with Voxel2MCNP to provide a common interface for modeling, visualization, and evaluation of data. Also, extensions to allow compatibility with several file formats, such as ENSDF for nuclear structure properties and radioactive decay data, SimpleGeo for solid geometry modeling, ImageJ for voxel lattices, and MCNPX’s MCTAL for simulation results have been added. The framework is presented and discussed in this paper and example workflows for body counter calibration and calculation of dose conversion coefficients is given to illustrate its application. (paper)

  8. Asymptotic analysis of the spatial discretization of radiation absorption and re-emission in Implicit Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    We perform an asymptotic analysis of the spatial discretization of radiation absorption and re-emission in Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC), a Monte Carlo technique for simulating nonlinear radiative transfer. Specifically, we examine the approximation of absorption and re-emission by a spatially continuous artificial-scattering process and either a piecewise-constant or piecewise-linear emission source within each spatial cell. We consider three asymptotic scalings representing (i) a time step that resolves the mean-free time, (ii) a Courant limit on the time-step size, and (iii) a fixed time step that does not depend on any asymptotic scaling. For the piecewise-constant approximation, we show that only the third scaling results in a valid discretization of the proper diffusion equation, which implies that IMC may generate inaccurate solutions with optically large spatial cells if time steps are refined. However, we also demonstrate that, for a certain class of problems, the piecewise-linear approximation yields an appropriate discretized diffusion equation under all three scalings. We therefore expect IMC to produce accurate solutions for a wider range of time-step sizes when the piecewise-linear instead of piecewise-constant discretization is employed. We demonstrate the validity of our analysis with a set of numerical examples.

  9. LPM-Effect in Monte Carlo Models of Radiative Energy Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Zapp, Korinna C; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    Extending the use of Monte Carlo (MC) event generators to jets in nuclear collisions requires a probabilistic implementation of the non-abelian LPM effect. We demonstrate that a local, probabilistic MC implementation based on the concept of formation times can account fully for the LPM-effect. The main features of the analytically known eikonal and collinear approximation can be reproduced, but we show how going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation for pixel detectors: a feasibility study for X radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinho, F.; Akiba, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the feasibility of a Monte Carlo simulation for the description of pixel semiconductor detectors as a tool for research and development of such devices and their applications for X-rays. We present as a result the technical aspects and main characteristics of a set of algorithms recently developed which allows one to estimate the energy spectrum and cluster classification. (author)

  11. Investigating the effect of K-characteristic radiation on the performance of nuclear medicine scintillators by Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaparinos, Panagiotis; Kandarakis, Ioannis; Cavouras, Dionisis; Delis, Harry; Panayiotakis, George

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of K-characteristic radiation on the performance of scintillator crystals incorporated in nuclear medicine detectors (LSO, BGO, GSO). K-characteristic radiation is produced within materials of at least one high atomic number element (e.g. Lu, Gd, Bi). This radiation may either be reabsorbed or it may escape the scintillator. In both cases the light emission efficiency of the scintillator may be affected resulting in either spatial or energy resolution degradation. A computational program, based on Monte Carlo methods, was developed in order to simulate the transport of K-characteristic radiation within the most commonly used scintillator materials. Crystal thickness was allowed to vary from 0.5 up to 15 mm. A monoenergetic pencil beam, with energy varying from 0.60 to 0.511 MeV was considered to fall on the center of the crystal surface. The dominant γ-ray interactions (elastic and inelastic scattering and photoelectric absorption) were taken into account in the simulation. Results showed that, depending on crystal thickness, incident photon energy and scintillator's intrinsic properties (L or K-fluorescence yield, effective atomic number and density), the scintillator's emission efficiency may be significantly reduced and affect spatial or energy resolution

  12. Planetary Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  13. Simulation of dose deposition in stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy: a fast approach combining Monte Carlo and deterministic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smekens, F; Freud, N; Letang, J M; Babot, D [CNDRI (Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations) Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Adam, J-F; Elleaume, H; Esteve, F [INSERM U-836, Equipe 6 ' Rayonnement Synchrotron et Recherche Medicale' , Institut des Neurosciences de Grenoble (France); Ferrero, C; Bravin, A [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: francois.smekens@insa-lyon.fr

    2009-08-07

    A hybrid approach, combining deterministic and Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, is proposed to compute the distribution of dose deposited during stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy treatment. The proposed approach divides the computation into two parts: (i) the dose deposited by primary radiation (coming directly from the incident x-ray beam) is calculated in a deterministic way using ray casting techniques and energy-absorption coefficient tables and (ii) the dose deposited by secondary radiation (Rayleigh and Compton scattering, fluorescence) is computed using a hybrid algorithm combining MC and deterministic calculations. In the MC part, a small number of particle histories are simulated. Every time a scattering or fluorescence event takes place, a splitting mechanism is applied, so that multiple secondary photons are generated with a reduced weight. The secondary events are further processed in a deterministic way, using ray casting techniques. The whole simulation, carried out within the framework of the Monte Carlo code Geant4, is shown to converge towards the same results as the full MC simulation. The speed of convergence is found to depend notably on the splitting multiplicity, which can easily be optimized. To assess the performance of the proposed algorithm, we compare it to state-of-the-art MC simulations, accelerated by the track length estimator technique (TLE), considering a clinically realistic test case. It is found that the hybrid approach is significantly faster than the MC/TLE method. The gain in speed in a test case was about 25 for a constant precision. Therefore, this method appears to be suitable for treatment planning applications.

  14. Use of implicit Monte Carlo radiation transport with hydrodynamics and compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleck, J.A. Jr.

    1971-03-01

    It is shown that the combination of implicit radiation transport and hydrodynamics, Compton scattering, and any other energy transport can be simply carried out by a ''splitting'' procedure. Contributions to material energy exchange can be reckoned separately for hydrodynamics, radiation transport without scattering, Compton scattering, plus any other possible energy exchange mechanism. The radiation transport phase of the calculation would be implicit, but the hydrodynamics and Compton portions would not, leading to possible time step controls. The time step restrictions which occur on radiation transfer due to large Planck mean absorption cross-sections would not occur

  15. Application of the Monte Carlo technique to the study of radiation transport in a prompt gamma in vivo neutron activation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, A.A.; Beddoe, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code (MORSE-SGC) from the Radiation Shielding Information Centre at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA, has been adapted and used to model radiation transport in the Auckland prompt gamma in vivo neutron activation analysis facility. Preliminary results are presented for the slow neutron flux in an anthropomorphic phantom which are in broad agreement with those obtained by measurement via activation foils. Since experimental optimization is not logistically feasible and since theoretical optimization of neutron activation facilities has not previously been attempted, it is hoped that the Monte Carlo calculations can be used to provide a basis for improved system design

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of radiative processes in electron-positron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiss, R.H.P.

    1982-01-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation of scattering processes has turned out to be one of the most successful methods of translating theoretical predictions into experimentally meaningful quantities. It is the purpose of this thesis to describe how this approach can be applied to higher-order QED corrections to several fundamental processes. In chapter II a very brief overview of the currently interesting phenomena in e +- scattering is given. It is argued that accurate information on higher-order QED corrections is very important and that the Monte Carlo approach is one of the most flexible and general methods to obtain this information. In chapter III the author describes various techniques which are useful in this context, and makes a few remarks on the numerical aspects of the proposed method. In the following three chapters he applies this to the processes e + e - → μ + μ - (γ) and e + e - → qanti q(sigma). In chapter IV he motivates his choice of these processes in view of their experimental and theoretical relevance. The formulae necessary for a computer simulation of all quantities of interest, up to order α 3 , is given. Chapters V and VI describe how this simulation can be performed using the techniques mentioned in chapter III. In chapter VII it is shown how additional dynamical quantities, namely the polarization of the incoming and outgoing particles, can be incorporated in our treatment, and the relevant formulae for the example processes mentioned above are given. Finally, in chapter VIII the author presents some examples of the comparison between theoretical predictions based on Monte Carlo simulations as outlined here, and the results from actual experiments. (Auth.)

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields and dosimetry devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guoqing

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods based on random sampling are widely used in different fields for the capability of solving problems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom. In this work, Monte Carlos methods are successfully applied for the simulation of the mixed neutron-gamma field in an interim storage facility and neutron dosimeters of different types. Details are discussed in two parts: In the first part, the method of simulating an interim storage facility loaded with CASTORs is presented. The size of a CASTOR is rather large (several meters) and the CASTOR wall is very thick (tens of centimeters). Obtaining the results of dose rates outside a CASTOR with reasonable errors costs usually hours or even days. For the simulation of a large amount of CASTORs in an interim storage facility, it needs weeks or even months to finish a calculation. Variance reduction techniques were used to reduce the calculation time and to achieve reasonable relative errors. Source clones were applied to avoid unnecessary repeated calculations. In addition, the simulations were performed on a cluster system. With the calculation techniques discussed above, the efficiencies of calculations can be improved evidently. In the second part, the methods of simulating the response of neutron dosimeters are presented. An Alnor albedo dosimeter was modelled in MCNP, and it has been simulated in the facility to calculate the calibration factor to get the evaluated response to a Cf-252 source. The angular response of Makrofol detectors to fast neutrons has also been investigated. As a kind of SSNTD, Makrofol can detect fast neutrons by recording the neutron induced heavy charged recoils. To obtain the information of charged recoils, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes were used for transporting incident neutrons. The response of Makrofol to fast neutrons is dependent on several factors. Based on the parameters which affect the track revealing, the formation of visible tracks was determined. For

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields and dosimetry devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoqing

    2011-12-22

    Monte Carlo methods based on random sampling are widely used in different fields for the capability of solving problems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom. In this work, Monte Carlos methods are successfully applied for the simulation of the mixed neutron-gamma field in an interim storage facility and neutron dosimeters of different types. Details are discussed in two parts: In the first part, the method of simulating an interim storage facility loaded with CASTORs is presented. The size of a CASTOR is rather large (several meters) and the CASTOR wall is very thick (tens of centimeters). Obtaining the results of dose rates outside a CASTOR with reasonable errors costs usually hours or even days. For the simulation of a large amount of CASTORs in an interim storage facility, it needs weeks or even months to finish a calculation. Variance reduction techniques were used to reduce the calculation time and to achieve reasonable relative errors. Source clones were applied to avoid unnecessary repeated calculations. In addition, the simulations were performed on a cluster system. With the calculation techniques discussed above, the efficiencies of calculations can be improved evidently. In the second part, the methods of simulating the response of neutron dosimeters are presented. An Alnor albedo dosimeter was modelled in MCNP, and it has been simulated in the facility to calculate the calibration factor to get the evaluated response to a Cf-252 source. The angular response of Makrofol detectors to fast neutrons has also been investigated. As a kind of SSNTD, Makrofol can detect fast neutrons by recording the neutron induced heavy charged recoils. To obtain the information of charged recoils, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes were used for transporting incident neutrons. The response of Makrofol to fast neutrons is dependent on several factors. Based on the parameters which affect the track revealing, the formation of visible tracks was determined. For

  19. A solution algorithm for calculating photon radiation fields with the aid of the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zappe, D.

    1978-04-01

    The MCTEST program and its subroutines for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation is presented. The program renders possible to calculate photon radiation fields of point or plane gamma sources. After changing two subroutines the calculation can also be carried out for the case of directed incidence of radiation on plane shields of iron or concrete. (author)

  20. Monte Carlo Studies of a Novel LiF Radiator for RICH Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Efimov, A.; Artuso, M.; Gao, Min; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.

    1995-01-01

    We show that a multifaceted LiF radiator produces more Cherenkov light and has better resolution per photon than a flat radiator slab when used in a ring imaging Cherenkov counter. Such a system is being considered for the CLEO III upgrade.

  1. Planetary magnetospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, T.W.; Michel, F.C.

    1975-01-01

    Recent planetary probes have resulted in the realization of the generality of magnetospheric interactions between the solar wind and the planets. The three categories of planetary magnetospheres are discussed: intrinsic slowly rotating magnetospheres, intrinsic rapidly rotating magnetospheres, and induced magnetospheres. (BJG)

  2. A review of radiation dosimetry applications using the MCNP Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solberg, T.D.; DeMarco, J.J.; Chetty, I.J.; Mesa, A.V.; Cagnon, C.H.; Li, A.N.; Mather, K.K.; Medin, P.M.; Arellano, A.R.; Smathers, J.B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2001-07-01

    The Monte Carlo code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) has a significant history dating to the early years of the Manhattan Project. More recently, MCNP has been used successfully to solve many problems in the field of medical physics. In radiotherapy applications MCNP has been used successfully to calculate the bremsstrahlung spectra from medical linear accelerators, for modeling the dose distributions around high dose rate brachytherapy sources, and for evaluating the dosimetric properties of new radioactive sources used in intravascular irradiation for prevention of restenosis following angioplasty. MCNP has also been used for radioimmunotherapy and boron neutron capture therapy applications. It has been used to predict fast neutron activation of shielding and biological materials. One area that holds tremendous clinical promise is that of radiotherapy treatment planning. In diagnostic applications, MCNP has been used to model X-ray computed tomography and positron emission tomography scanners, to compute the dose delivered from CT procedures, and to determine detector characteristics of nuclear medicine devices. MCNP has been used to determine particle fluxes around radiotherapy treatment devices and to perform shielding calculations in radiotherapy treatment rooms. This manuscript is intended to provide to the reader a comprehensive summary of medical physics applications of the MCNP code. (orig.)

  3. A review of radiation dosimetry applications using the MCNP Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solberg, T.D.; DeMarco, J.J.; Chetty, I.J.; Mesa, A.V.; Cagnon, C.H.; Li, A.N.; Mather, K.K.; Medin, P.M.; Arellano, A.R.; Smathers, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    The Monte Carlo code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) has a significant history dating to the early years of the Manhattan Project. More recently, MCNP has been used successfully to solve many problems in the field of medical physics. In radiotherapy applications MCNP has been used successfully to calculate the bremsstrahlung spectra from medical linear accelerators, for modeling the dose distributions around high dose rate brachytherapy sources, and for evaluating the dosimetric properties of new radioactive sources used in intravascular irradiation for prevention of restenosis following angioplasty. MCNP has also been used for radioimmunotherapy and boron neutron capture therapy applications. It has been used to predict fast neutron activation of shielding and biological materials. One area that holds tremendous clinical promise is that of radiotherapy treatment planning. In diagnostic applications, MCNP has been used to model X-ray computed tomography and positron emission tomography scanners, to compute the dose delivered from CT procedures, and to determine detector characteristics of nuclear medicine devices. MCNP has been used to determine particle fluxes around radiotherapy treatment devices and to perform shielding calculations in radiotherapy treatment rooms. This manuscript is intended to provide to the reader a comprehensive summary of medical physics applications of the MCNP code. (author)

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-07

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for (60)Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with (60)Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for 60 Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with 60 Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage. (paper)

  6. Monte-Carlo study on primary knock-on atom energy spectrum produced by neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wei; Liu Yongkang; Deng Yongjun; Ma Jimin

    2012-01-01

    Computational method on energy distribution of primary knock-on atom (PKA) produced by neutron radiation was built in the paper. Based on the DBCN card in MCNP, reaction position, reaction type and energy transfer between neutrons and atoms were recorded. According to statistic of these data, energy and space distributions of PKAs were obtained. The method resolves preferably randomicity of random number and efficiency of random sampling computation. The results show small statistical fluctuation and well statistical. Three-dimensional figure of energy and space distribution of PKAs were obtained, which would be important to evaluate radiation capability of materials and study radiation damage by neutrons. (authors)

  7. Monte Carlo simulation methods in moment-based scale-bridging algorithms for thermal radiative-transfer problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, J.D.; Park, H.; Wollaber, A.B.; Rauenzahn, R.M.; Knoll, D.A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a moment-based acceleration algorithm applied to Monte Carlo simulation of thermal radiative-transfer problems. Our acceleration algorithm employs a continuum system of moments to accelerate convergence of stiff absorption–emission physics. The combination of energy-conserving tallies and the use of an asymptotic approximation in optically thick regions remedy the difficulties of local energy conservation and mitigation of statistical noise in such regions. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the developed method. We also compare directly to the standard linearization-based method of Fleck and Cummings [1]. A factor of 40 reduction in total computational time is achieved with the new algorithm for an equivalent (or more accurate) solution as compared with the Fleck–Cummings algorithm

  8. A review of the use and potential of the GATE Monte Carlo simulation code for radiation therapy and dosimetry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrut, David, E-mail: david.sarrut@creatis.insa-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1 (France); Centre Léon Bérard (France); Bardiès, Manuel; Marcatili, Sara; Mauxion, Thibault [Inserm, UMR1037 CRCT, F-31000 Toulouse, France and Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier, UMR1037 CRCT, F-31000 Toulouse (France); Boussion, Nicolas [INSERM, UMR 1101, LaTIM, CHU Morvan, 29609 Brest (France); Freud, Nicolas; Létang, Jean-Michel [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard, 69008 Lyon (France); Jan, Sébastien [CEA/DSV/I2BM/SHFJ, Orsay 91401 (France); Loudos, George [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Athens 12210 (Greece); Maigne, Lydia; Perrot, Yann [UMR 6533 CNRS/IN2P3, Université Blaise Pascal, 63171 Aubière (France); Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, 12210, Athens (Greece); Pietrzyk, Uwe [Institut für Neurowissenschaften und Medizin, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, Germany and Fachbereich für Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften, Bergische Universität Wuppertal, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Robert, Charlotte [IMNC, UMR 8165 CNRS, Universités Paris 7 et Paris 11, Orsay 91406 (France); and others

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, the authors' review the applicability of the open-source GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the GEANT4 toolkit for radiation therapy and dosimetry applications. The many applications of GATE for state-of-the-art radiotherapy simulations are described including external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, intraoperative radiotherapy, hadrontherapy, molecular radiotherapy, and in vivo dose monitoring. Investigations that have been performed using GEANT4 only are also mentioned to illustrate the potential of GATE. The very practical feature of GATE making it easy to model both a treatment and an imaging acquisition within the same frameworkis emphasized. The computational times associated with several applications are provided to illustrate the practical feasibility of the simulations using current computing facilities.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation methods in moment-based scale-bridging algorithms for thermal radiative-transfer problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Densmore, J.D., E-mail: jeffery.densmore@unnpp.gov [Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, P.O. Box 79, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States); Park, H., E-mail: hkpark@lanl.gov [Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS B216, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wollaber, A.B., E-mail: wollaber@lanl.gov [Computational Physics and Methods Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS D409, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Rauenzahn, R.M., E-mail: rick@lanl.gov [Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS B216, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Knoll, D.A., E-mail: nol@lanl.gov [Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS B216, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    We present a moment-based acceleration algorithm applied to Monte Carlo simulation of thermal radiative-transfer problems. Our acceleration algorithm employs a continuum system of moments to accelerate convergence of stiff absorption–emission physics. The combination of energy-conserving tallies and the use of an asymptotic approximation in optically thick regions remedy the difficulties of local energy conservation and mitigation of statistical noise in such regions. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the developed method. We also compare directly to the standard linearization-based method of Fleck and Cummings [1]. A factor of 40 reduction in total computational time is achieved with the new algorithm for an equivalent (or more accurate) solution as compared with the Fleck–Cummings algorithm.

  10. Study of the response of a lithium yttrium borate scintillator based neutron rem counter by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, C.; Tyagi, Mohit; Biju, K.; Shanbhag, A. A.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2015-12-01

    The scarcity and the high cost of 3He has spurred the use of various detectors for neutron monitoring. A new lithium yttrium borate scintillator developed in BARC has been studied for its use in a neutron rem counter. The scintillator is made of natural lithium and boron, and the yield of reaction products that will generate a signal in a real time detector has been studied by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. A 2 cm lead introduced to enhance the gamma rejection shows no appreciable change in the shape of the fluence response or in the yield of reaction products. The fluence response when normalized at the average energy of an Am-Be neutron source shows promise of being used as rem counter.

  11. Study of the response of a lithium yttrium borate scintillator based neutron rem counter by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunil, C., E-mail: csunil11@gmail.com [Accelerator Radiation Safety Section, Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tyagi, Mohit [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Biju, K.; Shanbhag, A.A.; Bandyopadhyay, T. [Accelerator Radiation Safety Section, Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-12-11

    The scarcity and the high cost of {sup 3}He has spurred the use of various detectors for neutron monitoring. A new lithium yttrium borate scintillator developed in BARC has been studied for its use in a neutron rem counter. The scintillator is made of natural lithium and boron, and the yield of reaction products that will generate a signal in a real time detector has been studied by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. A 2 cm lead introduced to enhance the gamma rejection shows no appreciable change in the shape of the fluence response or in the yield of reaction products. The fluence response when normalized at the average energy of an Am–Be neutron source shows promise of being used as rem counter.

  12. ZZ SAIL, Albedo Scattering Data Library for 3-D Monte-Carlo Radiation Transport in LWR Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: Format: SAIL format; Number of groups: 23 neutron / 17 gamma-ray; Nuclides: Type 04 Concrete and Low Carbon Steel (A533B). Origin: Science Applications, Inc (SAI); Weighting spectrum: yes. SAIL is a library of albedo scattering data to be used in three-dimensional Monte Carlo codes to solve radiation transport problems specific to the reactor pressure vessel cavity region of a LWR. The library contains data for Type 04 Concrete and Low Carbon Steel (A533B). 2 - Method of solution: The calculation of the albedo data was perform- ed with a version of the discrete ordinates transport code DOT which treats the transport of neutrons, secondary gamma-rays and gamma- rays in one dimension, while maintaining the complete two-dimension- al treatment of the angular dependence

  13. Application of gamma radiation backscattering in determining density and Zsub(eff) of scattering material Monte Carlo optimization of configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cechak, T.

    1982-01-01

    Applying Gardner's method of double evaluation one detector should be positioned such that its response should be independent of the material density and the second detector should be positioned so as to maximize changes in response due to density changes. The experimental scanning for optimal energy is extremely time demanding. A program was written based on the Monte Carlo method which solves the problem of error magnitude in case the computation of gamma radiation backscattering neglects multiply scattered photons, the problem of how this error depends on the atomic number of the scattering material as well as the problem of whether the representation of individual scatterings in the spectrum of backscattered photons depends on the positioning of the detector. 42 detectors, 8 types of material and 10 different density values were considered. The computed dependences are given graphically. (M.D.)

  14. Physics study of microbeam radiation therapy with PSI-version of Monte Carlo code GEANT as a new computational tool

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanek, J; Laissue, J A; Lyubimova, N; Di Michiel, F; Slatkin, D N

    2000-01-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a currently experimental method of radiotherapy which is mediated by an array of parallel microbeams of synchrotron-wiggler-generated X-rays. Suitably selected, nominally supralethal doses of X-rays delivered to parallel microslices of tumor-bearing tissues in rats can be either palliative or curative while causing little or no serious damage to contiguous normal tissues. Although the pathogenesis of MRT-mediated tumor regression is not understood, as in all radiotherapy such understanding will be based ultimately on our understanding of the relationships among the following three factors: (1) microdosimetry, (2) damage to normal tissues, and (3) therapeutic efficacy. Although physical microdosimetry is feasible, published information on MRT microdosimetry to date is computational. This report describes Monte Carlo-based computational MRT microdosimetry using photon and/or electron scattering and photoionization cross-section data in the 1 e V through 100 GeV range distrib...

  15. Modeling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shields by using Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaitėa, A; Plukienė, R; Ridikas, D

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 (AVF cyclotron of Research Center of Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Japan) – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC (heavy-ion synchrotron of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan) and ISIS-800 (ISIS intensive spallation neutron source facility of the Rutherford Appleton laboratory, UK) – high energy neutron (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The calculation results were then compared with experimental data.compared with experimental data.

  16. A review of the use and potential of the GATE Monte Carlo simulation code for radiation therapy and dosimetry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrut, David; Bardiès, Manuel; Marcatili, Sara; Mauxion, Thibault; Boussion, Nicolas; Freud, Nicolas; Létang, Jean-Michel; Jan, Sébastien; Loudos, George; Maigne, Lydia; Perrot, Yann; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Robert, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors' review the applicability of the open-source GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the GEANT4 toolkit for radiation therapy and dosimetry applications. The many applications of GATE for state-of-the-art radiotherapy simulations are described including external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, intraoperative radiotherapy, hadrontherapy, molecular radiotherapy, and in vivo dose monitoring. Investigations that have been performed using GEANT4 only are also mentioned to illustrate the potential of GATE. The very practical feature of GATE making it easy to model both a treatment and an imaging acquisition within the same frameworkis emphasized. The computational times associated with several applications are provided to illustrate the practical feasibility of the simulations using current computing facilities

  17. Review of Hybrid (Deterministic/Monte Carlo) Radiation Transport Methods, Codes, and Applications at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, John C.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Mosher, Scott W.; Evans, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the hybrid (Monte Carlo/deterministic) radiation transport methods and codes used at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and examples of their application for increasing the efficiency of real-world, fixed-source Monte Carlo analyses. The two principal hybrid methods are (1) Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) for optimization of a localized detector (tally) region (e.g., flux, dose, or reaction rate at a particular location) and (2) Forward Weighted CADIS (FW-CADIS) for optimizing distributions (e.g., mesh tallies over all or part of the problem space) or multiple localized detector regions (e.g., simultaneous optimization of two or more localized tally regions). The two methods have been implemented and automated in both the MAVRIC sequence of SCALE 6 and ADVANTG, a code that works with the MCNP code. As implemented, the methods utilize the results of approximate, fast-running 3-D discrete ordinates transport calculations (with the Denovo code) to generate consistent space- and energy-dependent source and transport (weight windows) biasing parameters. These methods and codes have been applied to many relevant and challenging problems, including calculations of PWR ex-core thermal detector response, dose rates throughout an entire PWR facility, site boundary dose from arrays of commercial spent fuel storage casks, radiation fields for criticality accident alarm system placement, and detector response for special nuclear material detection scenarios and nuclear well-logging tools. Substantial computational speed-ups, generally O(10 2-4 ), have been realized for all applications to date. This paper provides a brief review of the methods, their implementation, results of their application, and current development activities, as well as a considerable list of references for readers seeking more information about the methods and/or their applications.

  18. Review of Hybrid (Deterministic/Monte Carlo) Radiation Transport Methods, Codes, and Applications at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, John C.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Mosher, Scott W.; Evans, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the hybrid (Monte Carlo/deterministic) radiation transport methods and codes used at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and examples of their application for increasing the efficiency of real-world, fixed-source Monte Carlo analyses. The two principal hybrid methods are (1) Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) for optimization of a localized detector (tally) region (e.g., flux, dose, or reaction rate at a particular location) and (2) Forward Weighted CADIS (FW-CADIS) for optimizing distributions (e.g., mesh tallies over all or part of the problem space) or multiple localized detector regions (e.g., simultaneous optimization of two or more localized tally regions). The two methods have been implemented and automated in both the MAVRIC sequence of SCALE 6 and ADVANTG, a code that works with the MCNP code. As implemented, the methods utilize the results of approximate, fast-running 3-D discrete ordinates transport calculations (with the Denovo code) to generate consistent space- and energy-dependent source and transport (weight windows) biasing parameters. These methods and codes have been applied to many relevant and challenging problems, including calculations of PWR ex-core thermal detector response, dose rates throughout an entire PWR facility, site boundary dose from arrays of commercial spent fuel storage casks, radiation fields for criticality accident alarm system placement, and detector response for special nuclear material detection scenarios and nuclear well-logging tools. Substantial computational speed-ups, generally O(102-4), have been realized for all applications to date. This paper provides a brief review of the methods, their implementation, results of their application, and current development activities, as well as a considerable list of references for readers seeking more information about the methods and/or their applications.

  19. Review of hybrid (deterministic/Monte Carlo) radiation transport methods, codes, and applications at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.C.; Peplow, D.E.; Mosher, S.W.; Evans, T.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the hybrid (Monte Carlo/deterministic) radiation transport methods and codes used at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and examples of their application for increasing the efficiency of real-world, fixed-source Monte Carlo analyses. The two principal hybrid methods are (1) Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) for optimization of a localized detector (tally) region (e.g., flux, dose, or reaction rate at a particular location) and (2) Forward Weighted CADIS (FW-CADIS) for optimizing distributions (e.g., mesh tallies over all or part of the problem space) or multiple localized detector regions (e.g., simultaneous optimization of two or more localized tally regions). The two methods have been implemented and automated in both the MAVRIC sequence of SCALE 6 and ADVANTG, a code that works with the MCNP code. As implemented, the methods utilize the results of approximate, fast-running 3-D discrete ordinates transport calculations (with the Denovo code) to generate consistent space- and energy-dependent source and transport (weight windows) biasing parameters. These methods and codes have been applied to many relevant and challenging problems, including calculations of PWR ex-core thermal detector response, dose rates throughout an entire PWR facility, site boundary dose from arrays of commercial spent fuel storage casks, radiation fields for criticality accident alarm system placement, and detector response for special nuclear material detection scenarios and nuclear well-logging tools. Substantial computational speed-ups, generally O(10 2-4 ), have been realized for all applications to date. This paper provides a brief review of the methods, their implementation, results of their application, and current development activities, as well as a considerable list of references for readers seeking more information about the methods and/or their applications. (author)

  20. Using Static Percentiles of AE9/AP9 to Approximate Dynamic Monte Carlo Runs for Radiation Analysis of Spiral Transfer Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Betty P.; O'Brien, T. Paul

    2015-06-01

    The Aerospace Corporation performed a study to determine whether static percentiles of AE9/AP9 can be used to approximate dynamic Monte Carlo runs for radiation analysis of spiral transfer orbits. Solar panel degradation is a major concern for solar-electric propulsion because solar-electric propulsion depends on the power output of the solar panel. Different spiral trajectories have different radiation environments that could lead to solar panel degradation. Because the spiral transfer orbits only last weeks to months, an average environment does not adequately address the possible transient enhancements of the radiation environment that must be accounted for in optimizing the transfer orbit trajectory. Therefore, to optimize the trajectory, an ensemble of Monte Carlo simulations of AE9/AP9 would normally be run for every spiral trajectory to determine the 95th percentile radiation environment. To avoid performing lengthy Monte Carlo dynamic simulations for every candidate spiral trajectory in the optimization, we found a static percentile that would be an accurate representation of the full Monte Carlo simulation for a representative set of spiral trajectories. For 3 LEO to GEO and 1 LEO to MEO trajectories, a static 90th percentile AP9 is a good approximation of the 95th percentile fluence with dynamics for 4-10 MeV protons, and a static 80th percentile AE9 is a good approximation of the 95th percentile fluence with dynamics for 0.5-2 MeV electrons. While the specific percentiles chosen cannot necessarily be used in general for other orbit trade studies, the concept of determining a static percentile as a quick approximation to a full Monte Carlo ensemble of simulations can likely be applied to other orbit trade studies. We expect the static percentile to depend on the region of space traversed, the mission duration, and the radiation effect considered.

  1. Efficient Sequential Monte Carlo Sampling for Continuous Monitoring of a Radiation Situation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmídl, Václav; Hofman, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2014), s. 514-527 ISSN 0040-1706 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102013018 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : radiation protection * atmospheric dispersion model * importance sampling Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 1.814, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/AS/smidl-0433631.pdf

  2. Planetary Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  3. Comparison of discrete ordinate and Monte Carlo simulations of polarized radiative transfer in two coupled slabs with different refractive indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D; Stamnes, S; Tanikawa, T; Sommersten, E R; Stamnes, J J; Lotsberg, J K; Stamnes, K

    2013-04-22

    A comparison is presented of two different methods for polarized radiative transfer in coupled media consisting of two adjacent slabs with different refractive indices, each slab being a stratified medium with no change in optical properties except in the direction of stratification. One of the methods is based on solving the integro-differential radiative transfer equation for the two coupled slabs using the discrete ordinate approximation. The other method is based on probabilistic and statistical concepts and simulates the propagation of polarized light using the Monte Carlo approach. The emphasis is on non-Rayleigh scattering for particles in the Mie regime. Comparisons with benchmark results available for a slab with constant refractive index show that both methods reproduce these benchmark results when the refractive index is set to be the same in the two slabs. Computed results for test cases with coupling (different refractive indices in the two slabs) show that the two methods produce essentially identical results for identical input in terms of absorption and scattering coefficients and scattering phase matrices.

  4. GPU - Accelerated Monte Carlo electron transport methods: development and application for radiation dose calculations using 6 GPU cards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, L.; Du, X.; Liu, T.; Xu, X. G.

    2013-01-01

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software test-bed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs (Graphics Processing Units). This paper presents the preliminary code development and the testing involving radiation dose related problems. In particular, the paper discusses the electron transport simulations using the class-II condensed history method. The considered electron energy ranges from a few hundreds of keV to 30 MeV. As for photon part, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were simulated. Voxelized geometry was supported. A serial CPU (Central Processing Unit)code was first written in C++. The code was then transplanted to the GPU using the CUDA C 5.0 standards. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. The code was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and later dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6*10 6 electron histories were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively. On-going work continues to test the code for different medical applications such as radiotherapy and brachytherapy. (authors)

  5. An investigation of the adjoint method for external beam radiation therapy treatment planning using Monte Carlo transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalok, M.; Mackie, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    A relatively new technique for achieving the right dose to the right tissue, is intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In this technique, a megavoltage x-ray beam is rotated around a patient, and the intensity and shape of the beam is modulated as a function of source position and patient anatomy. The relationship between beam-let intensity and patient dose can be expressed under a matrix form where the matrix D ij represents the dose delivered to voxel i by beam-let j per unit fluence. The D ij influence matrix is the key element that enables this approach. In this regard, sensitivity theory lends itself in a natural way to the process of computing beam weights for treatment planning. The solution of the adjoint form of the Boltzmann equation is an adjoint function that describes the importance of particles throughout the system in contributing to the detector response. In this case, adjoint methods can provide the sensitivity of the dose at a single point in the patient with respect to all points in the source field. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using the adjoint method and Monte Carlo transport for radiation therapy treatment planning

  6. A Monte Carlo study of the energy spectra and transmission characteristics of scattered radiation from x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platten, David John

    2014-06-01

    Existing data used to calculate the barrier transmission of scattered radiation from computed tomography (CT) are based on primary beam CT energy spectra. This study uses the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system and Epp user code to determine the energy spectra of CT scatter from four different primary CT beams passing through an ICRP 110 male reference phantom. Each scatter spectrum was used as a broad-beam x-ray source in transmission simulations through seventeen thicknesses of lead (0.00-3.50 mm). A fit of transmission data to lead thickness was performed to obtain α, β and γ parameters for each spectrum. The mean energy of the scatter spectra were up to 12.3 keV lower than that of the primary spectrum. For 120 kVp scatter beams the transmission through lead was at least 50% less than predicted by existing data for thicknesses of 1.5 mm and greater; at least 30% less transmission was seen for 140 kVp scatter beams. This work has shown that the mean energy and half-value layer of CT scatter spectra are lower than those of the corresponding primary beam. The transmission of CT scatter radiation through lead is lower than that calculated with currently available data. Using the data from this work will result in less lead shielding being required for CT scanner installations.

