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Sample records for cardiopulmonary resuscitation biomedical

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: biomedical and biophysical analysis (Chapter XXX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordergraaf, G.J; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Scheffer, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of the human in caring for others is reflected in the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Superstition, divine intervention and finally science have contributed to the development of a technique which may allow any person to save another’s life. Fully 50% of the firs...

  2. Neurology of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; Geocadin, R G

    2017-01-01

    This chapter aims to provide an up-to-date review of the science and clinical practice pertaining to neurologic injury after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The past two decades have seen a major shift in the science and practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, with a major emphasis on postresuscitation neurologic care. This chapter provides a nuanced and thoughtful historic and bench-to-bedside overview of the neurologic aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A particular emphasis is made on the anatomy and pathophysiology of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, up-to-date management of survivors of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and a careful discussion on neurologic outcome prediction. Guidance to practice evidence-based clinical care when able and thoughtful, pragmatic suggestions for care where evidence is lacking are also provided. This chapter serves as both a useful clinical guide and an updated, thorough, and state-of-the-art reference on the topic for advanced students and experienced practitioners in the field. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Andrés Vargas-Garzón

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reanimation’s guidelines dictated by the AHA (American Heart Association are the strategies to follow in the envi­ronment of any situation related to cardiac arrest. They are acquired after the analysis of the evidence available in reani­mation from higher to less quality, with the best neurological results. After years of observation, was achieved to establish that survival behind cardiac arrest is, in general, low (6%, except that any witness starts immediately cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR maneuvers; therefore, medical personal must know and practice these maneuvers. With these con­siderations, it’s necessary to emphasize in the theoretical training of CPR of all health professional and laity, which guarantee everybody be prepared to emergency system ac­tivation, brain’s preservation and defibrillate to recuperate heart and life. The actual approach that combines compres­sions and defibrillation to closed chest, rescue ventilation and cardio tonic drugs. The guidelines AHA 2010, focus on increase frequency and quality of CPR. The objective of this article is to recognize various changes in these guidelines in cardiopulmonary reanimation and promote the continued education’s importance in reanimation.

  4. Pharmacotherapy In Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNAYDIN, Berrin

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is defined as cessation of cardiac mechanical activity. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through several maneuvers and techniques. Although the two interventions, which are competent basic life support and prompt defibrillation, improve the survival rate, several adjuvant cardiac medication drugs are advocated to treat cardiac arrest during advanced cardiac life support. Since the introduction of modern CPR there have been man...

  5. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in hospitalized infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Christoph P; Graham, Eric M; Hill, Kevin; Li, Jennifer S; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Clark, Reese H; Smith, P Brian

    2016-10-01

    Hospitalized infants requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) represent a high-risk group. Recent data on risk factors for mortality following CPR in this population are lacking. We hypothesized that infant demographic characteristics, diagnoses, and levels of cardiopulmonary support at the time of CPR requirement would be associated with survival to hospital discharge following CPR. Retrospective cohort study. All infants receiving CPR on day of life 2 to 120 admitted to 348 Pediatrix Medical Group neonatal intensive care units from 1997 to 2012. We collected data on demographics, interventions, center volume, and death prior to NICU discharge. We evaluated predictors of death after CPR using multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to account for clustering of the data by center. Our cohort consisted of 2231 infants receiving CPR. Of these, 1127 (51%) survived to hospital discharge. Lower gestational age, postnatal age, 5-min APGAR, congenital anomaly, and markers of severity of illness were associated with higher mortality. Mortality after CPR did not change significantly over time (Cochran-Armitage test for trend p=0.35). Mortality following CPR in infants is high, particularly for less mature, younger infants with congenital anomalies and those requiring cardiopulmonary support prior to CPR. Continued focus on at risk infants may identify targets for CPR prevention and improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Updates in small animal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Daniel J; Boller, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    For dogs and cats that experience cardiopulmonary arrest, rates of survival to discharge are 6% to 7%, as compared with survival rates of 20% for people. The introduction of standardized cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines and training in human medicine has led to substantial improvements in outcome. The Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation initiative recently completed an exhaustive literature review and generated a set of evidence-based, consensus cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines in 5 domains: preparedness and prevention, basic life support, advanced life support, monitoring, and postcardiac arrest care. This article reviews some of the most important of these new guidelines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Prehospital thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spöhr, F; Böttiger, B W

    2005-02-01

    Although prehospital cardiac arrest has an incidence of 40-90/100,000 inhabitants per year, there has been a lack of therapeutic options to improve the outcome of these patients. Of all cardiac arrests, 50-70% are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or massive pulmonary embolism (PE). Thrombolysis has been shown to be a causal and effective therapy in patients with AMI or PE who do not suffer cardiac arrest. In contrast, experience with the use of thrombolysis during cardiac arrest has been limited. Thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) acts directly on thrombi or emboli causing AMI or PE. In addition, experimental studies suggest that thrombolysis causes an improvement in microcirculatory reperfusion after cardiac arrest. In-hospital and prehospital case series and clinical studies suggest that thrombolysis during CPR may cause a restoration of spontaneous circulation and survival even in patients that have been resuscitated conventionally without success. In addition, there is evidence for an improved neurological outcome in patients receiving a thrombolytic therapy during during CPR. A large randomized, double-blind multicenter trial that has started recently is expected to show if this new therapeutic option can generally improve the prognosis of patients with cardiac arrest.

  8. Teaching Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carveth, Stephen W.

    1979-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a key part of emergency cardiac care. It is a basic life support procedure that can be taught in the schools with the assistance of the American Heart Association. (JMF)

  9. Amitriptyline Intoxication Responded to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güldem Turan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The most severe effects in amitriptiline intoxications are related with central nervous system and cardiovascular system. Amitriptiline intoxication especially with high doses has severe cardiac effects and can result in cardiac arrest. Most favorable responses can be achieved with efficient and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We wanted to present a case ingested high dose of amitriptiline for attempt to suicide and responded to prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  10. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: the essential of 2015 guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maudet, Ludovic; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Trueb, Lionel

    2016-02-10

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines have been updated in October 2015. The 2010 guidelines are reaffirmed: immediate call for help via the local dispatch center, high quality CPR (frequency between 100 and 120/min, compression depth between 5 and 6 cm) and early defibrillation improve patient's survival chances. This article reviews the essential elements of resuscitation and recommended advanced measures.

  11. Are We Successful in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Kozaci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we aimed to determine the success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed in the patients with diagnosis of cardiac arrest, and demographic characteristics of these patients. Material and Methods: The patients admitted to Adana Numune Education and Research Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine between 01.01.2011 and 31.12.2012, and who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation were included to this study planned as retrospectively. The age, gender, status of judicial cases, causes and time of cardiac arrest, first observed arrest rhythm, the diseases prior to the arrest, means of arrival to emergency department, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the name of the hospitalised clinic, the existence of the operation, and outcome of the patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation in accordance with current advanced life support protocols were recorded in standard data entry form. Results: A total of 290 patients with completely accessible data were included to the study. Most of these patients were men (65.2%. The mean ages were 61 ± 19 years for men, 67 ± 14 years for women (p = 0.018. The most common diagnosis were ischemic heart disease and heart failure according to the analysis of the patient's medical history. 92 patients (31.7% were brought to the emergency department after death, and all of these patients were unsuccessful following to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 198 patients (68.3% had cardiac arrest in the emergency department, and we determined that cardiopulmonary resuscitation application of 102 patients were successful. The most common causes of cardiac arrest were myocardial infarction and heart failure. Mostly first observed rhythm in the monitor was asystole. The response rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia was higher. Most patients were hospitalised to the

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjørstad, Odd Jarle; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg

    2013-02-19

    The criteria for refraining from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients are based on patients' right to refuse treatment and the duty of the treating personnel not to exacerbate their suffering and not to administer futile treatment. When is cardiopulmonary resuscitation futile in these patients? Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed for the period 1989-2010 on the results of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in advanced cancer patients and on factors that affected the results of CPR when special mention was made of cancer. The searches yielded 333 hits and 18 included articles: four meta-analyses, eight retrospective clinical studies, and six review articles. Cancer patients had a poorer post-CPR survival than non-cancer patients. Survival declined with increasing extent of the cancer disease. Widespread and therapy-resistant cancer disease coupled with a performance status lower than WHO 2 or a PAM score (Pre-Arrest Morbidity Index) of above 8 was regarded as inconsistent with survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is futile for in-hospital cancer patients with widespread incurable disease and poor performance status.

  13. Conflicting perspectives compromising discussions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, J

    2010-09-01

    Healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives are expected to discuss resuscitation together. This study aims to identify the differences in the knowledge base and understanding of these parties. Questionnaires examining knowledge and opinion on resuscitation matters were completed during interviews of randomly selected doctors, nurses and the general public. 70% doctors, 24% nurses and 0% of a public group correctly estimated survival to discharge following in-hospital resuscitation attempts. Deficiencies were identified in doctor and nurse knowledge of ethics governing resuscitation decisions. Public opinion often conflicts with ethical guidelines. Public understanding of the nature of cardiopulmonary arrests and resuscitation attempts; and of the implications of a \\'Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR)\\' order is poor. Television medical dramas are the primary source of resuscitation knowledge. Deficiencies in healthcare professionals\\' knowledge of resuscitation ethics and outcomes may compromise resuscitation decisions. Educational initiatives to address deficiencies are necessary. Parties involved in discussion on resuscitation do not share the same knowledge base reducing the likelihood of meaningful discussion. Public misapprehensions surrounding resuscitation must be identified and corrected during discussion.

  14. Acute posthypoxic myoclonus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwes, Aline; van Poppelen, Daniel; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Zandstra, Durk F.; Weinstein, Henry C.; Tromp, Selma C.; Zandbergen, Eveline G. J.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Horn, Janneke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute posthypoxic myoclonus (PHM) can occur in patients admitted after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and is considered to have a poor prognosis. The origin can be cortical and/or subcortical and this might be an important determinant for treatment options and prognosis. The aim of

  15. Anaesthetists' knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation | Ogboli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is an integral part of an anaesthetist's knowledge and practice. In Nigeria, these skills are taught mainly during medical school and postgraduate training. Objectives: The study sought to assess the knowledge of anaesthetists about CPR. Methodology: A structured ...

  16. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: update, controversies and new advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre C. Zago

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary arrest is a medical emergency in which the lapse of time between event onset and the initiation of measures of basic and advanced support, as well as the correct care based on specific protocols for each clinical situation, constitute decisive factors for a successful therapy. Cardiopulmonary arrest care cannot be restricted to the hospital setting because of its fulminant nature. This necessitates the creation of new concepts, strategies and structures, such as the concept of life chain, cardio-pulmonary resuscitation courses for professionals who work in emergency medical services, the automated external defibrillator, the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, and mobile intensive care units, among others. New concepts, strategies and structures motivated by new advances have also modified the treatment and improved the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the hospital setting. Among them, we can cite the concept of cerebral resuscitation, the application of the life chain, the creation of the universal life support algorithm, the adjustment of drug doses, new techniques - measure of the end-tidal carbon dioxide levels and of the coronary perfusion pressure - and new drugs under research.

  17. Mitigating hyperventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolla, Dhimitri; Lewandowski, Tyler; Carlson, Jestin

    2016-03-01

    Although multiple airway management and ventilation strategies have been proposed during cardiac arrest, the ideal strategy is unknown. Current strategies call for advanced airways, such as endotracheal intubation and supraglottic airways. These may facilitate hyperventilation which is known to adversely affect cardiopulmonary physiology. We provide a summary of conceptual models linking hyperventilation to patient outcomes and identify methods for mitigating hyperventilation during cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Educational Purpose Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGHICIU Nicolae

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Along with the development of computers and other sciences we can use in our personal projects complex structures built with microcontrollers. They miniaturise and simplify the final project, instead they depend/rely on the computer, through the programming of the microcontroller/s/them. This project presents the application of electronics in order to achieve a resuscitation mannequin for didactic purpose, using Arduino Prototyping Platform.

  19. Liver laceration related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Beydilli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is recognized as a medical procedure performed to maintain vital functions of a person whose cardiac and respiratory functions have stopped. Chest compression is the most essential component of CPR and it is performed on the lower half of the sternum. During CPR, many complications may occur because of chest compressions, especially chest injuries including sternum and rib fractures. Rarely tracheal injury, rupture of the stomach, or liver or spleen injury may also occur as complications.In this study, we present two cases of liver injury caused by resuscitation. With this article, we want to emphasize the importance of making correct chest compressions. Keywords: Resuscitation complications, Emergency service, Liver laceration, Autopsy

  20. Some Medicolegal Aspects of the Russian Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Kuksinsky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyze the Russian legislation to identify the medicolegal aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are most significant for an intensive care anesthesiologist. Statutory acts concerning human health care, including those pertinent to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and those providing for the responsibility of medical workers in some cases were analyzed. A number of discrepancies in various legal acts concerning human death verification and resuscitative measures were identified. The analysis has revealed the aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are, from the point of view of legislation, most important for the physician.

  1. Apps4CPR: A review study of mobile applications for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M. (2013, 23 September). Apps4CPR: A review study of mobile applications for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and support. Presentation given during the 6th World Congress on Social Media, Mobile Apps and Internet/Web 2.0 in Medicine, Health, and Biomedical Research, London, UK.

  2. Comparison of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques using video camera recordings.

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, C J; Heyworth, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To use video recordings to compare the performance of resuscitation teams in relation to their previous training in cardiac resuscitation. METHODS--Over a 10 month period all cardiopulmonary resuscitations carried out in an accident and emergency (A&E) resuscitation room were videotaped. The following variables were monitored: (1) time to perform three defibrillatory shocks; (2) time to give intravenous adrenaline (centrally or peripherally); (3) the numbers and grade of medical an...

  3. Attitude of elderly patients towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chliara, Daphne; Chalkias, Athanasios; Horopanitis, Evaggelos E; Papadimitriou, Lila; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-10-01

    Although researchers in several countries have investigated patients' points of view regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there has been no research investigating this issue in Greece. The present study aimed at identifying the attitude of older Greek patients regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation. One basic questionnaire consisting of 34 questions was used in order to identify patients' opinions regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation in five different hospitals from June to November 2011. In total, 300 questionnaires were collected. Although patients' knowledge regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation was poor, most of them would like to be resuscitated in case they suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest. Also, they believe that they should have the right to accept or refuse treatment. However, the legal and sociocultural norms in Greece do not support patients' choice for the decision to refuse resuscitation. The influence of several factors, such as their general health status or the underlying pathology, could lead patients to give a "do not attempt resuscitation" order. The attitudes of older Greek patients regarding resuscitation are not different from others', whereas the legal and sociocultural norms in Greece do not support patient choice in end-of-life decisions, namely the decision to refuse resuscitation. We advocate the introduction of advanced directives, as well as the establishment and implementation of specific legislation regarding the ethics of resuscitation in Greece. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  4. Rescuer fatigue during simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, E S; Cheung, P-Y; O'Reilly, M; Aziz, K; Schmölzer, G M

    2015-02-01

    To assess development of fatigue during chest compressions (CCs) in simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Prospective randomized manikin crossover study. Thirty neonatal healthcare professionals who successfully completed the Neonatal Resuscitation Program performed CPR using (i) 3:1 compression:ventilation (C:V) ratio, (ii) continuous CC with asynchronous ventilation (CCaV) at a rate of 90 CC per min and (iii) CCaV at 120 CC per min for a duration of 10 min on a neonatal manikin. Changes in peak pressure (a surrogate of fatigue) and CC rate were continuously recorded and fatigue among groups was compared. Participants were blinded to pressure tracings and asked to rate their level of comfort and fatigue for each CPR trial. Compared with baseline, a significant decrease in peak pressure was observed after 72, 96 and 156 s in group CCaV-120, CCaV-90 and 3:1 C:V, respectively. CC depth decreased by 50% within the first 3 min during CCaV-120, 30% during CCaV-90 and 20% during 3:1 C:V. Moreover, 3:1 C:V and CCaV were similarly preferred by healthcare professionals. Similarly, 3:1 C:V and CCaV CPR were also fatiguing. We recommend that rescuers should switch after every second cycle of heart rate assessment during neonatal CPR.

  5. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Unusual Techniques for Unusual Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhu Bhatnagar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in prone position has been dealt with in 2010 American Heart Association (AHA guidelines but have not been reviewed in 2015 guidelines. The guidelines for patients presenting with cardiac arrest under general anesthesia in lateral decubitus position and regarding resuscitation in confined spaces like airplanes are also not available in AHA guidelines. This article is an attempt to highlight the techniques adopted for resuscitation in these unusual situations. Aims: This study aims to find out the methodology and efficacy in nonconventional CPR approaches such as CPR in prone, CPR in lateral position, and CPR in confined spaces. Methods: We conducted a literature search using MeSH search strings such as CPR + Prone position, CPR + lateral Position, and CPR + confined spaces. Results: No randomized controlled trials are available. The literature search gives a handful of case reports, some simulation- and manikin-based studies but none can qualify for class I evidence. The successful outcome of CPR performed in prone position has shown compressions delivered on the thoracic spine with the same rate and force as they were delivered during supine position. A hard surface is required under the patient to provide uniform force and sternal counter pressure. Two rescuer technique for providing successful chest compression in lateral position has been documented in the few case reports published. Over the head CPR and straddle (STR, CPR has been utilized for CPR in confined spaces. Ventilation in operating rooms was taken care by an advanced airway in situ. Conclusion: A large number of studies of high quality are required to be conducted to determine the efficacy of CPR in such positions.

  6. The Level Of Knowlege Guidelines Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation For Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Lukešová, Ludmila

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to determine the level of theoretical knowledge of the procedures of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of selected non-medical staff members in VFN in Prague. The work is subdivided into a theoretical and a practical part. In the first part I comment on the history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the basic and widespread vital support to adults and children and the didactics of CPR. In the second- practical part I compare the theoretical knowledge of CPR of selected n...

  7. Successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation following cardiopulmonary arrest in a geriatric chinchilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Christina M; Peyton, Jamie L; Miller, Mona; Johnson, Eric G; Kovacic, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    To describe the successful application of CPR in a geriatric chinchilla employing basic and advanced life support measures during cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). A 13-year-old female intact chinchilla presented to a general and multispecialty referral hospital for a dental procedure. During recovery from anesthesia the patient suffered CPA and CPR was initiated. Noninvasive positive pressure mask ventilation was initiated and external chest compressions were performed. An 18-Ga needle was introduced into the medullary cavity of the right humerus as an intraosseous catheter and provided access for administration of drugs and fluids. After return of spontaneous circulation was noted mannitol was administered via the intraosseous catheter to alleviate suspected increased intracranial pressure. Clinical improvement was noted shortly after administration. Monitoring during the recovery period showed a normal sinus cardiac rhythm and a SpO₂ of 100% while on supplemental oxygen. Neurologic function continued to improve over the following hours. Oxygen therapy was provided via an oxygen cage, and administration of antimicirobials, gastrointestinal protectants, and nutritional supplementation were part of the post resuscitation care. Oxygen therapy was discontinued after 24 hours, during which time normal behaviors were observed and neurologic status was considered appropriate. The patient was discharged 48 hours after CPA. Published reports from clinical practice on the outcomes of CPR for exotic small mammals are limited. This report details the successful outcome of the use of combined basic and advanced life support measures for the provision of CPR in a chinchilla. This report also highlights the utility of an intraosseous catheter for administration of drugs and fluids novel to this species during resuscitation and recovery. To the authors' knowledge this is the first published report of successful CPR following CPA in a geriatric chinchilla. © Veterinary Emergency

  8. Obstacles to bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, K; Taniguchi, T; Yoshida, M; Yamamoto, K

    2000-05-01

    bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is performed infrequently in Japan. We conducted this study to identify Japanese attitudes toward the performance of bystander CPR. participants were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with varying scenarios and CPR techniques (mouth-to-mouth ventilation plus chest compression (MMV plus CC) versus chest compression alone (CC)). a total of 1302/1355 individuals completed the questionnaire, including high school students, teachers, emergency medical technicians, medical nurses, and medical students. About 2% of high school students, 3% of teachers, 26% of emergency medical technicians, 3% of medical nurses and 16% of medical students claimed they would 'definitely' perform MMV plus CC on a stranger. However, 21-72% claimed they would prefer the alternative of performing CC alone. Respondents claimed their unwillingness to perform MMV is not due to the fear of contracting a communicable disease, but the lack of confidence in their ability to perform CPR properly. in all categories of respondents, willingness to perform MMV plus CC for a stranger was disappointingly low. Better training in MMV together with teaching awareness that CC alone can be given should be instituted to maximize the number of potential providers of CPR in the community, even in communities where the incidence of HIV is very low.

  9. The importance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Benjamin S

    2013-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a fundamental component of initial care for the victim of cardiac arrest. In the past few years, increasing quantitative evidence has demonstrated that survival from cardiac arrest is dependent on the quality of delivered CPR. This review will focus on this body of evidence and on a range of practical approaches to improving CPR performance. A number of strategies to improve CPR quality have been evaluated recently, during both prehospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest care. These strategies have included the use of real-time CPR sensing and feedback, the employment of physiologic monitoring such as end-tidal CO(2) measurement and the use of metronome prompting. The use of mechanical CPR devices to avoid the challenges of manual CPR performance has also represented a topic of great current interest. Additional approaches have focused on both prearrest training (e.g. high-fidelity simulation education and CPR refreshers) and postarrest training (e.g. debriefing). A number of strategies have been evaluated to improve CPR performance. While many questions remain surrounding the relative value of each approach, it is likely that combinations of these methods may be useful in a variety of care settings to improve care for cardiac arrest victims.

  10. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: what cost to cheat death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H; Angus, D C; Abramson, N S

    1996-12-01

    To review the various outcomes from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the factors that influence these outcomes, the costs associated with CPR, and the application of cost-analyses to CPR. Data used to prepare this article were drawn from published articles and work in progress. Articles were selected for their relevance to the subjects of CPR and cost-analysis by MEDLINE keyword search. The authors extracted all applicable data from the English literature. Cost-analysis studies of CPR programs are limited by the high variation in resources consumed and attribution of cost to these resources. Furthermore, cost projections have not been adjusted to reflect patient-dependent variation in outcome. Variation in the patient's underlying condition, presenting cardiac rhythm, time to provision of definitive CPR, and effective perfusion all influence final outcome and, consequently, influence the cost-effectiveness of CPR programs. Based on cost data from previous studies, preliminary estimates of the cost-effectiveness of CPR programs for all 6-month survivors of a large international multicenter collaborative trial are $406,605.00 per life saved (range $344,314.00 to $966,759.00), and $225,892.00 per quality-adjusted-life-year (range $191,286.00 to $537,088.00). Reported outcome from CPR has varied from reasonable rates of good recovery, including return to full employment to 100% mortality. Appropriate CPR is encouraged, but continued widespread application appears extremely expensive.

  11. New insights for adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Up-coming resuscitation guidelines 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Pranskūnas, Andrius; Dobožinskas, Paulius; Pilvinis, Vidas; Pranskūnienė, Živilė; Jasinskas, Nedas; Stašaitis, Kęstutis; Vaitkaitienė, Eglė; Vaitkaitis, Dinas

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in cardiac arrest care, the overall survival to hospital discharge remains poor. The objective of this paper was to review the innovations in cardiopulmonary resuscitation that could influence survival or change our understanding about cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We have performed a search in the MEDLINE and the Cochrane databases for randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, expert reviews from December 2005 to March 2010 using the terms cardiac arrest, basic life supp...

  12. delta-Opioid-induced pharmacologic myocardial hibernation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiangshao; Tang, Wanchun; Sun, Shijie; Weil, Max Harry

    2006-12-01

    Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an event of global myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, which is associated with severe postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction and fatal outcome. Evidence has demonstrated that mammalian hibernation is triggered by cyclic variation of a delta-opiate-like compound in endogenous serum, during which the myocardial metabolism is dramatically reduced and the myocardium tolerates the stress of ischemia and reperfusion without overt ischemic and reperfusion injury. Previous investigations also proved that the delta-opioid agonist elicited the cardioprotection in a model of regional ischemic intact heart or myocyte. Accordingly, we were prompted to search for an alternative intervention of pharmacologically induced myocardial hibernation that would result in rapid reductions of myocardial metabolism and therefore minimize the myocardial ischemic and reperfusion injury during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Prospective, controlled laboratory study. University-affiliated research laboratory. In the series of studies performed in the established rat and pig model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the delta-opioid receptor agonist, pentazocine, was administered during ventricular fibrillation. : The myocardial metabolism reflected by the concentration of lactate, or myocardial tissue PCO2 and PO2, is dramatically reduced during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. These are associated with less severe postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction and longer duration of postresuscitation survival. delta-Opioid-induced pharmacologic myocardial hibernation is an option to minimize the myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  13. Outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation - predictors of survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishtiaq, O.; Iqbal, M.; Zubair, M.; Qayyum, R.; Adil, M.

