WorldWideScience

Sample records for care consensus policy

  1. On values and democratic policy making: the deceptively fragile consensus around market-oriented medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Mark

    2002-12-01

    Market-oriented strategies, embodied in managed competition, have become the primary focus of contemporary U.S. health policy. This dominance reflects the emergence of a bipartisan coalition of support among political elites. This study traces the historical evolution of elite support for the market and suggests that the consensus favoring managed competition is deceptively fragile, with support riven by cleavages in the values used to judge fairness in the allocation of medical care. A unique data set of matched questions asked of both policy elites and the general public is used to document these differences in ethical norms. The implications of these cleavages help to explain three puzzling aspects of contemporary U.S. health policy: (1) the persisting inability to translate the principles of managed competition into politically feasible reforms, (2) the repeated failures to implement demonstration projects intended to test competitive pricing within the Medicare program, and (3) the inability of state regulations to assuage the public's concerns about managed care. Some prescriptions for a more revealing and effective treatment of market reforms in health policy conclude this study.

  2. A New Foreign Policy Consensus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the achievements of Reagan's foreign policy. Explores the question: Did Reagan reconstruct a domestic foreign policy consensus? Concludes that no consensus was reached. Analyzes Reagan's political beliefs, including his antinuclear sentiments, and examines relations between Reagan and Congress. (RW)

  3. End of Life Care Policy for the Dying: Consensus Position Statement of Indian Association of Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Macaden, Stanley C; Naveen Salins; Maryann Muckaden; Priyadarshini Kulkarni; Anjum Joad; Vivek Nirabhawane; Srinagesh Simha

    2014-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Purpose: To develop an End of Life Care (EOLC) Policy for patients who are dying with an advanced life limiting illness. To improve the quality of care of the dying by limiting unnecessary therapeutic medical interventions, providing access to trained palliative care providers, ensuring availability of essential medications for pain and symptom control and improving awareness of EOLC issues through education initiatives. Evidence: A review of Country reports, observational s...

  4. End of life care policy for the dying: Consensus position statement of indian association of palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley C Macaden

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop an End of Life Care (EOLC Policy for patients who are dying with an advanced life limiting illness. To improve the quality of care of the dying by limiting unnecessary therapeutic medical interventions, providing access to trained palliative care providers, ensuring availability of essential medications for pain and symptom control and improving awareness of EOLC issues through education initiatives. Evidence: A review of Country reports, observational studies and key surveys demonstrates that EOLC in India is delivered ineffectively, with a majority of the Indian population dying with no access to palliative care at end of life and essential medications for pain and symptom control. Limited awareness of EOLC among public and health care providers, lack of EOLC education, absent EOLC policy and ambiguous legal standpoint are some of the major barriers in effective EOLC delivery. Recommendations: Access to receive good palliative and EOLC is a human right. All patients are entitled to a dignified death. Government of India (GOI to take urgent steps towards a legislation supporting good EOLC, and all hospitals and health care institutions to have a working EOLC policy Providing a comprehensive care process that minimizes physical and non physical symptoms in the end of life phase and ensuring access to essential medications for pain and symptom control Palliative care and EOLC to be part of all hospital and community/home based programs Standards of palliative and EOLC as established by appropriate authorities and Indian Association of Palliative Care (IAPC met and standards accredited and monitored by national and international accreditation bodies All health care providers with direct patient contact are urged to undergo EOLC certification, and EOLC training should be incorporated into the curriculum of health care education.

  5. Ethics and immunization policy: promoting dialogue to sustain consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudtner, C; Marcuse, E K

    2001-05-01

    The societal consensus that has supported the United States' universal childhood immunization programs for the past 50 years shows signs of eroding. This article proposes a systematic approach to evaluate immunization policy options. Through a unifying framework that combines epidemiologic, economic, and ethical concerns, this approach promotes a clearer understanding of underlying issues and inherent tradeoffs between alternative policies. Such a systematic examination of policy options could facilitate the public dialogue necessary to continually recreate a broad consensus on immunization practices and enable us to choose policies most in accord with our fundamental values.

  6. Decentralized energy planning and consensus in energy policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbanks, T. J.

    1980-05-02

    This paper explores the following three propositions and their relationships: (1) that, in our pluralistic policymaking environment, we cannot solve our nation's energy problems unless we can reach agreement among a diverse group of interested parties about specific actions; (2) that, short of a manifest emergency, such a consensus is difficult to reach unless the scale of the decision-making unit is relatively small; and therefore (3) that one of the keys to an effective energy policy in the United states is to rely heavily on local and regional energy planning and decision-making. First, the paper reviews our problem of irresolution and its roots, and it summaries the policy options for resolving it. Then it explores one of those options, decentralized planning, in a little more detail. Finally, it offers some speculations about the viability of a decentralized approach to energy planninng.

  7. Consensus meeting on microdialysis in neurointensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellander, Bo-Michael; Cantais, Emmanuel; Enblad, Per;

    2004-01-01

    Microdialysis is used in many European neurointensive care units to monitor brain chemistry in patients suffering subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) or traumatic brain injury (TBI).......Microdialysis is used in many European neurointensive care units to monitor brain chemistry in patients suffering subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) or traumatic brain injury (TBI)....

  8. Obstetric Care consensus No. 6: Periviable Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 0.5% of all births occur before the third trimester of pregnancy, and these very early deliveries result in the majority of neonatal deaths and more than 40% of infant deaths. A recent executive summary of proceedings from a joint workshop defined periviable birth as delivery occurring from 20 0/7 weeks to 25 6/7 weeks of gestation. When delivery is anticipated near the limit of viability, families and health care teams are faced with complex and ethically challenging decisions. Multiple factors have been found to be associated with short-term and long-term outcomes of periviable births in addition to gestational age at birth. These include, but are not limited to, nonmodifiable factors (eg, fetal sex, weight, plurality), potentially modifiable antepartum and intrapartum factors (eg, location of delivery, intent to intervene by cesarean delivery or induction for delivery, administration of antenatal corticosteroids and magnesium sulfate), and postnatal management (eg, starting or withholding and continuing or withdrawing intensive care after birth). Antepartum and intrapartum management options vary depending upon the specific circumstances but may include short-term tocolytic therapy for preterm labor to allow time for administration of antenatal steroids, antibiotics to prolong latency after preterm premature rupture of membranes or for intrapartum group B streptococci prophylaxis, and delivery, including cesarean delivery, for concern regarding fetal well-being or fetal malpresentation. Whenever possible, periviable births for which maternal or neonatal intervention is planned should occur in centers that offer expertise in maternal and neonatal care and the needed infrastructure, including intensive care units, to support such services. This document describes newborn outcomes after periviable birth, provides current evidence and recommendations regarding interventions in this setting, and provides an outline for family counseling with the goal of

  9. Obstetric Care Consensus No. 4: Periviable Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 0.5% of all births occur before the third trimester of pregnancy, and these very early deliveries result in the majority of neonatal deaths and more than 40% of infant deaths. A recent executive summary of proceedings from a joint workshop defined periviable birth as delivery occurring from 20 0/7 weeks to 25 6/7 weeks of gestation. When delivery is anticipated near the limit of viability, families and health care teams are faced with complex and ethically challenging decisions. Multiple factors have been found to be associated with short-term and long-term outcomes of periviable births in addition to gestational age at birth. These include, but are not limited to, nonmodifiable factors (eg, fetal sex, weight, plurality), potentially modifiable antepartum and intrapartum factors (eg, location of delivery, intent to intervene by cesarean delivery or induction for delivery, administration of antenatal corticosteroids and magnesium sulfate), and postnatal management (eg, starting or withholding and continuing or withdrawing intensive care after birth). Antepartum and intrapartum management options vary depending upon the specific circumstances but may include short-term tocolytic therapy for preterm labor to allow time for administration of antenatal steroids, antibiotics to prolong latency after preterm premature rupture of membranes or for intrapartum group B streptococci prophylaxis, and delivery, including cesarean delivery, for concern regarding fetal well-being or fetal malpresentation. Whenever possible, periviable births for which maternal or neonatal intervention is planned should occur in centers that offer expertise in maternal and neonatal care and the needed infrastructure, including intensive care units, to support such services. This document describes newborn outcomes after periviable birth, provides current evidence and recommendations regarding interventions in this setting, and provides an outline for family counseling with the goal of

  10. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  11. Transitions of Care Consensus Policy Statement American College of Physicians-Society of General Internal Medicine-Society of Hospital Medicine-American Geriatrics Society-American College of Emergency Physicians-Society of Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Vincenza; Beck, Dennis; Budnitz, Tina; Miller, Doriane C; Potter, Jane; Wears, Robert L; Weiss, Kevin B; Williams, Mark V

    2009-08-01

    The American College of Physicians (ACP), Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM), Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM), American Geriatric Society (AGS), American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) developed consensus standards to address the quality gaps in the transitions between inpatient and outpatient settings. The following summarized principles were established: 1.) Accountability; 2) Communication; 3.) Timely interchange of information; 4.) Involvement of the patient and family member; 5.) Respect the hub of coordination of care; 6.) All patients and their family/caregivers should have a medical home or coordinating clinician; 7.) At every point of transitions the patient and/or their family/caregivers need to know who is responsible for their care at that point; 9.) National standards; and 10.) Standardized metrics related to these standards in order to lead to quality improvement and accountability. Based on these principles, standards describing necessary components for implementation were developed: coordinating clinicians, care plans/transition record, communication infrastructure, standard communication formats, transition responsibility, timeliness, community standards, and measurement.

  12. A consensus development conference model for establishing health policy for surveillance and screening of antimicrobial-resistant organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buick, Steve; Joffe, A Mark; Taylor, Geoffrey; Conly, John

    2015-04-01

    The Canadian Consensus Development Conference on Surveillance and Screening for Antimicrobial-Resistant Organisms (AROs) was sponsored by the Alberta Ministry of Health to provide evidence to update policies for ARO screening in acute care settings. A rigorous evidence-based literature review completed before the conference concluded that that neither universal nor targeted screening of patients was associated with a reduction in hospital-acquired ARO colonization, infection, morbidity, or mortality. Leading international clinicians, scientists, academics, policy makers, and administrators presented current evidence and clinical experience, focusing on whether and how hospitals should screen patients for AROs as part of broader ARO control strategies. An unbiased and independent "jury" with a broad base of expertise from complementary disciplines considered the evidence and released a consensus statement of 22 recommendations. Policy highlights included developing an integrated "One Health" strategy, fully resourcing basic infection control practices, not performing universal screening, and focusing original research to determine what works.

  13. Inside and Outside the Policy Consensus: Science in a Time of Policy Upheaval in Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, K. M.

    2011-12-01

    A public policy consensus in the United States typically lasts fifty years, an epoch in politics. During periods of relative stability, Constitutional provisions protect the status quo and Congressional procedures favor incremental changes. The consensus breaks down when elections bring members into the institutions with fundamentally different assumptions about the purpose of government. The ensuing policy upheaval brings change that is likely to be transformational with the new policy resembling little of what existed before. The important determinants of potential for policy upheaval and subsequent innovation are the magnitude of the electoral victory, committee specialization and seniority of the members remaining in Congress. The late 19th century policy arc that created the USGS and other rationally based government agencies used scientists to depoliticize important development decisions - e.g. where and when to build irrigation projects or research facilities. The country flourished through the 20th century as politicians of both parties agreed to keep science as a neutral advisor to their decision process. This consensus began to fray after WWII when nuclear physicists, among others, questioned DOD nuclear weapons development plans; the Sierra Club challenged dams on the Colorado River; and tragic mistakes such as thalidomide and DES became well known. Science became vulnerable to politicization as the prior consensus was dismantled incrementally election by election. The late 20th century saw increasingly small majority party margins and divided government became a regular election result instead of a rarity. Divided government lasted for one election cycle before party realignments in 1860, 1896 and 1934. Coincident with the recurring periods of divided government since 1980 without a recognizable realignment was a transformation in the view of science from "collaborator" to "enemy" in the policy process. Geosciences have been caught in the legislative

  14. Family Policy in the 1980s: Controversy and Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldous, Joan; Dumon, Wilfried

    1990-01-01

    Examines controversy concerning efficacy of federal family policy of the 1980s and its effects on family programs. Analyzes family planning and abortion policies and welfare issues. Compares programs devoted to elderly and to children. Concludes by considering the role of social scientists in the policy process and the social context of future…

  15. Consensus of microbiology reporting of ear swab results to primary care clinicians in patients with otitis externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, M; Howell-Jones, R; Cunningham, R; McNulty, C

    2011-01-01

    Otitis externa is a ubiquitous inflammatory disease; although it arises most commonly from an infection, there is no consensus in the UK for the reporting of ear swab culture results. This study aims to review current microbiology laboratory reporting of ear swab specimens to primary care and reach an evidence-based consensus for a reporting policy. Fifty consecutive ear swab reports were reviewed from each of 12 laboratories in the South West region to determine and discuss reporting practice. The Health Protection Agency (HPA) GP Microbiology Laboratory Use Group reviewed the underlying evidence and worked towards a consensus of expert microbiology opinion for laboratory reporting of ear swab results using a modified version of the Delphi technique. A total of 487 reports from primary care were reviewed (54% female; 46% male). Cultures most commonly yielded Pseudomonas species (36%), Staphylococcus species (21%), Streptococcus species (15%) and fungi (11%). Five reporting policies were agreed: Policy 1: Common pathogens such as group A beta-haemolytic streptococci, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus - Always reported by name with antibiotic susceptibilities. Policy 2: Pseudomonas species - Always reported, but antibiotic susceptibilities only reported in severe disease. Policy 3: Aspergillus, Candida, coliforms and Proteus species, as well as non-group A streptococci and anaerobes - Only reported if moderate numbers of colonies and it is the predominant organism present; if appropriate report antibiotic susceptibilities. Policy 4: Coagulase-negative staphylococci, diphtheroids and enterococci - Not reported by name; generic terms used and antibiotic susceptibilities not reported. Policy 5: When antibiotic susceptibilities reported these must include susceptibility to a topical antibiotic. It is suggested that laboratories should consider adopting this evidence-based reporting consensus for ear swab culture results from primary care patients with

  16. Building consensus on key priorities for rural health care in South Africa using the Delphi technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije Versteeg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa is currently undergoing major health system restructuring in an attempt to improve health outcomes and reduce inequities in access. Such inequities exist between private and public health care and within the public health system itself. Experience shows that rural health care can be disadvantaged in policy formulation despite good intentions. The objective of this study was to identify the major challenges and priority interventions for rural health care provision in South Africa thereby contributing to pro-rural health policy dialogue. Methods: The Delphi technique was used to develop consensus on a list of statements that was generated through interviews and literature review. A panel of rural health practitioners and other stakeholders was asked to indicate their level of agreement with these statements and to rank the top challenges in and interventions required for rural health care. Results: Response rates ranged from 83% in the first round (n=44 to 64% in the final round (n=34. The top five priorities were aligned to three of the WHO health system building blocks: human resources for health (HRH, governance, and finance. Specifically, the panel identified a need to focus on recruitment and support of rural health professionals, the employment of managers with sufficient and appropriate skills, a rural-friendly national HRH plan, and equitable funding formulae. Conclusion: Specific policies and strategies are required to address the greatest rural health care challenges and to ensure improved access to quality health care in rural South Africa. In addition, a change in organisational climate and a concerted effort to make a career in rural health appealing to health care workers and adequate funding for rural health care provision are essential.

  17. Developing an undergraduate curriculum in Special Care Dentistry - by consensus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dougall, A

    2013-02-01

    It has been reported that healthcare providers often lack the skills set to provide care for people with disabilities, leading to inequalities in health and reduced access to health care. Newly graduating dentists are likely to see a significant number of patients with special healthcare needs in the course of their practicing lives. However, there is evidence of national and international variation in the availability of education and training at the undergraduate level in this important, emerging area. The quality and content of undergraduate education in Special Care Dentistry has been shown to correlate with students\\' confidence and their expressed willingness, towards providing care for patients with special healthcare needs in their future practice. The aim of this study was to use information from a three-round Delphi process, continued into a face-to-face meeting, to establish consensus on what constitutes the essential core knowledge, skills and attitudes required by a newly qualified dentist so that they are able to deliver patient care to diverse populations following graduation. A high level of agreement was established amongst an international panel of experts from 30 countries. The final core items identified by the panel showed a paradigm shift away from the traditional emphasis on medical diagnosis within a curriculum towards an approach based on the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) with patient-centred treatment planning for people with disabilities and special healthcare needs according to function or environment. Many of the core skills identified by the panel are transferable across a curriculum and should encourage a person-centred approach to treatment planning based on the function, needs and wishes of the patient rather than their specific diagnosis.

  18. [Social consensus on medical technology policy: ethical issues and citizen participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hajime

    2004-01-01

    Social consensus is considered to be a necessary condition for a policy to be introduced and implemented effectively. This is the case with the approval, regulation and prohibition of certain advanced medical research and technology, especially when they could invoke moral disputes in society. Public policies on organ transplantation, definition of death, euthanasia, genetic screening and diagnosis, and human stem cell research are recent examples. The concept of consensus, however, is elusive, along with the measures to secure it. Technocratic decision making, as a paternalistic activity frequently led by experts, sometimes poses a challenge to democratic decision making, supposedly based on a well-informed and rational public. It also remains to be proved whether public involvement in policymaking can be a solution to ethical value conflicts in society. From the perspective of policy sciences, this paper first introduces the concept of consensus, especially consensus on moral issues in pluralistic societies, and its implications to public policy, including citizen participation in decision making. Then, it briefly explains the historical background with which social consensus and public involvement have increasingly flourished in the field of technology assessments and technology policy making, including biomedical technology. Next, major institutions, governmental and nongovernmental, involved in the ethical aspects of medical research and technology, are presented along with their efforts for citizen participation. Finally, the paper discusses some of the future agendas on this issue.

  19. [Consensus on nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes for home care of patients with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzolin, Karina; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira; Ruschel, Karen Brasil; Mussi, Cláudia Motta; de Lucena, Amália Fátima; Rabelo, Eneida Rejane

    2012-12-01

    This was a consensus study with six cardiology nurses with the objective of selecting nursing diagnoses, outcomes and interventions described by NANDA International (NANDA-I), Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC), Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC), for home care of patients with heart failure (HF). Eight nursing diagnoses (NDs) were pre-selected and a consensus was achieved in three stages, during which interventions/activities and outcomes/indicators of each NDs were validated and those considered valid obtained 70% to 100% consensus. From the eight pre-selected NDs, two were excluded due to the lack of consensus on appropriate interventions for the clinical home care scenario. Eleven interventions were selected from a total of 96 pre-selected ones and seven outcomes were validated out of 71. The practice of consensus among expert nurses provides assistance to the qualifications of the care process and deepens the knowledge about the use of tazonomies in nursing clinical practice.

  20. CHOA concussion consensus: establishing a uniform policy for academic accommodations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoli, David Michael; Burns, Thomas G; Meehan, William P; Reisner, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Concussion research generally centers on physical challenges, though aspects such as social functioning and returning to school also warrant attention in pediatric populations. Restoring academic performance postconcussion remains a challenge. Here we provide recommendations addressing a uniform policy for pediatric concussion patients in academic institutions. Tools that may minimize difficulty with academic re-entry include independent educational evaluations, individualized educational programs (IEPs), student support teams (SSTs), letters of academic accommodation, time off, and 504 Plans. Recognition and treatment is crucial for symptom relief and prevention of functional disruption, as is specialist referral during the acute window. We recommend early intervention with a letter of academic accommodation and SST and suggest that 504 Plans and IEPs be reserved for protracted or medically complicated cases. Students with concussion should be observed for anxiety and depression because these symptoms can lead to prolonged recovery, decreased quality of life, and other social challenges.

  1. Sharing the Caring: Rethinking Current Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Don

    1992-01-01

    This article presents an argument for reforming Australian public policy in favor of social care, rather than family, residential, or community care, for the elderly, sick, and disabled. After noting policy assumptions that families are the focus of caring and women are the natural caregivers, the paper describes changes in Australian family…

  2. Hermeneutic application research - finding a common understanding and consensus on care and caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Camilla; Nyström, Lisbet

    2017-03-01

    To clinically and contextually implement the theoretical and factual knowledge of care and caring that has been developed in the last 30 years is seen as a great challenge in caring science research. Emphasis has been put on problem-solving research methodologies and action research in hopes of narrowing the divide between caring theory and clinical practice. Thus, the intention is now to further action research towards a hermeneutic approach and to put emphasis on hermeneutic application where theory and praxis become one through human dialogue. This article highlights hermeneutic application research as an alternative methodology within participatory-oriented research which presents a new opportunity to unite clinical practice and caring theory. The aim is to contribute to the development of the hermeneutical application research design in its epistemological, ontological and ethical perspective, by articulating and clarifying the central foundations in the application. On the basis of Gadamer's hermeneutical thinking and Levinas ethical thinking, the central foundations in the application research are ethics, creation of a hermeneutical room, dialogue and common understanding and appropriation and action. When theoretical understanding turns into praxis, knowledge also becomes activity and theory and practice become one. Application thus realises the basic idea that praxis and theory are one, and thus, theory of caring can only become evident and implemented in a clinical practice through moments when the participants find a common understanding and consensus on the knowledge of care and caring. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  3. Coming to consensus on policy to create supportive built environments and community design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Kim D; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Spence, John C; Neary, Neil E; Nykiforuk, Candace I J

    2012-01-01

    In April 2011, a conference with invited experts from research, policy and practice was held to build consensus around policy levers to address environmental determinants of obesity. The gap between existing policy tools and what can promote health through community design is a major policy opportunity. This commentary represents a consensus of next actions towards creating built environments that support healthy active living. The policy environment and Canadian evidence are reviewed. Issues and challenges to policy change are discussed. Recommendations to create supportive built environments that encourage healthy active living in communities include the following: 1) empower planning authorities to change bylaws that impede healthy active living, protect and increase access to green space, introduce zoning to increase high density, mixed land use, and influence the location and distribution of food stores; 2) establish stable funding for infrastructure promoting active transportation and opportunities for recreation; 3) evaluate the effectiveness of programs to improve the built environment so that successful interventions can be identified and disseminated; 4) mandate health impact assessment of planning, development and transportation policies to ensure that legislative changes promote health and safety; 5) frame issues to dispel myths and to promote protection from obesity risk factors.

  4. Developing consensus-based policy solutions for medicines adherence for Europe: a delphi study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clyne Wendy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-adherence to prescribed medication is a pervasive problem that can incur serious effects on patients’ health outcomes and well-being, and the availability of resources in healthcare systems. This study aimed to develop practical consensus-based policy solutions to address medicines non-adherence for Europe. Methods A four-round Delphi study was conducted. The Delphi Expert Panel comprised 50 participants from 14 countries and was representative of: patient/carers organisations; healthcare providers and professionals; commissioners and policy makers; academics; and industry representatives. Participants engaged in the study remotely, anonymously and electronically. Participants were invited to respond to open questions about the causes, consequences and solutions to medicines non-adherence. Subsequent rounds refined responses, and sought ratings of the relative importance, and operational and political feasibility of each potential solution to medicines non-adherence. Feedback of individual and group responses was provided to participants after each round. Members of the Delphi Expert Panel and members of the research group participated in a consensus meeting upon completion of the Delphi study to discuss and further refine the proposed policy solutions. Results 43 separate policy solutions to medication non-adherence were agreed by the Panel. 25 policy solutions were prioritised based on composite scores for importance, and operational and political feasibility. Prioritised policy solutions focused on interventions for patients, training for healthcare professionals, and actions to support partnership between patients and healthcare professionals. Few solutions concerned actions by governments, healthcare commissioners, or interventions at the system level. Conclusions Consensus about practical actions necessary to address non-adherence to medicines has been developed for Europe. These actions are also applicable to

  5. Policy analysis: palliative care in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Peter; Hynes, Geralyn; McCallion, Philip; Payne, Sheila; Larkin, Philip; McCarron, Mary

    2014-03-01

    Palliative care for patients with advanced illness is a subject of growing importance in health services, policy and research. In 2001 Ireland became one of the first nations to publish a dedicated national palliative care policy. This paper uses the 'policy analysis triangle' as a framework to examine what the policy entailed, where the key ideas originated, why the policy process was activated, who were the key actors, and what were the main consequences. Although palliative care provision expanded following publication, priorities that were unaddressed or not fully embraced on the national policy agenda are identified. The factors underlying areas of non-fulfilment of policy are then discussed. In particular, the analysis highlights that policy initiatives in a relatively new field of healthcare face a trade-off between ambition and feasibility. Key policy goals could not be realised given the large resource commitments required; the competition for resources from other, better-established healthcare sectors; and challenges in expanding workforce and capacity. Additionally, the inherently cross-sectoral nature of palliative care complicated the co-ordination of support for the policy. Policy initiatives in emerging fields such as palliative care should address carefully feasibility and support in their conception and implementation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Policy analysis: palliative care in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Larkin, P

    2014-03-01

    Palliative care for patients with advanced illness is a subject of growing importance in health services, policy and research. In 2001 Ireland became one of the first nations to publish a dedicated national palliative care policy. This paper uses the \\'policy analysis triangle\\' as a framework to examine what the policy entailed, where the key ideas originated, why the policy process was activated, who were the key actors, and what were the main consequences. Although palliative care provision expanded following publication, priorities that were unaddressed or not fully embraced on the national policy agenda are identified. The factors underlying areas of non-fulfilment of policy are then discussed. In particular, the analysis highlights that policy initiatives in a relatively new field of healthcare face a trade-off between ambition and feasibility. Key policy goals could not be realised given the large resource commitments required; the competition for resources from other, better-established healthcare sectors; and challenges in expanding workforce and capacity. Additionally, the inherently cross-sectoral nature of palliative care complicated the co-ordination of support for the policy. Policy initiatives in emerging fields such as palliative care should address carefully feasibility and support in their conception and implementation.

  7. From consensus to conflict: the domestic political economy of East-West energy trade policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jentleson, B.W.

    Changes in the domestic politics of East-West energy trade policy indicate a more general transformation of the domestic politics of American foreign policy. In the postwar period the basic, consensual pattern of congressional bipartisanship, executive-branch unity, interest-group collaboration, and a supportive public has been replaced by the conflictual pattern of an assertive Congress, a fragmented executive branch, antagonistic interest groups, and a divided public. These contrasting patterns are manifestations of structural changes in the domestic political economy. Along both political and economic dimensions, and differentiated according to whether the locus of pressure was group-specific or more general, what had been basic foundations of consensus became by the early 1970s fissures of conflict. Of particular significance were the weakening of the macropolitical foundations (the basic accord on foreign-policy objectives and strategies) in the wake of both Vietnam and detente and the increased marginal value of the economic costs, both diffuse (macroeconomic) and particularistic (microeconomic), to be paid for economic coercion. In this transformed context, the state's support-building instruments of ideology and economic compensation were insufficient to build consensus. As a result, in this issue area and perhaps more generally, high levels of domestic constraints on the conduct of American foreign policy have become the rule rather than the exception. 98 references, 3 figures.

  8. Towards international consensus on patient harm: perspectives on pressure injury policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Debra; Hutchinson, Marie; Barnason, Susan; Li, William; Mannix, Judy; Neville, Stephen; Piper, Donella; Power, Tamara; Smith, Graeme D; Usher, Kim

    2016-10-01

    To analyse influential policies that inform practice related to pressure injury management in Australia, England, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Scotland and the United States of America. Pressure injuries are associated with significant harm to patients, and carry economic consequences for the health sector. Internationally, preventing and managing pressure injuries is a key nursing activity and quality indicator. Comparative review and synthesis of pressure injury policies that inform practice. The predominant focus of policy is on patient risk assessment, compliance with documentation and pressure relief. Financial penalty for institutions is emerging as a strategy where pressure injuries occur. Comparisons of prevalence rates are hampered by the lack of consensus on data collection and reporting. To date there has been little evaluation of policy implementation and implemented policy strategies, associated guidelines remain founded upon expert opinion and low-level evidence. The pressure injury policy agenda has fostered a discourse of attention to incidents, compliance and penalty (sanctions). Prevention and intervention strategies are informed by technical and biomedical interpretations of patient risk and harm, with little attention given to the nature or design of nursing work. Considerable challenges remain if this policy agenda is successfully to eliminate pressure injury as a source of patient harm. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux-Charles Louise

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensivists must provide enough analgesia and sedation to ensure dying patients receive good palliative care. However, if it is perceived that too much is given, they risk prosecution for committing euthanasia. The goal of this study is to develop consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients that help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Methods Using the Delphi technique, panelists rated levels of agreement with statements describing how analgesics and sedatives should be given to dying ICU patients and how palliative care should be distinguished from euthanasia. Participants were drawn from 3 panels: 1 Canadian Academic Adult Intensive Care Fellowship program directors and Intensive Care division chiefs (N = 9; 2 Deputy chief provincial coroners (N = 5; 3 Validation panel of Intensivists attending the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group meeting (N = 12. Results After three Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on 16 statements encompassing the role of palliative care in the intensive care unit, the management of pain and suffering, current areas of controversy, and ways of improving palliative care in the ICU. Conclusion Consensus guidelines were developed to guide the administration of analgesics and sedatives to dying ICU patients and to help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia.

  10. Therapeutic Residential Care for Children and Youth : A Consensus Statement of the International Work Group on Therapeutic Residential Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whittaker, James K.; Holmes, Lisa; del Valle, Jorge F.; Ainsworth, Frank; Andreassen, Tore; Anglin, James P.; Bellonci, Christopher; Berridge, David; Bravo, Amaia; Canali, Cinzia; Courtney, Mark; Currey, Laura; Daly, Daniel L.; Gilligan, Robbie; Grietens, Hans; Harder, Annemiek T.; Holden, Martha J.; James, Sigrid; Kendrick, Andrew; Knorth, Erik J.; Lausten, Mette; Lyons, John S.; Martin, Eduardo; McDermid, Samantha; McNamara, Patricia; Palareti, Laura; Ramsey, Susan; Sisson, Kari M.; Small, Richard W.; Thoburn, June; Thompson, Ronald; Zeira, Anat

    While the focus of this consensus statement and the review volume that preceded it (Whittaker, Del Valle, & Holmes, 2014) is on therapeutic residential care (TRC), a specialized form of group care, we view our work as supportive of a much wider effort internationally concerned with the quality of

  11. The standard of care debate: the Declaration of Helsinki versus the international consensus opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, R K; Emanuel, E; Grady, C; Wendler, D

    2004-04-01

    The World Medical Association's revised Declaration of Helsinki endorses the view that all trial participants in every country are entitled to the worldwide best standard of care. In this paper the authors show that this requirement has been rejected by every national and international committee that has examined this issue. They argue that the consensus view now holds that it is ethically permissible, in some circumstances, to provide research participants less than the worldwide best care. Finally, the authors show that there is also consensus regarding the broad conditions under which this is acceptable.

  12. Unraveling the Hidden Curriculum. Values in Youth Care Interventions and Youth Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, M.

    2012-01-01

    Themes such as “effectiveness” and “evidence-based practice” dominate current debates about and within the professional field of youth care. The field seems to focus almost solely on the effectiveness of interventions and policy measures and there appears to be a general consensus on the objectivity

  13. AFEM Consensus Conference, 2013. AFEM Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care Workgroup Consensus Paper: Advancing Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care in Africa-Advocacy and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.K. Mould-Millman

    2014-06-01

    Future directions of the AFEM Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care Workgroup include creating an online Toolkit. This will serve as a repository of template documents to guide implementation and development of clinical care, education, transportation, public access, policy and governance.

  14. From Consensus to Contention: Changing Revenue and Policy Dynamics in Uganda?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Ulriksen, Marianne

    This paper examines how the changing relationships between the Ugandan government, on the one side, and citizens and donors, on the other, affect public policy priorities. We hypothesise that citizens can affect government’s policy priority both as voters, as represented by civil society organisa......, citizens’ preferences became an important political consideration. In the latter period, donors have lost some of their erstwhile funding dominance, the government is building new partnerships, and social sector expansion has lost much of its electoral appeal.......This paper examines how the changing relationships between the Ugandan government, on the one side, and citizens and donors, on the other, affect public policy priorities. We hypothesise that citizens can affect government’s policy priority both as voters, as represented by civil society...... strategies and social spending, to relationships for which consensus is waning and the government is moving (back) to policies of infrastructural development and structural transformation of the economy. In the former period, donors provided the majority of funding and, with the introduction of elections...

  15. Two Different Views on Monetary Policy Impact: The New Consensus and Post-Keynesian Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius-Corneliu Marinas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to make a synthesis of the differences between two new macroeconomic views. A New Consensus has arisen among neoclassical and New-Keynesian economists, such as Romer, Taylor and Walsh. This new view seeks to redefine the application of monetary policy by re-specifying the most appropriate monetary rule, which is used for inflation targeting. The framework of the monetary policy impact requires the usage of a expectations augmented Phillips curve, characterized through the lack of trade-off inflation-unemployment in the long-run. Post-keynesian macroeconomic critical, whose promoters are Arestis, Lavoie and Satterfield, argues that for most of the production levels obtained output change has no effect on inflation. This is a re-formulation of the Keynesian aggregate supply curve, which is entirely horizontal.

  16. Restricting marketing to children: Consensus on policy interventions to address obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Kim D; Lobstein, Tim; Landon, Jane; Kent, Monique Potvin; Pellerin, Suzie; Caulfield, Timothy; Finegood, Diane; Mongeau, Lyne; Neary, Neil; Spence, John C

    2013-01-01

    Obesity presents major challenges for public health and the evidence is strong. Lessons from tobacco control indicate a need for changing the policy and environments to make healthy choices easier and to create more opportunities for children to achieve healthy weights. In April 2011, the Alberta Policy Coalition for Chronic Disease Prevention convened a consensus conference on environmental determinants of obesity such as marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages to children. We examine the political environment, evidence, issues, and challenges of placing restrictions on marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages within Canada. We recommend a national regulatory system prohibiting commercial marketing of foods and beverages to children and suggest that effective regulations must set minimum standards, monitor compliance, and enact penalties for non-compliance. PMID:23447026

  17. Obstetric Care Consensus No. 4 Summary: Periviable Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 0.5% of all births occur before the third trimester of pregnancy, and these very early deliveries result in the majority of neonatal deaths and more than 40% of infant deaths. A recent executive summary of proceedings from a joint workshop defined periviable birth as delivery occurring from 20 0/7 weeks to 25 6/7 weeks of gestation. When delivery is anticipated near the limit of viability, families and health care teams are faced with complex and ethically challenging decisions. Multiple factors have been found to be associated with short-term and long-term outcomes of periviable births in addition to gestational age at birth. These include, but are not limited to, nonmodifiable factors (eg, fetal sex, weight, plurality), potentially modifiable antepartum and intrapartum factors (eg, location of delivery, intent to intervene by cesarean delivery or induction for delivery, administration of antenatal corticosteroids and magnesium sulfate), and postnatal management (eg, starting or withholding and continuing or withdrawing intensive care after birth). Antepartum and intrapartum management options vary depending upon the specific circumstances but may include short-term tocolytic therapy for preterm labor to allow time for administration of antenatal steroids, antibiotics to prolong latency after preterm premature rupture of membranes or for intrapartum group B streptococci prophylaxis, and delivery, including cesarean delivery, for concern regarding fetal well-being or fetal malpresentation. Whenever possible, periviable births for which maternal or neonatal intervention is planned should occur in centers that offer expertise in maternal and neonatal care and the needed infrastructure, including intensive care units, to support such services. This document describes newborn outcomes after periviable birth, provides current evidence and recommendations regarding interventions in this setting, and provides an outline for family counseling with the goal of

  18. Involving Patients in a Multidisciplinary European Consensus Process and in the Development of a 'Patient Summary of the Consensus Document for Colon and Rectal Cancer Care'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, Petra G.; Taylor, Claire; Henning, Geoffrey; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J.; Espin, Eloy; Wiggers, Theo; Gore-Booth, Jola; Moss, Barbara; Valentini, Vincenzo; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Context High-quality cancer care should be accessible for patients and healthcare professionals. Involvement of patients as partners in guideline formation and consensus processes is still rarely found. EURECCA, short for European Registration of Cancer Care, is the platform to improve outcomes of c

  19. Changing policies, changing patterns of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine; Szebehely, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Despite pursuing the policy of ageing in place, the two Nordic countries of Denmark and Sweden have taken diverse roads in regard to the provision of formal, public tax-financed home care for older people. Whilst Sweden has cut down home care and targeted services for the most needy, Denmark has...... continued the generous provision of home care. This article focuses on the implication of such diverse policies for the provision and combination of formal and informal care resources for older people. Using data from Level of Living surveys (based on interviews with a total of 1,158 individuals aged 67......–87 in need of practical help), the article investigates the consequences of the two policy approaches for older people of different needs and socio-economic backgrounds and evaluates how the development corresponds with ideals of universalism in the Nordic welfare model. Our findings show that in both...

  20. Seeking worldwide professional consensus on the principles of end-of-life care for the critically ill. The Consensus for Worldwide End-of-Life Practice for Patients in Intensive Care Units (WELPICUS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprung, Charles L; Truog, Robert D; Curtis, J Randall; Joynt, Gavin M; Baras, Mario; Michalsen, Andrej; Briegel, Josef; Kesecioglu, Jozef; Efferen, Linda; De Robertis, Edoardo; Bulpa, Pierre; Metnitz, Philipp; Patil, Namrata; Hawryluck, Laura; Manthous, Constantine; Moreno, Rui; Leonard, Sara; Hill, Nicholas S; Wennberg, Elisabet; McDermid, Robert C; Mikstacki, Adam; Mularski, Richard A; Hartog, Christiane S; Avidan, Alexander

    2014-10-15

    Great differences in end-of-life practices in treating the critically ill around the world warrant agreement regarding the major ethical principles. This analysis determines the extent of worldwide consensus for end-of-life practices, delineates where there is and is not consensus, and analyzes reasons for lack of consensus. Critical care societies worldwide were invited to participate. Country coordinators were identified and draft statements were developed for major end-of-life issues and translated into six languages. Multidisciplinary responses using a web-based survey assessed agreement or disagreement with definitions and statements linked to anonymous demographic information. Consensus was prospectively defined as >80% agreement. Definitions and statements not obtaining consensus were revised based on comments of respondents, and then translated and redistributed. Of the initial 1,283 responses from 32 countries, consensus was found for 66 (81%) of the 81 definitions and statements; 26 (32%) had >90% agreement. With 83 additional responses to the original questionnaire (1,366 total) and 604 responses to the revised statements, consensus could be obtained for another 11 of the 15 statements. Consensus was obtained for informed consent, withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, legal requirements, intensive care unit therapies, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, shared decision making, medical and nursing consensus, brain death, and palliative care. Consensus was obtained for 77 of 81 (95%) statements. Worldwide consensus could be developed for the majority of definitions and statements about end-of-life practices. Statements achieving consensus provide standards of practice for end-of-life care; statements without consensus identify important areas for future research.

  1. Consensus of primary care in acute pancreatitis in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Makoto Otsuki; Tetsuhide Ito; Kazuo Inui; Tooru Shimosegawa; Shigeki Tanaka; Keisho Kataoka; Hiromitsu Saisho; Kazuichi Okazaki; Yosikazu Kuroda; Norio Sawabu; Yoshifumi Takeyama; Masahiko Hirota; Shinju Arata; Masaru Koizumi; Shigeyuki Kawa; Terumi Kamisawa; Kazunori Takeda; Toshihiko Mayumi; Motoji Kitagawa

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis in Japan is increasing and ranges from 187 to 347 cases per million populations. Case fatality was 0.2% for mild to moderate, and 9.0% for severe acute pancreatitis in Japan in 2003. Experts in pancreatitis in Japan made this document focusing on the practical aspects in the early management of patients with acute pancreatitis.The correct diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and severity stratification should be made in all patients using the criteria for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and the multifactor scoring system proposed by the Research Committee of Intractable Diseases of the Pancreas as early as possible. All patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis should be managed in the hospital.Monitoring of blood pressure, pulse and respiratory rate,body temperature, hourly urinary volume, and blood oxygen saturation level is essential in the management of such patients. Early vigorous intravenous hydration is of foremost importance to stabilize circulatory dynamics. Adequate pain relief with opiates is also important. In severe acute pancreatitis, prophylactic intravenous administration of antibiotics at an early stage is recommended. Administration of protease inhibitors should be initiated as soon as thediagnosis of acute pancreatitis is confirmed. A combination of enteral feeding with parenteral nutrition from early stage is recommended if there are no clear signs and symptoms of ileus and gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients with severe acute pancreatitis should be transferred to ICU as early as possible to perform special measures such as continuous regional arterial infusion of protease inhibitors and antibiotics, and continuous hemodiafiltration. The Japanese Government covers medical care expense for severe acute pancreatitis as one of the projects of Research on Measures for Intractable Diseases.

  2. Developing an internationally-applicable service specification for continence care: systematic review, evidence synthesis and expert consensus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian S Wagg

    Full Text Available Global demographic trends suggest that the incidence of both urinary and faecal incontinence will rise in the coming years, bringing significant health and economic implications for both patients and payers. There is limited organisational evidence to guide payers and providers about service configuration which will deliver efficient guideline-compliant, high-quality patient care.To create, using evidence from a systematic review, qualitative data and expert consensus an internationally applicable service specification for continence care.Evidence was obtained from a systematic and grey literature review of published randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies reporting efficacy of continence service design at the level of the community dwelling patient with either bladder or bowel incontinence, governmental reports and policy frameworks supplemented by data from 47 semi-structured interviews with clinicians, patients, patient-representatives and policy experts from four geographies broadly representative of different healthcare systems.A number of themes related to current and potential future organisation of continence care were identified from the data. A modular service specification with eight core components was created including case detection, initial assessment and treatment, case co-ordination, caregiver support, community-based support, specialist assessment and treatment, use of containment products, and use of technology. Within this framework important key recommendations are: ensure robust referral pathways, shift assessment for case coordination to nurses specializing in continence care, promote self-management and technology, use comprehensive assessment tools and service performance targets based on outcome and operational measures.This study has defined practice gaps in the provision of continence services and described eight core components of a service specification for incontinence that commissioners and

  3. Recognizing rhetoric in health care policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jill; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Byrne, Emma; McDonnell, Janet

    2008-01-01

    Critiques of the 'naïve rationalist' model of policy-making abound in the sociological and political science literature. Yet academic debate on health care policy-making continues to be couched in the dominant discourse of evidence-based medicine, whose underlying assumptions--that policies are driven by facts rather than values and these can be clearly separated; that 'evidence' is context-free, can be objectively weighed up and placed unproblematically in a 'hierarchy'; and that policy-making is essentially an exercise in decision science--have constrained both thinking and practice. In this paper, drawing on theoretical work from political science and philosophy, and innovative empirical work in the health care sector, we argue that health care is well overdue for a re-defining of what policy-making is. Policy-making is the formal struggle over ideas and values, played out by the rhetorical use of language and the enactment of social situations. While the selection, evaluation and implementation of research evidence are important in the policy-making process, they do not equate to that process. The study of argument in the construction of policy has the potential to illuminate dimensions of the process that are systematically occluded when policy-making is studied through a naïve rationalist lens. In particular, a rhetorical perspective highlights the struggle over ideas, the 'naming and framing' of policy problems, the centrality of audience and the rhetorical use of language in discussion to increase the audience's adherence to particular framings and proposals. Rhetorical theory requires us to redefine what counts as 'rationality'--which must extend from what is provably true (by logic) and probably true (by Bayesian reasoning) to embrace, in addition, that which is plausibly true (i.e. can convince a reasonable audience). Future research into health care policy-making needs to move beyond the study of 'getting evidence into practice' and address the

  4. It takes a (virtual) village: crowdsourcing measurement consensus to advance survivorship care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Carla; Beckjord, Ellen; Moser, Richard P; Vieux, Sana N; Padgett, Lynne S; Hesse, Bradford W

    2015-03-01

    We report results from the use of an innovative tool (the Grid-Enabled Measures (GEM) database) to drive consensus on the use of measures evaluating the efficacy and implementation of survivorship care plans. The goal of this initiative was to increase the use of publicly available shared measures to enable comparability across studies. Between February and August 2012, research and practice communities populated the GEM platform with constructs and measures relevant to survivorship care planning, rated the measures, and provided qualitative feedback on the quality of the measures. Fifty-one constructs and 124 measures were entered into the GEM-Care Planning workspace by participants. The greatest number of measures appeared in the domains of Health and Psychosocial Outcomes, Health Behaviors, and Coordination of Care/Transitional Care. Using technology-mediated social participation, GEM presents a novel approach to how we measure and improve the quality of survivorship care.

  5. The emerging EU quality of care policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; van de Bovenkamp, Hester M.; Vrangbæk, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    involvement in healthcare policy over the last twenty years. Based on interviews and document and literature analysis we show that the scope of EU involvement has widened from public health and access to care, to quality of care. In this paper we concentrate on the latter. Focusing on the recent EU......Despite the fact that Member States and many citizens of the EU like to keep healthcare a foremost national competence and the EU treaties state that Member States remain primarily responsible for the organization and delivery of health care services, the European Union (EU) has expanded its...... and desirability of the EU's involvement is clearly needed, also considering the differences in quality of care policies between and within EU Member States. Both arguments in favour and against further EU involvement are discussed in this paper...

  6. [Therapeutic Residential Care for Children and Youth: A Consensus Statement of the International Work Group on Therapeutic Residential Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, James K; Holmes, Lisa; Del Valle, Jorge F; Ainsworth, Frank; Andreassen, Tore; Anglin, James; Bellonci, Christopher; Berridge, David; Bravo, Amaia; Canali, Cinzia; Courtney, Mark; Currey, Laurah; Daly, Daniel; Gilligan, Robbie; Grietens, Hans; Harder, Annemiek; Holden, Martha; James, Sigrid; Kendrick, Andrew; Knorth, Erick; Lausten, Mette; Lyons, John; Martin, Eduardo; McDermid, Samantha; McNamara, Patricia; Palareti, Laura; Ramsey, Susan; Sisson, Kari; Small, Richard; Thoburn, June; Thompson, Ronald; Zeira, Anat

    2017-08-01

    Therapeutic Residential Care for Children and Youth: A Consensus Statement of the International Work Group on Therapeutic Residential Care. In many developed countries around the world residential care interventions for children and adolescents have come under increasing scrutiny. Against this background an international summit was organised in England (spring 2016) with experts from 13 countries to reflect on therapeutic residential care (TRC). The following working definition of TRC was leading: “Therapeutic residential care involves the planful use of a purposefully constructed, multi-dimensional living environment designed to enhance or provide treatment, education, socialization, support, and protection to children and youth with identified mental health or behavioral needs in partnership with their families and in collaboration with a full spectrum of community based formal and informal helping resources”. The meeting was characterised by exchange of information and evidence, and by preparing an international research agenda. In addition, the outlines of a consensus statement on TRC were discussed. This statement, originally published in English and now reproduced in a Spanish translation, comprises inter alia five basic principles of care that according to the Work Group on Therapeutic Residental Care should be guiding for residential youth care provided at any time.

  7. Consensus development of core competencies in intensive and critical care medicine training in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyun; Xi, Xiuming; Ma, Penglin; Qiu, Haibo; Yu, Kaijiang; Tang, Yaoqing; Qian, Chuanyun; Fang, Qiang; Wang, Yushan; Yu, Xiangyou; Xu, Yuan; Du, Bin

    2016-10-16

    The aim of this study is to develop consensus on core competencies required for postgraduate training in intensive care medicine. We used a combination of a modified Delphi method and a nominal group technique to create and modify the list of core competencies to ensure maximum consensus. Ideas were generated modified from Competency Based Training in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe collaboration (CoBaTrICE) core competencies. An online survey invited healthcare professionals, educators, and trainees to rate and comment on these competencies. The output from the online survey was edited and then reviewed by a nominal group of 13 intensive care professionals to identify each competence for importance. The resulting list was then recirculated in the nominal group for iterative rating. The online survey yielded a list of 199 competencies for nominal group reviewing. After five rounds of rating, 129 competencies entered the final set defined as core competencies. We have generated a set of core competencies using a consensus technique which can serve as an indicator for training program development.

  8. The neurologist's role in supporting transition to adult health care: A consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lawrence W; Camfield, Peter; Capers, Melissa; Cascino, Greg; Ciccarelli, Mary; de Gusmao, Claudio M; Downs, Stephen M; Majnemer, Annette; Miller, Amy Brin; SanInocencio, Christina; Schultz, Rebecca; Tilton, Anne; Winokur, Annick; Zupanc, Mary

    2016-08-23

    The child neurologist has a critical role in planning and coordinating the successful transition from the pediatric to adult health care system for youth with neurologic conditions. Leadership in appropriately planning a youth's transition and in care coordination among health care, educational, vocational, and community services providers may assist in preventing gaps in care, delayed entry into the adult care system, and/or health crises for their adolescent patients. Youth whose neurologic conditions result in cognitive or physical disability and their families may need additional support during this transition, given the legal and financial considerations that may be required. Eight common principles that define the child neurologist's role in a successful transition process have been outlined by a multidisciplinary panel convened by the Child Neurology Foundation are introduced and described. The authors of this consensus statement recognize the current paucity of evidence for successful transition models and outline areas for future consideration.

  9. Eliminating health disparities through culturally and linguistically centered integrated health care: consensus statements, recommendations, and key strategies from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Katherine; Chapa, Teresa; Ybarra, Rick; Martinez, Octavio N

    2014-05-01

    This report is the outcome of an expert consensus meeting sponsored by the United States Deparment of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health, which was convened to formulate consensus statements, provide recommendations and identify key strategies from practice for implementing integrated health and behavioral health care intended to improve health status for underserved populations.

  10. Increasing Internal Stakeholder Consensus about a University Science Center's Outreach Policies and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Richard D.

    For decades the United States has tried to increase the number of students pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and careers. Educators and policy makers continue to seek strategies to increase the number of students in the STEM education pipeline. Public institutions of higher education are involved in this effort through education and public outreach (EPO) initiatives. Arizona State University opened its largest research facility, the new Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV (ISTB4) in September, 2012. As the new home of the School of Earth & Space Exploration (SESE), ISTB4 was designed to serve the school's dedication to K-12 education and public outreach. This dissertation presents a menu of ideas for revamping the EPO program for SESE. Utilizing the Delphi method, I was able to clarify which ideas would be most supported, and those that would not, by a variety of important SESE stakeholders. The study revealed that consensus exists in areas related to staffing and expansion of free programming, whereas less consensus exist in the areas of fee-based programs. The following most promising ideas for improving the SESE's EPO effort were identified and will be presented to SESE's incoming director in July, 2013: (a) hire a full-time director, theater manager, and program coordinator; (b) establish a service-learning requirement obligating undergraduate SESE majors to serve as docent support for outreach programs; (c) obligate all EPO operations to advise, assist, and contribute to the development of curricula, activities, and exhibits; (d) perform a market and cost analysis of other informational education venues offering similar programming; (3) establish a schedule of fee-based planetarium and film offerings; and (f) create an ISTB4 centric, fee-based package of programs specifically correlated to K12 education standards that can be delivered as a fieldtrip experience.

  11. Access to out-of-hospital emergency care in Africa: Consensus conference recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Stein

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Out-of-hospital emergency care (OHEC should be accessible to all who require it. However, available data suggests that there are a number of barriers to such access in Africa, mainly centred around challenges in public knowledge, perception and appropriate utilisation of OHEC. Having reached consensus in 2013 on a two-tier system of African OHEC, the African Federation for Emergency Medicine (AFEM OHEC Group sought to gain further consensus on the narrower subject of access to OHEC in Africa. The objective of this paper is to report the outputs and statements arising from the AFEM OHEC access consensus meeting held in Cape Town, South Africa in April 2015. The discussion was structured around six dimensions of access to care (i.e. awareness, availability, accessibility, accommodation, affordability and acceptability and tackled both Tier-1 (community first responder and Tier-2 (formal prehospital services and Emergency Medical Services OHEC systems. In Tier-1 systems, the role of community involvement and support was emphasised, along with the importance of a first responder system acceptable to the community in which it is embedded in order to optimise access. In Tier-2 systems, the consensus group highlighted the primacy of a single toll-free emergency number, matching of Emergency Medical Services resource demand and availability through appropriate planning and the cost-free nature of Tier-2 emergency care, amongst other factors that impact accessibility. Much work is still needed in prioritising the steps and clarifying the tools and metrics that would enable the ideal of optimal access to OHEC in Africa.

  12. End-of-life care policy: An integrated care plan for the dying: A Joint Position Statement of the Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine (ISCCM) and the Indian Association of Palliative Care (IAPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatra, Sheila Nainan; Salins, Naveen; Iyer, Shivakumar; Macaden, Stanley C; Divatia, Jigeeshu V; Muckaden, Maryann; Kulkarni, Priyadarshini; Simha, Srinagesh; Mani, Raj Kumar

    2014-09-01

    The purpose was to develop an end-of-life care (EOLC) policy for patients who are dying with an advanced life limiting illness and to develop practical procedural guidelines for limiting inappropriate therapeutic medical interventions and improve the quality of care of the dying within an ethical framework and through a professional and family/patient consensus process. The Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine (ISCCM) published its first guidelines on EOLC in 2005 [1] which was later revised in 2012.[2] Since these publications, there has been an exponential increase in empirical information and discussion on the subject. The literature reviewed observational studies, surveys, randomized controlled studies, as well as guidelines and recommendations, for education and quality improvement published across the world. The search terms were: EOLC; do not resuscitate directives; withdrawal and withholding; intensive care; terminal care; medical futility; ethical issues; palliative care; EOLC in India; cultural variations. Indian Association of Palliative Care (IAPC) also recently published its consensus position statement on EOLC policy for the dying.[3]. An expert committee of members of the ISCCM and IAPC was formed to make a joint EOLC policy for the dying patients. Proposals from the chair were discussed, debated, and recommendations were formulated through a consensus process. The members extensively reviewed national and international established ethical principles and current procedural practices. This joint EOLC policy has incorporated the sociocultural, ethical, and legal perspectives, while taking into account the needs and situation unique to India.

  13. [Consensus on hereditary cancer between the Spanish Oncology Society and the primary care societies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, L; Balmaña, J; Barrel, I; Grandes, S; Graña, B; Guillén, C; Marcos, H; Ramírez, D; Redondo, E; Sánchez, J

    2013-01-01

    It is believed that 5% of all cancers are hereditary, on being caused by mutations in the germinal line in cancer susceptibility genes. The hereditary pattern in the majority of cases is autosomal dominant. Genetic tests are only recommended to individuals whose personal or family history is highly suggestive of a hereditary cancer. The appropriate assessment of these individuals and their families must be performed in Cancer Genetic Counselling Units (UCGC). Representatives of the Spanish Medical Oncology Society (Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica [SEOM]) and the three primary care scientific societies: Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine (Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [SEMFyC]), Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians (Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN]) and the Spanish Society of General and Family Doctors (Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG]), met to prepare this consensus document on hereditary cancer. The consensus identified the three main aspects: how to identify subjects at risk of hereditary cancer; how to refer to a UCGC; and the usefulness of the assessment and genetic studies. A document, with the text fully agreed by all the participants, has been prepared. It contains a summary of the principal characteristics of the care for individuals with hereditary cancer. It shows how to; identify them, assess them, refer them to a UCGC. How to assess their genetic risk, perform genetic studies, as well as prevention measures and reduction of the risk is also presented. This consensus document is a landmark in the relationships with several Scientific Societies that represent the professionals who provide care to individuals with cancer and their families, and will help to improve care in hereditary cancer in Spain. Copyright © 2013. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  14. A review and survey of policies utilized for interventional pain procedures: a need for consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Lynn; Salajegheh, Reza; Hamill-Ruth, Robin J; Yerra, Sandeep; Butz, John

    2017-01-01

    Background Other than the newly published anticoagulation guidelines, there are currently few recommendations to assist pain medicine physicians in determining the safety parameters to follow when performing interventional pain procedures. Little information exists regarding policies for oral intake, cumulative steroid dose limits, driving restrictions with and without sedation, and routine medication use for interventional procedures. Methods A 16-question survey was developed on common policies currently in use for interventional pain procedures. The questionnaire was distributed through the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and American Academy of Pain Medicine. We sought to statistically analyze the range of policies being used by pain medicine physicians and to determine if there are any commonly accepted standards. Results A total of 337 physicians out of 4037 members responded to our survey with a response rate of 8.4%. A total of 82% of these respondents used a sedative agent while performing an interventional pain procedure. The majority of respondents required drivers after procedures, except after trigger points. A total of 47% indicated that they have an nil per os (NPO) policy for procedures without sedation. A total of 98% reported that they had an anticoagulation policy before an interventional procedure. A total of 17% indicated that the interval between steroid doses was <2 weeks, while 53% indicated that they waited 2–4 weeks between steroid doses. Conclusion Our study has clearly demonstrated a wide variation in the current practice among physicians regarding sedation, NPO status, steroid administration, and the need for designated drivers. There was much higher endorsement of policies regarding anticoagulation. There is an obvious need for evidence-based guidelines for these aspects of interventional pain care to improve patient safety and minimize the risk of adverse events. PMID:28360531

  15. Education and Health Care Policies in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziblim Abukari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Education and health care policies in Ghana since independence have been universalist in approach providing free universal health care and free basic and tertiary education until the early 1980s. Precipitated primarily by a severe drought, stagnant economic growth, mismanagement, and political instability, Ghana undertook major economic reforms with prodding from the World Bank and International Monetary Fund in a bid to salvage the economy. These economic measures included cost recovery and cutback spending in education and health sectors. However, in recent years, purposive targeted interventions have been pursued to address inequalities in education and health care. These new programs include the Education Capitation Grant, school feeding program, and the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS, which are propelling Ghana toward the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. The prospects of these programs in addressing disparities in access to education and health care in the country and recommendations for improved delivery are discussed.