  7. Planetary Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    4 Abstract Planetary defense against asteroids should be a major concern for every government in the world . Millions of asteroids and...helps make Planetary Defense viable because defending the Earth against asteroids benefits from all the above technologies. So if our planet security...information about their physical characteristics so we can employ the right strategies. It is a crucial difference if asteroids are made up of metal

  8. GATE Monte Carlo simulation in radiation therapy for complex and dynamic beams in IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhalouche, Saadia

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the three methods of cancer treatment along with surgery and chemotherapy. It has evolved with the development of treatment techniques such as IMRT and VMAT along with IGRT for patient positioning. The aim is to effectively treat tumors while limiting the dose to healthy organs. In our work, we use the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform to model a LINAC for a 6 MV photon beam. The resulting model is then validated with a dosimetric study by calculating relevant parameters for the beam quality. The LINAC model is then used for simulating clinical IMRT treatment plans in the ORL domain. Simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. We also explored the possibility of modeling the LINAC portal imaging system. This technique referred to as MV-CBCT combine the LINAC source with a flat panel detector to acquire 3D images of the patient. This part was validated first by acquiring 2D projections on patient and anthropomorphic phantom, and by reconstructing 3D volumes. Here again, validation was performed by comparing simulated and actual images. As a second step, a dosimetric validation was done by evaluating the dose deposited by IMRT beams, by means of portal signal only. We show in the present work the ability of GATE to perform complex IMRT treatments and portal images as they are performed routinely for dosimetric quality control. (author) [fr

  9. Analysis of scattered radiation in an irradiated body by means of the monte carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hideki; Nakamura, Masaru; Tsuiki, Saeko; Shimizu, Ikuo; Higashi, Naoki; Kamada, Takao

    1992-01-01

    Isodose charts for oblique incidence are simply obtained from normal isodose data of correcting methods such as the tissue-air ratio (TAR) method, the effective source-skin distance (SSD) method etc. Although, in these correcting methods, the depth dose data on the beam axis remained as the normal depth dose data, which were measured on the geometry of perpendicular incidence. In this paper, the primary and scattered dose on the beam axis for 60 Co gamma-ray oblique incidence were calculated by means of the Monthe Carlo simulation, and the variation of the percentage depth dose and scatter factor were evaluated for oblique incident angles. The scattered dose distribution was altered for change in the oblique incident angle. Also, for increasing the angle, percentage depth dose (PDD) was decreased and the scatter factor was increased. If the depth dose for oblique incidence was calculated using normal PDD data and normal scatter factors, the results become an underestimation of the shallow region up to several cm, and an overesitimation for the deep region. (author)

  10. Monte Carlo mixture model of lifetime cancer incidence risk from radiation exposure on shuttle and international space station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, L.E.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    1999-01-01

    Estimating uncertainty in lifetime cancer risk for human exposure to space radiation is a unique challenge. Conventional risk assessment with low-linear-energy-transfer (LET)-based risk from Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies may be inappropriate for relativistic protons and nuclei in space due to track structure effects. This paper develops a Monte Carlo mixture model (MCMM) for transferring additive, National Institutes of Health multiplicative, and multiplicative excess cancer incidence risks based on Japanese atomic bomb survivor data to determine excess incidence risk for various US astronaut exposure profiles. The MCMM serves as an anchor point for future risk projection methods involving biophysical models of DNA damage from space radiation. Lifetime incidence risks of radiation-induced cancer for the MCMM based on low-LET Japanese data for nonleukemia (all cancers except leukemia) were 2.77 (90% confidence limit, 0.75-11.34) for males exposed to 1 Sv at age 45 and 2.20 (90% confidence limit, 0.59-10.12) for males exposed at age 55. For females, mixture model risks for nonleukemia exposed separately to 1 Sv at ages of 45 and 55 were 2.98 (90% confidence limit, 0.90-11.70) and 2.44 (90% confidence limit, 0.70-10.30), respectively. Risks for high-LET 200 MeV protons (LET=0.45 keV/μm), 1 MeV α-particles (LET=100 keV/μm), and 600 MeV iron particles (LET=180 keV/μm) were scored on a per particle basis by determining the particle fluence required for an average of one particle per cell nucleus of area 100 μm 2 . Lifetime risk per proton was 2.68x10 -2 % (90% confidence limit, 0.79x10 -3 %-0.514x10 -2 %). For α-particles, lifetime risk was 14.2% (90% confidence limit, 2.5%-31.2%). Conversely, lifetime risk per iron particle was 23.7% (90% confidence limit, 4.5%-53.0%). Uncertainty in the DDREF for high-LET particles may be less than that for low-LET radiation because typically there is very little dose-rate dependence. Probability density functions for

  11. Comparison between beta radiation dose distribution due to LDR and HDR ocular brachytherapy applicators using GATE Monte Carlo platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Laoues; Rachid, Khelifi; Ahmed, Sidi Moussa

    2016-08-01

    Eye applicators with 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources are generally used in brachytherapy for the treatment of eye diseases as uveal melanoma. Whenever, radiation is used in treatment, dosimetry is essential. However, knowledge of the exact dose distribution is a critical decision-making to the outcome of the treatment. The Monte Carlo technique provides a powerful tool for calculation of the dose and dose distributions which helps to predict and determine the doses from different shapes of various types of eye applicators more accurately. The aim of this work consisted in using the Monte Carlo GATE platform to calculate the 3D dose distribution on a mathematical model of the human eye according to international recommendations. Mathematical models were developed for four ophthalmic applicators, two HDR 90Sr applicators SIA.20 and SIA.6, and two LDR 106Ru applicators, a concave CCB model and a flat CCB model. In present work, considering a heterogeneous eye phantom and the chosen tumor, obtained results with the use of GATE for mean doses distributions in a phantom and according to international recommendations show a discrepancy with respect to those specified by the manufacturers. The QC of dosimetric parameters shows that contrarily to the other applicators, the SIA.20 applicator is consistent with recommendations. The GATE platform show that the SIA.20 applicator present better results, namely the dose delivered to critical structures were lower compared to those obtained for the other applicators, and the SIA.6 applicator, simulated with MCNPX generates higher lens doses than those generated by GATE. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Monte Carlo Code for Relativistic Radiation Transport Around Kerr Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy David; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  13. Physical Processes and Applications of the Monte Carlo Radiative Energy Deposition (MRED) Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Warren, Kevin M.; Sierawski, Brian D.; King, Michael P.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.; Auden, Elizabeth C.

    2015-08-01

    MRED is a Python-language scriptable computer application that simulates radiation transport. It is the computational engine for the on-line tool CRÈME-MC. MRED is based on c++ code from Geant4 with additional Fortran components to simulate electron transport and nuclear reactions with high precision. We provide a detailed description of the structure of MRED and the implementation of the simulation of physical processes used to simulate radiation effects in electronic devices and circuits. Extensive discussion and references are provided that illustrate the validation of models used to implement specific simulations of relevant physical processes. Several applications of MRED are summarized that demonstrate its ability to predict and describe basic physical phenomena associated with irradiation of electronic circuits and devices. These include effects from single particle radiation (including both direct ionization and indirect ionization effects), dose enhancement effects, and displacement damage effects. MRED simulations have also helped to identify new single event upset mechanisms not previously observed by experiment, but since confirmed, including upsets due to muons and energetic electrons.

  14. A 3D Monte Carlo model of radiation affecting cells, and its application to neuronal cells and GCR irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Kim, Angela; Vazquez, Marcelo E.; Guida, Peter; Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    A 3D Monte Carlo model of radiation transport in matter is applied to study the effect of heavy ion radiation on human neuronal cells. Central nervous system effects, including cognitive impairment, are suspected from the heavy ion component of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) during space missions. The model can count, for instance, the number of direct hits from ions, which will have the most affect on the cells. For comparison, the remote hits, which are received through δ-rays from the projectile traversing space outside the volume of the cell, are also simulated and their contribution is estimated. To simulate tissue effects from irradiation, cellular matrices of neuronal cells, which were derived from confocal microscopy, were simulated in our model. To produce this realistic model of the brain tissue, image segmentation was used to identify cells in the images of cells cultures. The segmented cells were inserted pixel by pixel into the modeled physical space, which represents a volume of interacting cells with periodic boundary conditions (PBCs). PBCs were used to extrapolate the model results to the macroscopic tissue structures. Specific spatial patterns for cell apoptosis are expected from GCR, as heavy ions produce concentrated damage along their trajectories. The apoptotic cell patterns were modeled based on the action cross sections for apoptosis, which were estimated from the available experimental data. The cell patterns were characterized with an autocorrelation function, which values are higher for non-random cell patterns, and the values of the autocorrelation function were compared for X rays and Fe ion irradiations. The autocorrelation function indicates the directionality effects present in apoptotic neuronal cells from GCR.

  15. Efficiency of radiation protection equipment in interventional radiology: a systematic Monte Carlo study of eye lens and whole body doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koukorava, C; Farah, J; Clairand, I; Donadille, L; Struelens, L; Vanhavere, F; Dimitriou, P

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were used to investigate the efficiency of radiation protection equipment in reducing eye and whole body doses during fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures. Eye lens doses were determined considering different models of eyewear with various shapes, sizes and lead thickness. The origin of scattered radiation reaching the eyes was also assessed to explain the variation in the protection efficiency of the different eyewear models with exposure conditions. The work also investigates the variation of eye and whole body doses with ceiling-suspended shields of various shapes and positioning. For all simulations, a broad spectrum of configurations typical for most interventional procedures was considered. Calculations showed that ‘wrap around’ glasses are the most efficient eyewear models reducing, on average, the dose by 74% and 21% for the left and right eyes respectively. The air gap between the glasses and the eyes was found to be the primary source of scattered radiation reaching the eyes. The ceiling-suspended screens were more efficient when positioned close to the patient’s skin and to the x-ray field. With the use of such shields, the H p (10) values recorded at the collar, chest and waist level and the H p (3) values for both eyes were reduced on average by 47%, 37%, 20% and 56% respectively. Finally, simulations proved that beam quality and lead thickness have little influence on eye dose while beam projection, the position and head orientation of the operator as well as the distance between the image detector and the patient are key parameters affecting eye and whole body doses. (paper)

  16. The Fifteen-Year Attitude History of the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Radiator and Collection Efficiencies for Micrometeoroids and Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anz-Meador, Phillip D.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Cooke, William J.; Koehler, H.

    2010-01-01

    An examination of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) radiator assembly was conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) during the summer of 2009. Immediately apparent was a distinct biasing of the largest 45 impact features towards one side of the radiator, in contrast to an approximately uniform distribution of smaller impacts. Such a distribution may be a consequence of the HST s attitude history and pointing requirements for the cold radiator, or of environmental effects, such as an anisotropic distribution of the responsible population in that size regime. Understanding the size-dependent spatial distribution of impact features is essential to the general analysis of these features. We have obtained from GSFC a 15 minute temporal resolution record of the state vector (Earth Centered Inertial position and velocity) and HST attitude, consisting of the orientation of the velocity and HST-sun vectors in HST body coordinates. This paper reviews the actual state vector and attitude history of the radiator in the context of the randomly tumbling plate assumption and assesses the statistical likelihood (or collection efficiency) of the radiator for the micrometeoroid and orbital debris environments. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center s Meteoroid Environment Model is used to assess the micrometeoroid component. The NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM) is used to model the orbital debris component. Modeling results are compared with observations of the impact feature spatial distribution, and the relative contribution of each environmental component are examined in detail.

  17. Implementation of Japanese male and female tomographic phantoms to multi-particle Monte Carlo code for ionizing radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2006-01-01

    Japanese male and female tomographic phantoms, which have been developed for radio-frequency electromagnetic-field dosimetry, were implemented into multi-particle Monte Carlo transport code to evaluate realistic dose distribution in human body exposed to radiation field. Japanese tomographic phantoms, which were developed from the whole body magnetic resonance images of Japanese average adult male and female, were processed as follows to be implemented into general purpose multi-particle Monte Carlo code, MCNPX2.5. Original array size of Japanese male and female phantoms, 320 x 160 x 866 voxels and 320 x 160 x 804 voxels, respectively, were reduced into 320 x 160 x 433 voxels and 320 x 160 x 402 voxels due to the limitation of memory use in MCNPX2.5. The 3D voxel array of the phantoms were processed by using the built-in repeated structure algorithm, where the human anatomy was described by the repeated lattice of tiny cube containing the information of material composition and organ index number. Original phantom data were converted into ASCII file, which can be directly ported into the lattice card of MCNPX2.5 input deck by using in-house code. A total of 30 material compositions obtained from International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) report 46 were assigned to 54 and 55 organs and tissues in the male and female phantoms, respectively, and imported into the material card of MCNPX2.5 along with the corresponding cross section data. Illustrative calculation of absorbed doses for 26 internal organs and effective dose were performed for idealized broad parallel photon and neutron beams in anterior-posterior irradiation geometry, which is typical for workers at nuclear power plant. The results were compared with the data from other Japanese and Caucasian tomographic phantom, and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report 74. The further investigation of the difference in organ dose and effective dose among tomographic

  18. Exploring Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, William L

    2012-01-01

    Exploring Monte Carlo Methods is a basic text that describes the numerical methods that have come to be known as "Monte Carlo." The book treats the subject generically through the first eight chapters and, thus, should be of use to anyone who wants to learn to use Monte Carlo. The next two chapters focus on applications in nuclear engineering, which are illustrative of uses in other fields. Five appendices are included, which provide useful information on probability distributions, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes for radiation transport, and other matters. The famous "Buffon's needle proble

  19. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF RADIATION DAMAGE IN BULK TUNGSTEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-09-22

    We used our recently developed lattice based OKMC code; KSOME [1] to carryout simulations of radiation damage in bulk W. We study the effect of dimensionality of self interstitial atom (SIA) diffusion i.e. 1D versus 3D on the defect accumulation during irradiation with a primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy of 100 keV at 300 K for the dose rates of 10-5 and 10-6 dpa/s. As expected 3D SIA diffusion significantly reduces damage accumulation due to increased probability of recombination events. In addition, dose rate, over the limited range examined here, appears to have no effect in both cases of SIA diffusion.

  20. Accuracy and Radiation Dose of CT-Based Attenuation Correction for Small Animal PET: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Chan, Kai-Chieh

    2013-06-01

    -Small animal PET allows qualitative assessment and quantitative measurement of biochemical processes in vivo, but the accuracy and reproducibility of imaging results can be affected by several parameters. The first aim of this study was to investigate the performance of different CT-based attenuation correction strategies and assess the resulting impact on PET images. The absorbed dose in different tissues caused by scanning procedures was also discussed to minimize biologic damage generated by radiation exposure due to PET/CT scanning. A small animal PET/CT system was modeled based on Monte Carlo simulation to generate imaging results and dose distribution. Three energy mapping methods, including the bilinear scaling method, the dual-energy method and the hybrid method which combines the kVp conversion and the dual-energy method, were investigated comparatively through assessing the accuracy of estimating linear attenuation coefficient at 511 keV and the bias introduced into PET quantification results due to CT-based attenuation correction. Our results showed that the hybrid method outperformed the bilinear scaling method, while the dual-energy method achieved the highest accuracy among the three energy mapping methods. Overall, the accuracy of PET quantification results have similar trend as that for the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients, whereas the differences between the three methods are more obvious in the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients than in the PET quantification results. With regards to radiation exposure from CT, the absorbed dose ranged between 7.29-45.58 mGy for 50-kVp scan and between 6.61-39.28 mGy for 80-kVp scan. For 18 F radioactivity concentration of 1.86x10 5 Bq/ml, the PET absorbed dose was around 24 cGy for tumor with a target-to-background ratio of 8. The radiation levels for CT scans are not lethal to the animal, but concurrent use of PET in longitudinal study can increase the risk of biological effects. The

  1. All about FAX: a Female Adult voXel phantom for Monte Carlo calculation in radiation protection dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R; Khoury, H J; Vieira, J W; Loureiro, E C M; Lima, V J M; Lima, F R A; Hoff, G

    2004-12-07

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has created a task group on dose calculations, which, among other objectives, should replace the currently used mathematical MIRD phantoms by voxel phantoms. Voxel phantoms are based on digital images recorded from scanning of real persons by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared to the mathematical MIRD phantoms, voxel phantoms are true to the natural representations of a human body. Connected to a radiation transport code, voxel phantoms serve as virtual humans for which equivalent dose to organs and tissues from exposure to ionizing radiation can be calculated. The principal database for the construction of the FAX (Female Adult voXel) phantom consisted of 151 CT images recorded from scanning of trunk and head of a female patient, whose body weight and height were close to the corresponding data recommended by the ICRP in Publication 89. All 22 organs and tissues at risk, except for the red bone marrow and the osteogenic cells on the endosteal surface of bone ('bone surface'), have been segmented manually with a technique recently developed at the Departamento de Energia Nuclear of the UFPE in Recife, Brazil. After segmentation the volumes of the organs and tissues have been adjusted to agree with the organ and tissue masses recommended by ICRP for the Reference Adult Female in Publication 89. Comparisons have been made with the organ and tissue masses of the mathematical EVA phantom, as well as with the corresponding data for other female voxel phantoms. The three-dimensional matrix of the segmented images has eventually been connected to the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. Effective dose conversion coefficients have been calculated for exposures to photons, and compared to data determined for the mathematical MIRD-type phantoms, as well as for other voxel phantoms.

  2. Estimation of the effects of a lead vest on dose reduction for radiation workers using Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young-khi, Lim; Byoung-il, Lee; Jeong-in, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the field of medical diagnosis or treatments using radiations, lead vests or aprons are widely used to protect the patients or workers from unwanted irradiation. Also, in nuclear power plants, it is recommended that the workers should wear a lead vest to reduce the dose for working in high radiation area. Generally, personal dosimeters were used to estimate the doses of workers but these cannot give the absolute values. So, measured values should be modified by comparing the reference conditions with conversion factors. Many trials to estimate the doses of workers with lead shield using two or more dosimeters at different locations were done but these had limitations. Through this study the personal dose with/without a lead vest and the effectiveness were evaluated by Monte Carlo methods. A lead vest which had been used at several nuclear sites was modelled with MIRD-V and typical Korean voxel phantom using MCNP-5 transport code. Organ doses were calculated in AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT irradiation geometry for several parallel photon beams. Also irradiation experiments were carried out using real typical Korean phantom with the lead vest and the results were compared with those calculated by simulations. In most cases, the lead vest decreases the organ doses about 30%. For low energy, the lead vest is very effective to reduce the dose but it is not so good for high energy photon shielding. For thyroids, the doses to high energy photons increased by 5% on the contrary. This study may be applied to the better design of personal shielding and dose estimation procedures for practical use. (author)

  3. Investigation of scattered radiation in 3D whole-body positron emission tomography using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, L.-E.; Brix, G.

    1999-01-01

    The correction of scattered radiation is one of the most challenging tasks in 3D positron emission tomography (PET) and knowledge about the amount of scatter and its distribution is a prerequisite for performing an accurate correction. One concern in 3D PET in contrast to 2D PET is the scatter contribution from activity outside the field-of-view (FOV) and multiple scatter. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we examined the scatter distribution for various phantoms. The simulations were performed for a whole-body PET system (ECAT EXACT HR + , Siemens/CTI) with an axial FOV of 15.5 cm and a ring diameter of 82.7 cm. With (without) interplane septa, up to one (two) out of three detected events are scattered (for a centred point source in a water-filled cylinder that nearly fills out the patient port), whereby the relative scatter fraction varies significantly with the axial position. Our results show that for an accurate scatter correction, activity as well as scattering media outside the FOV have to be taken into account. Furthermore it could be shown that there is a considerable amount of multiple scatter which has a different spatial distribution from single scatter. This means that multiple scatter cannot be corrected by simply rescaling the single scatter component. (author)

  4. Calculation of the secondary gamma radiation by the Monte Carlo method at displaced sampling from distributed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, Eh.E.; Fadeev, I.A.

    1979-01-01

    A possibility to use displaced sampling from a bulk gamma source in calculating the secondary gamma fields by the Monte Carlo method is discussed. The algorithm proposed is based on the concept of conjugate functions alongside the dispersion minimization technique. For the sake of simplicity a plane source is considered. The algorithm has been put into practice on the M-220 computer. The differential gamma current and flux spectra in 21cm-thick lead have been calculated. The source of secondary gamma-quanta was assumed to be a distributed, constant and isotropic one emitting 4 MeV gamma quanta with the rate of 10 9 quanta/cm 3 xs. The calculations have demonstrated that the last 7 cm of lead are responsible for the whole gamma spectral pattern. The spectra practically coincide with the ones calculated by the ROZ computer code. Thus the algorithm proposed can be offectively used in the calculations of secondary gamma radiation transport and reduces the computation time by 2-4 times

  5. Coupling of near-field thermal radiative heating and phonon Monte Carlo simulation: Assessment of temperature gradient in n-doped silicon thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Basil T.; Francoeur, Mathieu; Bong, Victor N.-S.; Mengüç, M. Pinar

    2014-01-01

    Near-field thermal radiative exchange between two objects is typically more effective than the far-field thermal radiative exchange as the heat flux can increase up to several orders higher in magnitudes due to tunneling of evanescent waves. Such an interesting phenomenon has started to gain its popularity in nanotechnology, especially in nano-gap thermophotovoltaic systems and near-field radiative cooling of micro-/nano-devices. Here, we explored the existence of thermal gradient within an n-doped silicon thin film when it is subjected to intensive near-field thermal radiative heating. The near-field radiative power density deposited within the film is calculated using the Maxwell equations combined with fluctuational electrodynamics. A phonon Monte Carlo simulation is then used to assess the temperature gradient by treating the near-field radiative power density as the heat source. Results indicated that it is improbable to have temperature gradient with the near-field radiative heating as a continuous source unless the source comprises of ultra-short radiative pulses with a strong power density. - Highlights: • This study investigates temperature distribution in an n-doped silicon thin film. • Near-field radiative heating is treated as a volumetric phenomenon. • The temperature gradient is computed using phonon MC simulation. • Temperature of thin film can be approximated as uniform for radiation calculations. • If heat source is a pulsed radiation, a temperature gradient can be established

  6. Planetary Magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.T.

    1980-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io

  7. Study on shielding design method of radiation streaming in a tokamak-type DT fusion reactor based on Monte Carlo calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi

    2003-09-01

    In tokamak-type DT nuclear fusion reactor, there are various type slits and ducts in the blanket and the vacuum vessel. The helium production in the rewelding location of the blanket and the vacuum vessel, the nuclear properties in the super-conductive TF coil, e.g. the nuclear heating rate in the coil winding pack, are enhanced by the radiation streaming through the slits and ducts, and they are critical concern in the shielding design. The decay gamma ray dose rate around the duct penetrating the blanket and the vacuum vessel is also enhanced by the radiation streaming through the duct, and they are also critical concern from the view point of the human access to the cryostat during maintenance. In order to evaluate these nuclear properties with good accuracy, three dimensional Monte Carlo calculation is required but requires long calculation time. Therefore, the development of the effective simple design evaluation method for radiation streaming is substantially important. This study aims to establish the systematic evaluation method for the nuclear properties of the blanket, the vacuum vessel and the Toroidal Field (TF) coil taking into account the radiation streaming through various types of slits and ducts, based on three dimensional Monte Carlo calculation using the MNCP code, and for the decay gamma ray dose rates penetrated around the ducts. The present thesis describes three topics in five chapters as follows; 1) In Chapter 2, the results calculated by the Monte Carlo code, MCNP, are compared with those by the Sn code, DOT3.5, for the radiation streaming in the tokamak-type nuclear fusion reactor, for validating the results of the Sn calculation. From this comparison, the uncertainties of the Sn calculation results coming from the ray-effect and the effect due to approximation of the geometry are investigated whether the two dimensional Sn calculation can be applied instead of the Monte Carlo calculation. Through the study, it can be concluded that the

  8. Semi-analog Monte Carlo (SMC) method for time-dependent non-linear three-dimensional heterogeneous radiative transfer problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Sung Hwan

    2004-02-01

    Radiative transfer is a complex phenomenon in which radiation field interacts with material. This thermal radiative transfer phenomenon is composed of two equations which are the balance equation of photons and the material energy balance equation. The two equations involve non-linearity due to the temperature and that makes the radiative transfer equation more difficult to solve. During the last several years, there have been many efforts to solve the non-linear radiative transfer problems by Monte Carlo method. Among them, it is known that Semi-Analog Monte Carlo (SMC) method developed by Ahrens and Larsen is accurate regard-less of the time step size in low temperature region. But their works are limited to one-dimensional, low temperature problems. In this thesis, we suggest some method to remove their limitations in the SMC method and apply to the more realistic problems. An initially cold problem was solved over entire temperature region by using piecewise linear interpolation of the heat capacity, while heat capacity is still fitted as a cubic curve within the lowest temperature region. If we assume the heat capacity to be linear in each temperature region, the non-linearity still remains in the radiative transfer equations. We then introduce the first-order Taylor expansion to linearize the non-linear radiative transfer equations. During the linearization procedure, absorption-reemission phenomena may be described by a conventional reemission time sampling scheme which is similar to the repetitive sampling scheme in particle transport Monte Carlo method. But this scheme causes significant stochastic errors, which necessitates many histories. Thus, we present a new reemission time sampling scheme which reduces stochastic errors by storing the information of absorption times. The results of the comparison of the two schemes show that the new scheme has less stochastic errors. Therefore, the improved SMC method is able to solve more realistic problems with

  9. The Premar Code for the Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation Transport In the Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupini, E.; Borgia, M.G.; Premuda, M.

    1997-03-01

    The Montecarlo code PREMAR is described, which allows the user to simulate the radiation transport in the atmosphere, in the ultraviolet-infrared frequency interval. A plan multilayer geometry is at present foreseen by the code, witch albedo possibility at the lower boundary surface. For a given monochromatic point source, the main quantities computed by the code are the absorption spatial distributions of aerosol and molecules, together with the related atmospheric transmittances. Moreover, simulation of of Lidar experiments are foreseen by the code, the source and telescope fields of view being assigned. To build-up the appropriate probability distributions, an input data library is assumed to be read by the code. For this purpose the radiance-transmittance LOWTRAN-7 code has been conveniently adapted as a source of the library so as to exploit the richness of information of the code for a large variety of atmospheric simulations. Results of applications of the PREMAR code are finally presented, with special reference to simulations of Lidar system and radiometer experiments carried out at the Brasimone ENEA Centre by the Environment Department

  10. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilseia Aparecida Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    heterogeneous eye model, indicating that the homogeneous water eye model is a reasonable one. The determined isodose curves give a good visualization of dose distributions inside the eye structures, pointing out their most exposed volume....................................................Cite this article as:Barbosa NA, da Rosa LAR, de Menezes AF, Reis JP, Facure A, Braz D. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(3:02038. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0203.8

  11. Radiation shielding techniques and applications. 4. Two-Phase Monte Carlo Approach to Photon Streaming Through Three-Legged Penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Travis; Hack, Joe; Nathan, Steve; Barnett, Marvin

    2001-01-01

    solutions for scattering of neutrons through multi-legged penetrations are readily available in the literature; similar analytical solutions for photon scattering through penetrations, however, are not. Therefore, computer modeling must be relied upon to perform our analyses. The computer code typically used by Westinghouse SMS in the evaluation of photon transport through complex geometries is the MCNP Monte Carlo computer code. Yet, geometries of this nature can cause problems even with the Monte Carlo codes. Striking a balance between how the code handles bulk transport through the wall with transport through the penetration void, particularly with the use of typical variance reduction methods, is difficult when trying to ensure that all the important regions of the model are sampled appropriately. The problem was broken down into several roughly independent cases. First, scatter through the penetration was considered. Second, bulk transport through the hot leg of the duct and then through the remaining thickness of wall was calculated to determine the amount of supplemental shielding required in the wall. Similar analyses were performed for the middle and cold legs of the penetration. Finally, additional external shielding from radiation streaming through the duct was determined for cases where the minimum offset distance was not feasible. Each case was broken down further into two phases. In the first phase of each case, photons were transported from the source material to an area at the face of the wall, or the opening of the duct, where photon energy and angular distributions were tallied, representing the source incident on the wall or opening. Then, a simplified model for each case was developed and analyzed using the data from the first phase and the new source term. (authors)

  12. Planetary Geomorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Victor R.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various topics related to planetary geomorphology, including: research techniques; such geomorphic processes as impact, volcanic, degradational, eolian, and hillslope/mass movement processes; and channels and valleys. Indicates that the subject should be taught as a series of scientific questions rather than scientific results of…

  13. Estimation of tumour dose enhancement due to gold nanoparticles during typical radiation treatments: a preliminary Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S H

    2005-01-01

    A recent mice study demonstrated that gold nanoparticles could be safely administered and used to enhance the tumour dose during radiation therapy. The use of gold nanoparticles seems more promising than earlier methods because of the high atomic number of gold and because nanoparticles can more easily penetrate the tumour vasculature. However, to date, possible dose enhancement due to the use of gold nanoparticles has not been well quantified, especially for common radiation treatment situations. Therefore, the current preliminary study estimated this dose enhancement by Monte Carlo calculations for several phantom test cases representing radiation treatments with the following modalities: 140 kVp x-rays, 4 and 6 MV photon beams, and 192 Ir gamma rays. The current study considered three levels of gold concentration within the tumour, two of which are based on the aforementioned mice study, and assumed either no gold or a single gold concentration level outside the tumour. The dose enhancement over the tumour volume considered for the 140 kVp x-ray case can be at least a factor of 2 at an achievable gold concentration of 7 mg Au/g tumour assuming no gold outside the tumour. The tumour dose enhancement for the cases involving the 4 and 6 MV photon beams based on the same assumption ranged from about 1% to 7%, depending on the amount of gold within the tumour and photon beam qualities. For the 192 Ir cases, the dose enhancement within the tumour region ranged from 5% to 31%, depending on radial distance and gold concentration level within the tumour. For the 7 mg Au/g tumour cases, the loading of gold into surrounding normal tissue at 2 mg Au/g resulted in an increase in the normal tissue dose, up to 30%, negligible, and about 2% for the 140 kVp x-rays, 6 MV photon beam, and 192 Ir gamma rays, respectively, while the magnitude of dose enhancement within the tumour was essentially unchanged. (note)

  14. Environmental dose rate heterogeneity of beta radiation and its implications for luminescence dating: Monte Carlo modelling and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nathan, R.P.; Thomas, P.J.; Jain, M.

    2003-01-01

    and identify the likely size of these effects on D-e distributions. The study employs the MCNP 4C Monte Carlo electron/photon transport model, supported by an experimental validation of the code in several case studies. We find good agreement between the experimental measurements and the Monte Carlo...

  15. Investigation of radiation absorption and X-ray fluorescence properties of medical imaging scintillators by Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolopoulos, D.; Kandarakis, I.; Cavouras, D.; Valais, I.; Linardatos, D.; Michail, C.; David, S.; Gaitanis, A.; Nomicos, C.; Louizi, A.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray absorption and X-ray fluorescence properties of medical imaging scintillating screens were studied by Monte Carlo methods as a function of the incident photon energy and screen-coating thickness. The scintillating materials examined were Gd 2 O 2 S (GOS) Gd 2 SiO 5 (GSO) YAlO 3 (YAP), Y 3 Al 5 O 12 (YAG), LuSiO 5 (LSO), LuAlO 3 (LuAP) and ZnS. Monoenergetic photon exposures were modeled in the range from 10 to 100 keV. The corresponding ranges of coating thicknesses of the investigated scintillating screens ranged up to 200 mg cm -2 . Results indicated that X-ray absorption and X-ray fluorescence are affected by the incident photon energy and the screen's coating thickness. Regarding incident photon energy, this X-ray absorption and fluorescence was found to exhibit very intense changes near the corresponding K edge of the heaviest element in the screen's scintillating material. Regarding coating thickness, thicker screens exhibited higher X-ray absorption and X-ray fluorescence. Results also indicated that a significant fraction of the generated X-ray fluorescent quanta escape from the scintillating screen. This fraction was found to increase with screen's coating thickness. At the energy range studied, most of the incident photons were found to be absorbed via one-hit photoelectric effect. As a result, the reabsorption of scattered radiation was found to be of rather minor importance; nevertheless this was found to increase with the screen's coating thickness. Differences in X-ray absorption and X-ray fluorescence were found among the various scintillators studied. LSO scintillator was found to be the most attractive material for use in many X-ray imaging applications, exhibiting the best absorption properties in the largest part of the energy range studied. Y-based scintillators were also found to be of significant absorption performance within the low energy ranges

  16. Local dose enhancement in radiation therapy: Monte Carlo simulation study; Reforco local de dose em radioterapia utilizando nanoparticulas: estudo por simulacao Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Laura E. da; Nicolucci, Patricia, E-mail: laura.emilia.fm@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras

    2014-04-15

    The development of nanotechnology has boosted the use of nanoparticles in radiation therapy in order to achieve greater therapeutic ratio between tumor and healthy tissues. Gold has been shown to be most suitable to this task due to the high biocompatibility and high atomic number, which contributes to a better in vivo distribution and for the local energy deposition. As a result, this study proposes to study, nanoparticle in the tumor cell. At a range of 11 nm from the nanoparticle surface, results have shown an absorbed dose 141 times higher for the medium with the gold nanoparticle compared to the water for an incident energy spectrum with maximum photon energy of 50 keV. It was also noted that when only scattered radiation is interacting with the gold nanoparticles, the dose was 134 times higher compared to enhanced local dose that remained significant even for scattered radiation. (author)

  17. Planetary Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  18. Planetary engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, James B.; Sagan, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Assuming commercial fusion power, heavy lift vehicles and major advances in genetic engineering, the authors survey possible late-21st century methods of working major transformations in planetary environments. Much more Earthlike climates may be produced on Mars by generating low freezing point greenhouse gases from indigenous materials; on Venus by biological conversion of CO2 to graphite, by canceling the greenhouse effect with high-altitude absorbing fine particles, or by a sunshield at the first Lagrangian point; and on Titan by greenhouses and/or fusion warming. However, in our present state of ignorance we cannot guarantee a stable endstate or exclude unanticipated climatic feedbacks or other unintended consequences. Moreover, as the authors illustrate by several examples, many conceivable modes of planetary engineering are so wasteful of scarce solar system resources and so destructive of important scientific information as to raise profound ethical issues, even if they were economically feasible, which they are not. Global warming on Earth may lead to calls for mitigation by planetary engineering, e.g., emplacement and replenishment of anti-greenhouse layers at high altitudes, or sunshields in space. But here especially we must be concerned about precision, stability, and inadvertent side-effects. The safest and most cost-effective means of countering global warming - beyond, e.g., improved energy efficiency, CFC bans and alternative energy sources - is the continuing reforestation of approximately 2 times 107 sq km of the Earth's surface. This can be accomplished with present technology and probably at the least cost.

  19. Planetary engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, James B.; Sagan, Carl

    Assuming commercial fusion power, heavy lift vehicles and major advances in genetic engineering, the authors survey possible late-21st century methods of working major transformations in planetary environments. Much more Earthlike climates may be produced on Mars by generating low freezing point greenhouse gases from indigenous materials; on Venus by biological conversion of CO2 to graphite, by canceling the greenhouse effect with high-altitude absorbing fine particles, or by a sunshield at the first Lagrangian point; and on Titan by greenhouses and/or fusion warming. However, in our present state of ignorance we cannot guarantee a stable endstate or exclude unanticipated climatic feedbacks or other unintended consequences. Moreover, as the authors illustrate by several examples, many conceivable modes of planetary engineering are so wasteful of scarce solar system resources and so destructive of important scientific information as to raise profound ethical issues, even if they were economically feasible, which they are not. Global warming on Earth may lead to calls for mitigation by planetary engineering, e.g., emplacement and replenishment of anti-greenhouse layers at high altitudes, or sunshields in space. But here especially we must be concerned about precision, stability, and inadvertent side-effects. The safest and most cost-effective means of countering global warming - beyond, e.g., improved energy efficiency, CFC bans and alternative energy sources - is the continuing reforestation of approximately 2 times 107 sq km of the Earth's surface. This can be accomplished with present technology and probably at the least cost.

  20. RADIATE 1. 0 - an interface to ARIADNE 3. 0 for the Monte Carlos LUCIFER 2. 2 and TWISTER 1. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brook, N.H. (Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1992-04-01

    An interface program is presented which enables the lowest order photoproduction generators, LUCIFER and TWISTER, to be used with the Monte Carlo, ARIADNE. This facility provides QCD cascade generation based on the colour dipole approximation. (orig.).

  1. Radiation dose considerations by intra-individual Monte Carlo simulations in dual source spiral coronary computed tomography angiography with electrocardiogram-triggered tube current modulation and adaptive pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Matthias S.; Kuettner, Axel; Lell, Michael M.; Wuest, Wolfgang; Scharf, Michael; Uder, Michael [University of Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Deak, Paul; Kalender, Willi A. [University of Erlangen, Department of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Keller, Andrea K.; Haeberle, Lothar [University of Erlangen, Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan; Seltmann, Martin [University of Erlangen, Department of Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate radiation dose levels in patients undergoing spiral coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) on a dual-source system in clinical routine. Coronary CTA was performed for 56 patients with electrocardiogram-triggered tube current modulation (TCM) and heart-rate (HR) dependent pitch adaptation. Individual Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed for dose assessment. Retrospective simulations with constant tube current (CTC) served as reference. Lung tissue was segmented and used for organ and effective dose (ED) calculation. Estimates for mean relative ED was 7.1 {+-} 2.1 mSv/100 mAs for TCM and 12.5 {+-} 5.3 mSv/100 mAs for CTC (P < 0.001). Relative dose reduction at low HR ({<=}60 bpm) was highest (49 {+-} 5%) compared to intermediate (60-70 bpm, 33 {+-} 12%) and high HR (>70 bpm, 29 {+-} 12%). However lowest ED is achieved at high HR (5.2 {+-} 1.5 mSv/100 mAs), compared with intermediate (6.7 {+-} 1.6 mSv/100 mAs) and low (8.3 {+-} 2.1 mSv/100 mAs) HR when automated pitch adaptation is applied. Radiation dose savings up to 52% are achievable by TCM at low and regular HR. However lowest ED is attained at high HR by pitch adaptation despite inferior radiation dose reduction by TCM. circle Monte Carlo simulations allow for individual radiation dose calculations. (orig.)