    2008-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Data were collected retrospectively of all adult patients who underwent CPR. Clinical outcomes of interest were survival at the end of CPR and survival at discharge from hospital. Factors associated with survival were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Of the 159 patients included, 55 (35%) were alive at the end of CPR and 17 (11%) were discharged alive from the hospital. At the end of CPR, univariate logistic regression analysis found the following factors associated with survival: cardiac arrest within hospital as compared to outside the hospital (odds ratio = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.27-6.20, p-value = 0.01), both cardiac and pulmonary arrest as compared to either cardiac or pulmonary arrest (odds ratio = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.19- 0.73, p-value = 0.004), asystole as cardiac rhythm at presentation (odds ratio = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.24-0.93, p-value = 0.03), and total atropine dose given during CPR (odds ratio = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62-0.97, p-value = 0.02). In multivariate logistic regression, cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.06-5.99, p-value = 0.04) and both cardiac and pulmonary arrest as compared to cardiac or pulmonary arrest (odds ratio = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.21-0.91, p-value = 0.03) were associated with survival at the end of CPR. At the time of discharge from hospital, univariate logistic regression analysis found following factors that were associated with survival: cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio = 8.4, 95% CI = 1.09-65.64, p-value = 0.04), duration of CPR (odds ratio = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.85-0.96, p-value = 0.001), and total atropine dose given during CPR (odds ratio = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.47-0.99, p-value = 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analysis cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio 8.69, 95% CI = 1.01-74.6, p-value = 0.05) and duration of CPR (odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.98, p-value = 0.01) were associated with survival at

  14. Acute posthypoxic myoclonus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwes Aline

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute posthypoxic myoclonus (PHM can occur in patients admitted after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and is considered to have a poor prognosis. The origin can be cortical and/or subcortical and this might be an important determinant for treatment options and prognosis. The aim of the study was to investigate whether acute PHM originates from cortical or subcortical structures, using somatosensory evoked potential (SEP and electroencephalogram (EEG. Methods Patients with acute PHM (focal myoclonus or status myoclonus within 72 hours after CPR were retrospectively selected from a multicenter cohort study. All patients were treated with hypothermia. Criteria for cortical origin of the myoclonus were: giant SEP potentials; or epileptic activity, status epilepticus, or generalized periodic discharges on the EEG (no back-averaging was used. Good outcome was defined as good recovery or moderate disability after 6 months. Results Acute PHM was reported in 79/391 patients (20%. SEPs were available in 51/79 patients and in 27 of them (53% N20 potentials were present. Giant potentials were seen in 3 patients. EEGs were available in 36/79 patients with 23/36 (64% patients fulfilling criteria for a cortical origin. Nine patients (12% had a good outcome. A broad variety of drugs was used for treatment. Conclusions The results of this study show that acute PHM originates from subcortical, as well as cortical structures. Outcome of patients admitted after CPR who develop acute PHM in this cohort was better than previously reported in literature. The broad variety of drugs used for treatment shows the existing uncertainty about optimal treatment.

  15. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Araujo G. Ferreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%, in Medicine and Nursing (46%, and were surveys (72% with healthcare team members (67% as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c to develop a written institutional policy; d to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes.

  16. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in Nigerian Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: For effective bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), retention of CPR skills after the training is central. The objective of this study was to find out how much of the CPR skills a group of Nigerian secondary school students would retain six weeks after their first exposure to the conventional CPR training. Materials…

  17. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and contrast media reactions in a radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, John M.; McBride, Kieran D.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To assess current knowledge and training in the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation within a radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The standard of knowledge about the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation among radiologists, radiographers and nurses were audited using a two-section questionnaire. Our results were compared against nationally accepted standards. Repeat audits were undertaken over a 28-month period. Three full audit cycles were completed. RESULTS: The initial audit confirmed that although a voluntary training programme was in place, knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques were below acceptable levels (set at 70%) for all staff members. The mean score for radiologists was 50%. Immediate changes instituted included retraining courses, the distribution of standard guidelines and the composition and distribution of two separate information handouts. Initial improvements were complemented by new wallcharts, which were distributed throughout the department, a series of lectures on management of contrast reactions and regular reviews with feedback to staff. In the third and final audit all staff groups had surpassed the required standard. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of contrast media reactions and resuscitation needs constant updating. Revision of skills requires a prescriptive programme; visual display of advice is a constant reminder. It is our contention all radiology departmental staff should consider it a personal duty to maintain their resuscitation skills at appropriate standards. O'Neill, J.M., McBride, K.D.(2001). Clinical Radiology 00, 000-000

  18. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and contrast media reactions in a radiology department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, John M.; McBride, Kieran D

    2001-04-01

    AIM: To assess current knowledge and training in the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation within a radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The standard of knowledge about the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation among radiologists, radiographers and nurses were audited using a two-section questionnaire. Our results were compared against nationally accepted standards. Repeat audits were undertaken over a 28-month period. Three full audit cycles were completed. RESULTS: The initial audit confirmed that although a voluntary training programme was in place, knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques were below acceptable levels (set at 70%) for all staff members. The mean score for radiologists was 50%. Immediate changes instituted included retraining courses, the distribution of standard guidelines and the composition and distribution of two separate information handouts. Initial improvements were complemented by new wallcharts, which were distributed throughout the department, a series of lectures on management of contrast reactions and regular reviews with feedback to staff. In the third and final audit all staff groups had surpassed the required standard. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of contrast media reactions and resuscitation needs constant updating. Revision of skills requires a prescriptive programme; visual display of advice is a constant reminder. It is our contention all radiology departmental staff should consider it a personal duty to maintain their resuscitation skills at appropriate standards. O'Neill, J.M., McBride, K.D.(2001). Clinical Radiology 00, 000-000.

  19. Latin American Consensus for Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 2017: Latin American Pediatric Critical Care Society Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Almonte, Enma; Alvarado, Manuel; Bogado, Norma Beatriz; Cyunel, Mariana; Escalante, Raffo; Finardi, Christiane; Guzmán, Gustavo; Jaramillo-Bustamante, Juan C; Madrid, Claudia C; Matamoros, Martha; Moya, Luis Augusto; Obando, Grania; Reboredo, Gaspar; López, Lissette R; Scheu, Christian; Valenzuela, Alejandro; Yerovi, Rocío; Yock-Corrales, Adriana

    2018-03-01

    To develop a Latin American Consensus about Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. To clarify, reinforce, and adapt some specific recommendations for pediatric patients and to stimulate the implementation of these recommendations in clinical practice. Expert consensus recommendations with Delphi methodology. Latin American countries. Experts in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation from 19 Latin American countries. Delphi methodology for expert consensus. The goal was to reach consensus with all the participating experts for every recommendation. An agreement of at least 80% of the participating experts had to exist in order to deliver a recommendation. Two Delphi voting rounds were sent out electronically. The experts were asked to score between 1 and 9 their level of agreement for each recommendation. The score was then classified into three groups: strong agreement (score 7-9), moderate agreement (score 4-6), and disagreement (score 1-3). Nineteen experts from 19 countries participated in both voting rounds and in the whole process of drafting the recommendations. Sixteen recommendations about organization of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, prevention, basic resuscitation, advanced resuscitation, and postresuscitation measures were approved. Ten of them had a consensus of 100%. Four of them were agreed by all the participants except one (94.7% consensus). One recommendation was agreed by all except two experts (89.4%), and finally, one was agreed by all except three experts (84.2%). All the recommendations reached a level of agreement. This consensus adapts 16 international recommendations to Latin America in order to improve the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children. Studies should be conducted to analyze the effectiveness of the implementation of these recommendations.

  20. Basic cardiopulmonary life support (BCLS for cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained paramedics and medics outside the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary resuscitation guideline of Basic Cardiopulmonary Life Support (BCLS for management of adult victims with cardiopulmonary arrest outside the hospital provides an algorithmic stepwise approach for optimal outcome of the victims by trained medics and paramedics. This guideline has been developed considering the need to have a universally acceptable practice guideline for India and keeping in mind the infrastructural limitations of some areas of the country. This guideline is based on evidence elicited in the international and national literature. In the absence of data from Indian population, the excerpts have been taken from international data, discussed with Indian experts and thereafter modified to make them practically applicable across India. The optimal outcome for a victim with cardiopulmonary arrest would depend on core links of early recognition and activation; early high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation and early transfer to medical facility. These links are elaborated in a stepwise manner in the BCLS algorithm. The BCLS also emphasise on quality check for various steps of resuscitation.

  1. Strategy analysis of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the community

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Li; Lu, Yuan-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest. This appreciation produced immense efforts by professional organizations to train laypeople for CPR skills. However, the rate of CPR training is low and varies widely across communities. Several strategies are used in order to improve the rate of CPR training and are performed in some advanced countries. The Chinese CPR training in communities could gain enlightenment from them.

  2. Traumatic Pancreatitis: A Rare Complication of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Muhammad

    2017-08-17

    An elderly gentleman was successfully revived after undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for cardiac arrest. Post CPR, the patient developed acute pancreatitis which was likely complication of inappropriately delivered chest compressions which caused further complications and resulted in the death of the patient. This case underlines the importance of quality chest compressions that includes correct placement of hands by the operator giving chest compressions to avoid lethal injuries to the receiver.

  3. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation standards for clinical practice and training in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbott, David; Smith, Gary; Mitchell, Sarah; Colquhoun, Michael; Nolan, Jerry; Soar, Jasmeet; Pitcher, David; Perkins, Gavin; Phillips, Barbara; King, Ben; Spearpoint, Ken

    2005-07-01

    The Royal College of Anaesthetists, the Royal College of Physicians, the Intensive Care Society and the Resuscitation Council (UK) have published new resuscitation standards. The document provides advice to UK healthcare organisations, resuscitation committees and resuscitation officers on all aspects of the resuscitation service. It includes sections on resuscitation training, resuscitation equipment, the cardiac arrest team, cardiac arrest prevention, patient transfer, post-resuscitation care, audit and research. The document makes several recommendations. Healthcare institutions should have, or be represented on, a resuscitation committee that is responsible for all resuscitation issues. Every institution should have at least one resuscitation officer responsible for teaching and conducting training in resuscitation techniques. Staff with patient contact should be given regular resuscitation training appropriate to their expected abilities and roles. Clinical staff should receive regular training in the recognition of patients at risk of cardiopulmonary arrest and the measures required for the prevention of cardiopulmonary arrest. Healthcare institutions admitting acutely ill patients should have a resuscitation team, or its equivalent, available at all times. Clear guidelines should be available indicating how and when to call for the resuscitation team. Cardiopulmonary arrest should be managed according to current national guidelines. Resuscitation equipment should be available throughout the institution for clinical use and for training. The practice of resuscitation should be audited to maintain and improve standards of care. A do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) policy should be compiled, communicated to relevant members of staff, used and audited regularly. Funding must be provided to support an effective resuscitation service.

  4. European cardiovascular nurses' and allied professionals' knowledge and practical skills regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Trond R; Mårtensson, Jan; Axelsson, Åsa; Jørgensen, Marianne; Strömberg, Anna; Thompson, David R; Norekvål, Tone M

    2018-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) remains a cornerstone in the treatment of cardiac arrest, and is directly linked to survival rates. Nurses are often first responders and need to be skilled in the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. As cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills deteriorate rapidly, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether there was an association between participants' cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and their practical cardiopulmonary resuscitation test results. This comparative study was conducted at the 2014 EuroHeartCare meeting in Stavanger ( n=133) and the 2008 Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing in Malmö ( n=85). Participants performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation for three consecutive minutes CPR training manikins from Laerdal Medical®. Data were collected with a questionnaire on demographics and participants' level of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Most participants were female (78%) nurses (91%) from Nordic countries (77%), whose main role was in nursing practice (63%), and 71% had more than 11 years' experience ( n=218). Participants who conducted cardiopulmonary resuscitation training once a year or more ( n=154) performed better regarding ventilation volume than those who trained less (859 ml vs. 1111 ml, p=0.002). Those who had cardiopulmonary resuscitation training offered at their workplace ( n=161) also performed better regarding ventilation volume (889 ml vs. 1081 ml, p=0.003) and compression rate per minute (100 vs. 91, p=0.04) than those who had not. Our study indicates a positive association between participants' performance on the practical cardiopulmonary resuscitation test and the frequency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation training was offered in the workplace. Large ventilation volumes were the most common error at both measuring points.

  5. Interhospital Transport of Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Practical and Ethical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noje, Corina; Fishe, Jennifer N; Costabile, Philomena M; Klein, Bruce L; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Pronovost, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    To discuss risks and benefits of interhospital transport of children in cardiac arrest undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Narrative review. Not applicable. Transporting children in cardiac arrest with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation between hospitals is potentially lifesaving if it enables access to resources such as extracorporeal support, but may risk transport personnel safety. Research is needed to optimize outcomes of patients transported with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reduce risks to the staff caring for them.

  6. [Nursing process in advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio Peña, Gerardo; Fuentes Leonardo, Ana María

    2002-01-01

    The process male nurse is a systematic and organized method to offer effective and efficient cares guided to the achievement of solving real problems of health, reducing the incidence and the duration. It is organized and systematic for that consists of five sequential and interrelated steps: Valuation, diagnostic, planning, execution and evaluation, in which are carried out interrelated actions, thought to maximize the long term results. The nurse process is based on the notion that the success of the cares is measured by the degree of effectiveness and the degree of satisfaction and the patient's progress. Applying this method in the Advanced Cardiac Live Support (ACLS) the identification of a cardiovascular or cardiopulmonary urgency was achieved that implies advanced treatment of the air road, defibrillation and appropriate medications to the circumstances. The ACLS challenges the nurses in charge from the patient's attention to make decisions quick low pressure and in dramatic scenes. Reason why it develops the flowing process male nurse in the advanced cardiopulmonary reanimation due to the incidence of these events in the National Institute of Cardiology Ignacio Chávez, which should guarantee the benefit of services in basic and advanced cardiopulmonary reanimation for personal with a high formation level in all the units of intensive cares and services of hospitalization in integrated form and stratified this way to avoid that it progresses to situations that cause the death or leave irreversible sequels since in the central nervous system the time it is a factor critical for the treatment of this events.

  7. The key changes in pediatric and neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Dyi-Shiang; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) were changed in 2005. There were some key changes in the recommendations for pediatric basic and advanced life support, and neonatal resuscitation. The key changes included: emphasis on effective compressions (push hard, push fast, allow full chest recoil and minimize interruptions in compressions), a single compression-ventilation ratio (30:2) CPR for all groups of ages (except neonate), confirmation of effective ventilations, medication given and defibrillator charged without interruption of CPR, not recommended to routine tracheal suction the vigorous meconium-stained baby in newborn resuscitation, etc. We illustrate the major key changes and hope everyone is well trained to perform high quality CPR.

  8. A survey on training in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Latin America, Spain, and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Carrillo, Angel

    2011-09-01

    To determine how training in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation is provided in the Iberoamerican countries. Survey. Latin America, Spain, and Portugal. Experts in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation education. A questionnaire was sent to experts in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in 21 countries in Latin America, Spain, and Portugal; we received 15 replies. Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training is not included in medical undergraduate or nursing training in any of these countries and pediatric residents receive systematic cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in only four countries. Basic pediatric life support courses, pediatric advanced life support courses, and pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructors courses are given in 13 of 15, 14 of 15, and 11 of 15 respondent countries, respectively. Course duration and the number of hours of practical training were variable: basic life support, 5 hrs (range, 4-8 hrs); practical training, 4 hrs (range, 2-5 hrs); advanced life support, 18 hrs (range, 10-30 hrs); and practical training, 14 hrs (range, 5-18 hrs). Only nine countries (60%) had a national group that organized pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Thirteen countries (86.6%) had fewer than five centers offering pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Respondents considered the main obstacles to the expansion of training in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation to be the shortage of instructors (28.5%), students' lack of financial resources (21.4%), and deficiencies in educational organization (21.4%). Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training is not uniform across the majority of Iberoamerican countries, with poor organization and little institutional involvement. National groups should be created in each country to plan and coordinate pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and to coordinate with other Iberoamerican countries.

  9. Survival without sequelae after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation after electric shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motawea, Mohamad; Al-Kenany, Al-Sayed; Hosny, Mostafa; Aglan, Omar; Samy, Mohamad; Al-Abd, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    "Electrical shock is the physiological reaction or injury caused by electric current passing through the human body. It occurs upon contact of a human body part with any source of electricity that causes a sufficient current through the skin, muscles, or hair causing undesirable effects ranging from simple burns to death." Ventricular fibrillation is believed to be the most common cause of death after electrical shock. "The ideal duration of cardiac resuscitation is unknown. Typically prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation is associated with poor neurologic outcomes and reduced long term survival. No consensus statement has been made and traditionally efforts are usually terminated after 15-30 minutes." The case under discussion seems worthy of the somewhat detailed description given. It is for a young man who survived after 65 minutes after electrical shock (ES) after prolonged high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), multiple defibrillations, and artificial ventilation without any sequelae. Early start of adequate chest compressions and close adherence to advanced cardiac life support protocols played a vital role in successful CPR.

  10. Does Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Cause Rib Fractures in Children? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Sabine; Mann, Mala; John, Nia; Ellaway, Bev; Sibert, Jo R.; Kemp, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is a diagnostic dilemma when a child presents with rib fractures after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) where child abuse is suspected as the cause of collapse. We have performed a systematic review to establish the evidence base for the following questions: (i) Does cardiopulmonary resuscitation cause rib fractures in…

  11. Voice advisory manikin versus instructor facilitated training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Høiby, Pernilla; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Training of healthcare staff in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is time-consuming and costly. It has been suggested to replace instructor facilitated (IF) training with an automated voice advisory manikin (VAM), which increases skill level by continuous verbal feedback during...... individual training. AIMS: To compare a VAM (ResusciAnne CPR skills station, Laerdal Medical A/S, Norway) with IF training in CPR using a bag-valve-mask (BVM) in terms of skills retention after 3 months. METHODS: Forty-three second year medical students were included and CPR performance (ERC Guidelines...... for Resuscitation 2005) was assessed in a 2 min test before randomisation to either IF training in groups of 8 or individual VAM training. Immediately after training and after 3 months, CPR performance was assessed in identical 2 min tests. Laerdal PC Skill Reporting System 2.0 was used to collect data. To quantify...

  12. [2018 National consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixiang; Meng, Qingyi; Yu, Tao

    2018-05-01

    To promote the technical training and scientific popularization of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in China, the Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Specialized Committee of Chinese Research Hospital Association combined with the Science Popularization Branch of the Chinese Medical Association wrote "2018 National consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in China". The formation was based on the general outline about "2016 National consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation in China", and to implement the important strategies included the "three pre" policy, prevention, precognition, and pre-warning, before the cardiac arrest (CA); the "three modernization" methods, standardized, diversified and individualized, during the CA; and the "three life" strategies, the rebirth, the extra and the extended, after the CA; and also combined with the concrete National conditions and clinical practice of China area. The document summarized the evidence of published science about CPR training till now, and recommend the establishment of "the CPR Training Triangle" according to the Chinese National conditions. The bases of the triangle were system, training and person, the core of which was CPR science. The main contents were: (1) The "three training" policy for CPR training: the cultivation of a sound system, which included professional credibility, extensive mobilization and continuous driving force, and the participation of the whole people and continuous improvement; the cultivation of scientific guidelines, which included scientific content, methods and thinking; and the cultivation of a healthy culture, which included the enhancement of civic quality, education of rescue scientifically, and advocate of healthy life. (2) The "three training" program of CPR training: training professional skills, which included standard, multiple, and individual skills; training multidimensional, which included time, space, and human; and training flexible, including problem, time

  13. Education Strategies Through Simulation For Training In Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regimar Carla Machado

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and reflective study based on scientific literature and critical analysis of authors related to teaching strategies through simulation for training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Current teaching methodologies CPR involve realistic simulation strategies and simulations in virtual environments, but the first method provides the best results, allowing proactivity of individuals in their teaching-learning process and bringing them the experience of a life threatening situation. It is noteworthy that health professionals need to be able to assist a victim in cardiac arrest, but even  existing effective teaching methodologies to enable them in this subject, is not fully applicable in the Brazilian context of health education.

  14. Knowledge of Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation among Brazilian Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Scipião Moura

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Sudden death is a substantial public health problem, representing a major cause of mortality worldwide. Suitable initial care is essential for a good prognosis of these patients. Objectives To assess the knowledge of the 2010 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR among medical students in their final year of undergraduate training. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 217 medical students enrolled in the sixth year of accredited medical schools in Brazil. A structured questionnaire with 27 items was used to record the sociodemographic characteristics of the participants and to assess their knowledge base of the 2010 ILCOR guidelines for CPR. Results Only fifty (23.04% out of 217 students achieved results considered as satisfactory in the written evaluation. The average score obtained was 56.74% correct answers. Seventeen percent of the students had never performed CPR maneuvers and 83.80% had never performed cardioversion or defibrillation. Conclusions The knowledge base of medical students regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation is low. Considering these medical students are in their final year of medical school, this study reveals a worrisome scenario.

  15. Bystander initiated actions in out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: results from the Amsterdam Resuscitation Study (ARRESUST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalewijn, R. A.; Tijssen, J. G.; Koster, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the functioning of the first two links of the chain of survival: 'access' and 'basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)'. In a prospective study, all bystander witnessed circulatory arrests resuscitated by emergency medical service (EMS) personnel, were

  16. The impact of post-resuscitation feedback for paramedics on the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleijenberg, Eduard; Koster, Rudolph W; de Vries, Hendrik; Beesems, Stefanie G

    2017-01-01

    The Guidelines place emphasis on high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study aims to measure the impact of post-resuscitation feedback on the quality of CPR as performed by ambulance personnel. Two ambulances are dispatched for suspected cardiac arrest. The crew (driver and paramedic) of the first arriving ambulance is responsible for the quality of CPR. The crew of the second ambulance establishes an intravenous access and supports the first crew. All resuscitation attempts led by the ambulance crew of the study region were reviewed by two research paramedics and structured feedback was given based on defibrillator recording with impedance signal. A 12-months period before introduction of post-resuscitation feedback was compared with a 19-months period after introduction of feedback, excluding a six months run-in interval. Quality parameters were chest compression fraction (CCF), chest compression rate, longest peri-shock pause and longest non-shock pause. In the pre-feedback period 55 cases were analyzed and 69 cases in the feedback period. Median CCF improved significantly in the feedback period (79% vs 86%, presuscitation feedback improves the quality of resuscitation, significantly increasing CCF and decreasing the duration of longest non-shock pauses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Revolving back to the basics in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roppolo, L P; Wigginton, J G; Pepe, P E

    2009-05-01

    Since the 1970s, most of the research and debate regarding interventions for cardiopulmonary arrest have focused on advanced life support (ALS) therapies and early defibrillation strategies. During the past decade, however, international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have not only emphasized the concept of uninterrupted chest compressions, but also improvements in the timing, rate and quality of those compressions. In essence, it has been a ''revolution'' in resuscitation medicine in terms of ''coming full circle'' to the 1960s when basic CPR was first developed. Recent data have indicated the need for minimally-interrupted chest compressions with an accompanying emphasis toward removing rescue ventilation altogether in sudden cardiac arrest, at least in the few minutes after a sudden unheralded collapse. In other studies, transient delays in defibrillation attempts and ALS interventions are even recommended so that basic CPR can be prioritized to first restore and maintain better coronary artery perfusion. New devices have now been developed to modify, in real-time, the performance of basic CPR, during both training and an actual resuscitative effort. Several new adjuncts have been created to augment chest compressions or enhance venous return and evolving technology may now be able to identify ventricular fibrillation (VF) without interrupting chest compressions. A renewed focus on widespread CPR training for the average person has also returned to center stage with ground-breaking training initiatives including validated video-based adult learning courses that can reliably teach and enable long term retention of basic CPR skills and automated external defibrillator (AED) use.