  16. Antibiotic Policies in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nese Saltoglu

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial management of patients in the Intensive Care Units are complex. Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem. Effective strategies for the prevention of antimicrobial resistance in ICUs have focused on limiting the unnecessary use of antibiotics and increasing compliance with infection control practices. Antibiotic policies have been implemented to modify antibiotic use, including national or regional formulary manipulations, antibiotic restriction forms, care plans, antibiotic cycling and computer assigned antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, infectious diseases consultation is a simple way to limit antibiotic use in ICU units. To improve rational antimicrobial using a multidisiplinary approach is suggested. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 299-309

  17. Consensus recommendations from the strategic planning summit for pain and palliative care pharmacy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Christopher M; Strassels, Scott A; Strickland, Jennifer M; Kral, Lee A; Craig, David S; Nesbit, Suzanne Amato; Finley, Rebecca S; McPherson, Mary Lynn

    2012-05-01

    Pain and symptoms related to palliative care (pain and palliative care [PPC]) are often undertreated. This is largely owing to the complexity in the provision of care and the potential discrepancy in education among the various health care professionals required to deliver care. Pharmacists are frequently involved in the care of PPC patients, although pharmacy education currently does not offer or require a strong curriculum commitment to this area of practice. The Strategic Planning Summit for the Advancement of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacy was convened to address opportunities to improve the education of pharmacists and pharmacy students on PPC. Six working groups were charged with objectives to address barriers and opportunities in the areas of student and professional assessment, model curricula, postgraduate training, professional education, and credentialing. Consensus was reached among the working groups and presented to the Summit Advisory Board for adoption. These recommendations will provide guidance on improving the care provided to PPC patients by pharmacists through integrating education at all points along the professional education continuum.

  18. Consensus statement on advancing research in emergency department operations and its impact on patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiadom, Maame Yaa A B; Ward, Michael J; Chang, Anna Marie; Pines, Jesse M; Jouriles, Nick; Yealy, Donald M

    2015-06-01

    The consensus conference on "Advancing Research in Emergency Department (ED) Operations and Its Impact on Patient Care," hosted by The ED Operations Study Group (EDOSG), convened to craft a framework for future investigations in this important but understudied area. The EDOSG is a research consortium dedicated to promoting evidence-based clinical practice in emergency medicine. The consensus process format was a modified version of the NIH Model for Consensus Conference Development. Recommendations provide an action plan for how to improve ED operations study design, create a facilitating research environment, identify data measures of value for process and outcomes research, and disseminate new knowledge in this area. Specifically, we call for eight key initiatives: 1) the development of universal measures for ED patient care processes; 2) attention to patient outcomes, in addition to process efficiency and best practice compliance; 3) the promotion of multisite clinical operations studies to create more generalizable knowledge; 4) encouraging the use of mixed methods to understand the social community and human behavior factors that influence ED operations; 5) the creation of robust ED operations research registries to drive stronger evidence-based research; 6) prioritizing key clinical questions with the input of patients, clinicians, medical leadership, emergency medicine organizations, payers, and other government stakeholders; 7) more consistently defining the functional components of the ED care system, including observation units, fast tracks, waiting rooms, laboratories, and radiology subunits; and 8) maximizing multidisciplinary knowledge dissemination via emergency medicine, public health, general medicine, operations research, and nontraditional publications. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  19. A Nordic Perspective on Early Childhood Education and Care Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karila, Kirsti

    2012-01-01

    The national policies and historical roots of early childhood education (ECE) vary from society to society. In the Nordic countries, early childhood education and care (ECEC) policies have been built in the context of the welfare state. As such, they are closely connected to other welfare policy areas such as social policy, family policy and…

  20. Consensus principles for wound care research obtained using a Delphi process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serena, Thomas; Bates-Jensen, Barbara; Carter, Marissa J; Cordrey, Renee; Driver, Vickie; Fife, Caroline E; Haser, Paul B; Krasner, Diane; Nusgart, Marcia; Smith, Adrianne P S; Snyder, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Too many wound care research studies are poorly designed, badly executed, and missing crucial data. The objective of this study is to create a series of principles for all stakeholders involved in clinical or comparative effectiveness research in wound healing. The Delphi approach was used to reach consensus, using a web-based survey for survey participants and face-to-face conferences for expert panel members. Expert panel (11 members) and 115 wound care researchers (respondents) drawn from 15 different organizations. Principles were rated for validity using 5-point Likert scales and comments. A 66% response rate was achieved in the first Delphi round from the 173 invited survey participants. The response rate for the second Delphi round was 46%. The most common wound care researcher profile was age 46-55 years, a wound care clinic setting, and >10 years' wound care research and clinical experience. Of the initial 17 principles created by the panel, only four principles were not endorsed in Delphi round 1 with another four not requiring revision. Of the 14 principles assessed by respondents in the second Delphi round, only one principle was not endorsed and it was revised; four other principles also needed revision based on the use of specific words or contextual use. Of the 19 final principles, three included detailed numbered lists. With the wide variation in design, conduct, and reporting of wound care research studies, it is hoped that these principles will improve the standard and practice of care in this field.

  1. [Consensus document on ultrasound training in Intensive Care Medicine. Care process, use of the technique and acquisition of professional skills].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuela Azcárate, J M; Clau-Terré, F; Vicho Pereira, R; Guerrero de Mier, M; Carrillo López, A; Ochagavia, A; López Pérez, J M; Trenado Alvarez, J; Pérez, L; Llompart-Pou, J A; González de Molina, F J; Fojón, S; Rodríguez Salgado, A; Martínez Díaz, M C; Royo Villa, C; Romero Bermejo, F J; Ruíz Bailén, M; Arroyo Díez, M; Argueso García, M; Fernández Fernández, J L

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound has become an essential tool in assisting critically ill patients. His knowledge, use and instruction requires a statement by scientific societies involved in its development and implementation. Our aim are to determine the use of the technique in intensive care medicine, clinical situations where its application is recommended, levels of knowledge, associated responsibility and learning process also implement the ultrasound technique as a common tool in all intensive care units, similar to the rest of european countries. The SEMICYUC's Working Group Cardiac Intensive Care and CPR establishes after literature review and scientific evidence, a consensus document which sets out the requirements for accreditation in ultrasound applied to the critically ill patient and how to acquire the necessary skills. Training and learning requires a structured process within the specialty. The SEMICYUC must agree to disclose this document, build relationships with other scientific societies and give legal cover through accreditation of the training units, training courses and different levels of training.

  2. Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

  3. Critical care management of patients following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: recommendations from the Neurocritical Care Society's Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diringer, Michael N; Bleck, Thomas P; Claude Hemphill, J; Menon, David; Shutter, Lori; Vespa, Paul; Bruder, Nicolas; Connolly, E Sander; Citerio, Giuseppe; Gress, Daryl; Hänggi, Daniel; Hoh, Brian L; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Le Roux, Peter; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Schmutzhard, Erich; Stocchetti, Nino; Suarez, Jose I; Treggiari, Miriam; Tseng, Ming-Yuan; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Wolf, Stefan; Zipfel, Gregory

    2011-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is an acute cerebrovascular event which can have devastating effects on the central nervous system as well as a profound impact on several other organs. SAH patients are routinely admitted to an intensive care unit and are cared for by a multidisciplinary team. A lack of high quality data has led to numerous approaches to management and limited guidance on choosing among them. Existing guidelines emphasize risk factors, prevention, natural history, and prevention of rebleeding, but provide limited discussion of the complex critical care issues involved in the care of SAH patients. The Neurocritical Care Society organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference on the critical care management of SAH to address this need. Experts from neurocritical care, neurosurgery, neurology, interventional neuroradiology, and neuroanesthesiology from Europe and North America were recruited based on their publications and expertise. A jury of four experienced neurointensivists was selected for their experience in clinical investigations and development of practice guidelines. Recommendations were developed based on literature review using the GRADE system, discussion integrating the literature with the collective experience of the participants and critical review by an impartial jury. Recommendations were developed using the GRADE system. Emphasis was placed on the principle that recommendations should be based not only on the quality of the data but also tradeoffs and translation into practice. Strong consideration was given to providing guidance and recommendations for all issues faced in the daily management of SAH patients, even in the absence of high quality data.

  4. Optimizing resources for the surgical care of children: an American Pediatric Surgical Association Outcomes and Clinical Trials Committee consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, Adam B; Dasgupta, Roshni; Chen, Li Ern; Blakely, Martin L; Islam, Saleem; Downard, Cynthia D; Rangel, Shawn J; St Peter, Shawn D; Calkins, Casey M; Arca, Marjorie J; Barnhart, Douglas C; Saito, Jacqueline M; Oldham, Keith T; Abdullah, Fizan

    2014-05-01

    The United States' healthcare system is facing unprecedented pressures: the healthcare cost curve is not sustainable while the bar of standards and expectations for the quality of care continues to rise. Systems committed to the surgical treatment of children will likely require changes and reorganization. Regardless of these mounting pressures, hospitals must remain focused on providing the best possible care to each child at every encounter. Available clinical expertise and hospital resources should be optimized to match the complexity of the treated condition. Although precise criteria are lacking, there is a growing consensus that the optimal combination of clinical experience and hospital resources must be defined, and efforts toward this goal have been supported by the Regents of the American College of Surgeons, the members of the American Pediatric Surgical Association, and the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) Board of Directors. The topic of optimizing outcomes and the discussion of the concepts involved have unfortunately become divisive. Our goals, therefore, are 1) to provide a review of the literature that can provide context for the discussion of regionalization, volume, and optimal resources and promote mutual understanding of these important terms, 2) to review the evidence that has been published to date in pediatric surgery associated with regionalization, volume, and resource, 3) to focus on a specific resource (anesthesia), and the association that this may have with outcomes, and 4) to provide a framework for future research and policy efforts.

  5. Theories about consensus-based conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, William D

    2006-04-01

    "Conservation and the Myth of Consensus" (Peterson et al. 2005) levels several serious indictments against consensus-based approaches to environmental decision making. Namely, the authors argue that consensus processes (1) reinforce apathy and ignorance of conservation issues; (2) legitimize damage to the environment; (3) quash public debate about conservation; (4) solidify the existing balance of power in favor of prodevelopment forces; and (5) block progress toward an ecologically sustainable future. Careful scrutiny of consensus-based approaches is important, especially considering their surging use in conservation policy. In the spirit of advancing the debate further, I review some of the limitations of the essay and its modes of inquiry.

  6. Consensus for improving the comprehensive care of patients with acute heart failure: summarised version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manito Lorite, N; Manzano Espinosa, L; Llorens Soriano, P; Masip Utset, J; Comín Colet, J; Formiga Pérez, F; Herrero Puente, P; Delgado Jiménez, J; Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M; Jacob Rodríguez, J; López de Sá Areses, E; Pérez Calvo, J I; Martín-Sánchez, F J; Miró Andreu, Ò

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this consensus document was to reach an agreement among experts on the multidisciplinary care of patients with acute heart failure. Starting with a narrative review of the care provided to these patients and a critical analysis of the healthcare procedures, we identified potential shortcomings and improvements and formalised a document on recommendations for optimising the clinical and therapeutic approach for acute heart failure. This document was validated through an in-person group session guided using participatory techniques. The process resulted in a set of 36 recommendations formulated by experts of the Spanish Society of Cardiology, the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine and the Spanish Society of Urgent and Emergency Care. The recommendations are designed to optimise the healthcare challenge presented by the care of patients with acute heart failure in the context of Spain's current National Health System. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  7. Interassociation Consensus Statement on Cardiovascular Care of College Student-Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Brian; Drezner, Jonathan; Baggish, Aaron; Harmon, Kimberly G; Emery, Michael S; Myerburg, Robert J; Sanchez, Eduardo; Molossi, Silvana; Parsons, John T; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular evaluation and care of college student-athletes is gaining increasing attention from both the public and medical communities. Emerging strategies include screening of the general athlete population, recommendations of permissible levels of participation by athletes with identified cardiovascular conditions, and preparation for responding to unanticipated cardiac events in athletic venues. The primary focus has been sudden cardiac death and the utility of screening with or without advanced cardiac screening. The National Collegiate Athletic Association convened a multidisciplinary task force to address cardiovascular concerns in collegiate student-athletes and to develop consensus for an interassociation statement. This document summarizes the task force deliberations and follow-up discussions, and includes available evidence on cardiovascular risk, pre-participation evaluation, and the recognition of and response to cardiac arrest. Future recommendations for cardiac research initiatives, education, and collaboration are also provided. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2016;doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.03.527.)

  8. Interassociation Consensus Statement on Cardiovascular Care of College Student-Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Brian; Drezner, Jonathan A; Baggish, Aaron; Harmon, Kimberly G; Emery, Michael S; Myerburg, Robert J; Sanchez, Eduardo; Molossi, Silvana; Parsons, John T; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-06-28

    Cardiovascular evaluation and care of college student-athletes is gaining increasing attention from both the public and medical communities. Emerging strategies include screening of the general athlete population, recommendations of permissible levels of participation by athletes with identified cardiovascular conditions, and preparation for responding to unanticipated cardiac events in athletic venues. The primary focus has been sudden cardiac death and the utility of screening with or without advanced cardiac screening. The National Collegiate Athletic Association convened a multidisciplinary task force to address cardiovascular concerns in collegiate student-athletes and to develop consensus for an interassociation statement. This document summarizes the task force deliberations and follow-up discussions, and includes available evidence on cardiovascular risk, pre-participation evaluation, and the recognition of and response to cardiac arrest. Future recommendations for cardiac research initiatives, education, and collaboration are also provided.

  9. Improving the care of individuals with schizophrenia and substance use disorders: consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziedonis, Douglas M; Smelson, David; Rosenthal, Richard N; Batki, Steven L; Green, Alan I; Henry, Renata J; Montoya, Ivan; Parks, Joseph; Weiss, Roger D

    2005-09-01

    National attention continues to focus on the need to improve care for individuals with co-occurring mental illnesses and substance use disorders, as emphasized in the 2003 President's New Freedom Commission Report on Mental Health and recent publications from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). These reports document the need for best practice recommendations that can be translated into routine clinical care. Although efforts are underway to synthesize literature in this area, few focused recommendations are available that include expert opinion and evidence-based findings on the management of specific co-occurring disorders, such as schizophrenia and addiction. In response to the need for user-friendly recommendations on the treatment of schizophrenia and addiction, a consensus conference of experts from academic institutions and state mental health systems was organized to 1) frame the problem from clinical and systems-level perspectives; 2) identify effective and problematic psychosocial, pharmacological, and systems practices; and 3) develop a summary publication with recommendations for improving current practice. The results of the consensus meeting served as the foundation for this publication, which presents a broad set of recommendations for clinicians who treat individuals with schizophrenia. "Integrated treatment" is the new standard for evidence-based treatment for this population and recommendations are given to help clinicians implement such integrated treatment. Specific recommendations are provided concerning screening for substance use disorders in patients with schizophrenia, assessing motivation for change, managing medical conditions that commonly occur in patients with dual diagnoses (e.g., cardiovascular disease, liver complications, lung cancer, HIV, and hepatitis B or C infections) and selecting the most appropriate medications for such patients to maximize safety and minimize drug interactions, use of

  10. From Policy to Practice: Implementation of Water Policies in Child Care Centers in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Ann E.; Henderson, Kathryn E.; Schwartz, Marlene B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Child care policies may contribute to healthy beverage consumption patterns. This study documented availability and accessibility of water and correspondence with state and federal policy and accreditation standards in child care centers. Design: One-day observations were conducted in a random sample of 40 Child and Adult Care Food…

  11. The diagnostic work up of growth failure in secondary health care; An evaluation of consensus guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekker Friedo W

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As abnormal growth might be the first manifestation of undetected diseases, it is important to have accurate referral criteria and a proper diagnostic work-up. In the present paper we evaluate the diagnostic work-up in secondary health care according to existing consensus guidelines and study the frequency of underlying medical disorders. Methods Data on growth and additional diagnostic procedures were collected from medical records of new patients referred for short stature to the outpatient clinics of the general paediatric departments of two hospitals (Erasmus MC – Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam and Spaarne Hospital, Haarlem between January 1998 and December 2002. As the Dutch Consensus Guideline (DCG is the only guideline addressing referral criteria as well as diagnostic work-up, the analyses were based on its seven auxological referral criteria to determine the characteristics of children who are incorrectly referred and the adequacy of workup of those who are referred. Results Twenty four percent of children older than 3 years were inappropriately referred (NCR. Of the correctly referred children 74–88% were short corrected for parental height, 40–61% had a height SDS Conclusion Existing guidelines for workup of children with suspected growth failure are poorly implemented. Although poorly implemented the DCG detects at least 5% pathologic causes of growth failure in children referred for short stature. New guidelines for referral are required with a better sensitivity and specificity, wherein distance to target height should get more attention. The general diagnostic work up for short stature should include testing for celiac disease in all children and for Turner syndrome in girls.

  12. Practical Techniques for Achieving Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, John A.

    Consensus is important in the making of a policy decision. If a decision is reached without consensus, morale and unit satisfaction may both suffer. With genuine consensus, a unit tends to willingly support and implement the new policy. After analyzing how observed small groups had actually reached consensus, the following ten techniques were…

  13. How commitment and involvement influence the development of strategic consensus in health care organizations: the multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Marie

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe how clinician and non-clinician managers achieved consensus of strategy in hospitals. This was the first empirical study undertaken that investigated the impact of organizational commitment on the strategic involvement-strategic consensus relationship. Clinicians and non-clinician managers hold a pivotal role in health care management from the strategic perspective. The importance of multidisciplinary collaboration is recognized, yet how strategic consensus is achieved amongst health service managers, has not been previously researched. The focus of the professional is often on local concerns rather on the broader organizational strategy. This orientation has led to the charge by health service management that clinicians are not interested in, or do not seek to be involved in strategy development. As half of the clinician group in this study were registered nurses and midwives it is important, for multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary collaboration and for strategic development that this group has an awareness of the importance of strategic involvement and organizational commitment in the attainment of strategic consensus. A descriptive study was undertaken and quantitative data were generated through the survey method. The aims of the study were articulated through hypotheses. Almost 400 middle manager heads of department, working in acute care not-for-profit health service organizations, in the Republic of Ireland, responded. Findings indicated that a stronger relationship existed between consensus and commitment than between involvement and commitment. In addition, when present in the organization, involvement and commitment together were better predictors of consensus than each of those factors on its own, but significantly commitment had a greater impact in predicting consensus than involvement had.

  14. [Consensus paper of the German Migraine and Headache Society on the structure of headache care facilities in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziniak, M; Malzacher, V; Förderreuther, S; Jürgens, T; Kropp, P; May, A; Straube, A

    2014-04-01

    This consensus paper introduces a classification of headache care facilities on behalf of the German Migraine and Headache Society. This classification is based on the recommendations of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) and the European Headache Federation (EHF) and was adapted to reflect the specific situation of headache care in Germany. It defines three levels of headache care: headache practitioner (level 1), headache outpatient clinic (level 2) and headache centers (level 3). The objective of the publication is to define and establish reliable criteria in the field of headache care in Germany.

  15. Caring: Implications for Child Care and for Family Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderic Beaujot

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Canadian families have changed, in part due to an economy that provides more work opportunities for women, and a cultural orientation that values equal opportunity and diversity in families. In spite of the change, both quantitative and qualitative evidence suggest a continued preference for mothers to spend considerable time with children, especially in the infant and toddler years. Thus, in an average couple, the presence of young children in the home brings wives to reduce their paid work and husbands to increase their paid work. Our reading of parental preferences suggests an interest in more services for young children in the form of early childhood education and child care, but also an interest in policies that would allow parents to spend more time with children through parental leaves, part-time work with good benefits, and subsidies that supplement market income. Many options available to two-parent families are often less feasible for lone parents, giving a higher priority to child care.

  16. Environmental Technology Policy in a Consensus Mode: The Case of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baark, Erik

    1997-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the historical, political and cultural factors which influenced the development of environmentalism and the formulation of policies for environmental technology in Denmark......This paper provides an analysis of the historical, political and cultural factors which influenced the development of environmentalism and the formulation of policies for environmental technology in Denmark...

  17. Obstetric Care Consensus No. 5: Severe Maternal Morbidity: Screening and Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document builds upon recommendations from peer organizations and outlines a process for identifying maternal cases that should be reviewed. Severe maternal morbidity is associated with a high rate of preventability, similar to that of maternal mortality. It also can be considered a near miss for maternal mortality because without identification and treatment, in some cases, these conditions would lead to maternal death. Identifying severe morbidity is, therefore, important for preventing such injuries that lead to mortality and for highlighting opportunities to avoid repeat injuries. The two-step screen and review process described in this document is intended to efficiently detect severe maternal morbidity in women and to ensure that each case undergoes a review to determine whether there were opportunities for improvement in care. Like cases of maternal mortality, cases of severe maternal morbidity merit quality review. In the absence of consensus on a comprehensive list of conditions that represent severe maternal morbidity, institutions and systems should either adopt an existing screening criteria or create their own list of outcomes that merit review.

  18. Obstetric Care Consensus No 5 Summary: Severe Maternal Morbidity: Screening And Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document builds upon recommendations from peer organizations and outlines a process for identifying maternal cases that should be reviewed. Severe maternal morbidity is associated with a high rate of preventability, similar to that of maternal mortality. It also can be considered a near miss for maternal mortality because without identification and treatment, in some cases, these conditions would lead to maternal death. Identifying severe morbidity is, therefore, important for preventing such injuries that lead to mortality and for highlighting opportunities to avoid repeat injuries. The two-step screen and review process described in this document is intended to efficiently detect severe maternal morbidity in women and to ensure that each case undergoes a review to determine whether there were opportunities for improvement in care. Like cases of maternal mortality, cases of severe maternal morbidity merit quality review. In the absence of consensus on a comprehensive list of conditions that represent severe maternal morbidity, institutions and systems should either adopt an existing screening criteria or create their own list of outcomes that merit review.

  19. End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

  20. Consensus Building Through Systems Thinking: the case of policy and planning in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz E. Maani

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a methodology and a case study using qualitative system dynamics to create consensus, team learning and shared vision in a public organisation. The case involves determining planning priorities for a Division of the Ministry of Health in New Zealand, leading to the creation of a business plan. The methodology involves Systems Thinking using Group Model Building (GMB - A three-step process starting with structured brainstorming using the partial KJ (Jiro Kawakita technique to identify priority areas and then clustering them into 'affinity' groups. Next, the priority clusters are used by the participants to construct causal loop diagrams representing 'systems of priorities'(in contrast with list of priorities. Finally, through a group process, leverage points or key priorities are identified as the basis for a business plan. While the above process was well agreed upon by the participants at the outset, strong group resistance was encountered when managers attempted to reduce the number of priority areas. Systems thinking approach was used to create consensus and the commitment to the outcome. The GMB approach offers significant promise in using qualitative system dynamics with non-systems experts. The methodology can be applied to change management initiative and complex decisions such as restructuring, reengineering, and supply chain design. The expected outcomes are greater commitment and shared vision.

  1. Ethical health care policy: nursing's voice in allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikonda-Woitas, Candace; Robinson, Janet Hoey

    2002-01-01

    Nurse administrators must become more involved in the policy debates concerning universal access to care and allocation of health care resources. In order to promote nursing's agenda in the policy debates, nurses must be familiar with the numerous ethical issues that impact macroallocation decisions. This article explores the ethical viewpoint of the nursing profession as it relates to allocation decisions and examines how the ethical principles of the nursing profession, along with the ethical theories of egalitarianism and utilitarianism, can be used throughout the policy process to guide the development of a plan for universal access to care.

  2. Health care technology as a policy issue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banta, H.D.

    1994-01-01

    Health care technology has become an increasingly visible issue in many countries, primarily because of the rising costs of health care. In addition, many questions concerning quality of care are being raised. Health care technology assessment has been seen as an aid in addressing questions

  3. US and territory telemedicine policies: identifying gaps in perinatal care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoroh, Ekwutosi M.; Kroelinger, Charlan D.; Smith, Alexander M.; Goodman, David A.; Barfield, Wanda D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Perinatal regionalization is a system of maternal and neonatal risk-appropriate health care delivery in which resources are ideally allocated for mothers and newborns during pregnancy, labor and delivery, and postpartum, in order to deliver appropriate care. Typically, perinatal risk-appropriate care is provided in-person, but with the advancement of technologies, the opportunity to provide care remotely has emerged. Telemedicine provides distance-based care to patients by consultation, diagnosis, and treatment in rural or remote US jurisdictions (states and territories). OBJECTIVE We sought to summarize the telemedicine policies of states and territories and assess if maternal and neonatal risk-appropriate care is specified. STUDY DESIGN We conducted a 2014 systematic World Wide Web–based review of publicly available rules, statutes, regulations, laws, planning documents, and program descriptions among US jurisdictions (N=59) on telemedicine care. Policies including language on the topics of consultation, diagnosis, or treatment, and those specific to maternal and neonatal risk-appropriate care were categorized for analysis. RESULTS Overall, 36 jurisdictions (32 states; 3 territories; and District of Columbia) (61%) had telemedicine policies with language referencing consultation, diagnosis, or treatment; 29 (49%) referenced consultation, 30 (51%) referenced diagnosis, and 35 (59%) referenced treatment. In all, 26 jurisdictions (22 states; 3 territories; and District of Columbia) (44%), referenced all topics. Only 3 jurisdictions (3 states; 0 territories) (5%), had policy language specifically addressing perinatal care. CONCLUSION The majority of states have published telemedicine policies, but few specify policy language for perinatal risk-appropriate care. By ensuring that language specific to the perinatal population is included in telemedicine policies, access to maternal and neonatal care can be increased in rural, remote, and resource

  4. Health care policy development: a critical analysis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jean E; Pauling, Carolyn D; Franzen, Debra B

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a phased approach for teaching baccalaureate nursing students critical analysis of health care policy, including refinement of existing policy or the foundation to create new policy. Central to this approach is the application of an innovative framework, the Grand View Critical Analysis Model, which was designed to provide a conceptual base for the authentic learning experience. Students come to know the interconnectedness and the importance of the model, which includes issue selection and four phases: policy focus, colleagueship analysis, evidence-based practice analysis, and policy analysis and development.

  5. From Consensus to Contention: Changing Revenue and Policy Dynamics in Uganda?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Ulriksen, Marianne

    This paper examines how the changing relationships between the Ugandan government, on the one side, and citizens and donors, on the other, affect public policy priorities. We hypothesise that citizens can affect government’s policy priority both as voters, as represented by civil society organisa......This paper examines how the changing relationships between the Ugandan government, on the one side, and citizens and donors, on the other, affect public policy priorities. We hypothesise that citizens can affect government’s policy priority both as voters, as represented by civil society...... organisations and as tax payers, whereas the influence of donors is largely driven by the extent to which the government is reliant on aid. The analysis shows how the relationships have shifted from being consensual between the government, the citizens and donors on the desirability of poverty eradication......, citizens’ preferences became an important political consideration. In the latter period, donors have lost some of their erstwhile funding dominance, the government is building new partnerships, and social sector expansion has lost much of its electoral appeal....

  6. Office of Disability, Aging and Long-Term Care Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Data and Tools Evaluation Database Office of Disability, Aging and Long-Term Care Policy (DALTCP) Home About Offices Disability, Aging, and Long-Te... DALTCP provides leadership on ...

  7. Experiences of orphan care in Amach, Uganda: assessing policy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-05-01

    May 1, 2007 ... Experiences of orphan care in Amach, Uganda: assessing policy implications .... in local concepts, institutions and practices with relevance in an .... Data analysis: The qualitative data was analysed using the conceptual ...

  8. A consensus guideline for antipsychotic drug use for dementia in care homes. Bridging the gap between scientific evidence and clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U.; Johansson, Alice; Selbaek, Geir; Murray, Matt; Burns, Alistair; Ballard, Clive; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: To produce a practice guideline that includes a set of detailed consensus principles regarding the prescription of antipsychotics (APs) amongst people with dementia living in care homes. Methods: We used a modified Delphi consensus procedure with three rounds, where we actively specified

  9. Caring for Ourselves: Wages and Benefits in Church Child Care. Policy Report #3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jo Bennett, Ed.

    This policy report on compensation for child care providers is designed for use by directors, child care providers, clergy, board members, and other leaders in church-housed child care programs. Section I underscores the importance of securing fair compensation and reasonable benefits for child care providers in church-housed and non-church-housed…

  10. "Who Cares for the Children?" Lessons from a Global Perspective of Child Care Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokteff, Maegan; Piercy, Kathleen W.

    2012-01-01

    We present the argument that the meaning of child care and the policies that address it are explicitly linked with national ideologies, work force participation, economic success, and child outcomes. The relationship between family and child care policies is cyclical in nature, with a nation's ideology and vision of family often driving child care…

  11. End-Of-Life Care for Persons with Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Report of a National Interdisciplinary Consensus Meeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM Goodridge

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available While systemic shortcomings in meeting the needs of individuals with progressive chronic illnesses at the end of life have been well documented, there is growing interest in improving both care and quality of life for persons with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. For instance, the American Thoracic Society has issued an official statement on palliative care for patients with respiratory diseases, affirming that the prevention, relief, reduction and soothing of symptoms “without affecting a cure” must become an integral component of standard care. A recent Medline search located 1015 articles related to palliative or end-of-life care for people with COPD published between 2001 and 2008, compared with only 336 articles published before 2001. To address the needs of Canadian patients, an interdisciplinary consensus meeting, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and supported by the Canadian Thoracic Society, the Canadian Respiratory Health Professionals and the Canadian Lung Association was convened in Toronto, Ontario, on November 22, 2008, to begin examining the quality of end-of-life care for individuals with COPD in Canada. The present report summarizes the background to and outcomes of this consensus meeting.

  12. Negotiating care in the context of Finnish and Italian elder care policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechner, Minna; Valokivi, Heli

    2012-06-01

    Negotiation is an integral part of all elder care, which by definition involves a relation between at least two people. In this article, we analyse negotiations concerning elder care in the context of Finnish and Italian elder care policies. At the macro level negotiations on elder care are shaped by elder care policies and at the micro level by individual skills and resources. Our focus is on the negotiations on eligibility that take place when elders attempt to access care. The data consist of qualitative interviews with Finnish and Italian elders in need of care. The analysis of individual experiences of care negotiations reflects the practical consequences of elder care policies to older people. The results indicate that the most negotiated eligibility criteria when seeking access to elder care are need, money and social relations. These criteria are negotiated when seeking eligibility to different sources of care: informal care, grey market, market-based, non-profit and public services. In Italy, negotiation is particularly crucial when accessing grey market care. Cash as the main Italian elder care policy tool tends to enhance the role of and need for negotiation. In Finland, a greater part of elder care is provided by the public sector and therefore the process of negotiation is more standardized than in Italy.

  13. Outcome Criteria for Discharging the Patient With a New Ostomy From Home Health Care: A WOCN Society Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Janice C; Kupsick, Phyllis T; McNichol, Laurie L

    2016-01-01

    The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society hosted a consensus panel of expert ostomy clinicians who were tasked with identifying minimal discharge criteria for home care patients with a new fecal or urinary diversion. Shortened hospital inpatient stays, higher patient acuity, and limited access to ostomy specialists send patients with new ostomies home with multiple educational and adjustment needs related to a new stoma. The Society recognized the lack of evidence-based ostomy practice and supported the work of the panel to develop statements that defined elements of the care plan for the patient or caregiver in home care who is adapting to living with a stoma. Eighteen statements were developed that provide minimum discharge criteria for the patient with a new ostomy in the home care setting. Support based upon current evidence as well as expert opinion with implementation strategies are offered for each statement.

  14. A feminist model of family care: practice and policy directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooyman, N R; Gonyea, J G

    1999-01-01

    Using a feminist perspective, this article examines women's experiences in caring for older family members with chronic illnesses or disabilities. Central to this analysis are the concepts of the social construction of gender-based inequities in caring, the interconnections between generations of women as givers and receivers of care, and variations in family care by gender, race, ethnicity, social class and sexual orientation. The authors critique current practice interventions and policies and purpose models for the elimination of gender-based inequities in caregiving and the provision of caregiver choice and empowerment for women and men, including feminist models of practice with women caregivers and economic and long-term care supports.

  15. Developing and implementing an oral care policy and assessment tool.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stout, Michelle

    2012-01-09

    Oral hygiene is an essential aspect of nursing care. Poor oral care results in patients experiencing pain and discomfort, puts individuals at risk of nutritional deficiency and infection, and has an adverse effect on quality of life. This article describes how an oral care policy and assessment tool were updated to ensure the implementation of evidence-based practice at one hospital in the Republic of Ireland.

  16. Misalignment between medicare policies and depression care in home health care: home health provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley A; Richardson, Joshua E; Bruce, Martha L

    2014-07-01

    Semistructured interviews with nurses working for home health care agencies in five states raise serious questions about the deleterious effects of Medicare policies and procedures on depression care. The agencies have strong incentives to limit nursing time in a given payment episode and to increase volume, making it difficult to provide high-quality depression care for homebound patients. Some nurses felt forced to "abandon" many patients with depression. The authors call for incremental policy changes in several key areas.

  17. Technical analysis, contestation and politics in policy agenda setting and implementation: the rise and fall of primary care maternal services from Ghana's capitation policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduah, Augustina; van Dijk, Han; Agyepong, Irene Akua

    2016-07-29

    Why issues get on the policy agenda, move into policy formulation and implementation while others drop off in the process is an important field of enquiry to inform public social policy development and implementation. This paper seeks to advance our understanding of health policy agenda setting, formulation and implementation processes in Ghana, a lower middle income country by exploring how and why less than three months into the implementation of a pilot prior to national scale up; primary care maternal services that were part of the basket of services in a primary care per capita national health insurance scheme provider payment system dropped off the agenda. We used a case study design to systematically reconstruct the decisions and actions surrounding the rise and fall of primary care maternal health services from the capitation policy. Data was collected from July 2012 and August 2014 through in-depth interviews, observations and document review. The data was analysed drawing on concepts of policy resistance, power and arenas of conflict. During the agenda setting and policy formulation stages; predominantly technical policy actors within the bureaucratic arena used their expertise and authority for consensus building to get antenatal, normal delivery and postnatal services included in the primary care per capita payment system. Once policy implementation started, policy makers were faced with unanticipated resistance. Service providers, especially the private self-financing used their professional knowledge and skills, access to political and social power and street level bureaucrat power to contest and resist various aspects of the policy and its implementation arrangements - including the inclusion of primary care maternal health services. The context of intense public arena conflicts and controversy in an election year added to the high level political anxiety generated by the contestation. The President and Minister of Health responded and removed

  18. State policies and the financing of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, A; Cvitanic, M; Bennett, C; Gorman, M; Serrato, C A

    1989-01-01

    State policies, with respect to the operation of Medicaid programs and the regulation of private health insurance, affect who gets what care, how much is spent, and who ultimately pays. A RAND Corporation study was used to assess States and the District of Columbia in terms of the effects of their Medicaid and health insurance regulations on people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and other human immunodeficiency virus-related illnesses. State characteristics are used to explain the individual State policy rankings.

  19. Internal Medicine Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum: Consensus Recommendations from the Canadian Internal Medicine Ultrasound (CIMUS) Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene W Y; Arishenkoff, Shane; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Desy, Janeve; Ailon, Jonathan; Martin, Leslie; Otremba, Mirek; Halman, Samantha; Willemot, Patrick; Blouw, Marcus

    2017-05-11

    Bedside point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is increasingly used to assess medical patients. At present, no consensus exists for what POCUS curriculum is appropriate for internal medicine residency training programs. This document details the consensus-based recommendations by the Canadian Internal Medicine Ultrasound (CIMUS) group, comprising 39 members, representing 14 institutions across Canada. Guiding principles for selecting curricular content were determined a priori. Consensus was defined as agreement by at least 80% of the members on POCUS applications deemed appropriate for teaching and assessment of trainees in the core (internal medicine postgraduate years [PGY] 1-3) and expanded (general internal medicine PGY 4-5) training programs. We recommend four POCUS applications for the core PGY 1-3 curriculum (inferior vena cava, lung B lines, pleural effusion, and abdominal free fluid) and three ultrasound-guided procedures (central venous catheterization, thoracentesis, and paracentesis). For the expanded PGY 4-5 curriculum, we recommend an additional seven applications (internal jugular vein, lung consolidation, pneumothorax, knee effusion, gross left ventricular systolic function, pericardial effusion, and right ventricular strain) and four ultrasound-guided procedures (knee arthrocentesis, arterial line insertion, arterial blood gas sampling, and peripheral venous catheterization). These recommendations will provide a framework for training programs at a national level.

  20. Simulation modeling of health care policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glied, Sherry; Tilipman, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Simulation modeling of health reform is a standard part of policy development and, in the United States, a required element in enacting health reform legislation. Modelers use three types of basic structures to build models of the health system: microsimulation, individual choice, and cell-based. These frameworks are filled in with data on baseline characteristics of the system and parameters describing individual behavior. Available data on baseline characteristics are imprecise, and estimates of key empirical parameters vary widely. A comparison of estimated and realized consequences of several health reform proposals suggests that models provided reasonably accurate estimates, with confidence bounds of approximately 30%.

  1. Competition policy for health care provision in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kifmann, Mathias

    2017-02-01

    Since the 1990s, Germany has introduced a number of competitive elements into its public health care system. Sickness funds were given some freedom to sign selective contracts with providers. Competition between ambulatory care providers and hospitals was introduced for certain diseases and services. As competition has become more intense, the importance of competition law has increased. This paper reviews these areas of competition policy. The problems of introducing competition into a corporatist system are discussed. Based on the scientific evidence on the effects of competition, key lessons and implications for future policy are formulated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Towards an international taxonomy of integrated primary care : A Delphi consensus approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, Pim; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.; Ruwaard, D.; Boesveld, I.C.; Arends, R.; Bruijnzeels, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Developing integrated service models in a primary care setting is considered an essential strategy for establishing a sustainable and affordable health care system. The Rainbow Model of Integrated Care (RMIC) describes the theoretical foundations of integrated primary care. The aim of

  3. Towards an international taxonomy of integrated primary care: a Delphi consensus approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, Pim P.; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J.M.; Ruwaard, Dirk; Boesveld, Inge; Arends, Roos; Bruijnzeels, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Developing integrated service models in a primary care setting is considered an essential strategy for establishing a sustainable and affordable health care system. The Rainbow Model of Integrated Care (RMIC) describes the theoretical foundations of integrated primary care. The aim of

  4. Towards an international taxonomy of integrated primary care : A Delphi consensus approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, Pim; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.; Ruwaard, D.; Boesveld, I.C.; Arends, R.; Bruijnzeels, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Developing integrated service models in a primary care setting is considered an essential strategy for establishing a sustainable and affordable health care system. The Rainbow Model of Integrated Care (RMIC) describes the theoretical foundations of integrated primary care. The aim of thi

  5. Towards an international taxonomy of integrated primary care: a Delphi consensus approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, Pim P.; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J.M.; Ruwaard, Dirk; Boesveld, Inge; Arends, Rosa Y.; Bruijnzeels, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Developing integrated service models in a primary care setting is considered an essential strategy for establishing a sustainable and affordable health care system. The Rainbow Model of Integrated Care (RMIC) describes the theoretical foundations of integrated primary care. The aim of thi

  6. The role of the primary care physician in the Israeli health care system as a 'gatekeeper'--the viewpoint of health care policy makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabenkin, H; Gross, R

    2000-06-01

    . However, in practice almost half oppose the full gatekeeper model. Therefore, introduction of a gatekeeper model into the Israeli health care system should be implemented gradually, based on incentives rather than regulations. Furthermore, the idea should be marketed by the primary care physicians' professional organizations, the Ministry of Health and the sick funds to physicians as well as to patients, in order to garner their support. In light of the broad consensus that competent primary care physicians are the basis for implementation of the gatekeeper model, board certification should be gradually required by employers of primary care physicians. The process of training physicians currently working in the system should be encouraged and supported by the Ministry of Health. Given the existing opposition of policy makers to giving primary care physicians exclusive referral rights to specialists, the current policy of direct access to a limited number of specialties should be continued but not extended to other specialties.

  7. The use of a policy dialogue to facilitate evidence-informed policy development for improved access to care: the case of the Winnipeg Central Intake Service (WCIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damani, Zaheed; MacKean, Gail; Bohm, Eric; DeMone, Brie; Wright, Brock; Noseworthy, Tom; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; Marshall, Deborah A

    2016-10-18

    meeting achieved its purpose (to engage stakeholders, elicit feedback, refine policy directions). Third, our decision-maker partners' expectations of the policy roundtable meeting were exceeded; they re-affirmed its value and described the refined policy directions as foundational to establishing the vocabulary, vision and framework for improving access to scheduled clinical services in Manitoba. Finally, our adaptation of key design elements was conducive to discussion of issues surrounding access to care. Our policy roundtable process was an effective tool for acquiring broad input from stakeholders, refining policy directions and forming the necessary consensus starting points to move towards evidence-informed policy.

  8. Development of an Internet Security Policy for health care establishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilioudis, C; Pangalos, G

    2000-01-01

    The Internet provides unprecedented opportunities for interaction and data sharing among health care providers, patients and researchers. However, the advantages provided by the Internet come with a significantly greater element of risk to the confidentiality and integrity of information. This paper defines the basic security requirements that must be addressed in order to use the Internet to safely transmit patient and/or other sensitive Health Care information. It describes a suitable Internet Security Policy for Health Care Establishments and provides the set of technical measures that are needed for its implementation. The proposed security policy and technical approaches have been based on an extensive study of the related recommendations from the security and standard groups both in EU amid USA and our related work and experience. The results have been utilized in the framework of the Intranet Health Clinic project, where the use of the Internet for the transmission of sensitive Health Care information is of vital importance.

  9. The top five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care: a consensus report from a European research collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockey David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physician-manned emergency medical teams supplement other emergency medical services in some countries. These teams are often selectively deployed to patients who are considered likely to require critical care treatment in the pre-hospital phase. The evidence base for guidelines for pre-hospital triage and immediate medical care is often poor. We used a recognised consensus methodology to define key priority areas for research within the subfield of physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Methods A European expert panel participated in a consensus process based upon a four-stage modified nominal group technique that included a consensus meeting. Results The expert panel concluded that the five most important areas for further research in the field of physician-based pre-hospital critical care were the following: Appropriate staffing and training in pre-hospital critical care and the effect on outcomes, advanced airway management in pre-hospital care, definition of time windows for key critical interventions which are indicated in the pre-hospital phase of care, the role of pre-hospital ultrasound and dispatch criteria for pre-hospital critical care services. Conclusion A modified nominal group technique was successfully used by a European expert group to reach consensus on the most important research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care.

  10. The Limits of Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poster, John B.

    Dynamics in the education policy arena suggest that, despite two generations of researchers extolling democratic leadership styles and consensus building over autocratic techniques, wide participation in policymaking and the broadest possible consensus are not always productive: American society has not yet agreed on what schools should…

  11. Public finance policy strategies to increase access to preconception care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kay A

    2006-09-01

    Policy and finance barriers reduce access to preconception care and, reportedly, limit professional practice changes that would improve the availability of needed services. Millions of women of childbearing age (15-44) lack adequate health coverage (i.e., uninsured or underinsured), and others live in medically underserved areas. Service delivery fragmentation and lack of professional guidelines are additional barriers. This paper reviews barriers and opportunities for financing preconception care, based on a review and analysis of state and federal policies. We describe states' experiences with and opportunities to improve health coverage, through public programs such as Medicaid, Medicaid waivers, and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The potential role of Title V and of community health centers in providing primary and preventive care to women also is discussed. In these and other public health and health coverage programs, opportunities exist to finance preconception care for low-income women. Three major policy directions are discussed. To increase access to preconception care among women of childbearing age, the federal and state governments have opportunities to: (1) improve health care coverage, (2) increase the supply of publicly subsidized health clinics, and (3) direct delivery of preconception screening and interventions in the context of public health programs.

  12. Waiting Time Policies in the Health Care Sector. What Works?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Bech, Mickael

    2013-01-01

    choice of hospital for somatic and psychiatric patients, short maximum waiting time guarantee for life-threatening diseases coupled with care packages for cancer and heart diseases and extra-activity targeted hospital grants. There are good reasons to believe that these policies have reduced waiting...

  13. Developing recommendations to improve the quality of diabetes care in Ireland: a policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Hugh, Sheena M; Perry, Ivan J; Bradley, Colin; Brugha, Ruairí

    2014-09-18

    In 2006, the Health Service Executive (HSE) in Ireland established an Expert Advisory Group (EAG) for Diabetes, to act as its main source of operational policy and strategic advice for this chronic condition. The process was heralded as the starting point for the development of formal chronic disease management programmes. Although recommendations were published in 2008, implementation did not proceed as expected. Our aim was to examine the development of recommendations by the EAG as an instrumental case study of the policy formulation process, in the context of a health system undergoing organisational and financial upheaval. This study uses Kingdon's Multiple Streams Theory to examine the evolution of the EAG recommendations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 15 stakeholders from the advisory group. Interview data were supplemented with documentary analysis of published and unpublished documents. Thematic analysis was guided by the propositions of the Kingdon model. In the problem stream, the prioritisation of diabetes within the policy arena was a gradual process resulting from an accumulation of evidence, international comparison, and experience. The policy stream was bolstered by group consensus rather than complete agreement on the best way to manage the condition. The EAG assumed the politics stream was also on course to converge with the other streams, as the group was established by the HSE, which had the remit for policy implementation. However, the politics stream did not converge due to waning support from health service management and changes to the organisational structure and financial capacity of the health system. These changes trumped the EAG process and the policy window remained closed, stalling implementation. Our results reflect the dynamic nature of the policy process and the importance of timing. The results highlight the limits of rational policy making in the face of organisational and fiscal upheaval

  14. An expert consensus on core competencies in integrated care for psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderji, Nadiya; Waddell, Andrea; Gupta, Mona; Soklaridis, Sophie; Steinberg, Rosalie

    2016-01-01

    All psychiatry residents in Canada are required to train in integrated care (also known as "shared care" or "collaborative care"). We sought to define the competencies required for integrated care practice, with an emphasis on those competencies necessary for all psychiatric postgraduate learners regardless of their intended future practice setting or population. We conducted a mixed methods study including qualitative interviews with nine psychiatrists practicing integrated care across Canada and a quantitative survey of 35 experts using a modified Delphi method. Our participants believed that integrated care aims to build capacity for improved quality of mental health care in unspecialized settings, and as such, its practice requires broad clinical expertise as well as competencies in interprofessional teamwork, collaborative leadership, knowledge exchange and program consultation. All psychiatrists require knowledge of evidence-based models of integrated care and the ability to work with organizations to implement these models. Psychiatrists are best prepared for integrated care practice through clinical exposure to primary care and/or community settings, as well as didactic teaching regarding the evidence for integrated care, quality improvement methods, leadership, health systems and population health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nursing shaping and influencing health and social care policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyffe, Theresa

    2009-09-01

    This paper seeks to consider how nursing as a profession in the United Kingdom is developing its role in shaping and influencing policy using lessons learnt from a policy study tour undertaken in the United States of America and extensive experience as a senior nurse within the government, the health service and more recently within a Professional Organization. The nursing profession faces major changes in health and health care and nurses need to be visible in the public debate about future models of health and health care. This paper critically reviews recent UK and USA literature and policy with relevance to nursing. Strategies that support nurses and nursing to influence policy are in place but more needs to be done to address all levels of nursing in order to find creative solutions that promote and increase the participation of nurses in the political process and health policy. There are lessons to be learnt in the UK from the US nursing experience. These need to be considered in the context of the UK and devolution. Although much has been achieved in positioning nurses and nursing as an influencer in the arena of policy and political decision-making, there is a need for greater co-ordination of action to ensure that nursing is actively supported in influencing and shaping health and health care policy. All leaders and other stakeholders require to play their part in considering how the actions set out in this article can be taken forward and how gaps such as education, fellowship experience and media engagement can be addressed in the future.

  16. End-of-Life Care Policies in Flemish Residential Care Facilities Accommodating Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Haene, I.; Pasman, H. R. W.; Deliens, L.; Bilsen, J.; Mortier, F.; Stichele, R. Vander

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article aims to describe the presence, content and implementation strategies of written policies on end-of-life decisions in Flemish residential care facilities (RCFs) accommodating persons with intellectual disabilities (ID), and to describe training, education and quality assessments of end-of-life care. Methods: A…

  17. Consensus and variations in opinions on delirium care : a survey of European delirium specialists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morandi, A; Davis, D; Taylor, J K; Bellelli, G; Olofsson, B; Kreisel, S; Teodorczuk, A; Kamholz, B; Hasemann, W; Young, J; Agar, M; de Rooij, S E; Meagher, D; Trabucchi, M; MacLullich, A M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are still substantial uncertainties over best practice in delirium care. The European Delirium Association (EDA) conducted a survey of its members and other interested parties on various aspects of delirium care. METHODS: The invitation to participate in the online survey was distr

  18. Social death in end-of-life care policy

    OpenAIRE

    Borgstrom, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Social death denotes a loss of personhood. The concept of social death is engaged with in English end-of-life care policy that sees social death before physical death as a problem. Policy-makers posit that dying persons are likely to be subject to a social death prior to their physical death unless they play an active and aware role in planning their death, facilitated through communication and access to services. Such a view foregrounds a vision of agency and does not address Sudnow's critiq...

  19. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015) – short version

    OpenAIRE

    DAS-Taskforce 2015; Baron, Ralf; Binder, Andreas; Biniek, Rolf; Braune, Stephan; Buerkle, Hartmut; Dall, Peter; Demirakca, Sueha; Eckardt, Rahel; Eggers, Verena; Eichler, Ingolf; Fietze, Ingo; Freys, Stephan; Fründ, Andreas; Garten, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine) and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine), twelve German medical societies published the "Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care". Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from th...

  20. Humanization policy in primary health care: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Junges, José Roque

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze humanization practices in primary health care in the Brazilian Unified Health System according to the principles of the National Humanization Policy. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was carried out, followed by a meta-synthesis, using the following databases: BDENF (nursing database), BDTD (Brazilian digital library of theses and dissertations), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to nursing and allied health literature), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean health care sciences literature), MedLine (International health care sciences literature), PAHO (Pan-American Health Care Organization Library) and SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online). The following descriptors were used: Humanization; Humanizing Health Care; Reception: Humanized care: Humanization in health care; Bonding; Family Health Care Program; Primary Care; Public Health and Sistema Único de Saúde (the Brazilian public health care system). Research articles, case studies, reports of experiences, dissertations, theses and chapters of books written in Portuguese, English or Spanish, published between 2003 and 2011, were included in the analysis. RESULTS Among the 4,127 publications found on the topic, 40 studies were evaluated and included in the analysis, producing three main categories: the first referring to the infrastructure and organization of the primary care service, made clear the dissatisfaction with the physical structure and equipment of the services and with the flow of attendance, which can facilitate or make difficult the access. The second, referring to the health work process, showed issues about the insufficient number of professionals, fragmentation of the work processes, the professional profile and responsibility. The third category, referring to the relational technologies, indicated the reception, bonding, listening, respect and dialog with the service users. CONCLUSIONS Although many practices were cited as humanizing they do not produce changes

  1. [Medical care, organ and tissue transplants, and targeted policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Carlos Dimas Martins; Schramm, Fermin Roland

    2006-09-01

    This article reflects on the moral legitimacy of implementing public policies for targeting advanced medical care, specifically in the case of organ and tissue transplants. The article refers to two theoretical approaches: the theory of capabilities by Nussbaum and Sen and the bioethics of protection by Schramm and Kottow, considered complementary in this context. The article begins by characterizing the issue of resource scarcity in transplantation, as well as strategies to overcome this problem. Next, the capabilities approach and bioethics of protection are briefly presented. Finally, from the perspective of the above-mentioned ethical approaches, in situations of scarce health resources such as the Brazilian case, the author contends that it would be morally justified to adopt targeted policies in advanced medical care, including organ transplantation.

  2. Australian health policy and end of life care for people with chronic disease: an analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Teresa; Braunack-Mayer, Annette; Crawford, Gregory B; Beilby, Justin

    2014-03-01

    End of life care for people with advanced chronic disease is a growing international imperative, with the majority of deaths in the world now related to chronic disease. The provision of care that meets the needs of people with advanced chronic disease must be guided by appropriate policy. The key policy areas impacting directly on end of life care are related to chronic disease, palliative care and, increasingly, aged care. This paper describes the outcomes of an audit of Australian chronic disease and end of life/palliative care policies. We identified that chronic disease health policies/strategies demonstrate a focus on prevention, early intervention and management, with scant recognition of end of life care needs. The majority assume that a referral to palliative care will address end of life care needs for people with chronic disease. By contrast, palliative care policies recognise the need for the incorporation of a palliative approach into advanced chronic disease care, but there are few connections between these two policy areas. Whilst palliative care policies intersect with carer and advance care planning policies, chronic disease policy does not. Key concerns requiring consideration when developing policy in this area are discussed and possible policy options identified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Controversy and consensus on a clinical pharmacist in primary care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazen, A.C.M.; van der Wal, Aletta W.; Sloeserwij, Vivianne M.; Zwart, Dorien L M; de Gier, Johan J; De Wit, Niek J.; Leendertse, A.J.; Bouvy, M.L.; De Bont, Antoinette A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Controversy about the introduction of a non-dispensing pharmacist in primary care practice hampers implementation. Objective The aim of this study is to systematically map the debate on this new role for pharmacists amongst all stakeholders to uncover and understand the controversy and co

  4. Controversy and consensus on a clinical pharmacist in primary care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.M. Hazen (Ankie); Wal, A.W.V.D. (Aletta W. Van Der); V.M. Sloeserwij (Vivianne); D.L.M. Zwart (Dorien Lyd Marieke); Gier, J.J.D. (Johan J. De); Wit, N.J.D. (Niek J. De); A.J. Leendertse (Anne); M.L. Bouvy (Marcel); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground Controversy about the introduction of a non-dispensing pharmacist in primary care practice hampers implementation. Objective The aim of this study is to systematically map the debate on this new role for pharmacists amongst all stakeholders to uncover and understand the contro

  5. Quality indicators for all dimensions of infertility care quality: consensus between professionals and patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dancet, E.A.; D'Hooghe, T.M.; Spiessens, C.; Sermeus, W.; Neubourg, D. De; Karel, N.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the relative importance of the six dimensions of quality of care according to different stakeholders and can a quality indicator set address all six quality dimensions and incorporate the views from professionals working in different disciplines and from patients? SUMMARY ANS

  6. Controversy and consensus on a clinical pharmacist in primary care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazen, A.C.M.; van der Wal, Aletta W.; Sloeserwij, Vivianne M.; Zwart, Dorien L M; de Gier, Johan J; De Wit, Niek J.; Leendertse, A.J.; Bouvy, M.L.; De Bont, Antoinette A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Controversy about the introduction of a non-dispensing pharmacist in primary care practice hampers implementation. Objective The aim of this study is to systematically map the debate on this new role for pharmacists amongst all stakeholders to uncover and understand the controversy and

  7. Controversy and consensus on a clinical pharmacist in primary care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.M. Hazen (Ankie); Wal, A.W.V.D. (Aletta W. Van Der); V.M. Sloeserwij (Vivianne); D.L.M. Zwart (Dorien); Gier, J.J.D. (Johan J. De); Wit, N.J.D. (Niek J. De); A.J. Leendertse (Anne); M.L. Bouvy (Marcel); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground Controversy about the introduction of a non-dispensing pharmacist in primary care practice hampers implementation. Objective The aim of this study is to systematically map the debate on this new role for pharmacists amongst all stakeholders to uncover and understand the

  8. The World Health Organization Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care and their consensus recommendations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pittet, D.; Allegranzi, B.; Boyce, J.; Voss, A.