  2. Radiation dose considerations by intra-individual Monte Carlo simulations in dual source spiral coronary computed tomography angiography with electrocardiogram-triggered tube current modulation and adaptive pitch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, Matthias S.; Kuettner, Axel; Lell, Michael M.; Wuest, Wolfgang; Scharf, Michael; Uder, Michael; Deak, Paul; Kalender, Willi A.; Keller, Andrea K.; Haeberle, Lothar; Achenbach, Stephan; Seltmann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate radiation dose levels in patients undergoing spiral coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) on a dual-source system in clinical routine. Coronary CTA was performed for 56 patients with electrocardiogram-triggered tube current modulation (TCM) and heart-rate (HR) dependent pitch adaptation. Individual Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed for dose assessment. Retrospective simulations with constant tube current (CTC) served as reference. Lung tissue was segmented and used for organ and effective dose (ED) calculation. Estimates for mean relative ED was 7.1 ± 2.1 mSv/100 mAs for TCM and 12.5 ± 5.3 mSv/100 mAs for CTC (P 70 bpm, 29 ± 12%). However lowest ED is achieved at high HR (5.2 ± 1.5 mSv/100 mAs), compared with intermediate (6.7 ± 1.6 mSv/100 mAs) and low (8.3 ± 2.1 mSv/100 mAs) HR when automated pitch adaptation is applied. Radiation dose savings up to 52% are achievable by TCM at low and regular HR. However lowest ED is attained at high HR by pitch adaptation despite inferior radiation dose reduction by TCM. circle Monte Carlo simulations allow for individual radiation dose calculations. (orig.)

  3. Many-integrated core (MIC) technology for accelerating Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport: A study based on the code DPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M.; Brualla, L.

    2018-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport is computationally demanding to obtain reasonably low statistical uncertainties of the estimated quantities. Therefore, it can benefit in a large extent from high-performance computing. This work is aimed at assessing the performance of the first generation of the many-integrated core architecture (MIC) Xeon Phi coprocessor with respect to that of a CPU consisting of a double 12-core Xeon processor in Monte Carlo simulation of coupled electron-photonshowers. The comparison was made twofold, first, through a suite of basic tests including parallel versions of the random number generators Mersenne Twister and a modified implementation of RANECU. These tests were addressed to establish a baseline comparison between both devices. Secondly, through the p DPM code developed in this work. p DPM is a parallel version of the Dose Planning Method (DPM) program for fast Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in voxelized geometries. A variety of techniques addressed to obtain a large scalability on the Xeon Phi were implemented in p DPM. Maximum scalabilities of 84 . 2 × and 107 . 5 × were obtained in the Xeon Phi for simulations of electron and photon beams, respectively. Nevertheless, in none of the tests involving radiation transport the Xeon Phi performed better than the CPU. The disadvantage of the Xeon Phi with respect to the CPU owes to the low performance of the single core of the former. A single core of the Xeon Phi was more than 10 times less efficient than a single core of the CPU for all radiation transport simulations.

  4. MORSE Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The MORSE code is a large general-use multigroup Monte Carlo code system. Although no claims can be made regarding its superiority in either theoretical details or Monte Carlo techniques, MORSE has been, since its inception at ORNL in the late 1960s, the most widely used Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The principal reason for this popularity is that MORSE is relatively easy to use, independent of any installation or distribution center, and it can be easily customized to fit almost any specific need. Features of the MORSE code are described

  5. A comparison between the performance degradation of 3T APS due to radiation exposure and the expected internal damage via Monte-Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gi Yoon; Kim, Myung Soo; Lim, Kyung Taek; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Chan Kyu [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Hwan [Luvantix ADM , Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    The trend of x-ray image sensor has been evolved from an amorphous silicon sensor to a crystal silicon sensor. A crystal silicon X-ray sensor, meaning a X-ray CIS (CMOS image sensor), is consisted of three transistors (Trs), i.e., a Reset Transistor, a Source Follower and a Select Transistor, and a photodiode. They are highly sensitive to radiation exposure. As the frequency of exposure to radiation increases, the quality of the imaging device dramatically decreases. The most well known effects of a X-ray CIS due to the radiation damage are increments in the reset voltage and dark currents. In this study, a pixel array of a X-ray CIS was made of 20×20 pixels and this pixel array was exposed to a high radiation dose. The radiation source was Co-60 and the total radiation dose was increased from 1 to 9 kGy with a step of 1 kGy. We irradiated the small pixel array to get the increments data of the reset voltage and the dark currents. Also, we simulated the radiation effects of the pixel by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) simulation. From the comparison of actual data and simulation data, the most affected location could be determined and the cause of the increments of the reset voltage and dark current could be found.

  6. Using the FLUKA Monte Carlo Code to Simulate the Interactions of Ionizing Radiation with Matter to Assist and Aid Our Understanding of Ground Based Accelerator Testing, Space Hardware Design, and Secondary Space Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Designing hardware to operate in the space radiation environment is a very difficult and costly activity. Ground based particle accelerators can be used to test for exposure to the radiation environment, one species at a time, however, the actual space environment cannot be duplicated because of the range of energies and isotropic nature of space radiation. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is an integrated physics package based at CERN that has been under development for the last 40+ years and includes the most up-to-date fundamental physics theory and particle physics data. This work presents an overview of FLUKA and how it has been used in conjunction with ground based radiation testing for NASA and improve our understanding of secondary particle environments resulting from the interaction of space radiation with matter.

  7. MO-E-18C-02: Hands-On Monte Carlo Project Assignment as a Method to Teach Radiation Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pater, P; Vallieres, M; Seuntjens, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a hands-on project on Monte Carlo methods (MC) recently added to the curriculum and to discuss the students' appreciation. Methods: Since 2012, a 1.5 hour lecture dedicated to MC fundamentals follows the detailed presentation of photon and electron interactions. Students also program all sampling steps (interaction length and type, scattering angle, energy deposit) of a MC photon transport code. A handout structured in a step-by-step fashion guides student in conducting consistency checks. For extra points, students can code a fully working MC simulation, that simulates a dose distribution for 50 keV photons. A kerma approximation to dose deposition is assumed. A survey was conducted to which 10 out of the 14 attending students responded. It compared MC knowledge prior to and after the project, questioned the usefulness of radiation physics teaching through MC and surveyed possible project improvements. Results: According to the survey, 76% of students had no or a basic knowledge of MC methods before the class and 65% estimate to have a good to very good understanding of MC methods after attending the class. 80% of students feel that the MC project helped them significantly to understand simulations of dose distributions. On average, students dedicated 12.5 hours to the project and appreciated the balance between hand-holding and questions/implications. Conclusion: A lecture on MC methods with a hands-on MC programming project requiring about 14 hours was added to the graduate study curriculum since 2012. MC methods produce “gold standard” dose distributions and slowly enter routine clinical work and a fundamental understanding of MC methods should be a requirement for future students. Overall, the lecture and project helped students relate crosssections to dose depositions and presented numerical sampling methods behind the simulation of these dose distributions. Research funding from governments of Canada and Quebec. PP acknowledges

  8. MO-E-18C-02: Hands-On Monte Carlo Project Assignment as a Method to Teach Radiation Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, P; Vallieres, M; Seuntjens, J [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present a hands-on project on Monte Carlo methods (MC) recently added to the curriculum and to discuss the students' appreciation. Methods: Since 2012, a 1.5 hour lecture dedicated to MC fundamentals follows the detailed presentation of photon and electron interactions. Students also program all sampling steps (interaction length and type, scattering angle, energy deposit) of a MC photon transport code. A handout structured in a step-by-step fashion guides student in conducting consistency checks. For extra points, students can code a fully working MC simulation, that simulates a dose distribution for 50 keV photons. A kerma approximation to dose deposition is assumed. A survey was conducted to which 10 out of the 14 attending students responded. It compared MC knowledge prior to and after the project, questioned the usefulness of radiation physics teaching through MC and surveyed possible project improvements. Results: According to the survey, 76% of students had no or a basic knowledge of MC methods before the class and 65% estimate to have a good to very good understanding of MC methods after attending the class. 80% of students feel that the MC project helped them significantly to understand simulations of dose distributions. On average, students dedicated 12.5 hours to the project and appreciated the balance between hand-holding and questions/implications. Conclusion: A lecture on MC methods with a hands-on MC programming project requiring about 14 hours was added to the graduate study curriculum since 2012. MC methods produce “gold standard” dose distributions and slowly enter routine clinical work and a fundamental understanding of MC methods should be a requirement for future students. Overall, the lecture and project helped students relate crosssections to dose depositions and presented numerical sampling methods behind the simulation of these dose distributions. Research funding from governments of Canada and Quebec. PP acknowledges

  9. Numerical simulations of a coupled radiative?conductive heat transfer model using a modified Monte Carlo method

    KAUST Repository

    Kovtanyuk, Andrey E.; Botkin, Nikolai D.; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Radiative-conductive heat transfer in a medium bounded by two reflecting and radiating plane surfaces is considered. This process is described by a nonlinear system of two differential equations: an equation of the radiative heat transfer

  10. Radiation transport simulation in gamma irradiator systems using E G S 4 Monte Carlo code and dose mapping calculations based on point kernel technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisali, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    A series of computer codes based on point kernel technique and also Monte Carlo method have been developed. These codes perform radiation transport calculations for irradiator systems having cartesian, cylindrical and mixed geometries. The monte Carlo calculations, the computer code 'EGS4' has been applied to a radiation processing type problem. This code has been acompanied by a specific user code. The set of codes developed include: GCELLS, DOSMAPM, DOSMAPC2 which simulate the radiation transport in gamma irradiator systems having cylinderical, cartesian, and mixed geometries, respectively. The program 'DOSMAP3' based on point kernel technique, has been also developed for dose rate mapping calculations in carrier type gamma irradiators. Another computer program 'CYLDETM' as a user code for EGS4 has been also developed to simulate dose variations near the interface of heterogeneous media in gamma irradiator systems. In addition a system of computer codes 'PRODMIX' has been developed which calculates the absorbed dose in the products with different densities. validation studies of the calculated results versus experimental dosimetry has been performed and good agreement has been obtained

  11. Planetary Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, James F.

    1997-01-01

    This grant was entitled 'Planetary Habitability' and the work performed under it related to elucidating the conditions that lead to habitable, i.e. Earth-like, planets. Below are listed publications for the past two and a half years that came out of this work. The main thrusts of the research involved: (1) showing under what conditions atmospheric O2 and O3 can be considered as evidence for life on a planet's surface; (2) determining whether CH4 may have played a role in warming early Mars; (3) studying the effect of varying UV levels on Earth-like planets around different types of stars to see whether this would pose a threat to habitability; and (4) studying the effect of chaotic obliquity variations on planetary climates and determining whether planets that experienced such variations might still be habitable. Several of these topics involve ongoing research that has been carried out under a new grant number, but which continues to be funded by NASA's Exobiology program.

  12. Planetary geology

    CERN Document Server

    Gasselt, Stephan

    2018-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date interdisciplinary geoscience-focused overview of solid solar system bodies and their evolution, based on the comparative description of processes acting on them. Planetary research today is a strongly multidisciplinary endeavor with efforts coming from engineering and natural sciences. Key focal areas of study are the solid surfaces found in our Solar System. Some have a direct interaction with the interplanetary medium and others have dynamic atmospheres. In any of those cases, the geological records of those surfaces (and sub-surfaces) are key to understanding the Solar System as a whole: its evolution and the planetary perspective of our own planet. This book has a modular structure and is divided into 4 sections comprising 15 chapters in total. Each section builds upon the previous one but is also self-standing. The sections are:  Methods and tools Processes and Sources  Integration and Geological Syntheses Frontiers The latter covers the far-reaching broad topics of exo...

  13. Utilizing Monte-Carlo radiation transport and spallation cross sections to estimate nuclide dependent scaling with altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argento, D.; Reedy, R. C.; Stone, J.

    2010-12-01

    Cosmogenic Nuclides (CNs) are a critical new tool for geomorphology, allowing researchers to date Earth surface events and measure process rates [1]. Prior to CNs, many of these events and processes had no absolute method for measurement and relied entirely on relative methods [2]. Continued improvements in CN methods are necessary for expanding analytic capability in geomorphology. In the last two decades, significant progress has been made in refining these methods and reducing analytic uncertainties [1,3]. Calibration data and scaling methods are being developed to provide a self consistent platform for use in interpreting nuclide concentration values into geologic data [4]. However, nuclide dependent scaling has been difficult to address due to analytic uncertainty and sparseness in altitude transects. Artificial target experiments are underway, but these experiments take considerable time for nuclide buildup in lower altitudes. In this study, a Monte Carlo method radiation transport code, MCNPX, is used to model the galactic cosmic-ray radiation impinging on the upper atmosphere and track the resulting secondary particles through a model of the Earth’s atmosphere and lithosphere. To address the issue of nuclide dependent scaling, the neutron flux values determined by the MCNPX simulation are folded in with estimated cross-section values [5,6]. Preliminary calculations indicate that scaling of nuclide production potential in free air seems to be a function of both altitude and nuclide production pathway. At 0 g/cm2 (sea-level) all neutron spallation pathways have attenuation lengths within 1% of 130 g/cm2. However, the differences in attenuation length are exacerbated with increasing altitude. At 530 g/cm2 atmospheric height (~5,500 m), the apparent attenuation lengths for aggregate SiO2(n,x)10Be, aggregate SiO2(n,x)14C and K(n,x)36Cl become 149.5 g/cm2, 151 g/cm2 and 148 g/cm2 respectively. At 700 g/cm2 atmospheric height (~8,400m - close to the highest

  14. Angular Distribution of Particles Emerging from a Diffusive Region and its Implications for the Fleck-Canfield Random Walk Algorithm for Implicit Monte Carlo Radiation Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, M A

    2000-01-01

    We present various approximations for the angular distribution of particles emerging from an optically thick, purely isotropically scattering region into a vacuum. Our motivation is to use such a distribution for the Fleck-Canfield random walk method [1] for implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) [2] radiation transport problems. We demonstrate that the cosine distribution recommended in the original random walk paper [1] is a poor approximation to the angular distribution predicted by transport theory. Then we examine other approximations that more closely match the transport angular distribution.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of THz radiation from GaAs p-i-n diodes under high electric fields using an extended valley model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh Nhu Thao

    2008-01-01

    We have applied a self-consistent ensemble Monte Carlo simulation procedure using an extended valley model to consider the THz radiation from GaAs p-i-n diodes under high electric fields. The present calculation has shown an important improvement of the numerical results when using this model instead of the usual valley model. It has been shown the importance of the full band-structure in the simulation of processes in semiconductors, especially under the influence of high electric fields. (author)

  16. Towards an Understanding of Radiative Factors on Planetary Rings: a Perspective from Cassini CIRS Observations at Saturn Equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Shawn M.; Spilker, L.; Edgington, S. G.; Déau, E.; Pilorz, S. H.

    2012-10-01

    Since arriving at Saturn in 2004, Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer has recorded tens of millions of spectra of Saturn’s rings (personal communication, M. Segura). CIRS records far infrared radiation (16.7-1000 microns) at focal plane 1 (FP1). Thermal emission from Saturn’s rings peaks at FP1 wavelengths. CIRS spectra are well characterized as blackbody emission at an effective temperature Te, multiplied by a scalar factor related to ring emissivity (Spilker et al. [2005, 2006]). CIRS can therefore characterize the rings' temperature and study the thermal environment to which the ring particles are subject. We focus on CIRS data from the 2009 Saturnian equinox. As the Sun's disk crossed the ring plane, CIRS obtained several radial scans of the rings at a variety of phase angles, local hour angles and distances. With the Sun's rays striking the rings at an incidence angle of zero, solar heating is virtually absent, and thermal radiation from Saturn and sunlight reflected by Saturn dominate the thermal environment. These observations present an apparent paradox. Equinox data show that the flux of thermal energy radiated by the rings is roughly equivalent to or even exceeds the energy incident upon them as prescribed by thermal models (Froidevaux [1981], Ferrari and Leyrat [2006], Morishima et al. [2009, 2010]). This apparent energy excess is largest in the C ring and Cassini Division. Conservation principles suggest that models underestimate heating of the rings, as it is clearly unphysical for the rings to radiate significantly more energy than is incident upon them. In this presentation, we will attempt to resolve this paradox and determine what this can teach us about Saturn's rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2012 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  17. Shaping of planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balick, B.

    1987-01-01

    The phases of stellar evolution and the development of planetary nebulae are examined. The relation between planetary nebulae and red giants is studied. Spherical and nonspherical cases of shaping planetaries with stellar winds are described. CCD images of nebulae are analyzed, and it is determined that the shape of planetary nebulae depends on ionization levels. Consideration is given to calculating the distances of planetaries using radio images, and molecular hydrogen envelopes which support the wind-shaping model of planetary nebulae

  18. Comparative study using Monte Carlo methods of the radiation detection efficiency of LSO, LuAP, GSO and YAP scintillators for use in positron emission imaging (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Kandarakis, Ioannis; Tsantilas, Xenophon; Valais, Ioannis; Cavouras, Dionisios; Louizi, Anna

    2006-01-01

    The radiation detection efficiency of four scintillators employed, or designed to be employed, in positron emission imaging (PET) was evaluated as a function of the crystal thickness by applying Monte Carlo Methods. The scintillators studied were the LuSiO 5 (LSO), LuAlO 3 (LuAP), Gd 2 SiO 5 (GSO) and the YAlO 3 (YAP). Crystal thicknesses ranged from 0 to 50 mm. The study was performed via a previously generated photon transport Monte Carlo code. All photon track and energy histories were recorded and the energy transferred or absorbed in the scintillator medium was calculated together with the energy redistributed and retransported as secondary characteristic fluorescence radiation. Various parameters were calculated e.g. the fraction of the incident photon energy absorbed, transmitted or redistributed as fluorescence radiation, the scatter to primary ratio, the photon and energy distribution within each scintillator block etc. As being most significant, the fraction of the incident photon energy absorbed was found to increase with increasing crystal thickness tending to form a plateau above the 30 mm thickness. For LSO, LuAP, GSO and YAP scintillators, respectively, this fraction had the value of 44.8, 36.9 and 45.7% at the 10 mm thickness and 96.4, 93.2 and 96.9% at the 50 mm thickness. Within the plateau area approximately (57-59)% (59-63)% (52-63)% and (58-61)% of this fraction was due to scattered and reabsorbed radiation for the LSO, GSO, YAP and LuAP scintillators, respectively. In all cases, a negligible fraction (<0.1%) of the absorbed energy was found to escape the crystal as fluorescence radiation

  19. A study of the dosimetry of small field photon beams used in intensity modulated radiation therapy in inhomogeneous media: Monte Carlo simulations, and algorithm comparisons and corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Andrew Osler

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of inhomogeneity corrections for lung, air, and bone in radiotherapy treatment planning. Traditionally, corrections based on physical density have been used. Modern algorithms use the electron density derived from CT images. Small fields are used in both conformal radiotherapy and IMRT, however, their beam characteristics in inhomogeneous media have not been extensively studied. This work compares traditional and modern treatment planning algorithms to Monte Carlo simulations in and near low-density inhomogeneities. Field sizes ranging from 0.5 cm to 5 cm in diameter are projected onto a phantom containing inhomogeneities and depth dose curves are compared. Comparisons of the Dose Perturbation Factors (DPF) are presented as functions of density and field size. Dose Correction Factors (DCF), which scale the algorithms to the Monte Carlo data, are compared for each algorithm. Physical scaling algorithms such as Batho and Equivalent Pathlength (EPL) predict an increase in dose for small fields passing through lung tissue, where Monte Carlo simulations show a sharp dose drop. The physical model-based collapsed cone convolution (CCC) algorithm correctly predicts the dose drop, but does not accurately predict the magnitude. Because the model-based algorithms do not correctly account for the change in backscatter, the dose drop predicted by CCC occurs farther downstream compared to that predicted by the Monte Carlo simulations. Beyond the tissue inhomogeneity all of the algorithms studied predict dose distributions in close agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Dose-volume relationships are important in understanding the effects of radiation to the lung. The dose within the lung is affected by a complex function of beam energy, lung tissue density, and field size. Dose algorithms vary in their abilities to correctly predict the dose to the lung tissue. A thorough analysis of the effects of density, and field size on dose to the

  20. Planetary Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, P. D.

    2001-11-01

    A revolution in the studies in planetary rings studies occurred in the period 1977--1981, with the serendipitous discovery of the narrow, dark rings of Uranus, the first Voyager images of the tenuous jovian ring system, and the many spectacular images returned during the twin Voyager flybys of Saturn. In subsequent years, ground-based stellar occultations, HST observations, and the Voyager flybys of Uranus (1986) and Neptune (1989), as well as a handful of Galileo images, provided much additional information. Along with the completely unsuspected wealth of detail these observations revealed came an unwelcome problem: are the rings ancient or are we privileged to live at a special time in history? The answer to this still-vexing question may lie in the complex gravitational interactions recent studies have revealed between the rings and their retinues of attendant satellites. Among the four known ring systems, we see elegant examples of Lindblad and corotation resonances (first invoked in the context of galactic disks), electromagnetic resonances, spiral density waves and bending waves, narrow ringlets which exhibit internal modes due to collective instabilities, sharp-edged gaps maintained via tidal torques from embedded moonlets, and tenuous dust belts created by meteoroid impact onto parent bodies. Perhaps most puzzling is Saturn's multi-stranded, clumpy F ring, which continues to defy a simple explanation 20 years after it was first glimpsed in grainy images taken by Pioneer 11. Voyager and HST images reveal a complex, probably chaotic, dynamical interaction between unseen parent bodies within this ring and its two shepherd satellites, Pandora and Prometheus. The work described here reflects contributions by Joe Burns, Jeff Cuzzi, Luke Dones, Dick French, Peter Goldreich, Colleen McGhee, Carolyn Porco, Mark Showalter, and Bruno Sicardy, as well as those of the author. This research has been supported by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics program and the

  1. Thermal Radiometer Signal Processing Using Radiation Hard CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuits for Use in Harsh Planetary Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilligan, G.; DuMonthier, J.; Aslam, S.; Lakew, B.; Kleyner, I.; Katz, R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal radiometers such as proposed for the Europa Clipper flyby mission require low noise signal processing for thermal imaging with immunity to Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and Single Event Latchup (SEL). Described is a second generation Multi- Channel Digitizer (MCD2G) Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) that accurately digitizes up to 40 thermopile pixels with greater than 50 Mrad (Si) immunity TID and 174 MeV-sq cm/mg SEL. The MCD2G ASIC uses Radiation Hardened By Design (RHBD) techniques with a 180 nm CMOS process node.

  2. Application of the measurement-based Monte Carlo method in nasopharyngeal cancer patients for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C.Y.; Lee, C.C.; Chao, T.C.; Lin, M.H.; Lai, P.A.; Liu, F.H.; Tung, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to utilize a measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) method to evaluate the accuracy of dose distributions calculated using the Eclipse radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) based on the anisotropic analytical algorithm. Dose distributions were calculated for the nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Ten NPC IMRT plans were evaluated by comparing their dose distributions with those obtained from the in-house MBMC programs for the same CT images and beam geometry. To reconstruct the fluence distribution of the IMRT field, an efficiency map was obtained by dividing the energy fluence of the intensity modulated field by that of the open field, both acquired from an aS1000 electronic portal imaging device. The integrated image of the non-gated mode was used to acquire the full dose distribution delivered during the IMRT treatment. This efficiency map redistributed the particle weightings of the open field phase-space file for IMRT applications. Dose differences were observed in the tumor and air cavity boundary. The mean difference between MBMC and TPS in terms of the planning target volume coverage was 0.6% (range: 0.0–2.3%). The mean difference for the conformity index was 0.01 (range: 0.0–0.01). In conclusion, the MBMC method serves as an independent IMRT dose verification tool in a clinical setting. - Highlights: ► The patient-based Monte Carlo method serves as a reference standard to verify IMRT doses. ► 3D Dose distributions for NPC patients have been verified by the Monte Carlo method. ► Doses predicted by the Monte Carlo method matched closely with those by the TPS. ► The Monte Carlo method predicted a higher mean dose to the middle ears than the TPS. ► Critical organ doses should be confirmed to avoid overdose to normal organs

  3. Utilization of Monte Carlo Calculations in Radiation Transport Analyses to Support the Design of the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.O.

    2000-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has given the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project approval to begin Title I design of the proposed facility to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and construction is scheduled to commence in FY01 . The SNS initially will consist of an accelerator system capable of delivering an ∼0.5 microsecond pulse of 1 GeV protons, at a 60 Hz frequency, with 1 MW of beam power, into a single target station. The SNS will eventually be upgraded to a 2 MW facility with two target stations (a 60 Hz station and a 10 Hz station). The radiation transport analysis, which includes the neutronic, shielding, activation, and safety analyses, is critical to the design of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed SNS, and the Monte Carlo method is the cornerstone of the radiation transport analyses

  4. Calculation of radiation dose rate above water layer of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Jaslovske Bohunice by the point Kernels (VISIPLAN) and Monte Carlo (MCNP4C) methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavik, O.; Kucharova, D.; Listjak, M.; Fueloep, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate maximal dose rate (DR) of gamma radiation above different configurations of reservoirs with spent nuclear fuel with cooling period 1.8 year and to compare by buildup factor method (Visiplan) and Monte Carlo simulations and to appreciate influence of scattered photons in the case of calculation of fully filled fuel transfer storage (FTS). On the ground of performed accounts it was shown, that relative contributions of photons from adjacent reservoirs are in the case buildup factor method (Visiplan) similar to Monte Carlo simulations. It means, that Visiplan can be used also for valuation of contributions of of dose rates from neighbouring reservoirs. It was shown, that calculations of DR by Visiplan are conservatively overestimated for this source of radiation and thickness of shielding approximately 2.6 - 3 times. Also following these calculations resulted, that by storage of reservoirs with cooling period 1.8 years in FTS is not needed any additional protection measures for workers against primal safety report. Calculated DR also above fully filled FTS by these reservoirs in Jaslovske Bohunice is very low on the level 0.03 μSv/h. (authors)

  5. Calculation of radiation dose rate above water layer of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Jaslovske Bohunice by the point Kernels (VISIPLAN) and Monte Carlo (MCNP4C) methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavik, O.; Kucharova, D.; Listjak, M.; Fueloep, M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate maximal dose rate (DR) of gamma radiation above different configurations of reservoirs with spent nuclear fuel with cooling period 1.8 year and to compare by buildup factor method (Visiplan) and Monte Carlo simulations and to appreciate influence of scattered photons in the case of calculation of fully filled fuel transfer storage (FTS). On the ground of performed accounts it was shown, that relative contributions of photons from adjacent reservoirs are in the case buildup factor method (Visiplan) similar to Monte Carlo simulations. It means, that Visiplan can be used also for valuation of contributions of of dose rates from neighbouring reservoirs. It was shown, that calculations of DR by Visiplan are conservatively overestimated for this source of radiation and thickness of shielding approximately 2.6 - 3 times. Also following these calculations resulted, that by storage of reservoirs with cooling period 1.8 years in FTS is not needed any additional protection measures for workers against primal safety report. Calculated DR also above fully filled FTS by these reservoirs in Jaslovske Bohunice is very low on the level 0.03 μSv/h. (authors)

  6. A New Radio Spectral Line Survey of Planetary Nebulae: Exploring Radiatively-driven Heating and Chemistry of Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Jesse; Kastner, Joel H.; Santander-García, Miguel; Montez, Rodolfo; Alcolea, Javier; Balick, Bruce; Bujarrabal, Valentín

    2018-01-01

    We report the results of a survey of mm-wave molecular line emission from nine nearby (Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM) 30 m telescope. Our sample comprises molecule-rich PNe spanning a wide range of central star UV luminosities as well as central star and nebular X-ray emission properties. Nine molecular line frequencies were chosen to investigate the molecular chemistry of these nebulae. New detections of one or more of five molecules -- the molecular mass tracer 13CO and the chemically important trace species HCO+, CN, HCN, and HNC -- were made in at least one PN. We present analysis of emission line flux ratios that are potential diagnostics of the influence that ultraviolet and X-ray radiation have on the chemistry of residual molecular gas in PNe.

  7. Molecular Dications in Planetary Atmospheric Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Falcinelli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental properties of multiply charged molecular ions, such as energetics, structure, stability, lifetime and fragmentation dynamics, are relevant to understand and model the behavior of gaseous plasmas as well as ionosphere and astrophysical environments. Experimental determinations of the Kinetic Energy Released (KER for ions originating from dissociations reactions, induced by Coulomb explosion of doubly charged molecular ions (molecular dications produced by double photoionization of CO2, N2O and C2H2 molecules of interest in planetary atmospheres, are reported. The KER measurement as a function of the ultraviolet (UV photon energy in the range of 28–65 eV was extracted from the electron-ion-ion coincidence spectra obtained by using tunable synchrotron radiation coupled with ion imaging techniques at the ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Laboratory Trieste, Italy. These experiments, coupled with a computational analysis based on a Monte Carlo trajectory simulation, allow assessing the probability of escape for simple ionic species in the upper atmosphere of Mars, Venus and Titan. The measured KER in the case of H+, C+, CH+, CH2+, N+, O+, CO+, N2+ and NO+ fragment ions range between 1.0 and 5.5 eV, being large enough to allow these ionic species to participate in the atmospheric escape from such planets into space. In the case of Mars, we suggest a possible explanation for the observed behavior of the O+ and CO22+ ion density profiles.

  8. FLUKA Monte Carlo Modelling of the CHARM Facility’s Test Area: Update of the Radiation Field Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Infantino, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    The present Accelerator Note is a follow-up of the previous report CERN-ACC-NOTE-2016-12345. In the present work, the FLUKA Monte Carlo model of CERN’s CHARM facility has been improved to the most up-to-date configuration of the facility, including: new test positions, a global refinement of the FLUKA geometry, a careful review of the transport and physics parameters. Several configurations of the facility, in terms of target material and movable shielding configuration, have been simulated. The full set of results is reported in the following and can act as a reference guide to any potential user of the facility.

  9. Radiation dose and risk to children undergoing cardiac catheterization for the treatment of a congenital heart disease using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakoumakis, E; Kostopoulou, H.; Dimitriadis, T.; Georgiou, E.; Makri, T.; Tsalafoutas, I.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective: Children diagnosed with congenital heart disease often undergo cardiac catheterization for their treatment, which involves the use of ionizing radiation and therefore a risk of radiation induced cancer. Our objective was to calculate the effective (E) and equivalent organ doses (HT) in those children and estimate the risk of radiation induced cancer (REID). Materials and methods: Fifty three children were divided into three groups, atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricular septal defect (VSD), and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), depending on their heart condition. In all procedures, the exposure conditions and the Dose-Area Product (DAP) meters readings were recorded for each individual acquisition. Monte Carlo simulations were run using the PCXMC 2.0 code and mathematical phantoms simulating children anatomy. The HT values to all irradiated organs and the resulting E and REID values were calculated. Results: The average DAP values were respectively 40±12 Gy·cm 2 for the ASD, 17.5±0.7 Gy·cm 2 for the VSD and 9.5±1 Gy·cm 2 for the PDA group. The average E values were 40±12, 22±2.5 and 17±3.6 mSv for ASD, VSD and PDA groups, respectively. The respective estimated REID values per procedure were 0.109, 0.106 and 0.067 %. For all groups the most heavily irradiated organs were the thymus, heart, breast, lung and stomach. (authors)

  10. Implementation and display of Computer Aided Design (CAD) models in Monte Carlo radiation transport and shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    An Xwindow application capable of importing geometric information directly from two Computer Aided Design (CAD) based formats for use in radiation transport and shielding analyses is being developed at ORNL. The application permits the user to graphically view the geometric models imported from the two formats for verification and debugging. Previous models, specifically formatted for the radiation transport and shielding codes can also be imported. Required extensions to the existing combinatorial geometry analysis routines are discussed. Examples illustrating the various options and features which will be implemented in the application are presented. The use of the application as a visualization tool for the output of the radiation transport codes is also discussed

  11. Performance analysis of a parallel Monte Carlo code for simulating solar radiative transfer in cloudy atmospheres using CUDA-enabled NVIDIA GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russkova, Tatiana V.

    2017-11-01

    One tool to improve the performance of Monte Carlo methods for numerical simulation of light transport in the Earth's atmosphere is the parallel technology. A new algorithm oriented to parallel execution on the CUDA-enabled NVIDIA graphics processor is discussed. The efficiency of parallelization is analyzed on the basis of calculating the upward and downward fluxes of solar radiation in both a vertically homogeneous and inhomogeneous models of the atmosphere. The results of testing the new code under various atmospheric conditions including continuous singlelayered and multilayered clouds, and selective molecular absorption are presented. The results of testing the code using video cards with different compute capability are analyzed. It is shown that the changeover of computing from conventional PCs to the architecture of graphics processors gives more than a hundredfold increase in performance and fully reveals the capabilities of the technology used.

  12. Estimation of miniature forest parameters, species, tree shape, and distance between canopies by means of Monte-Carlo based radiative transfer model with forestry surface model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Y.; Arai, K.

    2007-01-01

    A method for estimation of forest parameters, species, tree shape, distance between canopies by means of Monte-Carlo based radiative transfer model with forestry surface model is proposed. The model is verified through experiments with the miniature model of forest, tree array of relatively small size of trees. Two types of miniature trees, ellipse-looking and cone-looking canopy are examined in the experiments. It is found that the proposed model and experimental results show a coincidence so that the proposed method is validated. It is also found that estimation of tree shape, trunk tree distance as well as distinction between deciduous or coniferous trees can be done with the proposed model. Furthermore, influences due to multiple reflections between trees and interaction between trees and under-laying grass are clarified with the proposed method

  13. Geometric optimization of a solar cubic-cavity multi-tubular thermochemical reactor using a Monte Carlo-finite element radiative transfer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valades-Pelayo, P.J.; Romero-Paredes, H.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C.A.; Villafán-Vidales, H.I.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the optimization of a multi-tubular solar thermochemical cavity reactor is carried out. The reactor consists of a cubic cavity made of woven graphite, housing nine 2.54 cm diameter tungsten tubes. A heat transfer model is developed and implemented considering high-temperature radiative transfer at steady state. The temperature distribution on the receiver tubes is determined by using a hybrid Monte Carlo-finite volume approach. The optimization aims at maximizing average tube temperature by varying tube locations. Optimal tube distributions are explored by using a custom-made stochastic, multi-parameter, global optimization algorithm. A considerable increase in average temperature as well as improvement on temperature uniformity is found in the optimized tube arrays. Patterns among the different optimal distributions are found, and general features are discussed.

  14. Simulations of GCR interactions within planetary bodies using GEANT4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesick, K.; Feldman, W. C.; Stonehill, L. C.; Coupland, D. D. S.

    2017-12-01

    On planetary bodies with little to no atmosphere, Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) can hit the body and produce neutrons primarily through nuclear spallation within the top few meters of the surfaces. These neutrons undergo further nuclear interactions with elements near the planetary surface and some will escape the surface and can be detected by landed or orbiting neutron radiation detector instruments. The neutron leakage signal at fast neutron energies provides a measure of average atomic mass of the near-surface material and in the epithermal and thermal energy ranges is highly sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. Gamma-rays can also escape the surface, produced at characteristic energies depending on surface composition, and can be detected by gamma-ray instruments. The intra-nuclear cascade (INC) that occurs when high-energy GCRs interact with elements within a planetary surface to produce the leakage neutron and gamma-ray signals is highly complex, and therefore Monte Carlo based radiation transport simulations are commonly used for predicting and interpreting measurements from planetary neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments. In the past, the simulation code that has been widely used for this type of analysis is MCNPX [1], which was benchmarked against data from the Lunar Neutron Probe Experiment (LPNE) on Apollo 17 [2]. In this work, we consider the validity of the radiation transport code GEANT4 [3], another widely used but open-source code, by benchmarking simulated predictions of the LPNE experiment to the Apollo 17 data. We consider the impact of different physics model options on the results, and show which models best describe the INC based on agreement with the Apollo 17 data. The success of this validation then gives us confidence in using GEANT4 to simulate GCR-induced neutron leakage signals on Mars in relevance to a re-analysis of Mars Odyssey Neutron Spectrometer data. References [1] D.B. Pelowitz, Los Alamos National Laboratory, LA-CP-05

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport and dose deposition from locally released gold nanoparticles labeled with 111In, 177Lu or 90Y incorporated into tissue implantable depots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Priscilla; Cai, Zhongli; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Lechtman, Eli; Mashouf, Shahram; Lu, Yijie; Winnik, Mitchell A.; Jaffray, David A.; Reilly, Raymond M.