  18. High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation: current and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Benjamin S

    2016-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) represents the cornerstone of cardiac arrest resuscitation care. Prompt delivery of high-quality CPR can dramatically improve survival outcomes; however, the definitions of optimal CPR have evolved over several decades. The present review will discuss the metrics of CPR delivery, and the evidence supporting the importance of CPR quality to improve clinical outcomes. The introduction of new technologies to quantify metrics of CPR delivery has yielded important insights into CPR quality. Investigations using CPR recording devices have allowed the assessment of specific CPR performance parameters and their relative importance regarding return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge. Additional work has suggested new opportunities to measure physiologic markers during CPR and potentially tailor CPR delivery to patient requirements. Through recent laboratory and clinical investigations, a more evidence-based definition of high-quality CPR continues to emerge. Exciting opportunities now exist to study quantitative metrics of CPR and potentially guide resuscitation care in a goal-directed fashion. Concepts of high-quality CPR have also informed new approaches to training and quality improvement efforts for cardiac arrest care.

  19. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation already in Egypt 5,000 years ago?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocklitz, A

    1997-06-06

    In light of the medically relevant features of the ancient Egyptian mouth-opening ceremony, the question of the effectiveness of medical practices in Egypt thousands of years ago is examined, whereby the religious and cultural framework also plays a significant role. In the Land on the Nile myth and reality clearly generated special conditions which favoured the systematic treatment of questions of resuscitation. Numerous examples show that this had practical consequences in the area of everyday medicine. In addition, rebirth and resurrection were central elements of the cult of the dead which had exact medical equivalents. These equivalents may demonstrate the advanced state of resuscitation practices in Egypt at that time. In this context, a reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian mouth-opening instrument is presented. In the cult of the dead, this instrument played a role which can be compared to the function of a modern laryngoscope. It appears possible that at the time of the pyramids the Egyptians already had an understanding of the technology required to perform instrument-aided artificial respiration. Whether or not they actually possessed a fundamental knowledge of the principles of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation remains unclear. Nevertheless, the astonishingly functional characteristics of the reconstructed mouth-opening instrument suggest that it was developed for more than purely symbolic purposes.

  20. Comprehensive cardiopulmonary life support (CCLS for cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained paramedics and medics inside the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR guideline of comprehensive cardiopulmonary life support (CCLS for management of the patient with cardiopulmonary arrest in adults provides an algorithmic step-wise approach for optimal outcome of the patient inside the hospital by trained medics and paramedics. This guideline has been developed considering the infrastructure of healthcare delivery system in India. This is based on evidence in the international and national literature. In the absence of data from the Indian population, the extrapolation has been made from international data, discussed with Indian experts and modified accordingly to ensure their applicability in India. The CCLS guideline emphasise the need to recognise patients at risk for cardiac arrest and their timely management before a cardiac arrest occurs. The basic components of CPR include chest compressions for blood circulation; airway maintenance to ensure airway patency; lung ventilation to enable oxygenation and defibrillation to convert a pathologic 'shockable' cardiac rhythm to one capable to maintaining effective blood circulation. CCLS emphasises incorporation of airway management, drugs, and identification of the cause of arrest and its correction, while chest compression and ventilation are ongoing. It also emphasises the value of organised team approach and optimal post-resuscitation care.

  1. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Pediatric Cardiac Population: In Search of a Standard of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Javier J; Jain, Parag; Raymond, Tia T; Minard, Charles G; Topjian, Alexis; Nadkarni, Vinay; Gaies, Michael; Bembea, Melania; Checchia, Paul A; Shekerdemian, Lara S; Thiagarajan, Ravi

    2018-02-01

    Although clinical and pharmacologic guidelines exist for the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children (Pediatric Advanced Life Support), the practice of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pediatric cardiac patients remains without universally accepted standards. We aim to explore variation in extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures by surveying clinicians who care for this high-risk patient population. A 28-item cross-sectional survey was distributed via a web-based platform to clinicians focusing on cardiopulmonary resuscitation practices and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation team dynamics immediately prior to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cannulation. Pediatric hospitals providing extracorporeal mechanical support services to patients with congenital and/or acquired heart disease. Critical care/cardiology specialist physicians, cardiothoracic surgeons, advanced practice nurse practitioners, respiratory therapists, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation specialists. None. Survey web links were distributed over a 2-month period with critical care and/or cardiology physicians comprising the majority of respondents (75%). Nearly all respondents practice at academic/teaching institutions (97%), 89% were from U.S./Canadian institutions and 56% reported less than 10 years of clinical experience. During extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation, a majority of respondents reported adherence to guideline recommendations for epinephrine bolus dosing (64%). Conversely, 19% reported using only one to three epinephrine bolus doses regardless of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration. Inotropic support is held after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cannulation "most of the time" by 58% of respondents and 94% report using afterload reducing/antihypertensive agents "some" to "most of the time" after achieving full extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. Interruptions in chest compressions are common

  2. Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation. An experimental study in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wohlfart Björn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal manual closed chest compressions are difficult to give. A mechanical compression/decompression device, named LUCAS, is programmed to give compression according to the latest international guidelines (2005 for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. The aim of the present study was to compare manual CPR with LUCAS-CPR. Methods 30 kg pigs were anesthetized and intubated. After a base-line period and five minutes of ventricular fibrillation, manual CPR (n = 8 or LUCAS-CPR (n = 8 was started and run for 20 minutes. Professional paramedics gave manual chest compression's alternating in 2-minute periods. Ventilation, one breath for each 10 compressions, was given to all animals. Defibrillation and, if needed, adrenaline were given to obtain a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Results The mean coronary perfusion pressure was significantly (p Conclusions LUCAS-CPR gave significantly higher coronary perfusion pressure and significantly fewer rib fractures than manual CPR in this porcine model.

  3. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and skills of registered nurses in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswaran, Lakshmi; Ehlers, Valerie J

    2014-01-01

    In Botswana nurses provide most health care in the primary, secondary and tertiary level clinics and hospitals. Trauma and medical emergencies are on the increase, and nurses should have cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge and skills in order to be able to implement effective interventions in cardiac arrest situations. The objective of this descriptive study was to assess registered nurses’ CPR knowledge and skills. A pre-test, intervention and re-test time-series research design was adopted, and data were collected from 102 nurses from the 2 referral hospitals in Botswana. A multiple-choice questionnaire and checklist were used to collect data. All nurses failed the pre-test. Their knowledge and skills improved after training, but deteriorated over the three months until the post-test was conducted. The significantly low levels of registered nurses’ CPR skills in Botswana should be addressed by instituting country-wide CPR training and regular refresher courses

  4. Certified Basic Life Support Instructors Assess Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills Poorly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla; Rasmussen, Stinne E; Kristensen, Mette Amalie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival from cardiac arrest. During basic life support (BLS) training, instructors assess CPR skills to enhance learning outcome. Emergency department staff and senior residents have been shown to assess chest compression...... quality poorly. Currently no studies have evaluated CPR assessment among certified BLS instructors. The aim of this study was to investigate certified BLS instructors’ assessment of chest compressions and rescue breathing.Methods: Data were collected at BLS courses for medical students at Aarhus...... of CPR skills may be beneficial to ensure high-quality learning outcome.Author Disclosures: C. Hansen: None. S.E. Rasmussen: None. M.A. Nebsbjerg: None. M. Stærk: None. B. Løfgren: None....

  5. [Basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation courses for parents of newborns and infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez, Diego; Castro, Adriana; Rabasa, Cecilia; Capelli, Carola; Cores Ponte, Florencia; Gutiérrez, Susana; Mariani, Gonzalo; Pacchioni, Sergio; Pardo, Amorina; Pérez, Gastón; Sorgetti, Mariana; Szyld, Edgardo

    2014-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) courses meet all the definitions of an educational activity for prevention of cardiac arrest death by risk patients' parents and/or the general population. The aim is to improve patients' home care and turn parents confident before their children are discharged from hospital, mainly from intensive care units. Currently these courses are part of discharge protocols in many neonatologist services although there are offers that exceed this target, and extend to other areas such as education and caregivers. Locally the experience of neonatal CPR at the Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría stands out in connection with delivering courses to high risk patients' parents as well as designing and spreading learning material.

  6. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions in the emergency department: An ethnography of tacit knowledge in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummell, Stephen P; Seymour, Jane; Higginbottom, Gina

    2016-05-01

    Despite media images to the contrary, cardiopulmonary resuscitation in emergency departments is often unsuccessful. The purpose of this ethnographic study was to explore how health care professionals working in two emergency departments in the UK, make decisions to commence, continue or stop resuscitation. Data collection involved participant observation of resuscitation attempts and in-depth interviews with nurses, medical staff and paramedics who had taken part in the attempts. Detailed case examples were constructed for comparative analysis. Findings show that emergency department staff use experience and acquired tacit knowledge to construct a typology of cardiac arrest categories that help them navigate decision making. Categorisation is based on 'less is more' heuristics which combine explicit and tacit knowledge to facilitate rapid decisions. Staff then work as a team to rapidly assimilate and interpret information drawn from observations of the patient's body and from technical, biomedical monitoring data. The meaning of technical data is negotiated during staff interaction. This analysis was informed by a theory of 'bodily' and 'technical' trajectory alignment that was first developed from an ethnography of death and dying in intensive care units. The categorisation of cardiac arrest situations and trajectory alignment are the means by which staff achieve consensus decisions and determine the point at which an attempt should be withdrawn. This enables them to construct an acceptable death in highly challenging circumstances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.F.; DeGuzman, L.R.; Pedersen, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Recent papers have raised doubt as to the magnitude of coronary blood flow during closed-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We will describe experiments that concern the methods of coronary flow measurement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nine anesthetized swine were instrumented to allow simultaneous measurements of coronary blood flow by both electromagnetic cuff flow probes and by the radiomicrosphere technique. Cardiac arrest was caused by electrical fibrillation and closed-chest massage was performed by a Thumper (Dixie Medical Inc., Houston). The chest was compressed transversely at a rate of 66 strokes/min. Compression occupied one-half of the massage cycle. Three different Thumper piston strokes were studied: 1.5, 2, and 2.5 inches. Mean aortic pressure and total systemic blood flow measured by the radiomicrosphere technique increased as Thumper piston stroke was lengthened (mean +/- SD): 1.5 inch stroke, 23 +/- 4 mm Hg, 525 +/- 195 ml/min; 2 inch stroke, 33 +/- 5 mm Hg, 692 +/- 202 ml/min; 2.5 inch stroke, 40 +/- 6 mm Hg, 817 +/- 321 ml/min. Both methods of coronary flow measurement (electromagnetic [EMF] and radiomicrosphere [RMS]) gave similar results in technically successful preparations (data expressed as percent prearrest flow mean +/- 1 SD): 1.5 inch stroke, EMF 12 +/- 5%, RMS 16 +/- 5%; 2 inch stroke, EMF 30 +/- 6%, RMS 26 +/- 11%; 2.5 inch stroke, EMF 50 +/- 12%, RMS 40 +/- 20%. The phasic coronary flow signal during closed-chest compression indicated that all perfusion occurred during the relaxation phase of the massage cycle. We concluded that coronary blood flow is demonstrable during closed-chest massage, but that the magnitude is unlikely to be more than a fraction of normal

  8. Do Radiologists Want/Need Training in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellhammer, F.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Prompt and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decreases morbidity and mortality following cardiopulmonary arrest. Radiologists are frequently confronted with severely ill patients, who may deteriorate at any time. Furthermore, they have to be aware of life-threatening reactions towards contrast media. This study was designed to assess experience and self-estimation of German-speaking radiologists in CPR and cardiac defibrillation (CD). Material and Methods: 650 German-speaking radiologists were audited by a specially designed questionnaire, which was sent via e-mail. The answers were expected to be re-mailed within a 2-month period. Results: The response rate was 12.6%. 72.8% of the responders had performed at least 1 CPR (range 9.5 ± 13.1) and 37% at least 1 CD. 67.9% had had opportunities to attend training courses, which had been utilized by 41.8% of them. The last training of the responders was more than 2 years ago in 69.2% and more than 5 years ago in 37%. Of all responders 75.6% expressed the need for further education. Conclusion: The small response rate indicates the small importance of CPR in the subpopulation surveyed. The vast majority of the responders, however, showed interest in basic and advanced life support and advocated regular updates. It seems reasonable that radiological Dept. themselves should organize courses in order to cope with their specific situations

  9. Do Radiologists Want/Need Training in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellhammer, F. [St. Katharinen Hospital, Frechen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2003-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decreases morbidity and mortality following cardiopulmonary arrest. Radiologists are frequently confronted with severely ill patients, who may deteriorate at any time. Furthermore, they have to be aware of life-threatening reactions towards contrast media. This study was designed to assess experience and self-estimation of German-speaking radiologists in CPR and cardiac defibrillation (CD). Material and Methods: 650 German-speaking radiologists were audited by a specially designed questionnaire, which was sent via e-mail. The answers were expected to be re-mailed within a 2-month period. Results: The response rate was 12.6%. 72.8% of the responders had performed at least 1 CPR (range 9.5 {+-} 13.1) and 37% at least 1 CD. 67.9% had had opportunities to attend training courses, which had been utilized by 41.8% of them. The last training of the responders was more than 2 years ago in 69.2% and more than 5 years ago in 37%. Of all responders 75.6% expressed the need for further education. Conclusion: The small response rate indicates the small importance of CPR in the subpopulation surveyed. The vast majority of the responders, however, showed interest in basic and advanced life support and advocated regular updates. It seems reasonable that radiological Dept. themselves should organize courses in order to cope with their specific situations.

  10. Potential of photoplethysmography to guide pulse checks during cardiopulmonary resuscitation : observations in an animal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijshoff, R.W.C.G.R.; Sar, van der T.; Aarts, R.M.; Woerlee, P.H.; Noordergraaf, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Detecting return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) via palpation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is challenging and often time-consuming, which can negatively impact outcome. Non-invasive ROSC detection could reduce compression pauses and thereby improve outcome. We

  11. Knowledge and preferences regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation : A survey among older patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Trudy J.; Leenman-Dekker, Sonja J.; Oldenhuis, Hilbrand K. E.; Bosveld, Henk E. P.; Berendsen, Annette J.

    Objective: Survival rates following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are low for older people, and are associated with a high risk of neurological damage. This study investigated the relationship between the preferences, knowledge of survival chances, and characteristics among older people

  12. Changing attitudes to cardiopulmonary resuscitation in older people: a 15-year follow-up study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, P E

    2009-03-01

    while it is well established that individual patient preferences regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may change with time, the stability of population preferences, especially during periods of social and economic change, has received little attention.

  13. Effect of dyad training on medical students' cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Candice; Huang, Chin-Chou; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the effects of dyadic training on medical students' resuscitation performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training.We provided students with a 2-hour training session on CPR for simulated cardiac arrest. Student teams were split into double groups (Dyad training groups: Groups A and B) or Single Groups. All groups received 2 CPR simulation rounds. CPR simulation training began with peer demonstration for Group A, and peer observation for Group B. Then the 2 groups switched roles. Single Groups completed CPR simulation without peer observation or demonstration. Teams were then evaluated based on leadership, teamwork, and team member skills.Group B had the highest first simulation round scores overall (P = 0.004) and in teamwork (P = 0.001) and team member skills (P = 0.031). Group B also had the highest second simulation round scores overall (P training groups with those of Single Groups in overall scores, leadership scores, teamwork scores, and team member scores. In the second simulation, Dyad training groups scored higher in overall scores (P = 0.002), leadership scores (P = 0.044), teamwork scores (P = 0.005), and team member scores (P = 0.008). Dyad training groups also displayed higher improvement in overall scores (P = 0.010) and team member scores (P = 0.022).Dyad training was effective for CPR training. Both peer observation and demonstration for peers in dyad training can improve student resuscitation performance.

  14. Effect of dyad training on medical students’ cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Candice; Huang, Chin-Chou; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the effects of dyadic training on medical students’ resuscitation performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training. We provided students with a 2-hour training session on CPR for simulated cardiac arrest. Student teams were split into double groups (Dyad training groups: Groups A and B) or Single Groups. All groups received 2 CPR simulation rounds. CPR simulation training began with peer demonstration for Group A, and peer observation for Group B. Then the 2 groups switched roles. Single Groups completed CPR simulation without peer observation or demonstration. Teams were then evaluated based on leadership, teamwork, and team member skills. Group B had the highest first simulation round scores overall (P = 0.004) and in teamwork (P = 0.001) and team member skills (P = 0.031). Group B also had the highest second simulation round scores overall (P training groups with those of Single Groups in overall scores, leadership scores, teamwork scores, and team member scores. In the second simulation, Dyad training groups scored higher in overall scores (P = 0.002), leadership scores (P = 0.044), teamwork scores (P = 0.005), and team member scores (P = 0.008). Dyad training groups also displayed higher improvement in overall scores (P = 0.010) and team member scores (P = 0.022). Dyad training was effective for CPR training. Both peer observation and demonstration for peers in dyad training can improve student resuscitation performance. PMID:28353555

  15. Mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation 99--survey results of a multi-organisational effort in public education in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Y T; Anantharaman, V; Lim, S H; Leong, K F; Pokkan, G

    2001-05-01

    Mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) 99 in Singapore was a large-scale multi-organisational effort to increase awareness and impart basic cardiac life support skills to the lay public. Mass CPR demonstrations followed by small group manikin practice with instructor guidance was conducted simultaneously in three centres, four times a day. The exercise enlisted 15 community organisations and received the support of 19 other organisations. Three hundred and ninety-eight manikins and 500 instructors ('I's) were mobilised to teach an audience of 6000 participants ('P's). Two surveys, for 'I's and 'P's were conducted with respondent rates of 65.8% and 50%, respectively. 73.6% of the P-respondents ('P-R's) indicated that they attended the event to increase their knowledge. 66.9% were willing to attend a more comprehensive CPR course. Concerns and perceptions in performing bystander CPR were assessed.

  16. Hemodynamic–directed cardiopulmonary resuscitation during in–hospital cardiac arrest*

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, Robert M.; Friess, Stuart H.; Maltese, Matthew R.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R.; Garuccio, Mia; Bhalala, Utpal; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines assume that cardiac arrest victims can be treated with a uniform chest compression (CC) depth and a standardized interval administration of vasopressor drugs. This non-personalized approach does not incorporate a patient’s individualized response into ongoing resuscitative efforts. In previously reported porcine models of hypoxic and normoxic ventricular fibrillation (VF), a hemodynamic-directed resuscitation improved short-term survival compared...

  17. Basic and advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation - guidelines of the Australian and New Zealand Resuscitation Councils 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibballs, James; Aickin, Richard; Nuthall, Gabrielle

    2012-07-01

    Guidelines for basic and advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have been revised by Australian and New Zealand Resuscitation Councils. Changes encourage CPR out-of-hospital and aim to improve the quality of CPR in-hospital. Features of basic CPR include: omission of abdominal thrusts for foreign body airway obstruction; commencement with chest compression followed by ventilation in a ratio of 30:2 or compression-only CPR if the rescuer is unwilling/unable to give expired-air breathing when the victim is 'unresponsive and not breathing normally'. Use of automated external defibrillators is encouraged. Features of advanced CPR include: prevention of cardiac arrest by rapid response systems; restriction of pulse palpation to 10 s to diagnosis cardiac arrest; affirmation of 15:2 compression-ventilation ratio for children and for infants other than newly born; initial bag-mask ventilation before tracheal intubation; a single direct current shock of 4 J/kg for ventricular fibrillation (VF) and pulseless ventricular tachycardia followed by immediate resumption of CPR for 2 min without analysis of cardiac rhythm and avoidance of unnecessary interruption of continuous external cardiac compressions. Monitoring of exhaled carbon dioxide is recommended to detect non-tracheal intubation, assess quality of CPR, and to help match ventilation to reduced cardiac output. The intraosseous route is recommended if immediate intravenous access is impossible. Amiodarone is strongly favoured over lignocaine for refractory VF and adrenaline over atropine for severe bradycardia, asystole and pulseless electrical activity. Family presence at resuscitation is encouraged. Therapeutic hypothermia is acceptable after resuscitation to improve neurological outcome. Extracorporeal circulatory support for in-hospital cardiac arrest may be used in equipped centres. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal

  18. Attitudes toward the performance of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Takumi; Omi, Wataru; Inaba, Hideo

    2007-10-01

    Early initiation of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves the chances of successful resuscitation and survival. The importance of bystander CPR is attracting more interest, and there has been an increase in attendance at CPR training courses in Japan. However, there have been few reports regarding Japanese attitudes toward the performance of bystander CPR. The present study was performed to identify current Japanese attitudes toward bystander CPR compared to our previous study performed in 1998. Between February and March 2006, participants were asked about their willingness to perform CPR in five varying scenarios, i.e., performing CPR on a stranger, a trauma patient, a child, an elderly person, and a relative, and CPR techniques consisting of chest compression plus mouth-to-mouth ventilation (CC plus MMV) versus chest compression only (CC only). A total of 4223 individuals (male 50%) completed the questionnaire, including high school students, teachers, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), medical nurses, and medical students. About 70% of the subjects had experienced CPR training more than once. Only 10-30% of high school students, teachers, and health care providers reported willingness to perform CC plus MMV, especially on a stranger or trauma victim. In contrast, 70-100% of these subjects reported willingness to perform CC only, which was the same as in our previous study. The reasons for the unwillingness among laypeople to perform CC plus MMV were inadequate knowledge and/or doubt regarding whether they could perform the techniques effectively, while health care providers reported a fear contracting of a disease. Most laypeople and health care providers are unlikely to perform CC plus MMV, especially on a stranger or trauma victim, but are more likely to perform CC only, as also found in our previous study in 1998. These findings suggest that MMV training should be de-emphasised and the awareness of CC alone should be emphasised because

  19. Prediction of survival to discharge following cardiopulmonary resuscitation using classification and regression trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebell, Mark H; Afonso, Anna M; Geocadin, Romergryko G

    2013-12-01

    To predict the likelihood that an inpatient who experiences cardiopulmonary arrest and undergoes cardiopulmonary resuscitation survives to discharge with good neurologic function or with mild deficits (Cerebral Performance Category score = 1). Classification and Regression Trees were used to develop branching algorithms that optimize the ability of a series of tests to correctly classify patients into two or more groups. Data from 2007 to 2008 (n = 38,092) were used to develop candidate Classification and Regression Trees models to predict the outcome of inpatient cardiopulmonary resuscitation episodes and data from 2009 (n = 14,435) to evaluate the accuracy of the models and judge the degree of over fitting. Both supervised and unsupervised approaches to model development were used. 366 hospitals participating in the Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation registry. Adult inpatients experiencing an index episode of cardiopulmonary arrest and undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the hospital. The five candidate models had between 8 and 21 nodes and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve from 0.718 to 0.766 in the derivation group and from 0.683 to 0.746 in the validation group. One of the supervised models had 14 nodes and classified 27.9% of patients as very unlikely to survive neurologically intact or with mild deficits (Tree models that predict survival to discharge with good neurologic function or with mild deficits following in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. Models like this can assist physicians and patients who are considering do-not-resuscitate orders.

  20. Implementing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Programs in High Schools: Iowa's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyme, Derek B; Atkins, Dianne L

    2017-02-01

    To understand perceived barriers to providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) education, implementation processes, and practices in high schools. Iowa has required CPR as a graduation requirement since 2011 as an unfunded mandate. A cross-sectional study was performed through multiple choice surveys sent to Iowa high schools to collect data about school demographics, details of CPR programs, cost, logistics, and barriers to implementation, as well as automated external defibrillator training and availability. Eighty-four schools responded (26%), with the most frequently reported school size of 100-500 students and faculty size of 25-50. When the law took effect, 51% of schools had training programs already in place; at the time of the study, 96% had successfully implemented CPR training. Perceived barriers to implementation were staffing, time commitment, equipment availability, and cost. The average estimated startup cost was $1000 US, and the yearly maintenance cost was <$500 with funds typically allocated from existing school resources. The facilitator was a school official or volunteer for 81% of schools. Average estimated training time commitment per student was <2 hours. Automated external defibrillators are available in 98% of schools, and 61% include automated external defibrillator training in their curriculum. Despite perceived barriers, school CPR training programs can be implemented with reasonable resource and time allocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Video quality of 3G videophones for telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tränkler, Uwe; Hagen, Oddvar; Horsch, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    We simulated a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) scene with a manikin and used two 3G videophones on the caller's side to transmit video to a laptop PC. Five observers (two doctors with experience in emergency medicine and three paramedics) evaluated the video. They judged whether the manikin was breathing and whether they would give advice for CPR; they also graded the confidence of their decision-making. Breathing was only visible from certain orientations of the videophones, at distances below 150 cm with good illumination and a still background. Since the phones produced a degradation in colours and shadows, detection of breathing mainly depended on moving contours. Low camera positioning produced better results than having the camera high up. Darkness, shaking of the camera and a moving background made detection of breathing almost impossible. The video from the two 3G videophones that were tested was of sufficient quality for telephone CPR provided that camera orientation, distance, illumination and background were carefully chosen. Thus it seems possible to use 3G videophones for emergency calls involving CPR. However, further studies on the required video quality in different scenarios are necessary.