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization's Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care have been issued by WHO Patient Safety on 5 May 2009 on the occasion of the launch of the Save Lives: Clean Your Hands initiative. The Guidelines represent the contribution of more than 100 international experts and provide a

  9. ANMCO/SIC Consensus Document: cardiology networks for outpatient heart failure care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspromonte, Nadia; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Mortara, Andrea; Battistoni, Ilaria; De Maria, Renata; Gabriele, Michele; Iacoviello, Massimo; Navazio, Alessandro; Pini, Daniela; Di Tano, Giuseppe; Marini, Marco; Ricci, Renato Pietro; Alunni, Gianfranco; Radini, Donatella; Metra, Marco; Romeo, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Changing demographics and an increasing burden of multiple chronic comorbidities in Western countries dictate refocusing of heart failure (HF) services from acute in-hospital care to better support the long inter-critical out-of- hospital phases of HF. In Italy, as well as in other countries, needs of the HF population are not adequately addressed by current HF outpatient services, as documented by differences in age, gender, comorbidities and recommended therapies between patients discharged for acute hospitalized HF and those followed-up at HF clinics. The Italian Working Group on Heart Failure has drafted a guidance document for the organisation of a national HF care network. Aims of the document are to describe tasks and requirements of the different health system points of contact for HF patients, and to define how diagnosis, management and care processes should be documented and shared among health-care professionals. The document classifies HF outpatient clinics in three groups: (i) community HF clinics, devoted to management of stable patients in strict liaison with primary care, periodic re-evaluation of emerging clinical needs and prompt treatment of impending destabilizations, (ii) hospital HF clinics, that target both new onset and chronic HF patients for diagnostic assessment, treatment planning and early post-discharge follow-up. They act as main referral for general internal medicine units and community clinics, and (iii) advanced HF clinics, directed at patients with severe disease or persistent clinical instability, candidates to advanced treatment options such as heart transplant or mechanical circulatory support. Those different types of HF clinics are integrated in a dedicated network for management of HF patients on a regional basis, according to geographic features. By sharing predefined protocols and communication systems, these HF networks integrate multi-professional providers to ensure continuity of care and patient empowerment. In

  10. GEDOS-SECOT consensus on the care process of patients with knee osteoarthritis and arthoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Iban, M A; Tejedor, A; Gil Garay, E; Revenga, C; Hermosa, J C; Montfort, J; Peña, M J; López Millán, J M; Montero Matamala, A; Capa Grasa, A; Navarro, M J; Gobbo, M; Loza, E

    To develop recommendations on the evaluation and management procedure in patients undergoing total knee replacement based on best evidence and the experience of a panel of experts. A multidisciplinary group of 12 experts was selected that defined the scope, users and the document parts. Three systematic reviews were performed in patients undergoing knee replacement: (i)efficacy and safety of fast-tracks; (ii)efficacy and safety of cognitive interventions in patients with catastrophic pain, and (iii) efficacy and safety of acute post-surgical pain management on post-surgical outcomes. A narrative review was conducted on the evaluation and management of pain sensitization, and about the efficacy and safety of pre-surgical physiotherapy. The experts generated the recommendations and explicative text. The level of agreement was evaluated in a multidisciplinary group of 85 experts with the Delphi technique. The level of evidence was established as well for each recommendation. A total of 20 recommendations were produced. An agreement higher than 80% was reached in all of them. We found the highest agreement on the need for a full discharge report, on providing proper information about the process and on following available guidelines. There is consensus among professionals involved in the management of patients undergoing total knee replacement, in that it is important to protocolize the replacement process, performing a proper, integrated and coordinated patient evaluation and follow-up, paying special attention to the surgical procedure and postoperative period. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Competition policy for health care provision in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Kurt R; Straume, Odd Rune

    2017-02-01

    Competition policy has played a very limited role for health care provision in Norway. The main reason is that Norway has a National Health Service (NHS) with extensive public provision and a wide set of sector-specific regulations that limit the scope for competition. However, the last two decades, several reforms have deregulated health care provision and opened up for provider competition along some dimensions. For specialised care, the government has introduced patient choice and (partly) activity (DRG) based funding, but also corporatised public hospitals and allowed for more private provision. For primary care, a reform changed the payment scheme to capitation and (a higher share of) fee-for-service, inducing almost all GPs on fixed salary contracts to become self-employed. While these reforms have the potential for generating competition in the Norwegian NHS, the empirical evidence is quite limited and the findings are mixed. We identify a set of possible caveats that may weaken the incentives for provider competition - such as the partial implementation of DRG pricing, the dual purchaser-provider role of regional health authorities, and the extensive consolidation of public hospitals - and argue that there is great scope for competition policy measures that could stimulate provider competition within the Norwegian NHS.

  12. Competition policy for health care provision in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Frederik T; Varkevisser, Marco

    2017-02-01

    In the Netherlands in 2006 a major health care reform was introduced, aimed at reinforcing regulated competition in the health care sector. Health insurers were provided with strong incentives to compete and more room to negotiate and selectively contract with health care providers. Nevertheless, the bargaining position of health insurers vis-à-vis both GPs and hospitals is still relatively weak. GPs are very well organized in a powerful national interest association (LHV) and effectively exploit the long-standing trust relationship with their patients. They have been very successful in mobilizing public support against unfavorable contracting practices of health insurers and enforcement of the competition act. The rapid establishment of multidisciplinary care groups to coordinate care for patients with chronic diseases further strengthened their position. Due to ongoing horizontal consolidation, hospital markets in the Netherlands have become highly concentrated. Only recently the Dutch competition authority prohibited the first hospital merger. Despite the highly concentrated health insurance market, it is unclear whether insurers will have sufficient countervailing buyer power vis-à-vis GPs and hospitals to effectively fulfill their role as prudent buyer of care, as envisioned in the reform. To prevent further consolidation and anticompetitive coordination, strict enforcement of competition policy is crucially important for safeguarding the potential for effective insurer-provider negotiations about quality and price.

  13. [Hepatitis C: diagnosis, anti-viral therapy, after-care. Hungarian consensus guideline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunyady, Béla; Gerlei, Zsuzsanna; Gervain, Judit; Horváth, Gábor; Lengyel, Gabriella; Pár, Alajos; Rókusz, László; Szalay, Ferenc; Telegdy, László; Tornai, István; Werling, Klára; Makara, Mihály

    2015-03-01

    need based on a Hungarian Priority Index system reflecting primarily the stage of liver disease, and considering also additional factors, i.e., activity and progression of liver disease, predictive factors of treatment and other special issues. Approved treatments are restricted to the most cost-effective combinations based on the cost per sustained viral response value in different patient categories with consensus between professional organizations, National Health Insurance Fund and patient organizations. More expensive therapies might be available upon co-financing by the patient or a third party. Interferon-free treatments and shorter therapy durations preferred as much as financially feasible. A separate budget is allocated to cover interferon-free treatments for the most-in-need interferon ineligible/intolerant patients, and for those who have no more interferon-based therapy option.

  14. Variables in health care policy-making: resolving a quandary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, George P

    2009-08-01

    Contemporary debate on health care resource management is tied to a central moral issue: how to achieve an optimum level of reasonable or appropriate treatment based on the medical condition of each patient. Failure to tackle and resolve this issue in a confident and forthright manner ensures that the present approach to health care decision-making will continue in a state of indecisiveness if not, indeed, lethargy. Undergirding this moral issue is the foundational economic dilemma of controlling costs while limiting access to health care resources. Crafting a just solution to an equitable distribution of finite health care resources is, indeed, a quandary, if not almost an impossibility. What this article seeks to do, nonetheless, is to undertake an examination of the principles, socio-economic values and public policies needed to formulate health care compromises necessary to achieve greater stability in the normative decision-making process. In turn, this will ensure, ideally, a level of distributive justice in the total allocative process.

  15. Care of diabetes in children and adolescents: controversies, changes, and consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Fergus J; Wherrett, Diane K

    2015-05-23

    Diabetes is one of the most common chronic medical disorders in children. The management of diabetes remains a substantial burden on children with diabetes and their families, despite improvements in treatment and rates of morbidity and mortality. Although most children with diabetes have type 1 diabetes, the increasing recognition of type 2 diabetes and genetic forms of diabetes in the paediatric population has important treatment implications. Diabetes therapy focuses strongly on targets for good metabolic control to reduce the risk of long-term complications. A parallel goal is to minimise short-term complications of hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis. Technology offers opportunity for improvement in care, but has not yet fully lived up to its potential. New insights into the pathogenesis of diabetes and the development of new therapies have led to clinical trials aimed at the prevention of diabetes.

  16. Changing policies, changing patterns of care: Danish and Swedish home care at the crossroads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostgaard, Tine; Szebehely, Marta

    2012-06-01

    Despite pursuing the policy of ageing in place, the two Nordic countries of Denmark and Sweden have taken diverse roads in regard to the provision of formal, public tax-financed home care for older people. Whilst Sweden has cut down home care and targeted services for the most needy, Denmark has continued the generous provision of home care. This article focuses on the implication of such diverse policies for the provision and combination of formal and informal care resources for older people. Using data from Level of Living surveys (based on interviews with a total of 1,158 individuals aged 67-87 in need of practical help), the article investigates the consequences of the two policy approaches for older people of different needs and socio-economic backgrounds and evaluates how the development corresponds with ideals of universalism in the Nordic welfare model. Our findings show that in both countries tax-funded home care is used across social groups but targeting of resources at the most needy in Sweden creates other inequalities: Older people with shorter education are left with no one to resort to but the family, whilst those with higher education purchase help from market providers. Not only does this leave some older people more at risk, it also questions the degree of de-familialisation which is otherwise often proclaimed to be a main characteristic of the Nordic welfare model.

  17. Application of a general health policy model in the American health care crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, R M

    1993-05-01

    There is near consensus that the US health care system requires reform. Only a quarter of the American public has faith in the current system. Health care was one of the major issues considered in the 1992 US presidential election and the search for innovative solutions has transcended administrations.

  18. Treatment for osteoporosis in Australian residential aged care facilities: consensus recommendations for fracture prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Gustavo; Close, Jacqueline J; de Jager, Julien P; Ebeling, Peter R; Inderjeeth, Charles; Lord, Stephen; McLachlan, Andrew J; Reid, Ian R; Troen, Bruce R; Sambrook, Philip N

    2010-08-02

    Older people living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) are at considerably higher risk of suffering fractures than older people living in the community. When admitted to RACFs, patients should be assessed for fracture risk to ensure early implementation of effective fracture prevention measures. Routine or regular determination of calcium and phosphate serum levels in institutionalised older people is not indicated. Opinion is divided about the value of routine measurements of serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone and bone turnover markers. The non-pharmacological approach to fracture prevention includes multifactorial programs of falls prevention and the use of hip protectors. Vitamin D supplementation is recommended for all patients in RACFs. Dietary calcium intake should be optimised (1200-1500 mg per day is recommended) and supplementation offered to those with inadequate intake. The decision to prescribe calcium supplements should be guided by patients' tolerance, whether or not they have a history of kidney stones, and emerging data about its cardiovascular safety. Bisphosphonates are the first-choice pharmacological agents for fracture prevention in older persons at high risk. Intravenous administration is as efficient as oral and has the significant advantage of better adherence. Use of strontium ranelate has not been tested on people in RACFs, but evidence in the "old-old" (those aged 75 years and older) suggests it could be a therapeutic option for fracture prevention in this setting. In general, teriparatide should not be considered as a first-line treatment for fracture prevention, particularly for people in RACFs.

  19. [Visitation policy, design and comfort in Spanish intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, D; Martín, L; Viña, L; Quindós, B; Espina, M J; Forcelledo, L; López-Amor, L; García-Arias, B; del Busto, C; de Cima, S; Fernández-Rey, E

    2015-01-01

    To determine the design and comfort in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs), by analysing visiting hours, information, and family participation in patient care. Descriptive, multicentre study. Spanish ICUs. A questionnaire e-mailed to members of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine, Critical and Coronary Units (SEMICYUC), subscribers of the Electronic Journal Intensive Care Medicine, and disseminated through the blog Proyecto HU-CI. A total of 135 questionnaires from 131 hospitals were analysed. Visiting hours: 3.8% open 24h, 9.8% open daytime, and 67.7% have 2 visits a day. Information: given only by the doctor in 75.2% of the cases, doctor and nurse together in 4.5%, with a frequency of once a day in 79.7%. During weekends, information is given in 95.5% of the cases. Information given over the phone 74.4%. Family participation in patient care: hygiene 11%, feeding 80.5%, physiotherapy 17%. Personal objects allowed: mobile phone 41%, computer 55%, sound system 77%, and television 30%. Architecture and comfort: all individual cubicles 60.2%, natural light 54.9%, television 7.5%, ambient music 12%, clock in the cubicle 15.8%, environmental noise meter 3.8%, and a waiting room near the ICU 68.4%. Visiting policy is restrictive, with a closed ICU being the predominating culture. On average, technological communication devices are not allowed. Family participation in patient care is low. The ICU design does not guarantee privacy or provide a desirable level of comfort. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Is integration of healthy lifestyle promotion into primary care feasible? Discussion and consensus sessions between clinicians and researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arrazola Arantza

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adoption of a healthy lifestyle, including physical activity, a healthy diet, moderate alcohol consumption and abstinence from smoking, is associated with a major decrease in the incidence of chronic diseases and mortality. Primary health-care (PHC services therefore attempt, with rather limited success, to promote such lifestyles in their patients. The objective of the present study is to ascertain the perceptions of clinicians and researchers within the Basque Health System of the factors that hinder or facilitate the integration of healthy lifestyle promotion in routine PHC setting. Methods Formative research based on five consensus meetings held by an expert panel of 12 PHC professionals with clinical and research experience in health promotion, supplied with selected bibliographic material. These meetings were recorded, summarized and the provisional findings were returned to participants in order to improve their validity. Results The Health Belief Model, the Theory of Planned Action, the Social Learning Theory, "stages of change" models and integrative models were considered the most useful by the expert panel. Effective intervention strategies, such as the "5 A's" strategy (assess, advise, agree, assist and arrange are also available. However, none of these can be directly implemented or continuously maintained under current PHC conditions. These strategies should therefore be redesigned by adjusting the intervention objectives and contents to the operation of primary care centres and, in turn, altering the organisation of the centres where they are to be implemented. Conclusion It is recommended to address optimisation of health promotion in PHC from a research perspective in which PHC professionals, researchers and managers of these services cooperate in designing and evaluating innovative programs. Future strategies should adopt a socio-ecological approach in which the health system plays an essential role but

  1. Reducing variation in health care: the rhetorical politics of a policy idea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Sandra J

    2013-02-01

    For decades, geographic variation in the use and cost of health care has captured the imagination of researchers and policy makers. As a policy problem, variation suggests its own solution--reducing variation--but the substantive weaknesses of this policy idea invite a second look at its success. This article considers the politics of policy ideas to analyze the potential rhetorical strengths of reducing variation. It finds that this idea appeals to multiple health care audiences, remains practically and politically ambiguous as to problem and solution, and resonates with long-held aspirations of policy elites, including being hopeful about solving the seemingly intractable problems of the US health care system.

  2. Undocumented Immigrants and Access to Health Care: Making a Case for Policy Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, Jean

    2014-02-01

    The growth in undocumented immigration in the United States has garnered increasing interest in the arenas of immigration and health care policy reform. Undocumented immigrants are restricted from accessing public health and social service as a result of their immigration status. The Patient Protection and Affordability Care Act restricts undocumented immigrants from participating in state exchange insurance market places, further limiting them from accessing equitable health care services. This commentary calls for comprehensive policy reform that expands access to health care for undocumented immigrants based on an analysis of immigrant health policies and their impact on health care expenditures, public health, and the role of health care providers. The intersectional nature of immigration and health care policy emphasizes the need for nurse policymakers to advocate for comprehensive policy reform aimed at improving the health and well-being of immigrants and the nation as a whole. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions:]br]sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Professional Responsibility, Consensus, and Conflict: A Survey of Physician Decisions for the Chronically Critically Ill in Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Miriam C; Donohue, Pamela K; Kudchadkar, Sapna R; Hutton, Nancy; Boss, Renee D

    2017-09-01

    To describe neonatologist and pediatric intensivist attitudes and practices relevant to high-stakes decisions for children with chronic critical illness, with particular attention to physician perception of professional duty to seek treatment team consensus and to disclose team conflict. Self-administered online survey. U.S. neonatal ICUs and PICUs. Neonatologists and pediatric intensivists. None. We received 652 responses (333 neonatologists, denominator unknown; 319 of 1,290 pediatric intensivists). When asked about guiding a decision for tracheostomy in a chronically critically ill infant, only 41.7% of physicians indicated professional responsibility to seek a consensus decision, but 73.3% reported, in practice, that they would seek consensus and make a consensus-based recommendation; the second most common practice (15.5%) was to defer to families without making recommendations. When presented with conflict among the treatment team, 63% of physicians indicated a responsibility to be transparent about the decision-making process and reported matching practices. Neonatologists more frequently reported a responsibility to give decision making fully over to families; intensivists were more likely to seek out consensus among the treatment team. ICU physicians do not agree about their responsibilities when approaching difficult decisions for chronically critically ill children. Although most physicians feel a professional responsibility to provide personal recommendations or defer to families, most physicians report offering consensus recommendations. Nearly all physicians embrace a sense of responsibility to disclose disagreement to families. More research is needed to understand physician responsibilities for making recommendations in the care of chronically critically ill children.

  4. Advancing LGBT Health Care Policies and Clinical Care Within a Large Academic Health Care System: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, Mollie A; Shipherd, Jillian C; Topor, David; AhnAllen, Christopher G; Sloan, Colleen A; Walton, Heather M; Matza, Alexis R; Trezza, Glenn R

    2017-01-01

    Culturally competent health care is especially important among sexual and gender minority patients because poor cultural competence contributes to health disparities. There is a need to understand how to improve health care quality and delivery for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) veterans in particular, because they have unique physical and mental health needs as both LGBT individuals and veterans. The following article is a case study that focuses on the policy and clinical care practices related to LGBT clinical competency, professional training, and ethical provision of care for veteran patients in the VA Boston Healthcare System. We apply Betancourt et al.'s (2003) cultural competence framework to outline the steps that VA Boston Healthcare System took to increase cultural competency at the organizational, structural, and clinical level. By sharing our experiences, we aim to provide a model and steps for other health care systems and programs, including other VA health care systems, large academic health care systems, community health care systems, and mental health care systems, interested in developing LGBT health initiatives.

  5. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015) - short version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ralf; Binder, Andreas; Biniek, Rolf; Braune, Stephan; Buerkle, Hartmut; Dall, Peter; Demirakca, Sueha; Eckardt, Rahel; Eggers, Verena; Eichler, Ingolf; Fietze, Ingo; Freys, Stephan; Fründ, Andreas; Garten, Lars; Gohrbandt, Bernhard; Harth, Irene; Hartl, Wolfgang; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Horter, Johannes; Huth, Ralf; Janssens, Uwe; Jungk, Christine; Kaeuper, Kristin Maria; Kessler, Paul; Kleinschmidt, Stefan; Kochanek, Matthias; Kumpf, Matthias; Meiser, Andreas; Mueller, Anika; Orth, Maritta; Putensen, Christian; Roth, Bernd; Schaefer, Michael; Schaefers, Rainhild; Schellongowski, Peter; Schindler, Monika; Schmitt, Reinhard; Scholz, Jens; Schroeder, Stefan; Schwarzmann, Gerhard; Spies, Claudia; Stingele, Robert; Tonner, Peter; Trieschmann, Uwe; Tryba, Michael; Wappler, Frank; Waydhas, Christian; Weiss, Bjoern; Weisshaar, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine) and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine), twelve German medical societies published the "Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care". Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) in conjunction with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) from 2013. For this update, a major restructuring and extension of the guidelines were needed in order to cover new aspects of treatment, such as sleep and anxiety management. The literature was systematically searched and evaluated using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. The body of evidence used to formulate these recommendations was reviewed and approved by representatives of 17 national societies. Three grades of recommendation were used as follows: Grade "A" (strong recommendation), Grade "B" (recommendation) and Grade "0" (open recommendation). The result is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, evidence and consensus-based set of level 3 guidelines. This publication was designed for all ICU professionals, and takes into account all critically ill patient populations. It represents a guide to symptom-oriented prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of delirium, anxiety, stress, and protocol-based analgesia, sedation, and sleep-management in intensive care medicine.

  6. Policy choices in dementia care-An exploratory analysis of the Alberta continuing care system (ACCS) using system dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepoiu-Martin, Monica; Bischak, Diane P

    2017-08-01

    The increase in the incidence of dementia in the aging population and the decrease in the availability of informal caregivers put pressure on continuing care systems to care for a growing number of people with disabilities. Policy changes in the continuing care system need to address this shift in the population structure. One of the most effective tools for assessing policies in complex systems is system dynamics. Nevertheless, this method is underused in continuing care capacity planning. A system dynamics model of the Alberta Continuing Care System was developed using stylized data. Sensitivity analyses and policy evaluations were conducted to demonstrate the use of system dynamics modelling in this area of public health planning. We focused our policy exploration on introducing staff/resident benchmarks in both supportive living and long-term care (LTC). The sensitivity analyses presented in this paper help identify leverage points in the system that need to be acknowledged when policy decisions are made. Our policy explorations showed that the deficits of staff increase dramatically when benchmarks are introduced, as expected, but at the end of the simulation period, the difference in deficits of both nurses and health care aids are similar between the 2 scenarios tested. Modifying the benchmarks in LTC only versus in both supportive living and LTC has similar effects on staff deficits in long term, under the assumptions of this particular model. The continuing care system dynamics model can be used to test various policy scenarios, allowing decision makers to visualize the effect of a certain policy choice on different system variables and to compare different policy options. Our exploration illustrates the use of system dynamics models for policy making in complex health care systems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. [Intercultural health care policy from the perspective of health care providers and Mapuche clients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Ana María; Astudillo, Paula; Barrios, Sara; Rivas, Edith

    2004-09-01

    Intercultural health is becoming an emergent topic in the design of health care programs for Mapuche people of Chile. This process faces important challenges such as the scarce theoretical support about the meaning of intercultural health and their practical consequences for providers and clients. To explore the perception in providers and Mapuche clients about intercultural health. A survey performed in 11 counties with the highest concentration of Mapuche people, of the IX region of Chile. The perception about the development of a new health policy specially designed for Mapuche patients was surveyed in 399 Mapuche patients and 64 providers of primary health care centers. Mapuche clients considered, as the main regional challenges, the indifference and discrimination of health care teams towards Mapuche patients, aggravated by the indifference of authorities. Providers considered that the main problem was a lack of knowledge about Mapuche culture and skills to deal with this ethnic group. Patients and providers agreed on the need to use Mapuche dialect in health care attentions, to coordinate actions with traditional healers and to accept ethnical therapeutic practices. There is scarce agreement between providers and Mapuche clients about the need for an special intercultural health policy, its contents, and the regional conditions for its implementation and development.

  8. In Search of Consensus: Role Versus Belief Systems in Bureaucratic Bargaining. An American Foreign Policy Simulation (AFPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Heidi H.; Moreno, Dario V.

    Reported are results from two runs of the simulation "Bureaucratic Bargaining," developed to help students understand the inherent tension between roles and belief systems in American foreign policy decision making. To determine their belief systems, 165 students enrolled in an introductory international relations course were tested with…

  9. Rare disease policies to improve care for patients in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, Charlotte; Aymé, Ségolène

    2015-10-01

    Rare diseases are those with a particularly low prevalence; in Europe, diseases are considered to be rare when they affect not more than 5 in 10000 persons in the European Union. The specificities of rare diseases make the area a veritable public health challenge: the limited number of patients and scarcity of knowledge and expertise single rare diseases out as a distinctive domain of high European added-value. The Orphan Medicinal Product Regulation of 1999 was the first European legislative text concerning rare diseases, followed by many initiatives, including recommendations by the Council of Ministers of the European Union in 2009. These initiatives contributed to the development of rare diseases policies at European and national level aimed at improving care for patients with rare diseases. A review of the political framework at European level and in European countries is provided to demonstrate how legislation has created a dynamic that is progressively improving care for patients with rare diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease)".

  10. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015 – short version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAS-Taskforce 2015

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, twelve German medical societies published the “Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care”. Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM in conjunction with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP from 2013. For this update, a major restructuring and extension of the guidelines were needed in order to cover new aspects of treatment, such as sleep and anxiety management. The literature was systematically searched and evaluated using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. The body of evidence used to formulate these recommendations was reviewed and approved by representatives of 17 national societies. Three grades of recommendation were used as follows: Grade “A” (strong recommendation, Grade “B” (recommendation and Grade “0” (open recommendation. The result is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, evidence and consensus-based set of level 3 guidelines. This publication was designed for all ICU professionals, and takes into account all critically ill patient populations. It represents a guide to symptom-oriented prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of delirium, anxiety, stress, and protocol-based analgesia, sedation, and sleep-management in intensive care medicine.

  11. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015) – short version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ralf; Binder, Andreas; Biniek, Rolf; Braune, Stephan; Buerkle, Hartmut; Dall, Peter; Demirakca, Sueha; Eckardt, Rahel; Eggers, Verena; Eichler, Ingolf; Fietze, Ingo; Freys, Stephan; Fründ, Andreas; Garten, Lars; Gohrbandt, Bernhard; Harth, Irene; Hartl, Wolfgang; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Horter, Johannes; Huth, Ralf; Janssens, Uwe; Jungk, Christine; Kaeuper, Kristin Maria; Kessler, Paul; Kleinschmidt, Stefan; Kochanek, Matthias; Kumpf, Matthias; Meiser, Andreas; Mueller, Anika; Orth, Maritta; Putensen, Christian; Roth, Bernd; Schaefer, Michael; Schaefers, Rainhild; Schellongowski, Peter; Schindler, Monika; Schmitt, Reinhard; Scholz, Jens; Schroeder, Stefan; Schwarzmann, Gerhard; Spies, Claudia; Stingele, Robert; Tonner, Peter; Trieschmann, Uwe; Tryba, Michael; Wappler, Frank; Waydhas, Christian; Weiss, Bjoern; Weisshaar, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine) and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine), twelve German medical societies published the “Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care”. Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) in conjunction with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) from 2013. For this update, a major restructuring and extension of the guidelines were needed in order to cover new aspects of treatment, such as sleep and anxiety management. The literature was systematically searched and evaluated using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. The body of evidence used to formulate these recommendations was reviewed and approved by representatives of 17 national societies. Three grades of recommendation were used as follows: Grade “A” (strong recommendation), Grade “B” (recommendation) and Grade “0” (open recommendation). The result is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, evidence and consensus-based set of level 3 guidelines. This publication was designed for all ICU professionals, and takes into account all critically ill patient populations. It represents a guide to symptom-oriented prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of delirium, anxiety, stress, and protocol-based analgesia, sedation, and sleep-management in intensive care medicine. PMID:26609286

  12. Palliative care for terminally ill patients in the Netherlands: Dutch government policy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    There is a broad range of palliative care available in the Netherlands. There are many options for obtaining palliative care at home. The care that terminally ill patients need can also be provided in nursing homes, care homes, hospitals and hospices. Government policy in this field is one of the re

  13. The nurse practitioner and policy in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Janet C; Reed, Pamela G

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this column is the interface between policy and end-of-life care, particularly as provided by advanced nurse practitioners. The complexities of end-of-life along with barriers in practice can diminish quality of life for patients and their families. Changes in policy are needed to enable nurse practitioners their full scope of practice in a way that benefits patients and families at end-of-life. Three areas particularly relevant to policy for nursing practitioners and end-of-life care are addressed: scope of practice, reimbursement, and prescribing practices. Other recommendations for policy and end-of-life care are discussed.

  14. [Inter-hospital CHUV-HUG medical consensus of back pain management. Its application in care pathways within CHUV of Lausanne].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goumoens, Pierre; Genevay, Stéphane; Tessitore, Enrico; Zaarour, Maroun; Duff, John Michael; Faundez, Antonio; Schizas, Constantin; Schindler, Maximilian; Zoccatelli, Davide; Foletti, Antonio; Norberg, Iohn; Belgrand, Liliana; Griesser, Anne-Claude; Kulik, Gerit

    2014-04-30

    Back pain is a considerable economical burden in industrialised countries. Its management varies widely across countries, including Switzerland. Thus, the University Hospital and University of Lausanne (CHUV) recently improved intern processes of back pain care. In an already existing collaborative context, the two university hospitals in French-speaking Switzerland (CHUV, University Hospital of Geneva), felt the need of a medical consensus, based on a common concept. This inter-hospital consensus produced three decisional algorithms that bear on recent concepts of back pain found in literature. Eventually, a fast track was created at CHUV, to which extern physicians will have an organised and rapid access. This fast track aims to reduce chronic back pain conditions and provides specialised education for general practitioners-in-training.

  15. Identifying important and feasible policies and actions for health at community sports clubs: a consensus-generating approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bridget; King, Lesley; Bauman, Adrian E; Baur, Louise A; Macniven, Rona; Chapman, Kathy; Smith, Ben J

    2014-01-01

    Children's high participation in organised sport in Australia makes sport an ideal setting for health promotion. This study aimed to generate consensus on priority health promotion objectives for community sports clubs, based on informed expert judgements. Delphi survey using three structured questionnaires. Forty-six health promotion, nutrition, physical activity and sport management/delivery professionals were approached to participate in the survey. Questionnaires used an iterative process to determine aspects of sports clubs deemed necessary for developing healthy sporting environments for children. Initially, participants were provided with a list of potential standards for a range of health promotion areas and asked to rate standards based on their importance and feasibility, and any barriers to implementation. Subsequently, participants were provided with information that summarised ratings for each standard to indicate convergence of the group, and asked to review and potentially revise their responses where they diverged. In a third round, participants ranked confirmed standards by priority. 26 professionals completed round 1, 21 completed round 2, and 18 completed round 3. The highest ranked standards related to responsible alcohol practices, availability of healthy food and drinks at sports canteens, smoke-free club facilities, restricting the sale and consumption of alcohol during junior sporting activities, and restricting unhealthy food and beverage company sponsorship. Identifying and prioritising health promotion areas that are relevant to children's sports clubs assists in focusing public health efforts and may guide future engagement of sports clubs. Approaches for providing informational and financial support to clubs to operationalise these standards are proposed. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Consensus report for the clinical care of smoking cessation in Spain. Comité Nacional para la Prevención del Tabaquismo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarelles Guillem, Francisco; Dalmau González-Gallarza, Regina; Clemente Jiménez, Lourdes; Díaz-Maroto Muñoz, José Luis; Lozano Polo, Adelaida; Pinet Ogué, María Cristina

    2013-03-16

    Tobacco use presents an odd confluence of circumstances: it is a significant and high threat to health, and there is a lack of motivation among health workers to act accordingly. Yet we have effective interventions. It is really hard to identify any other determinant of health presenting this mixture of lethality, prevalence, and lack of care, despite having effective treatments readily available. On the other hand, smoking cessation interventions are considered as the gold standard of preventive interventions, far above other preventive measures commonly used. This has prompted the National Committee for Smoking Prevention to develop a consensus document for the Clinical Care of Smoking Cessation in Spain. The purpose of this technical and scientific document is to agree on a basic proposal of quality of care to tackle smokers to quit. This document would serve as a guideline in the clinical practice in our country. The aims of this agreement are to review the effectiveness of the existing therapies for smoking cessation, to synthesize their available evidence, and to set the basic minimum standards of care in the clinical practice of patients who smoke. The consensus sets the strategies, and the evidences that support them, in order to assist both the smokers who want to quit, and the smokers who do not, setting out the steps to intervene in the most adequate.

  17. Care ‘going market’: Finnish elderly-care policies in transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneli Anttonen

    2011-06-01

    -ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} The article evaluates marketization and its effects on elderly-care policies in Finland, where the welfare state has been the most important mechanism in mitigating failures caused by the functioning of market. In addition, since the 1960s the public sector has been regarded as the guarantee for citizens' social rights and the common good. Therefore, marketization, denoting to market logics intervened with social-care practices that construct care as a commodity and the individual in need of care as a consumer, is a critical juncture for an evaluation of the underlying pattern change. To evaluate the change this article employs a framework of institutional policy analysis. By focusing on institutional framing of care policies, institutionalized responsibilities, policy discourses, and policy outcomes and by using textual and statistical data, this article aims to reach a detailed but comprehensive picture on marketization and its influence in the Finnish social-care regime. All institutional aspects analysed in the study show a clear transition from universal social policies based on public responsibility to market-friendly policies and the marketization of social care. However, they also imply that marketization is regulated by public authorities. On the basis of these results, we argue that Finnish elderly-care policies is going through a profound change, in magnitude similar to what occurred 30-40 years ago when the politics of universalism was breaking through. The new direction points to the market and a deep-going reform of social-care service provision is taking place, and the earlier state-centred welfare production mode is at least partly withering away. In this respect the pattern of social-care service

  18. An official American Thoracic Society policy statement: pay-for-performance in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeremy M; Scales, Damon C; Au, David H; Carson, Shannon S; Curtis, J Randall; Dudley, R Adams; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Krishnan, Jerry A; Maurer, Janet R; Mularski, Richard; Popovich, John; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Sinuff, Tasnim; Heffner, John E

    2010-04-01

    Pay-for-performance is a model for health care financing that seeks to link reimbursement to quality. The American Thoracic Society and its members have a significant stake in the development of pay-for-performance programs. To develop an official ATS policy statement addressing the role of pay-for-performance in pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. The statement was developed by the ATS Health Policy Committee using an iterative consensus process including an expert workshop and review by ATS committees and assemblies. Pay-for-performance is increasingly utilized by health care purchasers including the United States government. Published studies generally show that programs result in small but measurable gains in quality, although the data are heterogeneous. Pay-for-performance may result in several negative consequences, including the potential to increase costs, worsen health outcomes, and widen health disparities, among others. Future research should be directed at developing reliable and valid performance measures, increasing the efficacy of pay-for-performance programs, minimizing negative unintended consequences, and examining issues of costs and cost-effectiveness. The ATS and its members can play a key role in the design and evaluation of these programs by advancing the science of performance measurement, regularly developing quality metrics alongside clinical practice guidelines, and working with payors to make performance improvement a routine part of clinical practice. Pay-for-performance programs will expand in the coming years. Pulmonary, critical care and sleep practitioners can use these programs as an opportunity to partner with purchasers to improve health care quality.

  19. Elderly and long-term care trends and policy in Taiwan: Challenges and opportunities for health care professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Hung Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to address the trends and policy of elderly and long-term care in Taiwan. In response to the increasing demand of an aging society, healthcare professionals play crucial roles in elderly and long-term care and quality assurance of services. This article focuses on the current situation of elderly health care, demands of long-term care, long-term care policy in Taiwan, draft of the Long-term Care Services Act, and draft of the Long-term Care Insurance Act. After the 10-year long-term care project was proposed by the Taiwan government, the supply of health care services and demand for long-term care have created many challenges and opportunities for innovative health professional development. Challenges consist of low old dependency ratio caused by low birth rate, lack of elderly and long-term care related manpower, services and education reform related to long-term care for the future society, and interprofessional collaboration and team work of long-term care. Opportunities include expanding the roles and the career pathways of healthcare professionals, promoting the concepts of active aging and good quality of life, and developing industrial cooperation related to long-term care services. Under these circumstances, healthcare professonals are actively involved in practice, education and research of long-term care services that ensure elderly and disabled people can live a healthier and better life.

  20. Developing New Mexico Health Care Policy: An application of the Vital Issues Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engi, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Icerman, L. [Icerman & Associates, Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The Vital Issues Process, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories Strategic Technologies Department, was utilized by the Health Care Task Force Advisory Group to apply structure to their policy deliberations. By convening three expert panels, an overarching goal for the New Mexico health care system, seven desired outcomes, nine policy options, and 17 action items were developed for the New Mexico health care system. Three broadly stated evaluation criteria were articulated and used to produce relative rankings of the desired outcomes and policy options for preventive care and information systems. Reports summarizing the policy deliberations were submitted for consideration by the Health Care Task Force, a Joint Interim Committee of the New Mexico Legislature, charged with facilitating the development and implementation of a comprehensive health care delivery system for New Mexico. The Task Force reported its findings and recommendations to the Second Session of the 41st New Mexico State Legislature in January 1994.

  1. Aging, care and social policy. Continuities and changes in Argentina and Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Concepción ARROYO RUEDA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to show from a comparative perspective of social policy, the provision of care in old age in Argentina and Mexico. It will also show the experience of the national policy of care in Argentina. In this country we carried out interviews with coordinators, operational personnel and users of the national program of care. The participants identify in the policy a vision of rights and social inclusion of the elderly and effective support for family caregivers. Meanwhile, in the case of Mexico, we observe scarce and ambiguous legislation on the subject, which is predominated by the practice of informal care to older people, given mainly by the women in the families. Basic care is outside the aging policy and confined within the «familist model» according to an exalted social assessment of the moral obligation of family care.

  2. Mixed methods research in the development and evaluation of complex interventions in palliative and end-of-life care: report on the MORECare consensus exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Morag; Preston, Nancy; Evans, Catherine J; Grande, Gunn; Short, Vicky; Benalia, Hamid; Higginson, Irene J; Todd, Chris

    2013-12-01

    Complex interventions are common in palliative and end-of-life care. Mixed methods approaches sit well within the multiphase model of complex intervention development and evaluation. Generic mixed methods guidance is useful but additional challenges in the research design and operationalization within palliative and end-of-life care may have an impact on the use of mixed methods. The objective of the study was to develop guidance on the best methods for combining quantitative and qualitative methods for health and social care intervention development and evaluation in palliative and end-of-life care. A one-day workshop was held where experts participated in facilitated groups using Transparent Expert Consultation to generate items for potential recommendations. Agreement and consensus were then sought on nine draft recommendations (DRs) in a follow-up exercise. There was at least moderate agreement with most of the DRs, although consensus was low. Strongest agreement was with DR1 (usefulness of mixed methods to palliative and end-of-life care) and DR5 (importance of attention to respondent burden), and least agreement was with DR2 (use of theoretical perspectives) and DR6 (therapeutic effects of research interviews). Narrative comments enabled recommendation refinement. Two fully endorsed, five partially endorsed, and two refined DRs emerged. The relationship of these nine to six key challenges of palliative and end-of-life care research was analyzed. There is a need for further discussion of these recommendations and their contribution to methodology. The recommendations should be considered when designing and operationalizing mixed methods studies of complex interventions in palliative care, and because they may have wider relevance, should be considered for other applications.

  3. Disintegrated care: the Achilles heel of international health policies in low and middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Unger

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To review the evidence basis of international aid and health policy. Context of case: Current international aid policy is largely neoliberal in its promotion of commoditization and privatisation. We review this policy's responsibility for the lack of effectiveness in disease control and poor access to care in low and middle-income countries. Data sources: National policies, international programmes and pilot experiments are examined in both scientific and grey literature. Conclusions and discussion: We document how health care privatisation has led to the pool of patients being cut off from public disease control interventions—causing health care disintegration—which in turn resulted in substandard performance of disease control. Privatisation of health care also resulted in poor access. Our analysis consists of three steps. Pilot local contracting-out experiments are scrutinized; national health care records of Colombia and Chile, two countries having adopted contracting-out as a basis for health care delivery, are critically examined against Costa Rica; and specific failure mechanisms of the policy in low and middle-income countries are explored. We conclude by arguing that the negative impact of neoliberal health policy on disease control and health care in low and middle-income countries justifies an alternative aid policy to improve both disease control and health care.

  4. Disintegrated care: the Achilles heel of international health policies in low and middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Unger

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To review the evidence basis of international aid and health policy. Context of case: Current international aid policy is largely neoliberal in its promotion of commoditization and privatisation. We review this policy's responsibility for the lack of effectiveness in disease control and poor access to care in low and middle-income countries. Data sources: National policies, international programmes and pilot experiments are examined in both scientific and grey literature. Conclusions and discussion: We document how health care privatisation has led to the pool of patients being cut off from public disease control interventions—causing health care disintegration—which in turn resulted in substandard performance of disease control. Privatisation of health care also resulted in poor access. Our analysis consists of three steps. Pilot local contracting-out experiments are scrutinized; national health care records of Colombia and Chile, two countries having adopted contracting-out as a basis for health care delivery, are critically examined against Costa Rica; and specific failure mechanisms of the policy in low and middle-income countries are explored. We conclude by arguing that the negative impact of neoliberal health policy on disease control and health care in low and middle-income countries justifies an alternative aid policy to improve both disease control and health care.

  5. Competition policy for health care provision in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Pedro Pita

    2017-02-01

    We review the role of competition among healthcare providers in Portugal, which has a public National Health Service (NHS) at the core of the health system. There is little competition among healthcare providers within the NHS. Competition among NHS primary care providers is hindered by excess demand (many residents in Portugal do not have a designated family doctor). Competition among NHS hospitals has been traditionally limited to cases of maximum guaranteed waiting time for surgery being exceeded. The Portuguese Competition Authority enforces competition law. It has focused on mergers between private hospitals and abuse of market power (including cartel cases) by private healthcare providers. The Healthcare Regulation Authority produced several reports on particular areas of activity by private healthcare providers. The main conclusion of these reviews was lack of conditions for effective competition, with the exception of dentistry. Within the NHS, the use of tendering procedures was able to create "competition for the market" in particular areas though it was not problem free. Details in the particular design adopted matter a lot. Overall, the scope for competition policy and for competition among healthcare providers to have a main role in a health system based on a public National Health Service seems limited, with more relevance to "competition for the market" situations than to "competition in the market".

  6. The development of a consensus definition for healthcare improvement science (HIS) in seven European countries: A consensus methods approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrae, Rhoda; Lillo-Crespo, Manuel; Rooney, Kevin D

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction There is a limited body of research in the field of healthcare improvement science (HIS). Quality improvement and ‘change making’ should become an intrinsic part of everyone’s job, every day in all parts of the healthcare system. The lack of theoretical grounding may partly explain the minimal transfer of health research into health policy. Methods This article seeks to present the development of the definition for healthcare improvement science. A consensus method approach was adopted with a two-stage Delphi process, expert panel and consensus group techniques. A total of 18 participants were involved in the expert panel and consensus group, and 153 answers were analysed as a part of the Delphi survey. Participants were researchers, educators and healthcare professionals from Scotland, Slovenia, Spain, Italy, England, Poland, and Romania. Results A high level of consensus was achieved for the broad definition in the 2nd Delphi iteration (86%). The final definition was agreed on by the consensus group: ‘Healthcare improvement science is the generation of knowledge to cultivate change and deliver person-centred care that is safe, effective, efficient, equitable and timely. It improves patient outcomes, health system performance and population health.’ Conclusions The process of developing a consensus definition revealed different understandings of healthcare improvement science between the participants. Having a shared consensus definition of healthcare improvement science is an important step forward, bringing about a common understanding in order to advance the professional education and practice of healthcare improvement science. PMID:28289467

  7. Adding home health care to the discussion on health information technology policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiano, Nicole; Brown, Ellen L; Hristidis, Vagelis; Page, Timothy F

    2013-01-01

    The potential for health information technology to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of health care has resulted in several U.S. policy initiatives aimed at integrating health information technology into health care systems. However, home health care agencies have been excluded from incentive programs established through policies, raising concerns on the extent to which health information technology may be used to improve the quality of care for older adults with chronic illness and disabilities. This analysis examines the potential issues stemming from this exclusion and explores potential opportunities of integrating home health care into larger initiatives aimed at establishing health information technology systems for meaningful use.

  8. Management of the Potential Organ Donor in the ICU: Society of Critical Care Medicine/American College of Chest Physicians/Association of Organ Procurement Organizations Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotloff, Robert M; Blosser, Sandralee; Fulda, Gerard J; Malinoski, Darren; Ahya, Vivek N; Angel, Luis; Byrnes, Matthew C; DeVita, Michael A; Grissom, Thomas E; Halpern, Scott D; Nakagawa, Thomas A; Stock, Peter G; Sudan, Debra L; Wood, Kenneth E; Anillo, Sergio J; Bleck, Thomas P; Eidbo, Elling E; Fowler, Richard A; Glazier, Alexandra K; Gries, Cynthia; Hasz, Richard; Herr, Dan; Khan, Akhtar; Landsberg, David; Lebovitz, Daniel J; Levine, Deborah Jo; Mathur, Mudit; Naik, Priyumvada; Niemann, Claus U; Nunley, David R; O'Connor, Kevin J; Pelletier, Shawn J; Rahman, Omar; Ranjan, Dinesh; Salim, Ali; Sawyer, Robert G; Shafer, Teresa; Sonneti, David; Spiro, Peter; Valapour, Maryam; Vikraman-Sushama, Deepak; Whelan, Timothy P M

    2015-06-01

    This document was developed through the collaborative efforts of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the American College of Chest Physicians, and the Association of Organ Procurement Organizations. Under the auspices of these societies, a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional task force was convened, incorporating expertise in critical care medicine, organ donor management, and transplantation. Members of the task force were divided into 13 subcommittees, each focused on one of the following general or organ-specific areas: death determination using neurologic criteria, donation after circulatory death determination, authorization process, general contraindications to donation, hemodynamic management, endocrine dysfunction and hormone replacement therapy, pediatric donor management, cardiac donation, lung donation, liver donation, kidney donation, small bowel donation, and pancreas donation. Subcommittees were charged with generating a series of management-related questions related to their topic. For each question, subcommittees provided a summary of relevant literature and specific recommendations. The specific recommendations were approved by all members of the task force and then assembled into a complete document. Because the available literature was overwhelmingly comprised of observational studies and case series, representing low-quality evidence, a decision was made that the document would assume the form of a consensus statement rather than a formally graded guideline. The goal of this document is to provide critical care practitioners with essential information and practical recommendations related to management of the potential organ donor, based on the available literature and expert consensus.

  9. The SOS-framework (Systems of Sedentary behaviours): an international transdisciplinary consensus framework for the study of determinants, research priorities and policy on sedentary behaviour across the life course: a DEDIPAC-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastin, Sebastien F M; De Craemer, Marieke; Lien, Nanna; Bernaards, Claire; Buck, Christoph; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Nazare, Julie-Anne; Lakerveld, Jeroen; O'Donoghue, Grainne; Holdsworth, Michelle; Owen, Neville; Brug, Johannes; Cardon, Greet

    2016-07-15

    Ecological models are currently the most used approaches to classify and conceptualise determinants of sedentary behaviour, but these approaches are limited in their ability to capture the complexity of and interplay between determinants. The aim of the project described here was to develop a transdisciplinary dynamic framework, grounded in a system-based approach, for research on determinants of sedentary behaviour across the life span and intervention and policy planning and evaluation. A comprehensive concept mapping approach was used to develop the Systems Of Sedentary behaviours (SOS) framework, involving four main phases: (1) preparation, (2) generation of statements, (3) structuring (sorting and ranking), and (4) analysis and interpretation. The first two phases were undertaken between December 2013 and February 2015 by the DEDIPAC KH team (DEterminants of DIet and Physical Activity Knowledge Hub). The last two phases were completed during a two-day consensus meeting in June 2015. During the first phase, 550 factors regarding sedentary behaviour were listed across three age groups (i.e., youths, adults and older adults), which were reduced to a final list of 190 life course factors in phase 2 used during the consensus meeting. In total, 69 international delegates, seven invited experts and one concept mapping consultant attended the consensus meeting. The final framework obtained during that meeting consisted of six clusters of determinants: Physical Health and Wellbeing (71% consensus), Social and Cultural Context (59% consensus), Built and Natural Environment (65% consensus), Psychology and Behaviour (80% consensus), Politics and Economics (78% consensus), and Institutional and Home Settings (78% consensus). Conducting studies on Institutional Settings was ranked as the first research priority. The view that this framework captures a system-based map of determinants of sedentary behaviour was expressed by 89% of the participants. Through an international

  10. Personalising care of adults with asthma from Asia: a modified e-Dephi consensus study to inform management tailored to attitude and control profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Alison; Price, David B; Pinnock, Hilary; Lee, Tan Tze; Roa, Camilo; Cho, Sang-Heon; David-Wang, Aileen; Wong, Gary; van der Molen, Thys; Ryan, Dermot; Castillo-Carandang, Nina; Yong, Yee Vern

    2017-01-01

    REALISE Asia—an online questionnaire-based study of Asian asthma patients—identified five patient clusters defined in terms of their control status and attitude towards their asthma (categorised as: ‘Well-adjusted and at least partly controlled’; ‘In denial about symptoms’; ‘Tolerating with poor control’; ‘Adrift and poorly controlled’; ‘Worried with multiple symptoms’). We developed consensus recommendations for tailoring management of these attitudinal–control clusters. An expert panel undertook a three-round electronic Delphi (e-Delphi): Round 1: panellists received descriptions of the attitudinal–control clusters and provided free text recommendations for their assessment and management. Round 2: panellists prioritised Round 1 recommendations and met (or joined a teleconference) to consolidate the recommendations. Round 3: panellists voted and prioritised the remaining recommendations. Consensus was defined as Round 3 recommendations endorsed by >50% of panellists. Highest priority recommendations were those receiving the highest score. The multidisciplinary panellists (9 clinicians, 1 pharmacist and 1 health social scientist; 7 from Asia) identified consensus recommendations for all clusters. Recommended pharmacological (e.g., step-up/down; self-management; simplified regimen) and non-pharmacological approaches (e.g., trigger management, education, social support; inhaler technique) varied substantially according to each cluster’s attitude to asthma and associated psychosocial drivers of behaviour. The attitudinal–control clusters defined by REALISE Asia resonated with the international panel. Consensus was reached on appropriate tailored management approaches for all clusters. Summarised and incorporated into a structured management pathway, these recommendations could facilitate personalised care. Generalisability of these patient clusters should be assessed in other socio-economic, cultural and literacy groups and

  11. Consensus statement to Schering-Plough Pharmaceuticals from the health care community regarding Rebetron development and marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A consensus statement regarding Schering-Plough's unethical dispensing practices for Rebetol (Ribavirin) has been issued by a coalition of organizations and individuals affected by hepatitis C (HCV). The statement demands that Ribavirin be unbundled from Intron-A; that the price of Ribavirin be immediately lowered to more closely match the cost of other drugs in the same nucleoside analogue class; and that HCV viral load results be unblinded for participants in Schering-Plough clinical trials. Endorsers of the statement also demand that Schering-Plough create access to Rebetol for those who cannot afford it and, until it is unbundled, create access to Ribavirin for those who wish to use it in combination with another Interferon. Each of these demands is described in detail. The organizations and individuals endorsing the consensus statement are listed.

  12. Public policy and medical tourism: ethical implications for the Egyptian health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Egypt's medical tourism industry has been experiencing tremendous growth. However, Egypt continues to lack the necessary investment in its public health system to effectively care for its population. Current policy and the emergence of medical tourism have led to unequal health care access, resulting in high a prevalence of infectious diseases and lack of resources for its most vulnerable populations. As a new Egyptian government emerges, it is important for policymakers to understand the critical issues and ethical concerns of existing health policy. This understanding may be used to propose new policy that more effectively allocates to care for Egypt's population.

  13. State Child Care Policies for Limited English Proficient Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firgens, Emily; Matthews, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG), the largest source of federal funding for child care assistance available to states, provides low-income families with help paying for child care. Studies have shown that low-income LEP (limited English proficient), as well as immigrant families, are less likely to receive child care assistance.…

  14. Consensus of the Spanish society of pediatric rheumatology for transition management from pediatric to adult care in rheumatic patients with childhood onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Inmaculada; Antón, Jordi; Bustabad, Sagrario; Camacho, Marisol; de Inocencio, Jaime; Gamir, M Luz; Graña, Jenaro; La Cruz, Lucía; Robledillo, Juan Carlos López; Medrano, Marta; Merino, Rosa; Modesto, Consuelo; Nuñez, Esmeralda; Rua, M Jesús; Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç; Vargas, Carmen; Carmona, Loreto; Loza, Estíbaliz

    2015-10-01

    To develop recommendations on the transition from pediatric care to adult care in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases with childhood onset based. Recommendations were generated following nominal group methodology and Delphi technique. A panel of 16 experts was established. A systematic literature review (on transitional care) and a narrative review were performed and presented to the panel in the first panel meeting to be discussed. A first draft of recommendations was generated and circulated. Focal groups with adolescents, young adults and parents were organized. In a second meeting, the focus group results along with the input from invited psychologist were used to establish definitive recommendations. Then, a Delphi process (two rounds) was carried out. A group of 72 pediatric and adult rheumatologists took part. Recommendations were voted from 1 (total disagreement) to 10 (total agreement). We defined agreement if at least 70 % voted ≥7. The level of evidence and grade or recommendation was assessed using the Oxford center for evidence-based medicine levels of evidence. Transition care was defined as a purposeful, planned process that addresses the medical, psychosocial and educational/vocational needs of adolescents and young adults with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases with childhood onset as they move from child-centered to adult-oriented healthcare systems. The consensus covers: transition needs, barriers and facilitators, transitional issues (objectives, participants, content, phases, timing, plans, documentation and responsibilities), physicians' and other health professionals' knowledge and skill requirements, models/programs, and strategies and guideline for implementation. Preliminary recommendations and agreement grade are shown in the Table (first Delphi round). These recommendations are intended to provide health professionals, patients, families and other stakeholders with a consensus on the transition process from

  15. Psychological Science and Innovative Strategies for Informing Health Care Redesign: A Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Stancin, Terry; Lochman, John E.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Miranda, Jeanne M.; Wysocki, Tim; Portwood, Sharon G.; Piacentini, John; Tynan, Douglas; Atkins, Marc; Kazak, Anne E.

    2017-01-01

    Recent health care legislation and shifting health care financing strategies are transforming health and behavioral health (a broad term referring to mental health, substance use, and health behavior) care in the United States. Advances in knowledge regarding effective treatment and services coupled with incentives for innovation in health and behavioral health care delivery systems make this a unique time for mobilizing our science to enhance the success of health and behavioral health care redesign. To optimize the potential of our current health care environment, a team was formed composed of leaders from the Societies of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, Pediatric Psychology, and Child and Family Policy and Practice (Divisions 53, 54, and 37 of the American Psychological Association). This team was charged with reviewing the scientific and policy literature with a focus on five major issues: (a) improving access to care and reducing health disparities, (b) integrating behavioral health care within primary care, (c) preventive services, (d) enhancing quality and outcomes of care, and (e) training and workforce development. The products of that work are summarized here, including recommendations for future research, clinical, training, and policy directions. We conclude that the current emphasis on accountable care and evaluation of the outcomes of care offer numerous opportunities for psychologists to integrate science and practice for the benefit of our children, families, and nation. The dramatic changes that are occurring in psychological and behavioral health care services and payment systems also require evolution in our practice and training models. PMID:26430948

  16. Consensus conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annika Porsborg; Lassen, Jesper

    Our results point to significant national variation both in terms of the perceived aim of consensus conferences, expectations to conference outcomes, conceptions of the roles of lay people and experts, and in terms of the way in which the role of public deliberation is interpreted. Interestingly...

  17. Women-friendly policy paradoxes?! Child Care policies and gender equality visions in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchorst, Anette

    2006-01-01

    The chapter focuses on the political construction of the equality-difference dilemma in Scandinavian welfare policies. Different policy logics of childcare policies in Sweden, Norway and Denmark are addressed and the visions of gender equality underpinning them are analyzed....

  18. Continuity and consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    maternal leave. These changes can be explained as adjustments to post-industrial conditions within a political culture relying on class compromises and a broad consensus informed by expert advice coming from civil servants and ad hoc policy commissions. The paper concludes that changes in Danish family......In Danish family policy, changes initiated by the present conservative-liberal government differ little from those proposed by the opposition. Recent changes are minor, but significant ones occurred in the 1960s, when childcare was universalized, and in the 1980s, when parental leave substituted...

  19. Health care models guiding mental health policy in Kenya 1965 - 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Rachel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental health policy is needed to set the strategy and direction for the provision of mental health services in a country. Policy formulation does not occur in a vacuum, however, but is influenced by local and international factors in the health sector and other sectors. Methods This study was carried out in 1997 to examine the evolution of mental health policy in Kenya between 1965 and 1997 in the context of changing international concepts of health and development. Qualitative content analysis of policy documents was combined with interviews of key policy makers. Results The study showed that during the period 1965-1997 the generic health policy in Kenya changed from one based on the Medical Model in the 1960s and 1970s to one based on the Primary Health Care Model in the late 1970s and the 1980s and finally to one based on the Market Model of health care in the 1990s. The mental health policy, on the other hand, evolved from one based on the Medical Model in the 1960s to one based on the Primary Health Care Model in the 1990s, but did not embrace the Market Model of health care. This resulted in a situation in the 1990s where the mental health policy was rooted in a different conceptual model from that of the generic health policy under which it was supposed to be implemented. This "Model Muddlement" may have impeded the implementation of the mental health policy in Kenya. Conclusions Integration of the national mental health policy with the general health policy and other sector policies would be appropriate and is now underway.