    2017-11-01

    Permanent seed implantation (PSI) brachytherapy is a highly conformal form of radiation therapy but is challenged with dose inhomogeneity due to its utilization of low energy radiation sources. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) conjugated with electron emitting radionuclides have recently been developed as a novel form of brachytherapy and can aid in homogenizing dose through physical distribution of radiolabeled AuNP when injected intratumorally (IT) in suspension. However, the distribution is unpredictable and precise placement of many injections would be difficult. Previously, we reported the design of a nanoparticle depot (NPD) that can be implanted using PSI techniques and which facilitates controlled release of AuNP. We report here the 3D dose distribution resulting from a NPD incorporating AuNP labeled with electron emitters (90Y, 177Lu, 111In) of different energies using Monte Carlo based voxel level dosimetry. The MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to assess differences in dose distribution from simulated NPD and conventional brachytherapy sources, positioned in breast tissue simulating material. We further compare these dose distributions in mice bearing subcutaneous human breast cancer xenografts implanted with 177Lu-AuNP NPD, or injected IT with 177Lu-AuNP in suspension. The radioactivity distributions were derived from registered SPECT/CT images and time-dependent dose was estimated. Results demonstrated that the dose distribution from NPD reduced the maximum dose 3-fold when compared to conventional seeds. For simulated NPD, as well as NPD implanted in vivo, 90Y delivered the most homogeneous dose distribution. The tumor radioactivity in mice IT injected with 177Lu-AuNP redistributed while radioactivity in the NPD remained confined to the implant site. The dose distribution from radiolabeled AuNP NPD were predictable and concentric in contrast to IT injected radiolabeled AuNP, which provided irregular and temporally variant dose distributions

  16. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Morgan C.

    2000-01-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V and V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second, the ability to

  17. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Morgan C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second

  18. Planetary Data System (PDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Planetary Data System (PDS) is an archive of data products from NASA planetary missions, which is sponsored by NASA's Science Mission Directorate. We actively...

  19. Integrating polarized light over a planetary disk applied to starlight reflected by extrasolar planets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, D.M.; de Rooij, W.A.; Cornet, G.; Hovenier, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    We present an efficient numerical method for integrating planetary radiation over a planetary disk, which is especially interesting for simulating signals of extrasolar planets. Our integration method is applicable to calculating the full flux vector of the disk-integrated planetary radiation, i.e.

  20. Vectorized Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Examination of the global algorithms and local kernels of conventional general-purpose Monte Carlo codes shows that multigroup Monte Carlo methods have sufficient structure to permit efficient vectorization. A structured multigroup Monte Carlo algorithm for vector computers is developed in which many particle events are treated at once on a cell-by-cell basis. Vectorization of kernels for tracking and variance reduction is described, and a new method for discrete sampling is developed to facilitate the vectorization of collision analysis. To demonstrate the potential of the new method, a vectorized Monte Carlo code for multigroup radiation transport analysis was developed. This code incorporates many features of conventional general-purpose production codes, including general geometry, splitting and Russian roulette, survival biasing, variance estimation via batching, a number of cutoffs, and generalized tallies of collision, tracklength, and surface crossing estimators with response functions. Predictions of vectorized performance characteristics for the CYBER-205 were made using emulated coding and a dynamic model of vector instruction timing. Computation rates were examined for a variety of test problems to determine sensitivities to batch size and vector lengths. Significant speedups are predicted for even a few hundred particles per batch, and asymptotic speedups by about 40 over equivalent Amdahl 470V/8 scalar codes arepredicted for a few thousand particles per batch. The principal conclusion is that vectorization of a general-purpose multigroup Monte Carlo code is well worth the significant effort required for stylized coding and major algorithmic changes

  1. Monte Carlo study of MOSFET dosimeter dose correction factors considering energy spectrum of radiation field in a steam generator channel head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung Koo; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    In Korea, a real-time effective dose measurement system is in development. The system uses 32 high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters to measure radiation doses at various organ locations in an anthropomorphic physical phantom. The MOSFET dosimeters are, however, mainly made of silicon and shows some degree of energy and angular dependence especially for low energy photons. This study determines the correction factors to correct for these dependences of the MOSFET dosimeters for accurate measurement of radiation doses at organ locations in the phantom. For this, first, the dose correction factors of MOSFET dosimeters were determined for the energy spectrum in the steam generator channel of the Kori Nuclear Power Plant Unit no.1 by Monte Carlo simulations. Then, the results were compared with the dose correction factors from 0.662 MeV and 1.25 MeV mono-energetic photons. The difference of the dose correction factors were found very negligible ({<=}1.5%), which in general shows that the dose corrections factors determined from 0.662 MeV and 1.25 MeV can be in a steam general channel head of a nuclear power plant. The measured effective dose was generally found to decrease by {approx}7% when we apply the dose correction factors.

  2. PENGEOM-A general-purpose geometry package for Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in material systems defined by quadric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansa, Julio; Salvat-Pujol, Francesc; Díaz-Londoño, Gloria; Carnicer, Artur; Lallena, Antonio M.; Salvat, Francesc

    2016-02-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENGEOM provides a complete set of tools to handle quadric geometries in Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport. The material structure where radiation propagates is assumed to consist of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The PENGEOM subroutines (a subset of the PENELOPE code) track particles through the material structure, independently of the details of the physics models adopted to describe the interactions. Although these subroutines are designed for detailed simulations of photon and electron transport, where all individual interactions are simulated sequentially, they can also be used in mixed (class II) schemes for simulating the transport of high-energy charged particles, where the effect of soft interactions is described by the random-hinge method. The definition of the geometry and the details of the tracking algorithm are tailored to optimize simulation speed. The use of fuzzy quadric surfaces minimizes the impact of round-off errors. The provided software includes a Java graphical user interface for editing and debugging the geometry definition file and for visualizing the material structure. Images of the structure are generated by using the tracking subroutines and, hence, they describe the geometry actually passed to the simulation code.

  3. Accurate and efficient radiation transport in optically thick media -- by means of the Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo method in the difference formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoke, A; Brooks, E D; McKinley, M; Daffin, F

    2005-01-01

    The equations of radiation transport for thermal photons are notoriously difficult to solve in thick media without resorting to asymptotic approximations such as the diffusion limit. One source of this difficulty is that in thick, absorbing media thermal emission is almost completely balanced by strong absorption. In a previous publication [SB03], the photon transport equation was written in terms of the deviation of the specific intensity from the local equilibrium field. We called the new form of the equations the difference formulation. The difference formulation is rigorously equivalent to the original transport equation. It is particularly advantageous in thick media, where the radiation field approaches local equilibrium and the deviations from the Planck distribution are small. The difference formulation for photon transport also clarifies the diffusion limit. In this paper, the transport equation is solved by the Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo (SIMC) method and a comparison is made between the standard formulation and the difference formulation. The SIMC method is easily adapted to the derivative source terms of the difference formulation, and a remarkable reduction in noise is obtained when the difference formulation is applied to problems involving thick media

  4. Estimation of children's radiation dose from cardiac catheterisations, performed for the diagnosis or the treatment of a congenital heart disease using TLD dosimetry and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakoumakis, E N; Gialousis, G I; Papadopoulou, Despina; Makri, Triantafillia; Pappouli, Zografia; Yakoumakis, Nikolaos; Papagiannis, Panayotis; Georgiou, Evangelos

    2009-01-01

    Entrance surface radiation doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters for 98 children who were referred to a cardiology department for the diagnosis or the treatment of a congenital heart disease. Additionally, all the radiographic parameters were recorded and Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the estimation of entrance surface dose to effective dose conversion factors, in order to further calculate the effective dose for each child. For diagnostic catheterisations the values ranged from 0.16 to 14.44 mSv, with average 3.71 mSv, and for therapeutic catheterisations the values ranged from 0.38 to 25.01 mSv, with average value 5 mSv. Effective doses were estimated for diagnostic procedures and interventional procedures performed for the treatment of five different heart diseases: (a) atrial septal defect (ASD), (b) ventricular septal defect (VSD), (c) patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), (d) aorta coarctation and (e) pulmonary stenosis. The high levels of radiation exposure are, however, balanced with the advantages of cardiac catheterisations such as the avoidance of surgical closure and the necessity of shorter or even no hospitalisation.

  5. Estimation of children's radiation dose from cardiac catheterisations, performed for the diagnosis or the treatment of a congenital heart disease using TLD dosimetry and Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakoumakis, E N; Gialousis, G I; Papadopoulou, Despina; Makri, Triantafillia; Pappouli, Zografia; Yakoumakis, Nikolaos; Papagiannis, Panayotis; Georgiou, Evangelos [Medical Physics Department, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Athens 11527 (Greece)

    2009-06-15

    Entrance surface radiation doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters for 98 children who were referred to a cardiology department for the diagnosis or the treatment of a congenital heart disease. Additionally, all the radiographic parameters were recorded and Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the estimation of entrance surface dose to effective dose conversion factors, in order to further calculate the effective dose for each child. For diagnostic catheterisations the values ranged from 0.16 to 14.44 mSv, with average 3.71 mSv, and for therapeutic catheterisations the values ranged from 0.38 to 25.01 mSv, with average value 5 mSv. Effective doses were estimated for diagnostic procedures and interventional procedures performed for the treatment of five different heart diseases: (a) atrial septal defect (ASD), (b) ventricular septal defect (VSD), (c) patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), (d) aorta coarctation and (e) pulmonary stenosis. The high levels of radiation exposure are, however, balanced with the advantages of cardiac catheterisations such as the avoidance of surgical closure and the necessity of shorter or even no hospitalisation.

  6. A Monte Carlo-based method to estimate radiation dose from spiral CT: from phantom testing to patient-specific models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarry, G; De Marco, J J; Beifuss, U; Cagnon, C H; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and test a method to estimate the relative and absolute absorbed radiation dose from axial and spiral CT scans using a Monte Carlo approach. Initial testing was done in phantoms and preliminary results were obtained from a standard mathematical anthropomorphic model (MIRD V) and voxelized patient data. To accomplish this we have modified a general purpose Monte Carlo transport code (MCNP4B) to simulate the CT x-ray source and movement, and then to calculate absorbed radiation dose in desired objects. The movement of the source in either axial or spiral modes was modelled explicitly while the CT system components were modelled using published information about x-ray spectra as well as information provided by the manufacturer. Simulations were performed for single axial scans using the head and body computed tomography dose index (CTDI) polymethylmethacrylate phantoms at both central and peripheral positions for all available beam energies and slice thicknesses. For comparison, corresponding physical measurements of CTDI in phantom were made with an ion chamber. To obtain absolute dose values, simulations and measurements were performed in air at the scanner isocentre for each beam energy. To extend the verification, the CT scanner model was applied to the MIRD V model and compared with published results using similar technical factors. After verification of the model, the generalized source was simulated and applied to voxelized models of patient anatomy. The simulated and measured absolute dose data in phantom agreed to within 2% for the head phantom and within 4% for the body phantom at 120 and 140 kVp; this extends to 8% for the head and 9% for the body phantom across all available beam energies and positions. For the head phantom, the simulated and measured absolute dose data agree to within 2% across all slice thicknesses at 120 kVp. Our results in the MIRD phantom agree within 11% of all the different organ dose values

  7. An Analysis on the Characteristic of Multi-response CADIS Method for the Monte Carlo Radiation Shielding Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho; Kim, Song Hyun

    2014-01-01

    It uses the deterministic method to calculate adjoint fluxes for the decision of the parameters used in the variance reductions. This is called as hybrid Monte Carlo method. The CADIS method, however, has a limitation to reduce the stochastic errors of all responses. The Forward Weighted CADIS (FW-CADIS) was introduced to solve this problem. To reduce the overall stochastic errors of the responses, the forward flux is used. In the previous study, the Multi-Response CADIS (MR-CAIDS) method was derived for minimizing sum of each squared relative error. In this study, the characteristic of the MR-CADIS method was evaluated and compared with the FW-CADIS method. In this study, how the CADIS, FW-CADIS, and MR-CADIS methods are applied to optimize and decide the parameters used in the variance reduction techniques was analyzed. The MR-CADIS Method uses a technique that the sum of squared relative error in each tally region was minimized to achieve uniform uncertainty. To compare the simulation efficiency of the methods, a simple shielding problem was evaluated. Using FW-CADIS method, it was evaluated that the average of the relative errors was minimized; however, MR-CADIS method gives a lowest variance of the relative errors. Analysis shows that, MR-CADIS method can efficiently and uniformly reduce the relative error of the plural response problem than FW-CADIS method

  8. Sci-Sat AM: Brachy - 04: Neutron production around a radiation therapy linac bunker - monte carlo simulations and physical measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatchadourian, R; Davis, S; Evans, M; Licea, A; Seuntjens, J; Kildea, J

    2012-07-01

    Photoneutrons are a major component of the equivalent dose in the maze and near the door of linac bunkers. Physical measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) calculations of neutron dose are key for validating bunker design with respect to health regulations. We attempted to use bubble detectors and a 3 He neutron spectrometer to measure neutron equivalent dose and neutron spectra in the maze and near the door of one of our bunkers. We also ran MC simulations with MCNP5 to measure the neutron fluence in the same region. Using a point source of neutrons, a Clinac 1800 linac operating at 10 MV was simulated and the fluence measured at various locations of interest. We describe the challenges faced when measuring dose with bubble detectors in the maze and the complexity of photoneutron spectrometry with linacs operating in pulsed mode. Finally, we report on the development of a userfriendly GUI for shielding calculations based on the NCRP 151 formalism. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. A Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Model to Improve Simulations of Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halubok, M.; Gu, L.; Yang, Z. L.

    2017-12-01

    A model of light transport in a three-dimensional vegetation canopy is being designed and evaluated. The model employs Monte Carlo ray tracing technique which offers simple yet rigorous approach of quantifying the photon transport in a plant canopy. This method involves simulation of a chain of scattering and absorption events incurred by a photon on its path from the light source. Implementation of weighting mechanism helps avoid `all-or-nothing' type of interaction between a photon packet and a canopy element, i.e. at each interaction a photon packet is split into three parts, namely, reflected, transmitted and absorbed, instead of assuming complete absorption, reflection or transmission. Canopy scenes in the model are represented by a number of polygons with specified set of reflectances and transmittances. The performance of the model is being evaluated through comparison against established plant canopy reflectance models, such as 3D Radiosity-Graphics combined model which calculates bidirectional reflectance distribution function of a 3D canopy scene. This photon transport model is to be coupled to a leaf level solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) model with the aim of further advancing of accuracy of the modeled SIF, which, in its turn, has a potential of improving our predictive capability of terrestrial carbon uptake.

  10. A GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculation platform and its application toward validating an MRI-guided radiation therapy beam model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuhe; Mazur, Thomas R.; Green, Olga; Hu, Yanle; Li, Hua; Rodriguez, Vivian; Wooten, H. Omar; Yang, Deshan; Zhao, Tianyu; Mutic, Sasa; Li, H. Harold, E-mail: hli@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, 4921 Parkview Place, Campus Box 8224, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The clinical commissioning of IMRT subject to a magnetic field is challenging. The purpose of this work is to develop a GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculation platform based on PENELOPE and then use the platform to validate a vendor-provided MRIdian head model toward quality assurance of clinical IMRT treatment plans subject to a 0.35 T magnetic field. Methods: PENELOPE was first translated from FORTRAN to C++ and the result was confirmed to produce equivalent results to the original code. The C++ code was then adapted to CUDA in a workflow optimized for GPU architecture. The original code was expanded to include voxelized transport with Woodcock tracking, faster electron/positron propagation in a magnetic field, and several features that make gPENELOPE highly user-friendly. Moreover, the vendor-provided MRIdian head model was incorporated into the code in an effort to apply gPENELOPE as both an accurate and rapid dose validation system. A set of experimental measurements were performed on the MRIdian system to examine the accuracy of both the head model and gPENELOPE. Ultimately, gPENELOPE was applied toward independent validation of patient doses calculated by MRIdian’s KMC. Results: An acceleration factor of 152 was achieved in comparison to the original single-thread FORTRAN implementation with the original accuracy being preserved. For 16 treatment plans including stomach (4), lung (2), liver (3), adrenal gland (2), pancreas (2), spleen(1), mediastinum (1), and breast (1), the MRIdian dose calculation engine agrees with gPENELOPE with a mean gamma passing rate of 99.1% ± 0.6% (2%/2 mm). Conclusions: A Monte Carlo simulation platform was developed based on a GPU- accelerated version of PENELOPE. This platform was used to validate that both the vendor-provided head model and fast Monte Carlo engine used by the MRIdian system are accurate in modeling radiation transport in a patient using 2%/2 mm gamma criteria. Future applications of this

  11. A GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculation platform and its application toward validating an MRI-guided radiation therapy beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yuhe; Mazur, Thomas R.; Green, Olga; Hu, Yanle; Li, Hua; Rodriguez, Vivian; Wooten, H. Omar; Yang, Deshan; Zhao, Tianyu; Mutic, Sasa; Li, H. Harold

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical commissioning of IMRT subject to a magnetic field is challenging. The purpose of this work is to develop a GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculation platform based on PENELOPE and then use the platform to validate a vendor-provided MRIdian head model toward quality assurance of clinical IMRT treatment plans subject to a 0.35 T magnetic field. Methods: PENELOPE was first translated from FORTRAN to C++ and the result was confirmed to produce equivalent results to the original code. The C++ code was then adapted to CUDA in a workflow optimized for GPU architecture. The original code was expanded to include voxelized transport with Woodcock tracking, faster electron/positron propagation in a magnetic field, and several features that make gPENELOPE highly user-friendly. Moreover, the vendor-provided MRIdian head model was incorporated into the code in an effort to apply gPENELOPE as both an accurate and rapid dose validation system. A set of experimental measurements were performed on the MRIdian system to examine the accuracy of both the head model and gPENELOPE. Ultimately, gPENELOPE was applied toward independent validation of patient doses calculated by MRIdian’s KMC. Results: An acceleration factor of 152 was achieved in comparison to the original single-thread FORTRAN implementation with the original accuracy being preserved. For 16 treatment plans including stomach (4), lung (2), liver (3), adrenal gland (2), pancreas (2), spleen(1), mediastinum (1), and breast (1), the MRIdian dose calculation engine agrees with gPENELOPE with a mean gamma passing rate of 99.1% ± 0.6% (2%/2 mm). Conclusions: A Monte Carlo simulation platform was developed based on a GPU- accelerated version of PENELOPE. This platform was used to validate that both the vendor-provided head model and fast Monte Carlo engine used by the MRIdian system are accurate in modeling radiation transport in a patient using 2%/2 mm gamma criteria. Future applications of this

  12. A GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculation platform and its application toward validating an MRI-guided radiation therapy beam model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhe; Mazur, Thomas R; Green, Olga; Hu, Yanle; Li, Hua; Rodriguez, Vivian; Wooten, H Omar; Yang, Deshan; Zhao, Tianyu; Mutic, Sasa; Li, H Harold

    2016-07-01

    The clinical commissioning of IMRT subject to a magnetic field is challenging. The purpose of this work is to develop a GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculation platform based on penelope and then use the platform to validate a vendor-provided MRIdian head model toward quality assurance of clinical IMRT treatment plans subject to a 0.35 T magnetic field. penelope was first translated from fortran to c++ and the result was confirmed to produce equivalent results to the original code. The c++ code was then adapted to cuda in a workflow optimized for GPU architecture. The original code was expanded to include voxelized transport with Woodcock tracking, faster electron/positron propagation in a magnetic field, and several features that make gpenelope highly user-friendly. Moreover, the vendor-provided MRIdian head model was incorporated into the code in an effort to apply gpenelope as both an accurate and rapid dose validation system. A set of experimental measurements were performed on the MRIdian system to examine the accuracy of both the head model and gpenelope. Ultimately, gpenelope was applied toward independent validation of patient doses calculated by MRIdian's kmc. An acceleration factor of 152 was achieved in comparison to the original single-thread fortran implementation with the original accuracy being preserved. For 16 treatment plans including stomach (4), lung (2), liver (3), adrenal gland (2), pancreas (2), spleen(1), mediastinum (1), and breast (1), the MRIdian dose calculation engine agrees with gpenelope with a mean gamma passing rate of 99.1% ± 0.6% (2%/2 mm). A Monte Carlo simulation platform was developed based on a GPU- accelerated version of penelope. This platform was used to validate that both the vendor-provided head model and fast Monte Carlo engine used by the MRIdian system are accurate in modeling radiation transport in a patient using 2%/2 mm gamma criteria. Future applications of this platform will include dose validation and

  13. The application of the Monte Carlo code FLUKA in radiation protection studies for the large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battistoni, Giuseppe; Broggi, Francesco; Brugger, Markus

    2010-01-01

    The multi-purpose particle interaction and transport code FLUKA is integral part of all radiation protection studies for the design and operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It is one of the very few codes available for this type of calculations which is capable to calculate in one and the same simulation proton-proton and heavy ion collisions at LHC energies as well as the entire hadronic and electromagnetic particle cascade initiated by secondary particles in detectors and beam-line components from TeV energies down to energies of thermal neutrons. The present paper reviews these capabilities of FLUKA in giving details of relevant physics models along with examples of radiation protection studies for the LHC such as shielding studies for underground areas occupied by personnel during LHC operation and the simulation of induced radioactivity around beam loss points. Integral part of the FLUKA development is a careful benchmarking of specific models as well as the code performance in complex, real life applications which is demonstrated with examples of studies relevant to radiation protection at the LHC. (author)

  14. Dosimetric quality control of treatment planning systems in external radiation therapy using Digital Test Objects calculated by PENELOPE Monte-Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Hdech, Yassine

    2011-01-01

    To ensure the required accuracy and prevent from mis-administration, cancer treatments, by external radiation therapy are simulated on Treatment Planning System or TPS before radiation delivery in order to ensure that the prescription is achieved both in terms of target volumes coverage and healthy tissues protection. The TPS calculates the patient dose distribution and the treatment time per beam required to deliver the prescribed dose. TPS is a key system in the decision process of treatment by radiation therapy. It is therefore essential that the TPS be subject to a thorough check of its performance (quality control or QC) and in particular its ability to accurately compute dose distributions for patients in all clinical situations that be met. The 'traditional' methods recommended to carry out dosimetric CQ of algorithms implemented in the TPS are based on comparisons between dose distributions calculated with the TPS and dose measured in physical test objects (PTO) using the treatment machine. In this thesis we propose to substitute the reference dosimetric measurements performed in OTP by benchmark dose calculations in Digital Test Objects using PENELOPE Monte-Carlo code. This method has three advantages: (i) it allows simulation in situations close to the clinic and often too complex to be experimentally feasible; (ii) due to the digital form of reference data the QC process may be automated; (iii) it allows a comprehensive TPS CQ without hindering the use of an equipment devoted primarily to patients treatments. This new method of CQ has been tested successfully on the Eclipse TPS from Varian Medical Systems Company. (author) [fr

  15. Estimation of radiation dose and risk to children undergoing cardiac catheterization for the treatment of a congenital heart disease using Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakoumakis, Emmanuel; Kostopoulou, Helen; Dimitriadis, Anastastios; Georgiou, Evaggelos [University of Athens, Medical Physics Department, Medical School, Athens (Greece); Makri, Triantafilia [' Agia Sofia' Hospital, Medical Physics Unit, Athens (Greece); Tsalafoutas, Ioannis [Anticancer-Oncology Hospital of Athens ' Agios Savvas' , Medical Physics Department, Athens (Greece)

    2013-03-15

    Children diagnosed with congenital heart disease often undergo cardiac catheterization for their treatment, which involves the use of ionizing radiation and therefore a risk of radiation-induced cancer. The purpose of this study was to calculate the effective and equivalent organ doses (H{sub T}) in those children and estimate the risk of exposure-induced death. Fifty-three children were divided into three groups: atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricular septal defect (VSD) and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). In all procedures, the exposure conditions and the dose-area product meters readings were recorded for each individual acquisition. Monte Carlo simulations were run using the PCXMC 2.0 code and mathematical phantoms simulating a child's anatomy. The H{sub T} values to all irradiated organs and the resulting E and risk of exposure-induced death values were calculated. The average dose-area product values were, respectively, 40 {+-} 12 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the ASD, 17.5 {+-} 0.7 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the VSD and 9.5 {+-} 1 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the PDA group. The average E values were 40 {+-} 12, 22 {+-} 2.5 and 17 {+-} 3.6 mSv for ASD, VSD and PDA groups, respectively. The respective estimated risk of exposure-induced death values per procedure were 0.109, 0.106 and 0.067%. Cardiac catheterizations in children involve a considerable risk for radiation-induced cancer that has to be further reduced. (orig.)

  16. Monte Carlo simulation for IRRMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, R.P.; Liu Lianyan

    2000-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is fast becoming a standard approach for many radiation applications that were previously treated almost entirely by experimental techniques. This is certainly true for Industrial Radiation and Radioisotope Measurement Applications - IRRMA. The reasons for this include: (1) the increased cost and inadequacy of experimentation for design and interpretation purposes; (2) the availability of low cost, large memory, and fast personal computers; and (3) the general availability of general purpose Monte Carlo codes that are increasingly user-friendly, efficient, and accurate. This paper discusses the history and present status of Monte Carlo simulation for IRRMA including the general purpose (GP) and specific purpose (SP) Monte Carlo codes and future needs - primarily from the experience of the authors

  17. Web-based, GPU-accelerated, Monte Carlo simulation and visualization of indirect radiation imaging detector performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Han; Sharma, Diksha; Badano, Aldo

    2014-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations play a vital role in the understanding of the fundamental limitations, design, and optimization of existing and emerging medical imaging systems. Efforts in this area have resulted in the development of a wide variety of open-source software packages. One such package, hybridmantis, uses a novel hybrid concept to model indirect scintillator detectors by balancing the computational load using dual CPU and graphics processing unit (GPU) processors, obtaining computational efficiency with reasonable accuracy. In this work, the authors describe two open-source visualization interfaces, webmantis and visualmantis to facilitate the setup of computational experiments via hybridmantis. The visualization tools visualmantis and webmantis enable the user to control simulation properties through a user interface. In the case of webmantis, control via a web browser allows access through mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets. webmantis acts as a server back-end and communicates with an NVIDIA GPU computing cluster that can support multiuser environments where users can execute different experiments in parallel. The output consists of point response and pulse-height spectrum, and optical transport statistics generated by hybridmantis. The users can download the output images and statistics through a zip file for future reference. In addition, webmantis provides a visualization window that displays a few selected optical photon path as they get transported through the detector columns and allows the user to trace the history of the optical photons. The visualization tools visualmantis and webmantis provide features such as on the fly generation of pulse-height spectra and response functions for microcolumnar x-ray imagers while allowing users to save simulation parameters and results from prior experiments. The graphical interfaces simplify the simulation setup and allow the user to go directly from specifying input parameters to receiving visual

  18. Web-based, GPU-accelerated, Monte Carlo simulation and visualization of indirect radiation imaging detector performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Han; Sharma, Diksha; Badano, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations play a vital role in the understanding of the fundamental limitations, design, and optimization of existing and emerging medical imaging systems. Efforts in this area have resulted in the development of a wide variety of open-source software packages. One such package, hybridMANTIS, uses a novel hybrid concept to model indirect scintillator detectors by balancing the computational load using dual CPU and graphics processing unit (GPU) processors, obtaining computational efficiency with reasonable accuracy. In this work, the authors describe two open-source visualization interfaces, webMANTIS and visualMANTIS to facilitate the setup of computational experiments via hybridMANTIS. Methods: The visualization tools visualMANTIS and webMANTIS enable the user to control simulation properties through a user interface. In the case of webMANTIS, control via a web browser allows access through mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets. webMANTIS acts as a server back-end and communicates with an NVIDIA GPU computing cluster that can support multiuser environments where users can execute different experiments in parallel. Results: The output consists of point response and pulse-height spectrum, and optical transport statistics generated by hybridMANTIS. The users can download the output images and statistics through a zip file for future reference. In addition, webMANTIS provides a visualization window that displays a few selected optical photon path as they get transported through the detector columns and allows the user to trace the history of the optical photons. Conclusions: The visualization tools visualMANTIS and webMANTIS provide features such as on the fly generation of pulse-height spectra and response functions for microcolumnar x-ray imagers while allowing users to save simulation parameters and results from prior experiments. The graphical interfaces simplify the simulation setup and allow the user to go directly from specifying

  19. Web-based, GPU-accelerated, Monte Carlo simulation and visualization of indirect radiation imaging detector performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Han; Sharma, Diksha; Badano, Aldo, E-mail: aldo.badano@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Imaging, Diagnostics, and Software Reliability, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations play a vital role in the understanding of the fundamental limitations, design, and optimization of existing and emerging medical imaging systems. Efforts in this area have resulted in the development of a wide variety of open-source software packages. One such package, hybridMANTIS, uses a novel hybrid concept to model indirect scintillator detectors by balancing the computational load using dual CPU and graphics processing unit (GPU) processors, obtaining computational efficiency with reasonable accuracy. In this work, the authors describe two open-source visualization interfaces, webMANTIS and visualMANTIS to facilitate the setup of computational experiments via hybridMANTIS. Methods: The visualization tools visualMANTIS and webMANTIS enable the user to control simulation properties through a user interface. In the case of webMANTIS, control via a web browser allows access through mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets. webMANTIS acts as a server back-end and communicates with an NVIDIA GPU computing cluster that can support multiuser environments where users can execute different experiments in parallel. Results: The output consists of point response and pulse-height spectrum, and optical transport statistics generated by hybridMANTIS. The users can download the output images and statistics through a zip file for future reference. In addition, webMANTIS provides a visualization window that displays a few selected optical photon path as they get transported through the detector columns and allows the user to trace the history of the optical photons. Conclusions: The visualization tools visualMANTIS and webMANTIS provide features such as on the fly generation of pulse-height spectra and response functions for microcolumnar x-ray imagers while allowing users to save simulation parameters and results from prior experiments. The graphical interfaces simplify the simulation setup and allow the user to go directly from specifying

  20. Space and Planetary Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbud-Madrid, Angel

    2018-02-01

    The space and multitude of celestial bodies surrounding Earth hold a vast wealth of resources for a variety of space and terrestrial applications. The unlimited solar energy, vacuum, and low gravity in space, as well as the minerals, metals, water, atmospheric gases, and volatile elements on the Moon, asteroids, comets, and the inner and outer planets of the Solar System and their moons, constitute potential valuable resources for robotic and human space missions and for future use in our own planet. In the short term, these resources could be transformed into useful materials at the site where they are found to extend mission duration and to reduce the costly dependence from materials sent from Earth. Making propellants and human consumables from local resources can significantly reduce mission mass and cost, enabling longer stays and fueling transportation systems for use within and beyond the planetary surface. Use of finely grained soils and rocks can serve for habitat construction, radiation protection, solar cell fabrication, and food growth. The same material could also be used to develop repair and replacement capabilities using advanced manufacturing technologies. Following similar mining practices utilized for centuries on Earth, identifying, extracting, and utilizing extraterrestrial resources will enable further space exploration, while increasing commercial activities beyond our planet. In the long term, planetary resources and solar energy could also be brought to Earth if obtaining these resources locally prove to be no longer economically or environmentally acceptable. Throughout human history, resources have been the driving force for the exploration and settling of our planet. Similarly, extraterrestrial resources will make space the next destination in the quest for further exploration and expansion of our species. However, just like on Earth, not all challenges are scientific and technological. As private companies start working toward

  1. Can planetary nebulae rotate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinin, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the inclination of spectral lines observed in a number of planetary nebulae when the spectrograph slit is placed along the major axis, which is presently ascribed to nonuniform expansion of the shells, actually may be due to rotation of the nebulae about their minor axes, as Campbell and Moore have suggested in their reports. It is assumed that the rotation of the central star (or, if the core is a binary system, circular motions of gas along quasi-Keplerian orbits) serves as the source of the original rotation of a protoplanetary nebula. The mechanism providing for strengthening of the original rotation in the process of expansion of the shell is the tangential pressure of L/sub α/ radiation due to the anisotropic properties of the medium and radiation field. The dynamic effect produced by them is evidently greatest in the epoch when the optical depth of the nebula in the L/sub c/ continuum becomes on the order of unity in the course of its expansion

  2. Photochemistry of Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Y. L.

    2005-12-01

    The Space Age started half a century ago. Today, with the completion of a fairly detailed study of the planets of the Solar System, we have begun studying exoplanets (or extrasolar planets). The overriding question in is to ask whether an exoplanet is habitable and harbors life, and if so, what the biosignatures ought to be. This forces us to confront the fundamental question of what controls the composition of an atmosphere. The composition of a planetary atmosphere reflects a balance between thermodynamic equilibrium chemistry (as in the interior of giant planets) and photochemistry (as in the atmosphere of Mars). The terrestrial atmosphere has additional influence from life (biochemistry). The bulk of photochemistry in planetary atmospheres is driven by UV radiation. Photosynthesis may be considered an extension of photochemistry by inventing a molecule (chlorophyll) that can harvest visible light. Perhaps the most remarkable feature of photochemistry is catalytic chemistry, the ability of trace amounts of gases to profoundly affect the composition of the atmosphere. Notable examples include HOx (H, OH and HO2) chemistry on Mars and chlorine chemistry on Earth and Venus. Another remarkable feature of photochemistry is organic synthesis in the outer solar system. The best example is the atmosphere of Titan. Photolysis of methane results in the synthesis of more complex hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon chemistry inevitably leads to the formation of high molecular weight products, giving rise to aerosols when the ambient atmosphere is cool enough for them to condense. These results are supported by the findings of the recent Cassini mission. Lastly, photochemistry leaves a distinctive isotopic signature that can be used to trace back the evolutionary history of the atmosphere. Examples include nitrogen isotopes on Mars and sulfur isotopes on Earth. Returning to the question of biosignatures on an exoplanet, our Solar System experience tells us to look for speciation

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of simultaneous radiation detection in the hybrid tomography system ClearPET-XPAD3/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dávila, H. Olaya, E-mail: hernan.olaya@uptc.edu.co; Martínez, S. A. [Physics Department, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Tunja-Colombia (Colombia); Sevilla, A. C., E-mail: acsevillam@unal.edu.co; Castro, H. F. [Physics Department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D.C - Colombia (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    Using the Geant4 based simulation framework SciFW1, a detailed simulation was performed for a detector array in the hybrid tomography prototype for small animals called ClearPET / XPAD, which was built in the Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille. The detector system consists of an array of phoswich scintillation detectors: LSO (Lutetium Oxy-ortosilicate doped with cerium Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce) and LuYAP (Lutetium Ortoaluminate of Yttrium doped with cerium Lu{sub 0.7}Y{sub 0.3}AlO{sub 3}:Ce) for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and hybrid pixel detector XPAD for Computed Tomography (CT). Simultaneous acquisition of deposited energy and the corresponding time - position for each recorded event were analyzed, independently, for both detectors. interference between detection modules for PET and CT. Information about amount of radiation reaching each phoswich crystal and XPAD detector using a phantom in order to study the effectiveness by radiation attenuation and influence the positioning of the radioactive source {sup 22}Na was obtained. The simulation proposed will improve distribution of detectors rings and interference values will be taken into account in the new versions of detectors.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of simultaneous radiation detection in the hybrid tomography system ClearPET-XPAD3/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, H. Olaya; Sevilla, A. C.; Castro, H. F.; Martínez, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Geant4 based simulation framework SciFW1, a detailed simulation was performed for a detector array in the hybrid tomography prototype for small animals called ClearPET / XPAD, which was built in the Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille. The detector system consists of an array of phoswich scintillation detectors: LSO (Lutetium Oxy-ortosilicate doped with cerium Lu2SiO5:Ce) and LuYAP (Lutetium Ortoaluminate of Yttrium doped with cerium Lu0.7Y0.3AlO3:Ce) for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and hybrid pixel detector XPAD for Computed Tomography (CT). Simultaneous acquisition of deposited energy and the corresponding time - position for each recorded event were analyzed, independently, for both detectors. interference between detection modules for PET and CT. Information about amount of radiation reaching each phoswich crystal and XPAD detector using a phantom in order to study the effectiveness by radiation attenuation and influence the positioning of the radioactive source 22Na was obtained. The simulation proposed will improve distribution of detectors rings and interference values will be taken into account in the new versions of detectors.