  2. Trainers’ Attitudes towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Current Care Guidelines, and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mäkinen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have shown that healthcare personnel hesitate to perform defibrillation due to individual or organisational attitudes. We aimed to assess trainers’ attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (CPR-D, Current Care Guidelines, and associated training. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to CPR trainers attending seminars in Finland (N=185 focusing on the updated national Current Care Guidelines 2011. The questions were answered using Likert scale (1 = totally disagree, 7 = totally agree. Factor loading of the questionnaire was made using maximum likelihood analysis and varimax rotation. Seven scales were constructed (Hesitation, Nurse’s Role, Nontechnical Skill, Usefulness, Restrictions, Personal, and Organisation. Cronbach’s alphas were 0.92–0.51. Statistics were Student’s t-test, ANOVA, stepwise regression analysis, and Pearson Correlation. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 124/185, 67% CPR trainers, of whom two-thirds felt that their undergraduate training in CPR-D had not been adequate. Satisfaction with undergraduate defibrillation training correlated with the Nontechnical Skills scale (p<0.01. Participants scoring high on Hesitation scale (p<0.01 were less confident about their Nurse’s Role (p<0.01 and Nontechnical Skills (p<0.01. Conclusion. Quality of undergraduate education affects the work of CPR trainers and some feel uncertain of defibrillation. The train-the-trainers courses and undergraduate medical education should focus more on practical scenarios with defibrillators and nontechnical skills.

  3. A Reliable Method for Rhythm Analysis during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Ayala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interruptions in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR compromise defibrillation success. However, CPR must be interrupted to analyze the rhythm because although current methods for rhythm analysis during CPR have high sensitivity for shockable rhythms, the specificity for nonshockable rhythms is still too low. This paper introduces a new approach to rhythm analysis during CPR that combines two strategies: a state-of-the-art CPR artifact suppression filter and a shock advice algorithm (SAA designed to optimally classify the filtered signal. Emphasis is on designing an algorithm with high specificity. The SAA includes a detector for low electrical activity rhythms to increase the specificity, and a shock/no-shock decision algorithm based on a support vector machine classifier using slope and frequency features. For this study, 1185 shockable and 6482 nonshockable 9-s segments corrupted by CPR artifacts were obtained from 247 patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The segments were split into a training and a test set. For the test set, the sensitivity and specificity for rhythm analysis during CPR were 91.0% and 96.6%, respectively. This new approach shows an important increase in specificity without compromising the sensitivity when compared to previous studies.

  4. A paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training project in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Javier; Matamoros, Martha M; López-Herce, Jesús; Carrillo, Angel P; Ordóñez, Flora; Moral, Ramón; Mencía, Santiago

    2010-04-01

    It is possible that the exportation of North American and European models has hindered the creation of a structured cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training programme in developing countries. The objective of this paper is to describe the design and present the results of a European paediatric and neonatal CPR training programme adapted to Honduras. A paediatric CPR training project was set up in Honduras with the instructional and scientific support of the Spanish Group for Paediatric and Neonatal CPR. The programme was divided into four phases: CPR training and preparation of instructors; training for instructors; supervised teaching; and independent teaching. During the first phase, 24 Honduran doctors from paediatric intensive care, paediatric emergency and anaesthesiology departments attended the paediatric CPR course and 16 of them the course for preparation as instructors. The Honduran Paediatric and Neonatal CPR Group was formed. In the second phase, workshops were given by Honduran instructors and four of them attended a CPR course in Spain as trainee instructors. In the third phase, a CPR course was given in Honduras by the Honduran instructors, supervised by the Spanish team. In the final phase of independent teaching, eight courses were given, providing 177 students with training in CPR. The training of independent paediatric CPR groups with the collaboration and scientific assessment of an expert group could be a suitable model on which to base paediatric CPR training in Latin American developing countries. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental design for study of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsan, W G; Levy, R C

    1981-03-01

    Many different designs for studies of various aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in dogs are described in the literature. No single technique is generally accepted. We present a systematized approach to the study of CPR in the canine model. Cardiac output, arterial blood pressure, and electrocardiogram were recorded for three different methods. The methods studied were closed chest compression, closed chest compression with an automatic gas-powered chest compressor, and open chest manual cardiac massage. Cardiac output for both types of external chest compression were less than 17% of control in all cases. With open chest cardiac massage, systemic arterial blood pressures were in the 50 mm Hg to 100 mm Hg range and cardiac output of up to 70% of control was achieved. Using a metronome to obtain compression rate and the arterial blood pressure to guide the efficacy of compression, consistent levels of cardiac output could be achieved for up to 30 minutes using open chest cardiac massage. Closed chest massage in man results in a cardiac output of 25% to 30% of normal when performed under optimal conditions. A cardiac output of 25% to 30% of control cannot be achieved in large dogs with external chest compression, and hence is not a good model to stimulate CPR in man.

  6. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation during spaceflight: examining the role of timing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Victor W; Whittam, Sarah W; Austin, Paul N; Branson, Richard D; Beck, George

    2011-08-01

    The majority of International Space Station (ISS) astronauts represent nonmedical professions. In order to serve as Crew Medical Officers (CMO), future crewmembers receive 40-70 h of medical training within 18 mo before missions, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) per the Guidelines of the American Heart Association. CPR compliance with the Guidelines is known to vary even among trained clinicians, let alone minimally trained caregivers (e.g., bystanders, nonphysician astronauts). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of timing devices, including audible metronomic tones, on CPR performed by nonmedical personnel, specifically 40 astronaut analogues trained in a fashion and within a timeframe similar to an ISS astronaut. Twenty bystander pairs performed two-person CPR for 4 min on a simulated cardiac arrest patient using three interventions: 1) CPR with no timing devices; 2) CPR with metronomic tones for chest compressions; and 3) CPR with a timing device and metronome for coordinating ventilation and compression rates, respectively. Each CPR performance was evaluated for compliance with the (then current) 2000 AHA Guidelines. Numbers of breaths and compressions significantly deviated from target values in the first two interventions (38 and 42 breaths vs. target of 32 breaths; 282 and 318 compressions vs. target of 240 compressions); the use of timing devices for both components of CPR resulted in significant improvement (32 breaths and 231 compressions). CPR timing devices that coordinate both breaths and compressions improve compliance of astronaut analogue rescuers with CPR guidelines, and may improve overall CPR performance and outcome.

  7. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Among Patients with Structurally Normal Hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Stephanie J; Bridges, Brian C; Kalra, Yuvraj; Pietsch, John B; Smith, Andrew H

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) has been well described as a rescue therapy in refractory cardiac arrest among patients with congenital heart disease. The purpose of this retrospective analysis of data from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization was to evaluate outcomes of eCPR in patients with structurally normal hearts and to identify risk factors that may contribute to mortality. During the study period, 1,431 patients met inclusion criteria. Median age was 16 years. Overall survival to hospital discharge was 32%. Conditional logistic regression demonstrated an independent survival benefit among smaller patients, patients with a lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) on cannulation, and those with a shorter duration from intubation to eCPR cannulation. A diagnosis of sepsis was independently associated with a nearly threefold increase in odds of mortality, whereas the diagnosis of myocarditis portended a more favorable outcome. Neurologic complications, pulmonary hemorrhage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, CPR, pH less than 7.20, and hyperbilirubinemia after eCPR cannulation were independently associated with an increase in odds of mortality. When utilizing eCPR in patients with structurally normal hearts, a diagnosis of sepsis is independently associated with mortality, whereas a diagnosis of myocarditis is protective. Neurologic complications and pulmonary hemorrhage while on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are independently associated with mortality.

  8. Regional Cerebral Oximetry During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Useful or Useless?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genbrugge, Cornelia; Dens, Jo; Meex, Ingrid; Boer, Willem; Eertmans, Ward; Sabbe, Marc; Jans, Frank; De Deyne, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 375,000 people annually experience sudden cardiac arrest (CA) in Europe. Most patients who survive the initial hours and days after CA die of postanoxic brain damage. Current monitors, such as electrocardiography and end-tidal capnography, provide only indirect information about the condition of the brain during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In contrast, cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy provides continuous, noninvasive, real-time information about brain oxygenation without the need for a pulsatile blood flow. It measures transcutaneous cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (rSO2). This information could supplement currently used monitors. Moreover, an evolution in rSO2 monitoring technology has made it easier to assess rSO2 in CA conditions. We give an overview of the literature regarding rSO2 measurements during CPR and the current commercially available devices. We highlight the feasibility of cerebral saturation measurement during CPR, its role as a quality parameter of CPR, predictor of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and neurologic outcome, and its monitoring function during transport. rSO2 is feasible in the setting of CA and has the potential to measure the quality of CPR, predict ROSC and neurologic outcome, and monitor post-CA patients during transport. The literature shows that rSO2 has the potential to serve multiple roles as a neuromonitoring tool during CPR and also to guide neuroprotective therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain computed tomographic findings in post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Tsuguharu; Yoshinaga, Kazumasa; Horibe, Takashi; Kokubu, Kiyokazu; Kokura, Yoshihiro; Matsui, Konosuke; Inamoto, Kazuo.

    1986-01-01

    We retrospectively assessed the brain computed tomographic (CT) findings in 22 post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) patients excluding neonatal cases. On the basis of the CT findings, the patients were divided into two groups. Eight patients (36.4 %) had bilateral abnormal lowdensity areas in the basal ganglia (Group I). The remaining 14 patients (63.6 %) had no abnormalities in that area (Group II). In Group I, the incidence of primary cardiac arrest and duration of advanced life support (ALS) was significantly different (p < 0.05) from Group II. Sex, age, duration of basic life support (BLS), time elapsed from initiation of BLS to initial CT and from initiation of ALS to initial CT was not significantly different between the two groups. Outcome was very poor in both groups and no significant difference was noted between them. We conclude that primary cardiac arrest and long duration of ALS were predictors of abnormal bilateral low-density areas in the basal ganglia in post-CPR patients. However, their appearance was not related to outcome. (author)

  10. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in Washington state public high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, Sheri; Quan, Linda

    2003-03-01

    To determine the best approaches for increasing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training opportunities for public high school students, we conducted a statewide survey of all 310 public high schools in Washington State. The findings describe CPR student training currently provided by high schools, barriers to providing, and strategies to increase CPR training of high school students. The response rate was 89% (276 schools) from a combination of mail and telephone surveys; 35% (n=97) reported that they did not provide any CPR student training. Of the 132 schools that provided CPR student training, 23% trained less than 10% of their students, and 39% trained more than 90% of their students. The majority of public high schools, 70%, did not have any teacher trained to teach CPR or had only one teacher with such training. Yet 80% of schools felt that CPR training is best provided in school settings. Schools perceived the greatest benefit of CPR training as providing students with the skill to save a life (43%). The most frequently identified barriers were logistical: limited time to teach the curriculum (24%), lack of funds (16%), and instructor scheduling difficulties (17%). Less than 5% of respondents voiced any opposition to CPR training, and that opposition was for logistical reasons. To increase CPR training, the single best strategies suggested were: increase funding, provide time in the curriculum, have more certified instructors, and make CPR student training a requirement.

  11. Capnography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Current evidence and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani Shankar Kodali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Capnography continues to be an important tool in measuring expired carbon dioxide (CO 2 . Most recent Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS guidelines now recommend using capnography to ascertain the effectiveness of chest compressions and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Based on an extensive review of available published literature, we selected all available peer-reviewed research investigations and case reports. Available evidence suggests that there is significant correlation between partial pressure of end-tidal CO 2 (PETCO 2 and cardiac output that can indicate the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Additional evidence favoring the use of capnography during CPR includes definitive proof of correct placement of the endotracheal tube and possible prediction of patient survival following cardiac arrest, although the latter will require further investigations. There is emerging evidence that PETCO 2 values can guide the initiation of extracorporeal life support (ECLS in refractory cardiac arrest (RCA. There is also increasing recognition of the value of capnography in intensive care settings in intubated patients. Future directions include determining the outcomes based on capnography waveforms PETCO 2 values and determining a reasonable duration of CPR. In the future, given increasing use of capnography during CPR large databases can be analyzed to predict outcomes.

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation using the cardio vent device in a resuscitation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suner, Selim; Jay, Gregory D; Kleinman, Gary J; Woolard, Robert H; Jagminas, Liudvikas; Becker, Bruce M

    2002-05-01

    To compare the "Bellows on Sternum Resuscitation" (BSR) device that permits simultaneous compression and ventilation by one rescuer with two person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation in a single blind crossover study performed in the laboratory setting. Tidal volume and compression depth were recorded continuously during 12-min CPR sessions with the BSR device and two person CPR. Six CPR instructors performed a total of 1,894 ventilations and 10,532 compressions in 3 separate 12-min sessions. Mean tidal volume (MTV) and compression rate (CR) with the BSR device differed significantly from CPR with the BVM group (1242 mL vs. 1065 mL, respectively, p = 0.0018 and 63.2 compressions per minute (cpm) vs. 81.3 cpm, respectively, p = 0.0076). Error in compression depth (ECD) rate of 9.78% was observed with the BSR device compared to 8.49% with BMV CPR (p = 0.1815). Error rate was significantly greater during the second half of CPR sessions for both BSR and BVM groups. It is concluded that one-person CPR with the BSR device is equivalent to two-person CPR with BVM in all measured parameters except for CR. Both groups exhibited greater error rate in CPR performance in the latter half of 12-min CPR sessions.

  13. Do-not-resuscitate order: The experiences of iranian cardiopulmonary resuscitation team members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolghader Assarroudi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One dilemma in the end-of-life care is making decisions for conducting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. This dilemma is perceived in different ways due to the influence of culture and religion. This study aimed to understand the experiences of CPR team members about the do-not-resuscitate order. Methods: CPR team members were interviewed, and data were analyzed using a conventional content analysis method. Results: Three categories and six subcategories emerged: “The dilemma between revival and suffering” with the subcategories of “revival likelihood” and “death as a cause for comfort;” “conflicting situation” with the subcategories of “latent decision” and “ambivalent order;” and “low-quality CPR” with the subcategories of “team member demotivation” and “disrupting CPR performance.” Conclusion: There is a need for the development of a contextual guideline, which is required for respecting the rights of patients and their families and providing legal support to health-care professionals during CPR.

  14. Withholding or termination of resuscitation in pediatric out-of-hospital traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallat, Mary E

    2014-04-01

    This multiorganizational literature review was undertaken to provide an evidence base for determining whether or not recommendations for out-of-hospital termination of resuscitation could be made for children who are victims of traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest. Although there is increasing acceptance of out-of-hospital termination of resuscitation for adult traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest when there is no expectation of a good outcome, children are routinely excluded from state termination-of-resuscitation protocols. The decision to withhold resuscitative efforts in a child under specific circumstances (decapitation or dependent lividity, rigor mortis, etc) is reasonable. If there is any doubt as to the circumstances or timing of the traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest, under the current status of limiting termination of resuscitation in the field to persons older than 18 years in most states, resuscitation should be initiated and continued until arrival to the appropriate facility. If the patient has arrested, resuscitation has already exceeded 30 minutes, and the nearest facility is more than 30 minutes away, involvement of parents and family of these children in the decision-making process with assistance and guidance from medical professionals should be considered as part of an emphasis on family-centered care, because the evidence suggests that either death or a poor outcome is inevitable.

  15. Use of a Metronome in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Elise; Cohen, Naiomi; Maniaci, Vincenzo; Pena, Barbara; Lozano, Juan Manuel; Linares, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Determine whether the use of a metronome improves chest compression rate and depth during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on a pediatric manikin. A prospective, simulation-based, crossover, randomized controlled trial was conducted. Participants included pediatric residents, fellows, nurses, and medical students who were randomly assigned to perform chest compressions on a pediatric manikin with and without an audible metronome. Each participant performed 2 rounds of 2 minutes of chest compressions separated by a 15-minute break. A total of 155 participants performed 2 rounds of chest compressions (74 with the metronome on during the first round and 81 with the metronome on during the second round of CPR). There was a significant improvement in the mean percentage of compressions delivered within an adequate rate (90-100 compressions per minute) with the metronome on compared with off (72% vs 50%; mean difference [MD] 22%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 15% to 29%). No significant difference was noted in the mean percentage of compressions within acceptable depth (38-51 mm) (72% vs 70%; MD 2%; 95% CI, -2% to 6%). The metronome had a larger effect among medical students (73% vs 55%; MD 18%; 95% CI, 8% to 28%) and pediatric residents and fellows (84% vs 48%; MD 37%; 95% CI, 27% to 46%) but not among pediatric nurses (46% vs 48%; MD -3%; 95% CI, -19% to 14%). The rate of chest compressions during CPR can be optimized by the use of a metronome. These findings will help medical professionals comply with the American Heart Association guidelines. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. A multimedia intervention on cardiopulmonary resuscitation and advance directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, R; Galecki, A T; Goold, S D; Hogikyan, R V

    1999-09-01

    To assess the effects of a multimedia educational intervention about advance directives (ADs) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on the knowledge, attitude and activity toward ADs and life-sustaining treatments of elderly veterans. Prospective randomized controlled, single blind study of educational interventions. General medicine clinic of a university-affiliated Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC). One hundred seventeen Veterans, 70 years of age or older, deemed able to make medical care decisions. The control group (n = 55) received a handout about ADs in use at the VAMC. The experimental group (n = 62) received the same handout, with an additional handout describing procedural aspects and outcomes of CPR, and they watched a videotape about ADs. Patients' attitudes and actions toward ADs, CPR and life-sustaining treatments were recorded before the intervention, after it, and 2 to 4 weeks after the intervention through self-administered questionnaires. Only 27.8% of subjects stated that they knew what an AD is in the preintervention questionnaire. This proportion improved in both the experimental and control (87.2% experimental, 52.5% control) subject groups, but stated knowledge of what an AD is was higher in the experimental group (odds ratio = 6.18, p CPR. This improved after the intervention in the experimental group (OR = 4.27, p =.004), but did not persist at follow-up. In the postintervention questionnaire, few subjects in either group stated that they discussed CPR or ADs with their physician on that day (OR = 0.97, p = NS). We developed a convenient means of educating elderly male patients regarding CPR and advance directives that improved short-term knowledge but did not stimulate advance care planning.

  17. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Disparities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewer, Audrey L; Ibrahim, Said A; Leary, Marion; Dutwin, David; McNally, Bryan; Anderson, Monique L; Morrison, Laurie J; Aufderheide, Tom P; Daya, Mohamud; Idris, Ahamed H; Callaway, Clifton W; Kudenchuk, Peter J; Vilke, Gary M; Abella, Benjamin S

    2017-05-17

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is associated with increased survival from cardiac arrest, yet bystander CPR rates are low in many communities. The overall prevalence of CPR training in the United States and associated individual-level disparities are unknown. We sought to measure the national prevalence of CPR training and hypothesized that older age and lower socioeconomic status would be independently associated with a lower likelihood of CPR training. We administered a cross-sectional telephone survey to a nationally representative adult sample. We assessed the demographics of individuals trained in CPR within 2 years (currently trained) and those who had been trained in CPR at some point in time (ever trained). The association of CPR training and demographic variables were tested using survey weighted logistic regression. Between September 2015 and November 2015, 9022 individuals completed the survey; 18% reported being currently trained in CPR, and 65% reported training at some point previously. For each year of increased age, the likelihood of being currently CPR trained or ever trained decreased (currently trained: odds ratio, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.97-0.99; P trained: OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.98-0.99; P =0.04). Furthermore, there was a greater then 4-fold difference in odds of being currently CPR trained from the 30-39 to 70-79 year old age groups (95% CI, 0.10-0.23). Factors associated with a lower likelihood of CPR training were lesser educational attainment and lower household income ( P training in CPR. Older age, lesser education, and lower income were associated with reduced likelihood of CPR training. These findings illustrate important gaps in US CPR education and suggest the need to develop tailored CPR training efforts to address this variability. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  18. The effects of sodium bicarbonate during prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yi-Ming; Wu, Shih-Hao; Li, Wen-Cheng; Kuo, Chan-Wei; Chen, Shou-Yen; Chen, Jih-Chang

    2013-03-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of sodium bicarbonate injection during prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (for >15 minutes). The retrospective cohort study consisted of adult patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) with the diagnosis of cardiac arrest in 2009. Data were retrieved from the institutional database. A total of 92 patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on whether they were treated (group1, n = 30) or not treated (group 2, n = 62) with sodium bicarbonate. There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics between groups. The median time interval between the administration of CPR and sodium bicarbonate injection was 36.0 minutes (IQR: 30.5-41.8 minutes). The median amount of bicarbonate injection was 100.2 mEq (IQR: 66.8-104.4). Patients who received a sodium bicarbonate injection during prolonged CPR had a higher percentage of return of spontaneous circulation, but not statistical significant (ROSC, 40.0% vs. 32.3%; P = .465). Sustained ROSC was achieved by 2 (6.7%) patients in the sodium bicarbonate treatment group, with no survival to discharge. No significant differences in vital signs after ROSC were detected between the 2 groups (heart rate, P = .124; systolic blood pressure, P = .094). Sodium bicarbonate injection during prolonged CPR was not associated with ROSC after adjust for variables by regression analysis (Table 3; P = .615; odds ratio, 1.270; 95% confidence interval: 0.501-3.219) The administration of sodium bicarbonate during prolonged CPR did not significantly improve the rate of ROSC in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Puyvelde, Tim; Ameloot, Koen; Roggen, Mieke; Troost, Els; Gewillig, Marc; Budts, Werner; Van De Bruaene, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients with underlying congenital heart disease is uncertain. This study aimed at evaluating outcome after CPR in patients with underlying congenital heart disease, factors related to worse outcome after CPR and whether survivors of sudden cardiac death (SCD) have a worse outcome when compared to an age, gender and disease-matched control population. Between 1984 and 2015, all patients with congenital heart disease who received in or out-of-hospital CPR were identified from the database of congenital heart disease from the University Hospitals Leuven. Postoperative and neonatal (CPR was excluded. For each survivor of SCD, two control patients matched for gender, age and underlying heart defect were included in the study. Thirty-eight patients (66% men; median age 25 years (interquartile range 9-40); 68% out-of-hospital) were identified, of which 27 (66%) survived the event. The main cause of SCD was ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation ( n=21). Heart defect complexity (odds ratio (OR) 5.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-21.9; P=0.027), pulmonary hypertension (OR 13.8; 95% CI 2.1-89.5; P=0.006) and time to return of spontaneous circulation (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.1; P=0.046) were related to worse outcome. Survivors of SCD had a worse prognosis when compared to an age, gender and disease-matched control group (5-year survival 76% vs. 98%; P=0.002). The complexity of underlying heart defect, pulmonary hypertension and time to return of spontaneous circulation are related to worse outcome in the case of CPR. Survivors of SCD have a worse outcome when compared to matched controls, indicating the need for adequate implantable cardioverter defibrillator indication assessment and for stringent follow-up of patients with worsening haemodynamics.