  20. Evidence-informed primary health care workforce policy: are we asking the right questions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Buchan, Jim; Brooks, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Australia is facing a primary health care workforce shortage. To inform primary health care (PHC) workforce policy reforms, reflection is required on ways to strengthen the evidence base and its uptake into policy making. In 2008 the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute funded the Australian Health Workforce Institute to host Professor James Buchan, Queen Margaret University, UK, an expert in health services policy research and health workforce planning. Professor Buchan's visit enabled over forty Australian PHC workforce mid-career and senior researchers and policy stakeholders to be involved in roundtable policy dialogue on issues influencing PHC workforce policy making. Six key thematic questions emerged. (1) What makes PHC workforce planning different? (2) Why does the PHC workforce need to be viewed in a global context? (3) What is the capacity of PHC workforce research? (4) What policy levers exist for PHC workforce planning? (5) What principles can guide PHC workforce planning? (6) What incentives exist to optimise the use of evidence in policy making? The emerging themes need to be discussed within the context of current PHC workforce policy reforms, which are focussed on increasing workforce supply (via education/training programs), changing the skill mix and extending the roles of health workers to meet patient needs. With the Australian government seeking to reform and strengthen the PHC workforce, key questions remain about ways to strengthen the PHC workforce evidence base and its uptake into PHC workforce policy making.

  1. Implementation as transfer between policy, research and practice in care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, P.J.M.; Niet, A. van der

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health Services Research is policy related and results have an impact on practices. Implementation of research output into practices is performed with a variety of strategies. Type of policy intentions and research output create a specific context for implementation. The main question

  2. Consenso brasileiro sobre políticas públicas do álcool Brazilian consensus on public policies on alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Laranjeira

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Esse é um resumo de uma reunião na qual vários especialistas, representando diversas organizações médicas e universitárias brasileiras, criaram um consenso sobre as principais políticas que deveriam ser implementadas pelos diferentes níveis de governo no Brasil. Há mais de 30 anos a OMS vem buscando um consenso internacional sobre as ações com maior potencial de trazer benefícios sociais. Essa busca trouxe duas conclusões importantes: 1 A pesquisa estabelece, sem margem à dúvida, que existem medidas de eficácia comprovada para reduzir os custos e os danos relacionados ao uso de álcool, visando ao bem comum; 2 É possível desenvolver estratégias que influenciam tanto a quantidade de álcool consumida por uma comunidade quanto os comportamentos de consumo e os contextos de alto risco causadores dos problemas relacionados ao consumo de álcool. Os objetivos deste Consenso são: 1 Tornar as evidências científicas mais acessíveis para os que elaboram políticas públicas; 2 Facilitar a avaliação das diversas estratégias disponíveis segundo critérios de efetividade, suporte científico, custo e viabilidade de transposição cultural; 3 Familiarizar o profissional de saúde, e em especial os que trabalham em saúde mental, sobre as prioridades da política do álcool.This is the summary of a meeting where a group of experts, representing several health organizations and academic departements from different parts of Brazil, created a consensus about the main alcohol policies which should be implemented by different levels of the brazilian government. The World Health Organization has been suggesting for 30 years the actions that should be implemented for the public good. Two important conclusions were reached: 1 The research establishes beyond doubt that public health measures of proven effectiveness are available to serve the public good by reducing the widespread costs and pain related to alcohol use; 2 To that end, it is

  3. Key informant perspectives on policy- and service-level challenges and opportunities for delivering integrated sexual and reproductive health and HIV care in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Jennifer A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integration of sexual and reproductive health (SRH and HIV services is a policy priority, both globally and in South Africa. Recent studies examining SRH/HIV integration in South Africa have focused primarily on the SRH needs of HIV patients, and less on the policy and service-delivery environment in which these programs operate. To fill this gap we undertook a qualitative study to elicit the views of key informants on policy-and service-level challenges and opportunities for improving integrated SRH and HIV care in South Africa. This study comprised formative research for the development of an integrated service delivery model in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN Province. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 21 expert key informants from the South African Department of Health, and local and international NGOs and universities. Thematic codes were generated from a subset of the transcripts, and these were modified, refined and organized during coding and analysis. Results While there was consensus among key informants on the need for more integrated systems of SRH and HIV care in South Africa, a range of inter-related systems factors at policy and service-delivery levels were identified as challenges to delivering integrated care. At the policy level these included vertical programming, lack of policy guidance on integrated care, under-funding of SRH, program territorialism, and weak referral systems; at the service level, factors included high client load, staff shortages and insufficient training and skills in SRH, resistance to change, and inadequate monitoring systems related to integration. Informants had varying views on the best way to achieve integration: while some favored a one-stop shop approach, others preferred retaining sub-specialisms while strengthening referral systems. The introduction of task-shifting policies and decentralization of HIV treatment to primary care provide opportunities for

  4. Operationalising unscheduled care policy: a qualitative study of healthcare professionals’ perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, Jessica; Salmon, Peter; Langer, Susanne; Hunter, Cheryl; Stenhoff, Alexandra; Guthrie, Elspeth; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Background UK health policy aims to reduce the use of unscheduled care, by increasing proactive and preventative management of patients with long-term conditions in primary care. Aim The study explored healthcare professionals’ understanding of why patients with long-term conditions use unscheduled care, and the healthcare professionals’ understanding of their role in relation to reducing the use of unscheduled care. Design and setting Qualitative study interviewing different types of healthcare professionals providing primary care or unscheduled care services in northwest England. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 29 healthcare professionals (six GPs; five out-of-hours GPs; four emergency department doctors; two practice nurses; three specialist nurses; two district nurses; seven active case managers). Data were analysed using framework analysis. Results Healthcare professionals viewed the use of unscheduled care as a necessary component of care for patients with long-term conditions. Those whose roles involved working to targets to reduce the use of unscheduled care described a tension between this and delivering optimum patient care. Three approaches to reducing unscheduled care were described: optimising the system; negotiating the system; and optimising the patient. Conclusion Current policy to reduce the use of unscheduled care does not take account of the perceptions of the healthcare professionals who are expected to implement them. Lipsky’s theory of street-level bureaucrats provides a framework to understand how healthcare professionals respond to imposed policies. Healthcare professionals did not see the use of unscheduled care as a problem and there was limited commitment to the policy targets. Therefore, policy should aim for whole-system change rather than reliance on individual healthcare professionals to make changes in their practice. PMID:23561786

  5. Advancing team-based primary health care: a comparative analysis of policies in western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Esther; Mallinson, Sara; Misfeldt, Renee; Boakye, Omenaa; Nasmith, Louise; Wong, Sabrina T

    2017-07-17

    We analyzed and compared primary health care (PHC) policies in British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan to understand how they inform the design and implementation of team-based primary health care service delivery. The goal was to develop policy imperatives that can advance team-based PHC in Canada. We conducted comparative case studies (n = 3). The policy analysis included: Context review: We reviewed relevant information (2007 to 2014) from databases and websites. Policy review and comparative analysis: We compared and contrasted publically available PHC policies. Key informant interviews: Key informants (n = 30) validated narratives prepared from the comparative analysis by offering contextual information on potential policy imperatives. Advisory group and roundtable: An expert advisory group guided this work and a key stakeholder roundtable event guided prioritization of policy imperatives. The concept of team-based PHC varies widely across and within the three provinces. We noted policy gaps related to team configuration, leadership, scope of practice, role clarity and financing of team-based care; few policies speak explicitly to monitoring and evaluation of team-based PHC. We prioritized four policy imperatives: (1) alignment of goals and policies at different system levels; (2) investment of resources for system change; (3) compensation models for all members of the team; and (4) accountability through collaborative practice metrics. Policies supporting team-based PHC have been slow to emerge, lacking a systematic and coordinated approach. Greater alignment with specific consideration of financing, reimbursement, implementation mechanisms and performance monitoring could accelerate systemic transformation by removing some well-known barriers to team-based care.

  6. Health Care as a Laboratory for the Study of Law and Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havighurst, Clark C.

    1988-01-01

    A course in health care law organized around the special institutions of the industry and related public policy concerns is described. The course is seen as an opportunity to examine the interplay of law and policy and to address ethics, professionalism, and profession regulation in this and other professions. (MSE)

  7. Finnish Media Literacy Education Policies and Best Practices in Early Childhood Education and Care since 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Leena

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to describe Finnish media literacy policies and good media education practices in early childhood education and care. This article will focus on describing two central action lines related to the Children and Media Program, initiated by the Division for Cultural Policy of the Ministry of Education and Culture in 2004.…

  8. Development of a national health care waste management policy for South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molefe, GS

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A Policy for Health Care Risk Waste (HCRW) Management is being developed by the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism in collaboration with the national Department of Health. The HCRW Management Policy aims at: i) Setting of standards...

  9. Youth transitioning out of foster care: an evaluation of a Supplemental Security Income policy change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laura; Rukh-Kamaa, Aneer

    2013-01-01

    Youths with disabilities face numerous challenges when they transition to adulthood. Those who are aging out of foster care face the additional challenge of losing their foster care benefits, although some will be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments after foster care ceases. However, the time needed to process SSI applications exposes those youths to a potential gap in the receipt of benefits as they move between foster care and SSI. We evaluate the effects of a 2010 Social Security Administration policy change that allows such youths to apply for SSI payments 60 days earlier than the previous policy allowed. The change provides additional time for processing claims before the applicant ages out of the foster care system. We examine administrative records on SSI applications from before and after the policy change to determine if the change has decreased the gap between benefits for the target population.

  10. Why Consensus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Polletta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activists have long justified their egalitarian organizational forms in prefigurative terms. Making decisions by consensus, decentralizing organization, and rotating leadership serves to model the radically democratic society that activists hope to bring into being. Our comparison of consensus-based decision-making in three historical periods, however, shows that activists have understood the purposes of prefiguration in very different ways. Whereas radical pacifists in the 1940s saw their cooperative organizations as sustaining movement stalwarts in a period of political repression, new left activists in the 1960s imagined that their radically democratic practices would be adopted by ever-widening circles. Along with the political conditions in which they have operated, activists’ distinctive understandings of equality have also shaped the way they have made decisions. Our interviews with 30 leftist activists today reveal a view of decision-making as a place to work through inequalities that are informal, unacknowledged, and pervasive.

  11. Primary care physician attitudes and perceptions of the impact of FDA-proposed REMS policy on prescription of extended-release and long-acting opioids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salinas GD

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gregory D Salinas, Caroline O Robinson, Maziar AbdolrasulniaCE Outcomes LLC, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: With increasing numbers of patients experiencing chronic pain, opioid therapy is becoming more common, leading to increases in concern about issues of abuse, diversion, and misuse. Further, the US Food and Drug Administration recently released a statement notifying sponsors and manufacturers of extended-release and long-acting opioids of the need to develop Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS programs in order to ensure that the benefits of this therapy choice outweigh the potential risks. There is little research on physician opinions concerning opioid-prescribing and education policies. To assess attitudes surrounding new opioid policies, a survey was designed and distributed to primary care physicians in October 2011. Data collected from 201 primary care physicians show that most are not familiar with the REMS requirements proposed by the Food and Drug Administration for extended-release and long-acting opioids; there is no consensus among primary care physicians on the impact of prescribing requirements on patient education and care; and increasing requirements for extended-release and long-acting opioid education may decrease opioid prescribing. Physician attitudes toward increased regulatory oversight of opioid therapy prescriptions should be taken into consideration by groups developing these interventions to ensure that they do not cause undue burden on already busy primary care physicians.Keywords: REMS, opioids, attitudes, survey

  12. A Policy Analysis of Child Care Subsidies: Increasing Quality, Access, and Affordability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodie-Dyer, Amber

    2011-01-01

    Changing family dynamics over the past four decades, including rises in the numbers of working mothers and single-parent families, have created an increased need for affordable child care. Government response to this need has involved a number of stop-and-start policy approaches, which have led to a fractured child care system that makes it…

  13. Science and Policy in Interaction: On practices of science policy interactions for policy-making in health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. van Egmond (Stans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn times of crisis, such as in the case of the volcanic ash cloud, the role of science in policy-making processes becomes more apparent than in ‘normal’, less controversial times. There is, however, hardly a policy area imaginable where science is not involved – even though that role, in

  14. The Influence of a Policy Document in the Practice of Intersectorial Collaboration in Danish Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Bendix; Beedholm, Kirsten; Kolbæk, Raymond

    Background Policy documents are powerful actors in health care, and they play a significant role because they produce certain discursive and non-discursive conditions for intersectorial collaboration. Central documents in Denmark are the Health Agreements. These policy documents set out the premi...... of language, constructs the actors in intersectorial collaboration within the framework of a market-economy understanding, the goal being to increase productivity and efficiency in health care delivery.......Background Policy documents are powerful actors in health care, and they play a significant role because they produce certain discursive and non-discursive conditions for intersectorial collaboration. Central documents in Denmark are the Health Agreements. These policy documents set out...... the premises for collaboration between hospitals, municipalities, and general practitioners in the five regions. This area is traditionally contested, and the intention of the Health Agreements is to be a guideline for the allocation of tasks and responsibilities within the collaboration. Aim • To exemplify...

  15. Hospices' enrollment policies may contribute to underuse of hospice care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge Carlson, Melissa D; Barry, Colleen L; Cherlin, Emily J; McCorkle, Ruth; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2012-12-01

    Hospice use in the United States is growing, but little is known about barriers that terminally ill patients may face when trying to access hospice care. This article reports the results of the first national survey of the enrollment policies of 591 US hospices. The survey revealed that 78 percent of hospices had at least one enrollment policy that may restrict access to care for patients with potentially high-cost medical care needs, such as chemotherapy or total parenteral nutrition. Smaller hospices, for-profit hospices, and hospices in certain regions of the country consistently reported more limited enrollment policies. We observe that hospice providers' own enrollment decisions may be an important contributor to previously observed underuse of hospice by patients and families. Policy changes that should be considered include increasing the Medicare hospice per diem rate for patients with complex needs, which could enable more hospices to expand enrollment.

  16. A Smartphone-Based Pain Management App for Adolescents With Cancer: Establishing System Requirements and a Pain Care Algorithm Based on Literature Review, Interviews, and Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Bonnie J; Nathan, Paul C; Seto, Emily; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Stinson, Jennifer N

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain that occurs both within and outside of the hospital setting is a common and distressing problem for adolescents with cancer. The use of smartphone technology may facilitate rapid, in-the-moment pain support for this population. To ensure the best possible pain management advice is given, evidence-based and expert-vetted care algorithms and system design features, which are designed using user-centered methods, are required. Objective To develop the decision algorithm and system requirements that will inform the pain management advice provided by a real-time smartphone-based pain management app for adolescents with cancer. Methods A systematic approach to algorithm development and system design was utilized. Initially, a comprehensive literature review was undertaken to understand the current body of knowledge pertaining to pediatric cancer pain management. A user-centered approach to development was used as the results of the review were disseminated to 15 international experts (clinicians, scientists, and a consumer) in pediatric pain, pediatric oncology and mHealth design, who participated in a 2-day consensus conference. This conference used nominal group technique to develop consensus on important pain inputs, pain management advice, and system design requirements. Using data generated at the conference, a prototype algorithm was developed. Iterative qualitative testing was conducted with adolescents with cancer, as well as pediatric oncology and pain health care providers to vet and refine the developed algorithm and system requirements for the real-time smartphone app. Results The systematic literature review established the current state of research related to nonpharmacological pediatric cancer pain management. The 2-day consensus conference established which clinically important pain inputs by adolescents would require action (pain management advice) from the app, the appropriate advice the app should provide to adolescents in pain, and the

  17. Evidence Use in Mental Health Policy Making for Children in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Justeen K; Mackie, Thomas I; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Niemi, Emily; Leslie, Laurel K

    2016-01-01

    Considerable attention is being given to the use of research evidence to inform public policy making. Building upon Weiss's model of research utilization, we examined the types and uses of evidence that child welfare administrators used in response to federal policy reforms requiring psychotropic medications oversight for children in foster care. Participants relied on a range of "global" and "local" evidence types throughout the policy development phase. Global research evidence was used to raise awareness about problems associated with psychotropic medication use. Local evidence helped to contextualize concerns and had problem-solving and political uses. In most states, policy actions were informed by a combination of evidence types.

  18. The Swedish national dental insurance and dental health care policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1981-01-01

    Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described.......Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described....

  19. Public Policy Report. Child Care: An Endangered Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jerlean

    1990-01-01

    Presents testimony given at a Congressional briefing on findings of the National Child Care Staffing Study. The study concerned the staffing and budgeting crisis in the child care industry as a whole and the University of Pittsburgh Child Development Center in particular. (Author/BB)

  20. Health literacy and the Affordable Care Act: a policy analysis for children with special health care needs in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keim-Malpass J

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jessica Keim-Malpass,1 Lisa C Letzkus,1,2 Christine Kennedy1 1University of Virginia School of Nursing, 2University of Virginia Children’s Hospital, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: Children with special health care needs (CSHCN represent populations with chronic health conditions that are often high utilizers of health care. Limited health literacy has emerged as a key indicator of adverse health outcomes, and CSHCN from limited health literacy families are particularly vulnerable. The purpose of this policy analysis is to outline key provisions in the Affordable Care Act (ACA that incorporate health literacy approaches for implementation and have implications for CSHCN in the USA. Several key provisions are incorporated in the ACA that involve health literacy and have implications for CSHCN. These include: expansion of public insurance coverage and simplifying the enrollment process, provisions assuring equity in health care and communication among all populations, improving access to patient-centered medical homes that can offer care coordination, ensuring enhanced medication safety by changing liquid medication labeling requirements, and provisions to train health care providers on literacy issues. More research is needed to determine how provisions pertaining to health literacy in the ACA are implemented in various states. Keywords: children, special health care needs, health literacy, Affordable Care Act, health policy  

  1. Older Workers and Care-Giving in England: the Policy Context for Older Workers' Employment Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeandle, Sue; Buckner, Lisa

    2017-08-04

    This article considers recent changes in the incidence of caring among people aged 50-64 in England and the policy context in which these have occurred. After introducing the topic, research questions addressed and methods used, it outlines findings from other research on how older workers experience and manage caring roles. It then sets out relevant public policy developments since carers were first accorded rights to recognition and services in 1995, focusing on workplace support, local services and financial help for people who reduce or quit their paid work to care. The article presents new analyses of the population censuses conducted in England in 2001 and 2011, focusing on people aged 50-64 and especially on those aged 60-64, the group in which the largest changes were seen. Theses show growth in caring at higher levels of intensity for older workers, and increases in the incidence of caring alongside paid work. To deepen understanding of these changes, the analysis also draws on data from a government survey of carers conducted in 2009-10. The concluding discussion argues that although the modest policy changes implemented since 1995 have provided some support to older workers managing work and care, more policy attention needs to be given following the sharp increase in the incidence of caring seen among people aged 50-64 in England between 2001 and 2011.

  2. Thrombotic Microangiopathy Care Pathway: A Consensus Statement for the Mayo Clinic Complement Alternative Pathway-Thrombotic Microangiopathy (CAP-TMA) Disease-Oriented Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Ronald S; Winters, Jeffrey L; Leung, Nelson; Murray, David L; Willrich, Maria A; Abraham, Roshini S; Amer, Hatem; Hogan, William J; Marshall, Ariela L; Sethi, Sanjeev; Tran, Cheryl L; Chen, Dong; Pruthi, Rajiv K; Ashrani, Aneel A; Fervenza, Fernando C; Cramer, Carl H; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Wolanskyj, Alexandra P; Thomé, Stephan D; Hook, C Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) comprise a heterogeneous set of conditions linked by a common histopathologic finding of endothelial damage resulting in microvascular thromboses and potentially serious complications. The typical clinical presentation is microangiopathic hemolytic anemia accompanied by thrombocytopenia with varying degrees of organ ischemia. The differential diagnoses are generally broad, while the workup is frequently complex and can be confusing. This statement represents the joint recommendations from a multidisciplinary team of Mayo Clinic physicians specializing in the management of TMA. It comprises a series of evidence- and consensus-based clinical pathways developed to allow a uniform approach to the spectrum of care including when to suspect TMA, what differential diagnoses to consider, which diagnostic tests to order, and how to provide initial empiric therapy, as well as some guidance on subsequent management. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Consensus statement on assistance to women with human immunodeficiency virus infection in the health care sector. National AIDS Plan (PNS) and AIDS Study Group (GeSIDA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    To develop a consensus document on clinical recommendations for the health care of women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We assembled a panel of experts appointed by the Secretariat of the National AIDS Plan and GeSIDA that included internal medicine physicians with expertise in the field of HIV infection, gynecologists, pediatricians and psychologists, and two panel members acting as coordinators. Scientific information was reviewed in publications and conference reports up to October 2012. In keeping with the criteria of the Infectious Disease Society of America, two levels of evidence were applied to support the proposed recommendations: the strength of the recommendation according to expert opinion (A, B, C), and the level of empirical evidence (i, ii, iii), already used in previous documents from SPNS/GeSIDA. We provide multiple recommendations for the clinical management of women with HIV infection, considering both the diagnostic and possible therapeutic strategies. The consensus recommends gender mainstreaming in health care, and promoting training for healthcare professionals in order to avoid gender bias. With currently available data it seems that the effectiveness of the treatment is the same in both men and women, there being no limitation as to the use of any antiretroviral for this reason. Women have more treatments suspended for reasons other than virological failure, thus they require better monitoring. This document presents recommendations for addressing women with HIV infection. This must be multidisciplinary, taking into account the differences that can be found in the diagnosis, disease development, and treatment between men and women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Developing public policy to advance the use of big data in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmueller, Axel; Henderson, Sarah; Warburton, Will; Elmagarmid, Ahmed; Pentland, Alex Sandy; Darzi, Ara

    2014-09-01

    The vast amount of health data generated and stored around the world each day offers significant opportunities for advances such as the real-time tracking of diseases, predicting disease outbreaks, and developing health care that is truly personalized. However, capturing, analyzing, and sharing health data is difficult, expensive, and controversial. This article explores four central questions that policy makers should consider when developing public policy for the use of "big data" in health care. We discuss what aspects of big data are most relevant for health care and present a taxonomy of data types and levels of access. We suggest that successful policies require clear objectives and provide examples, discuss barriers to achieving policy objectives based on a recent policy experiment in the United Kingdom, and propose levers that policy makers should consider using to advance data sharing. We argue that the case for data sharing can be won only by providing real-life examples of the ways in which it can improve health care.

  5. Boutique to Booming: Medicare Managed Care and the Private Path to Policy Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Andrew S

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, Medicare Advantage (MA) enrollment surpassed 30 percent of eligible beneficiaries. Twenty-five years earlier, enrollment hovered at just 3 percent. The expansion of private Medicare plans presents a puzzling instance of policy change within Medicare-a program long held to be a quintessential case of policy stasis. This article investigates the policy features that made Medicare susceptible to this dramatic policy shift, as well as the processes by which the initial policy change remade the politics of Medicare and solidified the MA program. The first enrollment surge occurred in the absence of a proximate legislative or administrative change. Instead, increased spending and expanded benefits were the result of the interaction of new market dynamics with an existing legislative framework-demonstrating an expansionary form of policy drift. The 1982 Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act created a policy space that gave the new and lightly controlled managed care industry considerable operational discretion. As the interests of the government's private partners changed in response to new market dynamics, a change occurred in the output and performance of the Medicare managed care program. As enrollment and spending increased, Medicare's politics were remade by the political empowerment of the managed care industry and the creation of a new subconstituency of beneficiaries. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  6. Five Policy Levers To Meet The Value Challenge In Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Ryan; Darzi, Ara

    2015-09-01

    The burden of cancer on public finances is a serious concern for policy makers. More people are developing cancer, and as standards of care have risen, more are surviving and requiring longer-term care. Precision medicine promises better outcomes but demands commensurately higher payments for care. As both incidence and per case costs rise, we suggest that the task of expanding access to high-quality cancer care poses a "value challenge" that policies in many countries are inadequate to meet. Policy makers should respond with a new approach. We explore questions that policy makers will need to consider regarding objectives, barriers, and levers for policy development. We use transparency and accountability as cornerstones of a new approach to promote value-based decision making. Although barriers to advancing this agenda are formidable, we recommend that governments define common standards for value-based accounting; serve as information brokers for evidence development; pioneer value-based procurement of goods and services; engage in deliberative democracy in cancer care; and educate communities to facilitate knowledge sharing between communities of patients, their caretakers, and researchers.

  7. Surge capacity logistics: care of the critically ill and injured during pandemics and disasters: CHEST consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einav, Sharon; Hick, John L; Hanfling, Dan; Erstad, Brian L; Toner, Eric S; Branson, Richard D; Kanter, Robert K; Kissoon, Niranjan; Dichter, Jeffrey R; Devereaux, Asha V; Christian, Michael D

    2014-10-01

    Successful management of a pandemic or disaster requires implementation of preexisting plans to minimize loss of life and maintain control. Managing the expected surges in intensive care capacity requires strategic planning from a systems perspective and includes focused intensive care abilities and requirements as well as all individuals and organizations involved in hospital and regional planning. The suggestions in this article are important for all involved in a large-scale disaster or pandemic, including front-line clinicians, hospital administrators, and public health or government officials. Specifically, this article focuses on surge logistics-those elements that provide the capability to deliver mass critical care. The Surge Capacity topic panel developed 23 key questions focused on the following domains: systems issues; equipment, supplies, and pharmaceuticals; staffing; and informatics. Literature searches were conducted to identify studies upon which evidence-based recommendations could be made. The results were reviewed for relevance to the topic, and the articles were screened by two topic editors for placement within one of the surge domains noted previously. Most reports were small scale, were observational, or used flawed modeling; hence, the level of evidence on which to base recommendations was poor and did not permit the development of evidence-based recommendations. The Surge Capacity topic panel subsequently followed the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) Guidelines Oversight Committee's methodology to develop suggestion based on expert opinion using a modified Delphi process. This article presents 22 suggestions pertaining to surge capacity mass critical care, including requirements for equipment, supplies, and pharmaceuticals; staff preparation and organization; methods of mitigating overwhelming patient loads; the role of deployable critical care services; and the use of transportation assets to support the surge response

  8. Getting the product right: how competition policy can improve health care markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, William M

    2014-06-01

    As hospital, physician, and health insurance markets consolidate and change in response to health care reform, some commentators have called for vigorous enforcement of the federal antitrust laws to prevent the acquisition and exercise of market power. In health care, however, stricter antitrust enforcement will benefit consumers only if it accounts for the competitive distortions caused by the sector's long history of government regulation. This article directs policy makers to a neglected dimension of health care competition that has been altered by regulation: the product. Competition may have failed to significantly lower costs, increase access, or improve quality in health care because we have been buying and selling the wrong things. Competition policy makers-meaning both antitrust enforcers and regulators-should force the health care industry to define and market products that can be assembled and warranted to consumers while keeping emerging sectors such as mHealth free from overregulation, wasteful subsidy, and appropriation by established insurer and provider interests.

  9. [The list of drugs in the Popular Pharmacy Program and the Brazilian National Pharmaceutical Care Policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauti, Sueli Miyuki; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; Lopes, Luciane Cruz

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the list of drugs in the Popular Pharmacy Program in Brazil (PFPB) in relation to the country's pharmaceutical care policy. The list of drugs in the PFPB was compared to the Brazilian and international reference lists of essential medicines, the components of pharmaceutical care in Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS), and drug production by the country's government pharmaceutical laboratories. The PFPB list includes 119 drugs, of which 19.3% and 47.1% were not selected on the Brazilian and international reference lists, respectively; 16.8% are not used in primary care, and 40.3% are not produced by the country's government laboratories. A revision of the PFPB list based on the essential medicines concept (World Health Organization), alignment of pharmaceutical care policies, and production by government laboratories are essential to improve quality of health care, management, training of prescribers, and information for the population.

  10. Policies on Conflicts of Interest in Health Care Guideline Development: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morciano, Cristina; Basevi, Vittorio; Faralli, Carla; Hilton Boon, Michele; Tonon, Sabina; Taruscio, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether organisations that develop health care guidelines have conflict of interest (COI) policies and to review the content of the available COI policies. Methods Survey and content analysis of COI policies available in English, French, Spanish, and Italian conducted between September 2014 and June 2015. A 24-item data abstraction instrument was created on the basis of guideline development standards. Results The survey identified 29 organisations from 19 countries that met the inclusion criteria. From these organisations, 19 policies were eligible for inclusion in the content analysis. Over one-third of the policies (7/19, 37%) did not report or did not clearly report whether disclosure was a prerequisite for membership of the guideline panel. Strategies for the prevention of COI such as divestment were mentioned by only two organisations. Only 21% of policies (4/19) used criteria to determine whether an interest constitutes a COI and to assess the severity of the risk imposed. Conclusions The finding that some organisations, in contradiction of widely available standards, still do not have COI policies publicly available is concerning. Also troubling were the findings that some policies did not clearly report critical steps in obtaining, managing and communicating disclosure of relationships of interest. This in addition to the variability encountered in content and accessibility of COI policies may cause confusion and distrust among guideline users. It is in the interest of guideline users and developers to design an agreed-upon, comprehensive, clear, and accessible COI policy. PMID:27846255

  11. Making Meaningful Improvements to Direct Care Worker Training Through Informed Policy: Understanding How Care Setting Structure and Culture Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemeny, M Elizabeth; Mabry, J Beth

    2015-10-09

    Well-intentioned policy governing the training of direct care workers (DCWs) who serve older persons, in practice, may become merely a compliance issue for organizations rather than a meaningful way to improve quality of care. This study investigates the relationships between best practices in DCW training and the structure and culture of long term support service (LTSS) organizations. Using a mixed-methods approach to analyzing data from 328 licensed LTSS organizations in Pennsylvania, the findings suggest that public policy should address methods of training, not just content, and consider organizational variations in size, training evaluation practices, DCW integration, and DCW input into care planning. Effective training also incorporates support for organizations and supervisors as key aspects of DCWs' learning and working environment.

  12. Policy and finance for preconception care opportunities for today and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kay; Atrash, Hani; Johnson, Alison

    2008-01-01

    This special supplement of Women's Health Issues offers 2 types of articles related to the policy and finance context for improving preconception health and health care. These articles discuss the impact of finance and policy on preconception health and health care, as well as the strategies that are being used to overcome the challenge of implementing preconception care with limited resources and inadequate health coverage for women. Invited papers from authors with expertise in health policy and finance issues describe how women's health and preconception care fit into the larger debates on health reform and how the paradigm for women's health must change. Other invited papers discuss opportunities and challenges for using programs such as Medicaid, Title X Family Planning, Title V Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant, Healthy Start, and Community Health Centers in improving preconception health and health care. Contributed articles on health services research in this supplement characterize the types of change occurring across the country. This paper also presents a framework for understanding the role of policy and finance in the larger Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Preconception Health and Health Care Initiative.

  13. Unravelling the concept of consumer preference: implications for health policy and optimal planning in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Michele M; Earl, Peter E; Haines, Terry P; Mitchell, Geoffrey K

    2010-10-01

    Accounting for consumer preference in health policy and delivery system design makes good economic sense since this is linked to outcomes, quality of care and cost control. Probability trade-off methods are commonly used in policy evaluation, marketing and economics. Increasingly applied to health matters, the trade-off preference model has indicated that consumers of health care discriminate between different attributes of care. However, the complexities of the health decision-making environment raise questions about the inherent assumptions concerning choice and decision-making behavior which frame this view of consumer preference. In this article, we use the example of primary care in Australia as a vehicle to examine the concept of 'consumer preference' from different perspectives within economics and discuss the significance of how we model preferences for health policy makers. In doing so, we question whether mainstream thinking, namely that consumers are capable of deliberating between rival strategies and are willing to make trade-offs, is a reliable way of thinking about preferences given the complexities of the health decision-making environment. Alternative perspectives on preference can assist health policy makers and health providers by generating more precise information about the important attributes of care that are likely to enhance consumer engagement and optimise acceptability of health care.

  14. Achieving Prudent Dementia Care (Palliare): An International Policy and Practice Imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Debbie; Fleming, Anne; Hanson, Elizabeth; de Abreu, Wilson; Crespo, Manuel Lillo; Macrae, Rhoda; Jackson, Graham; Hvalič-Touzery, Simona; Holmerová, Iva; Routasalo, Pirkko

    2016-12-31

    This paper examines the provision of integrated advanced dementia care within seven European countries and critically reviews the potential contribution of the Prudent Healthcare perspective as a starting point for reform. Progressive efforts to innovate, promote quality and integrate care are tempered with the reality of resource constraints. Some policy makers in Europe and North America have turned their attention to the principles of Prudent Healthcare as a potential mechanism to maximise benefits for patients within available resources. As dementia progresses, living well requires increasing levels of support and care, people living with advanced dementia have complex health and social care needs, are highly dependent on others but are not yet at the terminal end stage of the condition. People with advanced dementia can benefit from a dementia specific palliative approach to care (Palliare), that helps them to live the best life possible for the months and often years they live with advanced dementia. It is also highly desirable to align policy innovations with integrated palliative care practice models and the education of the dementia workforce to accelerate informed improvements in advanced dementia care. There may be some coherence, at least superficially between Prudent Healthcare and integrated palliative care models such as Palliare. It is argued that for successful implementation, both require practitioners to be equipped with knowledge and skills and be empowered to deliver high quality care often within impoverished care environments. Adoption of the prudent perspective will however require development of a repertoire of approaches to hear the voice or proxy voice of people living with advanced dementia and to commit to the development and implementation of new evidence for advanced dementia practice. Evidence informing this policy debate draws upon contemporary literature and policy and the findings from research activities undertaken by the

  15. Achieving Prudent Dementia Care (Palliare: An International Policy and Practice Imperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Tolson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the provision of integrated advanced dementia care within seven European countries and critically reviews the potential contribution of the Prudent Healthcare perspective as a starting point for reform. Progressive efforts to innovate, promote quality and integrate care are tempered with the reality of resource constraints. Some policy makers in Europe and North America have turned their attention to the principles of Prudent Healthcare as a potential mechanism to maximise benefits for patients within available resources. As dementia progresses, living well requires increasing levels of support and care, people living with advanced dementia have complex health and social care needs, are highly dependent on others but are not yet at the terminal end stage of the condition. People with advanced dementia can benefit from a dementia specific palliative approach to care ('Palliare', that helps them to live the best life possible for the months and often years they live with advanced dementia. It is also highly desirable to align policy innovations with integrated palliative care practice models and the education of the dementia workforce to accelerate informed improvements in advanced dementia care. There may be some coherence, at least superficially between Prudent Healthcare and integrated palliative care models such as Palliare. It is argued that for successful implementation, both require practitioners to be equipped with knowledge and skills and be empowered to deliver high quality care often within impoverished care environments. Adoption of the prudent perspective will however require development of a repertoire of approaches to hear the voice or proxy voice of people living with advanced dementia and to commit to the development and implementation of new evidence for advanced dementia practice. Evidence informing this policy debate draws upon contemporary literature and policy and the findings from research activities

  16. Childbirth policies and practices in Ireland and the journey towards midwifery-led care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devane, Declan; Murphy-Lawless, Jo; Begley, Cecily M

    2007-03-01

    To describe the dominant policies and practices that have governed childbirth in Ireland, and to outline the progress made towards the introduction of midwifery-led care in one health region. A review of maternity-care policies in Ireland was conducted using government and regional health-authority documents and two historical reviews of government policies. A search was also carried out in PubMed and cinahl databases, using the keywords 'maternity care', 'childbirth', 'policy', 'midwifery-led', 'Ireland/Irish', with relevant Boolean and string operands. Childbirth as a social process is influenced by the model of care, and affects the physical and psychological outcomes for the woman and her family. In Ireland, routine intervention in labour is common, but, since the early 1990s, some changes in the Irish maternity services have taken place. Pilot projects on community midwifery have been introduced in some areas. Challenges to the provision of maternity care in the Health Service Executive, North Eastern area (formerly the North-Eastern Health Board) led to the production of the Kinder report, which included a recommendation to introduce pilot midwifery-led units (MLUs). THE INTRODUCTION OF MIDWIFERY-LED CARE: A Maternity Services Taskforce was established in January 2002 with a wide remit, including facilitation of the establishment of MLUs in Cavan General Hospital, Cavan and Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, Co. Louth. The MLUs are being evaluated within the context of a randomised trial known as 'the MidU study', which compares midwife-led care with the present system of medical-led care for women who are at low risk of complications during pregnancy and labour. The journey to midwifery-led care in Ireland has been a long one. The phased introduction of MLUs, which are subject to rigorous evaluation, will provide quality evidence upon which to base the future development of maternity care across Ireland.

  17. Medication management policy, practice and research in Australian residential aged care: Current and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluggett, Janet K; Ilomäki, Jenni; Seaman, Karla L; Corlis, Megan; Bell, J Simon

    2017-02-01

    Eight percent of Australians aged 65 years and over receive residential aged care each year. Residents are increasingly older, frailer and have complex care needs on entry to residential aged care. Up to 63% of Australian residents of aged care facilities take nine or more medications regularly. Together, these factors place residents at high risk of adverse drug events. This paper reviews medication-related policies, practices and research in Australian residential aged care. Complex processes underpin prescribing, supply and administration of medications in aged care facilities. A broad range of policies and resources are available to assist health professionals, aged care facilities and residents to optimise medication management. These include national guiding principles, a standardised national medication chart, clinical medication reviews and facility accreditation standards. Recent Australian interventions have improved medication use in residential aged care facilities. Generating evidence for prescribing and deprescribing that is specific to residential aged care, health workforce reform, medication-related quality indicators and inter-professional education in aged care are important steps toward optimising medication use in this setting.

  18. [Health policies and politicized health? An analysis of sexual and reproductive health policies in Peru from the perspective of medical ethics, quality of care, and human rights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J Jaime; Yamin, Alicia Ely

    2008-01-01

    Health professionals view medical ethics as a discipline that provides the basis for more adequate patient care. In recent years the concepts of quality of care and human rights - with their attending discourses - have joined the concept of medical ethics among the paradigms to consider in care for humans both at the individual and health policy levels. The current study seeks to analyze such paradigms, based on a case study of sexual and reproductive health policies in Peru in the last 10 years.

  19. Achieving benefit for patients in primary care informatics: the report of a international consensus workshop at Medinfo 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon de Lusignan

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions We should make more efforts to share learning; develop clear internationally acceptable definitions; highlight gaps between pockets of excellence and real-world practice, and most importantly suggest how they might be bridged. Knowledge synthesis from different health systems may provide a greater understanding of how the third actor (the computer is best used in primary care.

  20. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies: An international Delphi consensus process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagnon, A.J.; DeBruyn, R.; Essén, B.; Gissler, M.; Heaman, M.; Jeambey, Z.; Korfker, D.; McCourt, C.; Roth, C.; Zeitlin, J.; Small, R.; Alexander, S.; Racapé, J.; Arntzen, A.; Barros, H.; Blondel, B.; Merry, L.; Glazier, R.; Kirby, R.; Mohangoo, A.; Macfarlane, A.; Dattani, N.; Nybo Andersen, A.M.; Mortensen, L.; Villadsen, S.; Davey, M.A.; Sievers, E.; Stray-Pedersen, B.; Urquia, M.; Janevic, T.; Guendelman, S.; Bolumar, F.; Río Sánchez, M.I.; Hjern, A.; Vangen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Through the World Health Assembly Resolution, 'Health of Migrants', the international community has identified migrant health as a priority. Recommendations for general hospital care for international migrants in receiving-countries have been put forward by the Migrant Friendly Hospital

  1. Comparison of Consensus on Life-sustaining Treatment of the Elderly in Care Facilities and Family Member Dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sunmi; Hong, Seong Ae; Lee, Hyun Sook

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the agreement in opinion between the elderly in care facilities and their family members regarding the life-sustaining treatment at the deathbed and to find out if the intentions of the elderly are being properly reflected in their deathbed treatment. Data were collected from 85 elderly individuals at five care facilities in Chunkcheongnam-do and 85 family members. The data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire from July 22, 2013 to August 15, 2014. A total of 170 cases were analyzed using SPSS version 21. First, the family members' preference for life-sustaining treatment was higher than the patients' preference. The preference between the elderly and their family members regarding life-sustaining treatment was statistically significant with regards to oral nutrition, pain control through oral and anal administration, pain control through intravenous administration, transfusion, and admission to an intensive care unit. Second, looking at the agreement between elderly and guardians regarding life-sustaining treatment, there was significant concordance about general testing, oral nutrition, intravenous hydration, intravenous nutrition, antibiotic treatment for severe infection with low resiliency, admission to an intensive care unit, blood pressure increase medication use, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and tracheotomy. It is essential for the medical staff to confirm agreement between the elderly and their family members regarding life-sustaining treatment, and if such a prior agreement is not feasible, the patient's intention should be considered more actionable than their family members.

  2. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies: An international Delphi consensus process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagnon, A.J.; DeBruyn, R.; Essén, B.; Gissler, M.; Heaman, M.; Jeambey, Z.; Korfker, D.; McCourt, C.; Roth, C.; Zeitlin, J.; Small, R.; Alexander, S.; Racapé, J.; Arntzen, A.; Barros, H.; Blondel, B.; Merry, L.; Glazier, R.; Kirby, R.; Mohangoo, A.; Macfarlane, A.; Dattani, N.; Nybo Andersen, A.M.; Mortensen, L.; Villadsen, S.; Davey, M.A.; Sievers, E.; Stray-Pedersen, B.; Urquia, M.; Janevic, T.; Guendelman, S.; Bolumar, F.; Río Sánchez, M.I.; Hjern, A.; Vangen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Through the World Health Assembly Resolution, 'Health of Migrants', the international community has identified migrant health as a priority. Recommendations for general hospital care for international migrants in receiving-countries have been put forward by the Migrant Friendly Hospital

  3. Family Models for Earning and Caring: Implications for Child Care and for Family Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravanera, Zenaida

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCanadian families have changed, in part due to an economy that provides more work opportunities for women, and a cultural orientation that values equal opportunity and diversity infamilies. In spite of the change, both quantitative and qualitative evidence suggest a continued preference for mothers to spend considerable time with children, especially in the infant andtoddler years. Thus, in an average couple, the presence of young children in the home brings wives to reduce their paid work and husbands to increase their paid work. Our reading of parentalpreferences suggests an interest in more services for young children in the form of early childhood education and child care, but also an interest in policies that would allow parents to spend more time with children through parental leaves, part-time work with good benefits, and subsidies that supplement market income. Many options available to two-parent families are often less feasible for lone parents, giving a higher priority to child care.RésuméLa famille canadiennes a changé, dû en partie à une économie qui offre plus de possibilités d’emploi pour les femmes, et à une tendance culturelle qui valorise l’égalité des chances et la diversité dans les familles. En dépit de ces changements, les preuves quantitatives et qualitatives suggèrent une préférence continue pour les mères de passer plus de temps avec les enfants, particulièrement quand il s’agit de nouveau-nés ou d’enfants en bas âge. Donc, pour un couple moyen, la présence de jeunes enfants au foyer pousse les femmes à réduire leurs emplois rémunérés et les maris à augmenter les leurs. Notre étude des préférences parentales suggère un intérêt pour un accroissement des services pour jeunes enfants sous la forme d’éducation préscolaire et de garde d’enfants, et aussi un intérêt pour des politiques qui permettraient aux parents de passer plus de temps avec leurs enfants tels que cong

  4. The Chronic Responsibility: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Danish Chronic Care Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Iben Munksgaard; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the results of a Fairclough-inspired critical discourse analysis aiming to clarify how chronically ill patients are presented in contemporary Danish chronic care policies. Drawing on Fairclough's three-dimensional framework for analyzing discourse, and using Dean's concepts...... of governmentality as an interpretative lens, we analyzed and explained six policies published by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority between 2005 and 2013. The analysis revealed that discourses within the policy vision of chronic care consider chronically ill patients' active role, lifestyle, and health...... behavior to be the main factors influencing susceptibility to chronic diseases. We argue that this discursive construction naturalizes a division between people who can actively manage responsible self-care and those who cannot. Such discourses may serve the interests of those patients who are already...

  5. The Chronic Responsibility: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Danish Chronic Care Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravn, Iben M; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-03-01

    This article reports on the results of a Fairclough-inspired critical discourse analysis aiming to clarify how chronically ill patients are presented in contemporary Danish chronic care policies. Drawing on Fairclough's three-dimensional framework for analyzing discourse, and using Dean's concepts of governmentality as an interpretative lens, we analyzed and explained six policies published by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority between 2005 and 2013. The analysis revealed that discourses within the policy vision of chronic care consider chronically ill patients' active role, lifestyle, and health behavior to be the main factors influencing susceptibility to chronic diseases. We argue that this discursive construction naturalizes a division between people who can actively manage responsible self-care and those who cannot. Such discourses may serve the interests of those patients who are already activated, while others remain subjugated to certain roles. For example, they may be labeled as "vulnerable."

  6. Waiting Time Policies in the Health Care Sector. What Works?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Bech, Mickael

    2013-01-01

    times. In addition, a range of other measures may indirectly have affected waiting times, such as a general increase in spending on health care, the general practitioners’ role as gate-keepers, increased use of activity-based hospital reimbursement, increasing use of private heath insurance and private...

  7. Moving toward a national policy on palliative and end of life care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley C Macaden

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Indian Palliative Care has developed over the past 17 years but it has also developed disabilities due to lack of a National Policy and hence has compromised its effectiveness. It is true that we have come a long way but we still have many miles to go and we will get there only if we have a proper road map and sign posts. This article attempts to suggest some specific measures in establishing such a National Policy

  8. Managing between the agendas: implementing health care reform policy in an acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Roslyn; Paull, Glenn; Magann, Linda; Davis, JanMaree

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to assess administrative and clinical manager stances on health system reform. Understanding these stances will help to identify cultural differences and competing agendas between these two key health service stakeholders and contribute to developing strategies to improve organisational performance. A qualitative methodology was used comprising in-depth open-ended interviews conducted in 2007 with 26 administrative and clinical managers who managed clinical units. This paper provides empirical insights into the ways that administrative and clinical mangers conceive of their managerial roles in relation to health care reform and performance improvement in health services. The findings suggest that developing a hybrid clinical manager culture as a means to bridge the gap between administrative and clinical manager stances on reform objectives, while possible, is not yet being realised. The research has relevance for health services that are experiencing organisational transformation. However, its location in one health service limits the generalisability of findings to other sites. Further research is needed to assess the opportunities for a hybrid culture to emerge as well as its effect. While attention is predominantly directed to clinician groups as a key stakeholder in implementing health reform policies, this paper has implications for how administrative managers also structure their roles and responsibilities to create an organisational climate conducive to change. This will include strategies to support clinical managers to make the transition from a predominantly clinical, to a clinical managerial, orientation. This paper addresses a significant problem in health service governance, namely the divide between the value stances of dual hierarchies. This problem is only now gaining prominence as a significant barrier to health reform.

  9. [The strategy of health care of population as a background of public social policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabriev, R U; Lindendraten, A L; Komarov, Yu M

    2014-01-01

    The overwhelming majority of underlying documents adopted during last years in area of health care first of all relate to development of public health system i.e. that most important branch targeted to rendering medical care and restoring lost health. At the same time, absence of the Federal strategy of health care of population hinders both achievement of goals stated for country and development of regional health strategies. Overall, this situation significantly decreases effectiveness of public policy in this sphere of activity. The main directions of strategy are presented. The major purpose of strategy as a public intersectoral approach to health care and health promotion of population is discussed.

  10. Scandals in health-care: their impact on health policy and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Jacqueline S

    2016-03-01

    Through an analysis of several high-profile scandals in health-care in the UK, this article discusses the nature of scandal and its impact on policy reform. The nursing profession is compared to social work and medicine, which have also undergone considerable examination and change as a result of scandals. The author draws on reports from public inquiries from 1945 to 2013 to form the basis of the discussion about policy responses following scandals in health-care. In each case, the nature of the scandal, the public and government discourses generated by events and the policy response to those failings are explored. These scandals are compared to the recent scandal at Mid Staffordshire Hospital. Conclusions are drawn about the impact of these events on the future of the profession and on health policy directions. Recent events have raised public anxieties about caring practices in nursing. Health policy reform driven by scandal may obscure the effect of under resourcing in health services and poses a very real threat to the continued support for state-run services. Understanding the socially constructed nature of scandal enables the nurse to develop a greater critical awareness of policy contexts in order that they can influence health service reform.

  11. The role of ethical banks in health care policy and financing in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Solans, Josep; Duaigues, Mónica; Balot, Jordi; García-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Ethical, social, or civic banks, constitute a secondary source of financing, which is particularly relevant in Southern and Central Europe. However there is no information on the scientific literature on this source of health care financing. We review the characteristics of saving banks in Spain and illustrate the contribution of one institution "Obra Social Caixa Catalunya" (OS-CC) to the health care financing in Spain. Savings bank health care funding was equivalent to 3 percent of the public health expenditure for 2008. The programs developed by OS-CC illustrate the complex role of savings banks in health financing, provision, training, and policy, particularly in the fields of integrated care and innovation. Financing is a basic tool for health policy. However, the role of social banking in the development of integrated care networks has been largely disregarded, in spite of its significant contribution to complementary health and social care in Southern and Central Europe. Decision makers both at the public health agencies and at the social welfare departments of savings banks should become aware of the policy implications and impact of savings bank activities in the long-term care system.

  12. Evidence and consensus-based German guidelines for the management of analgesia, sedation and delirium in intensive care – short version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinschmidt, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Targeted monitoring of analgesia, sedation and delirium, as well as their appropriate management in critically ill patients is a standard of care in intensive care medicine. With the undisputed advantages of goal-oriented therapy established, there was a need to develop our own guidelines on analgesia and sedation in intensive care in Germany and these were published as 2nd Generation Guidelines in 2005. Through the dissemination of these guidelines in 2006, use of monitoring was shown to have improved from 8 to 51% and the use of protocol-based approaches increased to 46% (from 21%.Between 2006–2009, the existing guidelines from the DGAI (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin and DIVI (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin were developed into 3rd Generation Guidelines for the securing and optimization of quality of analgesia, sedation and delirium management in the intensive care unit (ICU. In collaboration with another 10 professional societies, the literature has been reviewed using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. Using data from 671 reference works, text, diagrams and recommendations were drawn up. In the recommendations, Grade “A” (very strong recommendation, Grade “B” (strong recommendation and Grade “0” (open recommendation were agreed.As a result of this process we now have an interdisciplinary and consensus-based set of 3rd Generation Guidelines that take into account all critically illness patient populations.The use of protocols for analgesia, sedation and treatment of delirium are repeatedly demonstrated. These guidelines offer treatment recommendations for the ICU team. The implementation of scores and protocols into routine ICU practice is necessary for their success.

  13. Evidence and consensus-based German guidelines for the management of analgesia, sedation and delirium in intensive care – short version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jörg; Heymann, Anja; Bäsell, Katrin; Baron, Ralf; Biniek, Rolf; Bürkle, Hartmut; Dall, Peter; Dictus, Christine; Eggers, Verena; Eichler, Ingolf; Engelmann, Lothar; Garten, Lars; Hartl, Wolfgang; Haase, Ulrike; Huth, Ralf; Kessler, Paul; Kleinschmidt, Stefan; Koppert, Wolfgang; Kretz, Franz-Josef; Laubenthal, Heinz; Marggraf, Guenter; Meiser, Andreas; Neugebauer, Edmund; Neuhaus, Ulrike; Putensen, Christian; Quintel, Michael; Reske, Alexander; Roth, Bernard; Scholz, Jens; Schröder, Stefan; Schreiter, Dierk; Schüttler, Jürgen; Schwarzmann, Gerhard; Stingele, Robert; Tonner, Peter; Tränkle, Philip; Treede, Rolf Detlef; Trupkovic, Tomislav; Tryba, Michael; Wappler, Frank; Waydhas, Christian; Spies, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Targeted monitoring of analgesia, sedation and delirium, as well as their appropriate management in critically ill patients is a standard of care in intensive care medicine. With the undisputed advantages of goal-oriented therapy established, there was a need to develop our own guidelines on analgesia and sedation in intensive care in Germany and these were published as 2nd Generation Guidelines in 2005. Through the dissemination of these guidelines in 2006, use of monitoring was shown to have improved from 8 to 51% and the use of protocol-based approaches increased to 46% (from 21%). Between 2006–2009, the existing guidelines from the DGAI (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin) and DIVI (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin) were developed into 3rd Generation Guidelines for the securing and optimization of quality of analgesia, sedation and delirium management in the intensive care unit (ICU). In collaboration with another 10 professional societies, the literature has been reviewed using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. Using data from 671 reference works, text, diagrams and recommendations were drawn up. In the recommendations, Grade “A” (very strong recommendation), Grade “B” (strong recommendation) and Grade “0” (open recommendation) were agreed. As a result of this process we now have an interdisciplinary and consensus-based set of 3rd Generation Guidelines that take into account all critically illness patient populations. The use of protocols for analgesia, sedation and treatment of delirium are repeatedly demonstrated. These guidelines offer treatment recommendations for the ICU team. The implementation of scores and protocols into routine ICU practice is necessary for their success. PMID:20200655

  14. Hospital organisation, management, and structure for prevention of health-care-associated infection: a systematic review and expert consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, Walter; Holmes, Alison; Dettenkofer, Markus; Goetting, Tim; Secci, Federica; Clack, Lauren; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Magiorakos, Anna-Pelagia; Pittet, Didier

    2015-02-01

    Despite control efforts, the burden of health-care-associated infections in Europe is high and leads to around 37,000 deaths each year. We did a systematic review to identify crucial elements for the organisation of effective infection-prevention programmes in hospitals and key components for implementation of monitoring. 92 studies published from 1996 to 2012 were assessed and ten key components identified: organisation of infection control at the hospital level; bed occupancy, staffing, workload, and employment of pool or agency nurses; availability of and ease of access to materials and equipment and optimum ergonomics; appropriate use of guidelines; education and training; auditing; surveillance and feedback; multimodal and multidisciplinary prevention programmes that include behavioural change; engagement of champions; and positive organisational culture. These components comprise manageable and widely applicable ways to reduce health-care-associated infections and improve patients' safety.

  15. Alignment between chronic disease policy and practice: case study at a primary care facility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire A Draper

    Full Text Available Chronic disease is by far the leading cause of death worldwide and of increasing concern in low- and middle-income countries, including South Africa, where chronic diseases disproportionately affect the poor living in urban settings. The Provincial Government of the Western Cape (PGWC has prioritized the management of chronic diseases and has developed a policy and framework (Adult Chronic Disease Management Policy 2009 to guide and improve the prevention and management of chronic diseases at a primary care level. The aim of this study is to assess the alignment of current primary care practices with the PGWC Adult Chronic Disease Management policy.One comprehensive primary care facility in a Cape Town health district was used as a case study. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews (n = 10, focus groups (n = 8 and document review. Participants in this study included clinical staff involved in chronic disease management at the facility and at a provincial level. Data previously collected using the Integrated Audit Tool for Chronic Disease Management (part of the PGWC Adult Chronic Disease Management policy formed the basis of the guide questions used in focus groups and interviews.The results of this research indicate a significant gap between policy and its implementation to improve and support chronic disease management at this primary care facility. A major factor seems to be poor policy knowledge by clinicians, which contributes to an individual rather than a team approach in the management of chronic disease patients. Poor interaction between facility- and community-based services also emerged. A number of factors were identified that seemed to contribute to poor policy implementation, the majority of which were staff related and ultimately resulted in a decrease in the quality of patient care.Chronic disease policy implementation needs to be improved in order to support chronic disease management at this facility. It is possible

  16. A study of human resource policies and practices for primary health care system in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: A comprehensive health care services requires effective human resource (HR management policy to ensure organizational success. Government is primarily concerned with the size of the workforce rather than the contemporary HR practices. This resulted into lack of attention to HR management in health sector. Objective: To critically examine HR policies and practice for primary health care system in Delhi. Materials and Methods: For critical analysis of HR policies and practices for primary urban health centers, related documents were examined from year 2005 to 2012. The policies and practices were examined with reference to HR planning, recruitment, selection, hiring, staffing, probation, induction training, performance evaluation, salary and transfer policy in the organization. Results: At present, updated HR planning is not done regularly and due to lack of such updated information actual HR requirement is not calculated leading to shortage backlog. To fill up this shortage contractual model to recruit staff has been adopted by health department. There is no induction training and training need assessment done in the organization. There is wide disparity in pay and leave provisions for different category of regular and contractual staff working under the same roof of health facilities. Conclusion: Disparity in salary, leave provision and other privileges in organization have brought discrimination and demotivation among employees. To deal with conflicting climate in organization comprehensive HR policy is suggested. Policy content should include HR planning, training and development, institute capacity building, HR information system, motivation, and retention strategies for HR.