  5. Radiation transport analyses for IFMIF design by the Attila software using a Monte-Carlo source model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arter, W.; Loughlin, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate calculation of the neutron transport through the shielding of the IFMIF test cell, defined by CAD, is a difficult task for several reasons. The ability of the powerful deterministic radiation transport code Attila, to do this rapidly and reliably has been studied. Three models of increasing geometrical complexity were produced from the CAD using the CADfix software. A fourth model was produced to represent transport within the cell. The work also involved the conversion of the Vitenea-IEF database for high energy neutrons into a format usable by Attila, and the conversion of a particle source specified in MCNP wssaformat to a form usable by Attila. The final model encompassed the entire test cell environment, with only minor modifications. On a state-of-the-art PC, Attila took approximately 3 h to perform the calculations, as a consequence of a careful mesh 'layering'. The results strongly suggest that Attila will be a valuable tool for modelling radiation transport in IFMIF, and for similar problems

  6. SU-F-T-663: Cerenkov Radiation Enhanced Radiotherapy with Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle: A Monte Carlo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B; Sajo, E [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Ouyang, Z; Ngwa, W [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A recent publication has shown that by delivering titanium dioxide nanoparticles (titania) as a photosensitizer into tumors, Cerenkov radiation (CR) produced by radionuclides could be used for substantially boosting damage to cancer cells. The present work compares CR production by various clinically relevant radiation sources including internal radionuclides and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and provides preliminarily computational results of CR absorption by titania. Methods: 1) Geant4.10.1 was used to simulate ionizing radiation-induced CR production in a 1cm diameter spherical volume using external radiotherapy sources: Varian Clinac IX 6MV and Eldorado {sup 60}Co, both with 10*10 cm{sup 2} field size. In each case the volume was placed at the maximum dose depth (1.5cm for 6MV source and 0.5cm for {sup 60}Co). In addition, {sup 18}F, {sup 192}Ir and {sup 60}Co were simulated using Geant4 radioactive decay models as internal sources. Dose deposition and CR production spectra in 200nm-400nm range were calculated as it is the excitation range of titania. 2) Using 6MV external source, the absorption by titania was calculated via the track length of CR in the spherical volume. The nanoparticle concentration was varied from 0.25 to 5µg/g. Results: Among different radioactive sources, results showed that {sup 18}F induced the highest amount of CR per disintegration, but {sup 60}Co had the highest yield per unit dose. When compared with external sources, 6MV source was shown to be the most efficient for the the same delivered dose. Simulations indicated increased absorption for increasing concentrations, with up to 68% absorption of generated CR for 5µg/g titania concentration. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that 6MV beam is favored with a higher CR yield, compared to radionuclides, and that the use of higher concentrations of titania may increase photosensitization. From the findings, we propose that if sufficiently potent concentrations of

  7. Reduction of radiation risks in patients undergoing some X-ray examinations by using optimal projections: A Monte Carlo program-based mathematical calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Chaparian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this paper were calculation and comparison of the effective doses, the risks of exposure-induced cancer, and dose reduction in the gonads for male and female patients in different projections of some X-ray examinations. Radiographies of lumbar spine [in the eight projections of anteroposterior (AP, posteroanterior (PA, right lateral (RLAT, left lateral (LLAT, right anterior-posterior oblique (RAO, left anterior-posterior oblique (LAO, right posterior-anterior oblique (RPO, and left posterior-anterior oblique (LPO], abdomen (in the two projections of AP and PA, and pelvis (in the two projections of AP and PA were investigated. A solid-state dosimeter was used for the measuring of the entrance skin exposure. A Monte Carlo program was used for calculation of effective doses, the risks of radiation-induced cancer, and doses to the gonads related to the different projections. Results of this study showed that PA projection of abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis radiographies caused 50%-57% lower effective doses than AP projection and 50%-60% reduction in radiation risks. Also use of LAO projection of lumbar spine X-ray examination caused 53% lower effective dose than RPO projection and 56% and 63% reduction in radiation risk for male and female, respectively, and RAO projection caused 28% lower effective dose than LPO projection and 52% and 39% reduction in radiation risk for males and females, respectively. About dose reduction in the gonads, using of the PA position rather than AP in the radiographies of the abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis can result in reduction of the ovaries doses in women, 38%, 31%, and 25%, respectively and reduction of the testicles doses in males, 76%, 86%, and 94%, respectively. Also for oblique projections of lumbar spine X-ray examination, with employment of LAO rather than RPO and also RAO rather than LPO, demonstrated 22% and 13% reductions to the ovaries doses and 66% and 54% reductions in the

  8. Proto-planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuckerman, B.

    1978-01-01

    A 'proto-planetary nebula' or a 'planetary nebula progenitor' is the term used to describe those objects that are losing mass at a rate >approximately 10 -5 Msolar masses/year (i.e. comparable to mass loss rates in planetary nebulae with ionized masses >approximately 0.2 Msolar masses) and which, it is believed, will become planetary nebulae themselves within 5 years. It is shown that most proto-planetary nebulae appear as very red objects although a few have been 'caught' near the middle of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. The precursors of these proto-planetaries are the general red giant population, more specifically probably Mira and semi-regular variables. (Auth.)end

  9. Comprehensive evaluations of cone-beam CT dose in image-guided radiation therapy via GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari, Davide; Scolari, Enrica; Silvestri, Chiara; Graves, Yan Jiang; Cervino, Laura [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92037-0843 (United States); Yan, Hao; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9315 (United States); Rice, Roger [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92037-0843 (United States)

    2014-03-07

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used for patient setup in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Radiation dose from CBCT scans has become a clinical concern. The purposes of this study are (1) to commission a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation package gCTD for Varian On-Board Imaging (OBI) system and test the calculation accuracy, and (2) to quantitatively evaluate CBCT dose from the OBI system in typical IGRT scan protocols. We first conducted dose measurements in a water phantom. X-ray source model parameters used in gCTD are obtained through a commissioning process. gCTD accuracy is demonstrated by comparing calculations with measurements in water and in CTDI phantoms. Twenty-five brain cancer patients are used to study dose in a standard-dose head protocol, and 25 prostate cancer patients are used to study dose in pelvis protocol and pelvis spotlight protocol. Mean dose to each organ is calculated. Mean dose to 2% voxels that have the highest dose is also computed to quantify the maximum dose. It is found that the mean dose value to an organ varies largely among patients. Moreover, dose distribution is highly non-homogeneous inside an organ. The maximum dose is found to be 1–3 times higher than the mean dose depending on the organ, and is up to eight times higher for the entire body due to the very high dose region in bony structures. High computational efficiency has also been observed in our studies, such that MC dose calculation time is less than 5 min for a typical case. (paper)

  10. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation dose in organs of female and male adult phantoms due to FDG-F18 absorbed in the lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinato Walmir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of dose conversion factors (S values for the radionuclide fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG absorbed in the lungs during a positron emission tomography (PET procedure was calculated using the Monte Carlo method (MCNPX version 2.7.0. For the obtained dose conversion factors of interest, it was considered a uniform absorption of radiopharmaceutical by the lung of a healthy adult human. The spectrum of fluorine was introduced in the input data file for the simulation. The simulation took place in two adult phantoms of both sexes, based on polygon mesh surfaces called FASH and MASH with anatomy and posture according to ICRP 89. The S values for the 22 internal organs/tissues, chosen from ICRP No. 110, for the FASH and MASH phantoms were compared with the results obtained from a MIRD V phantoms called ADAM and EVA used by the Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD. We observed variation of more than 100% in S values due to structural anatomical differences in the internal organs of the MASH and FASH phantoms compared to the mathematical phantom.

  11. Quality control of the treatment planning systems dose calculations in external radiation therapy using the Penelope Monte Carlo code; Controle qualite des systemes de planification dosimetrique des traitements en radiotherapie externe au moyen du code Monte-Carlo Penelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazy-Aubignac, L

    2007-09-15

    The treatment planning systems (T.P.S.) occupy a key position in the radiotherapy service: they realize the projected calculation of the dose distribution and the treatment duration. Traditionally, the quality control of the calculated distribution doses relies on their comparisons with dose distributions measured under the device of treatment. This thesis proposes to substitute these dosimetry measures to the profile of reference dosimetry calculations got by the Penelope Monte-Carlo code. The Monte-Carlo simulations give a broad choice of test configurations and allow to envisage a quality control of dosimetry aspects of T.P.S. without monopolizing the treatment devices. This quality control, based on the Monte-Carlo simulations has been tested on a clinical T.P.S. and has allowed to simplify the quality procedures of the T.P.S.. This quality control, in depth, more precise and simpler to implement could be generalized to every center of radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  12. Radiation risk assessment in neonatal radiographic examinations of the chest and abdomen: a clinical and Monte Carlo dosimetry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makri, T; Yakoumakis, E; Papadopoulou, D; Gialousis, G; Theodoropoulos, V; Sandilos, P; Georgiou, E

    2006-01-01

    Seeking to assess the radiation risk associated with radiological examinations in neonatal intensive care units, thermo-luminescence dosimetry was used for the measurement of entrance surface dose (ESD) in 44 AP chest and 28 AP combined chest-abdominal exposures of a sample of 60 neonates. The mean values of ESD were found to be equal to 44 ± 16 μGy and 43 ± 19 μGy, respectively. The MCNP-4C2 code with a mathematical phantom simulating a neonate and appropriate x-ray energy spectra were employed for the simulation of the AP chest and AP combined chest-abdominal exposures. Equivalent organ dose per unit ESD and energy imparted per unit ESD calculations are presented in tabular form. Combined with ESD measurements, these calculations yield an effective dose of 10.2 ± 3.7 μSv, regardless of sex, and an imparted energy of 18.5 ± 6.7 μJ for the chest radiograph. The corresponding results for the combined chest-abdominal examination are 14.7 ± 7.6 μSv (males)/17.2 ± 7.6 μSv (females) and 29.7 ± 13.2 μJ. The calculated total risk per radiograph was low, ranging between 1.7 and 2.9 per million neonates, per film, and being slightly higher for females. Results of this study are in good agreement with previous studies, especially in view of the diversity met in the calculation methods

  13. Radiation risk assessment in neonatal radiographic examinations of the chest and abdomen: a clinical and Monte Carlo dosimetry study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makri, T.; Yakoumakis, E.; Papadopoulou, D.; Gialousis, G.; Theodoropoulos, V.; Sandilos, P.; Georgiou, E.

    2006-10-01

    Seeking to assess the radiation risk associated with radiological examinations in neonatal intensive care units, thermo-luminescence dosimetry was used for the measurement of entrance surface dose (ESD) in 44 AP chest and 28 AP combined chest-abdominal exposures of a sample of 60 neonates. The mean values of ESD were found to be equal to 44 ± 16 µGy and 43 ± 19 µGy, respectively. The MCNP-4C2 code with a mathematical phantom simulating a neonate and appropriate x-ray energy spectra were employed for the simulation of the AP chest and AP combined chest-abdominal exposures. Equivalent organ dose per unit ESD and energy imparted per unit ESD calculations are presented in tabular form. Combined with ESD measurements, these calculations yield an effective dose of 10.2 ± 3.7 µSv, regardless of sex, and an imparted energy of 18.5 ± 6.7 µJ for the chest radiograph. The corresponding results for the combined chest-abdominal examination are 14.7 ± 7.6 µSv (males)/17.2 ± 7.6 µSv (females) and 29.7 ± 13.2 µJ. The calculated total risk per radiograph was low, ranging between 1.7 and 2.9 per million neonates, per film, and being slightly higher for females. Results of this study are in good agreement with previous studies, especially in view of the diversity met in the calculation methods.

  14. Measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation of high definition dose evaluation for nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated by using intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C.Y.; Tung, C.J.; Lee, C.C.; Lin, M.H.; Chao, T.C.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) simulation using a high definition (HD) phantom was used to evaluate the dose distribution in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Around nasopharyngeal cavity, there exists many small volume organs-at-risk (OARs) such as the optic nerves, auditory nerves, cochlea, and semicircular canal which necessitate the use of a high definition phantom for accurate and correct dose evaluation. The aim of this research was to study the advantages of using an HD phantom for MBMC simulation in NPC patients treated with IMRT. The MBMC simulation in this study was based on the IMRT treatment plan of three NPC patients generated by the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) of the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) using a calculation grid of 2 mm 2 . The NPC tumor was treated to a cumulative dose of 7000 cGy in 35 fractions using the shrinking-field sequential IMRT (SIMRT) method. The BEAMnrc MC Code was used to simulate a Varian EX21 linear accelerator treatment head. The HD phantom contained 0.5 × 0.5 × 1 mm 3 voxels for the nasopharyngeal area and 0.5 × 0.5 × 3 mm 3 for the rest of the head area. An efficiency map was obtained for the amorphous silicon aS1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to adjust the weighting of each particle in the phase-space file for each IMRT beam. Our analysis revealed that small volume organs such as the eighth cranial nerve, semicircular canal, cochlea and external auditory canal showed an absolute dose difference of ≥200 cGy, while the dose difference for larger organs such as the parotid glands and tumor was negligible for the MBMC simulation using the HD phantom. The HD phantom was found to be suitable for Monte Carlo dose volume analysis of small volume organs. - Highlights: • HD dose evaluation for IMRT of NPC patients have been verified by the MC method. • MC results shows

  15. ARCHERRT - a GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: software development and application to helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lin; Yang, Youming; Bednarz, Bryan; Sterpin, Edmond; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Ji, Wei; Xu, X George

    2014-07-01

    Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHERRT is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head & neck. To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHERRT. Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHERRT and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHERRT agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHERRT are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head & neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to specific architecture of GPU, modified Woodcock tracking algorithm

  16. ARCHERRT – A GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: Software development and application to helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lin; Yang, Youming; Bednarz, Bryan; Sterpin, Edmond; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Ji, Wei; Xu, X. George

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHERRT is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head & neck. Methods: To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHERRT. Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHERRT and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. Results: For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHERRT agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHERRT are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head & neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to specific architecture of GPU, modified

  17. Carlos Romero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Entrevista (en español Presentación Carlos Romero, politólogo, es profesor-investigador en el Instituto de Estudios Políticos de la Facultad de Ciencias Jurídicas y Políticas de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, en donde se ha desempeñado como coordinador del Doctorado, subdirector y director del Centro de Estudios de Postgrado. Cuenta con ocho libros publicados sobre temas de análisis político y relaciones internacionales, siendo uno de los últimos Jugando con el globo. La política exter...

  18. Planetary Landscape Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, H.

    building Lunar or Martian bases. Factors of this category are the presence of water, 24 h communication oppor- tunity with Earth, radio noise free sky, radiation, temperature etc conditions. Since the emergence of the discipline of astrobiology, potentially habitable niches - and espe- cially the so far undiscovered de facto inhabited niches - make very high value of a given landscape. CONCLUSION As we have closer touch with planetary surfaces other than our, and as human (and manned) exploration of the Solar System will again be in the agenda, in addition to physical geographic or geologic factors, new ones: economical, cultural, aesthetic and geofactors together will determine the value of a certain landscape in a given area. Its study will be more geographic than geologic. The above listed ele- ments can be important when chosing a base or landing site on any planetary body. The landscape values can be merged in a GIS system and this way we can more ea- sity determine not only landcape types but also the optimal landing sites for future missions. References [1] Mezõsi , G.: A földrajzi táj (geographic landscape), in: Általános ter- mészerföldrajz, Budapest, 1993. pp 807-818. [2] Baker, V. R.: Extraterrestrial Geo- morphology: An Introduction. Geomorphology 37 (2001) pp 175-178. [3] Jakucs, L.: A földrajzi burok kozmogén és endogén dinamikája (Endogenic and Cosmogenic Dy- namics of the Geospheres). JATEPress, 1997. 3

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of age-dependent radiation dose from alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides to critical trabecular bone and bone marrow targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dant, James T.; Richardson, Richard B.; Nie, Linda H.

    2013-05-01

    Alpha (α) particles and low-energy beta (β) particles present minimal risk for external exposure. While these particles can induce leukemia and bone cancer due to internal exposure, they can also be beneficial for targeted radiation therapies. In this paper, a trabecular bone model is presented to investigate the radiation dose from bone- and marrow-seeking α and β emitters to different critical compartments (targets) of trabecular bone for different age groups. Two main issues are addressed with Monte Carlo simulations. The first is the absorption fractions (AFs) from bone and marrow to critical targets within the bone for different age groups. The other issue is the application of 223Ra for the radiotherapy treatment of bone metastases. Both a static model and a simulated bone remodeling process are established for trabecular bone. The results show significantly lower AFs from radionuclide sources in the bone volume to the peripheral marrow and the haematopoietic marrow for adults than for newborns and children. The AFs from sources on the bone surface and in the bone marrow to peripheral marrow and haematopoietic marrow also varies for adults and children depending on the energy of the particles. Regarding the use of 223Ra as a radionuclide for the radiotherapy of bone metastases, the simulations show a significantly higher dose from 223Ra and its progeny in forming bone to the target compartment of bone metastases than that from two other more commonly used β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, 153Sm and 89Sr. There is also a slightly lower dose from 223Ra in forming bone to haematopoietic marrow than that from 153Sm and 89Sr. These results indicate a higher therapy efficiency and lower marrow toxicity from 223Ra and its progeny. In conclusion, age-related changes in bone dimension and cellularity seem to significantly affect the internal dose from α and β emitters in the bone and marrow to critical targets, and 223Ra may be a more efficient

  20. Impact of cardio-synchronous brain pulsations on Monte Carlo calculated doses for synchrotron micro- and mini-beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchado de Sola, Francisco; Vilches, Manuel; Prezado, Yolanda; Lallena, Antonio M

    2018-05-15

    To assess the effects of brain movements induced by heartbeat on dose distributions in synchrotron micro- and mini-beam radiaton therapy and to develop a model to help guide decisions and planning for future clinical trials. The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to simulate the irradiation of a human head phantom with a variety of micro- and mini-beam arrays, with beams narrower than 100 μm and above 500 μm, respectively, and with radiation fields of 1cm × 2cm and 2cm × 2cm. The dose in the phantom due to these beams was calculated by superposing the dose profiles obtained for a single beam of 1μm × 2cm. A parameter δ, accounting for the total displacement of the brain during the irradiation and due to the cardio-synchronous pulsation, was used to quantify the impact on peak-to-valley dose ratios and the full-width at half-maximum. The difference between the maximum (at the phantom entrance) and the minimum (at the phantom exit) values of the peak-to-valley dose ratio reduces when the parameter δ increases. The full-width at half-maximum remains almost constant with depth for any δ value. Sudden changes in the two quantities are observed at the interfaces between the various tissues (brain, skull and skin) present in the head phantom. The peak-to-valley dose ratio at the center of the head phantom reduces when δ increases, remaining above 70% of the static value only for mini-beams and δ smaller than ~ 200 μm. Optimal setups for brain treatments with synchrotron radiation micro- and mini-beam combs depend on the brain displacement due to cardio-synchronous pulsation. Peak-to-valley dose ratios larger than 90% of the maximum values obtained in the static case occur only for mini-beams and relatively large dose rates. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Planetary nomenclature, like terrestrial nomenclature, is used to uniquely identify a feature on the surface of a planet or satellite so that the feature can be...

  2. ARCHERRT – A GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: Software development and application to helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Ji, Wei; Xu, X. George; Yang, Youming; Bednarz, Bryan; Sterpin, Edmond

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHER RT is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head and neck. Methods: To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHER RT . Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHER RT and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. Results: For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHER RT agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHER RT are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head and neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to specific architecture of GPU

  3. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Danielle; Siegbahn, E. Albert; Fallone, B. Gino; Serduc, Raphael; Warkentin, Brad

    2012-05-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2-49 (mouse) and 2-46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2-87% and 33-96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this study

  4. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Danielle; Fallone, B Gino; Warkentin, Brad; Siegbahn, E Albert; Serduc, Raphael

    2012-01-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm 2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm 2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm 2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2–49 (mouse) and 2–46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2–87% and 33–96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this

  5. Differences in dose-volumetric data between the analytical anisotropic algorithm and the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo algorithm in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Akira; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Miyabe, Yuki; Narabayashi, Masaru; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the differences in dose-volumetric data obtained using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) vs the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Dose-volumetric data from 20 patients treated with SBRT for solitary lung cancer generated using the iPlan XVMC for the Novalis system consisting of a 6-MV linear accelerator and micro-multileaf collimators were recalculated with the AAA in Eclipse using the same monitor units and identical beam setup. The mean isocenter dose was 100.2% and 98.7% of the prescribed dose according to XVMC and AAA, respectively. Mean values of the maximal dose (D max ), the minimal dose (D min ), and dose received by 95% volume (D 95 ) for the planning target volume (PTV) with XVMC were 104.3%, 75.1%, and 86.2%, respectively. When recalculated with the AAA, those values were 100.8%, 77.1%, and 85.4%, respectively. Mean dose parameter values considered for the normal lung, namely the mean lung dose, V 5 , and V 20 , were 3.7 Gy, 19.4%, and 5.0% for XVMC and 3.6 Gy, 18.3%, and 4.7% for the AAA, respectively. All of these dose-volumetric differences between the 2 algorithms were within 5% of the prescribed dose. The effect of PTV size and tumor location, respectively, on the differences in dose parameters for the PTV between the AAA and XVMC was evaluated. A significant effect of the PTV on the difference in D 95 between the AAA and XVMC was observed (p = 0.03). Differences in the marginal doses, namely D min and D 95 , were statistically significant between peripherally and centrally located tumors (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively). Tumor location and volume might have an effect on the differences in dose-volumetric parameters. The differences between AAA and XVMC were considered to be within an acceptable range (<5 percentage points)

  6. X-ray observations of planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparao, K.M.V.; Tarafdar, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    The Einstein satellite was used to observe 19 planetary nebulae and X-ray emission was detected from four planetary nebulae. The EXOSAT satellite observed 12 planetary nebulae and five new sources were detected. An Einstein HRI observation shows that NGC 246 is a point source, implying that the X-rays are from the central star. Most of the detected planetary nebulae are old and the X-rays are observed during the later stage of planetary nebulae/central star evolution, when the nebula has dispersed sufficiently and/or when the central star gets old and the heavy elements in the atmosphere settle down due to gravitation. However in two cases where the central star is sufficiently luminous X-rays were observed, even though they were young nebulae; the X-radiation ionizes the nebula to a degree, to allow negligible absorption in the nebula. Temperature T x is obtained using X-ray flux and optical magnitude and assuming the spectrum is blackbody. T x agrees with Zanstra temperature obtained from optical Helium lines. (author)

  7. Non-planetary Science from Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, M.; Rabe, K.; Daniels, K.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary science is naturally focussed on the issues of the origin and history of solar systems, especially our own. The implications of an early turbulent history of our solar system reach into many areas including the origin of Earth's oceans, of ores in the Earth's crust and possibly the seeding of life. There are however other areas of science that stand to be developed greatly by planetary missions, primarily to small solar system bodies. The physics of granular materials has been well-studied in Earth's gravity, but lacks a general theory. Because of the compacting effects of gravity, some experiments desired for testing these theories remain impossible on Earth. Studying the behavior of a micro-gravity rubble pile -- such as many asteroids are believed to be -- could provide a new route towards exploring general principles of granular physics. These same studies would also prove valuable for planning missions to sample these same bodies, as techniques for anchoring and deep sampling are difficult to plan in the absence of such knowledge. In materials physics, first-principles total-energy calculations for compounds of a given stoichiometry have identified metastable, or even stable, structures distinct from known structures obtained by synthesis under laboratory conditions. The conditions in the proto-planetary nebula, in the slowly cooling cores of planetesimals, and in the high speed collisions of planetesimals and their derivatives, are all conditions that cannot be achieved in the laboratory. Large samples from comets and asteroids offer the chance to find crystals with these as-yet unobserved structures as well as more exotic materials. Some of these could have unusual properties important for materials science. Meteorites give us a glimpse of these exotic materials, several dozen of which are known that are unique to meteorites. But samples retrieved directly from small bodies in space will not have been affected by atmospheric entry, warmth or

  8. Planetary mass function and planetary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominik, M.

    2011-02-01

    With planets orbiting stars, a planetary mass function should not be seen as a low-mass extension of the stellar mass function, but a proper formalism needs to take care of the fact that the statistical properties of planet populations are linked to the properties of their respective host stars. This can be accounted for by describing planet populations by means of a differential planetary mass-radius-orbit function, which together with the fraction of stars with given properties that are orbited by planets and the stellar mass function allows the derivation of all statistics for any considered sample. These fundamental functions provide a framework for comparing statistics that result from different observing techniques and campaigns which all have their very specific selection procedures and detection efficiencies. Moreover, recent results both from gravitational microlensing campaigns and radial-velocity surveys of stars indicate that planets tend to cluster in systems rather than being the lonely child of their respective parent star. While planetary multiplicity in an observed system becomes obvious with the detection of several planets, its quantitative assessment however comes with the challenge to exclude the presence of further planets. Current exoplanet samples begin to give us first hints at the population statistics, whereas pictures of planet parameter space in its full complexity call for samples that are 2-4 orders of magnitude larger. In order to derive meaningful statistics, however, planet detection campaigns need to be designed in such a way that well-defined fully deterministic target selection, monitoring and detection criteria are applied. The probabilistic nature of gravitational microlensing makes this technique an illustrative example of all the encountered challenges and uncertainties.

  9. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF RADIATION DAMAGE IN TUNGSTEN SUBJECTED TO NEUTRON FLUX WITH PKA SPECTRUM CORRESPONDING TO THE HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-12-31

    The objective of this work is to study the damage accumulation in pure tungsten (W) subjected to neutron bombardment with a primary knock-on atom (PKA) spectrum corresponding to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), using the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) method.

  10. Superficial dose distribution in breast for tangential radiation treatment, Monte Carlo evaluation of Eclipse algorithms in case of phantom and patient geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarova, Roumiana; Gustafsson, Magnus; Bäck, Anna; Drugge, Ninni; Palm, Åsa; Lindberg, Andreas; Berglund, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to examine experimentally and by the Monte Carlo method the accuracy of the Eclipse Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) and Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) algorithms in the superficial region (0–2 cm) of the breast for tangential photon beams in a phantom case as well as in a number of patient geometries. The aim is also to identify differences in how the patient computer tomography data are handled by the treatment planning system and in the Monte Carlo simulations in order to reduce influences of these effects on the evaluation. Materials and methods: Measurements by thermoluminescent dosimeters and gafchromic film are performed for six MV tangential irradiation of the cylindrical solid water phantom. Tangential treatment of seven patients is investigated considering open beams. Dose distributions are obtained by the Eclipse PBC and AAA algorithms. Monte Carlo calculations are carried out by BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc code package. Calculations are performed with a calculation grid of 1.25 × 1.25 × 5 mm 3 for PBC and 2 × 2 × 5 mm 3 for AAA and Monte Carlo, respectively. Dose comparison is performed in both dose and spatial domains by the normalized dose difference method. Results: Experimental profiles from the surface toward the geometrical center of the cylindrical phantom are obtained at the beam entrance and exit as well as laterally. Full dose is received beyond 2 mm in the lateral superficial region and beyond 7 mm at the beam entrance. Good agreement between experimental, Monte Carlo and AAA data is obtained, whereas PBC is seen to underestimate the entrance dose the first 3–4 mm and the lateral dose by more than 5% up to 8 mm depth. In the patient cases considered, AAA and Monte Carlo show agreement within 3% dose and 4 mm spatial tolerance. PBC systematically underestimates the dose at the breast apex. The dimensions of region out of tolerance vary with the local breast shape. Different interpretations of patient

  11. Measuring and interpreting X-ray fluorescence from planetary surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Alan; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fraser, George; Kolbe, Michael; Krumrey, Michael; Mantero, Alfonso; Mantler, Michael; Peacock, Anthony; Pia, Maria-Grazia; Pullan, Derek; Schneider, Uwe G; Ulm, Gerhard

    2008-11-15

    As part of a comprehensive study of X-ray emission from planetary surfaces and in particular the planet Mercury, we have measured fluorescent radiation from a number of planetary analog rock samples using monochromatized synchrotron radiation provided by the BESSY II electron storage ring. The experiments were carried out using a purpose built X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer chamber developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute. The XRF instrumentation is absolutely calibrated and allows for reference-free quantitation of rock sample composition, taking into account secondary photon- and electron-induced enhancement effects. The fluorescence data, in turn, have been used to validate a planetary fluorescence simulation tool based on the GEANT4 transport code. This simulation can be used as a mission analysis tool to predict the time-dependent orbital XRF spectral distributions from planetary surfaces throughout the mapping phase.

  12. Do planetary seasons play a role in attaining stable climates?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper Wibeck; Bohr, Jakob

    2018-01-01

    A simple phenomenological account for planetary climate instabilities is presented. The description is based on the standard model where the balance of incoming stellar radiation and outward thermal radiation is described by the effective planet temperature. Often, it is found to have three diffe...

  13. New and misclassified planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohoutek, L.

    1978-01-01

    Since the 'Catalogue of Galactic Planetary Nebulae' 226 new objects have been classified as planetary nebulae. They are summarized in the form of designations, names, coordinates and the references to the discovery. Further 9 new objects have been added and called 'proto-planetary nebulae', but their status is still uncertain. Only 34 objects have been included in the present list of misclassified planetary nebulae although the number of doubtful cases is much larger. (Auth.)

  14. Dust in planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    The author's review concentrates on theoretical aspects of dust in planetary nebulae (PN). He considers the questions: how much dust is there is PN; what is its composition; what effects does it have on the ionization structure, on the dynamics of the nebula. (Auth.)

  15. The planetary scientist's companion

    CERN Document Server

    Lodders, Katharina

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive and practical book of facts and data about the Sun, planets, asteroids, comets, meteorites, the Kuiper belt and Centaur objects in our solar system. Also covered are properties of nearby stars, the interstellar medium, and extra-solar planetary systems.

  16. Experience with the Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, E M.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, N.B., (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport provides a powerful research and design tool that resembles in many aspects laboratory experiments. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations can provide an insight not attainable in the laboratory. However, the Monte Carlo method has its limitations, which if not taken into account can result in misleading conclusions. This paper will present the experience of this author, over almost three decades, in the use of the Monte Carlo method for a variety of applications. Examples will be shown on how the method was used to explore new ideas, as a parametric study and design optimization tool, and to analyze experimental data. The consequences of not accounting in detail for detector response and the scattering of radiation by surrounding structures are two of the examples that will be presented to demonstrate the pitfall of condensed.

  17. Experience with the Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, E.M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport provides a powerful research and design tool that resembles in many aspects laboratory experiments. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations can provide an insight not attainable in the laboratory. However, the Monte Carlo method has its limitations, which if not taken into account can result in misleading conclusions. This paper will present the experience of this author, over almost three decades, in the use of the Monte Carlo method for a variety of applications. Examples will be shown on how the method was used to explore new ideas, as a parametric study and design optimization tool, and to analyze experimental data. The consequences of not accounting in detail for detector response and the scattering of radiation by surrounding structures are two of the examples that will be presented to demonstrate the pitfall of condensed

  18. SPEX: the Spectropolarimeter for Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietjens, J. H. H.; Snik, F.; Stam, D. M.; Smit, J. M.; van Harten, G.; Keller, C. U.; Verlaan, A. L.; Laan, E. C.; ter Horst, R.; Navarro, R.; Wielinga, K.; Moon, S. G.; Voors, R.

    2017-11-01

    We present SPEX, the Spectropolarimeter for Planetary Exploration, which is a compact, robust and low-mass spectropolarimeter designed to operate from an orbiting or in situ platform. Its purpose is to simultaneously measure the radiance and the state (degree and angle) of linear polarization of sunlight that has been scattered in a planetary atmosphere and/or reflected by a planetary surface with high accuracy. The degree of linear polarization is extremely sensitive to the microphysical properties of atmospheric or surface particles (such as size, shape, and composition), and to the vertical distribution of atmospheric particles, such as cloud top altitudes. Measurements as those performed by SPEX are therefore crucial and often the only tool for disentangling the many parameters that describe planetary atmospheres and surfaces. SPEX uses a novel, passive method for its radiance and polarization observations that is based on a carefully selected combination of polarization optics. This method, called spectral modulation, is the modulation of the radiance spectrum in both amplitude and phase by the degree and angle of linear polarization, respectively. The polarization optics consists of an achromatic quarter-wave retarder, an athermal multiple-order retarder, and a polarizing beam splitter. We will show first results obtained with the recently developed prototype of the SPEX instrument, and present a performance analysis based on a dedicated vector radiative transport model together with a recently developed SPEX instrument simulator.

  19. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  20. Igo - A Monte Carlo Code For Radiotherapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, M.; Regev, D.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver a lethal dose to the tumor, while minimizing the dose to normal tissues and vital organs. To carry out this task, it is critical to calculate correctly the 3-D dose delivered. Monte Carlo transport methods (especially the Adjoint Monte Carlo have the potential to provide more accurate predictions of the 3-D dose the currently used methods. IG0 is a Monte Carlo code derived from the general Monte Carlo Program - MCNP, tailored specifically for calculating the effects of radiation therapy. This paper describes the IG0 transport code, the PIG0 interface and some preliminary results

  1. TH-AB-207A-07: Radiation Dose Simulation for a Newly Proposed Dynamic Bowtie Filters for CT Using Fast Monte Carlo Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T; Lin, H; Gao, Y; Caracappa, P; Wang, G; Cong, W; Xu, X [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dynamic bowtie filter is an innovative design capable of modulating the X-ray and balancing the flux in the detectors, and it introduces a new way of patient-specific CT scan optimizations. This study demonstrates the feasibility of performing fast Monte Carlo dose calculation for a type of dynamic bowtie filter for cone-beam CT (Liu et al. 2014 9(7) PloS one) using MIC coprocessors. Methods: The dynamic bowtie filter in question consists of a highly attenuating bowtie component (HB) and a weakly attenuating bowtie (WB). The HB is filled with CeCl3 solution and its surface is defined by a transcendental equation. The WB is an elliptical cylinder filled with air and immersed in the HB. As the scanner rotates, the orientation of WB remains the same with the static patient. In our Monte Carlo simulation, the HB was approximated by 576 boxes. The phantom was a voxelized elliptical cylinder composed of PMMA and surrounded by air (44cm×44cm×40cm, 1000×1000×1 voxels). The dose to the PMMA phantom was tallied with 0.15% statistical uncertainty under 100 kVp source. Two Monte Carlo codes ARCHER and MCNP-6.1 were compared. Both used double-precision. Compiler flags that may trade accuracy for speed were avoided. Results: The wall time of the simulation was 25.4 seconds by ARCHER on a 5110P MIC, 40 seconds on a X5650 CPU, and 523 seconds by the multithreaded MCNP on the same CPU. The high performance of ARCHER is attributed to the parameterized geometry and vectorization of the program hotspots. Conclusion: The dynamic bowtie filter modeled in this study is able to effectively reduce the dynamic range of the detected signals for the photon-counting detectors. With appropriate software optimization methods, the accelerator-based (MIC and GPU) Monte Carlo dose engines have shown good performance and can contribute to patient-specific CT scan optimizations.

  2. Formation of planetary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahic, A.

    1982-01-01

    It seemed appropriate to devote the 1980 School to the origin of the solar system and more particularly to the formation of planetary systems (dynamic accretion processes, small bodies, planetary rings, etc...) and to the physics and chemistry of planetary interiors, surface and atmospheres (physical and chemical constraints associated with their formation). This Summer School enabled both young researchers and hard-nosed scientists, gathered together in idyllic surroundings, to hold numerous discussions, to lay the foundations for future cooperation, to acquire an excellent basic understanding, and to make many useful contacts. This volume reflects the lectures and presentations that were delivered in this Summer School setting. It is aimed at both advanced students and research workers wishing to specialize in planetology. Every effort has been made to give an overview of the basic knowledge required in order to gain a better understanding of the origin of the solar system. Each article has been revised by one or two referees whom I would like to thank for their assistance. Between the end of the School in August 1980 and the publication of this volume in 1982, the Voyager probes have returned a wealth of useful information. Some preliminary results have been included for completeness

  3. The effect of carbon monoxide on planetary haze formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hörst, S. M.; Tolbert, M. A, E-mail: sarah.horst@colorado.edu [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-01-20

    Organic haze plays a key role in many planetary processes ranging from influencing the radiation budget of an atmosphere to serving as a source of prebiotic molecules on the surface. Numerous experiments have investigated the aerosols produced by exposing mixtures of N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} to a variety of energy sources. However, many N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} atmospheres in both our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems also contain carbon monoxide (CO). We have conducted a series of atmosphere simulation experiments to investigate the effect of CO on the formation and particle size of planetary haze analogues for a range of CO mixing ratios using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that CO strongly affects both number density and particle size of the aerosols produced in our experiments and indicates that CO may play an important, previously unexplored, role in aerosol chemistry in planetary atmospheres.