  20. Knowledge and Attitude of Radiology Technologists Towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behroozi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The number of casualties and critically ill patients referred to radiology departments increased during the past decade, which caused the risk of cardiac arrest in radiology departments to increase considerably. Objectives The current study aimed to evaluate the knowledge and attitude of radiology technologists regarding Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR. Patients and Methods After approval a cross sectional study was designed. Ninety five radiology technologists (male and female were selected in four tertiary referral hospitals in Ahvaz, Iran. Accordingly, 87 radiologic technologists of which agreed to participate in the study. The researchers developed a questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of three distinct sections including demographic data, attitude, and technical knowledge questions. Reliability of the technical knowledge questions were evaluated using Cronbach’s alpha (76%. Data collection was performed using interview method. Results Of the total 87 questionnaires, one was incomplete. None of the participants had attended a training program since employment. The average scores of attitude towards CPR and technical knowledge were 80 ± 8.9 and 8.8 ± 2.3, respectively. A correlation was observed between age and work experience (r = 0.866, P ≤ 0.0001, age and technical knowledge (r = 0.380, P ≤ 0.0001, work experience and technical knowledge (r = 0.317, P = 0.003, and attitude and technical knowledge (r = 0.397, P ≤ 0.0001. Also a correlation was observed between work experience and attitude (r = 0.385, P ≤ 0.0001. No significant difference was observed between male and female subjects’ technical knowledge (P ≥ 0.05 and attitude (P ≥ 0.05. Conclusions It can be concluded that, although the attitude of participants towards CPR was positive in general, their technical knowledge was poor. This finding should urge decision-makers to consider delivering in-service training courses to radiology technologists

  1. 2017 American Heart Association Focused Update on Adult Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality: An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Monica E; Goldberger, Zachary D; Rea, Thomas; Swor, Robert A; Bobrow, Bentley J; Brennan, Erin E; Terry, Mark; Hemphill, Robin; Gazmuri, Raúl J; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Travers, Andrew H

    2018-01-02

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a lifesaving technique for victims of sudden cardiac arrest. Despite advances in resuscitation science, basic life support remains a critical factor in determining outcomes. The American Heart Association recommendations for adult basic life support incorporate the most recently published evidence and serve as the basis for education and training for laypeople and healthcare providers who perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Basic life support knowledge of secondary school students in cardiopulmonary resuscitation training using a song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca Del Pozo, Francisco Javier; Valle Alonso, Joaquin; Canales Velis, Nancy Beatriz; Andrade Barahona, Mario Miguel; Siggers, Aidan; Lopera, Elisa

    2016-07-20

    To examine the effectiveness of a "cardiopulmonary resuscitation song" in improving the basic life support skills of secondary school students. This pre-test/post-test control design study enrolled secondary school students from two middle schools randomly chosen in Córdoba, Andalucia, Spain. The study included 608 teenagers. A random sample of 87 students in the intervention group and 35 in the control group, aged 12-14 years were selected. The intervention included a cardiopulmonary resuscitation song and video. A questionnaire was conducted at three-time points: pre-intervention, one month and eight months post-intervention. On global knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there were no significant differences between the intervention group and the control group in the trial pre-intervention and at the month post-intervention. However, at 8 months there were significant differences with a p-value = 0.000 (intervention group, 95% CI: 6.39 to 7.13 vs. control group, 95% CI: 4.75 to 5.92), F(1,120)=16.644, p=0.000). In addition, significant differences about students' basic life support knowledge about chest compressions at eight months post-intervention (F(1,120)=15.561, p=0.000) were found. Our study showed that incorporating the song component in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation teaching increased its effectiveness and the ability to remember the cardiopulmonary resuscitation algorithm. Our study highlights the need for different methods in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation teaching to facilitate knowledge retention and increase the number of positive outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest.

  3. Resuscitation after prolonged cardiac arrest: role of cardiopulmonary bypass and systemic hyperkalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakopoulos, Oliver J; Allen, Bradley S; Buckberg, Gerald D; Hristov, Nikola; Tan, Zhongtuo; Villablanca, J Pablo; Trummer, Georg

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine (1) the role of emergency cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) after prolonged cardiac arrest and failed cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and (2) the use of systemic hyperkalemia during CPB to convert intractable ventricular fibrillation (VF). Thirty-one pigs (34 +/- 2 kg) underwent 15 minutes of cardiac arrest after induced VF, followed by 10 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation-advanced life support. Peripheral CPB was used if cardiopulmonary resuscitation failed to restore stable circulation. Damage was assessed by evaluating hemodynamics, biochemical variables (creatine kinase-MB, neuron-specific enolase), neurologic deficit score, and brain magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation alone was successful in only 19% (6 of 31 pigs). Cardiopulmonary bypass was initiated in 81% of animals (25 of 31 pigs) either for hypotension (5 of 25 pigs) or intractable VF (20 of 25 pigs). Defibrillation was successful in 7 of 20 animals during the first 10 minutes after initiating CPB. Ventricular fibrillation persisted more than 10 minutes in 13 of 20 pigs, and animals were treated either with repeated defibrillation (6 of 13 pigs) or with a potassium bolus (7 of 13 pigs) to induce transient cardiac arrest. Overall survival at 24 hours was 84% with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (100% of pigs with hypotension; 71% in CPB-VF < 10 minutes). Despite CPB, fatal myocardial failure occurred after VF duration of more than 10 minutes in all pigs treated with electrical defibrillation, whereas hyperkalemia allowed 100% cardioversion and 86% survival. Biochemical variables remained elevated in all groups. Similarly, severe brain injury was present in all animals as confirmed by neurologic deficit score (197 +/- 10) and magnetic resonance imaging. Emergency CPB after prolonged cardiac arrest improves survival and allows systemic hyperkalemia to convert intractable VF, but fails to reduce neurologic damage. 2010 The Society of Thoracic

  4. A review of simulation-enhanced, team-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onan, Arif; Simsek, Nurettin; Elcin, Melih; Turan, Sevgi; Erbil, Bülent; Deniz, Kaan Zülfikar

    2017-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training is an essential element of clinical skill development for healthcare providers. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation has described issues related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care education. Educational interventions have been initiated to try to address these issues using a team-based approach and simulation technologies that offer a controlled, safe learning environment. The aim of the study is to review and synthesize published studies that address the primary question "What are the features and effectiveness of educational interventions related to simulation-enhanced, team-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation training?" We conducted a systematic review focused on educational interventions pertaining to cardiac arrest and emergencies that addressed this main question. The findings are presented together with a discussion of the effectiveness of various educational interventions. In conclusion, student attitudes toward interprofessional learning and simulation experiences were more positive. Research reports emphasized the importance of adherence to established guidelines, adopting a holistic approach to training, and that preliminary training, briefing, deliberate practices, and debriefing should help to overcome deficiencies in cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Factors affecting team leadership skills and their relationship with quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Joyce H Y; Ong, G J; Davies, Robin P; Gao, Fang; Perkins, Gavin D

    2012-09-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between team-leadership skills and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an adult cardiac-arrest simulation. Factors affecting team-leadership skills were also assessed. Forty advanced life-support providers leading a cardiac arrest team in a standardized cardiac-arrest simulation were videotaped. Background data were collected, including age (in yrs), sex, whether they had received any leadership training in the past, whether they were part of a professional group, the most recent advanced life-support course (in months) they had undergone, advanced life-support instructor/provider status, and whether they had led in any cardiac arrest situation in the preceding 6 months. Participants were scored using the Cardiac Arrest Simulation test score and Leadership Behavior Description Questionnaire for leadership skills. Process-focused quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation data were collected directly from manikin and video recordings. Primary outcomes were complex technical skills (measured as Cardiac Arrest Simulation test score, preshock pause, and hands-off ratio). Secondary outcomes were simple technical skills (chest-compression rate, depth, and ventilation rate). Univariate linear regressions were performed to examine how leadership skills affect quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and bivariate correlations elicited factors affecting team-leadership skills.Teams led by leaders with the best leadership skills performed higher quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation with better technical performance (R = 0.75, p resuscitation training.

  6. Association between public cardiopulmonary resuscitation education and the willingness to perform bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a metropolitan citywide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jeong Woo; Ryoo, Hyun Wook; Moon, Sungbae; Kim, Jong-Yeon; Ahn, Jae Yun; Park, Jeong Bae; Seo, Kang Suk; Kim, Jong Kun; Kim, Yun Jeong

    2017-06-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important factor associated with improved survival rates and neurologic prognoses in cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We assessed how factors related to CPR education including timing of education, period from the most recent education session, and content, affected CPR willingness. In February 2012, trained interviewers conducted an interview survey of 1,000 Daegu citizens through an organized questionnaire. The subjects were aged ≥19 years and were selected by quota sampling. Their social and demographic characteristics, as well as CPR and factors related to CPR education, were investigated. Chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate how education-related factors affected the willingness to perform CPR. Of total 1,000 cases, 48.0% were male. The multivariate analyses revealed several factors significantly associated with CPR willingness: didactic plus practice group (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3 to 5.0), group with more than four CPR education session (AOR, 7.68; 95% CI, 3.21 to 18.35), interval of less than 6 months from the last CPR education (AOR, 4.47; 95% CI 1.29 to 15.52), and education with automated external defibrillator (AOR, 5.98; 95% CI 2.30 to 15.53). The following were associated with increased willingness to perform CPR: practice sessions and automated electrical defibrillator training in public CPR education, more frequent CPR training, and shorter time period from the most recent CPR education sessions.

  7. Public cardiopulmonary resuscitation training rates and awareness of hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a cross-sectional survey of Victorians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Janet E; Smith, Karen; Case, Rosalind; Cartledge, Susie; Straney, Lahn; Finn, Judith

    2017-04-01

    To provide contemporary Australian data on the public's training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and awareness of hands-only CPR. A cross-sectional telephone survey in April 2016 of adult residents of the Australian state of Victoria was conducted. Primary outcomes were rates of CPR training and awareness of hands-only CPR. Of the 404 adults surveyed (mean age 55 ± 17 years, 59% female, 73% metropolitan residents), 274 (68%) had undergone CPR training. Only 50% (n = 201) had heard of hands-only CPR, with most citing first-aid courses (41%) and media (36%) as sources of information. Of those who had undergone training, the majority had received training more than 5 years previously (52%) and only 28% had received training or refreshed training in the past 12 months. Most received training in a formal first-aid class (43%), and received training as a requirement for work (67%). The most common reasons for not having training were: they had never thought about it (59%), did not have time (25%) and did not know where to learn (15%). Compared to standard CPR, a greater proportion of respondents were willing to provide hands-only CPR for strangers (67% vs 86%, P CPR training rates and awareness of hands-only CPR. Further promotion of hands-only CPR and self-instruction (e.g. DVD kits or online) may see further improvements in CPR training and bystander CPR rates. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Morimura, Naoto; Nagao, Ken; Asai, Yasufumi; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Nara, Satoshi; Hase, Mamoru; Tahara, Yoshio; Atsumi, Takahiro

    2014-06-01

    A favorable neurological outcome is likely to be achieved in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients with ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT) on the initial electrocardiogram (ECG). However, in patients without pre-hospital restoration of spontaneous circulation despite the initial VF/VT, the outcome is extremely low by conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Extracorporeal CPR (ECPR) may enhance cerebral blood flow and recovery of neurological function. We prospectively examined how ECPR for OHCA with VF/VT would affect neurological outcomes. The design of this trial was a prospective, observational study. We compared differences of outcome at 1 and 6 months after OHCA between ECPR group (26 hospitals) and non-ECPR group (20 hospitals). Primary endpoints were the rate of favorable outcomes defined by the Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance and Overall Performance Categories (CPC) 1 or 2 at 1 and 6 months after OHCA. Based on intention-to-treat analysis, CPC 1 or 2 were 12.3% (32/260) in the ECPR group and 1.5% (3/194) in the non-ECPR group at 1 month (P<0.0001), and 11.2% (29/260) and 2.6% (5/194) at 6 months (P=0.001), respectively. By per protocol analysis, CPC 1 or 2 were 13.7% (32/234) in the ECPR group and 1.9% (3/159) in the non-ECPR group at 1 month (P<0.0001), and 12.4% (29/234) and 3.1% (5/159) at 6 months (P=0.002), respectively. In OHCA patients with VF/VT on the initial ECG, a treatment bundle including ECPR, therapeutic hypothermia and IABP was associated with improved neurological outcome at 1 and 6 months after OHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nurses' knowledge and skill retention following cardiopulmonary resuscitation training: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Rosemary

    2005-08-01

    This paper reports a literature review examining factors that enhance retention of knowledge and skills during and after resuscitation training, in order to identify educational strategies that will optimize survival for victims of cardiopulmonary arrest. Poor knowledge and skill retention following cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for nursing and medical staff has been documented over the past 20 years. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training is mandatory for nursing staff and is important as nurses often discover the victims of in-hospital cardiac arrest. Many different methods of improving this retention have been devised and evaluated. However, the content and style of this training lack standardization. A literature review was undertaken using the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE and British Nursing Index databases and the keywords 'cardiopulmonary resuscitation', 'basic life support', 'advanced life support' and 'training'. Papers published between 1992 and 2002 were obtained and their reference lists scrutinized to identify secondary references, of these the ones published within the same 10-year period were also included. Those published in the English language that identified strategies to enhance the acquisition or retention of Cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills and knowledge were included in the review. One hundred and five primary and 157 secondary references were identified. Of these, 24 met the criteria and were included in the final literature sample. Four studies were found pertaining to cardiac arrest simulation, three to peer tuition, four to video self-instruction, three to the use of different resuscitation guidelines, three to computer-based learning programmes, two to voice-activated manikins, two to automated external defibrillators, one to self-instruction, one to gaming and the one to the use of action cards. Resuscitation training should be based on in-hospital scenarios and current evidence

  10. Easy-to-learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation training programme: a randomised controlled trial on laypeople's resuscitation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Rachel Jia Min; Lim, Swee Han; Wu, Vivien Xi; Leong, Tak Yam; Liaw, Sok Ying

    2018-04-01

    Simplifying the learning of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is advocated to improve skill acquisition and retention. A simplified CPR training programme focusing on continuous chest compression, with a simple landmark tracing technique, was introduced to laypeople. The study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the simplified CPR training in improving lay rescuers' CPR performance as compared to standard CPR. A total of 85 laypeople (aged 21-60 years) were recruited and randomly assigned to undertake either a two-hour simplified or standard CPR training session. They were tested two months after the training on a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Participants' performance on the sequence of CPR steps was observed and evaluated using a validated CPR algorithm checklist. The quality of chest compression and ventilation was assessed from the recording manikins. The simplified CPR group performed significantly better on the CPR algorithm when compared to the standard CPR group (p CPR. However, a significantly higher number of compressions and proportion of adequate compressions was demonstrated by the simplified group than the standard group (p CPR group than in the standard CPR group (p CPR by focusing on continuous chest compressions, with simple hand placement for chest compression, could lead to better acquisition and retention of CPR algorithms, and better quality of chest compressions than standard CPR. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  11. Does lying in the recovery position increase the likelihood of not delivering cardiopulmonary resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-Tellado, Miguel; Navarro-Patón, Rubén; Pavón-Prieto, Maria Del Pilar; Fernández-López, Marta; Mateos-Lorenzo, Javier; López-Fórneas, Ivan

    2017-06-01

    Resuscitation guidelines endorse unconscious and normally breathing out-of-hospital victims to be placed in the recovery position to secure airway patency, but recently a debate has been opened as to whether the recovery position threatens the cardiac arrest victim's safety assessment and delays the start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. To compare the assessment of the victim's breathing arrest while placed in the recovery position versus maintaining an open airway with the continuous head tilt and chin lift technique to know whether the recovery position delays the cardiac arrest victim's assessment and the start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Basic life support-trained university students were randomly divided into two groups: one received a standardized cardiopulmonary resuscitation refresher course including the recovery position and the other received a modified cardiopulmonary resuscitation course using continuous head tilt and chin lift for unconscious and spontaneously breathing patients. A human simulation test to evaluate the victim's breathing assessment was performed a week later. In total, 59 participants with an average age of 21.9 years were included. Only 14 of 27 (51.85%) students in the recovery position group versus 23 of 28 (82.14%) in the head tilt and chin lift group p=0.006 (OR 6.571) detected breathing arrest within 2min. The recovery position hindered breathing assessment, delayed breathing arrest identification and the initiation of cardiac compressions, and significantly increased the likelihood of not starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation when compared to the results shown when the continuous head tilt and chin lift technique was used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Rates in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Monique L.; Cox, Margueritte; Al-Khatib, Sana M.; Nichol, Graham; Thomas, Kevin L.; Chan, Paul S.; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Fosbol, Emil L.; Eigel, Brian; Clendenen, Bill; Peterson, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Context Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves the likelihood of surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), yet treatment rates differ by a community’s racial and income composition. Objective To determine if CPR training differs by the race and income of communities across the United States (U.S.). Design, Setting, and Participants We analyzed county-level CPR training rates from 2010–2011 using CPR training data from the American Heart Association, the American Red Cross, and the Health and Safety Institute. We utilized multivariable logistic regression models to examine the association of annual adult CPR training rates with a county’s proportion of black residents and median household income (categorized as tertiles), as well as other demographic, geographic, and healthcare characteristics. Main Outcome Measure CPR training rate. Results From 07/01/2010–06/30/2011, 13.1 million persons in 3143 U.S. counties received CPR training. The median county training rate ranged from 0.00%–1.29% (median=0.51%) in the lower tertile, 1.29%–4.07% (median=2.39%) in the middle tertile, and >4.07% (median=6.81%) in the upper tertile. Counties that were most likely to have CPR training rates in the lower tertile included those with a higher proportion of rural (odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10, 1.15 per 5 percentage point [PP] change), black (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.06, 1.13 per 5 PP change), and Hispanic residents (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02, 1.11 per 5 PP change); those with a lower median household income (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04, 1.34 per $10,000 decrease); those with a higher median age (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04, 1.53 per 10 year change); and those located in the South. Conclusions Counties with a higher proportion of rural, black, Hispanic, and lower income residents had lower CPR training rates. Differences in CPR training by race and income may contribute to recognized disparities in bystander CPR treatment and OHCA survival, and

  13. Novel electronic refreshers for cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magura Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently the American Red Cross requires that individuals renew their cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR certification annually; this often requires a 4- to 8-hour refresher course. Those trained in CPR often show a decrease in essential knowledge and skills within just a few months after training. New electronic means of communication have expanded the possibilities for delivering CPR refreshers to members of the general public who receive CPR training. The study’s purpose was to determine the efficacy of three novel CPR refreshers - online website, e-mail and text messaging – for improving three outcomes of CPR training - skill retention, confidence for using CPR and intention to use CPR. These three refreshers may be considered “novel” in that they are not typically used to refresh CPR knowledge and skills. Methods The study conducted two randomized clinical trials of the novel CPR refreshers. A mailed brochure was a traditional, passive refresher format and served as the control condition. In Trial 1, the refreshers were delivered in a single episode at 6 months after initial CPR training. In Trial 2, the refreshers were delivered twice, at 6 and 9 months after initial CPR training, to test the effect of a repeated delivery. Outcomes for the three novel refreshers vs. the mailed brochure were determined at 12 months after initial CPR training. Results Assignment to any of three novel refreshers did not improve outcomes of CPR training one year later in comparison with receiving a mailed brochure. Comparing outcomes for subjects who actually reviewed some of the novel refreshers vs. those who did not indicated a significant positive effect for one outcome, confidence for performing CPR. The website refresher was associated with increased behavioral intent to perform CPR. Stated satisfaction with the refreshers was relatively high. The number of episodes of refreshers (one vs. two did not have a significant effect

  14. Novel electronic refreshers for cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently the American Red Cross requires that individuals renew their cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification annually; this often requires a 4- to 8-hour refresher course. Those trained in CPR often show a decrease in essential knowledge and skills within just a few months after training. New electronic means of communication have expanded the possibilities for delivering CPR refreshers to members of the general public who receive CPR training. The study’s purpose was to determine the efficacy of three novel CPR refreshers - online website, e-mail and text messaging – for improving three outcomes of CPR training - skill retention, confidence for using CPR and intention to use CPR. These three refreshers may be considered “novel” in that they are not typically used to refresh CPR knowledge and skills. Methods The study conducted two randomized clinical trials of the novel CPR refreshers. A mailed brochure was a traditional, passive refresher format and served as the control condition. In Trial 1, the refreshers were delivered in a single episode at 6 months after initial CPR training. In Trial 2, the refreshers were delivered twice, at 6 and 9 months after initial CPR training, to test the effect of a repeated delivery. Outcomes for the three novel refreshers vs. the mailed brochure were determined at 12 months after initial CPR training. Results Assignment to any of three novel refreshers did not improve outcomes of CPR training one year later in comparison with receiving a mailed brochure. Comparing outcomes for subjects who actually reviewed some of the novel refreshers vs. those who did not indicated a significant positive effect for one outcome, confidence for performing CPR. The website refresher was associated with increased behavioral intent to perform CPR. Stated satisfaction with the refreshers was relatively high. The number of episodes of refreshers (one vs. two) did not have a significant effect on any outcomes

  15. Emotional Impact of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training on High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alismail

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe American Heart Association (AHA has implemented several programs to educate the public about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. A common issue in bystander CPR is the fear of hurting the victim. As a result, the victim may not receive CPR in time. The purpose of this study was to measure the emotional impact of CPR training on high school students using two approved AHA courses.MethodsA total of 60 students participated in this study. These students had a mean age of 15.4 ± 1.2 years old and were selected from a high school in Southern California. Subjects were divided into two groups, Basic Life Support (BLS (n1 = 31 and Hands-Only™ CPR (n2 = 29. Emotional impacts were assessed by having each subject answer a questionnaire based on given scenarios before and after their training session.ResultsThere was a significant difference in both groups when comparing positive-emotion scores before and after the training (BLS: 30.3 ± 6.0 vs. 34.5 ± 6.7, p < 0.001; Hands-Only 27.9 ± 5.0 vs. 32.1 ± 6.5, p < 0.001. In addition, both groups showed significant reductions in negative-emotion scores (BLS: 29.2 ± 6.7 vs. 23.7 ± 6.5, p < 0.001 and Hands-Only: 26.8 ± 6.1vs. 24.8 ± 7.7, p = 0.05.ConclusionOur results indicate that the AHA programs have positive effects on students’ emotional response. We recommend that future studies include an in-depth study design that probes the complexity of students’ emotions after completing an AHA session.

  16. Change in tidal volume during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in newborn piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Elliott S; Cheung, Po-Yin; O'Reilly, Megan; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of inflations during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is to deliver an adequate tidal volume (VT) to facilitate gas exchange. However, no study has examined VT delivery during chest compression (CC) in detail to understand the effect of CC on lung aeration. The aim of the study was to examine VT changes during CC and their effect on lung aeration. Piglets were anaesthetised, instrumented and intubated with zero leak. They were then randomly assigned to CPR using either 3:1 compression:ventilation ratio (C:V) (n=6), continuous CC with asynchronous ventilations (CCaV) (90 CC/min with 30/min asynchronous ventilations) (n=6) or continuous CC superimposed with 30 s sustained inflations (CC+SI) with a CC rate of 120/min (n=5). A respiratory function monitor (NM3, Respironics, Philips, Andover, Massachusetts, USA) was used to continuously measure inspiration tidal volume (VTi) and expirational tidal volume (VTe). ANOVA with Bonferroni post-test were used to compare variables of all three groups. During the inflation in the 3:1 C:V group, the mean (SD) VTi and VTe was 23.5 (5.3) mL/kg and 19.4 (2.7) mL/kg (p=0.16), respectively. During the CC, we observed a significant VT loss in the 3:1 group with VTi and VTe being 4.1 (1.2) mL/kg and 11.1 (3.3) mL/kg (p=0.007), respectively. In the CCaV group, VTe was higher compared with VTi, but this was not significant. In the CC+SI group, a VT gain during each CC with VTi and VTe of 16.3 (3.2) mL/kg and 14 (3) mL/kg (p=0.21), respectively, was observed. VT delivery is improved using CC+SI compared with 3:1 C:V. This improvement in VT delivery may lead to better alveolar oxygen delivery and lung aeration. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Quality of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during paediatric resuscitation training: time to stop the blind leading the blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshid, Muhammad; Lo, Tsz-Yan Milly; Reynolds, Fiona

    2009-05-01

    Recent evidence suggested that the quality of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during adult advanced life support training was suboptimal. This study aimed to assess the CPR quality of a paediatric resuscitation training programme, and to determine whether it was sufficiently addressed by the trainee team leaders during training. CPR quality of 20 consecutive resuscitation scenario training sessions was audited prospectively using a pre-designed proforma. A consultant intensivist and a senior nurse who were also Advanced Paediatric Life Support (APLS) instructors assessed the CPR quality which included ventilation frequency, chest compression rate and depth, and any unnecessary interruption in chest compressions. Team leaders' response to CPR quality and elective change of compression rescuer during training were also recorded. Airway patency was not assessed in 13 sessions while ventilation rate was too fast in 18 sessions. Target compression rate was not achieved in only 1 session. The median chest compression rate was 115 beats/min. Chest compressions were too shallow in 10 sessions and were interrupted unnecessarily in 13 sessions. More than 50% of training sessions did not have elective change of the compression rescuer. 19 team leaders failed to address CPR quality during training despite all team leaders being certified APLS providers. The quality of CPR performance was suboptimal during paediatric resuscitation training and team leaders-in-training had little awareness of this inadequacy. Detailed CPR quality assessment and feedback should be integrated into paediatric resuscitation training to ensure optimal performance in real life resuscitations.