  17. Business and continuity of operations: care of the critically ill and injured during pandemics and disasters: CHEST consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, Pritish K; Feldman, Henry; Christian, Michael D; Devereaux, Asha V; Kissoon, Niranjan; Dichter, Jeffrey R

    2014-10-01

    During disasters, supply chain vulnerabilities, such as power, transportation, and communication, may affect the delivery of medications and medical supplies and hamper the ability to deliver critical care services. Disasters also have the potential to disrupt information technology (IT) in health-care systems, resulting in interruptions in patient care, particularly critical care, and other health-care business functions. The suggestions in this article are important for all of those involved in a large-scale pandemic or disaster with multiple critically ill or injured patients, including front-line clinicians, hospital administrators, and public health or government officials. The Business and Continuity of Operations Panel followed the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) Guidelines Oversight Committee's methodology in developing key questions regarding medication and supply shortages and the impact disasters may have on healthcare IT. Task force members met in person to develop the 13 key questions believed to be most relevant for Business and Continuity of Operations. A systematic literature review was then performed for relevant articles and documents, reports, and gray literature reported since 2007. No studies of sufficient quality were identified upon which to make evidence-based recommendations. Therefore, the panel developed expert opinion-based suggestions using a modified Delphi process. Eighteen suggestions addressing mitigation strategies for supply chain vulnerabilities including medications and IT were generated. Suggestions offered to hospitals and health system leadership regarding medication and supply shortages include: (1) purchase key medications and supplies from more than one supplier, (2) substituted medications or supplies should ideally be similar to those already used by an institution's providers, (3) inventories should be tracked electronically to monitor medication/supply levels, (4) consider higher inventories of medications

  18. [National Policy of Humanization and education of health care professionals: integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Guilherme Correa; Meneguim, Silmara; Lima, Silvana Andréa Molina; Moreno, Vania

    2013-01-01

    The National Policy of Humanization aims at innovations in health production, management and care with emphasis on permanent education for workers in the Unified Public Health System and training of university students in the health care field. This study aimed to know, through an integrative review of the literature, the scientific production about the National Policy of Humanization and education of health care professionals, from 2002 to 2010. Ten articles were analyzed in thematic strand through three axes: humanization and users caring, humanization and the work process, humanization and training. The articles point to the need to overcome the biological conception, valuing cultural aspects of users. The work process is marked by the devaluation of workers and by users deprived of their rights. The training of health professionals is grounded in health services where the prevailing standards are practices that hinder innovative attitudes.

  19. End-of-life care in the United States: policy issues and model programs of integrated care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Wiener

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: End-of-life care financing and delivery in the United States is fragmented and uncoordinated, with little integration of acute and long-term care services. Objective: To assess policy issues involving end-of-life care, especially involving the hospice benefit, and to analyse model programs of integrated care for people who are dying. Methods: The study conducted structured interviews with stakeholders and experts in end-of-life care and with administrators of model programs in the United States, which were nominated by the experts. Results: The two major public insurance programs—Medicare and Medicaid—finance the vast majority of end-of-life care. Both programs offer a hospice benefit, which has several shortcomings, including requiring physicians to make a prognosis of a six month life expectancy and insisting that patients give up curative treatment—two steps which are difficult for doctors and patients to make—and payment levels that may be too low. In addition, quality of care initiatives for nursing homes and hospice sometimes conflict. Four innovative health systems have overcome these barriers to provide palliative services to beneficiaries in their last year of life. Three of these health systems are managed care plans which receive capitated payments. These providers integrate health, long-term and palliative care using an interdisciplinary team approach to management of services. The fourth provider is a hospice that provides palliative services to beneficiaries of all ages, including those who have not elected hospice care. Conclusions: End-of-life care is deficient in the United States. Public payers could use their market power to improve care through a number of strategies.

  20. National Policy on Health Care Hearing: an evaluative study from covering services and diagnostic procedures

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the National Policy on Hearing Health Care (PNASA) based on the coverage of specialized services and diagnostic procedures in hearing health care in Brazil. METHODS: This is an evaluation study focused on the coverage of specialized services that offer moderate- and high-complexity diagnostic procedures by region and in Brazil as a whole. We analyzed the data for the period of 2004-2011 collected from the Unified Health System's Informatics Department database (DATASUS), ...

  1. Health services research in workers' compensation medical care: policy issues and research opportunities.

    OpenAIRE

    Himmelstein, J; Buchanan, J L; Dembe, A E; Stevens, B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe some of the unique aspects of medical care offered under workers' compensation insurance systems and discuss the major policy considerations relevant to health services researchers undertaking investigations in this area. BACKGROUND AND FINDINGS: State-based workers' compensation (WC) insurance systems requiring employers to pay for medical care and wage replacement for workplace injuries and illnesses were first developed between 1910 and 1920 in the United States. Emp...

  2. Bridging the gap in ageing: Translating policies into practice in Malaysian Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambigga Krishnapillai S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Population ageing is poised to become a major challenge to the health system as Malaysia progresses to becoming a developed nation by 2020. This article aims to review the various ageing policy frameworks available globally; compare aged care policies and health services in Malaysia with Australia; and discuss various issues and challenges in translating these policies into practice in the Malaysian primary care system. Fundamental solutions identified to bridge the gap include restructuring of the health care system, development of comprehensive benefit packages for older people under the national health financing scheme, training of the primary care workforce, effective use of electronic medical records and clinical guidelines; and empowering older people and their caregivers with knowledge, skills and positive attitudes to ageing and self care. Ultimately, family medicine specialists must become the agents for change to lead multidisciplinary teams and work with various agencies to ensure that better coordination, continuity and quality of care are eventually delivered to older patients across time and settings.

  3. A right to health care? Participatory politics, progressive policy, and the price of loose language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, David A

    2016-08-01

    This article begins by clarifying and noting various limitations on the universal reach of the human right to health care under positive international law. It then argues that irrespective of the human right to health care established by positive international law, any system of positive international law capable of generating legal duties with prima facie moral force necessarily presupposes a universal moral human right to health care. But the language used in contemporary human rights documents or human rights advocacy is not a good guide to the content of this rather more modest universal moral human right to health care. The conclusion reached is that when addressing issues of justice as they inevitably arise with respect to health policy and health care, both within and between states, there is typically little to gain and much to risk by framing deliberation in terms of the human right to health care.

  4. A geospatial analysis of the impacts of maternity care fee payment policies on the uptake of skilled birth care in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Many low and middle income countries have initiated maternity fee exemption and removal policies to promote use of skilled maternity care. After two and a half decades of these policies, uptake of skilled birth care remains low and inequalities continue to exist in many low and middle income countries. This study uses 2 decades of birth histories data to examine four maternity fee paying policies enacted in Ghana over the past 3 decades and their geospatial impacts on uptake of ski...

  5. [Consensus document for the detection and management of Chagas disease in primary health care in a non-endemic areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca Saumell, Carme; Soriano-Arandes, Antoni; Solsona Díaz, Lluís; Gascón Brustenga, Joaquim

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Although it is commonly transmitted by an insect vector in continental Latin-America, in recent decades, due migration, has been diagnosed in other countries such Spain, the European country with a largest immigrant population of Latin American. For a long time, the patient remains asymptomatic, but some years after this stage, the symptoms can be serious (dilated cardiomyopathy, megacolon, megaesophagus). In addition, detection in pregnant women has a high priority because of the route of vertical transmission. Several specific guidelines about Chagas disease has been developed on the Banks of blood, maternal hospitals, HIV co-infection, organ transplant. But due to the detection of lack of information to primary care professionals, we consider to will be useful this document written and agreed to by family phisicians, pediatricians and specialists in International Health.

  6. Low Income and Impoverished Families Pay More Disproportionately for Child Care. Policy Brief Number 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kristin; Gozjolko, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    According to research based on the 2004 Survey of Income and Program Participation, working families with young children living in poverty pay 32 percent of their income on child care, nearly five times more than families living at more than 200 percent of the poverty level. This brief asks policy makers to consider allowing more subsidies to be…

  7. Sharing the caring : State, family and gender equality in parental leave policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widener, Anmarie J.

    2006-01-01

    Parental leave policies give parents a temporary leave from employment in order to care for a child. Secondary aims are to increase women’s attachment to the labour force as well as supporting gender equal roles in paid and unpaid work. This study researched parent satisfaction of parental leave

  8. Access to Health Care for Undocumented Migrants: A Comparative Policy Analysis of England and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J. Grit (Kor); J.J. den Otter (Joost); A. Spreij

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe presence of undocumented migrants is increasing in many Western countries despite wide-ranging attempts by governments to increase border security. Measures taken to control the influx of immigrants include policies that restrict access to publicly funded health care for undocumented

  9. MODERNIZATION OF POSTGRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION AS A FACTOR OF REALIZATION OF PERSONNEL POLICY IN HEALTH CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:In the article they discuss the status and problems of modernization of doctors in the context of the implementation of the state policy in the national system of Russian health care. The author presents judgments about the role and certification of postgraduate training of physicians, the directions of the improvement of professional education of doctors.

  10. Creating Access to Opportunities for Youth in Transition from Foster Care. An AYPF Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Erin; Fryar, Garet

    2014-01-01

    What happens to youth in foster care when they turn 18? Many face unprecedented challenges like homelessness, lack of financial resources, difficulty accessing educational opportunities, and unemployment. In this issue brief, The American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) document these challenges and opportunities in three distinct yet overlapping areas…

  11. Sharing the caring : State, family and gender equality in parental leave policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widener, Anmarie J.

    2006-01-01

    Parental leave policies give parents a temporary leave from employment in order to care for a child. Secondary aims are to increase women’s attachment to the labour force as well as supporting gender equal roles in paid and unpaid work. This study researched parent satisfaction of parental leave p

  12. Creating Access to Opportunities for Youth in Transition from Foster Care. An AYPF Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Erin; Fryar, Garet

    2014-01-01

    What happens to youth in foster care when they turn 18? Many face unprecedented challenges like homelessness, lack of financial resources, difficulty accessing educational opportunities, and unemployment. In this issue brief, The American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) document these challenges and opportunities in three distinct yet overlapping areas…

  13. Policy-making for real: Politics and progress in South African health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fourie

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available Problems have been accumulating in South African health care for well over three centuries yet when it comes to resolving the crisis by means of appropriate policy measures, one becomes aware of the powers at play and the interests at stake in maintaining the status quo, thus obstructing much initiative in the process of reform.

  14. Constructions of Social Inclusion within Australian Early Childhood Education and Care Policy Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sandie; Turner, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Social inclusion discourses have been powerful in informing early childhood policy contexts, both internationally and in Australia (the context of the current study) for the past decade or so. But little research has examined the productive aspects of social inclusion discourses particularly within early childhood education and care (ECEC) policy…

  15. Constructions of Social Inclusion within Australian Early Childhood Education and Care Policy Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sandie; Turner, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Social inclusion discourses have been powerful in informing early childhood policy contexts, both internationally and in Australia (the context of the current study) for the past decade or so. But little research has examined the productive aspects of social inclusion discourses particularly within early childhood education and care (ECEC) policy…

  16. Improving the care of older persons in Australian prisons using the Policy Delphi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Karen; Newman, Claire; Doona, Katherine

    2016-09-01

    There are currently no internationally recognised and approved processes relating to the care of older persons with dementia in prison. This research aimed to develop tools and procedures related to managing the care of, including the identification and assessment of, older persons with dementia who are imprisoned in New South Wales, Australia. A modified approach to the Policy Delphi method, using both surveys and facilitated discussion groups, enabled experts to come together to discuss improving the quality of care provision for older persons with dementia in prison and achieve research aims.

  17. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The United States pediatric population with chronic health conditions is expanding. Currently, this demographic comprises 12-18% of the American child and youth population. Affected children often receive fragmented, uncoordinated care. Overall, the American health care delivery system produces modest outcomes for this population. Poor, uninsured and minority children may be at increased risk for inferior coordination of services. Further, the United States health care delivery system is primarily organized for the diagnosis and treatment of acute conditions. For pediatric patients with chronic health conditions, the typical acute problem-oriented visit actually serves as a barrier to care. The biomedical model of patient education prevails, characterized by unilateral transfer of medical information. However, the evidence basis for improvement in disease outcomes supports the use of the chronic care model, initially proposed by Dr. Edward Wagner. Six inter-related elements distinguish the success of the chronic care model, which include self-management support and care coordination by a prepared, proactive team. United States health care lacks a coherent policy direction for the management of high cost chronic conditions, including rheumatic diseases. A fundamental restructure of United States health care delivery must urgently occur which places the patient at the center of care. For the pediatric rheumatology workforce, reimbursement policies and the actions of health plans and insurers are consistent barriers to chronic disease improvement. United States reimbursement policy and overall fragmentation of health care services pose specific challenges for widespread implementation of the chronic care model. Team-based multidisciplinary care, care coordination and self-management are integral to improve outcomes. Pediatric rheumatology demand in the United States far exceeds available workforce supply. This article reviews the career

  18. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a decide-announce-defend'' approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other's positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a safe'' context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  19. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a ``decide-announce-defend`` approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other`s positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a ``safe`` context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  20. Best practices in developing a national palliative care policy in resource limited settings: lessons from five African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyirika, Emmanuel Bk; Namisango, Eve; Garanganga, Eunice; Monjane, Lidia; Ginindza, Ntombi; Madonsela, Gugulethu; Kiyange, Fatia

    2016-01-01

    Given the high unmet need for palliative care in Africa and other resource limited settings, it is important that countries embrace the public health approach to increasing access through its integration within existing healthcare systems. To give this approach a strong foundation that would ensure sustainability, the World Health Organisation urges member states to ensure that policy environments are suitable for this intervention. The development, strengthening, and implementation of national palliative care policies is a priority. Given the lack of a critical mass of palliative care professionals in the region and deficiency in documenting and sharing best practices as part of information critical for regional development, policy development becomes a complex process. This article shares experiences with regard to best practices when advocating the national palliative care policies. It also tells about policy development process, the important considerations, and cites examples of policy content outlines in Africa.

  1. [Rapid headache guidelines. Neurology consensus between Neurology (SAN) and Primary Care (SEMERGEN Andalucía). Referral criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Campoy, J A; González Oria, C; Fernández Recio, M; Gómez Aranda, F; Jurado Cobo, C M; Heras Pérez, J A

    2012-01-01

    Headache is one of the most frequent reasons for consultation in our health centers, something which should not be surprising if we consider that is one of the most common symptoms experienced by the population. The main concern of the family physician and emergency physician is to reach a correct diagnosis by clinical history and a basic neurological examination and adapted to the time and means at its disposal. In case of diagnostic doubts or suspected secondary headache, the primary care physician or emergency medical have to refer the patient to be studied and/or treated for Neurology services, such referral shall be made with varying degrees of urgency depending on the presence, or not, of symptoms or signs of alarm. A working group consisting of Neurologists of Sociedad Andaluza de Neurología (SAN) to provide services in different hospitals in Andalucía and Family Physicians representatives of the Sociedad Andaluza de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria (SAMFyC) and the Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN Andalucía), has developed a Quick Guide headache, which addresses the more practical aspects for the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of patients with headache. We show you in this paper, the chapter that deals the alarm criteria and referral. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  2. Health Care Market Concentration Trends In The United States: Evidence And Policy Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Brent D

    2017-09-01

    Policy makers and analysts have been voicing concerns about the increasing concentration of health care providers and health insurers in markets nationwide, including the potential adverse effect on the cost and quality of health care. The Council of Economic Advisers recently expressed its concern about the lack of estimates of market concentration in many sectors of the US economy. To address this gap in health care, this study analyzed market concentration trends in the United States from 2010 to 2016 for hospitals, physician organizations, and health insurers. Hospital and physician organization markets became increasingly concentrated over this time period. Concentration among primary care physicians increased the most, partially because hospitals and health care systems acquired primary care physician organizations. In 2016, 90 percent of Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) were highly concentrated for hospitals, 65 percent for specialist physicians, 39 percent for primary care physicians, and 57 percent for insurers. Ninety-one percent of the 346 MSAs analyzed may have warranted concern and scrutiny because of their concentration levels in 2016 and changes in their concentrations since 2010. Public policies that enhance competition are needed, such as stricter enforcement of antitrust laws, reducing barriers to entry, and restricting anticompetitive behaviors. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  3. Implementation of a health care policy: An analysis of barriers and facilitators to practice change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sword Wendy

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Governments often create policies that rely on implementation by arms length organizations and require practice changes on the part of different segments of the health care system without understanding the differences in and complexities of these agencies. In 2000, in response to publicity about the shortening length of postpartum hospital stay, the Ontario government created a universal program offering up to a 60-hour postpartum stay and a public health follow-up to mothers and newborn infants. The purpose of this paper is to examine how a health policy initiative was implemented in two different parts of a health care system and to analyze the barriers and facilitators to achieving practice change. Methods The data reported came from two studies of postpartum health and service use in Ontario Canada. Data were collected from newly delivered mothers who had uncomplicated vaginal deliveries. The study samples were drawn from the same five purposefully selected hospitals for both studies. Questionnaires prior to discharge and structured telephone interviews at 4-weeks post discharge were used to collect data before and after policy implementation. Qualitative data were collected using focus groups with hospital and community-based health care practitioners and administrators at each site. Results In both studies, the respondents reflected a population of women who experienced an "average" or non-eventful hospital-based, singleton vaginal delivery. The findings of the second study demonstrated wide variance in implementation of the offer of a 60-hour stay among the sites and focus groups revealed that none of the hospitals acknowledged the 60-hour stay as an official policy. The uptake of the offer of a 60-hour stay was unrelated to the rate of offer. The percentage of women with a hospital stay of less than 25 hours and the number with the guideline that the call be within 48 hours of hospital discharge. Public health

  4. Evaluation of Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Child Care Centers within Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jaime S; Contreras, Dawn; Gold, Abby; Keim, Ann; Oscarson, Renee; Peters, Paula; Procter, Sandra; Remig, Valentina; Smathers, Carol; Mobley, Amy R

    2015-10-01

    Although some researchers have examined nutrition and physical activity policies within urban child care centers, little is known about the potentially unique needs of rural communities. Child care centers serving preschool children located within low-income rural communities (n = 29) from seven states (Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) were assessed to determine current nutrition and physical activity (PA) practices and policies. As part of a large-scale childhood obesity prevention project, the Community Healthy Living Index's previously validated Early Childhood Program Assessment Tool was used to collect data. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to identify high-priority areas. Healthy People 2020 and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' recommendations for nutrition and PA policies in child care centers were used as benchmarks. Reports of not fully implementing (nutrition-related policies or practices within rural early child care centers were identified. Centers not consistently serving a variety of fruits (48%), vegetables (45%), whole grains (41%), limiting saturated fat intake (31%), implementing healthy celebration guidelines (41%), involving children in mealtime (62%), and referring families to nutrition assistance programs (24%) were identified. More than one third of centers also had limited structured PA opportunities. Although eligible, only 48% of the centers participated in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Overall, centers lacked parental outreach, staff training, and funding/resources to support nutrition and PA. These results provide insight into where child care centers within low-income, rural communities may need assistance to help prevent childhood obesity.

  5. Systematic Reviews and Health Policy: The Influence of a Project on Perinatal Care since 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Daniel M

    2011-01-01

    Context: Interrelated publications between 1988 and 1992 have influenced health policy and clinical practice: The Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials (ODPT), Effective Care in Pregnancy and Childbirth (ECPC), A Guide to Effective Care in Pregnancy and Childbirth (GECPC), and Effective Care of the Newborn Infant (ECNI). These publications applied and advanced methods that had a substantial history in the medical, biological, physical, and social sciences. Their unique contribution was to demonstrate the feasibility of organizing and sustaining programs to conduct systematic reviews across an entire field of health care. The publications also influenced subsequent advances in the methodology of systematic reviews and contributed to their proliferation; in large measure, but not entirely, because their editors and many of the authors participated in organizing and developing the Cochrane Collaboration. This article describes how and why these publications attracted favorable attention and resources from policymakers in numerous countries. Methods: This article applies historical methods to the analysis of primary sources that help explain the influence of systematic reviews, mainly on health policy. These methods guide an analysis of the rhetoric of the two volumes of ECPC and of primary sources generated as systematic reviews influenced health policy. The analysis of rhetoric employs the methods of intellectual history and social studies of science. The analysis of policymaking uses the methods of political and policy history, political science, and public administration. Because the focus of this article is how science influenced policy it alludes to but does not describe in detail the literature on the methods, production, and publication of systematic reviews. Findings: The influence of the four publications on policy was mainly a result of (1) their powerful blending of the rhetoric of scientific and polemical discourse, especially but not exclusively in ECPC; (2

  6. Sustainability of Long-term Care: Puzzling Tasks Ahead for Policy-Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Ilaria; van der Wees, Philip J.; Mot, Esther S.; Wammes, Joost J.G.; Jeurissen, Patrick P.T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The sustainability of long-term care (LTC) is a prominent policy priority in many Western countries. LTC is one of the most pressing fiscal issues for the growing population of elderly people in the European Union (EU) Member States. Country recommendations regarding LTC are prominent under the EU’s European Semester. Methods: This paper examines challenges related to the financial- and organizational sustainability of LTC systems in the EU. We combined a targeted literature review and a descriptive selected country analysis of: (1) public- and private funding; (2) informal care and externalities; and (3) the possible role of technology in increasing productivity. Countries were selected via purposive sampling to establish a cohort of country cases covering the spectrum of differences in LTC systems: public spending, private funding, informal care use, informal care support, and cash benefits. Results: The aging of the population, the increasing gap between availability of informal care and demand for LTC, substantial market failures of private funding for LTC, and fiscal imbalances in some countries, have led to structural reforms and enduring pressures for LTC policy-makers across the EU. Our exploration of national policies illustrates different solutions that attempt to promote fairness while stimulating efficient delivery of services. Important steps must be taken to address the sustainability of LTC. First, countries should look deeper into the possibilities of complementing public- and private funding, as well as at addressing market failures of private funding. Second, informal care externalities with spill-over into neighboring policy areas, the labor force, and formal LTC workers, should be properly addressed. Thirdly, innovations in LTC services should be stimulated to increase productivity through technology and process innovations, and to reduce costs. Conclusion: The analysis shows why it is difficult for EU Member State governments to

  7. Sustainability of Long-term Care: Puzzling Tasks Ahead for Policy-Makers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Mosca

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The sustainability of long-term care (LTC is a prominent policy priority in many Western countries. LTC is one of the most pressing fiscal issues for the growing population of elderly people in the European Union (EU Member States. Country recommendations regarding LTC are prominent under the EU’s European Semester. Methods This paper examines challenges related to the financial- and organizational sustainability of LTC systems in the EU. We combined a targeted literature review and a descriptive selected country analysis of: (1 public- and private funding; (2 informal care and externalities; and (3 the possible role of technology in increasing productivity. Countries were selected via purposive sampling to establish a cohort of country cases covering the spectrum of differences in LTC systems: public spending, private funding, informal care use, informal care support, and cash benefits. Results The aging of the population, the increasing gap between availability of informal care and demand for LTC, substantial market failures of private funding for LTC, and fiscal imbalances in some countries, have led to structural reforms and enduring pressures for LTC policy-makers across the EU. Our exploration of national policies illustrates different solutions that attempt to promote fairness while stimulating efficient delivery of services. Important steps must be taken to address the sustainability of LTC. First, countries should look deeper into the possibilities of complementing public- and private funding, as well as at addressing market failures of private funding. Second, informal care externalities with spill-over into neighboring policy areas, the labor force, and formal LTC workers, should be properly addressed. Thirdly, innovations in LTC services should be stimulated to increase productivity through technology and process innovations, and to reduce costs. Conclusion The analysis shows why it is difficult for EU Member State

  8. Improving medication safety in primary care. A review and consensus procedure by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lainer, M.; Vogele, A.; Wensing, M.; Sonnichsen, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug treatment is an important clinical process in primary care that is associated with risk of error and adverse events. OBJECTIVE: To review currently available research evidence on the topic and to develop a framework, which can help to guide improvement of medication safety. METHODS:

  9. Shared Decision Making in Intensive Care Units: An American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Alexander A.; Davidson, Judy E.; Morrison, Wynne; Danis, Marion; White, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Shared decision-making (SDM) is endorsed by critical care organizations, however there remains confusion about what SDM is, when it should be used, and approaches to promote partnerships in treatment decisions. The purpose of this statement is to define SDM, recommend when SDM should be used, identify the range of ethically acceptable decision-making models, and present important communication skills. Methods The American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) and American Thoracic Society (ATS) Ethics Committees reviewed empirical research and normative analyses published in peer-reviewed journals to generate recommendations. Recommendations approved by consensus of the full Ethics Committees of ACCM and ATS were included in the statement. Main Results Six recommendations were endorsed: 1) Definition: Shared decision-making is a collaborative process that allows patients, or their surrogates, and clinicians to make health care decisions together, taking into account the best scientific evidence available, as well as the patient’s values, goals, and preferences. 2) Clinicians should engage in a SDM process to define overall goals of care (including decisions regarding limiting or withdrawing life-prolonging interventions) and when making major treatment decisions that may be affected by personal values, goals, and preferences. 3) Clinicians should use as their “default” approach a SDM process that includes three main elements: information exchange, deliberation, and making a treatment decision. 4) A wide range of decision-making approaches are ethically supportable including patient- or surrogate-directed and clinician-directed models. Clinicians should tailor the decision-making process based on the preferences of the patient or surrogate. 5) Clinicians should be trained in communication skills. 6) Research is needed to evaluate decision-making strategies. Conclusions Patient and surrogate preferences for decision-making roles regarding value

  10. Obesity as a Socially Defined Disease: Philosophical Considerations and Implications for Policy and Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2016-03-01

    Obesity has generated significant worries amongst health policy makers and has obtained increased attention in health care. Obesity is unanimously defined as a disease in the health care and health policy literature. However, there are pragmatic and not principled reasons for this. This warrants an analysis of obesity according to standard conceptions of disease in the literature of philosophy of medicine. According to theories and definitions of disease referring to (abnormal functioning of) internal processes, obesity is not a disease. Obesity undoubtedly can result in disease, making it a risk factor for disease, but not a disease per se. According to several social conceptions of disease, however, obesity clearly is a disease. Obesity can conflict with aesthetic, moral, or other social norms. Making obesity a "social disease" may very well be a wise health policy, assuring and improving population health, especially if we address the social determinants of obesity, such as the food supply and marketing system. However, applying biomedical solutions to social problems may also have severe side effects. It can result in medicalization and enhance stigmatization and discrimination of persons based on appearance or behavior. Approaching social problems with biomedical means may also serve commercial and professionals' interests more than the health and welfare of individuals; it may make quick fix medical solutions halt more sustainable structural solutions. This urges health insurers, health care professionals, and health policy makers to be cautious. Especially if we want to help and respect persons that we classify and treat as obese.

  11. High performance work systems: the gap between policy and practice in health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Sandra G; Bartram, Timothy; Stanton, Pauline

    2011-01-01

    Studies of high-performing organisations have consistently reported a positive relationship between high performance work systems (HPWS) and performance outcomes. Although many of these studies have been conducted in manufacturing, similar findings of a positive correlation between aspects of HPWS and improved care delivery and patient outcomes have been reported in international health care studies. The purpose of this paper is to bring together the results from a series of studies conducted within Australian health care organisations. First, the authors seek to demonstrate the link found between high performance work systems and organisational performance, including the perceived quality of patient care. Second, the paper aims to show that the hospitals studied do not have the necessary aspects of HPWS in place and that there has been little consideration of HPWS in health system reform. The paper draws on a series of correlation studies using survey data from hospitals in Australia, supplemented by qualitative data collection and analysis. To demonstrate the link between HPWS and perceived quality of care delivery the authors conducted regression analysis with tests of mediation and moderation to analyse survey responses of 201 nurses in a large regional Australian health service and explored HRM and HPWS in detail in three casestudy organisations. To achieve the second aim, the authors surveyed human resource and other senior managers in all Victorian health sector organisations and reviewed policy documents related to health system reform planned for Australia. The findings suggest that there is a relationship between HPWS and the perceived quality of care that is mediated by human resource management (HRM) outcomes, such as psychological empowerment. It is also found that health care organisations in Australia generally do not have the necessary aspects of HPWS in place, creating a policy and practice gap. Although the chief executive officers of health

  12. Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Family Child Care Homes in Oregon: Baseline Findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Katherine B.; Rice, Kelly R.; Trost, Stewart G.

    2012-01-01

    Baseline findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project include data from Family Child Care Providers (FCCPs) in Oregon (n=53) who completed assessments of nutrition and physical activity policies and practices and BMI data for children in the care of FCCPs (n=205). Results show that a significant percentage of FCCPs failed to meet child care…

  13. Alliance system and policy change: necessary ingredients for improvement in diabetes care and reduction of disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Noreen M; Quinn, Martha; Dodge, Julia A; Nelson, Belinda W

    2014-11-01

    Reducing diabetes inequities requires system and policy changes based on real-life experiences of vulnerable individuals living with the condition. While introducing innovative interventions for African American, Native American, and Latino low-income people, the five community-based sites of the Alliance to Reduce Disparities in Diabetes recognized that policy changes were essential to sustain their efforts. Data regarding change efforts were collected from site leaders and examined against documents provided routinely to the National Program Office at the University of Michigan. A policy expert refined the original lists to include only confirmed policy changes, scope of change (organizational to national), and stage of accomplishment (1, beginning; 2, adoption; 3, implementation; and 4, full maintenance). Changes were again verified through site visits and telephone interviews. In 3 years, Alliance teams achieved 53 system and policy change accomplishments. Efforts were implemented at the organizational (33), citywide (13), state (5), and national (2) levels, and forces helping and hindering success were identified. Three types of changes were deemed especially significant for diabetes control: data sharing across care-providing organizations, embedding community health workers into the clinical care team, and linking clinic services with community assets and resources in support of self-management.

  14. Helping consumers to select an appropriate long-term care insurance policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firman, J P

    1992-01-01

    Consumers who purchase long term care insurance policies can get good value for their money but there are several residual risks. Advisers have an important responsibility to make sure that their clients fully understand these risks. We recommend that consumers who are appropriate candidates for long term care insurance take into account the following guidelines: Make sure that a policy is bought from a well-known, financially secure company that has an A.M. Best Company rating of A or A+ or at least an A rating from Standard & Poor's. Avoid companies that have a history of consumer complaints, post-claims underwriting, high agent commissions, high lapse rates, or abuses in the Medigap market. Buy a policy with level premiums but understand that in the absence of explicit rate guarantees, premiums may be increased in the future. Seek policies that are guaranteed renewable, explicitly ensure fair access to policy upgrades, provide protection in case of late premium payments, and guarantee protection from potential changes in government benefits.

  15. Integrated care: a fresh perspective for international health policies in low and middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Unger

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To propose a social-and-democrat health policy alternative to the current neoliberal one. Context of case: The general failure of neoliberal health policies in low and middle-income countries justifies the design of an alternative to bring disease control and health care back in step with ethical principles and desired outcomes. Data sources: National policies, international programmes and pilot experiments—including those led by the authors—are examined in both scientific and grey literature. Case description: We call for the promotion of a publicly-oriented health sector as a cornerstone of such alternative policy. We define ‘publicly-oriented’ as opposed to ‘private-for-profit’ in terms of objectives and commitment, not of ownership. We classify development strategies for such a sector according to an organisation-based typology of health systems defined by Mintzberg. As such, strategies are adapted to three types of health systems: machine bureaucracies, professional bureaucracies and divisionalized forms. We describe avenues for family and community health and for hospital care. We stress social control at the peripheral level to increase accountability and responsiveness. Community-based, national and international sources are required to provide viable financing. Conclusions and discussion: Our proposed social-and-democrat health policy calls for networking, lobbying and training as a joint effort in which committed health professionals can lead the way.

  16. Understanding public elderly care policy in Norway: A narrative analysis of governmental White papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Frode F

    2015-08-01

    How the general public in Norway conceives being an older adult and the meaning of chronological age has changed over the last few decades. As narratives of aging may be identified in the Norwegian mass media and in the population at large, dominant narratives may also be identified in policy documents, such as government health policy papers. This article explores a narrative analytical framework based on stories, subtexts, and counterstories; it argues that such narratives are characterized as much by what is unsaid as by what is said, and as much by choice of words and word combinations as by explicit messages. Culture strongly influences the conception of a likely future (what will be) and an envisioned future (what ought to be) regarding aging and geriatric care in Norway, as expressed in the public policy papers. The public policy story is discussed as both a story continuously developing, where later health policy papers relate to and comment on earlier documents, and as a story characterized by a measure of cultural incoherence. Some recent government documents dealing with professional geriatric care will serve as material for a narrative analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A consensus plan for action to improve access to cancer care in the association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Mark

    2014-01-01

    consists of Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam. It, thus, includes low- and middle-income countries where the double whammy of infectious and chronic diseases will pose an enormous challenge in allocating limited resources to competing health issues. Cancer statistics, even at the sub-national level, only tell part of the story. Many individuals who contract cancer in poor countries have no medical insurance and no, or limited, expectation of public assistance. Whilst any person who has a family member with cancer can expect to bear some consequential burden of care or expense, in a poor family in a poor environment the burden will surely be greater. This additional burden from cancer is rarely considered, and even more rarely quantified, even in developed nations.

  18. [Policies and standards applied to municipal day care centers in Rio de Janeiro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcelos, Rafaela Moledo; Tancredi, Rinaldini Coralini Philippo; Marin, Victor Augustus

    2013-11-01

    Day care centers were first established in Brazil with the aim of reducing infant mortality rates, however the incidence of foodborne disease transmission has been on the increase. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that each year 1.8 million deaths worldwide occur in children under 5 years of age, which is attributed to the consumption of contaminated food. However, Brazilian legislation does not provide specific rules of operation for day care center kitchens. Thus, the scope of this study is to research the standards relating to the operation of day care centers, discussing the health regulations related to food production. By means of a review of electronic pages of various government organs, the regulations inherent to the operation and production of food in day care centers were examined. After scrutiny of the twenty-seven pieces of legislation found, there is a concern with water quality, supply of food, the control of pests and vectors, structural conditions and food policies. In spite of this, it was seen that not all the surveillance policies for the quality of food offered in day care centers are effective. Also observed was the lack of a specific regulation that establishes the quality criteria for safe handling of food in day care centers.

  19. Research methods for formal consensus development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Daphne; Warren-Forward, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews three research methods for developing consensus. Consensus statements and guidelines are increasingly used to clarify and standardise practice, and inform health policy, when relevant and rigorous evidence is lacking. Clinicians need to evaluate the quality of practice guidelines to determine whether to incorporate them into clinical practice or reject them. Formal methods of developing consensus provide a scientific method that uses expert panel members to evaluate current evidence and expert opinions to produce consensus statements for clinical problems. Online search for relevant literature was conducted in Medline and CINAHL. A literature review of consensus, consensus development and research methods papers published in English in peer-reviewed journals. The three methods of developing consensus discussed are the Delphi technique, nominal group technique and the consensus development conference. The techniques and their respective advantages are described, and examples from the literature are provided. The three methods are compared and a flowchart to assist researchers selecting an appropriate method is included. Online resources with information on the development and evaluation of clinical guidelines are reviewed. This paper will help researchers to select an appropriate research method for developing consensus statements and guidelines. When developing consensus guidelines for clinical practice, researchers should use a formal research method to ensure rigour and credibility.

  20. Three Policy Issues in Deciding the Cost of Nursing Home Care: Provincial Differences and How They Influence Elderly Couples' Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Stadnyk, Robin L.

    2009-01-01

    Nursing home care is subsidized in all Canadian provinces, but residents must personally contribute to the cost. This paper explores policy issues that have led to differences in costs of nursing home care among provinces, and how policy and cost differences influence the experiences of married couples when one spouse requires nursing home care. The paper is based on a multiple-case study of three Canadian provinces, each of which had a different system for determining personal contributions ...

  1. A critical review of Singapore's policies aimed at supporting families caring for older members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kalyani K

    2006-01-01

    This article critically examines the family-oriented social policies of the Singapore government aimed at supporting families caring for older members. The sectors focused on are financial security, health, and housing. Singaporeans have been reminded that the family should be the first line of defense for aging families, followed by the community - the state would step in as the last resort. Drawing from recent research and examination of the state policies, the author argues that more should be done to help family caregivers looking after elder relatives. Recommendations for innovative ways to recognize and reward family carers conclude the paper.

  2. Policy Perspective: Ensuring Comprehensive Care and Support for Gender Nonconforming Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowshen, Nadia; Meadows, Rachel; Byrnes, Maureen; Hawkins, Linda; Eder, Jennifer; Noonan, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite recent notable advances in societal equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals, youth who identify as trans* or gender nonconforming, in particular, continue to experience significant challenges accessing the services they need to grow into healthy adults. This policy perspective first offers background information describing this population, their unique healthcare needs, and obstacles when seeking care, including case study examples. The authors then provide recommendations for medical education, health systems, and insurance payers, as well as recommendations for school systems and broader public policy changes to improve the health and well-being of gender nonconforming youth. PMID:28861528

  3. The potential conflict between policy and ethics in caring for undocumented immigrants at academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacari Stone, Lisa; Steimel, Leah; Vasquez-Guzman, Estela; Kaufman, Arthur

    2014-04-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are at the forefront of delivering care to the diverse medically underserved and uninsured populations in the United States, as well as training the majority of the health care workforce, who are professionally obligated to serve all patients regardless of race or immigration status. Despite AHCs' central leadership role in these endeavors, few consolidated efforts have emerged to resolve potential conflicts between national, state, and local policies that exclude certain classifications of immigrants from receiving federal public assistance and health professionals' social missions and ethical oath to serve humanity. For instance, whereas the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provides a pathway to insurance coverage for more than 30 million Americans, undocumented immigrants and legally documented immigrants residing in the United States for less than five years are ineligible for Medicaid and excluded from purchasing any type of coverage through state exchanges. To inform this debate, the authors describe their experience at the University of New Mexico Hospital (UNMH) and discuss how the UNMH has responded to this challenge and overcome barriers. They offer three recommendations for aligning AHCs' social missions and professional ethics with organizational policies: (1) that AHCs determine eligibility for financial assistance based on residency rather than citizenship, (2) that models of medical education and health professions training provide students with service-learning opportunities and applied community experience, and (3) that frontline staff and health care professionals receive standardized training on eligibility policies to minimize discrimination towards immigrant patients.

  4. Advance care planning for nursing home residents with dementia: Influence of 'we DECide' on policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampe, Sophie; Sevenants, Aline; Smets, Tinne; Declercq, Anja; Van Audenhove, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    (1) To pilot 'we DECide' in terms of influence on advance care planning policy and practice in nursing home dementia care units. (2) To investigate barriers and facilitators for implementing 'we DECide'. This was a pre-test-post-test study in 18 nursing homes. Measurements included: compliance with best practice of advance care planning policy (ACP-audit); advance care planning practice (ACP criteria: degree to which advance care planning was discussed, and OPTION scale: degree of involvement of residents and families in conversations). Advance care planning policy was significantly more compliant with best practice after 'we DECide'; policy in the control group was not. Advance care planning was not discussed more frequently, nor were residents and families involved to a higher degree in conversations after 'we DECide'. Barriers to realizing advance care planning included staff's limited responsibilities; facilitators included support by management staff, and involvement of the whole organization. 'We DECide' had a positive influence on advance care planning policy. Daily practice, however, did not change. Future studies should pay more attention to long-term implementation strategies. Long-term implementation of advance care planning requires involvement of the whole organization and a continuing support system for health care professionals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. On Relating Health Care Policy to the Provision of Health Care to Black Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darity, William A.

    This paper addresses health and social issues as well as other socioeconomic problems which affect the black family, and the development of appropriate policy and programs to deal with those problems. Data on infant mortality, life expectancy, maternal mortality, physician and dental visits, and some selected death rates from specific causes are…

  6. Cuidados enfermeros en Cuidados Paliativos: Análisis, consensos y retos Nursing care in Palliative Care: analysis, consensuses and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Codorniu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available La creciente complejidad de los cuidados que requieren las personas en situación de enfermedad avanzada y al final de vida, y la variabilidad de profesionales sanitarios que intervienen en el proceso asistencial, nos conduce a clarificar el rol profesional enfermero en el equipo multidisciplinar de Cuidados Paliativos (CP. Objetivo: reflexionar sobre la práctica enfermera en CP. Metodología: Técnica del grupo nominal. Se seleccionaron 10 enfermeras con más de 10 años de experiencia profesional en CP. Categorías elegidas para la atención enfermera: Evolución de los cuidados, de la profesión enfermera, funciones y actividades de enfermería, historia de los cuidados paliativos. Conclusiones: Necesidad de definir las competencias enfermeras en CP; Necesidad de contemplar la práctica profesional en el marco de un modelo conceptual y la aplicación del método científico enfermero; Necesidad de avanzar en prácticas reflexivas basadas en evidencias científicas; Iniciar una línea de investigación en competencias enfermeras en CP.The increasing complexity of care needed by patients with advanced diseases or end-of-life situation, added to variability of health professionals who participate in patient care, make necessary to clarify the specific role of nurses in a interdisciplinary Palliative Care team (PC. Aim: To establish a reflection about the nurse practice in PC. Methodology: Nominal group study. Ten nurses with more than 10 years of experience in PC were selected. The main areas of discussion were: the evolution of care and nursing profession, the general practice of nurses and Palliative Care history. Conclusion: There is the need: a define nurse's competences in PC; b describe the professional practice in the frame of a conceptual model and the application of nurse's scientific method; c advance in a practice based on scientific evidence; d start a research line about nurse's competences in PC.

  7. Nutrition policy, food and drinks at school and after school care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissau, I; Poùlsen, J

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the paper is to describe food and drinks available in food stands or cantina at Danish schools and food and drinks provided at after school care institutions in Denmark. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The survey was performed in 1999 and self-administered postal questionnaires we....... CONCLUSION: The paper highlights the important aspects of the institutional level as one of six important levels as regards the prevention of obesity and an important level at which to act to increase nutrition habits in school children....... sent to all private and public schools and all after school care institutions in Denmark. The participation rate was 70 at schools and 66 at after school care institutions. RESULTS: In total, 3% of schools and 4% of after school care institutions have a written policy on nutrition. All Danish children...

  8. Participation and coordination in Dutch health care policy-making. A network analysis of the system of intermediate organizations in Dutch health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamping, Antonie J; Raab, Jörg; Kenis, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    This study explores the system of intermediate organizations in Dutch health care as the crucial system to understand health care policy-making in the Netherlands. We argue that the Dutch health care system can be understood as a system consisting of distinct but inter-related policy domains. In this study, we analyze four such policy domains: Finances, quality of care, manpower planning and pharmaceuticals. With the help of network analytic techniques, we describe how this highly differentiated system of >200 intermediate organizations is structured and coordinated and what (policy) consequences can be observed with regard to its particular structure and coordination mechanisms. We further analyze the extent to which this system of intermediate organizations enables participation of stakeholders in policy-making using network visualization tools. The results indicate that coordination between the different policy domains within the health care sector takes place not as one would expect through governmental agencies, but through representative organizations such as the representative organizations of the (general) hospitals, the health care consumers and the employers' association. We further conclude that the system allows as well as denies a large number of potential participants access to the policy-making process. As a consequence, the representation of interests is not necessarily balanced, which in turn affects health care policy. We find that the interests of the Dutch health care consumers are well accommodated with the national umbrella organization NPCF in the lead. However, this is no safeguard for the overall community values of good health care since, for example, the interests of the public health sector are likely to be marginalized.

  9. What is the Role of Parental Leave policies in shaping Work and Care in the Enlarged EU?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    . The article uses comparative data from the second round of the European Social Survey carried out in 2004/05. The analysis shows that both time spent on full-time care and different care policies influence mothers' subjective feelings that caring for children has negative consequences for their careers...

  10. Impact of Individual-, Environmental-, and Policy-Level Factors on Health Care Utilization Among US Farmworkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Joni A.; Gabbard, Susan; Kronick, Richard G.; Roesch, Scott C.; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Zuniga, Maria L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We examined individual-, environmental-, and policy-level correlates of US farmworker health care utilization, guided by the behavioral model for vulnerable populations and the ecological model. Methods. The 2006 and 2007 administrations of the National Agricultural Workers Survey (n = 2884) provided the primary data. Geographic information systems, the 2005 Uniform Data System, and rurality and border proximity indices provided environmental variables. To identify factors associated with health care use, we performed logistic regression using weighted hierarchical linear modeling. Results. Approximately half (55.3%) of farmworkers utilized US health care in the previous 2 years. Several factors were independently associated with use at the individual level (gender, immigration and migrant status, English proficiency, transportation access, health status, and non-US health care utilization), the environmental level (proximity to US–Mexico border), and the policy level (insurance status and workplace payment structure). County Federally Qualified Health Center resources were not independently associated. Conclusions. We identified farmworkers at greatest risk for poor access. We made recommendations for change to farmworker health care access at all 3 levels of influence, emphasizing Federally Qualified Health Center service delivery. PMID:21330594

  11. Does public reporting measure up? Federalism, accountability and child-care policy in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lynell; Findlay, Tammy

    2010-01-01

    Governments in Canada have recently been exploring new accountability measures within intergovernmental relations. Public reporting has become the preferred mechanism in a range of policy areas, including early learning and child-care, and the authors assess its effectiveness as an accountability measure. The article is based on their experience with a community capacity-building project that considers the relationship between the public policy, funding and accountability mechanisms under the federal/provincial/territorial agreements related to child-care. The authors argue that in its current form, public reporting has not lived up to its promise of accountability to citizens. This evaluation is based on the standards that governments have set for themselves under the federal/provincial/territorial agreements, as well as guidelines set by the Public Sector Accounting Board, an independent body that develops accounting standards over time through consultation with governments.

  12. The crisis as catalyst for reframing health care policies in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helderman, Jan-Kees

    2015-01-01

    Seen from the perspective of health, the global financial crisis (GFC) may be conceived of as an exogenous factor that has undermined the fiscal sustainability of European welfare states and consequently, their (expanding) health systems as well. Being one of the core programs of European welfare states, health care has always belonged to the sovereignty of European Member States. However, in past two decades, European welfare states have in fact become semi-sovereign states and the European Union (EU) no longer is an exogenous actor in European health policy making. Today, the EU not only puts limits to unsustainable growth levels in health care spending, it also acts as an health policy agenda setter. Since the outbreak of the GFC, it does so in an increasingly coercive and persuasive way, claiming authority over health system reforms alongside the responsibilities of its Member States.

  13. Preconception care policy, guidelines, recommendations and services across six European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shawe, Jill; Delbaere, Ilse; Ekstrand, Maria

    2015-01-01

    for healthy women and men were fragmented and inconsistent. Preconception guidance was often included in antenatal and pregnancy guidelines. Differences between countries were seen with regard to nutritional and lifestyle advice particularly in relation to fish, caffeine and alcohol consumption, and vitamin......Objectives Preconception care is important for the screening, prevention and management of risk factors that affect pregnancy outcomes. We aimed to investigate pre-pregnancy care policies, guidelines, recommendations and services in six European countries. Methods In 2013, an electronic search......: Governmental policy and legislation; Professional bodies and organisations; Healthcare providers; Charitable organisations; Web-based public information and internet sites. Results All countries had preconception recommendations for women with chronic diseases, such as diabetes and epilepsy. Recommendations...

  14. Creating value in health care through big data: opportunities and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roski, Joachim; Bo-Linn, George W; Andrews, Timothy A

    2014-07-01

    Big data has the potential to create significant value in health care by improving outcomes while lowering costs. Big data's defining features include the ability to handle massive data volume and variety at high velocity. New, flexible, and easily expandable information technology (IT) infrastructure, including so-called data lakes and cloud data storage and management solutions, make big-data analytics possible. However, most health IT systems still rely on data warehouse structures. Without the right IT infrastructure, analytic tools, visualization approaches, work flows, and interfaces, the insights provided by big data are likely to be limited. Big data's success in creating value in the health care sector may require changes in current polices to balance the potential societal benefits of big-data approaches and the protection of patients' confidentiality. Other policy implications of using big data are that many current practices and policies related to data use, access, sharing, privacy, and stewardship need to be revised.

  15. Developing an adaptive policy for long-term care capacity planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Puterman, Martin L

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes a refined methodology for determining long-term care (LTC) capacity levels over a multi-year planning horizon based on a previous study. The problem is to find a capacity level in each year during the planning horizon to meet a wait time service level criterion. Instead of a static policy for capacity planning, we proposal an adaptive policy, where the capacity level required in this year depends on the achieved service level in the last year as the state of the LTC system. We aggregate service levels into a few groups for tractability. Our methodology integrates a discrete event simulation for describing the LTC system and an optimization algorithm to find required capacity levels. We illustrate this methodology through a case study. The results show that the refined methodology overcomes the problems observed in the previous study. It also improves resource utilization greatly. To execute this adaptive policy in practice requires availability of surge or temporary capacity.

  16. Towards an integrated approach for the analysis of gender equity in policies supporting paid work and care responsibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Saraceno

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to develop a conceptual framework for analysing the degree to which public policies support gender equity in paid work and care. Combining the distinction between commodification and decommodification and the distinction between defamilialisation, supported familialism, and familialism by default our study identifies a number of relevant policies, ranging from services, leave entitlements, income support measures, and fiscal instruments to forms of acknowledgement of care work in pension systems. Although our main objective is conceptual, we offer a comparative overview of these policies for all of the EU countries, plus Norway. Thus, we provide a preliminary typology of policy approaches.

  17. Perceptions of an open visitation policy by intensive care unit workers

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background An intensive care unit (ICU) admission is a stressful event for the patient and the patient’s family. Several studies demonstrated symptoms of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder in family members of patients admitted to ICU. Some studies recognize that the open visitation policy (OVP) is related to a reduction in symptoms of anxiety and depression for the patient and an improvement in family satisfaction. However, some issues have been presented as barriers for ...

  18. Analysis of the relevance of public policy for mental health care in Costa Rica1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Martínez Esquivel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay seeks to answer the question what is the relevance of public policy in mental health care? Recently, the National Mental Health Policy was established in Costa Rica, but despite that was a step forward for the country, its real and effective implementation means a challenge. At present, health is seen as a historical process, affected by various social determinants that represent the possible reasons why people get sick. To address this reality, the Primary Health Care serve as one based on health promotion strategy in the implementation of public policies that direct the actions of the sector is one of its priority areas. From this perspective, mental health plays a major role in the welfare of the individual and the community. It is concluded that the development of a National Mental Health Policy represents a breakthrough for Costa Rica, but all health professionals should know and sensitize themselves and the public as to cater for the promotion of mental health and prevention of mental illness.

  19. Immunization of Health-Care Providers: Necessity and Public Health Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltezou, Helena C; Poland, Gregory A

    2016-08-01

    Health-care providers (HCPs) are at increased risk for exposure to vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) in the workplace. The rationale for immunization of HCPs relies on the need to protect them and, indirectly, their patients from health-care-associated VPDs. Published evidence indicates significant immunity gaps for VPDs of HCPs globally. Deficits in knowledge and false perceptions about VPDs and vaccines are the most common barriers for vaccine uptake and may also influence communication about vaccines between HCPs and their patients. Most countries have immunization recommendations for HCPs; however, there are no universal policies and significant heterogeneity exists between countries in terms of vaccines, schedules, frame of implementation (recommendation or mandatory), and target categories of HCPs. Mandatory influenza immunization policies for HCPs have been implemented with high vaccine uptake rates. Stronger recommendations for HCP immunization and commitment at the level of the health-care facility are critical in order to achieve high vaccine coverage rates. Given the importance to health, mandatory immunization policies for VPDs that can cause serious morbidity and mortality to vulnerable patients should be considered.

  20. Collaboration with behavioral health care facilities to implement systemwide tobacco control policies--California, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lauren; Modayil, Mary V; Pavlik, Jim; Morris, Chad D

    2015-02-05

    The California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) administered 4 regional trainings in 2012 to staffers at CTCP-funded projects, tobacco control coalitions, several county departments of mental health and alcohol and drug, and administrators and providers from behavioral health care facilities. These trainings focused on the special tobacco use cessation needs and opportunities for cessation among persons with mental illness or substance abuse disorders, and they provided information about cessation and smoke-free policies. CTCP surveyed county and private behavioral health care programs to assess their readiness for adopting tobacco control strategies at treatment facilities. Between baseline and follow-up we found a decrease in the proportion of organizations at the precontemplation or contemplation stages of change and twice as many organizations at the action and maintenance stages of change. Significant obstacles remain to implementing policy: many agencies have concerns about going tobacco-free. But significant progress has been made, as evidenced by new policies and a growing number of tobacco-free coalitions consisting of public health agencies, behavioral health care agencies, and local hospitals.

  1. Immunization of Health-Care Providers: Necessity and Public Health Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltezou, Helena C.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Health-care providers (HCPs) are at increased risk for exposure to vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) in the workplace. The rationale for immunization of HCPs relies on the need to protect them and, indirectly, their patients from health-care-associated VPDs. Published evidence indicates significant immunity gaps for VPDs of HCPs globally. Deficits in knowledge and false perceptions about VPDs and vaccines are the most common barriers for vaccine uptake and may also influence communication about vaccines between HCPs and their patients. Most countries have immunization recommendations for HCPs; however, there are no universal policies and significant heterogeneity exists between countries in terms of vaccines, schedules, frame of implementation (recommendation or mandatory), and target categories of HCPs. Mandatory influenza immunization policies for HCPs have been implemented with high vaccine uptake rates. Stronger recommendations for HCP immunization and commitment at the level of the health-care facility are critical in order to achieve high vaccine coverage rates. Given the importance to health, mandatory immunization policies for VPDs that can cause serious morbidity and mortality to vulnerable patients should be considered. PMID:27490580

  2. Collaboration With Behavioral Health Care Facilities to Implement Systemwide Tobacco Control Policies — California, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lauren; Modayil, Mary V.; Pavlik, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) administered 4 regional trainings in 2012 to staffers at CTCP-funded projects, tobacco control coalitions, several county departments of mental health and alcohol and drug, and administrators and providers from behavioral health care facilities. These trainings focused on the special tobacco use cessation needs and opportunities for cessation among persons with mental illness or substance abuse disorders, and they provided information about cessation and smoke-free policies. CTCP surveyed county and private behavioral health care programs to assess their readiness for adopting tobacco control strategies at treatment facilities. Between baseline and follow-up we found a decrease in the proportion of organizations at the precontemplation or contemplation stages of change and twice as many organizations at the action and maintenance stages of change. Significant obstacles remain to implementing policy: many agencies have concerns about going tobacco-free. But significant progress has been made, as evidenced by new policies and a growing number of tobacco-free coalitions consisting of public health agencies, behavioral health care agencies, and local hospitals. PMID:25654218

  3. The PolicyRelevance of WearEmissions fromRoad Transport,Nowand in the Future-An InternationalWorkshop Report and Consensus Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Gerlofs-Nijland, M.E.; Gehrig, R.; Gustafsson, M.; Janssen, N.; Harrison, R.M.; Hulskotte, J.; Johansson, C.; Jozwicka, M.; Keuken, M.; Krijgsheld, K.; Ntziachristos, L.; Riediker, M.; Cassee, F.R.

    2013-01-01

    Road transport emissions are a major contributor to ambient particulate matter concentrations and have been associated with adverse health effects. Therefore, these emissions are targeted through increasingly stringent European emission standards. These policies succeed in reducing exhaust emissions

  4. Perceived impact of the Medicare policy to adjust payment for health care-associated infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Grace M.; Hartmann, Christine W.; Graham, Denise; Kassler, William; Linn, Maya Dutta; Krein, Sarah; Saint, Sanjay; Goldmann, Donald A.; Fridkin, Scott; Horan, Teresa; Jernigan, John; Jha, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) ceased additional payment for hospitalizations resulting in complications deemed preventable, including several health care-associated infections. We sought to understand the impact of the CMS payment policy on infection prevention efforts. Methods A national survey of infection preventionists from a random sample of US hospitals was conducted in December 2010. Results Eighty-one percent reported increased attention to HAIs targeted by the CMS policy, whereas one-third reported spending less time on nontargeted HAIs. Only 15% reported increased funding for infection control as a result of the CMS policy, whereas most reported stable (77%) funding. Respondents reported faster removal of urinary (71%) and central venous (50%) catheters as a result of the CMS policy, whereas routine urine and blood cultures on admission occurred infrequently (27% and 13%, respectively). Resource shifting (ie, less time spent on nontargeted HAIs) occurred more commonly in large hospitals (odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval: 1.0–5.1; P = .038) but less often in hospitals where front-line staff were receptive to changes in clinical processes (odds ratio, 0.5; 95% confidence interval: 0.3–0.8; P = .005). Conclusion Infection preventionists reported greater hospital attention to preventing targeted HAIs as a result of the CMS nonpayment policy. Whether the increased focus and greater engagement in HAI prevention practices has led to better patient outcomes is unclear. PMID:22541855

  5. An official American Thoracic Society policy statement: managing conscientious objections in intensive care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Newby, Mithya; Wicclair, Mark; Pope, Thaddeus; Rushton, Cynda; Curlin, Farr; Diekema, Douglas; Durrer, Debbie; Ehlenbach, William; Gibson-Scipio, Wanda; Glavan, Bradford; Langer, Rabbi Levi; Manthous, Constantine; Rose, Cecile; Scardella, Anthony; Shanawani, Hasan; Siegel, Mark D; Halpern, Scott D; Truog, Robert D; White, Douglas B

    2015-01-15

    Intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians sometimes have a conscientious objection (CO) to providing or disclosing information about a legal, professionally accepted, and otherwise available medical service. There is little guidance about how to manage COs in ICUs. To provide clinicians, hospital administrators, and policymakers with recommendations for managing COs in the critical care setting. This policy statement was developed by a multidisciplinary expert committee using an iterative process with a diverse working group representing adult medicine, pediatrics, nursing, patient advocacy, bioethics, philosophy, and law. The policy recommendations are based on the dual goals of protecting patients' access to medical services and protecting the moral integrity of clinicians. Conceptually, accommodating COs should be considered a "shield" to protect individual clinicians' moral integrity rather than as a "sword" to impose clinicians' judgments on patients. The committee recommends that: (1) COs in ICUs be managed through institutional mechanisms, (2) institutions accommodate COs, provided doing so will not impede a patient's or surrogate's timely access to medical services or information or create excessive hardships for other clinicians or the institution, (3) a clinician's CO to providing potentially inappropriate or futile medical services should not be considered sufficient justification to forgo the treatment against the objections of the patient or surrogate, and (4) institutions promote open moral dialogue and foster a culture that respects diverse values in the critical care setting. This American Thoracic Society statement provides guidance for clinicians, hospital administrators, and policymakers to address clinicians' COs in the critical care setting.