  4. Low dose out-of-field radiotherapy, part 2: Calculating the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum from scattered radiation using Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrobala, A; Adamczyk, S; Kruszyna-Mochalska, M; Skórska, M; Konefał, A; Suchorska, W; Zaleska, K; Kowalik, A; Jackowiak, W; Malicki, J

    2017-08-01

    During radiotherapy, leakage from the machine head and collimator expose patients to out-of-field irradiation doses, which may cause secondary cancers. To quantify the risks of secondary cancers due to out-of-field doses, it is first necessary to measure these doses. Since most dosimeters are energy-dependent, it is essential to first determine the type of photon energy spectrum in the out-of-field area. The aim of this study was to determine the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum for a 6 MV photon beam using the GEANT 4-Monte Carlo method. A specially-designed large water phantom was simulated with a static field at gantry 0°. The source-to-surface distance was 92cm for an open field size of 10×10cm2. The photon energy spectra were calculated at five unique positions (at depths of 0.5, 1.6, 4, 6, 8, and 10cm) along the central beam axis and at six different off-axis distances. Monte Carlo simulations showed that mean radiation energy levels drop rapidly beyond the edge of the 6 MV photon beam field: at a distance of 10cm, the mean energy level is close to 0.3MeV versus 1.5MeV at the central beam axis. In some cases, the energy level actually increased even as the distance from the field edge increased: at a depth of 1.6cm and 15cm off-axis, the mean energy level was 0.205MeV versus 0.252MeV at 20cm off-axis. The out-of-field energy spectra and dose distribution data obtained in this study with Monte Carlo methods can be used to calibrate dosimeters to measure out-of-field radiation from 6MV photons. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Stochastic calculations for radiation risk assessment: a Monte-Carlo approach to the simulation of radiocesium transport in the pasture-cow-milk food chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathies, M; Eisfeld, K; Paretzke, H; Wirth, E [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H. Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz

    1981-05-01

    The effects of introducing probability distributions of the parameters in radionuclide transport models are investigated. Results from a Monte-Carlo simulation were presented for the transport of /sup 137/Cs via the pasture-cow-milk pathway, taking into the account the uncertainties and naturally occurring fluctuations in the rate constants. The results of the stochastic model calculations characterize the activity concentrations at a given time t and provide a great deal more information for analysis of the environmental transport of radionuclides than deterministic calculations in which the variation of parameters is not taken into consideration. Moreover the stochastic model permits an estimate of the variation of the physico-chemical behaviour of radionuclides in the environment in a more realistic way than by using only the highest transfer coefficients in deterministic approaches, which can lead to non-realistic overestimates of the probability with which high activity levels will be encountered.

  6. Use of Ionizing Radiation by the students of the Faculty of Odontology of the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala. Radiographic Techniques evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Montenegro, E.S. del

    2000-01-01

    In the present thesis an evaluation of the radiographic techniques was made by the students in the clinics of the Faculty of Odontology in the Universidad de San Carlos. The sample was 56 students of fourth and fifth year, an survey form was designed including information about radiographic technique, pacient, film seting up, cone alineation, furthermore exposure repetitions and its cause. It was conclude that paralelism technique is used by 46% of the students, 41% bicectriz technique, 13% both techniques, 100 % aleta mordible. Regarding to equipment set up previous to exposure 88% of the students sets the equipment in acceptable way, 88% used XCP accesory to hold the film without desinfection procedures and it was not set up properly. A 92% of the evaluated student had to repeat the exposures due to wrong application of radiographic techniques

  7. Evaluation of radiation exposure of workers caring for the patient after administration of radionuclide I-131 based on the Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudzietzova, J.; Sabol, J.; Fueloep, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the paper using the Monte Carlo method ( code MCNPX) were calculated absorbed doses in organs caregivers, from which thereafter was set the value of the equivalent dose in these organs by appropriate formulas and then effective doses in selected geometries using protective shielding devices. The results show that using of shielding aprons equivalent of 1 mm of lead will reduce the exposure of workers caring for patients after administration of the radionuclide I-131 by about 30%. If the caregiver without protective shielding aprons is located between two patients, the gamma rays will be reduced by about 18% due to averted body of caregiver, while the worker's personal dosimeter located at the chest will register approximately 40% lower value of personal dose equivalent. (authors)

  8. Monte Carlo simulations and radiation dosimetry measurements of 142Pr capillary tube-based radioactive implant (CTRI). A new structure for brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakht, M.K.; Haddadi, A.; Sadeghi, M.; Ahmadi, S.J.; Sadjadi, S.S.; Tenreiro, C.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, a promising β - -emitting praseodymium-142 glass seed was proposed for brachytherapy of prostate cancer. In accordance with the previous study, a 142 Pr capillary tube-based radioactive implant (CTRI) was suggested as a source with a new structure to enhance application of β - -emitting radioisotopes such as 142 Pr in brachytherapy. Praseodymium oxide powder was encapsulated in a glass capillary tube. Then, a thin and flexible fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon layer sealed the capillary tube. The source was activated in the Tehran Research Reactor by the 141 Pr(n, γ) 142 Pr reaction. Measurements of the dosimetric parameters were performed using GafChromic radiochromic film. In addition, the dose rate distribution of 142 Pr CTRI was calculated by modeling 142 Pr source in a water phantom using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP5) Code. The active source was unreactive and did not leak in water. In comparison with the earlier proposed 142 Pr seed, the suggested source showed similar desirable dosimetric characteristics. Moreover, the 142 Pr CTRI production procedure may be technically and economically more feasible. The mass of praseodymium in CTRI structure could be greater than that of the 142 Pr glass seed; therefore, the required irradiation time and the neutron flux could be reduced. A 142 Pr CTRI was proposed for brachytherapy of prostate cancer. The dosimetric calculations by the experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulation were performed to fulfill the requirements according to the American Association of Physicists in Medicine recommendations before the clinical use of new brachytherapy sources. The characteristics of the suggested source were compared with those of the previously proposed 142 Pr glass seed. (author)

  9. Robotic Planetary Drill Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Brian J.; Thompson, S.; Paulsen, G.

    2010-01-01

    Several proposed or planned planetary science missions to Mars and other Solar System bodies over the next decade require subsurface access by drilling. This paper discusses the problems of remote robotic drilling, an automation and control architecture based loosely on observed human behaviors in drilling on Earth, and an overview of robotic drilling field test results using this architecture since 2005. Both rotary-drag and rotary-percussive drills are targeted. A hybrid diagnostic approach incorporates heuristics, model-based reasoning and vibration monitoring with neural nets. Ongoing work leads to flight-ready drilling software.

  10. Topics in planetary plasmaspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    Contributions to the understanding of two distinct kinds of planetary plasmaspheres: namely the earth-type characterized by an ionospheric source and a convection limited radial extent, and the Jupiter-type characterized by a satellite source and a radial extent determined by flux tube interchange motions. In both cases the central question is the geometry of the plasma distribution in the magnetosphere as it is determined by the appropriate production and loss mechanisms. The contributions contained herein concern the explication and clarification of these production and loss mechanisms

  11. Planetary submillimeter spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    The aim is to develop a comprehensive observational and analytical program to study solar system physics and meterology by measuring molecular lines in the millimeter and submillimeter spectra of planets and comets. A primary objective is to conduct observations with new JPL and Caltech submillimeter receivers at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. A secondary objective is to continue to monitor the time variable planetary phenomena (e.g., Jupiter and Uranus) at centimeter wavelength using the NASA antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN).

  12. Europlanet Research Infrastructure: Planetary Simulation Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.; Mason, N. J.; Green, S.; Gómez, F.; Prieto, O.; Helbert, J.; Colangeli, L.; Srama, R.; Grande, M.; Merrison, J.

    2008-09-01

    EuroPlanet The Europlanet Research Infrastructure consortium funded under FP7 aims to provide the EU Planetary Science community greater access for to research infrastructure. A series of networking and outreach initiatives will be complimented by joint research activities and the formation of three Trans National Access distributed service laboratories (TNA's) to provide a unique and comprehensive set of analogue field sites, laboratory simulation facilities, and extraterrestrial sample analysis tools. Here we report on the infrastructure that comprises the second TNA; Planetary Simulation Facilities. 11 laboratory based facilities are able to recreate the conditions found in the atmospheres and on the surfaces of planetary systems with specific emphasis on Martian, Titan and Europa analogues. The strategy has been to offer some overlap in capabilities to ensure access to the highest number of users and to allow for progressive and efficient development strategies. For example initial testing of mobility capability prior to the step wise development within planetary atmospheres that can be made progressively more hostile through the introduction of extreme temperatures, radiation, wind and dust. Europlanet Research Infrastructure Facilties: Mars atmosphere simulation chambers at VUA and OU These relatively large chambers (up to 1 x 0.5 x 0.5 m) simulate Martian atmospheric conditions and the dual cooling options at VUA allows stabilised instrument temperatures while the remainder of the sample chamber can be varied between 220K and 350K. Researchers can therefore assess analytical protocols for instruments operating on Mars; e.g. effect of pCO2, temperature and material (e.g., ± ice) on spectroscopic and laser ablation techniques while monitoring the performance of detection technologies such as CCD at low T & variable p H2O & pCO2. Titan atmosphere and surface simulation chamber at OU The chamber simulates Titan's atmospheric composition under a range of

  13. Temperature variance study in Monte-Carlo photon transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorla, J.

    1985-10-01

    We study different Monte-Carlo methods for solving radiative transfer problems, and particularly Fleck's Monte-Carlo method. We first give the different time-discretization schemes and the corresponding stability criteria. Then we write the temperature variance as a function of the variances of temperature and absorbed energy at the previous time step. Finally we obtain some stability criteria for the Monte-Carlo method in the stationary case [fr

  14. Radiation heat transfer model using Monte Carlo ray tracing method on hierarchical ortho-Cartesian meshes and non-uniform rational basis spline surfaces for description of boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuczyński Paweł

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a solution of radiation heat transfer problems in enclosures filled with nonparticipating medium using ray tracing on hierarchical ortho-Cartesian meshes. The idea behind the approach is that radiative heat transfer problems can be solved on much coarser grids than their counterparts from computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The resulting code is designed as an add-on to OpenFOAM, an open-source CFD program. Ortho-Cartesian mesh involving boundary elements is created based upon CFD mesh. Parametric non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS surfaces are used to define boundaries of the enclosure, allowing for dealing with domains of complex shapes. Algorithm for determining random, uniformly distributed locations of rays leaving NURBS surfaces is described. The paper presents results of test cases assuming gray diffusive walls. In the current version of the model the radiation is not absorbed within gases. However, the ultimate aim of the work is to upgrade the functionality of the model, to problems in absorbing, emitting and scattering medium projecting iteratively the results of radiative analysis on CFD mesh and CFD solution on radiative mesh.

  15. Radiation Protection at the dental clinic of the Faculty of Dentistry of the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala in the year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiente, Dalsy

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis the procedures of radiation protection used by students of dentistry, also the infrastructure of equipment, protective barriers and protective devices at the clinic of the faculty was evaluated. A sample of 76 students and two technicians were evaluated, also 7 dental units with x-ray tubes were evaluated. The conclusions are that only 2 equipment of x-rays meets the requirements of radiation safety and radiology techniques used by the students need to be improved to obtain good image quality and therefore better diagnostic by the students could be made

  16. Structure of planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goad, L.E.

    1975-01-01

    Image-tube photographs of planetary nebulae taken through narrow-band interference filters are used to map the surface brightness of these nebulae in their most prominent emission lines. These observations are best understood in terms of a two-component model consisting of a tenuous diffuse nebular medium and a network of dense knots and filaments with neutral cores. The observations of the diffuse component indicate that the inner regions of these nebulae are hollow shells. This suggests that steady stellar winds are the dominant factor in determining the structure of the central regions of planetary nebulae. The observations of the filamentary components of NGC 40 and NGC 6720 show that the observed nebular features can result from the illumination of the inner edges of dense fragmentary neutral filaments by the central stars of these nebulae. From the analysis of the observations of the low-excitation lines in NGC 2392, it is concluded that the rate constant for the N + --H charge transfer reaction is less than 10 -12 cm 3 sec -1

  17. Lunar and Planetary Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, Alexander T.

    2018-05-01

    Lunar and planetary geology can be described using examples such as the geology of Earth (as the reference case) and geologies of the Earth's satellite the Moon; the planets Mercury, Mars and Venus; the satellite of Saturn Enceladus; the small stony asteroid Eros; and the nucleus of the comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Each body considered is illustrated by its global view, with information given as to its position in the solar system, size, surface, environment including gravity acceleration and properties of its atmosphere if it is present, typical landforms and processes forming them, materials composing these landforms, information on internal structure of the body, stages of its geologic evolution in the form of stratigraphic scale, and estimates of the absolute ages of the stratigraphic units. Information about one body may be applied to another body and this, in particular, has led to the discovery of the existence of heavy "meteoritic" bombardment in the early history of the solar system, which should also significantly affect Earth. It has been shown that volcanism and large-scale tectonics may have not only been an internal source of energy in the form of radiogenic decay of potassium, uranium and thorium, but also an external source in the form of gravity tugging caused by attractions of the neighboring bodies. The knowledge gained by lunar and planetary geology is important for planning and managing space missions and for the practical exploration of other bodies of the solar system and establishing manned outposts on them.

  18. Specialized Monte Carlo codes versus general-purpose Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, Vadim; DesRosiers, Colleen; Papiez, Lech; Lu, Xiaoyi

    2002-01-01

    The possibilities of Monte Carlo modeling for dose calculations and optimization treatment are quite limited in radiation oncology applications. The main reason is that the Monte Carlo technique for dose calculations is time consuming while treatment planning may require hundreds of possible cases of dose simulations to be evaluated for dose optimization. The second reason is that general-purpose codes widely used in practice, require an experienced user to customize them for calculations. This paper discusses the concept of Monte Carlo code design that can avoid the main problems that are preventing wide spread use of this simulation technique in medical physics. (authors)

  19. Monte Carlo methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardenet Rémi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Bayesian inference often requires integrating some function with respect to a posterior distribution. Monte Carlo methods are sampling algorithms that allow to compute these integrals numerically when they are not analytically tractable. We review here the basic principles and the most common Monte Carlo algorithms, among which rejection sampling, importance sampling and Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC methods. We give intuition on the theoretical justification of the algorithms as well as practical advice, trying to relate both. We discuss the application of Monte Carlo in experimental physics, and point to landmarks in the literature for the curious reader.

  20. 3D absorbed dose calculation with GATE Monte Carlo simulation for the image-guided radiation therapy dedicated to the small animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noblet, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Innovating irradiators dedicated to small animal allow to mimic clinical treatments in image-guided radiation therapy. Clinical practice is scaled down to the small animal by reducing beam dimensions (from cm to mm) and energy (from MeV to keV). Millimeter medium energy beams ( [fr

  1. Minimizing the background radiation in the new neutron time-of-flight facility at CERN FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations for the optimization of the n_TOF second experimental line

    CERN Document Server

    Bergström, Ida; Elfgren, Erik

    2013-06-11

    At the particle physics laboratory CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, the Neutron Time-of-Flight facility has recently started the construction of a second experimental line. The new neutron beam line will unavoidably induce radiation in both the experimental area and in nearby accessible areas. Computer simulations for the minimization of the background were carried out using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation package. The background radiation in the new experimental area needs to be kept to a minimum during measurements. This was studied with focus on the contributions from backscattering in the beam dump. The beam dump was originally designed for shielding the outside area using a block of iron covered in concrete. However, the backscattering was never studied in detail. In this thesis, the fluences (i.e. the flux integrated over time) of neutrons and photons were studied in the experimental area while the beam dump design was modified. An optimized design was obtained by stopping the fast neutrons in a high Z mat...

  2. Deuterons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, K.; Parker, D. E.; Friedberg, W.

    2011-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to deuterons ( 2 H + ) in the energy range 10 MeV -1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder TM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of the effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for the equivalent and effective dose incorporated a radiation weighting factor of 2. At 15 of 19 energies for which coefficients for the effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations differed by < 3 %. The greatest difference, 47 %, occurred at 30 MeV. (authors)

  3. BREM5 electroweak Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, D.C. II.

    1987-01-01

    This is an update on the progress of the BREMMUS Monte Carlo simulator, particularly in its current incarnation, BREM5. The present report is intended only as a follow-up to the Mark II/Granlibakken proceedings, and those proceedings should be consulted for a complete description of the capabilities and goals of the BREMMUS program. The new BREM5 program improves on the previous version of BREMMUS, BREM2, in a number of important ways. In BREM2, the internal loop (oblique) corrections were not treated in consistent fashion, a deficiency that led to renormalization scheme-dependence; i.e., physical results, such as cross sections, were dependent on the method used to eliminate infinities from the theory. Of course, this problem cannot be tolerated in a Monte Carlo designed for experimental use. BREM5 incorporates a new way of treating the oblique corrections, as explained in the Granlibakken proceedings, that guarantees renormalization scheme-independence and dramatically simplifies the organization and calculation of radiative corrections. This technique is to be presented in full detail in a forthcoming paper. BREM5 is, at this point, the only Monte Carlo to contain the entire set of one-loop corrections to electroweak four-fermion processes and renormalization scheme-independence. 3 figures

  4. Experimental study and Monte Carlo modeling of operational quantities in metrology of ionizing radiation: application to neutrons dosimetry by radio-photoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, Youbba-Ould

    2014-01-01

    We characterize a passive dosimeter capable of measuring both fast and thermal neutrons for ambient and personal dosimetry. These neutrons can be detected in a mixed neutron-gamma field with appropriate converters (polyethylene for fast neutrons, cadmium for thermal neutrons). Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX helped with the geometrical conception of the dosimeter and the choice of materials. The responses of the RPL dosimeter to these neutrons are linear in H * (10) and H p (10) with detection limits of 2 mSv for fast neutrons and 0.19 mSv for thermal neutrons. The angular dependencies are satisfactory according to the ISO 21909 norm. A calibration factor of (9.5 ± 0.5)*10 -2 mSv.cm 2 /RPL signal is obtained to the fast neutrons of the IPHC's 241 Am-Be calibrator. This factor is (9.7 ± 0.3)*10 -3 mSv.cm 2 /RPL signal for the thermalized neutrons. (author)

  5. The Solar Connections Observatory for Planetary Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliversen, Ronald J.; Harris, Walter M.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connection theme roadmap calls for comparative study of how the planets, comets, and local interstellar medium (LISM) interact with the Sun and respond to solar variability. Through such a study we advance our understanding of basic physical plasma and gas dynamic processes, thus increasing our predictive capabilities for the terrestrial, planetary, and interplanetary environments where future remote and human exploration will occur. Because the other planets have lacked study initiatives comparable to the terrestrial ITM, LWS, and EOS programs, our understanding of the upper atmospheres and near space environments on these worlds is far less detailed than our knowledge of the Earth. To close this gap we propose a mission to study {\\it all) of the solar interacting bodies in our planetary system out to the heliopause with a single remote sensing space observatory, the Solar Connections Observatory for Planetary Environments (SCOPE). SCOPE consists of a binocular EUV/FUV telescope operating from a remote, driftaway orbit that provides sub-arcsecond imaging and broadband medium resolution spectro-imaging over the 55-290 nm bandpass, and high (R>10$^{5}$ resolution H Ly-$\\alpha$ emission line profile measurements of small scale planetary and wide field diffuse solar system structures. A key to the SCOPE approach is to include Earth as a primary science target. From its remote vantage point SCOPE will be able to observe auroral emission to and beyond the rotational pole. The other planets and comets will be monitored in long duration campaigns centered when possible on solar opposition when interleaved terrestrial-planet observations can be used to directly compare the response of both worlds to the same solar wind stream and UV radiation field. Using a combination of observations and MHD models, SCOPE will isolate the different controlling parameters in each planet system and gain insight into the underlying physical processes that define the

  6. Technology under Planetary Protection Research (PPR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Planetary protection involves preventing biological contamination on both outbound and sample return missions to other planetary bodies. Numerous areas of research...

  7. TU-EF-304-10: Efficient Multiscale Simulation of the Proton Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for DNA Double Strand Break (DSB) Induction and Bio-Effective Dose in the FLUKA Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, V; Tsiamas, P; Axente, M; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Stewart, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: One of the more critical initiating events for reproductive cell death is the creation of a DNA double strand break (DSB). In this study, we present a computationally efficient way to determine spatial variations in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton therapy beams within the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. Methods: We used the independently tested Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) developed by Stewart and colleagues (Radiat. Res. 176, 587–602 2011) to estimate the RBE for DSB induction of monoenergetic protons, tritium, deuterium, hellium-3, hellium-4 ions and delta-electrons. The dose-weighted (RBE) coefficients were incorporated into FLUKA to determine the equivalent {sup 6}°60Co γ-ray dose for representative proton beams incident on cells in an aerobic and anoxic environment. Results: We found that the proton beam RBE for DSB induction at the tip of the Bragg peak, including primary and secondary particles, is close to 1.2. Furthermore, the RBE increases laterally to the beam axis at the area of Bragg peak. At the distal edge, the RBE is in the range from 1.3–1.4 for cells irradiated under aerobic conditions and may be as large as 1.5–1.8 for cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. Across the plateau region, the recorded RBE for DSB induction is 1.02 for aerobic cells and 1.05 for cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. The contribution to total effective dose from secondary heavy ions decreases with depth and is higher at shallow depths (e.g., at the surface of the skin). Conclusion: Multiscale simulation of the RBE for DSB induction provides useful insights into spatial variations in proton RBE within pristine Bragg peaks. This methodology is potentially useful for the biological optimization of proton therapy for the treatment of cancer. The study highlights the need to incorporate spatial variations in proton RBE into proton therapy treatment plans.

  8. Rheology of planetary ices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, W.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-04-24

    The brittle and ductile rheology of ices of water, ammonia, methane, and other volatiles, in combination with rock particles and each other, have a primary influence of the evolution and ongoing tectonics of icy moons of the outer solar system. Laboratory experiments help constrain the rheology of solar system ices. Standard experimental techniques can be used because the physical conditions under which most solar system ices exist are within reach of conventional rock mechanics testing machines, adapted to the low subsolidus temperatures of the materials in question. The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of a decade-long experimental deformation program and to provide some background in deformation physics in order to lend some appreciation to the application of these measurements to the planetary setting.

  9. Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clampin, M.

    2007-06-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC will provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F type stars which cannot be found with RV techniques, and observe the inner spatial structure and colors of debris disks. The robust mission design is simple and flexible ensuring mission success while minimizing cost and risk. The science payload consists of a heritage optical telescope assembly (OTA), and visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) instrument.

  10. Dosimetric measurements and Monte Carlo simulation for achieving ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Research Articles Volume 74 Issue 3 March 2010 pp 457-468 ... Food irradiation; electron accelerator; Monte Carlo; dose uniformity. ... for radiation processing of food and medical products is being commissioned at our centre in Indore, India.

  11. Monte Carlo: Basics

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, K. P. N.

    2001-01-01

    An introduction to the basics of Monte Carlo is given. The topics covered include, sample space, events, probabilities, random variables, mean, variance, covariance, characteristic function, chebyshev inequality, law of large numbers, central limit theorem (stable distribution, Levy distribution), random numbers (generation and testing), random sampling techniques (inversion, rejection, sampling from a Gaussian, Metropolis sampling), analogue Monte Carlo and Importance sampling (exponential b...

  12. Solar planetary systems stardust to terrestrial and extraterrestrial planetary sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Asit B

    2017-01-01

    The authors have put forth great efforts in gathering present day knowledge about different objects within our solar system and universe. This book features the most current information on the subject with information acquired from noted scientists in this area. The main objective is to convey the importance of the subject and provide detailed information on the physical makeup of our planetary system and technologies used for research. Information on educational projects has also been included in the Radio Astronomy chapters.This information is a real plus for students and educators considering a career in Planetary Science or for increasing their knowledge about our planetary system

  13. On the treatment of ill-conditioned cases in the Monte Carlo library least-squares approach for inverse radiation analyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meric, Ilker; Johansen, Geir A.; Holstad, Marie B.; Mattingly, John; Gardner, Robin P.

    2012-05-01

    Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) has been and still is one of the major methods of choice for the elemental analysis of various bulk samples. This is mostly due to the fact that PGNAA offers a rapid, non-destructive and on-line means of sample interrogation. The quantitative analysis of the prompt gamma-ray data could, on the other hand, be performed either through the single peak analysis or the so-called Monte Carlo library least-squares (MCLLS) approach, of which the latter has been shown to be more sensitive and more accurate than the former. The MCLLS approach is based on the assumption that the total prompt gamma-ray spectrum of any sample is a linear combination of the contributions from the individual constituents or libraries. This assumption leads to, through the minimization of the chi-square value, a set of linear equations which has to be solved to obtain the library multipliers, a process that involves the inversion of the covariance matrix. The least-squares solution may be extremely uncertain due to the ill-conditioning of the covariance matrix. The covariance matrix will become ill-conditioned whenever, in the subsequent calculations, two or more libraries are highly correlated. The ill-conditioning will also be unavoidable whenever the sample contains trace amounts of certain elements or elements with significantly low thermal neutron capture cross-sections. In this work, a new iterative approach, which can handle the ill-conditioning of the covariance matrix, is proposed and applied to a hydrocarbon multiphase flow problem in which the parameters of interest are the separate amounts of the oil, gas, water and salt phases. The results of the proposed method are also compared with the results obtained through the implementation of a well-known regularization method, the truncated singular value decomposition. Final calculations indicate that the proposed approach would be able to treat ill-conditioned cases appropriately.

  14. SU-F-T-375: Optimization of a New Co-60 Machine for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: A Monte Carlo Characterization Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, O; Fan, J; Tahanout, F; Eldib, A; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a wide range of dose output for intensity modulation purposes while minimizing the beam penumbra for a new rotating cobalt therapy system. The highest dose rate needs to be maximized as well. Methods: The GEPTS Monte Carlo system is used to calculate the dose distribution from each tested Co-60 head for a wide range of field sizes (1×1 to 40×40 cm2). This includes the transport of photons (and secondary electrons) from the source through the collimation system (primary collimator, Y and × jaws, and MLCs) and finally in the water phantom. Photon transport includes Compton scattering (with electron binding effect), Rayleigh scattering, Photoelectric effect (with detailed simulation of fluorescence x-rays). Calculations are done for different system designs to reduce geometric penumbra and provide dose output modulation. Results: Taking into account different clinical requirements, the choice of a movable head (SAD = 70 to 80 cm) is made. The 120-leaf MLC (6-cm thick) entrance is at 32 cm from the bottom of the source (to reduce penumbra while allowing larger patient clearance). Three system designs (refereed here as S1–3) were simulated with different effective source sizes (2mm, 10mm and 17mm diameter). The effective point source is at mid-height of the 25-mm-long source. Using a 12000-Ci source, the designed Co-60 head can deliver a wide range of dose outputs (0.5 − 4 Gy/mn). A dose output of 2.2 Gy/mn can be delivered for a 10cm × 10cm field size with 1-cm penumbra using a 10mm effective source. Conclusion: A new 60Co-based VMAT machine is designed to meet different clinical requirements in term of dose output and beam penumbra. Outcomes from this study can be used for the design of 60Co machines for which a renewed interest is seen.

  15. Simulation of image detectors in radiology for determination of scatter-to-primary ratios using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP/MCNPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smans, Kristien; Zoetelief, Johannes; Verbrugge, Beatrijs; Haeck, Wim; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Bosmans, Hilde

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and validate three methods to simulate radiographic image detectors with the Monte Carlo software MCNP/MCNPX in a time efficient way. The first detector model was the standard semideterministic radiography tally, which has been used in previous image simulation studies. Next to the radiography tally two alternative stochastic detector models were developed: A perfect energy integrating detector and a detector based on the energy absorbed in the detector material. Validation of three image detector models was performed by comparing calculated scatter-to-primary ratios (SPRs) with the published and experimentally acquired SPR values. For mammographic applications, SPRs computed with the radiography tally were up to 44% larger than the published results, while the SPRs computed with the perfect energy integrating detectors and the blur-free absorbed energy detector model were, on the average, 0.3% (ranging from -3% to 3%) and 0.4% (ranging from -5% to 5%) lower, respectively. For general radiography applications, the radiography tally overestimated the measured SPR by as much as 46%. The SPRs calculated with the perfect energy integrating detectors were, on the average, 4.7% (ranging from -5.3% to -4%) lower than the measured SPRs, whereas for the blur-free absorbed energy detector model, the calculated SPRs were, on the average, 1.3% (ranging from -0.1% to 2.4%) larger than the measured SPRs. For mammographic applications, both the perfect energy integrating detector model and the blur-free energy absorbing detector model can be used to simulate image detectors, whereas for conventional x-ray imaging using higher energies, the blur-free energy absorbing detector model is the most appropriate image detector model. The radiography tally overestimates the scattered part and should therefore not be used to simulate radiographic image detectors.

  16. Configuration and validation of an analytical model predicting secondary neutron radiation in proton therapy using Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, J; Bonfrate, A; De Marzi, L; De Oliveira, A; Delacroix, S; Martinetti, F; Trompier, F; Clairand, I

    2015-05-01

    This study focuses on the configuration and validation of an analytical model predicting leakage neutron doses in proton therapy. Using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, a facility-specific analytical model was built to reproduce out-of-field neutron doses while separately accounting for the contribution of intra-nuclear cascade, evaporation, epithermal and thermal neutrons. This model was first trained to reproduce in-water neutron absorbed doses and in-air neutron ambient dose equivalents, H*(10), calculated using MCNPX. Its capacity in predicting out-of-field doses at any position not involved in the training phase was also checked. The model was next expanded to enable a full 3D mapping of H*(10) inside the treatment room, tested in a clinically relevant configuration and finally consolidated with experimental measurements. Following the literature approach, the work first proved that it is possible to build a facility-specific analytical model that efficiently reproduces in-water neutron doses and in-air H*(10) values with a maximum difference less than 25%. In addition, the analytical model succeeded in predicting out-of-field neutron doses in the lateral and vertical direction. Testing the analytical model in clinical configurations proved the need to separate the contribution of internal and external neutrons. The impact of modulation width on stray neutrons was found to be easily adjustable while beam collimation remains a challenging issue. Finally, the model performance agreed with experimental measurements with satisfactory results considering measurement and simulation uncertainties. Analytical models represent a promising solution that substitutes for time-consuming MC calculations when assessing doses to healthy organs. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. On the treatment of ill-conditioned cases in the Monte Carlo library least-squares approach for inverse radiation analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meric, Ilker; Johansen, Geir A; Holstad, Marie B; Mattingly, John; Gardner, Robin P

    2012-01-01

    Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) has been and still is one of the major methods of choice for the elemental analysis of various bulk samples. This is mostly due to the fact that PGNAA offers a rapid, non-destructive and on-line means of sample interrogation. The quantitative analysis of the prompt gamma-ray data could, on the other hand, be performed either through the single peak analysis or the so-called Monte Carlo library least-squares (MCLLS) approach, of which the latter has been shown to be more sensitive and more accurate than the former. The MCLLS approach is based on the assumption that the total prompt gamma-ray spectrum of any sample is a linear combination of the contributions from the individual constituents or libraries. This assumption leads to, through the minimization of the chi-square value, a set of linear equations which has to be solved to obtain the library multipliers, a process that involves the inversion of the covariance matrix. The least-squares solution may be extremely uncertain due to the ill-conditioning of the covariance matrix. The covariance matrix will become ill-conditioned whenever, in the subsequent calculations, two or more libraries are highly correlated. The ill-conditioning will also be unavoidable whenever the sample contains trace amounts of certain elements or elements with significantly low thermal neutron capture cross-sections. In this work, a new iterative approach, which can handle the ill-conditioning of the covariance matrix, is proposed and applied to a hydrocarbon multiphase flow problem in which the parameters of interest are the separate amounts of the oil, gas, water and salt phases. The results of the proposed method are also compared with the results obtained through the implementation of a well-known regularization method, the truncated singular value decomposition. Final calculations indicate that the proposed approach would be able to treat ill-conditioned cases appropriately. (paper)

  18. Current and future applications of Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The use of radionuclides in medicine has a long history and encompasses a large area of applications including diagnosis and radiation treatment of cancer patients using either external or radionuclide radiotherapy. The 'Monte Carlo method'describes a very broad area of science, in which many processes, physical systems, and phenomena are simulated by statistical methods employing random numbers. The general idea of Monte Carlo analysis is to create a model, which is as similar as possible to the real physical system of interest, and to create interactions within that system based on known probabilities of occurrence, with random sampling of the probability density functions (pdfs). As the number of individual events (called 'histories') is increased, the quality of the reported average behavior of the system improves, meaning that the statistical uncertainty decreases. The use of the Monte Carlo method to simulate radiation transport has become the most accurate means of predicting absorbed dose distributions and other quantities of interest in the radiation treatment of cancer patients using either external or radionuclide radiotherapy. The same trend has occurred for the estimation of the absorbed dose in diagnostic procedures using radionuclides as well as the assessment of image quality and quantitative accuracy of radionuclide imaging. As a consequence of this generalized use, many questions are being raised primarily about the need and potential of Monte Carlo techniques, but also about how accurate it really is, what would it take to apply it clinically and make it available widely to the nuclear medicine community at large. Many of these questions will be answered when Monte Carlo techniques are implemented and used for more routine calculations and for in-depth investigations. In this paper, the conceptual role of the Monte Carlo method is briefly introduced and followed by a survey of its different applications in diagnostic and therapeutic

  19. The impact of Monte Carlo simulation: a scientometric analysis of scholarly literature

    CERN Document Server

    Pia, Maria Grazia; Bell, Zane W; Dressendorfer, Paul V

    2010-01-01

    A scientometric analysis of Monte Carlo simulation and Monte Carlo codes has been performed over a set of representative scholarly journals related to radiation physics. The results of this study are reported and discussed. They document and quantitatively appraise the role of Monte Carlo methods and codes in scientific research and engineering applications.

  20. Kinematics of galactic planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiosa, M.I.; Khromov, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    The classical method of determining the components of the solar motion relative to the centroid of the system of planetary nebulae with known radial velocities is investigated. It is shown that this method is insensitive to random errors in the radial velocities and that low accuracy in determining the coordinates of the solar apex and motion results from the insufficient number of planetaries with measured radial velocities. The planetary nebulae are found not to satisfy well the law of differential galactic rotation with circular orbits. This is attributed to the elongation of their galactic orbits. A method for obtaining the statistical parallax of planetary nebulae is considered, and the parallax calculated from the tau components of their proper motion is shown to be the most reliable

  1. Calcium signals in planetary embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    The calcium-isotope composition of planetary bodies in the inner Solar System correlates with the masses of such objects. This finding could have implications for our understanding of how the Solar System formed.

  2. China's roadmap for planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yong; Yao, Zhonghua; Wan, Weixing

    2018-05-01

    China has approved or planned a string of several space exploration missions to be launched over the next decade. A new generation of planetary scientists in China is playing an important role in determining the scientific goals of future missions.

  3. SU-F-T-560: Measurement of Dose Blurring Effect Due to Respiratory Motion for Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Using Monte Carlo Based Calculation Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badkul, R; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Lominska, C; Wang, F; Ramanjappa, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Intra-fractional tumor motion due to respiration may potentially compromise dose delivery for SBRT of lung tumors. Even sufficient margins are used to ensure there is no geometric miss of target volume, there is potential dose blurring effect may present due to motion and could impact the tumor coverage if motions are larger. In this study we investigated dose blurring effect of open fields as well as Lung SBRT patients planned using 2 non-coplanar dynamic conformal arcs(NCDCA) and few conformal beams(CB) calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) based algorithm utilizing phantom with 2D-diode array(MapCheck) and ion-chamber. Methods: SBRT lung patients were planned on Brainlab-iPlan system using 4D-CT scan and ITV were contoured on MIP image set and verified on all breathing phase image sets to account for breathing motion and then 5mm margin was applied to generate PTV. Plans were created using two NCDCA and 4-5 CB 6MV photon calculated using XVMC MC-algorithm. 3 SBRT patients plans were transferred to phantom with MapCheck and 0.125cc ion-chamber inserted in the middle of phantom to calculate dose. Also open field 3×3, 5×5 and 10×10 were calculated on this phantom. Phantom was placed on motion platform with varying motion from 5, 10, 20 and 30 mm with duty cycle of 4 second. Measurements were carried out for open fields as well 3 patients plans at static and various degree of motions. MapCheck planar dose and ion-chamber reading were collected and compared with static measurements and computed values to evaluate the dosimetric effect on tumor coverage due to motion. Results: To eliminate complexity of patients plan 3 simple open fields were also measured to see the dose blurring effect with the introduction of motion. All motion measured ionchamber values were normalized to corresponding static value. For open fields 5×5 and 10×10 normalized central axis ion-chamber values were 1.00 for all motions but for 3×3 they were 1 up to 10mm motion and 0.97 and 0

  4. Planetary Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, Charles; Briggs, Stephen; Victor, David

    2016-07-01

    The climate is beginning to behave in unusual ways. The global temperature reached unprecedented highs in 2015 and 2016, which led climatologists to predict an enormous El Nino that would cure California's record drought. It did not happen the way they expected. That tells us just how unreliable temperature has become as an indicator of important aspects of climate change. The world needs to go beyond global temperature to a set of planetary vital signs. Politicians should not over focus policy on one indicator. They need to look at the balance of evidence. A coalition of scientists and policy makers should start to develop vital signs at once, since they should be ready at the entry into force of the Paris Agreement in 2020. But vital signs are only the beginning. The world needs to learn how to use the vast knowledge we will be acquiring about climate change and its impacts. Is it not time to use all the tools at hand- observations from space and ground networks; demographic, economic and societal measures; big data statistical techniques; and numerical models-to inform politicians, managers, and the public of the evolving risks of climate change at global, regional, and local scales? Should we not think in advance of an always-on social and information network that provides decision-ready knowledge to those who hold the responsibility to act, wherever they are, at times of their choosing?