  18. Knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of clinicians at a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... patients and recognising cardiac arrest, to assess clinicians' ... programmes that are accessible, innovative and inexpensive. .... well as, and sometimes better than, traditional CPR.16 In ... resuscitation training programme resulted in a noticeable ... 31 physicians in Canada whose resuscitation skills were.

  19. Treatment of electroencephalographic status epilepticus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TELSTAR): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, Barry J.; van Putten, Michel J. A. M.; Horn, Janneke; Blans, Michiel J.; Beishuizen, Albertus; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Hofmeijer, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) status epilepticus is described in 10 to 35% of patients with postanoxic encephalopathy after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation and is associated with case fatality rates of 90 to 100%. It is unclear whether these EEG patterns represent a condition to be treated

  20. A Pilot Study of Flipped Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training: Which Items Can Be Self-Trained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Raemdonck, Veerle; Aerenhouts, Dirk; Monsieurs, Koen; De Martelaer, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated self-trained basic life support (BLS) skills acquired from an e-learning platform to design a complementary in-class training approach. Design: In total, 41 students (15-17 years, 29 men) participated in a pilot study on self-training in BLS. After 6 weeks, a compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) test…

  1. Effects of Age, Gender, School Class on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills of Nigerian Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin; Onyeaso, Chukwudi Ochi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The need for training of schoolchildren on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as potential bystander CPR providers is growing globally but Nigeria is still behind and lacks basic necessary data. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of age, gender and school class on CPR skills of Nigerian secondary school…

  2. Understanding the Impact of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training on Participants' Perceived Confidence Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, Shawn M.

    2013-01-01

    This pre-experimental, participatory action research study investigated the impact of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training on participants' perceived confidence and willingness to initiate CPR. Parents of seventh and eighth grade students were surveyed. Parent participants were asked to watch the American Heart Association's Family and…

  3. A Curriculum-Based Health Service Program in Hypertension, Diabetes, Venereal Diseases and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Samuel T.; Janer, Ann L.

    1978-01-01

    Special screening and education courses in hypertension, diabetes, venereal disease, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were added as electives at the Auburn University School of Pharmacy. Applied learning experiences for students and services to the community are achieved. Course goals and content and behavioral objectives in each area are…

  4. Quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation during real-life out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyllenborg, Tore; Granfeldt, Asger; Lippert, Freddy

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, little is known about bystander CPR quality in real-life OHCA. AIM: To describe bystander CPR quality based on automated external defibrillator (AED) CPR process data during OH...

  5. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: state of the art in 2011 | Möhr ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Failure to recognise the signs of sudden cardiac arrest or impending cardiac arrest will lead to delayed intervention. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) must be initiated without delay, irrespective of the level of skill of the caregiver. The 2010 CPR guidelines emphasise the importance of chest compressions, which have ...

  6. Unexpected fatal neurological deterioration after successful cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and therapeutic hypothermia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, R.; Tjan, D.H.; Adriaanse, M.W.; Vugt, R. van; Zanten, A.R. van

    2008-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was admitted to the intensive care unit after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to pulseless electrical activity. She was treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia to minimise secondary anoxic brain damage. After a 24 h period of

  7. Treatment of electroencephalopgraphic status epilepticus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TELSTAR): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, Barry Johannes; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Horn, J.; Blans, M.J.; Beishuizen, A.; van Rootselaar, A.F.; Hofmeijer, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Electroencephalographic (EEG) status epilepticus is described in 10 to 35% of patients with postanoxic encephalopathy after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation and is associated with case fatality rates of 90 to 100%. It is unclear whether these EEG patterns represent a

  8. Rates of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Monique L; Cox, Margueritte; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Nichol, Graham; Thomas, Kevin L; Chan, Paul S; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Fosbol, Emil L; Eigel, Brian; Clendenen, Bill; Peterson, Eric D

    2014-02-01

    Prompt bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves the likelihood of surviving an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Large regional variations in survival after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have been noted. To determine whether regional variations in county-level rates of CPR training exist across the United States and the factors associated with low rates in US counties. We used a cross-sectional ecologic study design to analyze county-level rates of CPR training in all US counties from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011. We used CPR training data from the American Heart Association, the American Red Cross, and the Health & Safety Institute. Using multivariable logistic regression models, we examined the association of annual rates of adult CPR training of citizens by these 3 organizations (categorized as tertiles) with a county's geographic, population, and health care characteristics. Completion of CPR training. Rate of CPR training measured as CPR course completion cards distributed and CPR training products sold by the American Heart Association, persons trained in CPR by the American Red Cross, and product sales data from the Health & Safety Institute. RESULTS During the study period, 13.1 million persons in 3143 US counties received CPR training. Rates of county training ranged from 0.00% to less than 1.29% (median, 0.51%) in the lower tertile, 1.29% to 4.07% (median, 2.39%) in the middle tertile, and greater than 4.07% or greater (median, 6.81%) in the upper tertile. Counties with rates of CPR training in the lower tertile were more likely to have a higher proportion of rural areas (adjusted odds ratio, 1.12 [95% CI, 1.10-1.15] per 5-percentage point [PP] change), higher proportions of black (1.09 [1.06-1.13] per 5-PP change) and Hispanic (1.06 [1.02-1.11] per 5-PP change) residents, a lower median household income (1.18 [1.04-1.34] per $10 000 decrease), and a higher median age (1.28 [1.04-1.58] per 10-year change). Counties in the South

  9. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: state of the art in 2011

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... knowledge and science of resuscitation and offer treatment recommendations. .... anaesthesia falls into one of two categories: medication related and ..... manual pads, or by pressing the button on the defibrillator. Check the ...

  10. Resuscitation on television: realistic or ridiculous? A quantitative observational analysis of the portrayal of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in television medical drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Dylan; Willoughby, Hannah

    2009-11-01

    Patients' preferences for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) relate to their perception about the likelihood of success of the procedure. There is evidence that the lay public largely base their perceptions about CPR on their experience of the portrayal of CPR in the media. The medical profession has generally been critical of the portrayal of CPR on medical drama programmes although there is no recent evidence to support such views. To compare the patient characteristics, cause and success rates of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on medical television drama with published resuscitation statistics. Observational study. 88 episodes of television medical drama were reviewed (26 episodes of Casualty, Casualty, 25 episodes of Holby City, 23 episodes of Grey's Anatomy and 14 episodes of ER) screened between July 2008 and April 2009. The patient's age and sex, medical history, presumed cause of arrest, use of CPR and immediate and long term survival rate were recorded. Immediate survival and survival to discharge following CPR. There were a total of 76 cardio-respiratory arrests and 70 resuscitation attempts in the episodes reviewed. The immediate success rate (46%) did not differ significantly from published real life figures (p=0.48). The resuscitation process appeared to follow current guidelines. Survival (or not) to discharge was rarely shown. The average age of patients was 36 years and contrary to reality there was not an age related difference in likely success of CPR in patients less than 65 compared with those 65 and over (p=0.72). The most common cause of cardiac arrest was trauma with only a minor proportion of arrests due to cardio-respiratory causes such as myocardial infarction. Whilst the immediate success rate of CPR in medical television drama does not significantly differ from reality the lack of depiction of poorer medium to long term outcomes may give a falsely high expectation to the lay public. Equally the lay public may perceive that the

  11. Team-focused Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Prehospital Principles Adapted for Emergency Department Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Blake; Runyon, Michael; Weekes, Anthony; Pearson, David

    2018-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has high rates of morbidity and mortality, and a growing body of evidence is redefining our approach to the resuscitation of these high-risk patients. Team-focused cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TFCPR), most commonly deployed and described by prehospital care providers, is a focused approach to cardiac arrest care that emphasizes early defibrillation and high-quality, minimally interrupted chest compressions while de-emphasizing endotracheal intubation and intravenous drug administration. TFCPR is associated with statistically significant increases in survival to hospital admission, survival to hospital discharge, and survival with good neurologic outcome; however, the adoption of similar streamlined resuscitation approaches by emergency physicians has not been widely reported. In the absence of a deliberately streamlined approach, such as TFCPR, other advanced therapies and procedures that have not shown similar survival benefit may be prioritized at the expense of simpler evidence-based interventions. This review examines the current literature on cardiac arrest resuscitation. The recent prehospital success of TFCPR is highlighted, including the associated improvements in multiple patient-centered outcomes. The adaptability of TFCPR to the emergency department (ED) setting is also discussed in detail. Finally, we discuss advanced interventions frequently performed during ED cardiac arrest resuscitation that may interfere with early defibrillation and effective high-quality chest compressions. TFCPR has been associated with improved patient outcomes in the prehospital setting. The data are less compelling for other commonly used advanced resuscitation tools and procedures. Emergency physicians should consider incorporating the TFCPR approach into ED cardiac arrest resuscitation to optimize delivery of those interventions most associated with improved outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tension pneumoperitoneum after bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry Johnson

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The Veress needle, usually used for insufflating the abdomen during laparoscopy, can also be an effective tool to decompress the abdomen when presented with tension pneumoperitoneum. Abdominal visceral injuries are rare following CPR but do occur and will likely require an invasive intervention. Surviving cardiac arrest as a young person and living without deficits outweighs the risk of a surgical correction for a visceral injury. While resuscitation measures are critical for survival, medical personnel need to be aware of potential complications from resuscitative efforts and potential management strategies.

  13. Prolonged successful cerebro cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Libardo A; Sanchez, Robinson; Gomez, Maria T; Cabrales, Jaime R; Echeverri, Dario

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 57 year old patient patient who underwent a diagnostic coronariography that showed three-vessel coronary disease. He presented cardiorespiratory arrest immediately at the end of the procedure; basic and advanced resuscitation maneuvers were started during a two hours period. During the resuscitation, primary angioplasty and stent implantation in the circumflex artery was performed. The patient recovered spontaneous circulation and was transferred to the coronary care unit. On the second day, a successful myocardial revascularization was performed and was discharged 16 days after the event without evident neurological deficit.

  14. ABC versus CAB for cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a prospective, randomized simulator-based trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, Stephan; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K; Zobrist, Roger; Hunziker, Patrick R; Hunziker, Sabina

    2013-09-06

    After years of advocating ABC (Airway-Breathing-Circulation), current guidelines of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) recommend CAB (Circulation-Airway-Breathing). This trial compared ABC with CAB as initial approach to CPR from the arrival of rescuers until the completion of the first resuscitation cycle. 108 teams, consisting of two physicians each, were randomized to receive a graphical display of either the ABC algorithm or the CAB algorithm. Subsequently teams had to treat a simulated cardiac arrest. Data analysis was performed using video recordings obtained during simulations. The primary endpoint was the time to completion of the first resuscitation cycle of 30 compressions and two ventilations. The time to execution of the first resuscitation measure was 32 ± 12 seconds in ABC teams and 25 ± 10 seconds in CAB teams (P = 0.002). 18/53 ABC teams (34%) and none of the 55 CAB teams (P = 0.006) applied more than the recommended two initial rescue breaths which caused a longer duration of the first cycle of 30 compressions and two ventilations in ABC teams (31 ± 13 vs.23 ± 6 sec; P = 0.001). Overall, the time to completion of the first resuscitation cycle was longer in ABC teams (63 ± 17 vs. 48 ± 10 sec; P ABC with an earlier start of CPR and a shorter time to completion of the first 30:2 resuscitation cycle. These findings endorse the change from ABC to CAB in international resuscitation guidelines.

  15. Critical incidents during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: what are the problems nobody wants to talk about?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenstein, Christian; Rupp, Peter; Fleischmann, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    We wanted to identify incidents that led or could have led to patient harm during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A nationwide anonymous and Internet-based critical incident reporting system gave the data. During a 4-year period we received 548 reports of which 74 occurred during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Human error was responsible for 85% of the incidents, whereas equipment failure contributed to 15% of the reports. Equipment failure was considered to be preventable in 61% of all the cases, whereas incidents because of human error could have been prevented in almost all the cases. In most cases, prevention can be accomplished by simple strategies with the Poka-Yoke technique. Insufficient training of emergency medical service physicians in Germany requires special attention. The critical incident reports raise concerns regarding the level of expertize provided by emergency medical service doctors.

  16. Brief compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation training video and simulation with homemade mannequin improves CPR skills

    OpenAIRE

    Wanner, Gregory K.; Osborne, Arayel; Greene, Charlotte H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training has traditionally involved classroom-based courses or, more recently, home-based video self-instruction. These methods typically require preparation and purchase fee; which can dissuade many potential bystanders from receiving training. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching compression-only CPR to previously untrained individuals using our 6-min online CPR training video and skills practice on a homemade mannequin, r...

  17. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho,Renata Maria de Oliveira; Campanharo,Cássia Regina Vancini; Lopes,Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno,Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Góis,Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Batista,Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Method: case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60) was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condit...

  18. Effects of flashlight guidance on chest compression performance in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a noisy environment

    OpenAIRE

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Chang, Chul Ho; Park, Incheol; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, SeungHo; Lee, Hahn Shick

    2012-01-01

    Background In real cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), noise can arise from instructional voices and environmental sounds in places such as a battlefield and industrial and high-traffic areas. A feedback device using a flashing light was designed to overcome noise-induced stimulus saturation during CPR. This study was conducted to determine whether ?flashlight? guidance influences CPR performance in a simulated noisy setting. Materials and methods We recruited 30 senior medical students with...

  19. Paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training program in Latin-America: the RIBEPCI experience

    OpenAIRE

    L?pez-Herce, Jes?s; Matamoros, Martha M.; Moya, Luis; Almonte, Enma; Coronel, Diana; Urbano, Javier; Carrillo, ?ngel; del Castillo, Jimena; Menc?a, Santiago; Moral, Ram?n; Ordo?ez, Flora; S?nchez, Carlos; Lagos, Lina; Johnson, Mar?a; Mendoza, Ovidio

    2017-01-01

    Background To describe the design and to present the results of a paediatric and neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program adapted to Latin-America. Methods A paediatric CPR coordinated training project was set up in several Latin-American countries with the instructional and scientific support of the Spanish Group for Paediatric and Neonatal CPR. The program was divided into four phases: CPR training and preparation of instructors; training for instructors; supervised tea...

  20. New cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines 2010: managing the newly born in delivery room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biban, Paolo; Filipovic-Grcic, Boris; Biarent, Dominique; Manzoni, Paolo

    2011-03-01

    Most newborns are born vigorous and do not require neonatal resuscitation. However, about 10% of newborns require some type of resuscitative assistance at birth. Although the vast majority will require just assisted lung aeration, about 1% requires major interventions such as intubation, chest compressions, or medications. Recently, new evidence has prompted modifications in the international cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines for both neonatal, paediatric and adult patients. Perinatal and neonatal health care providers must be aware of these changes in order to provide the most appropriate and evidence-based emergency interventions for newborns in the delivery room. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the main recommended changes in neonatal resuscitation at birth, according to the publication of the international Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) in the CoSTR document (based on evidence of sciences) and the new 2010 guidelines released by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a historical perspective leading up to the end of the 19th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmektzoglou, Konstantinos A; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Syros, Periklis; Chalkias, Athanasios; Kalambalikis, Lazaros; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2012-01-01

    Social laws and religious beliefs throughout history underscore the leaps and bounds that the science of resuscitation has achieved from ancient times until today. The effort to resuscitate victims goes back to ancient history, where death was considered a special form of sleep or an act of God. Biblical accounts of resuscitation attempts are numerous. Resuscitation in the Middle Ages was forbidden, but later during Renaissance, any prohibition against performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was challenged, which finally led to the Enlightenment, where scholars attempted to scientifically solve the problem of sudden death. It was then that the various components of CPR (ventilation, circulation, electricity, and organization of emergency medical services) began to take shape. The 19th century gave way to hallmarks both in the ventilatory support (intubation innovations and the artificial respirator) and the open-and closed chest circulatory support. Meanwhile, novel defibrillation techniques had been employed and ventricular fibrillation described. The groundbreaking discoveries of the 20th century finally led to the scientific framework of CPR. In 1960, mouth-to-mouth resuscitation was eventually combined with chest compression and defibrillation to become CPR as we now know it. This review presents the scientific milestones behind one of medicine's most widely used fields.

  2. [New Insights into Maternal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation--Significance of Simulation Research and Training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Majima, Nozomi; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Pregnancy-related mortality, estimated to occur in approximately 1: 50,000 deliveries, is rare in developed countries. The 2010 American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines for Resuscitation emphasize the importance of high-quality chest compression as a key determinant of successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. During pregnancy, the uterus can compress the inferior vena cava, impeding venous return and thereby reducing stroke volume and cardiac output. To maximize the effectiveness of chest compressions in pregnancy, the AHA guidelines recommend the 27-30 degrees left-lateral tilt (LLT) position. When CPR is performed on parturients in the LLT position, chest compressions will probably be more effective if performed with the operator standing on the left side of the patient. The videolaryngoscope Pentax-AWS Airwayscope (AWS) was found to be an effective tool for airway management during chest compressions in 27 LLT simulations, suggesting that the AWS may be a useful device for airway management during maternal resuscitation.

  3. Evaluation of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation curriculum in a low resource environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mary P; Lyon, Camila B; Janiszewski, David; Aksamit, Deborah; Kateh, Francis; Sampson, John

    2015-11-07

    To evaluate whether a 2-day International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) Universal Algorithm-based curriculum taught in a tertiary care hospital in Liberia increases local health care provider knowledge and skill comfort level. A combined basic and advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum was developed for low-resource settings that included lectures and low-fidelity manikin-based simulations. In March 2014, the curriculum was taught to healthcare providers in a tertiary care hospital in Liberia. In a quality assurance review, participants were evaluated for knowledge and comfort levels with resuscitation before and after the workshop. They were also videotaped during simulation sessions and evaluated on standardized performance metrics. Fifty-two hospital staff completed both pre-and post-curriculum surveys. The median score was 45% pre-curriculum and 82% post-curriculum (presuscitation in this low-resource setting.

  4. CT findings of the brain post cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, Masami; Miyamoto, Seiji; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Fukuzumi, Akio; Iwasaki, Satoru; Tabuse, Hisayuki

    1999-01-01

    The subjects were 88 cases of non-traumatic CPA excluding those with primary brain disease. The subjects were divided into 4 groups according to the duration of cardiac arrest: Group A (less than 15 minutes, 2 cases), Group B (15-30 minutes, 11 cases), Group C (more than 30 minutes, 40 cases), Group D (no resuscitation after cardiac arrest, 35 cases). All cases in Group A were observed to be clear consciousness after resuscitation. Not only the functional outcome but also the survivals rates were poorer as the duration of cardiac arrest increased in Groups B and C compared to Group A. The mortality rate was 85% or higher for cardiac arrest of 15 minutes or longer. Brain edema after resuscitation was examined by head CT in the basal-ganglia and thalamus regions, and in the corticomedullary junction of the cerebrum. In the cases of short duration of cardiac arrest, the basal-ganglia and thalamus regions, and the corticomedullary junction were clearly visible on CT. On the other hand, these areas were poorly or not visible (marked brain edema) in the cases of longer duration of cardiac arrest. The borders of the basal-ganglia and thalamus regions, and the corticomedullary junction were not obscured in any of the cases in Group A. However, the borders of these regions were poorly visible or not visible more frequently as the duration of cardiac arrest increased. In particular, the corticomedullary junction was not visible more frequently after cardiac arrest of long duration. Brain edema is caused and intensified by prolongation of hypoxia, but it is also reported to be caused by external cardiac massage, which increases the intracranial pressure. This was also suggested by the more notable brain edema in the corticomedullary junction than in the basal-ganglia and thalamus regions. These findings of brain edema appeared on head CT within 4 hours after CPR. Findings suggestive of vascular occlusion were also obtained. (K.H.)

  5. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE & ATTITUDE OF THE PEDIATRIC RESIDENT ABOUT NEONATAL & PEDIATRIC CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M KADIAVAR

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A high leve of skill & knowledge is required in circumstances of cardiopulmonary resucitation which represents the most urgent clinical situations. The difficulties for pediatric residents who are fronted with the most cases of pediatric & neonatal resucitation are due to different causes of cardiorespiratory arrest in camparison to adults. This study aimed to assess the knowledge & their personal attitude toward the neonatal & pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitatin. Methods: By cross - sectional multicenter study between the pediatric residents who were studied in the teaching hospitals in Tehran (1378-90. Data were gathered among 140 residents by self-completed questionnaires which were included three parts as. demographic information assessment of their attitude by summation of score via ranking list questions and total score from assessment to their knowledge by different scenarios which were formatted in the multiple choice questions. Results: 35.7% of the residents studied in the first year of residency 35.0% in the second year and the remainder (29/3% in the third year More than 90% of them considered their knowledge about neonatal and pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation low & less than average. Net only 80% of the residents self - assessed their actual ability about this issue low but also declaired the insufficient education during the medical training. The total score of knowledge assessment was 14.7 + 1_0.54 from 30 without any significant relations among the residents in different hospitals or various levels of pediatric residency. (P value= 0.1 , 0.7 There was not significant correlation between the total score from their attitude & their knowledge. Conclusion: Pediatric residents as the key personnel in the management of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of the neonates and children should have enough knowledge and skills about this topic. This survey demonstrates a low level of the pediatric & neonatal

  6. Influenece of the CPRmeter on angular position of elbows and generated forces during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Kopacz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: It is commonly known that ergonomics in emergency medical services (EMS is very important. Emergency medical services workers are exposed to different conditions and they should perform a variety of tasks. Material and Methods: The aim of the work has been to analyze the angular position of elbows and forces generated by the upper limbs during cardiopulmonary resuscitation with and without the CPRmeter based on feedback technology. Ten male paramedics and 10 male non-paramedics, in a kneeling position, performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR on an Ambu Megacode manikin placed on the ground. Measurements were taken after 1 min and 4 min following the beginning of the trial. The angular position of the elbows was evaluated with a BTS Smart DX 7000 motion capture system. Kistler platforms 9286BA were used for measuring forces. Results: In the paramedic group, one statistically significant difference was observed in the mean difference between maximal and minimal right elbow angle in the 1st min without the device vs. the mean difference in the 4th min without the device. In the paramedic group, a 25% force decrease was observed after 4 min of resuscitation in trials without the CPRmeter in comparison to the 1st min. In trials with the CPRmeter, the force parameters were similar in the 1st and 4th min and more stable. No statistically significant differences were noticed in the control group. Conclusions: The CPRmeter has influence on the magnitude of the forces applied by the upper limbs and on the optimization of the rescuer effort during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The CPRmeter had no influence on the position of the upper part of the kinematic chain. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(6:909–916

  7. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Microgravity: Efficacy in the Swine During Parabolic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Smith L.; Campbell, Mark R.; Billica, Roger D.; Gilmore, Stevan M.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The International Space Station will need to be as capable as possible in providing Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Previous studies with manikins in parabolic microgravity (0 G) have shown that delivering CPR in microgravity is difficult. End tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2) has been previously shown to be an effective non-invasive tool for estimating cardiac output during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Animal models have shown that this diagnostic adjunct can be used as a predictor of survival when PetCO2 values are maintained above 25% of pre-arrest values. METHODS: Eleven anesthetized Yorkshire swine were flown in microgravity during parabolic flight. Physiologic parameters, including PetCO2, were monitored. Standard ACLS protocols were used to resuscitate these models after chemical induction of cardiac arrest. Chest compressions were administered using conventional body positioning with waist restraint and unconventional vertical-inverted body positioning. RESULTS: PetCO2 values were maintained above 25% of both 1-G and O-G pre-arrest values in the microgravity environment (33% +/- 3 and 41 +/- 3). No significant difference between 1-G CPR and O-G CPR was found in these animal models. Effective CPR was delivered in both body positions although conventional body positioning was found to be quickly fatiguing as compared with the vertical-inverted. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be effectively administered in microgravity (0 G). Validation of this model has demonstrated that PetCO2 levels were maintained above a level previously reported to be predictive of survival. The unconventional vertical-inverted position provided effective CPR and was less fatiguing as compared with the conventional body position with waist restraints.