  6. Palliative Care and Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Lynne T; Grady, Kathleen L; Kutner, Jean S; Adler, Eric; Berlinger, Nancy; Boss, Renee; Butler, Javed; Enguidanos, Susan; Friebert, Sarah; Gardner, Timothy J; Higgins, Phil; Holloway, Robert; Konig, Madeleine; Meier, Diane; Morrissey, Mary Beth; Quest, Tammie E; Wiegand, Debra L; Coombs-Lee, Barbara; Fitchett, George; Gupta, Charu; Roach, William H

    2016-09-13

    The mission of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association includes increasing access to high-quality, evidence-based care that improves patient outcomes such as health-related quality of life and is consistent with the patients' values, preferences, and goals. Awareness of and access to palliative care interventions align with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association mission. The purposes of this policy statement are to provide background on the importance of palliative care as it pertains to patients with advanced cardiovascular disease and stroke and their families and to make recommendations for policy decisions. Palliative care, defined as patient- and family-centered care that optimizes health-related quality of life by anticipating, preventing, and treating suffering, should be integrated into the care of all patients with advanced cardiovascular disease and stroke early in the disease trajectory. Palliative care focuses on communication, shared decision making about treatment options, advance care planning, and attention to physical, emotional, spiritual, and psychological distress with inclusion of the patient's family and care system. Our policy recommendations address the following: reimbursement for comprehensive delivery of palliative care services for patients with advanced cardiovascular disease and stroke; strong payer-provider relationships that involve data sharing to identify patients in need of palliative care, identification of better care and payment models, and establishment of quality standards and outcome measurements; healthcare system policies for the provision of comprehensive palliative care services during hospitalization, including goals of care, treatment decisions, needs of family caregivers, and transition to other care settings; and health professional education in palliative care as part of licensure requirements. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Proposed policies on palliative care for elderly people in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose F. Parodi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fast aging of population, epidemiological changes and the need to guarantee human rights (health, social protection,etc. force countries and the wider community to become aware and develop policies that form the basis for an strategy of maintaining the health and care of elderly people. This should be designed taking into account the particularities of this age group, and the need for adaptation of social health services to provide quality care and equity. The adequacy of services involves recognizing the new requirements, the particularities of the risks and problems of this stage of life, comprehensive care, and even decent evidence-based on the end of life. In the presence of new problems and new goals, new skills, new work scenarios and an information system that improve the efficiency and quality of interventions are required

  8. Mental health policy in Kenya -an integrated approach to scaling up equitable care for poor populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Rachel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although most donor and development agency attention is focussed on communicable diseases in Kenya, the importance of non-communicable diseases including mental health and mental illness is increasingly apparent, both in their own right and because of their influence on health, education and social goals. Mental illness is common but the specialist service is extremely sparse and primary care is struggling to cope with major health demands. Non health sectors e.g. education, prisons, police, community development, gender and children, regional administration and local government have significant concerns about mental health, but general health programmes have been surprisingly slow to appreciate the significance of mental health for physical health targets. Despite a people centred post colonial health delivery system, poverty and global social changes have seriously undermined equity. This project sought to meet these challenges, aiming to introduce sustainable mental health policy and implementation across the country, within the context of extremely scarce resources. Methods A multi-faceted and comprehensive programme which combined situation appraisal to inform planning, sustained intersectoral policy dialogue at national and regional level; establishment of a health sector system for coordination, supervision and training of at each level (national, regional, district and primary care; development workshops; production of toolkits, development of guidelines and standards; encouragement of intersectoral liaison at national, regional, district and local levels; public education; and integration of mental health into health management systems. Results The programme has achieved detailed situation appraisal, epidemiological needs assessment, inclusion of mental health into the health sector reform plans, and into the National Package of Essential Health Interventions, annual operational plans, mental health policy guidelines

  9. Managed care in Latin America: the new common sense in health policy reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriart, C; Merhy, E E; Waitzkin, H

    2001-04-01

    This article presents the results of the comparative research project, "Managed Care in Latin America: Its Role in Health System Reform." Conducted by teams in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, and the United States, the study focused on the exportation of managed care, especially from the United States, and its adoption in Latin American countries. Our research methods included qualitative and quantitative techniques. The adoption of managed care reflects the process of transnationalization in the health sector. Our findings demonstrate the entrance of the main multinational corporations of finance capital into the private sector of insurance and health services, and these corporations' intention to assume administrative responsibilities for state institutions and to secure access to medical social security funds. International lending agencies, especially the World Bank, support the corporatization and privatization of health care services, as a condition of further loans to Latin American countries. We conclude that this process of change, which involves the gradual adoption of managed care as an officially favored policy, reflects ideologically based discourses that accept the inexorable nature of managed care reforms.

  10. [2013: The Seville document on consensus on the alternatives to allogenic blood transfusion. Update to the Seville document. Spanish Societies of Anaesthesiology (SEDAR), Haematology and Haemotherapy (SEHH), Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH), Critical Care Medicine (SEMICYUC), Thrombosis and Haemostasis (SETH) and Blood Transfusion (SETS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Noval, S R; Muñoz, M; Asuero, M; Contreras, E; García-Erce, J A; Llau, J V; Moral, V; Páramo, J A; Quintana, M

    2013-01-01

    As allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is not harmless, multiple alternatives to TSA (AABT) have emerged, but there is a huge variability with respect to their indications and appropriate use. This variability results from the interplay of a number of factors, which include physicians specialty, knowledge and preferences, degree of anaemia, transfusion policy, and AABT availability. Since the ABBT are not harmless and may not meet costeffectiveness criteria, such avariability is unacceptable. The Spanish Societies of Anaesthesiology (SEDAR), Haematology and Haemotherapy (SEHH), Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH), Critical Care Medicine (SEMICYUC), Thrombosis and Haemostasis (SETH) and Blood Transfusion (SETS) have developed a Consensus Document for the proper use of AABTs. A panel of experts convened by these six Societies have conducted a systematic review of the medical literature and developed the «2013. Seville Document of Consensus on Alternatives to Allogeneic Blood Transfusion», which only considers those AABT aimed to decrease the transfusion of packed red cells. The AABTs are defined as any pharmacological and non-pharmacological measure aimed to decrease the transfusion of of red blood cell concentrates, while preserving the patient safety. For each AABT, the main question is formulated, positively or negatively, as: «Does or does not this particular AABT reduce the transfusion rate?» All the recommendations on the use of AABTs were formulated according to the GRADE (Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology.

  11. Ethnocentrism is an unacceptable rationale for health care policy: a critique of transplant tourism position statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R W

    2008-06-01

    Medical tourism has emerged as a global health care phenomenon, valued at $60 billion worldwide in 2006. Transplant tourism, unlike other more benign forms of medical tourism, has become a flashpoint within the transplant community, underscoring the uneasy relationships among science, religion, politics, ethics and international health care policies concerning the commercialization of transplantation. Numerous professional associations have drafted or issued position statements condemning transplant tourism. Often the criticism is misdirected. The real issue concerns both the source and circumstances surrounding the procurement of donor organs, including commercialization. Unfortunately, many of the position statements circulated to date represent an ethnocentric and decidedly western view of transplantation. As such, the merits of culturally insensitive policy statements issued by otherwise well-intended transplant professionals, and the organizations they represent, must be evaluated within the broader context of foreign relations and diplomacy, as well as cultural and ethical relativity. Having done so, many persons may find themselves reluctant to endorse statements that have produced a misleading social desirability bias, which, to a great extent, has impeded more thoughtful and inclusive deliberations on the issues. Therefore, instead of taking an official position on policy matters concerning the commercial aspects of transplantation, international professional associations should offer culturally respectful guidance.

  12. Three policy issues in deciding the cost of nursing home care: provincial differences and how they influence elderly couples' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnyk, Robin L

    2009-08-01

    Nursing home care is subsidized in all Canadian provinces, but residents must personally contribute to the cost. This paper explores policy issues that have led to differences in costs of nursing home care among provinces, and how policy and cost differences influence the experiences of married couples when one spouse requires nursing home care. The paper is based on a multiple-case study of three Canadian provinces, each of which had a different system for determining personal contributions to the cost of care. Cross-case analysis of payment systems showed that provinces addressed three main policy issues in determining the cost of care: (a) what costs should be the responsibility of nursing home residents, (b) how subsidies should be determined and (c) how community-dwelling spouses of nursing home residents should be assured of an adequate income. In provinces with policies that resulted in higher care costs to couples and lower amounts of income and assets available to the community-dwelling spouses, study participants described reduced discretionary spending, increased financial concerns and perceptions of system unfairness. This paper discusses the implications of these three policy issues and recent related changes to provincial policies.

  13. Child protection and out of home care: Policy, practice, and research connectionsAustralia and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an outline of the early development of care and protection in Australia and New Zealand as a backdrop to an overview of child protection systems and policies and the current childprotection profile in both countries. Key issues that have become the focus of policy reform are canvassed and legislative and policy initiatives to promote child safety as well as strengthen families are elaborated. An overview of trends in relation to out of home care, including routes into care, care arrangements and permanency policies is provided. The article profiles selected research studies from Australia focusing on outcomes of care: stability of care, mental health and educational outcomes of looked after children, abuse in care, and routes out of care through reunification and aging out. Other issues treated are the overrepresentation of indigenous children in care systems in both countries and the challenges of maintaining cultural connections. The article concludes with a brief comparative analysis identifying similarities and differences in child welfare systems in both countries.

  14. Policy Measures to Support Palliative Care at Home: A Cross-Country Case Comparison in Three European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetens, Arno; Beernaert, Kim; Deliens, Luc; Aubry, Régis; Radbruch, Lukas; Cohen, Joachim

    2017-07-21

    The proportion of people in need of palliative care worldwide is rising, and the majority wish to receive this care at home. Many countries have created policy measures to support palliative care at home. To list and compare existing policy measures designed to support palliative care at home in addition to available primary care services in Belgium, France, and Germany. A cross-country case comparison based on expert consultation, governmental policy documents, and relevant scientific literature. All three countries have policy measures that allow informal caregivers to adapt their working patterns or take leave of absence to provide care without losing employee rights; however, only Belgium offers specific paid palliative care leave. All three countries offer various allowances to people who are dying at home and their caregivers. Cost-reductions for out-of-pocket expenses are available, based on the level of care dependency in Germany and on prognosis in Belgium, but are not provided in France. Mobile home support teams exist in all three countries and are free of charge for patients and caregivers; but only in Belgium and Germany, there are specialist multidisciplinary palliative home care teams. Belgium and Germany provide respite care for palliative patients. European countries with similar contextual characteristics offer comparable policy measures to support palliative care at home in addition to the available primary care services. However, important differences exist in the criteria for access and the extent of what is offered. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Child Care Subsidy Policies and Practices: Implications for Child Care Providers. New Federalism: Issues and Options for States, Series A. Assessing the New Federalism: An Urban Institute Program To Assess Changing Social Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gina; Snyder, Kathleen; Tout, Kathryn

    This brief summarizes the report "Essential but Often Ignored: Child Care Providers in the Subsidy System," examining child care subsidy policies and practices shaping experiences of providers serving subsidized children, particularly those affecting providers' payments and their overall experience with the subsidy system. Research on the voucher…

  16. Preferences on policy options for ensuring the financial sustainability of health care services in the future: results of a stakeholder survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordrup, David; Angelis, Aris; Kanavos, Panos

    2013-12-01

    highest preference was for policies to modify lifestyle and implement more extensive screening within risk groups for high burden illnesses. There was a broad consensus not to reallocate resources from social security/education. Between stakeholders, there were differences of opinion between industry/advisory and a range of other groups, with industry being generally more in favour of market-based interventions and an increased role for the private sector in health care financing/delivery. Conversely, stakeholders from academia, government, national health services and insurance were relatively more in favour of more restrictive purchasing of new and expensive technologies, and (to varying extent) of higher income/corporate taxes. Taxes on cigarettes/alcohol were by far considered the most politically feasible option. According to this study, policy options that are broadly acceptable across stakeholder groups with different inherent interests exist but are limited to lifestyle modification, screening interventions and excise taxes on harmful products. Representatives from the private sector tend to view solutions rooted in the private sector as both effective and politically feasible options, while stakeholders from academia and the public sector seem to place more emphasis on solutions that do not disproportionately impact certain population groups.

  17. Of honey and health policy: the limits of sweet, sticky substances in reforming primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    It is a well-known axiom that one attracts more flies with honey than vinegar. Nowhere has this approach been taken more to heart than in the past decade of primary care policy in Canada. Governments, physician and nursing organizations and regional health authorities have invested in a lot of "honey" to draw healthcare providers onto a path from single-physician offices to team-based care with flexible hours and a population-based approach. In the lead essay for this edition of Healthcare Papers, Kates and colleagues have outlined a framework that embraces this paradigm. Their articulation of a framework is a place to start, but it can only be a start. To make that framework come alive, a wider variety of policy tools will be needed than have been used thus far, and by a wider variety of actors. Within the healthcare workforce itself, leadership, vision and the courage to hold ourselves to account for changes to primary care are needed.

  18. Policies and guidelines outside the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry: influencing oral health care for persons with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keels, Martha Ann

    2007-01-01

    Organizations other than the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) have produced policies and guidelines regarding oral health care for persons with special health care needs (PSHCN). These organizations may be classified as: (1) educational groups; (2) legislative groups; (3) research-oriented groups; (4) industry groups; and (5) parent support groups. The other dental organization heavily advocating for oral health for PSHCN is the Special Care Dentistry Association. Diagnosis-based associations, such as the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasia, also provide caregiver and patient support. Legislative agendas at the state and federal levels are aimed at improving the oral health of PSHCN. The purpose of this paper is to review the policies and guidelines outside AAPD influencing oral health care for PSHCN. AAPD should be aware of these activities and develop such policies in concert with other organizations where feasible.

  19. The State of Diabetes Prevention Policy in the USA Following the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konchak, Juleigh Nowinski; Moran, Margaret R; O'Brien, Matthew J; Kandula, Namratha R; Ackermann, Ronald T

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a major public health problem in the USA, affecting over 12 % of American adults and imposing considerable health and economic burden on individuals and society. There is a strong evidence base demonstrating that lifestyle behavioral changes and some medications can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in high risk adults, and several policy and healthcare system changes motivated by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) have the potential to accelerate diabetes prevention. In this narrative review, we (1) offer a conceptual framework for organizing how the ACA may influence diabetes prevention efforts at the level of individuals, healthcare providers, and health systems; (2) highlight ACA provisions at each of these levels that could accelerate type 2 diabetes prevention nationwide; and (3) explore possible policy gaps and opportunity areas for future research and action.

  20. Education and Health: a necessary dialogue policies of comprehensive care for people with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelma Alves Marques Pintor

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to reflect on the importance of dialogue between education and health, basic thought of as public policy in the context of comprehensive care to people with disabilities. These findings emphasize the difficulty faced by these areas to establish a dialogue that results in convergent planning intersectoral action for health promotion, quality of life and social and educational inclusion of disabled people, especially the mentally handicapped. Based on studies of Brazilian authors seek to clarify some facts that underscore the need for dialogue and do not justify the perpetuation of the gap between these fields of knowledge. Presents the partial results of an experience of intersectionality between these areas in the municipal schools of Niterói (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil with students with disabilities, which stresses the absence of a culture of popular participation in local public policies.

  1. Foster Care Dynamics and System Science: Implications for Research and Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Wulczyn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Although system is a word frequently invoked in discussions of foster care policy and practice, there have been few if any attempts by child welfare researchers to understand the ways in which the foster care system is a system. As a consequence, insights from system science have yet to be applied in meaningful ways to the problem of making foster care systems more effective. In this study, we draw on population biology to organize a study of admissions and discharges to foster care over a 15-year period. We are interested specifically in whether resource constraints, which are conceptualized here as the number of beds, lead to a coupling of admissions and discharges within congregate care. The results, which are descriptive in nature, are consistent with theory that ties admissions and discharges together because of a resource constraint. From the data, it is clear that the underlying system exerts an important constraint on what are normally viewed as individual-level decisions. Our discussion calls on extending efforts to understand the role of system science in studies of child welfare systems, with a particular emphasis on the role of feedback as a causal influence.

  2. The policy and politics of the 2015 long-term care reform in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarse, J A M Hans; Jeurissen, P P Patrick

    2016-03-01

    As of 2015 a major reform in LTC is taking place in the Netherlands. An important objective of the reform is to reign in expenditure growth to safeguard the fiscal sustainability of LTC. Other objectives are to improve the quality of LTC by making it more client-tailored. The reform consists of four interrelated pillars: a normative reorientation, a shift from residential to non-residential care, decentralization of non-residential care and expenditure cuts. The article gives a brief overview of these pillars and their underlying assumptions. Furthermore, attention is paid to the political decision-making process and the politics of implementation and evaluation. Perceptions of the effects of the reform so far widely differ: positive views alternate with critical views. Though the reform is radical in various aspects, LTC care will remain a largely publicly funded provision. A statutory health insurance scheme will remain in place to cover residential care. The role of municipalities in publicly funded non-residential care is significantly upgraded. The final section contains a few policy lessons.

  3. Policy Statement--Using personal health records to improve the quality of health care for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    A personal health record (PHR) is a repository of information from multiple contributors (eg, patient, family, guardians, physicians, and other health care professionals) regarding the health of an individual. The development of electronic PHRs presents new opportunities and challenges to the practice of pediatrics. This policy statement provides recommendations for actions that pediatricians can take to support the development and use of PHRs for children. Pediatric health care professionals must become actively involved in developing and adopting PHRs and PHR systems. The American Academy of Pediatrics supports development of: educational programs for families and clinicians on effective and efficient use of PHRs; incentives to facilitate PHR use and maintenance; and child- and adolescent-friendly standards for PHR content, portability, security, and privacy. Properly designed PHR systems for pediatric care can empower patients. PHRs can improve access to health information, improve coordination of preventive health and health maintenance activities, and support emergency and disaster management activities. PHRs provide support for the medical home for all children, including those with special health care needs and those in foster care. PHRs can also provide information to serve as the basis for pediatric quality improvement efforts. For PHRs to be adopted sufficiently to realize these benefits, we must determine how best to support their development and adoption. Privacy and security issues, especially with regard to children and adolescents, must be addressed.

  4. Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Susan N.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Saelens, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies. PMID:22218842

  5. Psychiatric expansionism and social control: the intersectioin of community care and state policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schissel, B

    1997-12-01

    Informed by the theories of political economy and professional interests, this research argues that psychiatric commitments to community care and to scientific categorization have contributed to expanding control of the mentally ill, and that these ideological commitments run parallel to and are exacerbated by state responses to macro-economic conditions. Time series analysis of the period from 1932 to 1975 is used to assess the relative impact of deinstitutionalization, medical entrenchment, and state fiscal policy on psychiatric expansionism. The findings demonstrate that a professional interests explanation (indicated by a commitment to community and to science) provides a significant contribution to a materialist-based explanation of expanding psychiatric control.

  6. Reproductive rights and the medical care system: a plea for rational health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, P A; Wagner, M G

    1993-01-01

    Recently, there have been many challenges to women's reproductive rights and freedoms: court-ordered cesarean sections; criminal cases against women for prenatal child abuse; and attempts to limit the practice of mid-wifery, home birth, and the operation of alternative birth centers. In these cases, medicine has been complicit or proactive in attempts to control the behavior or health care options of pregnant women. We discuss medicine's role as an agent of social control, the medical reconstruction of problems that are social in nature, and the need for a more coherent policy framework to guide physician practices.

  7. Policy barriers to health care access fuel discriminatory treatment: the role of Promotoras in overcoming malos tratos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Tania L; Ramirez, Mariana A; Capitman, John A

    2012-01-01

    This article demonstrates that policy barriers resulting in access to health care inequities were significantly decreased by 2 Promotora interventions for 416 legal and undocumented Latino immigrants in the California Central Valley. Promotoras conducted baseline/follow-up assessments and referrals/phone-calls/visits during a 3-month period. In-depth interviews with Promotoras and a policy analysis on policy-driven access programs were carried out. Access to care was significantly increased between legal and undocumented immigrant from baseline to follow-up. Systemic barriers to access (malos tratos) reflected on personal barriers such as affordability of care. Promotoras help participants overcome barriers but do not change the policies determining access and procedures.

  8. The influence of hospital drug formulary policies on the prescribing patterns of proton pump inhibitors in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Due; Schou, Mette; Kristiansen, Anja Sparre

    2014-01-01

    AIM: This study had two aims: Firstly, to describe how prescriptions for proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in primary care were influenced by a change of the hospital drug policy, and secondly, to describe if a large discount on an expensive PPI (esomeprazole) to a hospital would influence prescribing...... policy on prescribings in primary care was measured by the likelihood of having a high-cost PPI prescribed before and after change of drug policy. RESULTS: In total, 9,341 hospital stays in 2009 and 2010 were included. The probability of a patient to be prescribed an expensive PPI after discharge...... for the recommended PPIs pantoprazole and lansoprazole to 14.6 and 26.1 %, respectively. The effect of a large discount on expensive PPI to hospital was 14.7 %, and this decreased to 2.6 % when coordinating drug policy in hospital and primary care. CONCLUSION: The likelihood of having an expensive PPI prescribed...

  9. Developing a Consensus-based Definition of "Kokoro-no Care" or Mental Health Services and Psychosocial Support: Drawing from Experiences of Mental Health Professionals Who Responded to the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuriko; Fukasawa, Maiko; Nakajima, Satomi; Narisawa, Tomomi; Keiko, Asano; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-29

    In this survey, we aimed to build consensus and gather opinions on 'Kokoro-no care' or mental health services and psychosocial support (MHSPSS) after a disaster, among mental health professionals who engaged in care after the Great East Japan Earthquake. We recruited mental health professionals who engaged in support activities after the Great East Japan Earthquake, which included local health professionals in the affected areas and members of mental health care teams dispatched from outside (n = 131). Adopting the Delphi process, we proposed a definition of 'Kokoro-no care', and asked the participants to rate the appropriateness on a 5-point Likert scale. We also solicited free comments based on the participants' experiences during the disaster. After Round 1, we presented the summary statistics and comments, and asked the participants to re-rate the definition that had been modified based on their comments. This process was repeated twice, until the consensus criterion of ≥ 80% of the participants scoring ≥ 4 on the statement was fulfilled. In Round 1, 68.7% of the respondents rated the proposed definition ≥ 4 for its appropriateness, and 88.4% did so in Round 2. The comments were grouped into categories (and subcategories) based on those related to the definition in general (Appropriate, Continuum of MHSPSS, Cautions in operation, Alternative categorisation of care components, Whether the care component should be categorised according to the professional involved, Ambiguous use of psychology, and Others), to mental health services (Appropriate, More specification within mental health services, More explicit remarks on mental health services, and Others), and to psychosocial support (Whether the care component should be categorised according to the professional involved, Raising concerns about the terms, and Others), and others. We achieved a consensus on the definition of 'Kokoro-no care', and systematically obtained suggestions on the concept, and

  10. [Connections between fiscal federalism and the funding of the Brazilian health care policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Luciana Dias

    2007-01-01

    In the Brazilian society's context of meager financial resources for health care, associated with structural features of fiscal federalism and with the current model of funding transfers for the Unified Health System's (SUS), important inequities directly impact political negotiations and the deployment of federal financing alternatives which are not directly linked to the supply and production of health care activities and services by states and municipalities. We observed that health policies, since the second half of the nineties, have developed their own mechanisms that, in the above mentioned context, tend to accommodate different interests and federative conflicts generated by structural factors and by institutional rules. However, the absence of an integrated planning program between the criteria to establish resource redistribution for financing the Unified Health System and the Brazilian Federation's fiscal sharing system, end up reinforcing certain asymmetric patterns and generating new imbalances, making the compensation of inequities difficult in public health spending at the sub-national domain.

  11. At-risk drinking in an HMO primary care sample: prevalence and health policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, M F; Manwell, L B; Barry, K L; Johnson, K

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to determine the prevalence of at-risk drinking using varying alcohol use criteria. METHODS: A period prevalence survey was conducted in 22 primary care practices (n = 19372 adults). RESULTS: The frequency of at-risk alcohol use varied from 7.5% (World Health Organization criteria) to 19.7% (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism criteria). A stepwise logistic model using National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism criteria found male gender, current tobacco use, never married status, retirement, and unemployment to be significant predictors of at-risk alcohol use. CONCLUSIONS: Public health policy needs to move to a primary care paradigm focusing on identification and treatment of at-risk drinkers. PMID:9584040

  12. A systematic review of care delivery models and economic analyses in lymphedema: health policy impact (2004-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, N L; Weiss, R; Feldman, J L; Stewart, B R; Armer, J M; Cormier, J N; Shih, Y-C T

    2013-03-01

    A project of the American Lymphedema Framework Project (ALFP), this review seeks to examine the policy and economic impact of caring for patients with lymphedema, a common side effect of cancer treatment. This review is the first of its kind undertaken to investigate, coordinate, and streamline lymphedema policy initiatives in the United States with potential applicability worldwide. As part of a large scale literature review aiming to systematically evaluate the level of evidence of contemporary peer-reviewed lymphedema literature (2004 to 2011), publications on care delivery models, health policy, and economic impact were retrieved, summarized, and evaluated by a team of investigators and clinical experts. The review substantiates lymphedema education models and clinical models implemented at the community, health care provider, and individual level that improve delivery of care. The review exposes the lack of economic analysis related to lymphedema. Despite a dearth of evidence, efforts towards policy initiatives at the federal and state level are underway. These initiatives and the evidence to support them are examined and recommendations for translating these findings into clinical practice are made. Medical and community-based disease management interventions, taking on a public approach, are effective delivery models for lymphedema care and demonstrate great potential to improve cancer survivorship care. Efforts to create policy at the federal, state, and local level should target implementation of these models. More research is needed to identify costs associated with the treatment of lymphedema and to model the cost outlays and potential cost savings associated with comprehensive management of chronic lymphedema.

  13. High quality care and ethical pay-for-performance: a Society of General Internal Medicine policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharam, J Frank; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Farber, Neil J; Sinsky, Christine; Rucker, Lisa; Rask, Kimberly J; Figaro, M Kathleen; Braddock, Clarence; Barry, Michael J; Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2009-07-01

    Pay-for-performance is proliferating, yet its impact on key stakeholders remains uncertain. The Society of General Internal Medicine systematically evaluated ethical issues raised by performance-based physician compensation. We conclude that current arrangements are based on fundamentally acceptable ethical principles, but are guided by an incomplete understanding of health-care quality. Furthermore, their implementation without evidence of safety and efficacy is ethically precarious because of potential risks to stakeholders, especially vulnerable patients. We propose four major strategies to transition from risky pay-for-performance systems to ethical performance-based physician compensation and high quality care. These include implementing safeguards within current pay-for-performance systems, reaching consensus regarding the obligations of key stakeholders in improving health-care quality, developing valid and comprehensive measures of health-care quality, and utilizing a cautious evaluative approach in creating the next generation of compensation systems that reward genuine quality.

  14. Early Childhood Care and Education and Other Family Policies and Programs in South-East Asia. Early Childhood and Family Policy Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerman, Sheila B.

    This report describes early childhood care and education (ECCE) and other family support policies and programs in seven southeast Asian countries: Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. The report draws primarily on background country reports prepared by officials in these countries to focus on the context in…

  15. There is little experience and limited data to support policy making on integrated care for dual eligibles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Marsha R; Jacobson, Gretchen A; Garfield, Rachel L

    2012-06-01

    Coordinating care for the nine million elderly or disabled and low-income people who are dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid is a pressing policy issue. To support the debate over this issue, we synthesized public data on how services are provided to dual eligibles receiving covered benefits in both programs. Our analysis confirmed that most dual-eligible beneficiaries receive benefits separately for each program through fee-for-service arrangements. Their enrollment in Medicare and Medicaid managed care is growing but still low, with highly uneven experiences across states. Few states or health plans have experience with coordinating care for dual eligibles within an integrated plan. These findings reinforce the need for caution in considering policies that would rapidly give states the responsibility for coordinating dual eligibles' care and coverage. We also found data gaps that warrant prompt attention in order to provide national-level oversight and improve the evidence base for debating and tracking policy changes.

  16. Engaging Consumer Voices in Health Care Policy: Lessons for Social Work Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Kristi Lohmeier; Saunders, A

    2016-02-01

    Community health centers provide comprehensive public health care in some of the most disadvantaged communities in the United States. To ensure that health centers meet the needs of their consumers, they uniquely engage them in their organizational decision-making and policy-development processes by requiring that their boards of directors encompass a 51 percent consumer majority. To understand the quality of board members' experiences, a critical ethnography was conducted using Arnstein's ladder of citizen participation and the socioecological model as a framework. The analysis identified multiple influences on the quality of participation among consumer members. Findings also confirm other research that has found that knowledge of the economic, political, and cultural factors surrounding the context of the individual health center is important to understanding meaningful participation. The experience is important to understand given the shift driven by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 in health care, which emphasizes a patient-entered model of care. Social work practitioners and others in the public health arena interested in empowering consumers to have a role in the provision of services need to understand the impact of each of these areas'and the experience of this unique sample of health center board members.

  17. Interpretive policy analysis: Marshallese COFA migrants and the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElfish, Pearl Anna; Purvis, Rachel S; Maskarinec, Gregory G; Bing, Williamina Ioanna; Jacob, Christopher J; Ritok-Lakien, Mandy; Rubon-Chutaro, Jellesen; Lang, Sharlynn; Mamis, Sammie; Riklon, Sheldon

    2016-06-11

    Since the enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the rate of uninsured in the United States has declined significantly. However, not all legal residents have benefited equally. As part of a community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership with the Marshallese community, an interpretative policy analysis research project was conducted to document Marshallese Compact of Free Association (COFA) migrants' understanding and experiences regarding the ACA and related health policies. This article is structured to allow the voice of Marshallese COFA migrants to explain their understanding and interpretation of the ACA and related polices on their health in their own words. Qualitative data was collected from 48 participants in five focus groups conducted at the local community center and three individual interviews for those unable to attend the focus groups. Marshallese community co-investigators participated throughout the research and writing process to ensure that cultural context and nuances in meaning were accurately captured and presented. Community co-investigators assisted with the development of the semi-structured interview guide, facilitated focus groups, and participated in qualitative data analysis. Content analysis revealed six consistent themes across all focus groups and individual interviews that include: understanding, experiences, effect on health, relational/historical lenses, economic contribution, and pleas. Working with Marshallese community co-investigators, we selected quotations that most represented the participants' collective experiences. The Marshallese view the ACA and their lack of coverage as part of the broader relationship between the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) and the United States. The Marshallese state that they have honored the COFA relationship, and they believe the United States is failing to meet its obligations of care and support outlined in the COFA. While the ACA and Medicaid Expansion have reduced

  18. [Consensus on competencies for advanced nursing practice in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Fullana, Pedro; De Pedro-Gómez, Joan E; Bennasar-Veny, Miquel; Fernández-Domínguez, Juan C; Sesé-Abad, Albert J; Morales-Asencio, José M

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of international consensus on the exact definition and core competencies of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, a problem particularly acute in our national context due to the lack of APN role development, which has a significantly short history in our country. The main objective of this paper was the delineation of the competence framework for Advanced Practice Nurses in our national context based on expert consensus through the Delphi method Based on a preliminary literature review process, a conglomerate of 17 domains of competence (clusters of related competencies) were identified. This initial set was revised, refined and validated by a group of expert panellists on the subject (clinicians, researchers, managers, and teachers) through successive rounds in search of a suitable consensus on each of the various proposed items The results helped to establish a solid foundation in the form of a skills map that could identify those sets of more specific competencies for advanced practice roles, regardless of regulatory and professional practice context, identifying domains such as Research and Evidence Based Practice, Clinical and Professional Leadership, or Care Management This set of skills related to advanced practice roles in our environment can delineate competency standards common to this level of nursing practice, and serve as a reference for policy development, a review of roles, or the establishment of academic profiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. The adult day care workforce in England at a time of policy change: implications for learning disability support services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Shereen; Manthorpe, Jill

    2010-06-01

    More people will receive personal budgets to pay for social care services in England. Such people may or may not continue using services such as adult day care centres. Many day centres are under threat of closure. These trends will affect those working in adult day care. This article examines the profile of this workforce, using recent NMDS-SC data and applying multinomial statistical modelling. We identified nearly 6000 adult day care workers, over half supporting adults with learning disability. The results of the analysis show significant variations between the adult day care, residential care and domiciliary workforces. At the personal level, day care workers are significantly older and less ethnically diverse than other workers. They tend to have been working in the sector for longer, and their work patterns are more stable. The findings are discussed within the context of policy changes affecting learning disabilities and social care workforce strategies.

  20. Consensus theoretic classification methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benediktsson, Jon A.; Swain, Philip H.

    1992-01-01

    Consensus theory is adopted as a means of classifying geographic data from multiple sources. The foundations and usefulness of different consensus theoretic methods are discussed in conjunction with pattern recognition. Weight selections for different data sources are considered and modeling of non-Gaussian data is investigated. The application of consensus theory in pattern recognition is tested on two data sets: 1) multisource remote sensing and geographic data and 2) very-high-dimensional remote sensing data. The results obtained using consensus theoretic methods are found to compare favorably with those obtained using well-known pattern recognition methods. The consensus theoretic methods can be applied in cases where the Gaussian maximum likelihood method cannot. Also, the consensus theoretic methods are computationally less demanding than the Gaussian maximum likelihood method and provide a means for weighting data sources differently.

  1. What is the evidence base for public involvement in health-care policy?: results of a systematic scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Annalijn; Morris, Zoë; Nolte, Ellen

    2015-04-01

    Public involvement in health-care policy has been advocated as a means to enhance health system responsiveness, yet evidence for its impact has been difficult to ascertain. To review the peer-reviewed empirical evidence on outcomes of public involvement in health-care policy. We systematically searched PsychINFO and PubMed from November 2000 to April 2010 for empirical studies that reported on original research only; studies in languages other than English, German or French were excluded. Data were extracted using a standardized evidence table with a priori determined headings. Nineteen studies were identified as eligible for inclusion in our review. We found that sound empirical evidence of the outcomes of public involvement activities in health care remains underdeveloped. The concept and the indicators used to examine and determine outcomes remain poorly specified and inconsistent, as does the reporting of the evidence. There was some evidence for the developmental role of public involvement, such as enhancing awareness, understanding and competencies among lay participants. Evidence for instrumental benefits of public involvement initiatives was less well documented. Despite the growing body of work on public involvement in health-care policy, evidence of its impact remains scarce; thus, firm conclusions about involvement activities that are appropriate and effective for policy development are difficult to draw. However, focus on outcomes risks missing the normative argument that involving the public in the health-care policy process may be seen to be of intrinsic value. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. How do high cost-sharing policies for physician care affect inpatient care use and costs among people with chronic disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Haichang

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly rising health care costs continue to be a significant concern in the United States. High cost-sharing strategies thus have been widely used to address rising health care costs. Since high cost-sharing policies can reduce needed care as well as unneeded care use, it raises the concern whether these policies for physician care are a good strategy for controlling costs among chronically ill patients, especially whether utilization and costs in inpatient care will increase in response. This study examined whether high cost sharing in physician care affects inpatient care utilization and costs differently between individuals with and without chronic conditions. Findings from this study will contribute to the insurance benefit design that can control care utilization and save costs of chronically ill individuals. Prior studies suffered from gaps that limit both internal validity and external validity of their findings. This study has its unique contributions by filling these gaps jointly. The study used data from the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative sample, with a cross-sectional study design. Instrumental variable technique was used to address the endogeneity between health care utilization and cost-sharing levels. We used negative binomial regression to analyze the count data and generalized linear models for costs data. To account for national survey sampling design, weight and variance were adjusted. The study compared the effects of high cost-sharing policies on inpatient care utilization and costs between individuals with and without chronic conditions to answer the research question. The final study sample consisted of 4523 individuals; among them, 752 had hospitalizations. The multivariate analysis demonstrated consistent patterns. Compared with low cost-sharing policies, high cost-sharing policies for physician care were not associated with a greater increase in inpatient care utilization (P = .86 for chronically ill

  3. Embryonic Stem Cell Research: A Policy Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Hermine

    Many health care issues generate minimal passion, promoting benign commentary and support from the various stakeholders involved. Stem cell research does not fall into this category, and on the contrary, embryonic stem cell (ESC) research has continued to foster controversy and emotion. Since 1998, which marked the first successful laboratory isolation of ESCs, this research continues to ignite moral, ethical, and legal debate over its efficacy. The focus of this policy analysis is to introduce the issues, examine and address the various perspectives that surround ESC research, and present policy options and/or solutions that may be used to successfully create a policy consensus regarding this much debated topic.

  4. Nutrition and physical activity in child care centers: the impact of a wellness policy initiative on environment and policy assessment and observation outcomes, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyn, Rodney; Maalouf, Joyce; Evers, Sarah; Davis, Justin; Griffin, Monica

    2013-05-23

    The child care environment has emerged as an ideal setting in which to implement policies that promote healthy body weight of children. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a wellness policy and training program on the physical activity and nutrition environment in 24 child care centers in Georgia. We used the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation instrument to identify changes to foods served, staff behaviors, and physical activity opportunities. Observations were performed over 1 day, beginning with breakfast and concluding when the program ended for the day. Observations were conducted from February 2010 through April 2011 for a total of 2 observations in each center. Changes to nutrition and physical activity in centers were assessed on the basis of changes in scores related to the physical activity and nutrition environment documented in the observations. Paired t test analyses were performed to determine significance of changes. Significant improvements to total nutrition (P environments of centers by enhancing active play (P = .02), the sedentary environment (P = .005), the portable environment (P = .002), staff behavior (P = .004), and physical activity training and education (P environment (P < .001), and nutrition training and education (P < .001). Findings from this study suggest that implementing wellness policies and training caregivers in best practices for physical activity and nutrition can promote healthy weight for young children in child care settings.

  5. Mandates for Collaboration: Health Care and Child Welfare Policy and Practice Reforms Create the Platform for Improved Health for Children in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnik, Sarah; Wilson, Leigh; Scribano, Philip; Wood, Joanne N; Noonan, Kathleen

    2015-10-01

    Improving the health of children in foster care requires close collaboration between pediatrics and the child welfare system. Propelled by recent health care and child welfare policy reforms, there is a strong foundation for more accountable, collaborative models of care. Over the last 2 decades health care reforms have driven greater accountability in outcomes, access to care, and integrated services for children in foster care. Concurrently, changes in child welfare legislation have expanded the responsibility of child welfare agencies in ensuring child health. Bolstered by federal legislation, numerous jurisdictions are developing innovative cross-system workforce and payment strategies to improve health care delivery and health care outcomes for children in foster care, including: (1) hiring child welfare medical directors, (2) embedding nurses in child welfare agencies, (3) establishing specialized health care clinics, and (4) developing tailored child welfare managed care organizations. As pediatricians engage in cross-system efforts, they should keep in mind the following common elements to enhance their impact: embed staff with health expertise within child welfare settings, identify long-term sustainable funding mechanisms, and implement models for effective information sharing. Now is an opportune time for pediatricians to help strengthen health care provision for children involved with child welfare. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Health care for immigrants in Europe: is there still consensus among country experts about principles of good practice? A Delphi study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devillé, Walter; Greacen, Tim; Bogic, Marija;

    2011-01-01

    and values of professionals working in different health care contexts and in different European countries as to what constitutes good practice in health care for immigrants. Methods: A total of 134 experts in 16 EU Member States participated in a three-round Delphi process. The experts represented four...... to 16 factors being identified as the most important for each participating country. All 186 factors were aggregated into 9 themes: (1) easy and equal access to health care, (2) empowerment of migrants, (3) culturally sensitive health care services, (4) quality of care, (5) patient/health care provider...

  7. Research-Informed Policy Options for Infant and Toddler Early Care and Education: Research-to-Policy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    This Research-to-Policy Resource List compiles research-based policy documents published in 2010 and later on the following topics: Early learning guidelines for infants and toddlers; Program standards for settings serving infants and toddlers; Core competencies and credentials for caregivers of infants and toddlers; Use of infant/toddler…

  8. Between consensus and contestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weale, Albert

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - Noting that discussions of public participation and priority setting typically presuppose certain political theories of democracy, the purpose of this paper is to discuss two theories: the consensual and the agonistic. The distinction is illuminating when considering the difference between institutionalized public participation and contestatory participation. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is a theoretical reconstruction of two ways of thinking about public participation in relation to priority setting in health care, drawing on the work of Habermas, a deliberative theorist, and Mouffe, a theorist of agonism. Findings - The different theoretical approaches can be associated with different ways of understanding priority setting. In particular, agonistic democratic theory would understand priority setting as system of inclusions and exclusions rather than the determination of a consensus of social values, which is the typical deliberative way of thinking about the issues. Originality/value - The paper shows the value of drawing out explicitly the tacit assumptions of practices of political participation in order to reveal their scope and limitations. It suggests that making such theoretical presuppositions explicit has value for health services management in recognizing these implicit choices.

  9. The rise and fall of cash for care in Norway: changes in the use of child-care policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brita Bungum

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false NO-BOK X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} The cash-for-care scheme was introduced in 1998 in Norway. During the first period after its introduction, the percentage of users was high at 91 per cent. Since 2005, however, the use has decreased substantially year by year. Thus, the use of cash for care has changed over the 15 years it has existed. In this article we take these changes as our point of departure and analyse more closely what we might call ‘the rise and fall of the cash-for-care scheme’ in Norway. Over the last 15 to 20 years, Norway has become a multicultural society and we need to include ethnicity when conducting research in the field of family policy. The focus is therefore on the intersection of gender, class, and ethnicity in parents’ use of cash for care over this period. Our analysis is based on different sources of data. We have used data from the evaluative programme undertaken by the Norwegian Research Council, including two surveys conducted before and after the reform (Gulbrandsen & Hellevik, 1998; Hellevik, 2000, and a qualitative case study focusing on fathers and mothers working in three different workplaces (Bungum et al. 2001. We have also used three other statistical studies which were carried out at two different points in time (Pettersen

  10. Judicial Deference Allows European Consensus to Emerge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dothan, Shai

    2017-01-01

    conceived as competing doctrines: the more there is of one, the less there is of another. This paper suggests a novel rationale for the emerging consensus doctrine: the doctrine can allow the ECHR to make good policies by drawing on the independent decision-making of many similar countries. In light of that...

  11. What's public? What's private? Policy trade-offs and the debate over mandatory annual influenza vaccination for health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Catherine L

    2008-01-01

    Policy decisions about public health services differ from those for personal health services. Both require trade-offs between such policy goals as liberty, security, efficiency, and equity. In public health, however, decisions about who will approve, pay for, and deliver services are often accompanied by decisions on when and how to compel individual behaviour. Policy becomes complex because different stakeholders interpret evidence differently: stakeholders may assign different weights to policy goals and may even define the same goals differently. In the debate over mandatory annual influenza vaccination for health care workers, for example, proponents as well as opponents of mandatory vaccination may convey arguments in security terms. Those in favour of mandatory vaccination emphasize subclinical infections and duty of care (public security) while those opposed emphasize risk of adverse events (personal security). Proponents assert less worker absenteeism (efficiency) while opponents stress coercion and alternate personal infection control measures (liberty and individual rights/responsibilities). Consequently, stakeholders talk past each other. Determining the place of mandatory influenza vaccination for health care workers thus demands reconciling policy trade-offs and clarifying the underlying disputes hidden in the language of the policy debate.

  12. Incomplete Markets and Imperfect Institutions: Some Challenges Posed by Trust for Contemporary Health Care and Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Mark; Gray, Bradford H

    2016-08-01

    As contemporary health policy promotes evidence-based practices using targeted incentives, policy makers may lose track of vital aspects of care that are difficult to measure. For more than a half century, scholars have recognized that these latter aspects play a crucial role in high-quality care and equitable health system performance but depend on the potentially frail reed of providers' trustworthiness: that is, their commitment to facets and outcomes of care not easily assessed by external parties. More recently, early experience with pay for performance in health settings suggests that enhancing financial rewards for the measurable undermines providers' commitment to the unmeasurable, degrading the trustworthiness of their practices. Reformers have looked to revised professional norms or reorganized practice arrangements to bolster the intrinsic motivations required for trustworthiness. We suggest here that these responses are likely to prove inadequate. We propose that they be complemented by a renewed policy-making commitment to nonprofit ownership among health care providers, insurers, and integrated delivery systems. We identify some of the concerns raised in the past with ownership-based policies and propose a set of responses. If these are pursued in combination, they hold the promise of a sustainable ownership-based policy reform for the United States.

  13. Corrupt practices in chinese medical care: the root in public policies and a call for Confucian-market approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ruiping

    2007-06-01

    This paper argues that three salient corrupt practices that mark contemporary Chinese health care, namely the over-prescription of indicated drugs, the prescription of more expensive forms of medication and more expensive diagnostic work-ups than needed, and illegal cash payments to physicians-i.e., red packages-result not from the introduction of the market to China, but from two clusters of circumstances. First, there has been a loss of the Confucian appreciation of the proper role of financial reward for good health care. Second, misguided governmental policies have distorted the behavior of physicians and hospitals. The distorting policies include (1) setting very low salaries for physicians, (2) providing bonuses to physicians and profits to hospitals from the excessive prescription of drugs and the use of more expensive drugs and unnecessary expensive diagnostic procedures, and (3) prohibiting payments by patients to physicians for higher quality care. The latter problem is complicated by policies that do not allow the use of governmental insurance and funds from medical savings accounts in private hospitals as well as other policies that fail to create a level playing field for both private and government hospitals. The corrupt practices currently characterizing Chinese health care will require not only abolishing the distorting governmental policies but also drawing on Confucian moral resources to establish a rightly directed appreciation of the proper place of financial reward in the practice of medicine.

  14. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boumans

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce "rational consensus", that is, "mathematical aggregation", by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  15. Integration for coexistence? Implementation of intercultural health care policy in Ghana from the perspective of service users and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyasi, Razak Mohammed; Poku, Adjoa Afriyie; Boateng, Simon; Amoah, Padmore Adusei; Mumin, Alhassan Abdul; Obodai, Jacob; Agyemang-Duah, Williams

    2017-01-01

    In spite of the World Health Organization's recommendations over the past decades, Ghana features pluralistic rather than truly integrated medical system. Policies about the integration of complementary medicine into the national health care delivery system need to account for individual-level involvement and cultural acceptability of care rendered by health care providers. Studies in Ghana, however, have glossed over the standpoint of the persons of the illness episode about the intercultural health care policy framework. This paper explores the health care users, and providers' experiences and attitudes towards the implementation of intercultural health care policy in Ghana. In-depth interviews, augmented with informal conversations, were conducted with 16 health service users, 7 traditional healers and 6 health professionals in the Sekyere South District and Kumasi Metropolis in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. Data were thematically analysed and presented based on the a posteriori inductive reduction approach. Findings reveal a widespread positive attitude to, and support for integrative medical care in Ghana. However, inter-provider communication in a form of cross-referrals and collaborative mechanisms between healers and health professionals seldom occurs and remains unofficially sanctioned. Traditional healers and health care professionals are skeptical about intercultural health care policy mainly due to inadequate political commitment for provider education. The medical practitioners have limited opportunity to undergo training for integrative medical practice. We also find a serious mistrust between the practitioners due to the "diversity of healing approaches and techniques." Weak institutional support, lack of training to meet standards of practice, poor registration and regulatory measures as well as negative perception of the integrative medical policy inhibit its implementation in Ghana. In order to advance any useful intercultural health care policy in

  16. Integrated primary health care in Greece, a missing issue in the current health policy agenda: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Lionis

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the past years, Greece has undergone several endeavors aimed at modernizing and improving national health care services with a focus on PHC. However, the extent to which integrated primary health care has been achieved is still questioned. Purpose: This paper explores the extent to which integrated primary health care (PHC is an issue in the current agenda of policy makers in Greece, reporting constraints and opportunities and highlighting the need for a policy perspective in developing integrated PHC in this Southern European country. Methods: A systematic review in PubMed/Medline and SCOPUS, along with a hand search in selected Greek biomedical journals was undertaken to identify key papers, reports, editorials or opinion letters relevant to integrated health care. Results: Our systematic review identified 198 papers and 161 out of them were derived from electronic search. Fifty-three papers in total served the scope of this review and are shortly reported. A key finding is that the long-standing dominance of medical perspectives in Greek health policy has been paving the way towards vertical integration, pushing aside any discussions about horizontal or comprehensive integration of care. Conclusion: Establishment of integrated PHC in Greece is still at its infancy, requiring major restructuring of the current national health system, as well as organizational culture changes. Moving towards a new policy-based model would bring this missing issue on the discussion table, facilitating further development.

  17. Consensus on the use of neurophysiological tests in the intensive care unit (ICU): electroencephalogram (EEG), evoked potentials (EP), and electroneuromyography (ENMG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guérit, J-M; Amantini, A; Amodio, P

    2009-01-01

    contribution to all other experts. A complete consensus has been reached when submitting the manuscript. RESULTS: What the group considered as the best classification systems for EEG and EP abnormalities in the ICU is first presented. CN tests are useful for diagnosis (epilepsy, brain death, and neuromuscular...... disorders), prognosis (anoxic ischemic encephalopathy, head trauma, and neurologic disturbances of metabolic and toxic origin), and follow-up, in the adult, paediatric, and neonatal ICU. Regarding prognosis, a clear distinction is made between these tests whose abnormalities are indicative of an ominous...

  18. Development and assessment of a radiology core curriculum in health care policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirowitz, S A

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing a core curriculum in health policy and practice for radiology residents and fellows, to determine whether such a curriculum would be considered professionally valuable by participants, and to determine if the curriculum would influence participants' careers. A core curriculum in health policy and practice was developed, involving 19 seminars presented over 5 weeks. Twelve faculty members presented comprehensive and integrated information relevant to current and future radiology practice. Topic clusters included health care structure and payment, technology and health services, radiology practice management, and career issues. Classroom teaching was supplemented by a course syllabus and resource library. Participants were surveyed following each seminar and at the conclusion of the curriculum. Participants described their baseline knowledge of each topic as weak. As a result of the curriculum, self-described knowledge ratings increased considerably. Interest in curriculum topics and perception of their importance and relevance to radiology practice increased. Of respondents, 84% (26 of 31) described the curriculum as having very good or excellent educational value. All respondents indicated that the curriculum should be repeated in the future, 42% (13 of 31) indicated that the curriculum motivated them to pursue further related education, and 61% (19 of 31) developed interest in personal involvement in administrative issues and radiology organizations. A core curriculum in health policy and practice was successfully integrated into radiology training. The curriculum resulted in increased knowledge, interest, and perceived importance of medical management issues by residents and fellows and stimulated their interest in pursuing further management education and involvement in radiology administration and organizations.

  19. The distortions of care needs and medical professionalism: The ruling practices of migrant labor policy in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li-Fang

    2015-08-01

    According to Taiwanese government policies and regulations, families planning to hire migrant care workers must apply for a medical assessment of the needs of elderly people destined to be cared for. The physician conducting this assessment acts as a gatekeeper who carries out her/his work with state and medical profession authority to identify, define, and regulate older people's needs. Using institutional ethnography as the method of inquiry, this article locates the problematic nature of the medical assessment as an entry point to an inquiry into how the care needs met by migrant workers are textually-mediated. This article begins by telling the daily story of an old woman and her live-in migrant worker to point out the standpoint of care recipients and their families where the inquiry anchors. I examine the physicians' daily working activities of medical assessment to discover how policy subordinates people's interests to the governmental purpose.

  20. AB064. Internet plus health care: review of the policies, consulting reports and advise for the urologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinan; Jin, Xunbo

    2015-01-01

    Objective The “internet plus health care” has become quite a hotspot for news and investors, by reviewing the relative policies and consulting reports, advice was provided for urologists. Methods Three open published policy paper on internet plus health care were reviewed. Opportunities and challenges for the urologists in this internet plus health care wave were presented, and suitable advice was provided for the urologists. Results The online diagnosis and recommending of the treatment were forbidden by the relative laws. The internet industry still has to be searching for the better breakthrough points to plus health care, the online services provided by relative websites or mobile applications has high legal risks for urologists. Conclusions The wave of internet plus health care brought a timely opportunity for the urologists to accumulate the academic credits and forge personal academic brands.

  1. The diffusion of innovation in nursing regulatory policy: removing a barrier to medication administration training for child care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Carolyn T; Crowley, Angela A

    2011-08-01

    Safe medication administration is an essential component of high-quality child care. Its achievement in New Jersey was impeded by a controversy over whether teaching child care providers medication administration involves registered nurses in the process of nursing delegation. Through the theoretical framework of the Diffusion of Innovation, this paper examines how the interpretation of regulatory policy related to nursing practice in New Jersey was adjusted by the Board of Nursing following a similar interpretation of regulatory policy by the Board of Nursing in Connecticut. This adjustment enabled New Jersey nurses to continue medication administration training for child care providers. National data supporting the need for training child care providers in medication administration is presented, the Diffusion of Innovation paradigm is described; the Connecticut case and the New Jersey dilemma are discussed; the diffusion process between the two states is analyzed and an assessment of the need for further change is made.

  2. Providing free maternal health care: ten lessons from an evaluation of the national delivery exemption policy in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Witter, Sophie; Adjei, Sam; Armar-Klemesu, Margaret; Graham, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Background: There is a growing movement, globally and in the Africa region, to reduce financial barriers to health care generally, but with particular emphasis on high priority services and vulnerable groups. Objective: This article reports on the experience of implementing a national policy to exempt women from paying for delivery care in public, mission and private health facilities in Ghana. Design: Using data from a complex evaluation which was carried out in 2005-2006, lessons are drawn ...

  3. Aligning health care policy with evidence-based medicine: the case for funding direct oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James A; Earl, Karen M; O'Neill, Blair J; Sharma, Mukul; Huynh, Thao; Leblanc, Kori; Ward, Richard; Teal, Philip A; Cox, Jafna L

    2014-10-01

    Misalignment between evidence-informed clinical care guideline recommendations and reimbursement policy has created care gaps that lead to suboptimal outcomes for patients denied access to guideline-based therapies. The purpose of this article is to make the case for addressing this growing access barrier to optimal care. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) is discussed as an example. Stroke is an extremely costly disease, imposing a significant human, societal, and economic burden. Stroke in the setting of AF carries an 80% probability of death or disability. Although two-thirds of these strokes are preventable with appropriate anticoagulation, this has historically been underprescribed and poorly managed. National and international guidelines endorse the direct oral anticoagulants as first-line therapy for this indication. However, no Canadian province has provided these agents with an unrestricted listing. These decisions appear to be founded on silo-based cost assessment-the drug costs rather than the total system costs-and thus overlook several important cost-drivers in stroke. The discordance between best scientific evidence and public policy requires health care providers to use a potentially suboptimal therapy in contravention of guideline recommendations. It represents a significant obstacle for knowledge translation efforts that aim to increase the appropriate anticoagulation of Canadians with AF. As health care professionals, we have a responsibility to our patients to engage with policy-makers in addressing and resolving this barrier to optimal patient care. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evidence and consensus-based German guidelines for the management of analgesia, sedation and delirium in intensive care--short version.

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinschmidt, Stefan; Koppert, Wolfgang; Kessler, Paul; Huth, Ralf; Hartl, Wolfgang; Haase, Ulrike; Garten, Lars; Engelmann, Lothar; Eichler, Ingolf; Eggers, Verena; Dictus, Christine; Dall, Peter; Bürkle, Hartmut; Biniek, Rolf; Bäsell, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Targeted monitoring of analgesia, sedation and delirium, as well as their appropriate management in critically ill patients is a standard of care in intensive care medicine. With the undisputed advantages of goal-oriented therapy established, there was a need to develop our own guidelines on analgesia and sedation in intensive care in Germany and these were published as 2nd Generation Guidelines in 2005. Through the dissemination of these guidelines in 2006, use of monitoring was shown to hav...