  5. Earth and planetary sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetherill, G.W.; Drake, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    The earth is a dynamic body. The major surface manifestation of this dynamism has been fragmentation of the earth's outer shell and subsequent relative movement of the pieces on a large scale. Evidence for continental movement came from studies of geomagnetism. As the sea floor spreads and new crust is formed, it is magnetized with the polarity of the field at the time of its formation. The plate tectonics model explains the history, nature, and topography of the oceanic crust. When a lithospheric plate surmounted by continental crust collides with an oceanic lithosphere, it is the denser oceanic lithosphere that is subducted. Hence the ancient oceans have vanished and the knowledge of ancient earth will require deciphering the complex continental geological record. Geochemical investigation shows that the source region of continental rocks is not simply the depleted mantle that is characteristic of the source region of basalts produced at the oceanic ridges. The driving force of plate tectonics is convection within the earth, but much remains to be learned about the convection and interior of the earth. A brief discussion of planetary exploration is given

  6. Low cloud investigations for project FIRE: Island studies of cloud properties, surface radiation, and boundary layer dynamics. A simulation of the reflectivity over a stratocumulus cloud deck by the Monte Carlo method. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Lin, Ruei-Fong

    1993-01-01

    The radiation field over a broken stratocumulus cloud deck is simulated by the Monte Carlo method. We conducted four experiments to investigate the main factor for the observed shortwave reflectively over the FIRE flight 2 leg 5, in which reflectivity decreases almost linearly from the cloud center to cloud edge while the cloud top height and the brightness temperature remain almost constant through out the clouds. From our results, the geometry effect, however, did not contribute significantly to what has been observed. We found that the variation of the volume extinction coefficient as a function of its relative position in the cloud affects the reflectivity efficiently. Additional check of the brightness temperature of each experiment also confirms this conclusion. The cloud microphysical data showed some interesting features. We found that the cloud droplet spectrum is nearly log-normal distributed when the clouds were solid. However, whether the shift of cloud droplet spectrum toward the larger end is not certain. The decrease of number density from cloud center to cloud edges seems to have more significant effects on the optical properties.

  7. Monte Carlo study of the influence of energy spectra, mesh size, high Z element on dose and PVDR based on 1-D and 3-D heterogeneous mouse head phantom for Microbeam Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Jing, Jia; Xu, Liangfeng; Mao, Xiaoli

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of energy spectra, mesh sizes, high Z element on dose and PVDR in Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) based on 1-D analogy-mouse-head-model (1-D MHM) and 3-D voxel-mouse-head-phantom (3-D VMHP) by Monte Carlo simulation. A Microbeam-Array-Source-Model was implemented into EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc. The microbeam size is assumed to be 25μm, 50μm or 75μm in thickness and fixed 1mm in height with 200μmc-t-c. The influence of the energy spectra of ID17@ESRF and BMIT@CLS were investigated. The mesh size was optimized. PVDR in 1-D MHM and 3-D VMHP was compared with the homogeneous water phantom. The arc influence of 3-D VMHP filled with water (3-D VMHWP) was compared with the rectangle phantom. PVDR of the lower BMIT@CLS spectrum is 2.4times that of ID17@ESRF for lower valley dose. The optimized mesh is 5µm for 25µm, and 10µm for 50µm and 75µm microbeams with 200µmc-t-c. A 500μm skull layer could make PVDR difference up to 62.5% for 1-D MHM. However this influence is limited (influence is limited for the more depth (influence of 3-D heterogeneous media. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tritons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose, and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, K.; Parker, D. E.; Friedberg, W.

    2010-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to tritons ( 3 H + ) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder TM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and calculation of gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 3%. The greatest difference, 43%, occurred at 30 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the US Government 2010. (authors)

  9. Helions at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, K.; Parker, D. E.; Friedberg, W.

    2010-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to helions ( 3 He 2+ ) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Calculations were performed using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder TM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 2%. The greatest difference, 62%, occurred at 100 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the U.S. Government 2010. (authors)

  10. Variational Monte Carlo Technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 8. Variational Monte Carlo Technique: Ground State Energies of Quantum Mechanical Systems. Sukanta Deb. General Article Volume 19 Issue 8 August 2014 pp 713-739 ...

  11. Planetary Geologic Mapping Handbook - 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K. L.; Skinner, J. A.; Hare, T. M.

    2009-01-01

    Geologic maps present, in an historical context, fundamental syntheses of interpretations of the materials, landforms, structures, and processes that characterize planetary surfaces and shallow subsurfaces (e.g., Varnes, 1974). Such maps also provide a contextual framework for summarizing and evaluating thematic research for a given region or body. In planetary exploration, for example, geologic maps are used for specialized investigations such as targeting regions of interest for data collection and for characterizing sites for landed missions. Whereas most modern terrestrial geologic maps are constructed from regional views provided by remote sensing data and supplemented in detail by field-based observations and measurements, planetary maps have been largely based on analyses of orbital photography. For planetary bodies in particular, geologic maps commonly represent a snapshot of a surface, because they are based on available information at a time when new data are still being acquired. Thus the field of planetary geologic mapping has been evolving rapidly to embrace the use of new data and modern technology and to accommodate the growing needs of planetary exploration. Planetary geologic maps have been published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) since 1962 (Hackman, 1962). Over this time, numerous maps of several planetary bodies have been prepared at a variety of scales and projections using the best available image and topographic bases. Early geologic map bases commonly consisted of hand-mosaicked photographs or airbrushed shaded-relief views and geologic linework was manually drafted using mylar bases and ink drafting pens. Map publishing required a tedious process of scribing, color peel-coat preparation, typesetting, and photo-laboratory work. Beginning in the 1990s, inexpensive computing, display capability and user-friendly illustration software allowed maps to be drawn using digital tools rather than pen and ink, and mylar bases became obsolete

  12. The Premar Code for the Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation Transport In the Atmosphere; Il codice PREMAR per la simulazione Montecarlo del trasporto della radiazione dell`atmosfera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Borgia, M.G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Energia; Premuda, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bologna (Italy). Ist. FISBAT

    1997-03-01

    The Montecarlo code PREMAR is described, which allows the user to simulate the radiation transport in the atmosphere, in the ultraviolet-infrared frequency interval. A plan multilayer geometry is at present foreseen by the code, witch albedo possibility at the lower boundary surface. For a given monochromatic point source, the main quantities computed by the code are the absorption spatial distributions of aerosol and molecules, together with the related atmospheric transmittances. Moreover, simulation of of Lidar experiments are foreseen by the code, the source and telescope fields of view being assigned. To build-up the appropriate probability distributions, an input data library is assumed to be read by the code. For this purpose the radiance-transmittance LOWTRAN-7 code has been conveniently adapted as a source of the library so as to exploit the richness of information of the code for a large variety of atmospheric simulations. Results of applications of the PREMAR code are finally presented, with special reference to simulations of Lidar system and radiometer experiments carried out at the Brasimone ENEA Centre by the Environment Department.

  13. Time-dependent simulations of disk-embedded planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stökl, A.; Dorfi, E. A.

    2014-03-01

    At the early stages of evolution of planetary systems, young Earth-like planets still embedded in the protoplanetary disk accumulate disk gas gravitationally into planetary atmospheres. The established way to study such atmospheres are hydrostatic models, even though in many cases the assumption of stationarity is unlikely to be fulfilled. Furthermore, such models rely on the specification of a planetary luminosity, attributed to a continuous, highly uncertain accretion of planetesimals onto the surface of the solid core. We present for the first time time-dependent, dynamic simulations of the accretion of nebula gas into an atmosphere around a proto-planet and the evolution of such embedded atmospheres while integrating the thermal energy budget of the solid core. The spherical symmetric models computed with the TAPIR-Code (short for The adaptive, implicit RHD-Code) range from the surface of the rocky core up to the Hill radius where the surrounding protoplanetary disk provides the boundary conditions. The TAPIR-Code includes the hydrodynamics equations, gray radiative transport and convective energy transport. The results indicate that diskembedded planetary atmospheres evolve along comparatively simple outlines and in particular settle, dependent on the mass of the solid core, at characteristic surface temperatures and planetary luminosities, quite independent on numerical parameters and initial conditions. For sufficiently massive cores, this evolution ultimately also leads to runaway accretion and the formation of a gas planet.

  14. Planetary Transmission Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, David G. (Technical Monitor); Samuel, Paul D.; Conroy, Joseph K.; Pines, Darryll J.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a methodology for detecting and diagnosing gear faults in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission. This diagnostic technique is based on the constrained adaptive lifting algorithm. The lifting scheme, developed by Wim Sweldens of Bell Labs, is a time domain, prediction-error realization of the wavelet transform that allows for greater flexibility in the construction of wavelet bases. Classic lifting analyzes a given signal using wavelets derived from a single fundamental basis function. A number of researchers have proposed techniques for adding adaptivity to the lifting scheme, allowing the transform to choose from a set of fundamental bases the basis that best fits the signal. This characteristic is desirable for gear diagnostics as it allows the technique to tailor itself to a specific transmission by selecting a set of wavelets that best represent vibration signals obtained while the gearbox is operating under healthy-state conditions. However, constraints on certain basis characteristics are necessary to enhance the detection of local wave-form changes caused by certain types of gear damage. The proposed methodology analyzes individual tooth-mesh waveforms from a healthy-state gearbox vibration signal that was generated using the vibration separation (synchronous signal-averaging) algorithm. Each waveform is separated into analysis domains using zeros of its slope and curvature. The bases selected in each analysis domain are chosen to minimize the prediction error, and constrained to have the same-sign local slope and curvature as the original signal. The resulting set of bases is used to analyze future-state vibration signals and the lifting prediction error is inspected. The constraints allow the transform to effectively adapt to global amplitude changes, yielding small prediction errors. However, local wave-form changes associated with certain types of gear damage are poorly adapted, causing a significant change in the

  15. Dust Dynamics Near Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Joshua; Hughes, Anna; Grund, Chris

    Observations of a lunar "horizon glow" by several Surveyor spacecraft in the 1960s opened the study of the dynamics of charged dust particles near planetary surfaces. The surfaces of the Moon and other airless planetary bodies in the solar system (asteroids, and other moons) are directly exposed to the solar wind and ionizing solar ultraviolet radiation, resulting in a time-dependent electric surface potential. Because these same objects are also exposed to bombardment by micrometeoroids, the surfaces are usually characterized by a power-law size distribution of dust that extends to sub-micron-sized particles. Individual particles can acquire a charge different from their surroundings leading to electrostatic levitation. Once levitated, particles may simply return to the surface on nearly ballistic trajectories, escape entirely from the moon or asteroid if the initial velocity is large, or in some cases be stably levitated for extended periods of time. All three outcomes have observable consequences. Furthermore, the behavior of charged dust near the surface has practical implications for planned future manned and unmanned activities on the lunar surface. Charged dust particles also act as sensitive probes of the near-surface plasma environment. Recent numerical modeling of dust levitation and transport show that charged micron-sized dust is likely to accumulate in topographic lows such as craters, providing a mechanism for the creation of dust "ponds" observed on the asteroid 433 Eros. Such deposition can occur when particles are supported by the photoelectron sheath above the dayside and drift over shadowed regions of craters where the surface potential is much smaller. Earlier studies of the lunar horizon glow are consistent with those particles being on simple ballistic trajectories following electrostatic launching from the surface. Smaller particles may be accelerated from the lunar surface to high altitudes consistent with observations of high altitude

  16. A critical evaluation of secondary cancer risk models applied to Monte Carlo dose distributions of 2-dimensional, 3-dimensional conformal and hybrid intensity-modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joosten, A; Bochud, F; Moeckli, R

    2014-01-01

    The comparison of radiotherapy techniques regarding secondary cancer risk has yielded contradictory results possibly stemming from the many different approaches used to estimate risk. The purpose of this study was to make a comprehensive evaluation of different available risk models applied to detailed whole-body dose distributions computed by Monte Carlo for various breast radiotherapy techniques including conventional open tangents, 3D conformal wedged tangents and hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). First, organ-specific linear risk models developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII committee were applied to mean doses for remote organs only and all solid organs. Then, different general non-linear risk models were applied to the whole body dose distribution. Finally, organ-specific non-linear risk models for the lung and breast were used to assess the secondary cancer risk for these two specific organs. A total of 32 different calculated absolute risks resulted in a broad range of values (between 0.1% and 48.5%) underlying the large uncertainties in absolute risk calculation. The ratio of risk between two techniques has often been proposed as a more robust assessment of risk than the absolute risk. We found that the ratio of risk between two techniques could also vary substantially considering the different approaches to risk estimation. Sometimes the ratio of risk between two techniques would range between values smaller and larger than one, which then translates into inconsistent results on the potential higher risk of one technique compared to another. We found however that the hybrid IMRT technique resulted in a systematic reduction of risk compared to the other techniques investigated even though the magnitude of this reduction varied substantially with the different approaches investigated. Based on the epidemiological data available, a reasonable

  17. SU-F-BRD-02: Application of ARCHERRT-- A GPU-Based Monte Carlo Dose Engine for Radiation Therapy -- to Tomotherapy and Patient-Independent IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, L; Du, X; Liu, T; Xu, X [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Yang, Y; Bednarz, B [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Sterpin, E [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: As a module of ARCHER -- Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments, ARCHER{sub RT} is designed for RadioTherapy (RT) dose calculation. This paper describes the application of ARCHERRT on patient-dependent TomoTherapy and patient-independent IMRT. It also conducts a 'fair' comparison of different GPUs and multicore CPU. Methods: The source input used for patient-dependent TomoTherapy is phase space file (PSF) generated from optimized plan. For patient-independent IMRT, the open filed PSF is used for different cases. The intensity modulation is simulated by fluence map. The GEANT4 code is used as benchmark. DVH and gamma index test are employed to evaluate the accuracy of ARCHER{sub RT} code. Some previous studies reported misleading speedups by comparing GPU code with serial CPU code. To perform a fairer comparison, we write multi-thread code with OpenMP to fully exploit computing potential of CPU. The hardware involved in this study are a 6-core Intel E5-2620 CPU and 6 NVIDIA M2090 GPUs, a K20 GPU and a K40 GPU. Results: Dosimetric results from ARCHER{sub RT} and GEANT4 show good agreement. The 2%/2mm gamma test pass rates for different clinical cases are 97.2% to 99.7%. A single M2090 GPU needs 50~79 seconds for the simulation to achieve a statistical error of 1% in the PTV. The K40 card is about 1.7∼1.8 times faster than M2090 card. Using 6 M2090 card, the simulation can be finished in about 10 seconds. For comparison, Intel E5-2620 needs 507∼879 seconds for the same simulation. Conclusion: We successfully applied ARCHER{sub RT} to Tomotherapy and patient-independent IMRT, and conducted a fair comparison between GPU and CPU performance. The ARCHER{sub RT} code is both accurate and efficient and may be used towards clinical applications.

  18. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options.

  19. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options

  20. Monte Carlo codes and Monte Carlo simulator program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Kenji; Asai, Kiyoshi; Suganuma, Masayuki.

    1990-03-01

    Four typical Monte Carlo codes KENO-IV, MORSE, MCNP and VIM have been vectorized on VP-100 at Computing Center, JAERI. The problems in vector processing of Monte Carlo codes on vector processors have become clear through the work. As the result, it is recognized that these are difficulties to obtain good performance in vector processing of Monte Carlo codes. A Monte Carlo computing machine, which processes the Monte Carlo codes with high performances is being developed at our Computing Center since 1987. The concept of Monte Carlo computing machine and its performance have been investigated and estimated by using a software simulator. In this report the problems in vectorization of Monte Carlo codes, Monte Carlo pipelines proposed to mitigate these difficulties and the results of the performance estimation of the Monte Carlo computing machine by the simulator are described. (author)

  1. Instrumentation For Multiple Radiation Detection Based On Novel Mercurous Halides For Nuclear Planetology, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation detectors that sense gamma and neutron radiation are critical to the exploration of planetary surface composition. Among the key technological challenges...

  2. Planetary Torque in 3D Isentropic Disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Masset, Frédéric; Velasco, David; Lega, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Planetary migration is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) problem, because Earth-size planetary cores are deeply embedded in protoplanetary disks. Simulations of these 3D disks remain challenging due to the steep resolution requirements. Using two different hydrodynamics codes, FARGO3D and PEnGUIn, we simulate disk–planet interaction for a one to five Earth-mass planet embedded in an isentropic disk. We measure the torque on the planet and ensure that the measurements are converged both in resolution and between the two codes. We find that the torque is independent of the smoothing length of the planet’s potential ( r s ), and that it has a weak dependence on the adiabatic index of the gaseous disk ( γ ). The torque values correspond to an inward migration rate qualitatively similar to previous linear calculations. We perform additional simulations with explicit radiative transfer using FARGOCA, and again find agreement between 3D simulations and existing torque formulae. We also present the flow pattern around the planets that show active flow is present within the planet’s Hill sphere, and meridional vortices are shed downstream. The vertical flow speed near the planet is faster for a smaller r s or γ , up to supersonic speeds for the smallest r s and γ in our study.

  3. Planetary Torque in 3D Isentropic Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Jeffrey [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Masset, Frédéric; Velasco, David [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Av. Universidad s/n, 62210 Cuernavaca, Mor. (Mexico); Lega, Elena, E-mail: jeffrey.fung@berkeley.edu [Université de la Côte d’Azur, Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur, CNRS, Laboratoire Lagrange UMR 7293, Nice (France)

    2017-03-01

    Planetary migration is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) problem, because Earth-size planetary cores are deeply embedded in protoplanetary disks. Simulations of these 3D disks remain challenging due to the steep resolution requirements. Using two different hydrodynamics codes, FARGO3D and PEnGUIn, we simulate disk–planet interaction for a one to five Earth-mass planet embedded in an isentropic disk. We measure the torque on the planet and ensure that the measurements are converged both in resolution and between the two codes. We find that the torque is independent of the smoothing length of the planet’s potential ( r {sub s}), and that it has a weak dependence on the adiabatic index of the gaseous disk ( γ ). The torque values correspond to an inward migration rate qualitatively similar to previous linear calculations. We perform additional simulations with explicit radiative transfer using FARGOCA, and again find agreement between 3D simulations and existing torque formulae. We also present the flow pattern around the planets that show active flow is present within the planet’s Hill sphere, and meridional vortices are shed downstream. The vertical flow speed near the planet is faster for a smaller r {sub s} or γ , up to supersonic speeds for the smallest r {sub s} and γ in our study.

  4. Planetary Image Geometry Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Robert C.; Pariser, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library is a multi-mission library used for projecting images (EDRs, or Experiment Data Records) and managing their geometry for in-situ missions. A collection of models describes cameras and their articulation, allowing application programs such as mosaickers, terrain generators, and pointing correction tools to be written in a multi-mission manner, without any knowledge of parameters specific to the supported missions. Camera model objects allow transformation of image coordinates to and from view vectors in XYZ space. Pointing models, specific to each mission, describe how to orient the camera models based on telemetry or other information. Surface models describe the surface in general terms. Coordinate system objects manage the various coordinate systems involved in most missions. File objects manage access to metadata (labels, including telemetry information) in the input EDRs and RDRs (Reduced Data Records). Label models manage metadata information in output files. Site objects keep track of different locations where the spacecraft might be at a given time. Radiometry models allow correction of radiometry for an image. Mission objects contain basic mission parameters. Pointing adjustment ("nav") files allow pointing to be corrected. The object-oriented structure (C++) makes it easy to subclass just the pieces of the library that are truly mission-specific. Typically, this involves just the pointing model and coordinate systems, and parts of the file model. Once the library was developed (initially for Mars Polar Lander, MPL), adding new missions ranged from two days to a few months, resulting in significant cost savings as compared to rewriting all the application programs for each mission. Currently supported missions include Mars Pathfinder (MPF), MPL, Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix, and Mars Science Lab (MSL). Applications based on this library create the majority of operational image RDRs for those missions. A

  5. CERN honours Carlo Rubbia

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Carlo Rubbia turned 75 on March 31, and CERN held a symposium to mark his birthday and pay tribute to his impressive contribution to both CERN and science. Carlo Rubbia, 4th from right, together with the speakers at the symposium.On 7 April CERN hosted a celebration marking Carlo Rubbia’s 75th birthday and 25 years since he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics. "Today we will celebrate 100 years of Carlo Rubbia" joked CERN’s Director-General, Rolf Heuer in his opening speech, "75 years of his age and 25 years of the Nobel Prize." Rubbia received the Nobel Prize along with Simon van der Meer for contributions to the discovery of the W and Z bosons, carriers of the weak interaction. During the symposium, which was held in the Main Auditorium, several eminent speakers gave lectures on areas of science to which Carlo Rubbia made decisive contributions. Among those who spoke were Michel Spiro, Director of the French National Insti...

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opat, G.I.

    1977-07-01

    An outline of the technique of computer simulation of particle physics experiments by the Monte Carlo method is presented. Useful special purpose subprograms are listed and described. At each stage the discussion is made concrete by direct reference to the programs SIMUL8 and its variant MONTE-PION, written to assist in the analysis of the radiative decay experiments μ + → e + ν sub(e) antiνγ and π + → e + ν sub(e)γ, respectively. These experiments were based on the use of two large sodium iodide crystals, TINA and MINA, as e and γ detectors. Instructions for the use of SIMUL8 and MONTE-PION are given. (author)

  7. VARIATIONAL PRINCIPLE FOR PLANETARY INTERIORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Li; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, the number of confirmed planets has grown above 2000. It is clear that they represent a diversity of structures not seen in our own solar system. In addition to very detailed interior modeling, it is valuable to have a simple analytical framework for describing planetary structures. The variational principle is a fundamental principle in physics, entailing that a physical system follows the trajectory, which minimizes its action. It is alternative to the differential equation formulation of a physical system. Applying the variational principle to the planetary interior can beautifully summarize the set of differential equations into one, which provides us some insight into the problem. From this principle, a universal mass–radius relation, an estimate of the error propagation from the equation of state to the mass–radius relation, and a form of the virial theorem applicable to planetary interiors are derived.

  8. Robotic vehicles for planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Brian; Matthies, Larry; Gennery, Donald; Cooper, Brian; Nguyen, Tam; Litwin, Todd; Mishkin, Andrew; Stone, Henry

    1992-01-01

    A program to develop planetary rover technology is underway at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) under sponsorship of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Developmental systems with the necessary sensing, computing, power, and mobility resources to demonstrate realistic forms of control for various missions have been developed, and initial testing has been completed. These testbed systems and the associated navigation techniques used are described. Particular emphasis is placed on three technologies: Computer-Aided Remote Driving (CARD), Semiautonomous Navigation (SAN), and behavior control. It is concluded that, through the development and evaluation of such technologies, research at JPL has expanded the set of viable planetary rover mission possibilities beyond the limits of remotely teleoperated systems such as Lunakhod. These are potentially applicable to exploration of all the solid planetary surfaces in the solar system, including Mars, Venus, and the moons of the gas giant planets.

  9. Electrostatic Phenomena on Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos I.

    2017-02-01

    The diverse planetary environments in the solar system react in somewhat different ways to the encompassing influence of the Sun. These different interactions define the electrostatic phenomena that take place on and near planetary surfaces. The desire to understand the electrostatic environments of planetary surfaces goes beyond scientific inquiry. These environments have enormous implications for both human and robotic exploration of the solar system. This book describes in some detail what is known about the electrostatic environment of the solar system from early and current experiments on Earth as well as what is being learned from the instrumentation on the space exploration missions (NASA, European Space Agency, and the Japanese Space Agency) of the last few decades. It begins with a brief review of the basic principles of electrostatics.

  10. Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujol Mora, J.

    1999-01-01

    The exposition to ionizing radiations is a constant fact in the life of the human being and its utilization as diagnostic and therapeutic method is generalized. However, it is notorious how as years go on, the fear to the ionizing radiation seems to persist too, and this fact is not limited to the common individual, but to the technical personnel and professional personnel that labors with them same. (S. Grainger) [es

  11. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  12. Monte Carlo codes use in neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paquis, P.; Mokhtari, F.; Karamanoukian, D.; Pignol, J.P.; Cuendet, P.; Iborra, N.

    1998-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculation codes allow to study accurately all the parameters relevant to radiation effects, like the dose deposition or the type of microscopic interactions, through one by one particle transport simulation. These features are very useful for neutron irradiations, from device development up to dosimetry. This paper illustrates some applications of these codes in Neutron Capture Therapy and Neutron Capture Enhancement of fast neutrons irradiations. (authors)

  13. From Planetary Mapping to Map Production: Planetary Cartography as integral discipline in Planetary Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nass, Andrea; van Gasselt, Stephan; Hargitai, Hendrik; Hare, Trent; Manaud, Nicolas; Karachevtseva, Irina; Kersten, Elke; Roatsch, Thomas; Wählisch, Marita; Kereszturi, Akos

    2016-04-01

    Cartography is one of the most important communication channels between users of spatial information and laymen as well as the open public alike. This applies to all known real-world objects located either here on Earth or on any other object in our Solar System. In planetary sciences, however, the main use of cartography resides in a concept called planetary mapping with all its various attached meanings: it can be (1) systematic spacecraft observation from orbit, i.e. the retrieval of physical information, (2) the interpretation of discrete planetary surface units and their abstraction, or it can be (3) planetary cartography sensu strictu, i.e., the technical and artistic creation of map products. As the concept of planetary mapping covers a wide range of different information and knowledge levels, aims associated with the concept of mapping consequently range from a technical and engineering focus to a scientific distillation process. Among others, scientific centers focusing on planetary cartography are the United State Geological Survey (USGS, Flagstaff), the Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK, Moscow), Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE, Hungary), and the German Aerospace Center (DLR, Berlin). The International Astronomical Union (IAU), the Commission Planetary Cartography within International Cartographic Association (ICA), the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), the WG IV/8 Planetary Mapping and Spatial Databases within International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) and a range of other institutions contribute on definition frameworks in planetary cartography. Classical cartography is nowadays often (mis-)understood as a tool mainly rather than a scientific discipline and an art of communication. Consequently, concepts of information systems, mapping tools and cartographic frameworks are used interchangeably, and cartographic workflows and visualization of spatial information in thematic maps have often been

  14. Gravitational waves emitted by extrasolar planetary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berti, E.; Ferrari, V.

    2001-01-01

    The recently discovered Extrasolar Planetary Systems (EPS's) are potentially interesting sources of gravitational waves, since they are very close to Earth (at distances ∼ 10 pc), and their orbital features and positions in the sky are quite well known. As a first estimate, we compute the orbital emission of these systems using the quadrupole formula. Then we show that, in principle, the orbiting planet could resonantly excite the quasi-normal modes of the central star. We use the general-relativistic theory of stellar pulsations to estimate the effects of such a resonance on the gravitational-wave emission of the system. We also consider radiation-reaction effects on the orbital evolution, and give upper limits on the timescales required for a planet to get off-resonance. (author)

  15. POET: Planetary Orbital Evolution due to Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penev, Kaloyan

    2014-08-01

    POET (Planetary Orbital Evolution due to Tides) calculates the orbital evolution of a system consisting of a single star with a single planet in orbit under the influence of tides. The following effects are The evolutions of the semimajor axis of the orbit due to the tidal dissipation in the star and the angular momentum of the stellar convective envelope by the tidal coupling are taken into account. In addition, the evolution includes the transfer of angular momentum between the stellar convective and radiative zones, effect of the stellar evolution on the tidal dissipation efficiency, and stellar core and envelope spins and loss of stellar convective zone angular momentum to a magnetically launched wind. POET can be used out of the box, and can also be extended and modified.

  16. Handbook of cosmic hazards and planetary defense

    CERN Document Server

    Allahdadi, Firooz

    2015-01-01

    Covers in a comprehensive fashion all aspects of cosmic hazards and possible strategies for contending with these threats through a comprehensive planetary defense strategy. This handbook brings together in a single reference work a rich blend of information about the various types of cosmic threats that are posed to human civilization by asteroids, comets, bolides, meteors, solar flares and coronal mass ejections, cosmic radiation and other types of threats that are only recently beginning to be understood and studied, such as investigation of the “cracks” in the protective shield provided by the Van Allen belts and the geomagnetosphere, of matter-antimatter collisions, orbital debris and radiological or biological contamination. Some areas that are addressed involve areas about which there is a good deal of information that has been collected for many decades by multiple space missions run by many different space agencies, observatories and scientific researchers. Other areas involving research and ...

  17. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winther, J.F.; Ulbak, K.; Dreyer, L.; Pukkala, E.; Oesterlind, A.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  18. SPEX: The spectropolarimeter for planetary EXploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snik, F.; Rietjens, J.H.H.; Harten, G. van; Stam, D.M.; Keller, C.U.; Smit, J.M.; Laan, E.C.; Verlaan, A.L.; Horst, R. ter; Navarro, R.; Wielinga, K.; Moon, S.G.; Voors, R.

    2010-01-01

    SPEX (Spectropolarimeter for Planetary EXploration) is an innovative, compact instrument for spectropolarimetry, and in particular for detecting and characterizing aerosols in planetary atmospheres. With its ∼1-liter volume it is capable of full linear spectropolarimetry, without moving parts. The

  19. Red giants as precursors of planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renzini, A.

    1981-01-01

    It is generally accepted that Planetary Nebulae are produced by asymptotic giant-branch stars. Therefore, several properties of planetary nebulae are discussed in the framework of the current theory of stellar evolution. (Auth.)

  20. Carlo Caso (1940 - 2007)

    CERN Multimedia

    Leonardo Rossi

    Carlo Caso (1940 - 2007) Our friend and colleague Carlo Caso passed away on July 7th, after several months of courageous fight against cancer. Carlo spent most of his scientific career at CERN, taking an active part in the experimental programme of the laboratory. His long and fruitful involvement in particle physics started in the sixties, in the Genoa group led by G. Tomasini. He then made several experiments using the CERN liquid hydrogen bubble chambers -first the 2000HBC and later BEBC- to study various facets of the production and decay of meson and baryon resonances. He later made his own group and joined the NA27 Collaboration to exploit the EHS Spectrometer with a rapid cycling bubble chamber as vertex detector. Amongst their many achievements, they were the first to measure, with excellent precision, the lifetime of the charmed D mesons. At the start of the LEP era, Carlo and his group moved to the DELPHI experiment, participating in the construction and running of the HPC electromagnetic c...

  1. Variational Monte Carlo Technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ias

    on the development of nuclear weapons in Los Alamos ..... cantly improved the paper. ... Carlo simulations of solids, Reviews of Modern Physics, Vol.73, pp.33– ... The computer algorithms are usually based on a random seed that starts the ...

  2. Markov Chain Monte Carlo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 3. Markov Chain Monte Carlo - Examples. Arnab Chakraborty. General Article Volume 7 Issue 3 March 2002 pp 25-34. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/03/0025-0034. Keywords.

  3. NUEN-618 Class Project: Actually Implicit Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brunner, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-12-14

    This research describes a new method for the solution of the thermal radiative transfer (TRT) equations that is implicit in time which will be called Actually Implicit Monte Carlo (AIMC). This section aims to introduce the TRT equations, as well as the current workhorse method which is known as Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC). As the name of the method proposed here indicates, IMC is a misnomer in that it is only semi-implicit, which will be shown in this section as well.

  4. Monte Carlo methods and applications in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.

    1990-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods for studying few- and many-body quantum systems are introduced, with special emphasis given to their applications in nuclear physics. Variational and Green's function Monte Carlo methods are presented in some detail. The status of calculations of light nuclei is reviewed, including discussions of the three-nucleon-interaction, charge and magnetic form factors, the coulomb sum rule, and studies of low-energy radiative transitions. 58 refs., 12 figs

  5. Monte Carlo methods and applications in nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.

    1990-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods for studying few- and many-body quantum systems are introduced, with special emphasis given to their applications in nuclear physics. Variational and Green's function Monte Carlo methods are presented in some detail. The status of calculations of light nuclei is reviewed, including discussions of the three-nucleon-interaction, charge and magnetic form factors, the coulomb sum rule, and studies of low-energy radiative transitions. 58 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Number of planetary nebulae in our galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloin, D.; Cruz-Gonzalez, C.; Peimbert, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is found that the contribution to the ionization of the interstellar medium due to planetary nebulae is from one or two orders of magnitude smaller than that due to O stars. The mass return to the interstellar medium due to planetary nebulae is investigated, and the birth rate of white dwarfs and planetary nebulae are compared. Several arguments are given against the possibility that the infrared sources detected by Becklin and Neugebauer in the direction of the galactic center are planetary nebulae

  7. Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Lemieux, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    Presents essential tools for using quasi-Monte Carlo sampling in practice. This book focuses on issues related to Monte Carlo methods - uniform and non-uniform random number generation, variance reduction techniques. It covers several aspects of quasi-Monte Carlo methods.

  8. Virtual reality and planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Michael W.

    Exploring planetary environments is central to NASA's missions and goals. A new computing technology called Virtual Reality has much to offer in support of planetary exploration. This technology augments and extends human presence within computer-generated and remote spatial environments. Historically, NASA has been a leader in many of the fundamental concepts and technologies that comprise Virtual Reality. Indeed, Ames Research Center has a central role in the development of this rapidly emerging approach to using computers. This ground breaking work has inspired researchers in academia, industry, and the military. Further, NASA's leadership in this technology has spun off new businesses, has caught the attention of the international business community, and has generated several years of positive international media coverage. In the future, Virtual Reality technology will enable greatly improved human-machine interactions for more productive planetary surface exploration. Perhaps more importantly, Virtual Reality technology will democratize the experience of planetary exploration and thereby broaden understanding of, and support for, this historic enterprise.

  9. Virtual reality and planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Exploring planetary environments is central to NASA's missions and goals. A new computing technology called Virtual Reality has much to offer in support of planetary exploration. This technology augments and extends human presence within computer-generated and remote spatial environments. Historically, NASA has been a leader in many of the fundamental concepts and technologies that comprise Virtual Reality. Indeed, Ames Research Center has a central role in the development of this rapidly emerging approach to using computers. This ground breaking work has inspired researchers in academia, industry, and the military. Further, NASA's leadership in this technology has spun off new businesses, has caught the attention of the international business community, and has generated several years of positive international media coverage. In the future, Virtual Reality technology will enable greatly improved human-machine interactions for more productive planetary surface exploration. Perhaps more importantly, Virtual Reality technology will democratize the experience of planetary exploration and thereby broaden understanding of, and support for, this historic enterprise.

  10. Planetary optical and infrared imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrile, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to obtain and analyze high spatial resolution charge coupled device (CCD) coronagraphic images of extra-solar planetary material and solar system objects. These data will provide information on the distribution of planetary and proto-planetary material around nearby stars leading to a better understanding of the origin and evolution of the solar system. Imaging within our solar system will provide information on the current cloud configurations on the outer planets, search for new objects around the outer planets, and provide direct support for Voyager, Galileo, and CRAF by imaging material around asteroids and clouds on Neptune. Over the last year this program acquired multispectral and polarization images of the disk of material around the nearby star Beta Pictoris. This material is believed to be associated with the formation of planets and provides a first look at a planetary system much younger than our own. Preliminary color and polarization data suggest that the material is very low albedo and similar to dark outer solar system carbon rich material. A coronagraphic search for other systems is underway and has already examined over 100 nearby stars. Coronagraphic imaging provided the first clear look at the rings of Uranus and albedo limits for the ring arcs around Neptune

  11. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXII

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This CD-ROM publication contains the extended abstracts that were accepted for presentation at the 32nd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference held at Houston, TX, March 12-16, 2001. The papers are presented in PDF format and are indexed by author, keyword, meteorite, program and samples for quick reference.

  12. ARCHER{sub RT} – A GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: Software development and application to helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Ji, Wei; Xu, X. George, E-mail: xug2@rpi.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Yang, Youming; Bednarz, Bryan [Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Sterpin, Edmond [Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium 1348 (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHER{sub RT} is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head and neck. Methods: To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHER{sub RT}. Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHER{sub RT} and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. Results: For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHER{sub RT} agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHER{sub RT} are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head and neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to

  13. Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities PSI at DLR for Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbow, E.; Rettberg, P.; Panitz, C.; Reitz, G.

    2008-09-01

    Ground based experiments, conducted in the controlled planetary and space environment simulation facilities PSI at DLR, are used to investigate astrobiological questions and to complement the corresponding experiments in LEO, for example on free flying satellites or on space exposure platforms on the ISS. In-orbit exposure facilities can only accommodate a limited number of experiments for exposure to space parameters like high vacuum, intense radiation of galactic and solar origin and microgravity, sometimes also technically adapted to simulate extraterrestrial planetary conditions like those on Mars. Ground based experiments in carefully equipped and monitored simulation facilities allow the investigation of the effects of simulated single environmental parameters and selected combinations on a much wider variety of samples. In PSI at DLR, international science consortia performed astrobiological investigations and space experiment preparations, exposing organic compounds and a wide range of microorganisms, reaching from bacterial spores to complex microbial communities, lichens and even animals like tardigrades to simulated planetary or space environment parameters in pursuit of exobiological questions on the resistance to extreme environments and the origin and distribution of life. The Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities PSI of the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at DLR in Köln, Germany, providing high vacuum of controlled residual composition, ionizing radiation of a X-ray tube, polychromatic UV radiation in the range of 170-400 nm, VIS and IR or individual monochromatic UV wavelengths, and temperature regulation from -20°C to +80°C at the sample size individually or in selected combinations in 9 modular facilities of varying sizes are presented with selected experiments performed within.