  8. Descriptive Analysis of Medication Administration During Inpatient Cardiopulmonary Arrest Resuscitation (from the Mayo Registry for Telemetry Efficacy in Arrest Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Dumitrascu, Adrian; Harris, Dana; Bosworth, Veronica; Clark, Brooke; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M Caroline

    2016-05-15

    Advanced cardiovascular life support guidelines exist, yet there are variations in clinical practice. Our study aims to describe the utilization of medications during resuscitation from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A retrospective review of patients who suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest from May 2008 to June 2014 was performed. Clinical and resuscitation data, including timing and dose of medications used, were extracted from the electronic medical record and comparisons made. A total of 94 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into different groups based on the medication combination used during resuscitation: (1) epinephrine; (2) epinephrine and bicarbonate; (3) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and calcium; (4) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and epinephrine drip; and (5) epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, and epinephrine drip. No difference in baseline demographics or clinical data was present, apart from history of dementia and the use of calcium channel blockers. The number of medications given was correlated with resuscitation duration (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.50, p resuscitation durations compared to that of the other groups (p resuscitation efforts for in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Increased duration and mortality rates were found in those resuscitations compared with epinephrine alone, likely due to the longer resuscitation duration in the former groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Problem-based learning in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: basic life support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardo, Pedro Miguel Garcez; Dal Sasso, Grace Terezinha Marcon

    2008-12-01

    Descriptive and exploratory study, aimed to develop an educational practice of Problem-Based Learning in CPR/BLS with 24 students in the third stage of the Nursing Undergraduate Course in a University in the Southern region of Brazil. The study used the PBL methodology, focused on problem situations of cardiopulmonary arrest, and was approved by the CONEP. The methodological strategies for data collection, such as participative observation and questionnaires to evaluate the learning, the educational practices and their methodology, allowed for grouping the results in: students' expectations; group activities; individual activities; practical activities; evaluation of the meetings and their methodology. The study showed that PBL allows the educator to evaluate the academic learning process in several dimensions, functioning as a motivating factor for both the educator and the student, because it allows the theoretical-practical integration in an integrated learning process.

  10. Comparison of different doses of epinephrine on myocardial perfusion and resuscitation success during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, K H; Ahnefeld, F W; Bowdler, I M

    1991-01-01

    Published results of dose-response effects of adrenergic drugs (epinephrine [E]) vary so much between studies because of differences in animal models and duration of ischemia before drug administration. In this investigation the effects of different doses of E on coronary perfusion pressure (CPP), left ventricular myocardial blood flow (MBF) and resuscitation success were compared during closed-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after a 4-minute period of ventricular fibrillation in 28 pigs. MBF was measured during normal sinus rhythm using tracer microspheres. After 4 minutes of ventricular fibrillation CPR was performed with the use of a pneumatic piston compressor. After 4 minutes of mechanical measures only, the animals were randomly allocated into four groups of seven, receiving 0.015, 0.030, 0.045, and 0.090 mg/kg E intravenously respectively. MBF measurements were started 45 seconds after E administration; hemodynamic measurements after 90 seconds. Four minutes after the first administration, the same E dose was given before defibrillation. The CPP of animals given 0.015, 0.030, 0.045 and 0.090 mg/kg E were as follows: 16.3 +/- 6.1, 25.6 +/- 5.8, 33.2 +/- 8.4 and 30.4 +/- 6.3 mm Hg. The left ventricular MBF values were: 14 +/- 9, 27 +/- 11, 43 +/- 6, 46 +/- 10 mL/min/100 g. The differences between the groups receiving 0.015 and 0.045 mg/kg and between the groups receiving 0.015 mg/kg and 0.090 mg/kg were statistically significant (P less than .05). Resuscitation success was 14.3%, 42.9%, 100% and 86.7% respectively. A significant difference in resuscitation success was found only between 0.015 mg/kg and 0.045 mg/kg E.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Resource-limited Health Systems-Considerations for Training and Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Jason; Patterson, Dean; Munjal, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    In the past 50 years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has gained widespread recognition as a life-saving skill that can be taught successfully to the general public. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be considered a cost-effective intervention that requires minimal classroom training and low-cost equipment and supplies; it is commonly taught throughout much of the developed world. But, the simplicity of CPR training and its access for the general public may be misleading, as outcomes for patients in cardiopulmonary arrest are poor and survival is dependent upon a comprehensive "chain-of-survival," which is something not achieved easily in resource-limited health care settings. In addition to the significant financial and physical resources needed to both train and develop basic CPR capabilities within a community, there is a range of ethical questions that should also be considered. This report describes some of the financial and ethical challenges that might result from CPR training in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). It is determined that for many health care systems, CPR training may have financial and ethically-deleterious, unintended consequences. Evidence shows Basic Life Support (BLS) skills training in a community is an effective intervention to improve public health. But, health care systems with limited resources should include CPR training only after considering the full implications of that intervention.

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: knowledge and opinions among the U.S. general public. State of the science-fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Catherine A; Larkin, Gregory L

    2008-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is undertaken more than 250,000 times annually in the United States. This study was undertaken to determine knowledge and opinions of the general public regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Validated multisite community-based cross-sectional survey. Knowledge and opinions about resuscitative practices and outcomes, using hypothetical clinical scenarios and other social, spiritual, and environmental considerations. Among 1831 participants representing 38 states, markedly inaccurate perceptions of cardiac arrest were reported. Participants' mean estimate of predicted survival rate after cardiac arrest was 54% (median 50%, IQR 35-75%), and mean estimated duration of resuscitative efforts in the ED was 28min (median 15min; IQR 10-30). Projected age and health status were independent predictors of resuscitation preferences in a series of 4 hypothetical scenarios. Participants indicated that physicians should consider patient and family wishes as the most important factors when making resuscitation decisions. Participants considered advanced technology and physician communication to be the most important actions during attempted resuscitation. Inaccurate perceptions regarding resuscitation and survival rates exist among the lay public. Participants indicated strong preferences regarding resuscitation and advance directives.

  13. Measuring and improving cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality inside the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Christopher; Bobrow, Bentley J; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler F; Dameff, Christian; Stolz, Uwe; Silver, Annemarie; Roosa, Jason; Page, Rianne; LoVecchio, Frank; Spaite, Daniel W

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate CPR quality during cardiac resuscitation attempts in an urban emergency department (ED) and determine the influence of the combination of scenario-based training, real-time audiovisual feedback (RTAVF), and post-event debriefing on CPR quality. CPR quality was recorded using an R Series monitor-defibrillator (ZOLL Medical) during the treatment of adult cardiac arrest patients. Phase 1 (P1; 11/01/2010-11/15/2012) was an observation period of CPR quality. Phase 2 (P2; 11/15/2012-11/08/2013) was after a 60-min psychomotor skills CPR training and included RTAVF and post-event debriefing. A total of 52 cardiac arrest patients were treated in P1 (median age 56 yrs, 63.5% male) and 49 in P2 (age 60 yrs, 83.7% male). Chest compression (CC) depth increased from 46.7 ± 3.8mm in P1 to 61.6 ± 2.8mm in P2 (p training, real-time audiovisual CPR feedback, and post-event debriefing was associated with improved CPR quality and compliance with CPR guidelines in this urban teaching emergency department. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Improvement in Trainees' Attitude and Resuscitation Quality With Repeated Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training: Cross-Sectional Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Won; Lee, Jeong Hun; Lee, Kyeong Ryong; Hong, Dae Young; Baek, Kwang Je; Park, Sang O

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of increasing numbers of training sessions in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on trainees' attitude and CPR quality. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for hospital employees was held every year from 2006 to 2010. Participants were recruited among the trainees in 2010. The trainees' attitudes toward CPR were surveyed by questionnaire, and the quality of their CPR was measured using 5-cycle 30:2 CPR on a manikin. Participants were categorized according to the number of consecutive CPR training sessions as T1 (only 2010), T2 (2009 and 2010), T3 (from 2008 to 2010) and T4-5 (from 2006 or 2007 to 2010). The trainee attitude and CPR quality were compared among the 4 groups. Of 923 CPR trainees, 267 were enrolled in the study. There was significant increase in willingness to start CPR and confidence in chest compression and mouth-to-mouth ventilation (MTMV) with increasing number of CPR training sessions attended (especially for ≥ 3 sessions). There was a significant increase in mean compression depth and decrease in percentage of chest compressions with depth of less than 38 mm in the T3 and T4-5 compared with the T1 and T2. No-flow time decreased significantly, and the percentage of MTMV with visible chest rise increased, as the number of training sessions increased. Repeated CPR training improved trainees' attitude and CPR quality. Because the number of training sessions increased (≥3), the willingness to start CPR and the confidence in skills increased significantly, and chest compression depth, no-flow time, and MTMV improved.

  15. Dynamic prediction of patient outcomes during ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonghee; Kim, Kyuseok; Callaway, Clifton W; Doh, Kibbeum; Choi, Jungho; Park, Jongdae; Jo, You Hwan; Lee, Jae Hyuk

    2017-02-01

    The probability of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and subsequent favourable outcomes changes dynamically during advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). We sought to model these changes using time-to-event analysis in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Adult (≥18 years old), non-traumatic OHCA patients without prehospital ROSC were included. Utstein variables and initial arterial blood gas measurements were used as predictors. The incidence rate of ROSC during the first 30min of ACLS in the emergency department (ED) was modelled using spline-based parametric survival analysis. Conditional probabilities of subsequent outcomes after ROSC (1-week and 1-month survival and 6-month neurologic recovery) were modelled using multivariable logistic regression. The ROSC and conditional probability models were then combined to estimate the likelihood of achieving ROSC and subsequent outcomes by providing k additional minutes of effort. A total of 727 patients were analyzed. The incidence rate of ROSC increased rapidly until the 10th minute of ED ACLS, and it subsequently decreased. The conditional probabilities of subsequent outcomes after ROSC were also dependent on the duration of resuscitation with odds ratios for 1-week and 1-month survival and neurologic recovery of 0.93 (95% CI: 0.90-0.96, p<0.001), 0.93 (0.88-0.97, p=0.001) and 0.93 (0.87-0.99, p=0.031) per 1-min increase, respectively. Calibration testing of the combined models showed good correlation between mean predicted probability and actual prevalence. The probability of ROSC and favourable subsequent outcomes changed according to a multiphasic pattern over the first 30min of ACLS, and modelling of the dynamic changes was feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pravastatin But Not Simvastatin Improves Survival and Neurofunctional Outcome After Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Bergt, MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Cardiac arrest (CA followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is associated with high mortality and poor neurological outcome. We compared the effects of pravastatin and simvastatin on survival and neurofunction in a murine model of CA/CPR. Pravastatin, a hydrophilic statin, increased survival and neurofunction during a 28-day follow-up period. This therapy was associated with improved pulmonary function, reduced pulmonary edema, and increased endothelial cell function in vitro. In contrast, lipophilic simvastatin did not modulate survival but increased pulmonary edema and impaired endothelial cell function. Although pravastatin may display a therapeutic option for post-CA syndrome, the application of simvastatin may require re-evaluation. Key Words: cardiac arrest, endothelial cell function, ischemia and reperfusion injury, pravastatin, resuscitation, simvastatin

  17. Increasing arterial oxygen partial pressure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation is associated with improved rates of hospital admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindelboeck, Walter; Schindler, Otmar; Moser, Adrian; Hausler, Florian; Wallner, Simon; Strasser, Christa; Haas, Josef; Gemes, Geza; Prause, Gerhard

    2013-06-01

    As recent clinical data suggest a harmful effect of arterial hyperoxia on patients after resuscitation from cardiac arrest (CA), we aimed to investigate this association during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the earliest and one of the most crucial phases of recirculation. We analysed 1015 patients who from 2003 to 2010 underwent out-of-hospital CPR administered by emergency medical services serving 300,000 inhabitants. Inclusion criteria for further analysis were nontraumatic background of CA and patients >18 years of age. One hundred and forty-five arterial blood gas analyses including oxygen partial pressure (paO2) measurement were obtained during CPR. We observed a highly significant increase in hospital admission rates associated with increases in paO2 in steps of 100 mmHg (13.3 kPa). Subsequently, data were clustered according to previously described cutoffs (≤ 60 mmHg [8 kPa

  18. A Novel Use of a Metronome in Dispatcher-assisted Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateyyah, Khalid A; Cady, Charles E; Poltrock, James T; Pirrallo, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Early, high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the key to increasing the likelihood of successful resuscitation in cardiac arrest. The use of dispatch-assisted (DA) CPR can increase the likelihood of bystander CPR. We describe a case in which a metronome was introduced to guide DA-CPR. The wife of a 52-year-old male activated 9-1-1 after her husband suffered a cardiac arrest. During her 9-1-1 call she received CPR instructions and heard a metronome over the phone while following the instructions. Return of spontaneous circulation of the patient occurred during paramedic on scene care. The patient was transported to hospital and discharged 6 days later with no neurological deficit. This case supports the use of a metronome by emergency medical dispatchers during the provision of DA-CPR to improve bystander CPR.

  19. Are the current guideline recommendations for neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation safe and effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenberg, Eric M

    2016-08-01

    A recently published review of approaches to optimize chest compressions in the resuscitation of asphyxiated newborns discussed the current recommendations and explored potential determinants of effective neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, not all potential determinants of effective neonatal CPR were explored. Chest compression shallower than the current guideline recommendation of approximately 33% of the anterior-posterior (AP) chest diameter may be safer and more effective. From a physiological standpoint, high-velocity brief duration shallower compression may be more effective than current recommendations. The application of a 1- or 2-finger method of high-impulse CPR, which would depend on the size of the subject, may be more effective than using a 2-thumb (TT) encircling hands method of CPR. Adrenaline should not be used in the treatment of asphyxiated neonates and when necessary titrated vasopressin should be used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The two-thumb technique using an elevated surface is preferable for teaching infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Trang K; Hemway, Rae Jean; Perlman, Jeffrey M

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether the two-thumb technique is superior to the two-finger technique for administering chest compressions using the floor surface and the preferred location for performing infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (ie, floor, table, or radiant warmer). Twenty Neonatal Resuscitation Program trained medical personnel performed CPR on a neonatal manikin utilizing the two-thumb vs two-finger technique, a compression to ventilation ratio of 30:2 for 2 minutes in random order on the floor, table, and radiant warmer. Compression depth favored the two-thumb over two-finger technique on the floor (27 ± 8 mm vs 23 ± 7), table (26 ± 7 mm vs 22 ± 7), and radiant warmer (29 ± 4 mm vs 23 ± 4) (all P CPR preferably using an elevated firm surface. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Public access defibrillation: successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation due to automatic external defibrillator at traffic accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, S; Reuter, H; Pfister, R; Michels, G

    2014-03-01

    A 65-year-old man collapsed after he stepped out of his car after a traffic accident. Fortunately, two police officers on a routine patrol in the area were quickly on the scene and started cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A passerby noticed that the patient was in distress and that an automatic defibrillator was nearby. He attached the electrodes of the defibrillator to the chest of the patient in accordance with instructions on the defibrillator and terminated the ventricular fibrillation (200 joule, biphasic). Emergency cardiac catheterization revealed a subtotal stenosis proximally in the right coronary artery, which was successfully treated with a stent. Based on the ideal basic life support, the immediate care by emergency mobile system and coronary angioplasty with successful revascularisation the patient could be released without any neurological deficit. This case illustrates that laypersons can use automatic external defibrillator in case of cardiac resuscitation sufficiently and quickly. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Disseminating cardiopulmonary resuscitation training by distributing 35,000 personal manikins among school children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Rasmussen, Lars S; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because most cardiac arrests occur at home, widespread training is needed to increase the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by lay persons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mass distribution of CPR instructional materials among schoolchildren. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: We distributed 35,002 resuscitation manikins to pupils (12 to 14 years of age) at 806 primary schools. Using the enclosed 24-minute instructional DVD, they trained in CPR and subsequently used the kit to train family and friends (second tier). They completed a questionnaire on who had trained...... in CPR using the kit. Teachers also were asked to evaluate the project. The incidence of bystander CPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the months following the project was compared with the previous year. In total, 6947 questionnaires (19.8%) were returned. The 6947 kits had been used to train 17...

  3. Social workers' experiences as the family support person during cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firn, Janice; DeVries, Keli; Morano, Dawnielle; Spano-English, Toni

    2017-07-01

    During inhospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempts, a designated family support person (FSP) may provide guidance and support to family members. Research on nurses and chaplains in this role has been published. Social workers also regularly fulfill this service, however, little is known about how they perceive and enact this role. To explore their experiences, qualitative interviews (n = 10) were conducted with FSP social workers. Critical realist thematic analysis identified five themes: walking in cold, promoting family presence, responding to the whole spectrum of grief, going beyond the family support role, and repercussions of bearing witness. Social workers perform a variety of tasks to promote family presence during resuscitation attempts and provide psychosocial support over the continuum of care. The FSP role impacts social workers emotionally and professionally. Implications for hospital policy, staffing, and clinical practice are discussed.

  4. Modelling ventricular fibrillation coarseness during cardiopulmonary resuscitation by mixed effects stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Kenneth; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Eftestøl, Trygve; Kramer-Johansen, Jo

    2015-10-15

    For patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and being in a shockable rhythm, the coarseness of the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal is an indicator of the state of the patient. In the current work, we show how mixed effects stochastic differential equations (SDE) models, commonly used in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modelling, can be used to model the relationship between CPR quality measurements and ECG coarseness. This is a novel application of mixed effects SDE models to a setting quite different from previous applications of such models and where using such models nicely solves many of the challenges involved in analysing the available data. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Does Video Laryngoscopy Offer Advantages over Direct Laryngoscopy during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraçoğlu, Ayten; Bezen, Olgaç; Şengül, Türker; Uğur, Egin Hüsnü; Şener, Sibel; Yüzer, Fisun

    2015-08-01

    Interruption of chest compressions should be minimized because of its negative effects on survival. This randomized, controlled, cross-over study aimed to analyze the effectiveness of Macintosh, Miller, McCoy and McGrath laryngoscopes during with or without chest compressions in the scope of a simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation scenario. The time required for successful tracheal intubation, number of attempts, dental trauma severity and the need for optimization manoeuvres were recorded during cardiopulmonary resuscitation with and without chest compressions. The experience with computer games during the last 10 years were asked to the participants and recorded. McCoy laryngoscope yielded the shortest time for successful tracheal intubation both in the presence of and without chest compressions. During the use of McCoy laryngoscopes, fewer tracheal intubation attempts, lower incidence of dental trauma and lower visual analogue scale scores on the ease of intubation were recorded. Participants who are experienced computer game players using Macintosh, McCoy and McGrath achieved successful tracheal intubation in a significantly shorter time during resuscitation without chest compressions. Dental trauma incidence and number of tracheal intubation attempts did not show any significant difference between the four laryngoscopes being related to the rate of playing computer games. McGrath video laryngoscopes do not appear to have advantages over direct laryngoscopes for securing a smooth and successful tracheal intubation during rhythmic chest compressions. We believe that as McCoy laryngoscope provided tracheal intubation in a shorter time and with fewer attempts, this laryngoscope may increase the success rate of resuscitation.

  6. Health care professionals' concerns regarding in-hospital family-witnessed cardiopulmonary resuscitation implementation into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak-Dankosky, Natalia; Andruszkiewicz, Paweł; Sherwood, Paula R; Kvist, Tarja

    2018-05-01

    In-hospital, family-witnessed cardiopulmonary resuscitation of adults has been found to help patients' family members deal with the short- and long-term emotional consequences of resuscitation. Because of its benefits, many national and international nursing and medical organizations officially recommend this practice. Research, however, shows that family-witnessed resuscitation is not widely implemented in clinical practice, and health care professionals generally do not favour this recommendation. To describe and provide an initial basis for understanding health care professionals' views and perspectives regarding the implementation of an in-hospital, family-witnessed adult resuscitation practice in two European countries. An inductive qualitative approach was used in this study. Finnish (n = 93) and Polish (n = 75) emergency and intensive care nurses and physicians provided written responses to queries regarding their personal observations, concerns and comments about in-hospital, family-witnessed resuscitation of an adult. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The study analysis yielded five themes characterizing health care professionals' main concerns regarding family-witnessed resuscitation: (1) family's horror, (2) disturbed workflow (3) no support for the family, (4) staff preparation and (5) situation-based decision. Despite existing evidence revealing the positive influence of family-witnessed resuscitation on patients, relatives and cardiopulmonary resuscitation process, Finnish and Polish health care providers cited a number of personal and organizational barriers against this practice. The results of this study begin to examine reasons why family-witnessed resuscitation has not been widely implemented in practice. In order to successfully apply current evidence-based resuscitation guidelines, provider concerns need to be addressed through educational and organizational changes. This study identified important implementation

  7. Wide variation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation interruption intervals among commercially available automated external defibrillators may affect survival despite high defibrillation efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David; Morgan, Carl

    2004-09-01

    Recent studies have associated interruptions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation imposed by automated external defibrillators (AEDs) with poor resuscitation outcome. In particular, the "hands-off" interval between precordial compressions and subsequent defibrillation shock has been implicated. We sought to determine the range of variation among current-generation AEDs with respect to this characteristic. Seven AEDs from six manufacturers were characterized via stopwatch and arrhythmia simulator with respect to the imposed hands-off interval. All AEDs were equipped with new batteries, and measurements were repeated five times for each AED. A wide variation in the hands-off interval between precordial compressions and shock delivery was observed, ranging from 5.2 to 28.4 secs, with only one AED achieving an interruption of <10 secs. Laboratory and clinical data suggest that this range of variation could be responsible for a more than two-fold variation in patient resuscitation success, an effect that far exceeds any defibrillation efficacy differences that may hypothetically exist. In addition to defibrillation waveform and dose, researchers should consider the hands-off cardiopulmonary resuscitation interruption interval between cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent defibrillation shock to be an important covariate of outcome in resuscitation studies. Defibrillator design should minimize this interval to avoid potential adverse consequences on patient survival.

  8. Witnessed arrest, but not delayed bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves prehospital cardiac arrest survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukmir, R B

    2004-05-01

    This study correlated the effect of witnessing a cardiac arrest and instituting bystander CPR (ByCPR), as a secondary end point in a study evaluating the effect of bicarbonate on survival. This prospective, randomised, double blinded clinical intervention trial enrolled 874 prehospital cardiopulmonary arrest patients encountered in a prehospital urban, suburban, and rural regional emergency medical service (EMS) area. This group underwent conventional advanced cardiac life support intervention followed by empiric early administration of sodium bicarbonate (1 mEq/l), monitoring conventional resuscitation parameters. Survival was measured as presence of vital signs on emergency department (ED) arrival. Data were analysed using chi(2) with Pearson correlation and odds ratio where appropriate. The overall survival rate was 13.9% (110 of 792) of prehospital cardiac arrest patients. The mean (SD) time until provision of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ByCPR) by laymen was 2.08 (2.77) minutes, and basic life support (BLS) by emergency medical technicians was 6.62 (5.73) minutes. There was improved survival noted with witnessed cardiac arrest-a 2.2-fold increase in survival, 18.9% (76 of 402) versus 8.6% (27 of 315) compared with unwitnessed arrests (ptwo minutes (p = 0.3752). Survival after prehospital cardiac arrest is more likely when witnessed, but not necessarily when ByCPR was performed by laymen.

  9. Occupational affiliation does not influence practical skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for in-hospital healthcare professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoren Ann-Britt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background D-CPR (Defibrillator Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation is a technique for optimal basic life support during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Guidelines recommend that healthcare professionals can perform CPR with competence. How CPR training and provision is organized varies between hospitals, and it is our impression that in Sweden this has generally improved during the last 15-20 years. However, some hospitals still do not have any AED (Automated External Defibrillators. The aim was to investigate potential differences in practical skills between different healthcare professions before and after training in D-CPR. Methods Seventy-four healthcare professionals were video recorded and evaluated for adherence to a modified Cardiff Score. A Laerdal Resusci Anne manikin in connection to PC Skill reporting System was used to evaluate CPR quality. A simulated CPR situation was accomplished during a 5-10 min scenario of ventricular fibrillation. Paired and unpaired statistical methods were used to examine differences within and between occupations with respect to the intervention. Results There were no differences in skills among the different healthcare professions, except for compressions per minute. In total, the number of compression per minute and depth improved for all groups (P P Conclusion Nearly all healthcare professionals learned to use the AED. There were no differences in CPR skill performances among the different healthcare professionals.