  5. Piloting an advanced methodology to analyse health care policy networks: The example of Belgrade, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Wenzel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Political decisions usually emerge from the competing interests of politicians, voters, and special interest groups. We investigated the applicability of an advanced methodological concept to determine whether certain institutional positions in a cooperating network have influence on the decision-making procedures. To that end, we made use of the institutional network of relevant health care and health governance institutions, concentrated in Belgrade, Serbia. Methods: We used a Principal Component Analysis (PCA based on a combination of measures for centrality in order to evaluate the positions of 25 players in Belgrade‟s institutional network. Their directed links were determined by a simulated position approach employing the authors‟ long-term involvement. Software packages used consisted of Visone 2.9, UCINET 6, and KeyPlayer 1.44. Results: In our analysis, the network density score in Belgrade was 71%. The PCA revealed two dimensions: control and attractiveness. The Ministry of Health exerted the highest level of control but displayed a low attractiveness in terms of receiving links from important players. The National Health Insurance Fund had less control capacity but a high attractiveness. The National Institute of Public Health‟s position was characterized by a low control capacity and high attractiveness, whereas the National Drug Agency, the National Health Council, and Non-Governmental Organisations were no prominent players. Conclusions: The advanced methodologies used here to analyse the health care policy network in Belgrade provided consistent results indicating that the intended decentralization of the health care network in Belgrade may be incomplete, still with low participation of civil society representatives. With the present study we set the stage for a broad-range survey based data collection applying the methodology piloted in Belgrade.

  6. Financial crisis and austerity measures in Greece: their impact on health promotion policies and public health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifanti, Amalia A; Argyriou, Andreas A; Kalofonou, Foteini H; Kalofonos, Haralabos P

    2013-11-01

    This review study explores the available data relating to the impact of financial crisis and subsequently applied austerity measures on the health care, social services and health promotion policies in Greece. It is evident that Greece is affected more than any other European country by the financial crisis. Unemployment, job insecurity, income reduction, poverty and increase of mental disorders are among the most serious consequences of crisis in the socioeconomic life. The health system is particularly affected by the severe austerity measures. The drastic curtailing of government spending has significantly affected the structure and functioning of public hospitals that cope with understaffing, deficits, drug shortage and basic medical supplies. Moreover, health promotion policies are constrained, inhibiting thus the relevant initiatives toward disease prevention and health promotion education practices. Overall, the current economic situation in Greece and its impact on real life and health care is quite concerning. Policy makers should not disregard the implications that austerity and fiscal policies have on the health sector. Greater attention is needed in order to ensure that individuals would continue getting public health care and having access to preventive and social support services. To face the economic hardship, policy makers are expected to implement human-centered approaches, safeguarding the human dignity and the moral values. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neoliberalism, Global Poverty Policy and Early Childhood Education and Care: A Critique of Local Uptake in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Donald; Lumsden, Eunice; McDowall Clark, Rory

    2015-01-01

    The global rise of a neoliberal "new politics of parenting" discursively constructs parents in poverty as the reason for, and remedy to, child poverty. This allows for Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) to become a key policy lever by using human technologies to intervene in and regulate the lives of parents and children in…

  8. Review of Reports to COSPAR: COSPAR Policy and Guidelines for the Utilization and Care of Animals Used in Space Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Alex

    The purpose of this session is to review the reports by the various countries that have flown animals in space during the proceeding 2 years to be in compliance with the Cospar resolution: Cospar Policy and Guidelines for the Utilization and Care of Animals Used in Space Research.

  9. Review of the COSPAR policy and guidelines for the utilization and care of animals used in space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Alex

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this session is to review reports by the various countries that have flown animals in space during the proceeding 2 years to be in compliance with the COSPAR resolution: COSPAR Policy and Guidelines for the Utilization and Care of Animals Used in Space Research.

  10. Neoliberalism, Global Poverty Policy and Early Childhood Education and Care: A Critique of Local Uptake in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Donald; Lumsden, Eunice; McDowall Clark, Rory

    2015-01-01

    The global rise of a neoliberal "new politics of parenting" discursively constructs parents in poverty as the reason for, and remedy to, child poverty. This allows for Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) to become a key policy lever by using human technologies to intervene in and regulate the lives of parents and children in…

  11. Consumers’ evaluation of allocation policies for scarce health care services: Vested interest activation trumps spatial and temporal distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. Benning (Tim); E. Breugelmans (Els); B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe allocation of scarce health care service resources often requires trade-offs between individual and collective outcomes (e.g., when some individuals benefit more strongly from a given policy than others). Based on construal level theory, one would expect that consumers cognitively re

  12. Explaining Large-Scale Policy Change in the Turkish Health Care System: Ideas, Institutions, and Political Actors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agartan, Tuba I

    2015-10-01

    Explaining policy change has been one of the major concerns of the health care politics and policy development literature. This article aims to explain the specific dynamics of large-scale reforms introduced within the framework of the Health Transformation Program in Turkey. It argues that confluence of the three streams - problem, policy, and politics - with the exceptional political will of the Justice and Development Party's (JDP) leaders opened up a window of opportunity for a large-scale policy change. The article also underscores the contribution of recent ideational perspectives that help explain "why" political actors in Turkey would focus on health care reform, given that there are a number of issues waiting to be addressed in the policy agenda. Examining how political actors framed problems and policies deepens our understanding of the content of the reform initiatives as well as the construction of the need to reform. The article builds on the insights of both the ideational and institutionalist perspectives when it argues that the interests, aspirations, and fears of the JDP, alongside the peculiar characteristics of the institutional context, have shaped its priorities and determination to carry out this reform initiative.

  13. From coordinated care trials to medicare locals: what difference does changing the policy driver from efficiency to quality make for coordinating care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Karen; Yen, Laurann; Banfield, Michelle; Gillespie, James; McRae, Ian; Wells, Robert

    2013-02-01

    The terms coordination and integration refer to a wide range of interventions, from strategies aimed at coordinating clinical care for individuals to organizational and system interventions such as managed care, which contract medical and support services. Ongoing debate about whether financial and organizational integration are needed to achieve clinical integration is evident in policy debates over several decades, from a focus through the 1990s on improving coordination through structural reform and the use of market mechanisms to achieve allocative efficiencies (better overall service mix) to more recent attention on system performance to improve coordination and quality. We examine this shift in Australia and ask how has changing the policy driver affected efforts to achieve coordination? Care planning, fund pooling and purchasing are still important planks in coordination. Evidence suggests that financial strategies can be used to drive improvements for particular patient groups, but these are unlikely to improve outcomes without being linked to clinical strategies that support coordination through multidisciplinary teamwork, IT, disease management guidelines and audit and feedback. Meso level organizational strategies might align the various elements to improve coordination. Changing the policy driver has refocused research and policy over the last two decades from a focus on achieving allocative efficiencies to achieving quality and value for money. Research is yet to develop theoretical approaches that can deal with the implications for assessing effectiveness. Efforts need to identify intervention mechanisms, plausible relationships between these and their measurable outcomes and the components of contexts that support the emergence of intervention attributes.

  14. An Official ATS/AACN/ACCP/ESICM/SCCM Policy Statement: Responding to Requests for Potentially Inappropriate Treatments in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosslet, Gabriel T; Pope, Thaddeus M; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Lo, Bernard; Truog, Robert D; Rushton, Cynda H; Curtis, J Randall; Ford, Dee W; Osborne, Molly; Misak, Cheryl; Au, David H; Azoulay, Elie; Brody, Baruch; Fahy, Brenda G; Hall, Jesse B; Kesecioglu, Jozef; Kon, Alexander A; Lindell, Kathleen O; White, Douglas B

    2015-06-01

    There is controversy about how to manage requests by patients or surrogates for treatments that clinicians believe should not be administered. This multisociety statement provides recommendations to prevent and manage intractable disagreements about the use of such treatments in intensive care units. The recommendations were developed using an iterative consensus process, including expert committee development and peer review by designated committees of each of the participating professional societies (American Thoracic Society, American Association for Critical Care Nurses, American College of Chest Physicians, European Society for Intensive Care Medicine, and Society of Critical Care). The committee recommends: (1) Institutions should implement strategies to prevent intractable treatment conflicts, including proactive communication and early involvement of expert consultants. (2) The term "potentially inappropriate" should be used, rather than futile, to describe treatments that have at least some chance of accomplishing the effect sought by the patient, but clinicians believe that competing ethical considerations justify not providing them. Clinicians should explain and advocate for the treatment plan they believe is appropriate. Conflicts regarding potentially inappropriate treatments that remain intractable despite intensive communication and negotiation should be managed by a fair process of conflict resolution; this process should include hospital review, attempts to find a willing provider at another institution, and opportunity for external review of decisions. When time pressures make it infeasible to complete all steps of the conflict-resolution process and clinicians have a high degree of certainty that the requested treatment is outside accepted practice, they should seek procedural oversight to the extent allowed by the clinical situation and need not provide the requested treatment. (3) Use of the term "futile" should be restricted to the rare

  15. Early Childhood Education and Care Policy in Portugal = A Educacao Pre-Escolar e os Cuidados para a Infancia em Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of Education, Lisbon (Portugal).

    Based on the view that the rapid expansion and development of preschool education requires careful scrutiny of both educational policy and practices, this book presents information on current early childhood education and care policy in Portugal. Section 1 of the book provides a historical framework for the development of early childhood education…

  16. Should the provision of home help services be contained?: Validation of the new preventive care policy in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishibashi Tomoaki

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To maintain the sustainability of public long-term care insurance (LTCI in Japan, a preventive care policy was introduced in 2006 that seeks to promote active improvement in functional status of elderly people who need only light care. This policy promotes the use of day care services to facilitate functional improvement, and contains the use of home help services that provide instrumental activity of daily living (IADL support. However, the validity of this approach remains to be demonstrated. Methods Subjects comprised 241 people aged 65 years and over who had recently been certified as being eligible for the lightest eligibility level and had began using either home help or day care services between April 2007 and October 2008 in a suburban city of Tokyo. A retrospective cohort study was conducted ending October 2009 to assess changes in the LTCI eligibility level of these subjects. Cox's proportional hazards model was used to calculate the relative risk of declining in function to eligibility Level 4 among users of the respective services. Results Multivariate analysis adjusted for factors related to service use demonstrated that the risk of decline in functional status was lower for users of home help services than for users of day care services (HR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.31-0.98. The same result was obtained when stratified by whether the subject lived with family or not. Furthermore, those who used two or more hours of home help services did not show an increase in risk of decline when compared with those who used less than two hours. Conclusions No evidence was obtained to support the effectiveness of the policy of promoting day care services and containing home help services for those requiring light care.

  17. What is the Role of Parental Leave policies in shaping Work and Care in the Enlarged EU?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, Anders

    2008-01-01

    .  On the one hand, our findings confirm the hypothesis that long term absence from the labour market due to parental leave has negative consequences for women's occupational careers. On other hand, our findings show that countries with well paid parental leave schemes combined with access to high quality child......The aim of the article is to examine the role of parental leave in shaping a mother's choice between work and care in the enlarged EU. A central question is how parental leave schemes affect mothers' employment and the occupational consequences for mothers who spend time on full-time caring....... The article uses comparative data from the second round of the European Social Survey carried out in 2004/05. The analysis shows that both time spent on full-time care and different care policies influence mothers' subjective feelings that caring for children has negative consequences for their careers...

  18. Youth with Behavioral Health Disorders Aging Out of Foster Care: a Systematic Review and Implications for Policy, Research, and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang-Yi, Christina D; Adams, Danielle R

    2017-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to (1) identify and summarize empirical studies on youth with behavioral health disorders aging out of foster care and (2) address implications for behavioral health policy, research, and practice. We identified previous studies by searching PubMed, PsycINFO, EBSCO, and ISI Citation Indexes and obtaining references from key experts in the child welfare field. A total of 28 full articles published between 1991 and 2014 were reviewed and summarized into the key areas including systems of care, disability type, transition practice area, study methods, study sample, transition outcome measures, study analysis, and study findings. Considering how fast youth who have behavioral health disorders fall through the crack as they exit foster care, one cannot understate the importance of incorporating timely and appropriate transition planning and care coordination for youth who have behavioral health disorders aging out of foster care into the usual case management performed by behavioral health systems and service providers.

  19. Developing a public health policy-research nexus: an evaluation of Nurse Practitioner models in aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Brenton; Clark, Shannon; Davey, Rachel; Parker, Rhian

    2013-10-01

    A frustration often expressed by researchers and policy-makers in public health is an apparent mismatch between respective priorities and expectations for research. Academics bemoan an oversimplification of their work, a reticence for independent critique and the constant pressure to pursue evaluation funding. Meanwhile, policy-makers look for research reports written in plain language with clear application, which are attuned to current policy settings and produced quickly. In a context where there are calls in western nations for evidence based policy with stronger links to academic research, such a mismatch can present significant challenges to policy program evaluation. The purpose of this paper is to present one attempt to overcome these challenges. Specifically, the paper describes the development of a conceptual framework for a large-scale, multifaceted evaluation of an Australian Government health initiative to expand Nurse Practitioner models of practice in aged care service delivery. In doing so, the paper provides a brief review of key points for the facilitation of a strong research-policy nexus in public health evaluations, as well as describes how this particular evaluation embodies these key points. As such, the paper presents an evaluation approach which may be adopted and adapted by others undertaking public health policy program evaluations.

  20. Accessibility to primary health care in Belgium: an evaluation of policies awarding financial assistance in shortage areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In many countries, financial assistance is awarded to physicians who settle in an area that is designated as a shortage area to prevent unequal accessibility to primary health care. Today, however, policy makers use fairly simple methods to define health care accessibility, with physician-to-population ratios (PPRs) within predefined administrative boundaries being overwhelmingly favoured. Our purpose is to verify whether these simple methods are accurate enough for adequately designating medical shortage areas and explore how these perform relative to more advanced GIS-based methods. Methods Using a geographical information system (GIS), we conduct a nation-wide study of accessibility to primary care physicians in Belgium using four different methods: PPR, distance to closest physician, cumulative opportunity, and floating catchment area (FCA) methods. Results The official method used by policy makers in Belgium (calculating PPR per physician zone) offers only a crude representation of health care accessibility, especially because large contiguous areas (physician zones) are considered. We found substantial differences in the number and spatial distribution of medical shortage areas when applying different methods. Conclusions The assessment of spatial health care accessibility and concomitant policy initiatives are affected by and dependent on the methodology used. The major disadvantage of PPR methods is its aggregated approach, masking subtle local variations. Some simple GIS methods overcome this issue, but have limitations in terms of conceptualisation of physician interaction and distance decay. Conceptually, the enhanced 2-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA) method, an advanced FCA method, was found to be most appropriate for supporting areal health care policies, since this method is able to calculate accessibility at a small scale (e.g. census tracts), takes interaction between physicians into account, and considers distance decay. While at

  1. U.S. civil rights policy and access to health care by minority Americans: implications for a changing health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, S; Markus, A; Darnell, J

    2000-01-01

    The history of health care discrimination as well as ongoing, extensive evidence of racial disparities argue for continued vigilance in the area of health care and civil rights. Under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, individuals have challenged de facto discriminatory policies adopted by health entities receiving federal financial assistance. Title VI health litigation is difficult because of complex issues of proof as well as confounding problems of poverty and lack of health insurance that affect both claims and remedies. An analysis of cases brought under the law suggests that discrimination claims within a particular market fare better than those challenging decisions to relocate or alter the market served. This has important implications for claims involving discrimination by managed care organizations. Because the same potential for discrimination exists in the new health system of managed care, although in altered form, data collection and evaluation are warranted.

  2. Does Health Insurance Premium Exemption Policy for Older People Increase Access to Health Care? Evidence from Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duku, Stephen Kwasi Opuku; van Dullemen, Caroline Elisabeth; Fenenga, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Aging in Sub-Saharan Africa causes major challenges for policy makers in social protection. Our study focuses on Ghana, one of the few Sub-Saharan African countries that passed a National Policy on Aging in 2010. Ghana is also one of the first Sub-Saharan African countries that launched a National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS; NHIS Act 650, 2003) with the aim to improve access to quality health care for all citizens, and as such can be considered as a means of poverty reduction. Our study assesses whether premium exemption policy under the NHIS that grants non-payments of annual health insurance premiums for older people increases access to health care. We assessed differences in enrollment coverage among four different age groups (18-49, 50-59, 60-69, and 70+). We found higher enrollment for the 70+ and 60-69 age groups. The likelihood of enrollment was 2.7 and 1.7 times higher for the 70+ and 60-69 age groups, respectively. Our results suggest the NHIS exemption policy increases insurance coverage of the aged and their utilization of health care services.

  3. Implementation and spread of interventions into the multilevel context of routine practice and policy: implications for the cancer care continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Elizabeth M; Green, Lawrence W; Glanz, Karen; Ayanian, John Z; Mittman, Brian S; Chollette, Veronica; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2012-05-01

    The promise of widespread implementation of efficacious interventions across the cancer continuum into routine practice and policy has yet to be realized. Multilevel influences, such as communities and families surrounding patients or health-care policies and organizations surrounding provider teams, may determine whether effective interventions are successfully implemented. Greater recognition of the importance of these influences in advancing (or hindering) the impact of single-level interventions has motivated the design and testing of multilevel interventions designed to address them. However, implementing research evidence from single- or multilevel interventions into sustainable routine practice and policy presents substantive challenges. Furthermore, relatively few multilevel interventions have been conducted along the cancer care continuum, and fewer still have been implemented, disseminated, or sustained in practice. The purpose of this chapter is, therefore, to illustrate and examine the concepts underlying the implementation and spread of multilevel interventions into routine practice and policy. We accomplish this goal by using a series of cancer and noncancer examples that have been successfully implemented and, in some cases, spread widely. Key concepts across these examples include the importance of phased implementation, recognizing the need for pilot testing, explicit engagement of key stakeholders within and between each intervention level; visible and consistent leadership and organizational support, including financial and human resources; better understanding of the policy context, fiscal climate, and incentives underlying implementation; explication of handoffs from researchers to accountable individuals within and across levels; ample integration of multilevel theories guiding implementation and evaluation; and strategies for long-term monitoring and sustainability.

  4. The Vanguard of Community-based Integrated Care in Japan: The Effect of a Rural Town on National Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hatano

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Japan has the largest percentage of elderly people in the world. In 2012 the government implemented a community-based integrated care system which provides seamless community healthcare resources for elderly people with chronic diseases and disabilities.  Methods: This paper describes the challenges of establishing a community-based integrated care system in 1974 in Mitsugi, a rural town of Japan. This system has influenced the government and become the model for the nationwide system.  Results: In the 1970s, Mitsugi’s aging population was growing faster than Japan’s, but elder care was fragmented among a variety of service sections. A community-based integrated care system evolved because of the small but aging population size and the initiative of some local leaders of medical care and politics. After the system took effect, the proportion of bedridden people and medical care costs for the elderly dropped in Mitsugi while it continued to rise everywhere else in Japan. Mitsugi’s community-based integrated care system is now shaping national policy.  Conclusion: Mitsugi is in the vanguard of Japan’s community-based integrated care system. The case showed the community-based integrated care system can diffuse from rural to urban areas.

  5. Financing institutional long-term care for the elderly in China: a policy evaluation of new models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Jingwei He, Alex; Fang, Lijie; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-12-01

    A rapid ageing population coupled with changes in family structure has brought about profound implications to social policy in China. Although the past decade has seen a steady increase in public funding to long-term care (LTC), the narrow financing base and vast population have created significant unmet demand, calling for reforms in financing. This paper focuses on the financing of institutional LTC care by examining new models that have emerged from local policy experiments against two policy goals: equity and efficiency. Three emerging models are explored: Social Health Insurance (SHI) in Shanghai, LTC Nursing Insurance (LTCNI) in Qingdao and a means-tested model in Nanjing. A focused systematic narrative review of academic and grey literature is conducted to identify and assess these models, supplemented with qualitative interviews with government officials from relevant departments, care home staff and service users. This paper argues that, although SHI appears to be a convenient solution to fund LTC, this model has led to systematic bias in affordable access among participants of different insurance schemes, and has created a powerful incentive for the over-provision of unnecessary services. The means-tested method has been remarkably constrained by narrow eligibility and insufficiency of funding resources. The LTCNI model is by far the most desirable policy option among the three studied here, but the narrow definition of eligibility has substantively excluded a large proportion of elders in need from access to care, which needs to be addressed in future reforms. This paper proposes three lines of LTC financing reforms for policy-makers: (1) the establishment of a prepaid financing mechanism pooled specifically for LTC costs; (2) the incorporation of more stringent eligibility rules and needs assessment; and (3) reforming the dominant fee-for-service methods in paying LTC service providers.

  6. Drug utilisation study in a tertiary care center: Recommendations for improving hospital drug dispensing policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niti Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug therapy accounts for a major portion of health expenditure. A useful strategy for achieving cost efficient healthcare is drug utilisation research as it forms the basis for making amendments in drug policies and helps in rational drug use. The present observational study was conducted to generate data on drug utilization in inpatients of our tertiary care hospital to identify potential targets for improving drug prescribing patterns. Data was collected retrospectively from randomly selected 231 medical records of patients admitted in various wards of the hospital. WHO Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical/Defined Daily Dose methodology was used to assess drug utilisation data and drug prescriptions were analysed by WHO core drug indicators. Antibiotics were prescribed most frequently and also accounted for majority of drug costs. The prescribed daily dose for most of the antibiotics corresponded to defined daily dose reflecting adherence to international recommendations. Brand name prescribing and polypharmacy was very common.78% of the total drugs prescribed were from the National List of Essential Medicines 2003. Restricting the use of newer and costlier antibiotics, branded drugs and number of drugs per prescription could be considered as targets to cut down the cost of drug therapysignificantly.

  7. [The role of private insurance in public health care systems: conceptual framework and policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, M

    2001-01-01

    The structure of the health care system ans specifically the type and amount of the public and private mix is not a closed issue. This article provides and update of the arguments that justify public intervention in health, and emphasizes the failures of the private insurance market that call for mandatory universal health insurance, although that does not necessarily mean that state has to be the insurer. The relationship between both sectors and the variables determining the relative level of expenditure in both are also analyzed. Following the literature on the public provision of private goods, the level of expenditure in a democracy is seen to depend on the preferences of the median voter, where private insurance usually tops up public insurance. The key variable determining the decision to buy additional private insurance is the difference in quality, defined broadly, between both sectors. Concerning policies, the appropriateness of fiscal incentives to promote the uptake of private insurance is discussed and it is concluded that there is no clear evidence of its suitability. Also, it is argued that models in which the public and private sectors appear totally segregated or totally integrated are preferable to intermediate models, in which both sectors appear combined. Medical coverage bought by an informed agent in exchange for a capitation payment seems a better way to integrate the private sector than through a system of vouchers.

  8. The history and politics of US health care policy for American Indians and Alaskan Natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitz, S J

    1996-10-01

    This paper traces the development of the US federal government's program to provide personal and public health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives since the 1940s. Minimal services had been provided since the mid 19th century through the Bureau of Indian Affairs of the Department of the Interior. As a result of attempts by western congressmen to weaken and destroy the bureau during the 1940s, responsibility for health services was placed with the US Public Health Service. The transfer thus created the only US national health program for civilians, providing virtually the full range of personal and public health services to a defined population at relatively low cost. Policy changes since the 1970s have led to an emphasis on self-determination that did not exist during the 1950s and 1960s. Programs administered by tribal governments tend to be more expensive than those provided by the Indian Health Service, but appropriations have not risen to meet the rising costs, nor are the appropriated funds distributed equitably among Indian Health Service regions. The result is likely to be an unequal deterioration in accessibility and quality of care.

  9. Policies for care during the third stage of labour: a survey of maternity units in Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam Asma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care for women during the third stage aims to reduce the risk of major haemorrhage, but is very variable. The current World Health Organisation (WHO recommendation is that care should include administration of a uterotonic (oxytocin, if it is available soon after birth of the baby, delayed cord clamping, and delivery of the placenta by controlled cord traction. Methods To ascertain care policies used during the third stage of labour in maternity units in Syria, we conducted a survey of 69 maternity units in obstetric and general public hospitals. A brief questionnaire was administered by face to face interview or telephone with senior obstetricians and midwives. Outcome measures were the use of prophylactic uterotonic drugs, timing of cord clamping, use of controlled cord traction, and treatment for postpartum haemorrhage. Obstetricians were asked about both vaginal and caesarean births, midwives only about vaginal births. Results Responses were obtained for 66 (96% hospitals: a midwife and an obstetrician were interviewed in 40; an obstetrician only in 20; a midwife only in 6. Responses were similar, although midwives were more likely to report that the umbilical cord was clamped after 1-3 minutes or after cessation of pulsation (2/40 obstetricians and 9/40 midwives. Responses have therefore been combined. One hospital reported never using a prophylactic uterotonic drug. The uterotonic was Syntometrine® (oxytocin and ergometrine in two thirds of hospitals; given after delivery of the placenta in 60 (91% for vaginal births, and in 47 (78% for caesarean births. Cord clamping was within 20 seconds at 42 hospitals 64% for vaginal births and 45 (75% for caesarean births. Controlled cord traction was never used in a quarter (17/66 of hospitals for vaginal births and a half (32/60 for caesarean births. 68% of respondents (45/66 thought there was a need for more randomised trials of interventions during the third stage of labour

  10. Evaluation of a policy to strengthen case management and quality of diabetes care in general practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Andreas; Vrangbaek, Karsten; Birk, Hans Okkels;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the utilization of a policy for strengthening general practitioner's case management and quality of care of diabetes patients in Denmark incentivized by a novel payment mode. We also want to elucidate any geographical variation or variation on the basis of practice features...... of the GP were are able to determine differences in use of the policy in relation to the practice-specific information. RESULTS: At the end of the study period (2007-2012) approximately 30% of practices have enrolled extending services to approximately 10% of the diabetes population. There is regional...

  11. An Optimization of (Q,r Inventory Policy Based on Health Care Apparel Products with Compound Poisson Demands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Pan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Addressing the problems of a health care center which produces tailor-made clothes for specific people, the paper proposes a single product continuous review model and establishes an optimal policy for the center based on (Q,r control policy to minimize expected average cost on an order cycle. A generic mathematical model to compute cost on real-time inventory level is developed to generate optimal order quantity under stochastic stock variation. The customer demands are described as compound Poisson process. Comparisons on cost between optimization method and experience-based decision on Q are made through numerical studies conducted for the inventory system of the center.

  12. International consensus statement on the peri-operative management of anaemia and iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, M; Acheson, A G; Auerbach, M

    2017-01-01

    Despite current recommendations on the management of pre-operative anaemia, there is no pragmatic guidance for the diagnosis and management of anaemia and iron deficiency in surgical patients. A number of experienced researchers and clinicians took part in an expert workshop and developed...... the following consensus statement. After presentation of our own research data and local policies and procedures, appropriate relevant literature was reviewed and discussed. We developed a series of best-practice and evidence-based statements to advise on patient care with respect to anaemia and iron deficiency...

  13. Policy Development by the People: The Navajo Child Care Standards Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Coleen

    1980-01-01

    Traces the development of the Navajo Child Care Standards Project and also the Model Law and Regulations for Navajo Foster Care Providers. Describes the successful involvement of Indian Parents in the development of tribal standards for foster child care. (AN)

  14. The impact of policies promoting health information technology on health care delivery in jails and local communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ben; Murphy, Judy

    2014-03-01

    The 1976 Supreme Court decision in Estelle v. Gamble declared that jails must provide medical treatment to detainees consistent with community standards of care. Yet despite their important role providing health care to about ten million people a year, jails remain largely siloed from the surrounding health care community, compromising inmates' health and adding to health care spending. Health information technology promises solutions. The current policy landscape, shaped by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act and the Affordable Care Act, is favorable to jails' implementation of health information technology (IT). In this article we examine how decisions largely external to jails-coming from the Supreme Court, Congress, and local policy makers-have contributed to the growth of health IT within jails and health information exchange between jails and local communities. We also discuss privacy concerns under the Health Insurance Portability and Affordability Act and other legislation. This article highlights a rare confluence of events that could improve the health of an overlooked population.

  15. Regionalization of ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes care: putting a national policy in proper perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Saif S; Epstein, Andrew J; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2006-04-04

    A uniform policy for regionalization of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) care raises several concerns. Transferring all STEMI patients to obtain primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) may be less effective than transferring only high-risk STEMI patients. Delays in time to treatment >60 min associated with transferring patients for primary PCI may result in increased mortality for the average patient as compared with providing immediate fibrinolytic therapy at their initial hospital; yet more than 95% of patients transferred for primary PCI in the U.S. exceed this 60-min benchmark. Superior outcomes associated with treatment at higher-volume regional STEMI centers are inconsistent among centers, and there is no direct evidence that patients will benefit by a transfer to a high-volume hospital from a low-volume hospital. Published data suggest as many as 800 PCI patients would need to be transferred to a high-volume PCI hospital to avoid a single death at a low-volume PCI hospital. Although European randomized trial data suggest transferring patients with STEMI for primary PCI may be superior to immediate fibrinolytic therapy, these findings are unlikely to generalize to the U.S. health care system given size, geography, and organization. ST segment elevation myocardial infarction care regionalization would require a massive redistribution of health care resources, depriving several hospitals of advanced cardiac care facilities, expertise, and associated revenue. Clearer evidence of the benefits and discussion of potential harms are needed before adopting a national STEMI regionalization policy.

  16. Policies pertaining to complementary and alternative medical therapies in a random sample of 39 academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael H; Sandler, Lynne; Hrbek, Andrea; Davis, Roger B; Eisenberg, David M

    2005-01-01

    This research documents policies in 39 randomly selected academic medical centers integrating complementary and alternative medical (CAM) services into conventional care. Twenty-three offered CAM services-most commonly, acupuncture, massage, dietary supplements, mind-body therapies, and music therapy. None had written policies concerning credentialing practices or malpractice liability. Only 10 reported a written policy governing use of dietary supplements, although three sold supplements in inpatient formularies, one in the psychiatry department, and five in outpatient pharmacies. Thus, few academic medical centers have sufficiently integrated CAM services into conventional care by developing consensus-written policies governing credentialing, malpractice liability, and dietary supplement use.

  17. Health policy and integrated mental health care in the SADC region: strategic clarification using the Rainbow Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, André Janse; Fourie, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness is a well-known challenge to global development, particularly in low-to-middle income countries. A key health systems response to mental illness is different models of integrated health care, especially popular in the South African Development Community (SADC) region. This complex construct is often not well-defined in health policy, hampering implementation efforts. A key development in this vein has been the Rainbow Model of integrated care, a comprehensive framework and taxonomy of integrated care based on the integrative functions of primary care. The purpose of this study was to explore the nature and strategic forms of integrated mental health care in selected SADC countries, specifically how integrated care is outlined in state-driven policies. Health policies from five SADC countries were analysed using the Rainbow Model as framework. Electronic copies of policy documents were transferred into NVivo 10, which aided in the framework analysis on the different types of integrated mental health care promoted in the countries assessed. Several Rainbow Model components were emphasised. Clinical integration strategies (coordination of person-focused care) such as centrality of client needs, case management and continuity were central considerations, while others such as patient education and client satisfaction were largely lacking. Professional integration (inter-professional partnerships) was mentioned in terms of agreements on interdisciplinary collaboration and performance management, while organisational integration (inter-organisational relationships) emerged under the guise of inter-organisational governance, population needs and interest management. Among others, available resources, population management and stakeholder management fed into system integration strategies (horizontally and vertically integrated systems), while functional integration strategies (financial, management and information system functions) included human resource

  18. Socialist government health policy reforms in Bolivia and Ecuador: The underrated potential of integrated care to tackle the social determinants of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herland Tejerina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Selective vertical programs prevailed over comprehensive primary health care in Latin America. In Bolivia and Ecuador, socialist governments intend to redirect health policy. We outline both countries’ health system’s features after reform, explore their efforts to rebuild primary health care, identify and explain policy gaps, and offer considerations for improvement. Methods Qualitative document analysis. Findings Earlier reform left Bolivia’s and Ecuador’s population in bad health, with limited access to a fragmented health system. Today, both countries focus their policy on household and community-based promotion and prevention. The negative effects on access to care of decentralization, dual employment, vertical programming and targeting are largely left unattended. Neglecting care is understandable in the light of particular interpretations of social medicine and social determinants, international policy pressures, reliance on external funding and institutional inertia. Current policy choices preserve key elements of selective care and consolidate commodification. It might not improve health and worsen poverty. Interpretation Care can be considered as a social determinant on its own. Key to the accomplishment of primary care is an integrated application of family medicine, taking advantage of individual care as one of the ways to act on social determinants. It deserves a central place on the policy-makers’ priority list, in Bolivia and Ecuador as elsewhere.

  19. NIH Blood and Marrow Transplant Late Effects Consensus Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    This day and a half symposium will bring together experts in blood and marrow transplantation, late effects, and health care delivery to discuss current evidence and knowledge gaps, develop consensus guidelines, and inform future research in the BMT survivor population.

  20. South African mental health care service user views on priorities for supporting recovery: implications for policy and service development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleintjes, Sharon; Lund, Crick; Swartz, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    The paper documents the views of South African mental health care service users on policy directions and service developments that are required to support their recovery. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with forty service users and service user advocates. A framework analysis approach was used to analyse the qualitative data. Service user priorities included addressing stigma, discrimination and disempowerment, and the links between mental health and poverty. They suggested that these challenges be addressed through public awareness campaigns, legislative and policy reform for rights protection, development of a national lobby to advocate for changes, and user empowerment. Users suggested that empowerment can be facilitated through opportunities for improved social relatedness and equitable access to social and economic resources. This study suggests three strategies to bridge the gap between mental health care service users rights and needs on one hand, and unsupportive attitudes, policies and practices on the other. These are: giving priority to service user involvement in policy and service reform, creating empathic alliances to promote user priorities, and building enabling partnerships to effect these priorities.

  1. Developing a Policy for Delegation of Nursing Care in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggle, Melinda

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are in a unique position to provide care for students with special health care needs in the school setting. The incidence of chronic conditions and improved technology necessitate care of complex health care needs that had formerly been managed in inpatient settings. Delegation is a tool that may be used by registered nurses to allow…

  2. School-Age Child Care Arrangements. Research-to-Policy Connections No. 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Sharmila; Kreader, J. Lee

    2006-01-01

    School-age children ages 5 through 12 years spend their out-of-school time in many different types of arrangements. In addition to parental care, these include relative care, non-relative care (either in their own or another family's home), center- or school-based programs, sports and extracurricular activities, summer activities, and self-care.…

  3. Between reason and coercion: ethically permissible influence in health care and health policy contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal-Barby, J S

    2012-12-01

    In bioethics, the predominant categorization of various types of influence has been a tripartite classification of rational persuasion (meaning influence by reason and argument), coercion (meaning influence by irresistible threats-or on a few accounts, offers), and manipulation (meaning everything in between). The standard ethical analysis in bioethics has been that rational persuasion is always permissible, and coercion is almost always impermissible save a few cases such as imminent threat to self or others. However, many forms of influence fall into the broad middle terrain-and this terrain is in desperate need of conceptual refining and ethical analysis in light of recent interest in using principles from behavioral science to influence health decisions and behaviors. This paper aims to address the neglected space between rational persuasion and coercion in bioethics. First, I argue for conceptual revisions that include removing the "manipulation" label and relabeling this space "nonargumentative influence," with two subtypes: "reason-bypassing" and "reason-countering." Second, I argue that bioethicists have made the mistake of relying heavily on the conceptual categories themselves for normative work and instead should assess the ethical permissibility of a particular instance of influence by asking several key ethical questions, which I elucidate, that relate to (1) the impact of the form of influence on autonomy and (2) the relationship between the influencer and the influenced. Finally, I apply my analysis to two examples of nonargumentative influence in health care and health policy: (1) governmental agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) trying to influence the public to be healthier using nonargumentative measures such as vivid images on cigarette packages to make more salient the negative effects of smoking, and (2) a physician framing a surgery in terms of survival rates instead of mortality rates to influence her patient to consent to

  4. The Initiative to extend Medicare into Mexico: a case study in changing U.S. Health Care Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto A. Ibarra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the geo-political activities of interest groups, governments and multinational corporations involved in an initiative to extend Medicare to U.S. retirees residing in Mexico.  If the initiative to change the current Medicare policy succeeds, the relocation of Medicare-eligible populations from the U.S. to Mexico is likely to increase; the U.S. is expected to gain cost-savings for taxpayers on Medicare; Mexico can develop senior-housing and options for long-term care it currently lacks; and foreign-led multinational corporations will increase their profits and dominance, fostering even more privatization in Mexico’s health care sector. By exploring new issues about retirement migration and health this study seeks to gain knowledge about the phenomena in a number of areas.  First, the retirement migration of North Americans to Latin America is an under-studied phenomenon in the fields of social gerontology, migration research, and health policy studies.  Second, the Medicare in Mexico initiative is even less well-known among health policy scholars than the retirement migration phenomenon into Mexico. Yet this initiative is inherently international in scope and involves a number of US-based institutions and interest groups actively promoting the project from within Mexico. Thus, the initiative has important geo-political and socio-economic implications for reforming health care systems in the U.S. and Mexico.

  5. Provider Behavior Under Global Budgeting and Policy Responses: An Observational Study on Eye Care Services in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao-Kai; Xirasagar, Sudha; Chen, Brian; Hussey, James R; Wang, I-Jong; Chen, Jen-Chieh; Lian, Ie-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Third-party payer systems are consistently associated with health care cost escalation. Taiwan's single-payer, universal coverage National Health Insurance (NHI) adopted global budgeting (GB) to achieve cost control. This study captures ophthalmologists' response to GB, specifically service volume changes and service substitution between low-revenue and high-revenue services following GB implementation, the subsequent Bureau of NHI policy response, and the policy impact. De-identified eye clinic claims data for the years 2000, 2005, and 2007 were analyzed to study the changes in Simple Claim Form (SCF) claims versus Special Case Claims (SCCs). The 3 study years represent the pre-GB period, post-GB but prior to region-wise service cap implementation period, and the post-service cap period, respectively. Repeated measures multilevel regression analysis was used to study the changes adjusting for clinic characteristics and competition within each health care market. SCF service volume (low-revenue, fixed-price patient visits) remained constant throughout the study period, but SCCs (covering services involving variable provider effort and resource use with flexibility for discretionary billing) increased in 2005 with no further change in 2007. The latter is attributable to a 30% cap negotiated by the NHI Bureau with the ophthalmology association and enforced by the association. This study demonstrates that GB deployed with ongoing monitoring and timely policy responses that are designed in collaboration with professional stakeholders can contain costs in a health insurance-financed health care system. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Predicting Levels of Policy Advocacy Engagement Among Acute-Care Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Bird, Melissa; Ward, Cathy Rogers; Brown-Saltzman, Katherine; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to describe the factors that predict health professionals' engagement in policy advocacy. The researchers used a cross-sectional research design with a sample of 97 nurses, 94 social workers, and 104 medical residents from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven predictor scales were associated with health professionals' policy advocacy engagement and revealed that five of the eight factors were significantly associated with it (p advocacy engagement, eagerness, skills, tangible support, and organizational receptivity. Regression analysis examined whether the seven scales, when controlling for sociodemographic variables and hospital site, predicted levels of policy advocacy engagement. Results revealed that patient advocacy engagement (p advocacy engagement. Ethical commitment did not predict policy advocacy engagement. The model explained 36% of the variance in policy advocacy engagement. Limitations of the study and its implications for future research, practice, and policy are discussed.

  7. The Consensus: Another View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H. Douglas

    1984-01-01

    Comments on the seven points of consensus presented in "A Theoretical Basis for Teaching the Receptive Skills" by Stephen Krashen, et al., particularly on the terminology that is derived from Krashen's other writings. Offers eight statements which reflect in more general terms an interpretation of Krashen's theories for language teachers…

  8. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce “rational consensus”, that is, “mathematical aggregation”, by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  9. A Delphic consensus assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberg, Kjell; Krenning, Eric; Sundin, Anders

    2016-01-01

    and pancreastatin); monoanalyte measurements; and lack sensitivity, specificity and predictive capacity. None of them meet the NIH metrics for clinical usage. A multinational, multidisciplinary Delphi consensus meeting of NEN experts (n = 33) assessed current imaging strategies and biomarkers in NEN management...

  10. Making Consensus Tractable

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan

    2010-01-01

    The process of consensus voting has many distinct advantages: it fosters discussion and participation, empowers minorities and independent thinkers, and is more likely, after a decision has been made, to secure the participants' support for the chosen course of action. The disadvantage of consensus decision making is, of course, the difficulty of reaching consensus. While this challenge is largely overcome in many theoretical settings such as Aumann's ``agree to disagree'' result, a hitherto unsolved difficulty is the lack of a framework offering rational (i.e., Bayesian) consensus decision making that can be performed using simple and efficient calculations. We propose a model featuring two possible states of the world and a finite number of individuals. The group has to come to a binary decision, where the merit of each of the two possible courses of action depends on the state of the world. Each member of the group has a private and independent signal at his or her disposal, giving some indication as to wh...

  11. Nurses’ opinions about implementation of a flexible or an open visiting policy in Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The majority of the ICUs applies a restricted visiting policy, despite the fact that numerous research data support the beneficial impact of a flexible or an open visiting policy for the patients and their families. Aim: The aim of the present study was to explore the perceptions of the ICU nursing staff regarding the implementation of a flexible or an open visiting policy, as well as the impact of these perception on the patients, their families and the nurses themselves. Mater...

  12. Addressing the Challenges in Tonsillectomy Research to Inform Health Care Policy: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandavia, Rishi; Schilder, Anne G M; Dimitriadis, Panagiotis A; Mossialos, Elias

    2017-09-01

    Eighty-five percent of investment in medical research has been wasted, with lack of effect on clinical practice and policy. There is increasing effort to improve the likelihood of research being used to influence clinical practice and policy. Tonsillectomy is one of the most common otorhinolaryngologic surgical procedures, and its frequency, cost, and morbidity create a clear need for evidence-based guidelines and policy. The first systematic review on tonsillectomy was conducted 40 years ago and highlighted the lack of definitive evidence for the procedure. Since that study, the body of evidence has still not been able to sufficiently inform policy. This review provides an overview of the key challenges in research to inform tonsillectomy policy and recommendations to help bridge the evidence-policy gap. The challenges in using research to inform policy can be summarized as 4 main themes: (1) non-policy-focused evidence and lack of available evidence, (2) quality of evidence, (3) communication of research findings, and (4) coordinating time frames. Researchers and decision makers should be aware of the limitations of research designs and conflicts of interest that can undermine policy decisions. Researchers must work with decision makers and patients throughout the research process to identify areas of unmet need and political priority, align research and policy time frames, and disseminate research findings. Incentives for researchers should be reorganized to promote dissemination of findings. It is important to consider why evidence gaps in tonsillectomy research have not been addressed during the past 40 years despite considerable investment in time and resources. These findings and recommendations will help produce research that is more responsive to policy gaps and more likely to result in policy changes.

  13. The impact of family policy and career interruptions on women's perceptions of negative occupational consequences of full-time home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the role of family policy in shaping mothers' choice between work and care and the perceived occupational consequences of that choice. A central question concerns how parental/maternal leave and childcare policies affect the occupational consequences for mothers who spend time...... on full-time caring. Using comparative data from the second round of the 2004/05 European Social Survey, the analysis shows that the duration of career interruption due to care-giving and different care policies influence mothers' subjective feelings about caring for children having negative consequences...... for their careers. On the one hand, our findings confirm the hypothesis that long-term absence from the labour market due to full-time care has negative consequences for women's occupational careers. On the other hand, our findings show that countries with well paid leave schemes combined with access to high...

  14. An implementation evaluation of a policy aiming to improve financial access to maternal health care in Djibo district, Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belaid Loubna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To bring down its high maternal mortality ratio, Burkina Faso adopted a national health policy in 2007 that designed to boost the assisted delivery rate and improving quality of emergency obstetrical and neonatal care. The cost of transportation from health centres to district hospitals is paid by the policy. The worst-off are exempted from all fees. Methods The objectives of this paper are to analyze perceptions of this policy by health workers, assess how this health policy was implemented at the district level, identify difficulties faced during implementation, and highlight interactional factors that have an influence on the implementation process. A multiple site case study was conducted at 6 health centres in the district of Djibo in Burkina Faso. The following sources of data were used: 1 district documents (n = 23; 2 key interviews with district health managers (n = 10, health workers (n = 16, traditional birth attendants (n = 7, and community management committees (n = 11; 3 non-participant observations in health centres; 4 focus groups in communities (n = 62; 5 a feedback session on the findings with 20 health staff members. Results All the activities were implemented as planned except for completely subsidizing the worst-off, and some activities such as surveys for patients and the quality assurance service team aiming to improve quality of care. District health managers and health workers perceived difficulties in implementing this policy because of the lack of clarity on some topics in the guidelines. Entering the data into an electronic database and the long delay in reimbursing transportation costs were the principal challenges perceived by implementers. Interactional factors such as relations between providers and patients and between health workers and communities were raised. These factors have an influence on the implementation process. Strained relations between the groups involved

  15. Safety Culture in Neonatal Intensive Care Units in the Gaza Strip, Palestine: A Need for Policy Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-El-Noor, Nasser Ibrahim; Hamdan, Motasem Abduallah; Abu-El-Noor, Mysoon Khalil; Radwan, Abdal-Karim Said; Alshaer, Ahmed Ali

    Assessment of the prevailing safety culture within the Gazan health care system can be used to identify problem areas. Specifically, the need for improvements, raising awareness about patient safety, the identification and evaluation of existing safety programs and interventions for improving the safety culture. This study aims to assess the safety culture in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Gaza Strip hospitals and to assess the safety culture in regards to caregivers' characteristics. In a cross-sectional study using a census sample, we surveyed all nurses and physicians working in at all the NICUs in the Gaza Strip, Palestine. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) which includes six scales was used to assess participants' attitudes towards safety culture. The overall score for SAQ was 63.9. Domains' scores ranged between 55.5 (perception of management) and 71.8 (stress recognition). The scores reported by our participants fell below the 75 out of a possible score of 100, which was considered as a cut-off point for a positive score. Moreover, our results revealed substantial variation in safety culture domain scores among participating NICUs. These results should be an indicator to our health care policy makers to modify current or adopt new health care policies to improve safety culture. It should also be a call to design customized programs for improving the safety culture in NICUs in the Gaza Strip. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancing pediatric workforce diversity and providing culturally effective pediatric care: implications for practice, education, and policy making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This policy statement serves to combine and update 2 previously independent but overlapping statements from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) on culturally effective health care (CEHC) and workforce diversity. The AAP has long recognized that with the ever-increasing diversity of the pediatric population in the United States, the health of all children depends on the ability of all pediatricians to practice culturally effective care. CEHC can be defined as the delivery of care within the context of appropriate physician knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of all cultural distinctions, leading to optimal health outcomes. The AAP believes that CEHC is a critical social value and that the knowledge and skills necessary for providing CEHC can be taught and acquired through focused curricula across the spectrum of lifelong learning. This statement also addresses workforce diversity, health disparities, and affirmative action. The discussion of diversity is broadened to include not only race, ethnicity, and language but also cultural attributes such as gender, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, and disability, which may affect the quality of health care. The AAP believes that efforts must be supported through health policy and advocacy initiatives to promote the delivery of CEHC and to overcome educational, organizational, and other barriers to improving workforce diversity.

  17. Population conference: consensus and conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, P D

    1984-01-01

    The United Nations-sponsored International Conference on Population held in Mexico City was both a rejection and an affirmation of a new policy of the Reagan administration. The policy denies international family planning funds to nongovernmental organizations that perform or actively promote abortion as a family planning method in other nations. A compromise statement was accepted urging governments to take appropriate measures to discourage abortion as a family planning method and when possible to provide for the humane treatment and counseling of women ho resorted to abortion. The statement on abortion was 1 of 88 reccomendations approved by the conference. The commitment expressed in the 10-year-old World Population Plan of Action to the rights and responsiblity to all people as reaffirmed. The conference also endorsed family life education and sex education as well as suitable family planning, information and services for adolescents, with due consideration given to the role, rights and obligations of parents. Increased support for international population and family planning programs was urged and World Bank President, Clausen, urged a 4-fold increase in international funding by the year 2000. Most of the conference's recommendations re devoted to the broad range of population policy issues, including morbidity and mortality, international and internal migration, the relationship between population and economic development and the status of women. The purpose of the recommendations is to increase the momentum of international support. The Mexico City conference was characterized by a remarkable degree of consensus about population policies with respect to integration with economic development, the need to respect individual rights and the recognition that all nations have sovereign rights to develop and implement their own population policies. Conflict and controversy arose in the areas of the arms race and the Middle East. The US position on abortion funding

  18. Extending Theorisations of the Global Teacher: Care Work, Gender, and Street-Level Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    This article is concerned with teachers' negotiation of global transitions premised on improving educational opportunity with implications for professionalism. The study blends sociology of gender, work, and organisations and gender policy analysis to theorise teachers' policy negotiations. I explore how 20 Argentine teachers mediate 3 programmes'…

  19. Policy options to improve leadership of middle managers in the Australian residential aged care setting: a narrative synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevalence of both chronic diseases and multi-morbidity increases with longer life spans. As Australia's population ages, the aged care sector is under increasing pressure to ensure that quality aged care is available. Key to responding to this pressure is leadership and management capability within the aged care workforce. A systematic literature review was conducted to inform the policy development necessary for the enhancement of clinical and managerial leadership skills of middle managers within residential aged care. Methods Using scientific journal databases, hand searching of specialist journals, Google, snowballing and suggestions from experts, 4,484 papers were found. After a seven-tiered culling process, we conducted a detailed review (narrative synthesis) of 153 papers relevant to leadership and management development in aged care, incorporating expert and key stakeholder consultations. Results • Positive staff experiences of a manager's leadership are critical to ensure job satisfaction and workforce retention, the provision of quality care and the well-being of care recipients, and potentially a reduction of associated costs. • The essential attributes of good leadership for aged care middle management are a hands-on accessibility and professional expertise in nurturing respect, recognition and team building, along with effective communication and flexibility. However, successful leadership and management outcomes depend on coherent and good organisational leadership (structural and psychological empowerment). • There is inadequate preparation for middle management leadership roles in the aged care sector and a lack of clear guidelines and key performance indicators to assess leadership and management skills. • Theory development in aged care leadership and management research is limited. A few effective generic clinical leadership programs targeting both clinical and managerial leaders exist. However, little is known regarding

  20. Policy options to improve leadership of middle managers in the Australian residential aged care setting: a narrative synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlyn Teri

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of both chronic diseases and multi-morbidity increases with longer life spans. As Australia's population ages, the aged care sector is under increasing pressure to ensure that quality aged care is available. Key to responding to this pressure is leadership and management capability within the aged care workforce. A systematic literature review was conducted to inform the policy development necessary for the enhancement of clinical and managerial leadership skills of middle managers within residential aged care. Methods Using scientific journal databases, hand searching of specialist journals, Google, snowballing and suggestions from experts, 4,484 papers were found. After a seven-tiered culling process, we conducted a detailed review (narrative synthesis of 153 papers relevant to leadership and management development in aged care, incorporating expert and key stakeholder consultations. Results • Positive staff experiences of a manager's leadership are critical to ensure job satisfaction and workforce retention, the provision of quality care and the well-being of care recipients, and potentially a reduction of associated costs. • The essential attributes of good leadership for aged care middle management are a hands-on accessibility and professional expertise in nurturing respect, recognition and team building, along with effective communication and flexibility. However, successful leadership and management outcomes depend on coherent and good organisational leadership (structural and psychological empowerment. • There is inadequate preparation for middle management leadership roles in the aged care sector and a lack of clear guidelines and key performance indicators to assess leadership and management skills. • Theory development in aged care leadership and management research is limited. A few effective generic clinical leadership programs targeting both clinical and managerial leaders exist. However

  1. Evidence-based health care policy in reimbursement decisions: lessons from a series of six equivocal case-studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Van Herck

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Health care technological evolution through new drugs, implants and other interventions is a key driver of healthcare spending. Policy makers are currently challenged to strengthen the evidence for and cost-effectiveness of reimbursement decisions, while not reducing the capacity for real innovations. This article examines six cases of reimbursement decision making at the national health insurance authority in Belgium, with outcomes that were contested from an evidence-based perspective in scientific or public media. METHODS: In depth interviews with key stakeholders based on the adapted framework of Davies allowed us to identify the relative impact of clinical and health economic evidence; experience, expertise & judgment; financial impact & resources; values, ideology & political beliefs; habit & tradition; lobbyists & pressure groups; pragmatics & contingencies; media attention; and adoption from other payers & countries. FINDINGS: Evidence was not the sole criterion on which reimbursement decisions were based. Across six equivocal cases numerous other criteria were perceived to influence reimbursement policy. These included other considerations that stakeholders deemed crucial in this area, such as taking into account the cost to the patient, and managing crisis scenarios. However, negative impacts were also reported, in the form of bypassing regular procedures unnecessarily, dominance of an opinion leader, using information selectively, and influential conflicts of interest. CONCLUSIONS: 'Evidence' and 'negotiation' are both essential inputs of reimbursement policy. Yet, purposely selected equivocal cases in Belgium provide a rich source to learn from and to improve the interaction between both. We formulated policy recommendations to reconcile the impact of all factors identified. A more systematic approach to reimburse new care may be one of many instruments to resolve the budgetary crisis in health care in other countries as

  2. Consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on the management of rosacea, part 1: a status report on the disease state, general measures, and adjunctive skin care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, James Q; Thiboutot, Diane; Gallo, Richard; Webster, Guy; Tanghetti, Emil; Eichenfield, Larry; Stein-Gold, Linda; Berson, Diane; Zaenglein, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    Rosacea is a common clinical diagnosis that encompasses a variety of presentations, predominantly involving the centrofacial skin. Reported to present most commonly in adults of Northern European heritage with fair skin, rosacea can affect males and females of all ethnicities and skin types. Pathophysiologic mechanisms that appear to correlate with the manifestation of rosacea have been the focus of multiple research studies, with outcomes providing a better understanding of why some individuals are affected and how their visible signs and symptoms develop. A better appreciation of the pathophysiologic mechanisms and inflammatory pathways of rosacea has allowed therapeutic strategies to be optimally incorporated. Part 1 of this 5-part series discusses the rosacea disease state with an emphasis on clinical correlation, reviews adjunctive skin care for cutaneous rosacea, and provides management caveats.

  3. [Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the mentally retarded: guidelines of a multidisciplinary consensus work group. Dutch Association of Physicians in Care of Mentally Handicapped].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, H

    2000-06-10

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is more frequent among people with intellectual disability than among the intellectually normal population. Also GORD is more serious in this population. The diagnosis is often missed, because most intellectually disabled cannot express their complaints of GORD. For that reason a multidisciplinary working group of the Dutch Association of physicians active in the care of persons with a mental handicap has developed guidelines. The working group recommends endoscopy in case of a (alarm) symptoms: haematemesis, prolonged vomiting, irondeficiency anaemia e.c.i., and a 24 hour oesophageal pH test in case of b (aspecific) symptoms: recurrent pneumonia, refusal of food, regurgitation, rumination, dental erosions. In general most patients are cured with drug treatment (omeprazol or another proton pump inhibitor). If symptoms are not improved after 6 months of optimal treatment, surgical treatment may be considered.

  4. 76 FR 67025 - Statement of Antitrust Enforcement Policy Regarding Accountable Care Organizations Participating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... with the final rule issued today by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (``CMS'') under Section 3022 of the Affordable Care Act (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Public Law 111-48... on which the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was enacted. Second, because the...

  5. Round table: Measuring and optimizing the impact of European health care research on policy and practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, J. de; Azzopardi Muscat, N.

    2013-01-01

    With health care systems becoming increasingly focused on effectiveness and efficiency, it is a logical development that the same requirements apply more and more to research production in the health care field. Health care research needs to show that investments are well spent and that it produces

  6. Achieving diagnosis by consensus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the collaborative work conducted at a multidisciplinary medical team meeting, where a patient’s definitive diagnosis is agreed, by consensus. The features that distinguish this process of diagnostic work by consensus are examined in depth. The current use of technology to support this collaborative activity is described, and experienced deficiencies are identified. Emphasis is placed on the visual and perceptual difficulty for individual specialities in making interpretations, and on how, through collaboration in discussion, definitive diagnosis is actually achieved. The challenge for providing adequate support for the multidisciplinary team at their meeting is outlined, given the multifaceted nature of the setting, i.e. patient management, educational, organizational and social functions, that need to be satisfied.

  7. Consensus statement on panic disorder from the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballenger, JC; Lecrubier, Y; Nutt, DJ; Baldwin, DS; den Boer, JA; Kasper, S; Shear, MK

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To provide primary care clinicians with a better understanding of management issues in panic disorder and guide clinical practice with recommendations for appropriate pharmacotherapy. Participants: The 4 members of the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety were James C.