  14. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Origin of Planetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The session titled Origin of Planetary Systems" included the following reports:Convective Cooling of Protoplanetary Disks and Rapid Giant Planet Formation; When Push Comes to Shove: Gap-opening, Disk Clearing and the In Situ Formation of Giant Planets; Late Injection of Radionuclides into Solar Nebula Analogs in Orion; Growth of Dust Particles and Accumulation of Centimeter-sized Objects in the Vicinity of a Pressure enhanced Region of a Solar Nebula; Fast, Repeatable Clumping of Solid Particles in Microgravity ; Chondrule Formation by Current Sheets in Protoplanetary Disks; Radial Migration of Phyllosilicates in the Solar Nebula; Accretion of the Outer Planets: Oligarchy or Monarchy?; Resonant Capture of Irregular Satellites by a Protoplanet ; On the Final Mass of Giant Planets ; Predicting the Atmospheric Composition of Extrasolar Giant Planets; Overturn of Unstably Stratified Fluids: Implications for the Early Evolution of Planetary Mantles; and The Evolution of an Impact-generated Partially-vaporized Circumplanetary Disk.

  15. Radiation Tolerant Temperature-Invariant Scintillation Modules, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation detectors are an invaluable tool for space applications spanning planetary science, astrophysics, heliophysics, space weather, and dosimetry for human...

  16. Bayesian Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajabalinejad, M.

    2010-01-01

    To reduce cost of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for time-consuming processes, Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) is introduced in this paper. The BMC method reduces number of realizations in MC according to the desired accuracy level. BMC also provides a possibility of considering more priors. In other words, different priors can be integrated into one model by using BMC to further reduce cost of simulations. This study suggests speeding up the simulation process by considering the logical dependence of neighboring points as prior information. This information is used in the BMC method to produce a predictive tool through the simulation process. The general methodology and algorithm of BMC method are presented in this paper. The BMC method is applied to the simplified break water model as well as the finite element model of 17th Street Canal in New Orleans, and the results are compared with the MC and Dynamic Bounds methods.

  17. From red giants to planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, S.

    1982-01-01

    The transition from red giants to planetary nebulae is studied by comparing the spectral characteristics of red giant envelopes and planetary nebulae. Observational and theoretical evidence both suggest that remnants of red giant envelopes may still be present in planetary nebula systems and should have significant effects on their formation. The dynamical effects of the interaction of stellar winds from central stars of planetary nebulae with the remnant red giant envelopes are evaluated and the mechanism found to be capable of producing the observed masses and momenta of planetary nebulae. The observed mass-radii relation of planetary nebulae may also be best explained by the interacting winds model. The possibility that red giant mass loss, and therefore the production of planetary nebulae, is different between Population I and II systems is also discussed

  18. Monte Carlo principles and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeside, D E [Oklahoma Univ., Oklahoma City (USA). Health Sciences Center

    1976-03-01

    The principles underlying the use of Monte Carlo methods are explained, for readers who may not be familiar with the approach. The generation of random numbers is discussed, and the connection between Monte Carlo methods and random numbers is indicated. Outlines of two well established Monte Carlo sampling techniques are given, together with examples illustrating their use. The general techniques for improving the efficiency of Monte Carlo calculations are considered. The literature relevant to the applications of Monte Carlo calculations in medical physics is reviewed.

  19. Contributon Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubi, A.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1979-05-01

    The contributon Monte Carlo method is based on a new recipe to calculate target responses by means of volume integral of the contributon current in a region between the source and the detector. A comprehensive description of the method, its implementation in the general-purpose MCNP code, and results of the method for realistic nonhomogeneous, energy-dependent problems are presented. 23 figures, 10 tables

  20. Carlos Vesga Duarte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Medina Avendaño

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Vega Duarte tenía la sencillez de los seres elementales y puros. Su corazón era limpio como oro de aluvión. Su trato directo y coloquial ponía de relieve a un santandereano sin contaminaciones que amaba el fulgor de las armas y se encandilaba con el destello de las frases perfectas

  1. Fundamentals of Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollaber, Allan Benton

    2016-01-01

    This is a powerpoint presentation which serves as lecture material for the Parallel Computing summer school. It goes over the fundamentals of the Monte Carlo calculation method. The material is presented according to the following outline: Introduction (background, a simple example: estimating @@), Why does this even work? (The Law of Large Numbers, The Central Limit Theorem), How to sample (inverse transform sampling, rejection), and An example from particle transport.

  2. Microcanonical Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1986-01-01

    The author discusses a recently developed algorithm for simulating statistical systems. The procedure interpolates between molecular dynamics methods and canonical Monte Carlo. The primary advantages are extremely fast simulations of discrete systems such as the Ising model and a relative insensitivity to random number quality. A variation of the algorithm gives rise to a deterministic dynamics for Ising spins. This model may be useful for high speed simulation of non-equilibrium phenomena

  3. Fundamentals of Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollaber, Allan Benton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-16

    This is a powerpoint presentation which serves as lecture material for the Parallel Computing summer school. It goes over the fundamentals of the Monte Carlo calculation method. The material is presented according to the following outline: Introduction (background, a simple example: estimating π), Why does this even work? (The Law of Large Numbers, The Central Limit Theorem), How to sample (inverse transform sampling, rejection), and An example from particle transport.

  4. CERN honours Carlo Rubbia

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    On 7 April CERN will be holding a symposium to mark the 75th birthday of Carlo Rubbia, who shared the 1984 Nobel Prize for Physics with Simon van der Meer for contributions to the discovery of the W and Z bosons, carriers of the weak interaction. Following a presentation by Rolf Heuer, lectures will be given by eminent speakers on areas of science to which Carlo Rubbia has made decisive contributions. Michel Spiro, Director of the French National Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics (IN2P3) of the CNRS, Lyn Evans, sLHC Project Leader, and Alan Astbury of the TRIUMF Laboratory will talk about the physics of the weak interaction and the discovery of the W and Z bosons. Former CERN Director-General Herwig Schopper will lecture on CERN’s accelerators from LEP to the LHC. Giovanni Bignami, former President of the Italian Space Agency and Professor at the IUSS School for Advanced Studies in Pavia will speak about his work with Carlo Rubbia. Finally, Hans Joachim Sch...

  5. CERN honours Carlo Rubbia

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    On 7 April CERN will be holding a symposium to mark the 75th birthday of Carlo Rubbia, who shared the 1984 Nobel Prize for Physics with Simon van der Meer for contributions to the discovery of the W and Z bosons, carriers of the weak interaction. Following a presentation by Rolf Heuer, lectures will be given by eminent speakers on areas of science to which Carlo Rubbia has made decisive contributions. Michel Spiro, Director of the French National Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics (IN2P3) of the CNRS, Lyn Evans, sLHC Project Leader, and Alan Astbury of the TRIUMF Laboratory will talk about the physics of the weak interaction and the discovery of the W and Z bosons. Former CERN Director-General Herwig Schopper will lecture on CERN’s accelerators from LEP to the LHC. Giovanni Bignami, former President of the Italian Space Agency, will speak about his work with Carlo Rubbia. Finally, Hans Joachim Schellnhuber of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research and Sven Kul...

  6. Who Writes Carlos Bulosan?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlie Samuya Veric

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Carlos Bulosan in Filipino and Filipino-American radical history and literature is indisputable. His eminence spans the pacific, and he is known, diversely, as a radical poet, fictionist, novelist, and labor organizer. Author of the canonical America Iis the Hearts, Bulosan is celebrated for chronicling the conditions in America in his time, such as racism and unemployment. In the history of criticism on Bulosan's life and work, however, there is an undeclared general consensus that views Bulosan and his work as coherent permanent texts of radicalism and anti-imperialism. Central to the existence of such a tradition of critical reception are the generations of critics who, in more ways than one, control the discourse on and of Carlos Bulosan. This essay inquires into the sphere of the critical reception that orders, for our time and for the time ahead, the reading and interpretation of Bulosan. What eye and seeing, the essay asks, determine the perception of Bulosan as the angel of radicalism? What is obscured in constructing Bulosan as an immutable figure of the political? What light does the reader conceive when the personal is brought into the open and situated against the political? the essay explores the answers to these questions in Bulosan's loving letters to various friends, strangers, and white American women. The presence of these interrogations, the essay believes, will secure ultimately the continuing importance of Carlos Bulosan to radical literature and history.

  7. Monte Carlo alpha calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockway, D.; Soran, P.; Whalen, P.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo algorithm to efficiently calculate static alpha eigenvalues, N = ne/sup ..cap alpha..t/, for supercritical systems has been developed and tested. A direct Monte Carlo approach to calculating a static alpha is to simply follow the buildup in time of neutrons in a supercritical system and evaluate the logarithmic derivative of the neutron population with respect to time. This procedure is expensive, and the solution is very noisy and almost useless for a system near critical. The modified approach is to convert the time-dependent problem to a static ..cap alpha../sup -/eigenvalue problem and regress ..cap alpha.. on solutions of a/sup -/ k/sup -/eigenvalue problem. In practice, this procedure is much more efficient than the direct calculation, and produces much more accurate results. Because the Monte Carlo codes are intrinsically three-dimensional and use elaborate continuous-energy cross sections, this technique is now used as a standard for evaluating other calculational techniques in odd geometries or with group cross sections.

  8. Solar Variability and Planetary Climates

    CERN Document Server

    Calisesi, Y; Gray, L; Langen, J; Lockwood, M

    2007-01-01

    Variations in solar activity, as revealed by variations in the number of sunspots, have been observed since ancient times. To what extent changes in the solar output may affect planetary climates, though, remains today more than ever a subject of controversy. In 2000, the SSSI volume on Solar Variability and Climate reviewed the to-date understanding of the physics of solar variability and of the associated climate response. The present volume on Solar Variability and Planetary Climates provides an overview of recent advances in this field, with particular focus at the Earth's middle and lower atmosphere. The book structure mirrors that of the ISSI workshop held in Bern in June 2005, the collection of invited workshop contributions and of complementary introductory papers synthesizing the current understanding in key research areas such as middle atmospheric processes, stratosphere-troposphere dynamical coupling, tropospheric aerosols chemistry, solar storm influences, solar variability physics, and terrestri...

  9. Monte Carlo simulation and experimental verification of radiotherapy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, J.; Deloar, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Based on fundamental physics and statistics, the Monte Carlo technique is generally accepted as the accurate method for modelling radiation therapy treatments. A Monte Carlo simulation system has been installed, and models of linear accelerators in the more commonly used electron beam modes have been built and commissioned. A novel technique for radiation dosimetry is also being investigated. Combining the advantages of both water tank and solid phantom dosimetry, a hollow, thin walled shell or mask is filled with water and then raised above the natural water surface to produce a volume of water with the desired irregular shape.

  10. Planetary interchange of bioactive material: probability factors and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, B C

    2001-01-01

    It is now well-accepted that both lunar and martian materials are represented in the meteorite collections. Early suggestions that viable organisms might survive natural transport between planets have not yet been thoroughly examined. The concept of Planetary Interchange of Bioactive Material (PIBM) is potentially relevant to the conditions under which life originated. PIBM has been also invoked to infer that the potential danger to Earth from martian materials is non-existent, an inference with, however, many pitfalls. Numerous impediments to efficient transfer of viable organisms exist. In this work, the lethality of space radiation during long transients and the biasing of launched objects toward materials unlikely to host abundant organisms are examined and shown to reduce the likelihood of successful transfer by orders of magnitude. It is also shown that martian meteorites studied to date assuredly have been subjected to sterilizing levels of ionizing radiation in space. PIBM considerations apply to both the solar system locale(s) of the origin of life and to the applicability of planetary protection protocols to preserve the biospheres of planetary bodies, including our own.

  11. INPOP17a planetary ephemerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, V.; Fienga, A.; Gastineau, M.; Laskar, J.

    2017-08-01

    Based on the use of Cassini radio tracking data and the introduction of LLR data obtained at 1064 nm, a new planetary ephemerides INPOP17a was built including improvements for the planet orbits as well as for Moon ephemerides. Besides new asteroid masses, new parameters related to the inner structure of the Moon were obtained and presented here. Comparisons with values found in the literature are also discussed. LLR Residuals reach the centimeter level for the new INPOP17a ephemerides.

  12. Numerical models of planetary dynamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.; Roberts, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a nonlinear, axisymmetric, spherical-shell model of planetary dynamos. This intermediate-type dynamo model requires a prescribed helicity field (the alpha effect) and a prescribed buoyancy force or thermal wind (the omega effect) and solves for the axisymmetric time-dependent magnetic and velocity fields. Three very different time dependent solutions are obtained from different prescribed sets of alpha and omega fields

  13. Stream Lifetimes Against Planetary Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, G. B.; Lega, E.; Froeschle, Cl.

    2011-01-01

    We study, both analytically and numerically, the perturbation induced by an encounter with a planet on a meteoroid stream. Our analytical tool is the extension of pik s theory of close encounters, that we apply to streams described by geocentric variables. The resulting formulae are used to compute the rate at which a stream is dispersed by planetary encounters into the sporadic background. We have verified the accuracy of the analytical model using a numerical test.

  14. Planetary Surface-Atmosphere Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrison, J. P.; Bak, E.; Finster, K.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Holstein-Rathlou, C.; Knak Jensen, S.; Nørnberg, P.

    2013-09-01

    Planetary bodies having an accessible solid surface and significant atmosphere, such as Earth, Mars, Venus, Titan, share common phenomenology. Specifically wind induced transport of surface materials, subsequent erosion, the generation and transport of solid aerosols which leads both to chemical and electrostatic interaction with the atmosphere. How these processes affect the evolution of the atmosphere and surface will be discussed in the context of general planetology and the latest laboratory studies will be presented.

  15. Status of Monte Carlo at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.L.; Cashwell, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    At Los Alamos the early work of Fermi, von Neumann, and Ulam has been developed and supplemented by many followers, notably Cashwell and Everett, and the main product today is the continuous-energy, general-purpose, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, coupled neutron-photon transport code called MCNP. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo research and development effort is concentrated in Group X-6. MCNP treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of arbitrary materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Monte Carlo has evolved into perhaps the main method for radiation transport calculations at Los Alamos. MCNP is used in every technical division at the Laboratory by over 130 users about 600 times a month accounting for nearly 200 hours of CDC-7600 time

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of gas Cerenkov detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.M.; Jain, M.; Jordan, T.M.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical study of selected gamma-ray and electron diagnostic necessitates coupling Cerenkov radiation to electron/photon cascades. A Cerenkov production model and its incorporation into a general geometry Monte Carlo coupled electron/photon transport code is discussed. A special optical photon ray-trace is implemented using bulk optical properties assigned to each Monte Carlo zone. Good agreement exists between experimental and calculated Cerenkov data in the case of a carbon-dioxide gas Cerenkov detector experiment. Cerenkov production and threshold data are presented for a typical carbon-dioxide gas detector that converts a 16.7 MeV photon source to Cerenkov light, which is collected by optics and detected by a photomultiplier

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation for Particle Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pia, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is an essential component of experimental particle physics in all the phases of its life-cycle: the investigation of the physics reach of detector concepts, the design of facilities and detectors, the development and optimization of data reconstruction software, the data analysis for the production of physics results. This note briefly outlines some research topics related to Monte Carlo simulation, that are relevant to future experimental perspectives in particle physics. The focus is on physics aspects: conceptual progress beyond current particle transport schemes, the incorporation of materials science knowledge relevant to novel detection technologies, functionality to model radiation damage, the capability for multi-scale simulation, quantitative validation and uncertainty quantification to determine the predictive power of simulation. The R&D on simulation for future detectors would profit from cooperation within various components of the particle physics community, and synerg...

  18. Status of Monte Carlo at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.L.; Cashwell, E.D.; Godfrey, T.N.K.; Schrandt, R.G.; Deutsch, O.L.; Booth, T.E.

    1980-05-01

    Four papers were presented by Group X-6 on April 22, 1980, at the Oak Ridge Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) Seminar-Workshop on Theory and Applications of Monte Carlo Methods. These papers are combined into one report for convenience and because they are related to each other. The first paper (by Thompson and Cashwell) is a general survey about X-6 and MCNP and is an introduction to the other three papers. It can also serve as a resume of X-6. The second paper (by Godfrey) explains some of the details of geometry specification in MCNP. The third paper (by Cashwell and Schrandt) illustrates calculating flux at a point with MCNP; in particular, the once-more-collided flux estimator is demonstrated. Finally, the fourth paper (by Thompson, Deutsch, and Booth) is a tutorial on some variance-reduction techniques. It should be required for a fledging Monte Carlo practitioner

  19. Evolution of planetary nebula nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of planetary nebula nuclei (PNNs) is examined with the aid of the most recent available stellar evolution calculations and new observations of these objects. Their expected distribution in the log L-log T plane is calculated based upon the stellar evolutionary models of Paczynski, Schoenberner and Iben, the initial mass function derived by Miller and Scalo, and various assumptions concerning mass loss during post-main sequence evolution. The distribution is found to be insensitive both to the assumed range of main-sequence progenitor mass and to reasonable variations in the age and the star forming history of the galactic disk. Rather, the distribution is determined by the strong dependence of the rate of stellar evolution upon core mass, the steepness of the initial mass function, and to a lesser extent the finite lifetime of an observable planetary nebula. The theoretical distributions are rather different than any of those inferred from earlier observations. Possible observational selection effects that may be responsible are examined, as well as the intrinsic uncertainties associated with the theoretical model predictions. An extensive photometric and smaller photographic survey of southern hemisphere planetary nebulae (PNs) is presented

  20. Monte Carlo codes use in neutron therapy; Application de codes Monte Carlo en neutrontherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquis, P.; Mokhtari, F.; Karamanoukian, D. [Hopital Pasteur, 06 - Nice (France); Pignol, J.P. [Hopital du Hasenrain, 68 - Mulhouse (France); Cuendet, P. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires; Fares, G.; Hachem, A. [Faculte des Sciences, 06 - Nice (France); Iborra, N. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France)

    1998-04-01

    Monte Carlo calculation codes allow to study accurately all the parameters relevant to radiation effects, like the dose deposition or the type of microscopic interactions, through one by one particle transport simulation. These features are very useful for neutron irradiations, from device development up to dosimetry. This paper illustrates some applications of these codes in Neutron Capture Therapy and Neutron Capture Enhancement of fast neutrons irradiations. (authors)

  1. Collisional stripping of planetary crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Philip J.; Leinhardt, Zoë M.; Elliott, Tim; Stewart, Sarah T.; Walter, Michael J.

    2018-02-01

    Geochemical studies of planetary accretion and evolution have invoked various degrees of collisional erosion to explain differences in bulk composition between planets and chondrites. Here we undertake a full, dynamical evaluation of 'crustal stripping' during accretion and its key geochemical consequences. Crusts are expected to contain a significant fraction of planetary budgets of incompatible elements, which include the major heat producing nuclides. We present smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of collisions between differentiated rocky planetesimals and planetary embryos. We find that the crust is preferentially lost relative to the mantle during impacts, and we have developed a scaling law based on these simulations that approximates the mass of crust that remains in the largest remnant. Using this scaling law and a recent set of N-body simulations of terrestrial planet formation, we have estimated the maximum effect of crustal stripping on incompatible element abundances during the accretion of planetary embryos. We find that on average approximately one third of the initial crust is stripped from embryos as they accrete, which leads to a reduction of ∼20% in the budgets of the heat producing elements if the stripped crust does not reaccrete. Erosion of crusts can lead to non-chondritic ratios of incompatible elements, but the magnitude of this effect depends sensitively on the details of the crust-forming melting process on the planetesimals. The Lu/Hf system is fractionated for a wide range of crustal formation scenarios. Using eucrites (the products of planetesimal silicate melting, thought to represent the crust of Vesta) as a guide to the Lu/Hf of planetesimal crust partially lost during accretion, we predict the Earth could evolve to a superchondritic 176Hf/177Hf (3-5 parts per ten thousand) at present day. Such values are in keeping with compositional estimates of the bulk Earth. Stripping of planetary crusts during accretion can lead to

  2. CONSTRAINING THE MOVEMENT OF THE SPIRAL FEATURES AND THE LOCATIONS OF PLANETARY BODIES WITHIN THE AB AUR SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Wisniewski, John P.; Hashimoto, Jun [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73071 (United States); Grady, Carol A. [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McElwain, Michael W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 6681, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kudo, Tomoyuki; Currie, Thayne M; Egner, Sebastian; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Masahiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Okamoto, Yoshiko K. [Institute of Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of Science, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Fukagawa, Misato [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Abe, Lyu [Laboratoire Lagrange (UMR 7293), Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d’Azur, 28 avenue Valrose, F-06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Brandner, Wolfgang; Feldt, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brandt, Timothy D. [Astrophysics Department, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Carson, Joseph C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston, 58 Coming Street, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Goto, Miwa, E-mail: Jamie.R.Lomax@ou.edu, E-mail: wisniewski@ou.edu, E-mail: carol.a.grady@nasa.gov [Universitäts-Sternwarte München, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 München (Germany); and others

    2016-09-01

    We present a new analysis of multi-epoch, H -band, scattered light images of the AB Aur system. We use a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to simultaneously model the system’s spectral energy distribution (SED) and H -band polarized intensity (PI) imagery. We find that a disk-dominated model, as opposed to one that is envelope-dominated, can plausibly reproduce AB Aur’s SED and near-IR imagery. This is consistent with previous modeling attempts presented in the literature and supports the idea that at least a subset of AB Aur’s spirals originate within the disk. In light of this, we also analyzed the movement of spiral structures in multi-epoch H -band total light and PI imagery of the disk. We detect no significant rotation or change in spatial location of the spiral structures in these data, which span a 5.8-year baseline. If such structures are caused by disk–planet interactions, the lack of observed rotation constrains the location of the orbit of planetary perturbers to be >47 au.

  3. Constraining the Movement of the Spiral Features and the Locations of Planetary Bodies Within the AB Aur System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Wisniewski, John P.; Grady, Carol A.; McElwain, Michael W.; Hashimoto, Jun; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Okamoto, Yoshiko K.; Fukagawa, Misato; Abe, Lyu

    2016-01-01

    We present a new analysis of multi-epoch, H-band, scattered light images of the AB Aur system. We use a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to simultaneously model the systems spectral energy distribution (SED) and H-band polarized intensity (PI) imagery. We find that a disk-dominated model, as opposed to one that is envelope dominated, can plausibly reproduce AB Aurs SED and near-IR imagery. This is consistent with previous modeling attempts presented in the literature and supports the idea that at least a subset of AB Aurs spirals originate within the disk. In light of this, we also analyzed the movement of spiral structures in multi-epoch H-band total light and PI imagery of the disk. We detect no significant rotation or change in spatial location of the spiral structures in these data, which span a 5.8-year baseline. If such structures are caused by disk planet interactions, the lack of observed rotation constrains the location of the orbit of planetary perturbers to be 47 au.

  4. A functional method for estimating DPA tallies in Monte Carlo calculations of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, Edward A.; Oliveira, Cassiano R.E. de

    2011-01-01

    There has been a growing need in recent years for the development of methodology to calculate radiation damage factors, namely displacements per atom (dpa), of structural components for Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The aim of this paper is to discuss the development and implementation of a dpa method using Monte Carlo method for transport calculations. The capabilities of the Monte Carlo code Serpent such as Woodcock tracking and fuel depletion are assessed for radiation damage calculations and its capability demonstrated and compared to those of the Monte Carlo code MCNP for radiation damage calculations of a typical LWR configuration. (author)

  5. Simulation of polarimetric effects in planetary system HD 189733

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantseva, K.; Kostogryz, N. M.; Yakobchuk, T. M.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we present results of linear polarization modelling for HD 189733 in the U filter using the Monte Carlo method. Our simulations are based on the well known effect that linear polarization of a centrosymmetric unresolved star becomes non-zero during the planet transit or in the presence of spots on its surface. HD 189733 is currently the brightest (m_{V}=7.67^{m}) known star to harbour a transiting exoplanet. This fact, along with the short orbital period (2.2 d), makes it very suitable for different types of observations including polarimetry. Since we are interested in occultation effects, a very important parameter is the ratio of the planet to star radii, which is also very large (0.15). As the host star is active and spots may cover up to 1% of the planetary surface, we perform our simulations for different spot parameters such as sizes, locations on the stellar disk, and temperatures.

  6. Usefulness of the Monte Carlo method in reliability calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanore, J.M.; Kalli, H.

    1977-01-01

    Three examples of reliability Monte Carlo programs developed in the LEP (Laboratory for Radiation Shielding Studies in the Nuclear Research Center at Saclay) are presented. First, an uncertainty analysis is given for a simplified spray system; a Monte Carlo program PATREC-MC has been written to solve the problem with the system components given in the fault tree representation. The second program MONARC 2 has been written to solve the problem of complex systems reliability by the Monte Carlo simulation, here again the system (a residual heat removal system) is in the fault tree representation. Third, the Monte Carlo program MONARC was used instead of the Markov diagram to solve the simulation problem of an electric power supply including two nets and two stand-by diesels

  7. Monte Carlo Codes Invited Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trama, J.C.; Malvagi, F.; Brown, F.

    2013-01-01

    This document lists 22 Monte Carlo codes used in radiation transport applications throughout the world. For each code the names of the organization and country and/or place are given. We have the following computer codes. 1) ARCHER, USA, RPI; 2) COG11, USA, LLNL; 3) DIANE, France, CEA/DAM Bruyeres; 4) FLUKA, Italy and CERN, INFN and CERN; 5) GEANT4, International GEANT4 collaboration; 6) KENO and MONACO (SCALE), USA, ORNL; 7) MC21, USA, KAPL and Bettis; 8) MCATK, USA, LANL; 9) MCCARD, South Korea, Seoul National University; 10) MCNP6, USA, LANL; 11) MCU, Russia, Kurchatov Institute; 12) MONK and MCBEND, United Kingdom, AMEC; 13) MORET5, France, IRSN Fontenay-aux-Roses; 14) MVP2, Japan, JAEA; 15) OPENMC, USA, MIT; 16) PENELOPE, Spain, Barcelona University; 17) PHITS, Japan, JAEA; 18) PRIZMA, Russia, VNIITF; 19) RMC, China, Tsinghua University; 20) SERPENT, Finland, VTT; 21) SUPERMONTECARLO, China, CAS INEST FDS Team Hefei; and 22) TRIPOLI-4, France, CEA Saclay

  8. The Planetary Data System— Archiving Planetary Data for the use of the Planetary Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Thomas H.; McLaughlin, Stephanie A.; Grayzeck, Edwin J.; Vilas, Faith; Knopf, William P.; Crichton, Daniel J.

    2014-11-01

    NASA’s Planetary Data System (PDS) archives, curates, and distributes digital data from NASA’s planetary missions. PDS provides the planetary science community convenient online access to data from NASA’s missions so that they can continue to mine these rich data sets for new discoveries. The PDS is a federated system consisting of nodes for specific discipline areas ranging from planetary geology to space physics. Our federation includes an engineering node that provides systems engineering support to the entire PDS.In order to adequately capture complete mission data sets containing not only raw and reduced instrument data, but also calibration and documentation and geometry data required to interpret and use these data sets both singly and together (data from multiple instruments, or from multiple missions), PDS personnel work with NASA missions from the initial AO through the end of mission to define, organize, and document the data. This process includes peer-review of data sets by members of the science community to ensure that the data sets are scientifically useful, effectively organized, and well documented. PDS makes the data in PDS easily searchable so that members of the planetary community can both query the archive to find data relevant to specific scientific investigations and easily retrieve the data for analysis. To ensure long-term preservation of data and to make data sets more easily searchable with the new capabilities in Information Technology now available (and as existing technologies become obsolete), the PDS (together with the COSPAR sponsored IPDA) developed and deployed a new data archiving system known as PDS4, released in 2013. The LADEE, MAVEN, OSIRIS REx, InSight, and Mars2020 missions are using PDS4. ESA has adopted PDS4 for the upcoming BepiColumbo mission. The PDS is actively migrating existing data records into PDS4 and developing tools to aid data providers and users. The PDS is also incorporating challenge

  9. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark studies at CERN's accelerator chain

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083190; Brugger, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Mixed particle and energy radiation fields present at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its accelerator chain are responsible for failures on electronic devices located in the vicinity of the accelerator beam lines. These radiation effects on electronics and, more generally, the overall radiation damage issues have a direct impact on component and system lifetimes, as well as on maintenance requirements and radiation exposure to personnel who have to intervene and fix existing faults. The radiation environments and respective radiation damage issues along the CERN’s accelerator chain were studied in the framework of the CERN Radiation to Electronics (R2E) project and are hereby presented. The important interplay between Monte Carlo simulations and radiation monitoring is also highlighted.

  10. Mars Technology Program Planetary Protection Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the NASA Planetary Protection program are to preserve biological and organic conditions of solar-system bodies for future scientific exploration and to protect the Earth from potential hazardous extraterrestrial contamination. As the exploration of solar system continues, NASA remains committed to the implementation of planetary protection policy and regulations. To fulfill this commitment, the Mars Technology Program (MTP) has invested in a portfolio of tasks for developing necessary technologies to meet planetary protection requirements for the next decade missions.

  11. PC 11: Symbiotic star or planetary nebulae?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez-Moreno, A.; Moreno, H.; Cortes, G.

    1987-01-01

    PC 11 is an object listed in Perek and Kohoutek (1967) Catalogue of Galactic Planetary Nebulae as PK 331 -5 0 1. Some authors suggest that it is not a planetary nebula, but that it has some characteristics (though not all) of symbiotic stars. We have made photographic, spectrophotometric and spectroscopic observations of PC 11. The analysis of the results suggests that it is a young planetary nebula. (Author)

  12. Planetary Science Training for NASA's Astronauts: Preparing for Future Human Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Evans, C. A.; Graff, T. G.; Young, K. E.; Zeigler, R.

    2017-02-01

    Astronauts selected in 2017 and in future years will carry out in situ planetary science research during exploration of the solar system. Training to enable this goal is underway and is flexible to accommodate an evolving planetary science vision.

  13. An improved wavelength selection scheme for Monte Carlo solvers applied to hypersonic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldick, Andrew; Modest, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    A new databasing scheme is developed for Monte Carlo Ray Tracing methods applied to hypersonic planetary entry. In this scheme, the complex relationships for the emission wavelength selection of atomic and molecular species in nonequilibrium flows are simplified by developing random number relationships for individual transitions, as opposed to using relationships for the spectral emission coefficient of a given species. These new techniques speed up wavelength selection by about 2 orders of magnitude, and offer flexibility for use in weighted or part-spectrum Monte Carlo solvers.

  14. Monte Carlo techniques in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, H.

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques have become one of the most popular tools in different areas of medical radiation physics following the development and subsequent implementation of powerful computing systems for clinical use. In particular, they have been extensively applied to simulate processes involving random behaviour and to quantify physical parameters that are difficult or even impossible to calculate analytically or to determine by experimental measurements. The use of the Monte Carlo method to simulate radiation transport turned out to be the most accurate means of predicting absorbed dose distributions and other quantities of interest in the radiation treatment of cancer patients using either external or radionuclide radiotherapy. The same trend has occurred for the estimation of the absorbed dose in diagnostic procedures using radionuclides. There is broad consensus in accepting that the earliest Monte Carlo calculations in medical radiation physics were made in the area of nuclear medicine, where the technique was used for dosimetry modelling and computations. Formalism and data based on Monte Carlo calculations, developed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine, were published in a series of supplements to the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, the first one being released in 1968. Some of these pamphlets made extensive use of Monte Carlo calculations to derive specific absorbed fractions for electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in organs of mathematical phantoms. Interest in Monte Carlo-based dose calculations with β-emitters has been revived with the application of radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies to radioimmunotherapy. As a consequence of this generalized use, many questions are being raised primarily about the need and potential of Monte Carlo techniques, but also about how accurate it really is, what would it take to apply it clinically and make it available widely to the medical physics

  15. Calibration and Monte Carlo modelling of neutron long counters

    CERN Document Server

    Tagziria, H

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo technique has become a very powerful tool in radiation transport as full advantage is taken of enhanced cross-section data, more powerful computers and statistical techniques, together with better characterisation of neutron and photon source spectra. At the National Physical Laboratory, calculations using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4B have been combined with accurate measurements to characterise two long counters routinely used to standardise monoenergetic neutron fields. New and more accurate response function curves have been produced for both long counters. A novel approach using Monte Carlo methods has been developed, validated and used to model the response function of the counters and determine more accurately their effective centres, which have always been difficult to establish experimentally. Calculations and measurements agree well, especially for the De Pangher long counter for which details of the design and constructional material are well known. The sensitivit...

  16. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory is committed to promoting and supporting high quality, cutting-edge...

  17. Polarimetry of stars and planetary systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Hough, James; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal

    2015-01-01

    ... fields of polarimetric exploration, including proto-planetary and debris discs, icy satellites, transneptunian objects, exoplanets and the search for extraterrestrial life -- unique results produced...

  18. Sealed Planetary Return Canister (SPRC), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sample return missions have primary importance in future planetary missions. A basic requirement is that samples be returned in pristine, uncontaminated condition,...

  19. Teaching, learning, and planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    The progress accomplished in the first five months of the three-year grant period of Teaching, Learning, and Planetary Exploration is presented. The objectives of this project are to discover new education products and services based on space science, particularly planetary exploration. An Exploration in Education is the umbrella name for the education projects as they are seen by teachers and the interested public. As described in the proposal, our approach consists of: (1) increasing practical understanding of the potential role and capabilities of the research community to contribute to basic education using new discoveries; (2) developing an intellectual framework for these contributions by supplying criteria and templates for the teacher's stories; (3) attracting astronomers, engineers, and technical staff to the project and helping them form productive education partnerships for the future, (4) exploring relevant technologies and networks for authoring and communicating the teacher's stories; (5) enlisting the participation of potential user's of the teacher's stories in defining the products; (6) actually producing and delivering many educationally useful teacher's stories; and (7) reporting the pilot study results with critical evaluation. Technical progress was made by assembling our electronic publishing stations, designing electronic publications based on space science, and developing distribution approaches for electronic products. Progress was made addressing critical issues by developing policies and procedures for securing intellectual property rights and assembling a focus group of teachers to test our ideas and assure the quality of our products. The following useful materials are being produced: the TOPS report; three electronic 'PictureBooks'; one 'ElectronicArticle'; three 'ElectronicReports'; ten 'PrinterPosters'; and the 'FaxForum' with an initial complement of printed materials. We have coordinated with planetary scientists and astronomers

  20. PSUP: A Planetary SUrface Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, F.; Quantin-Nataf, C.; Ballans, H.; Dassas, K.; Audouard, J.; Carter, J.; Gondet, B.; Lozac'h, L.; Malapert, J.-C.; Marmo, C.; Riu, L.; Séjourné, A.

    2018-01-01

    The large size and complexity of planetary data acquired by spacecraft during the last two decades create a demand within the planetary community for access to the archives of raw and high level data and for the tools necessary to analyze these data. Among the different targets of the Solar System, Mars is unique as the combined datasets from the Viking, Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Express and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter missions provide a tremendous wealth of information that can be used to study the surface of Mars. The number and the size of the datasets require an information system to process, manage and distribute data. The Observatories of Paris Sud (OSUPS) and Lyon (OSUL) have developed a portal, called PSUP (Planetary SUrface Portal), for providing users with efficient and easy access to data products dedicated to the Martian surface. The objectives of the portal are: 1) to allow processing and downloading of data via a specific application called MarsSI (Martian surface data processing Information System); 2) to provide the visualization and merging of high level (image, spectral, and topographic) products and catalogs via a web-based user interface (MarsVisu), and 3) to distribute some of these specific high level data with an emphasis on products issued by the science teams of OSUPS and OSUL. As the MarsSI service is extensively described in a companion paper (Quantin-Nataf et al., companion paper, submitted to this special issue), the present paper focus on the general architecture and the functionalities of the web-based user interface MarsVisu. This service provides access to many data products for Mars: albedo, mineral and thermal inertia global maps from spectrometers; mosaics from imagers; image footprints and rasters from the MarsSI tool; high level specific products (defined as catalogs or vectors). MarsVisu can be used to quickly assess the visualized processed data and maps as well as identify areas that have not been mapped yet