  8. Spanish Consensus Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2016-01-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms—without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period—all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain. PMID:27213161

  9. Developing consumer-directed care for people with a disability: 10 lessons for user participation in health and community care policy and program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Goetz F; Laragy, Carmel

    2010-11-01

    This paper outlines 10 lessons derived from the development of a consumer-directed care program for families with disabled children in Melbourne, Australia. The following program elements proved to be of importance over the course of the development process: (1) research participants should be involved as early as possible; (2) an open, inclusive communication style in conjunction with a good understanding of potential concerns and a careful framing of the policy issue is required to build trust and allow meaningful collaboration; (3) various strands of evidence have to be woven together; (4) ongoing commitment and support from management and key stakeholders; (5) effective knowledge transfer and cultural change processes; (6) capacity building; (7) mediation of power differentials; (8) community building; (9) participant re-engagement strategies; and (10) solid project management skills.

  10. The assessment on impact of essential drugs policy on primary health care system in rural areas of Shandong Province policy and regulation division of the Health Department of Shandong Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuge; Shu, Defeng; Xia, Mei; Gao, Dehai; Lu, Dan; Huang, Ning; Tian, Xiaoqing; An, Limei; Li, Shixue; Li, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    At present, China has achieved an initial establishment and gradual implementation of a framework for national essential drugs policy. With the further implementation of the national essential drugs policy, it is not clear how the policy works, whether it achieves the original intention of essential drugs policy, and what impact essential drugs policy exerts on the primary health care system. In view of it, we conducted a field research on sample areas of Shandong Province to understand the conditions of the implementation of the essential drugs policy in Shandong Province. From three perspectives of medical institutions, patients and medical staff, this thesis analyzes the impact of essential drugs policy on village-level and township-level health service system, summarizes the effectiveness of implementing essential drugs policy, discovers the problems of various aspects and conducts an in-depth analysis of the causes, and puts forward feasible suggestions to provide reference for improving the essential drugs policy. The assessment results show that the implementation of essential drugs policy in Shandong Province has played a positive role in promoting the sound development of the primary health care system, changed the situation of covering hospital expenses with medicine revenue in the past, contributed to the return of medical institutions to public welfare, and reduced the patient's economic burden of disease. But there emerge many problems as follows: impact on the doctor's diagnosis and treatment due to incompleteness of drug types, and distribution not in place, patient loss and operational difficulty of village clinic. Thus, this thesis makes recommendations of drugs catalog formulation, drug procurement, sales and use, and meanwhile points out that the supporting financial compensation policy and performance appraisal policy and other measures in place are a prerequisite for a positive role of essential drugs policy.

  11. [PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION OF PERSONNEL POLICY IN REFORMING OF UKRAINIAN HEALTH CARE SYSTEM USING THE EXAMPLE OF DERMATOVENEREOLOGICAL SERVICE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolenko, V V; Dykun, O P; Isayenko, R M; Remennyk, O I; Avramenko, T P; Stepanenko, V I; Petrova, K I; Volosovets, O P; Lazoryshynets, V V

    2014-01-01

    The health care system, its modernization and optimization are among the most important functions of the modern Ukrainian state. The main goal of the reforms in the field of healthcare is to improve the health of the population, equal and fair access for all to health services of adequate quality. Important place in the health sector reform belongs to optimizing the structure and function of dermatovenereological service. The aim of this work is to address the issue of human resources management of dermatovenereological services during health sector reform in Ukraine, taking into account the real possibility of disengagement dermatovenereological providing care between providers of primary medical care level (general practitioners) and providers of secondary (specialized) and tertiary (high-specialized) medical care (dermatovenerologists and pediatrician dermatovenerologists), and coordinating interaction between these levels. During research has been found, that the major problems of human resources of dermatovenereological service are insufficient staffing and provision of health-care providers;,growth in the number of health workers of retirement age; sectoral and regional disparity of staffing; the problem of improving the skills of medical personnel; regulatory support personnel policy areas and create incentives for staff motivation; problems of rational use of human resources for health care; problems of personnel training for dermatovenereological service. Currently reforming health sector should primarily serve the needs of the population in a fairly effective medical care at all levels, to ensure that there must be sufficient qualitatively trained and motivated health workers. To achieve this goal directed overall work of the Ministry of Health of Uktaine, the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, medical universities, regional health authorities, professional medical associations. Therefore Ukrainian dermatovenereological care, in particular

  12. Pain management policies and practices in pediatric emergency care: a nationwide survey of Italian hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrante, Pierpaolo; Cuttini, Marina; Zangardi, Tiziana; Tomasello, Caterina; Messi, Gianni; Pirozzi, Nicola; Losacco, Valentina; Piga, Simone; Benini, Franca

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain experienced by children in emergency departments (EDs) is often poorly assessed and treated. Although local protocols and strategies are important to ensure appropriate staff behaviours, few studies have focussed on pain management policies at hospital or department level. This study aimed at describing the policies and reported practices of pain assessment and treatment in a national sample of Italian pediatric EDs, and identifying the assocoated structural and organisational...

  13. Executive summary of the consensus statement on assistance to women with HIV infection in the health care sector. National AIDS Plan (PNS) and AIDS Study Group (GeSIDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to develop a consensus on clinical recommendations for health care assistance for women with HIV infection. To this end, a panel of experts, appointed by the Secretariat of the National AIDS Plan and GeSIDA was assembled, that included internal medicine physicians with expertise in the field of HIV infection, gynecologists, pediatricians and psychologists, with two members of the panel acting as coordinators. Scientific information was reviewed in publications and conference reports up to October 2012. In keeping with the criteria of the Infectious Disease Society of America, two levels of evidence were applied to support the proposed recommendations: the strength of the recommendation according to expert opinion (A, B, C) and the level of empirical evidence (I, II, III), already used in previous documents from SPNS/GESIDA. Multiple recommendations are provided for the clinical management of women with HIV infection, considering both the diagnostic and possible therapeutic strategies. This document presents recommendations for the treatment of women with HIV infection. This must be multidisciplinary, taking into account the differences that can be found in the diagnosis, development of disease and treatment between men and women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. History, law, and policy as a foundation for health care delivery for American Indian and Alaska native children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Judith; Brenneman, George; Rhoades, Everett; Chilton, Lance

    2009-12-01

    Most American Indian and Alaska Native Children (AIAN) receive health care that is based on the unique historical legacy of tribal treaty obligations and a trust relationship of sovereign nation to sovereign nation. From colonial America to the early 21st century, the wellbeing of AIAN children has been impacted as federal laws were crafted for the health, education and wellbeing of its AIAN citizens. Important public laws are addressed in this article, highlighting the development of the Indian Health Service (IHS), a federal agency designed to provide comprehensive clinical and public health services to citizens of federally recognized tribes. The context during which various acts were made into law are described to note the times during which the policy making process took place. Policies internal and external to the IHS are summarized, widening the lens spanning the past 200 years and into the future of these first nations' youngest members.

  15. Achieving consensus in environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurstedt, Jr., H. A.; Jones, R. M.; Walker, J. A.; Middleman, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new research effort on consensus tied to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) within the US Department of Energy's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). We define consensus and explain why consensus decisions are not merely desirable but necessary in furthering ERP activities. As examples of our planned applied research, we first discuss Nominal Group Technique as a representative consensus-generating tool, and we conclude by describing the consensus-related mission of the Waste Management Review Group, established at Virginia Tech to conduct independent, third-party review of DWTM/ERP plans and activities. 10 refs.

  16. An international review of the long-term care workforce: policies and shortages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Shereen; Manthorpe, Jill

    2005-01-01

    The developed world's population is aging, due to trends of increased life expectancies and decreased fertility rates. These trends are predicted to increase demand on long-term care services. At the same time, the long-term care workforce is in shortage in most of the developed world. Moreover, such shortages are expected to increase due to parallel socio-demographic factors. The increase in demand for longterm care, coupled with shortage in supply of care workers, has promoted some attention from policymakers. The current paper provides an international review of institutional arrangements for long-term care in different developed countries and in particular explores different strategies used or proposed to resolve the shortage in the long-term care workforce.

  17. The relationship between drivers and policy in the implementation of cultural competency training in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Nisha; Betancourt, Joseph R; Park, Elyse R; Sprague-Martinez, Linda

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, cultural competence has appeared on the agendas of the medical profession as well as other health care providers. Through semistructured interviews with staff at different types of health care institutions, we explored the motivation for and barriers against the implementation of cultural competence training. The findings show that while some progress has been made, there is still work to be done in making cultural competency an integral part of the organizational fabric of health care. National organizations need to consider their leadership role in helping health care organizations translate broad statements of cultural competence into meaningful action.

  18. Health care policy reform: a microanalytic model for comparing hospitals in the United States and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, R J; Woller, G M; Neubauer, G; Rothaemel, F T; Zelle, B

    1999-01-01

    Microcomparison, or single-component analysis, of health care systems offers a potentially better basis for reform than traditional macrocomparison analysis of aggregate elements. Using macroanalysis, available evidence shows that Germany provides cheaper but more effective hospital care than the United States. To find the causes for this outcome, we developed a microanalytic model of hospital administrators' perceptions, financial ratios, medical outcomes, and pharmaceutical costs. However, only data on pharmaceutical costs were available, and these were similar in both countries. Our significant outcome was development of a microcomparative model that gives world medical care providers new criteria for analyzing and improving cost to care ratios.

  19. Informatics, evidence-based care, and research; implications for national policy: a report of an American Medical Informatics Association health policy conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomrosen, Meryl; Detmer, Don E

    2010-01-01

    There is an increased level of activity in the biomedical and health informatics world (e-prescribing, electronic health records, personal health records) that, in the near future, will yield a wealth of available data that we can exploit meaningfully to strengthen knowledge building and evidence creation, and ultimately improve clinical and preventive care. The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) 2008 Health Policy Conference was convened to focus and propel discussions about informatics-enabled evidence-based care, clinical research, and knowledge management. Conference participants explored the potential of informatics tools and technologies to improve the evidence base on which providers and patients can draw to diagnose and treat health problems. The paper presents a model of an evidence continuum that is dynamic, collaborative, and powered by health informatics technologies. The conference's findings are described, and recommendations on terminology harmonization, facilitation of the evidence continuum in a "wired" world, development and dissemination of clinical practice guidelines and other knowledge support strategies, and the role of diverse stakeholders in the generation and adoption of evidence are presented.

  20. Sharing resources: opportunities for smaller primary care practices to increase their capacity for patient care. Findings from the 2009 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey of Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Ashley-Kay; Doty, Michelle M; Audet, Anne-Marie J

    2011-03-01

    Most Americans get their health care in small physician practices. Yet, small practice settings are often unable to provide the same range of services or partici­pate in quality improvement initiatives as large practices because they lack the staff, infor­mation technology, and office systems. One promising strategy is to share clinical sup­port services and information systems with other practices. New findings from the 2009 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey of Primary Care Physicians suggest smaller practices that share resources are more likely than those without shared resources to have advanced electronic medical records and health information technology, routinely track and manage patient information, have after-hours care arrangements, and engage in quality monitoring and benchmarking. This issue brief highlights strategies that can increase resources among small- and medium-sized practices and efforts supported by states, the private sector, and the Affordable Care Act that encourage the expansion of shared-resource models.

  1. An evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of policy navigators to improve access to care for the poor in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solon, Orville; Peabody, John W; Woo, Kimberly; Quimbo, Stella A; Florentino, Jhiedon; Shimkhada, Riti

    2009-09-01

    Even when health insurance coverage is available, health policies may not be effective at increasing coverage among vulnerable populations. New approaches are needed to improve access to care. We experimentally introduced a novel intervention that uses Policy Navigators to increase health insurance enrollment in a poor population. We used data from the Quality Improvement Demonstration Study (QIDS), a randomized experiment taking place at the district level in the Visayas region of the Philippines. In two arms of the study, we compared the effects of introducing Policy Navigators to controls. The Policy Navigators advocated for improved access to care by providing regular system-level expertise directly to the policy-makers, municipal mayors and governors responsible for paying for and enrolling poor households into the health insurance program. Using regression models, we compared levels of enrollment in our intervention versus control sites. We also assessed the cost-effectiveness of marginal increases in enrollment. We found that Policy Navigators improved enrollment in health insurance between 39% and 102% compared to the controls. Policy navigators were cost-effective at 0.86 USD per enrollee. However, supplementary national government campaigns, which were implemented to further increase coverage, attenuated normal enrollment efforts. Policy Navigators appear to be effective in improving access to care and their success underscores the importance of local-level strategies for improving enrollment.

  2. Home care in Europe: growing interest among decision makers, but little information available for policy development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.

    2010-01-01

    Research problem: Integrated systems of home care are assumed to be an adequate response to current and future challenges to health and social services that result from demographic and social developments. The interest in home care systems and the willingness to learn from foreign experiences is gro

  3. ESSA and Students in Foster Care. Policy Update. Vol. 23, No. 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Sarah-Jane

    2016-01-01

    For years, students in foster care have been among the most transient in the nation, enduring sudden, sometimes frequent school changes as they move from home to home. The lack of school stability contributes to those children's academic struggles: Students in foster care are more likely than their peers to score lower on assessments and less…

  4. Why do we need an oral health care policy in Canada?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, James L

    2006-05-01

    Although health care is a right of citizenship, severe inequities in oral health and access to care persist. This paper provides information on the financing, organization and delivery of oral health services in Canada. It concludes that dental care has largely fallen out of consideration as health care. The increasing costs of dental insurance and disparities in oral health and access to care threaten the system"s sustainability. The legislation that allows the insured to receive tax-free care and requires all taxpayers to subsidize that expenditure is socially unjust. Unless an alternative direction is taken, dentistry will lose its relevance as a profession working for the public good and this will be followed by further erosion of public support for dental education and research. However, never before have we had the opportunity presented by high levels of oral health, the extensive resources already allocated to oral health care, plus the support of other organizations to allow us to consider what else we might do. One of the first steps would be to establish new models for the delivery of preventive measures and care that reach out to those who do not now enjoy access.

  5. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-07

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  6. Policy Effects on the Quality of Public Health Care: Evaluating Portuguese Public Hospitals’ Quality through Customers’ Views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Jaime R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, public health care administration issues are reviewed and public hospital patients’ views on quality of health care are empirically tested. The purpose is to support the recommendation of new public policies that lead to better performance, if necessary. Hospital patients’ views on service quality were assessed through a questionnaire to estimate a global customer satisfaction measure. We argue that customer satisfaction should be measured through multiple indicators, as a latent variable. Thus, we considered the latent segment models (LSM approach to assess customer service satisfaction. We found a twosegment latent structure: segment 1, the satisfied, with 48 percent of patients, mostly male and middle-aged patients; and segment 2, the unsatisfied, with 52 percent of patients, mostly female and youngest/oldest patients.

  7. [Care of the chronically ill: strategic challenge, macro-management and health policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Picard, Patricia; Fuster-Culebras, Juli

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic diseases is increasing, with the patients who suffer from them having greater need for healthcare. This fact forces a redirection in the health system, currently focused on the acute diseases, to achieve an efficient care. For this reason, it is necessary to work at all levels, starting with political decisions. These decisions should be based on the technical and scientific evidence available. Health planning is essential to establish care strategies, defining the actions to ensure the coordination and continuity of care, and also the redefinition of professional roles, where primary care nurses assume more competencies, becoming key professionals in the care of the chronic patient. The new model should include the professionalization of the management of health services. Information and communication technologies will play an important role in the development of strategies, but considering them as the tools that they are, allowing for the patient to be the focus of attention, and ensuring the privacy and the confidentiality.

  8. How do Policy and Institutional Settings Shape Opportunities for Community-Based Primary Health Care? A Comparison of Ontario, Québec and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Tenbensel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Community-based primary health care describes a model of service provision that is oriented to the population health needs and wants of service users and communities, and has particular relevance to supporting the growing proportion of the population with multiple chronic conditions. Internationally, aspirations for community-based primary health care have stimulated local initiatives and influenced the design of policy solutions. However, the ways in which these ideas and influences find their way into policy and practice is strongly mediated by policy settings and institutional legacies of particular jurisdictions. This paper seeks to compare the key institutional and policy features of Ontario, Québec and New Zealand that shape the ‘space available’ for models of community-based primary health care to take root and develop. Our analysis suggests that two key conditions are the integration of relevant health and social sector organisations, and the range of policy levers that are available and used by governments. New Zealand has the most favourable conditions, and Ontario the least favourable. All jurisdictions, however, share a crucial barrier, namely the ‘barbed-wire fence’ that separates funding of medical and ‘non-medical’ primary care services, and the clear interests primary care doctors have in maintaining this fence. Moves in the direction of system-wide community-based primary health care require a gradual dismantling of this fence.

  9. Usefulness of a KT Event to Address Practice and Policy Gaps Related to Integrated Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen; Boakye, Omenaa; Wallace, Nicole

    2016-02-01

    There are limited evaluations of the impact of knowledge translation (KT) activities aimed at addressing practice and policy gaps. We report on the impact of an interactive, end-of-grant KT event. Although action items were developed and key stakeholder support attained, minimal follow-through had occurred three months after the KT event. Several organizational obstacles to transitioning knowledge into action were identified: leadership, program policies, infrastructure, changing priorities, workload and physician engagement. Key messages include: (1) ensure ongoing and facilitated networking opportunities, (2) invest in building implementation capacity, (3) target multi-level implementation activities and (4) focus further research on KT evaluation.

  10. Developing recommendations to improve the quality of diabetes care in Ireland: a policy analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Hugh, Sheena M

    2014-09-01

    In 2006, the Health Service Executive (HSE) in Ireland established an Expert Advisory Group (EAG) for Diabetes, to act as its main source of operational policy and strategic advice for this chronic condition. The process was heralded as the starting point for the development of formal chronic disease management programmes. Although recommendations were published in 2008, implementation did not proceed as expected. Our aim was to examine the development of recommendations by the EAG as an instrumental case study of the policy formulation process, in the context of a health system undergoing organisational and financial upheaval.

  11. Nurses’ opinions about implementation of a flexible or an open visiting policy in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katika K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The majority of the ICUs applies a restricted visiting policy, despite the fact that numerous research data support the beneficial impact of a flexible or an open visiting policy for the patients and their families. Aim: The aim of the present study was to explore the perceptions of the ICU nursing staff regarding the implementation of a flexible or an open visiting policy, as well as the impact of these perception on the patients, their families and the nurses themselves. Material – Method: The studied sample consisted of 105 nurses working in the ICUs of five Hospitals of Athens, Greece. The data collection was conducted through the use of a questionnaire, which included the demographic and professional data and questions regarding the nurses’ perceptions in relation to the types of visitation as well as their benefits or not for the patients, their families and the working conditions of the nursing staff. The statistical analysis was performed by the statistical package SPSS, ver. 17.Results: 90.5% of the studied sample was working in an ICU with a restricted type visitation policy and 57.2% was against changing the existing policy, though the participants did not appear to be totally against a flexible policy. There was no statistical correlation between the gender and the nurses’ perception. Working position, educational level and the years of working experience showed statistically significant correlation. Nurses with higher educational level and more experience had recognized the beneficial impact of visitation on patient and were in favor of the implementation of a more flexible policy, recognizing the increased satisfaction of the patients, their families and themselves. However, they are opposed letting the patients themselves or their families decide on the type of visitation to be implemented.Conclusions: The type of visitation in the ICUs affects the patients, their families and the nursing staff of the ICUs. The

  12. Malnutrition: a discussion from history and primary health care for the construction of social policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar Javier Manrique Corredor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the welfare of a society depends on appropriate social policies, which allow to decrease social inequalities, and essential good nutrition of its people. Outcomes and Discussion: the current food crisis and poverty facing the world, invites to the building of diagnosis strategies, intervention and monitoring, based on scientific and involving the public, private and civil society. Methodology: descriptive and historical-hermeneutic. Conclusions: the study of the social determinants of health, are essential for building social policies, which should be structured taking into account the historical background and the current socio-political context, to understand better the processes of health and disease in a population.

  13. Technical analysis, contestation and politics in policy agenda setting and implementation : the rise and fall of primary care maternal services from Ghana’s capitation policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koduah, A.; Dijk, van J.W.M.; Agyepong, I.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Why issues get on the policy agenda, move into policy formulation and implementation while others drop off in the process is an important field of enquiry to inform public social policy development and implementation. This paper seeks to advance our understanding of health policy agenda

  14. Current health care system policy for vulnerability reduction in the United States of America: a personal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenfels, Edward J

    2002-04-01

    To raise questions about how the United States of America, which spends 1.3 trillion dollars on health care, conducts cutting-edge biomedical research, has the most advanced medical technology, and trains a cadre of highly competent health professionals cares for the most vulnerable members of its population. Relevant statistical data were extrapolated from the most current statistical sources and research reports, and assessed in terms of existing practices and policies. The data clearly demonstrated that particular population cohorts -- the elderly, the poor, new immigrants, the homeless, the HIV-positive, and substance abusers -- were especially vulnerable to illness and its consequences. Since American medicine, despite all of its science, technology, and clinical competence, operates in a non-system, there is currently no efficacious approach to vulnerability reduction. To turn health care in the U.S. into a high quality, comprehensive, and cost-effective system, government officials, health care planners, and medical practitioners must address a series of fundamental social, economic, and political issues. What other countries, like those in South Eastern Europe, can learn from this is not to duplicate these mistakes.

  15. Caring for Children and Older People - A Comparison of European Policies and Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine; Fridberg, Torben

    Current debate is focused on the way we organise, finance and provide care for children and older people. Should day care for children be contracted out? Is a local approach the most beneficial for the organisation of social care? Should home help for older people be financed through an insurance......? With increasing demand for services, most countries search for new ways of meeting need. Overall, trends point towards more pluralism in the welfare systems, where to a greater extent than before the state, voluntary organisations, for-profit organisations, employers and the family function as intrinsic parts...

  16. Welfare to Work: Early Childhood Care and Education. SERVE Policy Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Charles, Ed.; Chapman, Stephen, Ed.; Nalley, Donna, Ed.

    This policy brief of the Southeastern Regional Vision for Education (SERVE) provides information for policymakers, educators, parents, and citizens on the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act. The brief discusses potential effects of welfare reform on children, describes research on welfare recipients and their children,…

  17. Adolescent Sexting in Schools: Criminalisation, Policy Imperatives, and Duty of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Aaron; Wurf, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Federal and State Government policies and curricula mandate the uptake of emergent digital technologies within schools. Recent research focusing on the propagation of adolescent-produced sexual images via digital technologies, more commonly known as sexting, highlights the need for an examination of the risks associated with the use of digital…

  18. Financing Early Care and Education: Funding and Policy Choices in a Changing Fiscal Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, Steffanie; Clemens, Beth; Poppe, Julie

    Because of an increasingly challenging fiscal climate, state lawmakers are faced with making tough financial decisions regarding their early childhood systems. This document describes and examines various funding sources used when making decisions about possible early childhood initiatives combined with policy choices that may be considered in…

  19. Health-care expenditure and health policy in the USA versus other high-spending OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni, Luca; Belloni, Annalisa; Sassi, Franco

    2014-07-05

    The USA has exceptional levels of health-care expenditure, but growth has slowed dramatically in recent years, amidst major efforts to close the coverage gap with other countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). We reviewed expenditure trends and key policies since 2000 in the USA and five other high-spending OECD countries. Higher health-sector prices explain much of the difference between the USA and other high-spending countries, and price dynamics are largely responsible for the slowdown in expenditure growth. Other high-spending countries did not face the same coverage challenges, and could draw from a broader set of policies to keep expenditure under control, but expenditure growth was similar to the USA. Tightening Medicare and Medicaid price controls on plans and providers, and leveraging the scale of the public programmes to increase efficiency in financing and care delivery, might prevent a future economic recovery from offsetting the slowdown in health sector prices and expenditure growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Vital Signs: Improvements in Maternity Care Policies and Practices That Support Breastfeeding - United States, 2007-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Cria G; Galuska, Deborah A; Dohack, Jaime L; Shealy, Katherine R; Murphy, Paulette E; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence M; Scanlon, Kelley S

    2015-10-09

    Although 80% of U.S. mothers begin breastfeeding their infants, many do not continue breastfeeding as long as they would like to. Experiences during the birth hospitalization affect a mother's ability to establish and maintain breastfeeding. The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative is a global program launched by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund, and has at its core the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding (Ten Steps), which describe evidence-based hospital policies and practices that have been shown to improve breastfeeding outcomes. Since 2007, CDC has conducted the biennial Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC) survey among all birth facilities in all states, the District of Columbia, and territories. CDC analyzed data from 2007 (baseline), 2009, 2011, and 2013 to describe trends in the prevalence of facilities using maternity care policies and practices that are consistent with the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. The percentage of hospitals that reported providing prenatal breastfeeding education (range = 91.1%-92.8%) and teaching mothers breastfeeding techniques (range = 87.8%-92.2%) was high at baseline and across all survey years. Implementation of the other eight steps was lower at baseline. From 2007 to 2013, six of these steps increased by 10-21 percentage points, although limiting non-breast milk feeding of breastfed infants and fostering post-discharge support only increased by 5-6 percentage points. Nationally, hospitals implementing more than half of the Ten Steps increased from 28.7% in 2007 to 53.9% in 2013. Maternity care policies and practices supportive of breastfeeding are improving nationally; however, more work is needed to ensure all women receive optimal breastfeeding support during the birth hospitalization. Because of the documented benefits of breastfeeding to both mothers and children, and because experiences in the first hours and days after birth help determine later

  1. The development of Korea's new long-term care service infrastructure and its results: focusing on the market-friendly policy used for expansion of the numbers of service providers and personal care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Yongho

    2013-01-01

    One of the main reasons for reforming long-term care systems is a deficient existing service infrastructure for the elderly. This article provides an overview of why and how the Korean government expanded long-term care infrastructure through the introduction of a new compulsory insurance system, with a particular focus on the market-friendly policies used to expand the infrastructure. Then, the positive results of the expansion of the long-term care infrastructure and the challenges that have emerged are examined. Finally, it is argued that the Korean government should actively implement a range of practical policies and interventions within the new system.

  2. Caring for Children and Older People - A Comparison of European Policies and Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine; Fridberg, Torben

    ? With increasing demand for services, most countries search for new ways of meeting need. Overall, trends point towards more pluralism in the welfare systems, where to a greater extent than before the state, voluntary organisations, for-profit organisations, employers and the family function as intrinsic parts......Current debate is focused on the way we organise, finance and provide care for children and older people. Should day care for children be contracted out? Is a local approach the most beneficial for the organisation of social care? Should home help for older people be financed through an insurance...... of the institutionalisation of the welfare systems. The welfare mix of each individual country does, however, depend on historical, cultural and political influences. Comparison of welfare systems therefore gives us an invaluable means to assess the welfare system of our own country. This book presents the social care...

  3. Innovation in care for individuals with cognitive impairment: Can reimbursement policy spread best practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borson, Soo; Chodosh, Joshua; Cordell, Cyndy; Kallmyer, Beth; Boustani, Malaz; Chodos, Anna; Dave, Jatin K; Gwyther, Lisa; Reed, Susan; Reuben, David B; Stabile, Stephen; Willis-Parker, Monica; Thies, William

    2017-09-16

    There is now an unprecedented opportunity to improve the care of the over 5 million people who are living with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias and many more with cognitive impairment due to brain injury, systemic diseases, and other causes. The introduction of a new Medicare care planning benefit-long sought openly by advocacy organizations and clinicians and badly needed by patients and families-could greatly improve health care quality, but only if widely and fully implemented. We describe the components of this new benefit and its promise of better clinical care, as well as its potential to create a new platform for clinical and health outcomes research. We highlight external factors-and some that are internal to the benefit structure itself-that challenge the full realization of its value, and we call for broad public and professional engagement to ensure that it will not fail. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Improving the evidence base in palliative care to inform practice and policy: thinking outside the box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Samar M; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl

    2014-12-01

    The adoption of evidence-based hierarchies and research methods from other disciplines may not completely translate to complex palliative care settings. The heterogeneity of the palliative care population, complexity of clinical presentations, and fluctuating health states present significant research challenges. The aim of this narrative review was to explore the debate about the use of current evidence-based approaches for conducting research, such as randomized controlled trials and other study designs, in palliative care, and more specifically to (1) describe key myths about palliative care research; (2) highlight substantive challenges of conducting palliative care research, using case illustrations; and (3) propose specific strategies to address some of these challenges. Myths about research in palliative care revolve around evidence hierarchies, sample heterogeneity, random assignment, participant burden, and measurement issues. Challenges arise because of the complex physical, psychological, existential, and spiritual problems faced by patients, families, and service providers. These challenges can be organized according to six general domains: patient, system/organization, context/setting, study design, research team, and ethics. A number of approaches for dealing with challenges in conducting research fall into five separate domains: study design, sampling, conceptual, statistical, and measures and outcomes. Although randomized controlled trials have their place whenever possible, alternative designs may offer more feasible research protocols that can be successfully implemented in palliative care. Therefore, this article highlights "outside the box" approaches that would benefit both clinicians and researchers in the palliative care field. Ultimately, the selection of research designs is dependent on a clearly articulated research question, which drives the research process.

  5. Market principles in health care and social security policy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Although health care in Japan is under the management of an obligatory insurance system, it is within the framework of a capitalist economy, and has helped achieve longevity during the post-war period. However, average lifetime has been improving in western European and Asian countries that have developed later. It has also been said that higher longevity is not necessarily due only to health care but also to the enhancement of environmental health achieved by economic improvements. On the other hand, the so-called 'development' led by capitalism and the market economy, and the luxuries that sometimes can be construed as uncultured, have caused unnecessary environmental destruction and disparities in wealth. Is it too cynical to think that the extended lifespan of the advanced countries has been achieved at the expense of the epidemics, refugee problems and wars which have resulted in a reduced lifespan in developing countries? It is said that capitalism is an economic ideology that includes many contradictions and is following a path of destruction. In addition, under the name of globalization, capitalism has continuously and rapidly caused vicious cycles of corruption, which are features commonly seen in today's world. It is still common that financial failures and threats are indirectly solved by initiating wars--a method completely inimical to health care. Along with environmental factors and the logic of this market doctrine, we have been trying to reform our financially-collapsed health care system. However, we cannot count on the 'durability' of any reform conducted without some awareness of our economic mistakes. It is often said that it is only because of the existence of the economy that we have health care. However, it is more realistic to say that stable health care and social security lead to a stable economy. Health care did not collapse. It was the market economy upon which health care depended that collapsed. Therefore, one must not consider that

  6. Improving care for people with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee: how has national policy for osteoarthritis been translated into service models in Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline; Hunter, David; Hinman, Rana; March, Lyn; Osborne, Richard; Bennell, Kim

    2011-05-01

    There is strong rationale for improving care for people with chronic conditions, including osteoarthritis (OA). Successful implementation of healthcare reform requires new concepts and directions that are strongly supported by policy, new models of care (service redesign) and changes in day-to-day practice (healthcare provider and patient practice). In this paper we discuss the extent to which policy about management of OA of the hip and knee has been translated into new service models in Australia. A structured search of government and other key health websites in Australia was performed to identify policy, funding initiatives and new services models for managing OA of the hip and knee. This search was supported by a literature review. Musculoskeletal conditions were designated a National Health Priority in Australia in 2002. Under the Better Arthritis and Osteoporosis Care initiative, Australia has developed a national policy for OA care and national evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for management of OA of the hip and knee. Only two well-described examples of new chronic disease management service models, the Osteoarthritis Clinical Pathway (OACP) model and the Osteoarthritis Hip and Knee Service (OAHKS) were identified. Primarily focused within acute care public hospital settings, these have been shown to be feasible and acceptable but have limited data on clinical impact and cost-effectiveness. While policy is extant, implementation has not been systematic and comprehensive. Clinicians have evidence-based recommendations for OA management but are poorly supported by service models to deliver these effectively and efficiently.

  7. An analysis of England's nursing policy on compassion and the 6Cs: the hidden presence of M. Simone Roach's model of caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Ann

    2016-03-01

    In 2012, chief nursing officers (CNO) in England published a policy on compassion in response to serious criticisms of patients' care. Because their objective is fundamentally to shape nursing, this study argues, following Popper, that the policy should be analysed. An appraisal tool, developed from Popper, Gadamer, Jauss and Thiselton, is the framework for this analysis. The CNO policy document identified six values and behaviours, termed '6Cs', required by all nurses, midwives and care staff. The document contains no data, references or acknowledgements, but is similar to the 6Cs defined by the Canadian nursing nun, Sister M. Simone Roach, in her theory of caring published 30 years earlier. Roach considered caring and the components of it, including compassion, to be moral virtues, an inner motivation to care. This study suggests that without explicit reference to Roach's ideas, and her underlying theoretical base, the CNO requirement has the effect of turning virtues into commodities and a form of external control, described by Ritzer as a McDonaldized dehumanization. This study, which has international relevance beyond England and the UK, suggests that the CNO revise their policy by acknowledging Roach's 6Cs and openly discuss the implications of her work for their policy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Policy Levers Key for Primary Health Care Organizations to Support Primary Care Practices in Meeting Medical Home Expectations: Comparing Leading States to the Australian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several countries with highly ranked delivery systems have implemented locally-based, publicly-funded primary health care organizations (PHCOs) as vehicles to strengthen their primary care foundations. In the United States, state governments have started down a similar pathway with models that share similarities with international PHCOs. The objective of this study was to determine if these kinds of organizations were working with primary care practices to improve their ability to provide comprehensive, coordinated, and accessible patient-centered care that met quality, safety, and efficiency outcomes—all core attributes of a medical home. This qualitative study looked at 4 different PHCO models—3 from the United States and 1 from Australia—with similar objectives and scope. Primary and secondary data included semi-structured interviews with 26 PHCOs and a review of government documents. The study found that the 4 PHCO models were engaging practices to meet a number of medical home expectations, but the US PHCOs were more uniform in efforts to work with practices and focused on arranging services to meet the needs of complex patients. There was significant variation in level of effort between the Australian PHCOs. These differences can be explained through the state governments' selection of payment models and use of data frameworks to support collaboration and incentivize performance of both PHCOs and practices. These findings offer policy lessons to inform health reform efforts under way to better capitalize on the potential of PHCOs to support a high-functioning primary health foundation as an essential component to a reformed health system. PMID:26636485

  9. Policy Levers Key for Primary Health Care Organizations to Support Primary Care Practices in Meeting Medical Home Expectations: Comparing Leading States to the Australian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takach, Mary

    2016-10-01

    Several countries with highly ranked delivery systems have implemented locally-based, publicly-funded primary health care organizations (PHCOs) as vehicles to strengthen their primary care foundations. In the United States, state governments have started down a similar pathway with models that share similarities with international PHCOs. The objective of this study was to determine if these kinds of organizations were working with primary care practices to improve their ability to provide comprehensive, coordinated, and accessible patient-centered care that met quality, safety, and efficiency outcomes-all core attributes of a medical home. This qualitative study looked at 4 different PHCO models-3 from the United States and 1 from Australia-with similar objectives and scope. Primary and secondary data included semi-structured interviews with 26 PHCOs and a review of government documents. The study found that the 4 PHCO models were engaging practices to meet a number of medical home expectations, but the US PHCOs were more uniform in efforts to work with practices and focused on arranging services to meet the needs of complex patients. There was significant variation in level of effort between the Australian PHCOs. These differences can be explained through the state governments' selection of payment models and use of data frameworks to support collaboration and incentivize performance of both PHCOs and practices. These findings offer policy lessons to inform health reform efforts under way to better capitalize on the potential of PHCOs to support a high-functioning primary health foundation as an essential component to a reformed health system.

  10. Health care policies and resisting consumers in a prototypical welfare state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke Hindhede, Anette

    2011-01-01

    policies. The paper is based on qualitative methods comprising observations and interviews in two hearing clinics. The paper shows that rather than a „withdrawal‟ of the state there has been a process of reform with governing at distance. The data suggests that a distinguishing mark of the consumer role......It has been argued by researchers from the Anglo-Saxon nations that the rationality of the market has increasingly infiltrated the medical field. This paper enquires via policy analysis how these principles have affected the prototypical welfare state of Denmark in relation to Danish hearing health...... on offer in Denmark is, that along with a free hearing aid, the Danish health consumer enjoys a range of rights and reciprocal responsibilities. The paper concludes that few of the hearing impaired patients were able to embrace the consumer ethos, and those who chose not to wear their prescribed hearing...

  11. Health care policies and resisting consumers in a prototypical welfare state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke Hindhede, Anette

    2011-01-01

    It has been argued by researchers from the Anglo-Saxon nations that the rationality of the market has increasingly infiltrated the medical field. This paper enquires via policy analysis how these principles have affected the prototypical welfare state of Denmark in relation to Danish hearing health...... policies. The paper is based on qualitative methods comprising observations and interviews in two hearing clinics. The paper shows that rather than a „withdrawal‟ of the state there has been a process of reform with governing at distance. The data suggests that a distinguishing mark of the consumer role...... on offer in Denmark is, that along with a free hearing aid, the Danish health consumer enjoys a range of rights and reciprocal responsibilities. The paper concludes that few of the hearing impaired patients were able to embrace the consumer ethos, and those who chose not to wear their prescribed hearing...

  12. Community, service, and policy strategies to improve health care access in the changing urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulis, D P

    2000-06-01

    Urban communities continue to face formidable historic challenges to improving public health. However, reinvestment initiatives, changing demographics, and growth in urban areas are creating changes that offer new opportunities for improving health while requiring that health systems be adapted to residents' health needs. This commentary suggests that health care improvement in metropolitan areas will require setting local, state, and national agendas around 3 priorities. First, health care must reorient around powerful population dynamics, in particular, cultural diversity, growing numbers of elderly, those in welfare-workplace transition, and those unable to negotiate an increasingly complex health system. Second, communities and governments must assess the consequences of health professional shortages, safety net provider closures and conversions, and new marketplace pressures in terms of their effects on access to care for vulnerable urban populations; they must also weigh the potential value of emerging models for improving those populations' care. Finally, governments at all levels should use their influence through accreditation, standards, tobacco settlements, and other financing streams to educate and guide urban providers in directions that respond to urban communities' health care needs.

  13. Conflict or Consensus?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Poulsen, Birgitte

    forms of institutional design of citizen participation processes, less attention has been paid to the role of public administrators, and their role in facilitating processes of citizen participation. Public administrators have to work with diverse groups of citizens with diverging, and often conflicting......, interests. However, many public administrators have not been adequately exposed to the rationales of conflicts and the skills in resolving conflicts. The aim of this paper is to analyse the different types of conflicts that public administrators experience in formal processes of citizen involvement. Whereas...... the literature of deliberative democracy claims that consensus is most often the result of rational deliberative processes, the claim of this paper is that conflicts is more likely a natural and integrated part of such deliberative acts. Conflicts are, thus, seen as inevitable. Also conflicts may function...

  14. On consensus biomarker selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambin Anna

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent development of mass spectrometry technology enabled the analysis of complex peptide mixtures. A lot of effort is currently devoted to the identification of biomarkers in human body fluids like serum or plasma, based on which new diagnostic tests for different diseases could be constructed. Various biomarker selection procedures have been exploited in recent studies. It has been noted that they often lead to different biomarker lists and as a consequence, the patient classification may also vary. Results Here we propose a new approach to the biomarker selection problem: to apply several competing feature ranking procedures and compute a consensus list of features based on their outcomes. We validate our methods on two proteomic datasets for the diagnosis of ovarian and prostate cancer. Conclusion The proposed methodology can improve the classification results and at the same time provide a unified biomarker list for further biological examinations and interpretation.

  15. [The ANMCO (National Association of Hospital Cardiologists) in a changing health care system. Consensus development of the Organizing Symposium of the XXXI National Congress of Cardiology--ANMCO; Florence, May 21, 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    This year's symposium, while following the 30-year-old tradition of Organizational Symposia which have become a trademark of the National Association of Hospital Cardiologists (ANMCO) annual meetings, is characterized by a novel approach in terms of method and content. Prompted by the profound changes affecting the socio-cultural, organizational and economic context in which the Health Service operates, the Board of the Association decided to invite the community of hospital-based cardiologists to reflect on and make proposals concerning a number of leading topics not strictly related to the organization of hospital-based cardiology, but of a wider relevance pertaining to the whole issue of the relationship between a Scientific Society and the other components of the Health Service: national and regional institutions, other doctors, the lay public and the pharmaceutical industry, etc. The main aim of this exercise was to stimulate the Society to adapt to a changing environment and so render it more capable of effectively fulfilling its duties. Naturally the larger the consensus regarding the strategies to adopt the greater this efficacy will be. Out of the many possible subjects, four were chosen as preeminent: 1. ANMCO and research: what fields of research should be prioritized, and with what kind of internal organization, and external relations? 2. ANMCO and professional training: what should be the professional standards governing the cardiologist in a changing society, what strategies for continuing education and institutional accreditation? 3. ANMCO and the community-based Health Service: the need to establish clear and efficient organizational relations with community-based cardiology and especially with general practitioners, in order to ensure that the health service is in tune with the real world, guarantee real continuity of care and reduce unnecessary hospital admissions; 4. ANMCO and the general population: how to support the citizen-user in the

  16. Improving cultural competency among hospice and palliative care volunteers: recommendations for social policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Maja

    2012-06-01

    This case study of 14 hospice and palliative care volunteers looked for recommendations and suggestions on how to increase cultural competency among hospice volunteers. In-depth interviews were conducted with a hospice in Toronto, Canada, and findings reveal that volunteers have very specific and diverse recommendations on how they prefer to be briefed and educated on cultural competency issues surrounding their patients. Findings also reveal hospice volunteers want more cultural competency training and acknowledge the importance of being culturally competent. This article concludes with a précis on recommendations for increasing cultural competency in hospice and palliative care for both volunteers and agencies and discusses the top 4 future trends in cultural competency for hospice care.

  17. Public and Private Sector in the Health Care System of the Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina: Policy and Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slipicevic, Osman; Malicbegovic, Adisa

    2012-01-01

    In Bosnia and Herzegovina citizens receive health care from both public and private providers. The current situation calls for a clear government policy and strategy to ensure better position and services from both parts. This article examines how health care services are delivered, particularly with respect to relationship between public and private providers. The paper notes that the public sector is plagued by a number of weaknesses in terms of inefficiency of services provision, poorly motivated staff, prevalent dual practice of public employees, poor working conditions and geographical imbalances. Private sector is not developing in ways that address the weaknesses of the public sector. Poorly regulated, it operates as an isolated entity, strongly profit-driven. The increasing burdens on public health care system calls for government to abandon its passive role and take action to direct growth and use potential of private sector. The paper proposes a number of mechanisms that can be used to influence private as well as public sector, since actions directed toward one part of the system will inevitable influence the other. PMID:23678309

  18. Rethinking the Standard of Care in Treating Professional Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Caroline; Sherman, Seth L; Spence, Bradley; Brenner, Lawrence H; Bal, B Sonny

    2016-04-01

    There is public discussion and debate about the role of the team physician in professional sports. There is uncertainty over whether a separate legal standard of care should apply when treating professional athletes. This article advocates a single standard of care for all patients. This article also proposes that it would be useful for team physicians to develop a consensus that there should be a health policy for professional athletes. This health policy should aspire that professional athletes can complete their career, while minimizing the risk of cognitive or physical injuries that affect later quality of life.

  19. Book review of Introduction to U.S. Health Policy: The Organization, Financing and Delivery of Health Care in America by Donald A. Barr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman Audrey R

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Donald A. Barr's Introduction to U.S. Health Policy: The Organization, Financing, and Delivery of Health Care in America (second edition, 2007 offers a lucid and informative overview of the U.S. health system and the dilemmas policy makers currently face. Barr has provided a balanced introduction to the way health care is organized, financed, and delivered in the United States. The thirteen chapters of the book are quite comprehensive in the topics they cover. Even those knowledgeable about the U.S. health care system are likely to find much to stimulate their thinking in the text. The book can also appropriately serve as a basic text for a health policy course or in the medical or nursing school curriculum.

  20. Five Years of HHS Home Health Care Evaluations: Using Evaluation to Change National Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Paul R.; Smith, Nick L.; Grob, George F.

    2012-01-01

    In 1997, American Evaluation Association member George Grob, now retired from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and currently President of the Center for Public Program Evaluation, made a testimony on Medicare home health care fraud and abuse before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging. The occasion was to announce the…

  1. Collaboration across private and public sector primary health care services: benefits, costs and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Julie; Powell Davies, Gawaine; Jayasuriya, Rohan; Fort Harris, Mark

    2011-07-01

    Ongoing care for chronic conditions is best provided by interprofessional teams. There are challenges in achieving this where teams cross organisational boundaries. This article explores the influence of organisational factors on collaboration between private and public sector primary and community health services involved in diabetes care. It involved a case study using qualitative methods. Forty-five participants from 20 organisations were purposively recruited. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and from content analysis of documents. Thematic analysis was used employing a two-level coding system and cross case comparisons. The patterns of collaborative patient care were influenced by a combination of factors relating to the benefits and costs of collaboration and the influence of support mechanisms. Benefits lay in achieving common or complementary health or organisational goals. Costs were incurred in bridging differences in organisational size, structure, complexity and culture. Collaboration was easier between private sector organisations than between private and public sectors. Financial incentives were not sufficient to overcome organisational barriers. To achieve more coordinated primary and community health care structural changes are also needed to better align funding mechanisms, priorities and accountabilities of the different organisations.

  2. Gender Policies Meet VET Practices--The Case of Health and Social Care in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høst, Håkon; Seland, Idunn; Skålholt, Asgeir

    2015-01-01

    Could the labour market gender balance be improved by introducing new types of apprenticeship-trained workers? This article investigates what happened in the wake of the Norwegian VET programme for health and social care, a new approach introduced via the 1994 educational reform. By upgrading this traditionally female-dominated area of education,…

  3. Biofuels. Handle with care. An analysis of EU biofuel policy with recommendations for action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-11-15

    For many policymakers biofuels must have seemed like a dream-come-true. The arguments put forward by supporters were plentiful and powerful. Carbon Dioxide emissions (CO2) could be cut because the biofuel crops absorb CO2 while they grow and energy security could be guaranteed because biofuels can be grown at home or imported from stable regions rather than oil states. The car industry also liked them because they took political focus away from vehicle fuel efficiency as a route to cutting CO2 emissions. Cars require only minor modifications to become green-looking 'flexfuel' models. Farmers liked them because it created another market for their products and even oil companies came to like them, because it enabled them to look more 'green'. The EU and other regions hurried to put in place volume targets and financial incentives to force the market to adopt biofuels. However, in the rush, the full impacts of their production were not well understood. And, by focusing on a single nascent technology, rather than on the goal - carbon emissions reductions - the dream soon turned to a nightmare. It has now become clear that there is no simple answer to the question of whether biofuels are truly a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels. The evidence, much of it published in the last three years, suggests that in the vast majority of existing cases, they are not. A change to current policy is needed. This report follows the adoption, at the end of 2008, of the European Union's mandatory 10% renewable energy target for transport, to be reached by 2020. It attempts to assess the environmental implications of that policy. Its key findings are that if the target is, as is widely accepted, almost completely to be met through the use of biofuels, it is highly unlikely to be met sustainably. In short, there is a very substantial risk that current policy will cause more harm than good. One of the most important reasons for this is the failure to account

  4. Who Cares about APA Policy and Does it Have an Impact? 2006 Annual Report of the APA Policy and Planning Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    What constitutes American Psychological Association (APA) policy? How does it affect the everyday and professional lives of APA members? How personally aware are psychologists of APA policies? In this report, the APA explores these questions and provide some intriguing findings on the fate of policies developed through the APA's complicated and…

  5. Who Cares about APA Policy and Does it Have an Impact? 2006 Annual Report of the APA Policy and Planning Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    What constitutes American Psychological Association (APA) policy? How does it affect the everyday and professional lives of APA members? How personally aware are psychologists of APA policies? In this report, the APA explores these questions and provide some intriguing findings on the fate of policies developed through the APA's complicated and…

  6. Customer care policy for utilities - demonstrated with the example of a call center; Customer Care fuer EVU - Wirkungszusammenhaenge am Beispiel des Telefon-Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisse, D. [Consulting und Services, pdv Unternehmensberatung GmbH, Roesrath (Germany)

    2000-01-10

    Customer care policy, for preventing change to another provider and consolidating customer loyalty, is becoming a strategic (powerful) instrument for a utility in the competitive market. But what does this really imply for the day-to-day process of dealing with client-specific operations and workflows? The article describes the interactions between strategic marketing for ensuring client satisfaction and the resulting requirements to be met by a utility's call center, and also describes the key 'parameters' and requirements for successful day-to-day management of call centers. (orig./CB) [German] Customer Care zur Reduzierung der Wechselbereitschaft bzw. zur Erhoehung der Kundenbindung wird fuer EVU zu einem strategischen Instrument im Kampf um die Kunden. Aber was bedeutet dies fuer die operative Abwicklung der kundenbezogenen Geschaeftsprozesse? Der Verfasser erlaeutert die Zusammenhaenge zwischen dem strategischen Ziel der Kundenzufriedenheit und der operativen Umsetzung des Telefon-Service und beschreibt die 'Stellschrauben', die fuer diesen Zweck bei der Planung aber auch im taeglichen Management eines Call Centers zur Verfuegung stehen. (orig.)

  7. Political Consensus and Fiscal Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg, Kurt; Holm Pedersen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming difficult to maintain consensus in a period of economic austerity, and this possibly challenges the ability of democratic institutions to take decisions on tough economic questions. In order to find out how political consensus influences fiscal outcomes, this article sets out...

  8. Attitude extremity, consensus and diagnosticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pligt, J.; Ester, P.; van der Linden, J.

    1983-01-01

    Studied the effects of attitude extremity on perceived consensus and willingness to ascribe trait terms to others with either pro- or antinuclear attitudes. 611 Ss rated their attitudes toward nuclear energy on a 5-point scale. Results show that attitude extremity affected consensus estimates. Trait

  9. Main: ANAERO5CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO5CONSENSUS S000481 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO5CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00047

  10. Main: ANAERO3CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO3CONSENSUS S000479 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO3CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00048

  11. Main: ANAERO4CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO4CONSENSUS S000480 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO4CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00047

  12. Main: ANAERO2CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO2CONSENSUS S000478 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO2CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000479, S00048

  13. Main: ANAERO1CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO1CONSENSUS S000477 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO1CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000478, S000479, S00048

  14. Policies to improve end-of-life decisions in Flemish hospitals: communication, training of health care providers and use of quality assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noortgate Nele

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and implementation of institutional end-of-life policies has been comprehensively studied in Flanders, Belgium, a country where euthanasia was legalised in 2002. Developing end-of-life policies in hospitals is a first step towards improving the quality of medical decision-making at the end-of-life. Implementation of policies through quality assessments, communication and the training and education of health care providers is equally important in improving actual end-of-life practice. The aim of the present study is to report on the existence and nature of end-of-life policy implementation activities in Flemish acute hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional mail survey was sent to all acute hospitals (67 main campuses in Flanders (Belgium. The questionnaire asked about hospital characteristics, the prevalence of policies on five types of end-of-life decisions: euthanasia, palliative sedation, alleviation of symptoms with possible life-shortening effect, do-not-resuscitate decision, and withdrawing or withholding of treatment, the internal and external communication of these policies, training and education on aspects of end-of-life care, and quality assessments of end-of-life care on patient and family level. Results The response rate was 55%. Results show that in 2007 written policies on most types of end-of-life decisions were widespread in acute hospitals (euthanasia: 97%, do-not-resuscitate decisions: 98%, palliative sedation: 79%. While standard communication of these policies to health care providers was between 71% and 91%, it was much lower to patients and/or family (between 17% and 50%. More than 60% of institutions trained and educated their caregivers in different aspects on end-of-life care. Assessment of the quality of these different aspects at patient and family level occurred in 25% to 61% of these hospitals. Conclusions Most Flemish acute hospitals have developed a policy on end-of-life practices

  15. When the private sphere goes public: exploring the issues facing family caregiver organizations in the development of long-term care policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozario, Philip A; Palley, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Though family caregiving forms the backbone of the long-term care system in the United States, long-term care policies have traditionally focused on paid services that frail older people and people with disabilities utilize for their day-to-day functioning. Part of the exclusion of family caregiving from the long-term care discourse stems from the traditional separation of the private sphere, where family caregiving occurs, from the public sphere of policy making. However, the passage of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the National Family Caregiver Support Program (NFCSP) and Medicaid waiver legislation may reflect recent changes in the government's position on their role in addressing issues related to the "private spheres." In this article, we explore the nature of family caregiving in the United States, the divide between the public and private spheres and provide an overview of family caregiving-related policies and programs in the U.S. In our review, we examine the provisions in the FMLA, NFCSP, and Medicaid waiver legislation that support family caregiving efforts. We also examine the roles of family caregiver organizations in making family caregiving an important element of long-term care policy and influencing policy-making.

  16. Informal Payments in the Health Care System - Research, Media and Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan Cherecheş

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Informal payments in the health system refer to any payment made outside the legal funding framework. The existence of the phenomenon in Central and Eastern European countries relates to the characteristics of the health systems in the communist period. The analysis is based on three types of data: a set of data gathered from literature review; a second set of data gathered from online media; and a third set of data collected from legislative and public policy. The analysis was pursued using the key words such as informal payment, under-the-table payment, out-of-pocket payment, envelope payment, healthcare corruption, under-the-counter payment. As reflected in the media reports and even publicly recognized by the officials of the Ministry of Health, informal payments are a serious problem of the Romanian healthcare system. Nevertheless, the studies pursued by local researchers are inconsistent with the actual magnitude of the problem. Besides that, there is a serious gap between the findings in this area and the policies intended to reduce the phenomenon.

  17. Aligning Yoga With Its Evolving Role in Health Care: Comments on Yoga Practice, Policy, Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Avinash R

    2017-07-01

    Evidence is accumulating that suggests that yoga has beneficial effects in mitigating the impact of certain diseases. As a result, efforts are being made to medicalize yoga and use it within integrative medicine as a therapy. However, there are substantial shortcomings in the practice, policy, and research of yoga that undermine its optimal use. Yoga as a modality functions within a context. Therefore, it is important to occasionally step back and examine the entirety of the context from a high vantage to assess whether the tactical and programmatic endeavors are aligned with the strategic intended purpose. This commentary discusses a few policy issues relevant to some key stakeholders. It suggests that yoga therapists need to calibrate their model of yoga by reducing emphasis on postures and increasing it on meditation and breathing exercises while catering to clients with chronic conditions. It recommends that yoga research should be more critical in evaluating yoga's fundamental tenets and use reductionist approach to do so. It proposes that autonomous regulators should extricate injury prone postures from the body of yoga practice for regulatory purposes, rather than regulate yoga summarily. It is suggested that payers should pay for yoga. However, they should use payment model as it is used for vaccination, instead of paying as it is done for physiotherapy. It concludes that yoga can help, but before it can help it needs help itself, and the various stakeholders need to reflect on the big picture so that they can collaborate on these improvements.

  18. Parents, siblings and grandparents in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A survey of policies in eight European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Gorm; Mirante, Nadia; Haumont, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    , Denmark, the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Spain and Italy). Of them 78% responded, and among those responded, 175 reported caring for at least 50 very low birth weight infants every year and their responses were analysed further. RESULTS: A majority of all units allowed access at any time...... for both parents. This was almost universal in northern Europe and the UK, whereas it was the policy of less than one-third of NICU in Spain and Italy, with France in an intermediate position. Restrictions on visiting of grandparents, siblings and friends, as well as restricting parents' presence during....... CONCLUSIONS: The presence of parents and other family members in European NICUs has improved over a 10-year period. Several barriers, however, are still in place, particularly in the South European countries....

  19. Overlaps and disconnects in reproductive health care: global policies, national programs, and the micropolitics of reproduction in northern Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Ellen E

    2007-01-01

    The International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) held in Cairo in 1994 called for a global commitment to increasing women's agency and reproductive options by promoting a reproductive health agenda. Voluntary contraceptive use and the quality of reproductive health care have become the predominant emphases in family planning initiatives. Yet, many programs worldwide demonstrate a continued commitment to fertility reduction and slowing population growth. This article explores three arenas of contemporary discourse about reproductive health and family planning. Using Senegal as a case study, it highlights the significant overlaps and disconnects among global reproductive health policy, national priorities and programs, and the biopolitics of gender, marriage, and fertility that shape Senegalese women's reproductive behavior. The article points to the slow decline in national fertility rates to explore how family planning initiatives fail to address reproduction in the context of women's socio-economic challenges and cultural and religious fertility ideals.

  20. Public Reporting of Nursing Home Quality of Care: Lessons from the United States Experience for Canadian Policy Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Alison M.; Draper, Kellie; Sales, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    While the demand for continuing care services in Canada grows, the quality of such services has come under increasing scrutiny. Consideration has been given to the use of public reporting of quality data as a mechanism to stimulate quality improvement and promote public accountability for and transparency in service quality. The recent adoption of the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) throughout a number of Canadian jurisdictions means that standardized quality data are available for comparisons among facilities across regions, provinces and nationally. In this paper, we explore current knowledge on public reporting in nursing homes in the United States to identify what lessons may inform policy discussion regarding potential use of public reporting in Canada. Based on these findings, we make recommendations regarding how public reporting should be progressed and managed if Canadian jurisdictions were to implement this strategy. PMID:21037828