  10. Do Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs Offer Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training in Australia and New Zealand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartledge, Susie H; Bray, Janet E; Stub, Dion; Krum, Henry; Finn, Judith

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation may provide an ideal environment to train high-risk cardiac patients and their families in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, whether this training is currently offered is unknown. The aims of this study were to: 1) describe the prevalence of CPR training in cardiac rehabilitation programs in Australia and New Zealand (NZ); and 2) examine perceived barriers and attitudes of cardiac rehabilitation coordinators towards providing CPR training. We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of Australian and NZ cardiac rehabilitation coordinators. We received 253 completed surveys (46.7% response rate) (Australia n=208, NZ n=45). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training was included in 23.9% of Australian programs and 56.6% in NZ. Common barriers to CPR training included lack of resources (49.7%) and a lack of awareness to provide CPR training for this high-risk group (33.7%). The majority of coordinators believed that lay people should be trained in CPR (96.3%) and were comfortable with recommending CPR training to this high-risk group (89.4%). While cardiac rehabilitation coordinators have positive attitudes towards CPR training, it is not currently part of most programs - particularly in Australia. Organisations formulating cardiac rehabilitation recommendations and guidelines should give consideration to include the provision of CPR training. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: determinant factors for immediate survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Aparecida Morais

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze determinant factors for the immediate survival of persons who receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation from the advanced support units of the Mobile Emergency Medical Services (SAMU of Belo Horizonte.METHOD: this is a retrospective, epidemiological study which analyzed 1,165 assistance forms, from the period 2008 - 2010. The collected data followed the Utstein style, being submitted to descriptive and analytical statistics with tests with levels of significance of 5%.RESULTS: the majority were male, the median age was 64 years, and the ambulance response time, nine minutes. Immediate survival was observed in 239 persons. An association was ascertained of this outcome with "cardiac arrest witnessed by persons trained in basic life support" (OR=3.49; p<0.05; CI 95%, "cardiac arrest witnessed by Mobile Emergency Medical Services teams" (OR=2.99; p<0.05; CI95%, "only the carry out of basic life support" (OR=0.142; p<0.05; CI95%, and "initial cardiac rhythm of asystole" (OR=0.33; p<0.05; CI 95%.CONCLUSION: early access to cardiopulmonary resuscitation was related to a favorable outcome, and the non-undertaking of advanced support, and asystole, were associated with worse outcomes. Basic and advanced life support techniques can alter survival in the event of cardiac arrest.

  12. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training for Medical Students in Anesthesiology Rotation in Ardabil Medical University (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh Isazadehfar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR training for undergraduate medical students has been noted to be poor in the past. Attempts have been made The aim of this study is to determine effect of CPR training in the anesthetic ward to improve knowledge and practice undergraduate medical student of CPR.Methods: A 12 month Educational experimental study with self control was done on all undergraduate medical student (n=30 at the medical university of Ardabil in 2006-2007. During I month of program allthis students have undergone CPR training including basic life support (BLS , advanced cardiac life support (ACLS and practical skills. Data were collected via questionnaire, demographic, pre/post knowledge and practice.Results: After training the acceptable score (good and very good about knowledge of BLS, ACLS and practical skill significantly increased %6.7 to %50 (p=0.0001 , %13.3 to %53.4 (p=0.001 and %3.3 to %100 (p=0.001 respectively. A significant relationship between knowledge of ACLS and practical skills was shown (p=0.005.Conclusion: The CPR training course in anesthetic ward leads to a significant increased in skills and knowledge. Adding this course to undergraduate curriculum of medical students especially in operaticallywards (e.g. Anesthetic ward is essential.Keywords: CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION; TRAINING; BASIC LIFE SUPPORT; ADVANCED CARDIAC LIFE SUPPORT

  13. Assessment of nurses’ cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and skills within three district hospitals in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background Nurses are usually the first to identify the need for and initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on patients with cardiopulmonary arrest in the hospital setting. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to reduce in-hospital deaths when received from adequately trained health care professionals. Aim We aimed to investigate nurses’ retention of CPR knowledge and skills at district hospitals in Botswana. Methods A quantitative, quasi-experimental study was conducted at three hospitals in Botswana. A pre-test, intervention, post-test, and a re-test after 6 months were utilised to determine the retention of CPR knowledge and skills. Non-probability, convenience sampling technique was used to select 154 nurses. The sequences of the test were consistent with the American Heart Association’s 2010 basic life support (BLS) guidelines for health care providers. Data were analysed to compare performance over time. Results This study showed markedly deficient CPR knowledge and skills among registered nurses in the three district hospitals. The pre-test knowledge average score (48%) indicated that the nurses did not know the majority of the BLS steps. Only 85 nurses participated in the re-evaluation test at 6 months. While a 26.4% increase was observed in the immediate post-test score compared with the pre-test, the performance of the available participants dropped by 14.5% in the re-test 6 months after the post-test. Conclusion Poor CPR knowledge and skills among registered nurses may impede the survival and management of cardiac arrest victims. Employers and nursing professional bodies in Botswana should encourage and monitor regular CPR refresher courses. PMID:29781687

  14. Assessment of nurses' cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and skills within three district hospitals in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswaran, Lakshmi; Cox, Megan; Moeng, Stoffel; Tsima, Billy M

    2018-04-12

     Nurses are usually the first to identify the need for and initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on patients with cardiopulmonary arrest in the hospital setting. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to reduce in-hospital deaths when received from adequately trained health care professionals.  We aimed to investigate nurses' retention of CPR knowledge and skills at district hospitals in Botswana.  A quantitative, quasi-experimental study was conducted at three hospitals in Botswana. A pre-test, intervention, post-test, and a re-test after 6 months were utilised to determine the retention of CPR knowledge and skills. Non-probability, convenience sampling technique was used to select 154 nurses.The sequences of the test were consistent with the American Heart Association's 2010 basic life support (BLS) guidelines for health care providers. Data were analysed to compare performance over time.  This study showed markedly deficient CPR knowledge and skills among registered nurses in the three district hospitals. The pre-test knowledge average score (48%) indicated that the nurses did not know the majority of the BLS steps. Only 85 nurses participated in the re-evaluation test at 6 months. While a 26.4% increase was observed in the immediate post-test score compared with the pre-test, the performance of the available participants dropped by 14.5% in the re-test 6 months after the post-test.  Poor CPR knowledge and skills among registered nurses may impede the survival and management of cardiac arrest victims. Employers and nursing professional bodies in Botswana should encourage and monitor regular CPR refresher courses.

  15. Comparison of exertion required to perform standard and active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, J J; Mianulli, M J; Gisch, T M; Coffeen, P R; Haidet, G C; Lurie, K G

    1995-02-01

    Active compression-decompression (ACD) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) utilizes a hand-held suction device with a pressure gauge that enables the operator to compress as well as actively decompress the chest. This new CPR method improves hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters when compared with standard CPR. ACD-CPR is easy to perform but may be more labor intensive. The purpose of this study was to quantify and compare the work required to perform ACD and standard CPR. Cardiopulmonary testing was performed on six basic cardiac life support- and ACD-trained St. Paul, MN fire-fighter personnel during performance of 10 min each of ACD and standard CPR on a mannequin equipped with a compression gauge. The order of CPR techniques was determined randomly with > 1 h between each study. Each CPR method was performed at 80 compressions/min (timed with a metronome), to a depth of 1.5-2 inches, and with a 50% duty cycle. Baseline cardiopulmonary measurements were similar at rest prior to performance of both CPR methods. During standard and ACD-CPR, respectively, rate-pressure product was 18.2 +/- 3.0 vs. 23.8 +/- 1.7 (x 1000, P CPR compared with standard CPR. Both methods require subanaerobic energy expenditure and can therefore be sustained for a sufficient length of time by most individuals to optimize resuscitation efforts. Due to the slightly higher work requirement, ACD-CPR may be more difficult to perform compared with standard CPR for long periods of time, particularly by individuals unaccustomed to the workload requirement of CPR, in general.

  16. Are YouTube videos accurate and reliable on basic life support and cardiopulmonary resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaylaci, Serpil; Serinken, Mustafa; Eken, Cenker; Karcioglu, Ozgur; Yilmaz, Atakan; Elicabuk, Hayri; Dal, Onur

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate reliability and accuracy of the information on YouTube videos related to CPR and BLS in accord with 2010 CPR guidelines. YouTube was queried using four search terms 'CPR', 'cardiopulmonary resuscitation', 'BLS' and 'basic life support' between 2011 and 2013. Sources that uploaded the videos, the record time, the number of viewers in the study period, inclusion of human or manikins were recorded. The videos were rated if they displayed the correct order of resuscitative efforts in full accord with 2010 CPR guidelines or not. Two hundred and nine videos meeting the inclusion criteria after the search in YouTube with four search terms ('CPR', 'cardiopulmonary resuscitation', 'BLS' and 'basic life support') comprised the study sample subjected to the analysis. Median score of the videos is 5 (IQR: 3.5-6). Only 11.5% (n = 24) of the videos were found to be compatible with 2010 CPR guidelines with regard to sequence of interventions. Videos uploaded by 'Guideline bodies' had significantly higher rates of download when compared with the videos uploaded by other sources. Sources of the videos and date of upload (year) were not shown to have any significant effect on the scores received (P = 0.615 and 0.513, respectively). The videos' number of downloads did not differ according to the videos compatible with the guidelines (P = 0.832). The videos downloaded more than 10,000 times had a higher score than the others (P = 0.001). The majority of You-Tube video clips purporting to be about CPR are not relevant educational material. Of those that are focused on teaching CPR, only a small minority optimally meet the 2010 Resucitation Guidelines. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  17. Hypothermia and postconditioning after cardiopulmonary resuscitation reduce cardiac dysfunction by modulating inflammation, apoptosis and remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Meybohm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mild therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest is neuroprotective, but its effect on myocardial dysfunction that is a critical issue following resuscitation is not clear. This study sought to examine whether hypothermia and the combination of hypothermia and pharmacological postconditioning are cardioprotective in a model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation following acute myocardial ischemia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty pigs (28-34 kg were subjected to cardiac arrest following left anterior descending coronary artery ischemia. After 7 minutes of ventricular fibrillation and 2 minutes of basic life support, advanced cardiac life support was started according to the current AHA guidelines. After successful return of spontaneous circulation (n = 21, coronary perfusion was reestablished after 60 minutes of occlusion, and animals were randomized to either normothermia at 38 degrees C, hypothermia at 33 degrees C or hypothermia at 33 degrees C combined with sevoflurane (each group n = 7 for 24 hours. The effects on cardiac damage especially on inflammation, apoptosis, and remodeling were studied using cellular and molecular approaches. Five animals were sham operated. Animals treated with hypothermia had lower troponin T levels (p<0.01, reduced infarct size (34+/-7 versus 57+/-12%; p<0.05 and improved left ventricular function compared to normothermia (p<0.05. Hypothermia was associated with a reduction in: (i immune cell infiltration, (ii apoptosis, (iii IL-1beta and IL-6 mRNA up-regulation, and (iv IL-1beta protein expression (p<0.05. Moreover, decreased matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity was detected in the ischemic myocardium after treatment with mild hypothermia. Sevoflurane conferred additional protective effects although statistic significance was not reached. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Hypothermia reduced myocardial damage and dysfunction after cardiopulmonary resuscitation possible via a reduced rate of apoptosis

  18. Pre-resuscitation factors associated with mortality in 49,130 cases of in-hospital cardiac arrest: a report from the National Registry for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Gregory Luke; Copes, Wayne S; Nathanson, Brian H; Kaye, William

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate key pre-arrest factors and their collective ability to predict post-cardiopulmonary arrest mortality. CPR is often initiated indiscriminately after in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. Improved understanding of pre-arrest factors associated with mortality may inform advance care planning. A cohort of 49,130 adults who experienced pulseless cardiopulmonary arrest from January 2000 to September 2004 was obtained from 366 US hospitals participating in the National Registry for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (NRCPR). Logistic regression with bootstrapping was used to model in-hospital mortality, which included those discharged in unfavorable and severely worsened neurologic state (Cerebral Performance Category >/=3). Overall in-hospital mortality was 84.1%. Advanced age, black race, non-cardiac, non-surgical illness category, pre-existing malignancy, acute stroke, trauma, septicemia, hepatic insufficiency, general floor or Emergency Department location, and pre-arrest use of vasopressors or assisted/mechanical ventilation were independently predictive of in-hospital mortality. Retained peri-arrest factors including cardiac monitoring, and shockable initial pulseless rhythms, were strongly associated with survival. The validation model's AUROC curve (0.77) revealed fair performance. Predictive pre-resuscitation factors may supplement patient-specific information available at bedside to assist in revising resuscitation plans during the patient's hospitalization. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Naloxone and epinephrine are equally effective for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a rat asphyxia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M-H; Xie, L; Liu, T-W; Song, F-Q; He, T

    2006-10-01

    It is not known whether naloxone is as efficacious as epinephrine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of the study was to compare the effects of naloxone and epinephrine on the outcomes of CPR following asphyxial cardiac arrest in rats. Cardiac arrest was induced with asphyxia by clamping the tracheal tubes. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized prospectively into a saline group (treated with normal saline, 1 ml intravenously, n = 8), an epinephrine group (treated with epinephrine, 0.04 mg/kg intravenously, n = 8) or a naloxone group (treated with naloxone, 1 mg/kg intravenously, n = 8) in a blind fashion during resuscitation after asphyxial cardiac arrest. After 5 min of untreated cardiac arrest, conventional manual CPR was started and each drug was administered at the same time. The rates of restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) were one of eight (12.5%), seven of eight (87.5%) and seven of eight (87.5%) in the saline, epinephrine and naloxone groups, respectively. The rates of ROSC in the epinephrine and naloxone groups were equal and significantly greater than that in the saline group (P = 0.01 and P = 0.01, respectively). The administration of naloxone or epinephrine alone may increase the resuscitation rate, and both drugs are equally effective for CPR in a rat asphyxia model. However, the mechanism by which naloxone produces its efficacy during CPR remains unclear and further experimentation will be necessary.

  20. Improvement of Skills in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation of Pediatric Residents by Recorded Video Feedbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantasit, Nattachai; Vaewpanich, Jarin; Kuptanon, Teeradej; Kamalaporn, Haruitai; Khositseth, Anant

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the pediatric residents' cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills, and their improvements after recorded video feedbacks. Pediatric residents from a university hospital were enrolled. The authors surveyed the level of pediatric resuscitation skill confidence by a questionnaire. Eight psychomotor skills were evaluated individually, including airway, bag-mask ventilation, pulse check, prompt starting and technique of chest compression, high quality CPR, tracheal intubation, intraosseous, and defibrillation. The mock code skills were also evaluated as a team using a high-fidelity mannequin simulator. All the participants attended a concise Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) lecture, and received video-recorded feedback for one hour. They were re-evaluated 6 wk later in the same manner. Thirty-eight residents were enrolled. All the participants had a moderate to high level of confidence in their CPR skills. Over 50 % of participants had passed psychomotor skills, except the bag-mask ventilation and intraosseous skills. There was poor correlation between their confidence and passing the psychomotor skills test. After course feedback, the percentage of high quality CPR skill in the second course test was significantly improved (46 % to 92 %, p = 0.008). The pediatric resuscitation course should still remain in the pediatric resident curriculum and should be re-evaluated frequently. Video-recorded feedback on the pitfalls during individual CPR skills and mock code case scenarios could improve short-term psychomotor CPR skills and lead to higher quality CPR performance.

  1. Stress and Coping of Critical Care Nurses After Unsuccessful Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeekin, Dawn E; Hickman, Ronald L; Douglas, Sara L; Kelley, Carol G

    2017-03-01

    Participation by a critical care nurse in an unsuccessful resuscitation can create a unique heightened level of psychological stress referred to as postcode stress, activation of coping behaviors, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). To explore the relationships among postcode stress, coping behaviors, and PTSD symptom severity in critical care nurses after experiencing unsuccessful cardiopulmonary resuscitations and to see whether institutional support attenuates these repeated psychological traumas. A national sample of 490 critical care nurses was recruited from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses' eNewsline and social media. Participants completed the Post-Code Stress Scale, the Brief COPE (abbreviated), and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, which were administered through an online survey. Postcode stress and PTSD symptom severity were weakly associated ( r = 0.20, P = .01). No significant associations between coping behaviors and postcode stress were found. Four coping behaviors (denial, self-distraction, self-blame, and behavioral disengagement) were significant predictors of PTSD symptom severity. Severity of postcode stress and PTSD symptoms varied with the availability of institutional support. Critical care nurses show moderate levels of postcode stress and PTSD symptoms when asked to recall an unsuccessful resuscitation and the coping behaviors used. Identifying the critical care nurses most at risk for PTSD will inform the development of interventional research to promote critical care nurses' psychological well-being and reduce their attrition from the profession. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  2. Real-Time Mobile Device-Assisted Chest Compression During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Satyam; Bucuti, Hakiza; Chitnis, Anurag; Klacman, Alex; Dantu, Ram

    2017-07-15

    Prompt administration of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a key determinant of survival from cardiac arrest. Strategies to improve CPR quality at point of care could improve resuscitation outcomes. We tested whether a low cost and scalable mobile phone- or smart watch-based solution could provide accurate measures of compression depth and rate during simulated CPR. Fifty health care providers (58% intensive care unit nurses) performed simulated CPR on a calibrated training manikin (Resusci Anne, Laerdal) while wearing both devices. Subjects received real-time audiovisual feedback from each device sequentially. Primary outcome was accuracy of compression depth and rate compared with the calibrated training manikin. Secondary outcome was improvement in CPR quality as defined by meeting both guideline-recommend compression depth (5 to 6 cm) and rate (100 to 120/minute). Compared with the training manikin, typical error for compression depth was mobile device feedback (60% vs 50%; p = 0.3). Sessions that did not meet guideline recommendations failed primarily because of inadequate compression depth (46 ± 2 mm). In conclusion, a mobile device application-guided CPR can accurately track compression depth and rate during simulation in a practice environment in accordance with resuscitation guidelines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Positive end-expiratory pressure improves survival in a rodent model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation using high-dose epinephrine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCaul, Conán

    2009-10-01

    Multiple interventions have been tested in models of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to optimize drug use, chest compressions, and ventilation. None has studied the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on outcome. We hypothesized that because PEEP can reverse pulmonary atelectasis, lower pulmonary vascular resistance, and potentially improve cardiac output, its use during CPR would increase survival.

  4. The effectiveness of ultrabrief and brief educational videos for training lay responders in hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation: implications for the future of citizen cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrow, Bentley J; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler F; Spaite, Daniel W; Potts, Jerald; Denninghoff, Kurt; Chikani, Vatsal; Brazil, Paula R; Ramsey, Bob; Abella, Benjamin S

    2011-03-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) but often is not performed. We hypothesized that subjects viewing very short Hands-Only CPR videos will (1) be more likely to attempt CPR in a simulated OHCA scenario and (2) demonstrate better CPR skills than untrained individuals. This study is a prospective trial of 336 adults without recent CPR training randomized into 4 groups: (1) control (no training) (n=51); (2) 60-second video training (n=95); (3) 5-minute video training (n=99); and (4) 8-minute video training, including manikin practice (n=91). All subjects were tested for their ability to perform CPR during an adult OHCA scenario using a CPR-sensing manikin and Laerdal PC SkillReporting software. One half of the trained subjects were randomly assigned to testing immediately and the other half after a 2-month delay. Twelve (23.5%) controls did not even attempt CPR, which was true of only 2 subjects (0.7%; P=0.01) from any of the experimental groups. All experimental groups had significantly higher average compression rates (closer to the recommended 100/min) than the control group (P38 mm) than the control group (PCPR videos are more likely to attempt CPR and show superior CPR skills than untrained laypersons. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01191736.

  5. Barriers and facilitators to learning and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neighborhoods with low bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation prevalence and high rates of cardiac arrest in Columbus, OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Comilla; Haukoos, Jason S; Bond, Cindy; Rabe, Marilyn; Colbert, Susan H; King, Renee; Sayre, Michael; Heisler, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Residents who live in neighborhoods that are primarily black, Latino, or poor are more likely to have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, less likely to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and less likely to survive. No prior studies have been conducted to understand the contributing factors that may decrease the likelihood of residents learning and performing CPR in these neighborhoods. The goal of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to learning and performing CPR in 3 low-income, high-risk, and predominantly black neighborhoods in Columbus, OH. Community-Based Participatory Research approaches were used to develop and conduct 6 focus groups in conjunction with community partners in 3 target high-risk neighborhoods in Columbus, OH, in January to February 2011. Snowball and purposeful sampling, done by community liaisons, was used to recruit participants. Three reviewers analyzed the data in an iterative process to identify recurrent and unifying themes. Three major barriers to learning CPR were identified and included financial, informational, and motivational factors. Four major barriers were identified for performing CPR and included fear of legal consequences, emotional issues, knowledge, and situational concerns. Participants suggested that family/self-preservation, emotional, and economic factors may serve as potential facilitators in increasing the provision of bystander CPR. The financial cost of CPR training, lack of information, and the fear of risking one's own life must be addressed when designing a community-based CPR educational program. Using data from the community can facilitate improved design and implementation of CPR programs.

  6. Effects of script-based role play in cardiopulmonary resuscitation team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sung Phil; Cho, Junho; Park, Yoo Seok; Kang, Hyung Goo; Kim, Chan Woong; Song, Keun Jeong; Lim, Hoon; Cho, Gyu Chong

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) team dynamics and performance between a conventional simulation training group and a script-based training group. This was a prospective randomised controlled trial of educational intervention for CPR team training. Fourteen teams, each consisting of five members, were recruited. The conventional group (C) received training using a didactic lecture and simulation with debriefing, while the script group (S) received training using a resuscitation script. The team activity was evaluated with checklists both before and after 1 week of training. The videotaped simulated resuscitation events were compared in terms of team dynamics and performance aspects. Both groups showed significantly higher leadership scores after training (C: 58.2 ± 9.2 vs. 67.2 ± 9.5, p=0.007; S: 57.9 ± 8.1 vs. 65.4 ± 12.1, p=0.034). However, there were no significant improvements in performance scores in either group after training. There were no differences in the score improvement after training between the two groups in dynamics (C: 9.1 ± 12.6 vs. S: 7.4 ± 13.7, p=0.715), performance (C: 5.5 ± 11.4 vs. S: 4.7 ± 9.6, p=0.838) and total scores (C: 14.6 ± 20.1 vs. S: 12.2 ± 19.5, p=0.726). Script-based CPR team training resulted in comparable improvements in team dynamics scores compared with conventional simulation training. Resuscitation scripts may be used as an adjunct for CPR team training.

  7. Prognostic factors of the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a cardiology hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timerman Ari

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the early and late results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a cardiology hospital and to try to detect prognostic determinants of both short- and long-term survival. METHODS: A series of 557 patients who suffered cardiorespiratory arrest (CRA at the Dante Pazzanese Cardiology Institute over a period of 5 years was analyzed to examine factors predicting successful resuscitation and long-term survival. RESULTS: Ressuscitation maneuvers were tried in 536 patients; 281 patients (52.4% died immediately, and 164 patients (30.6% survived for than 24 hours. The 87 patients who survived for more than 1 month after CRA were compared with nonsurvivors. Coronary disease, cardiomyopathy, and valvular disease had a better prognosis. Primary arrhythmia occurred in 73.5% of the >1-month survivor group and heart failure occurred in 12.6% of this group. In those patients in whom the initial mechanism of CRA was ventricular fibrillation, 33.3% survived for more than 1 month, but of those with ventricular asystole only 4.3% survived. None of the 10 patients with electromechanical dissociation survived. There was worse prognosis in patients included in the extreme age groups (zero to 10 years and 70 years or more. The best results occurred when the cardiac arrest took place in the catheterization laboratories. The worst results occurred in the intensive care unit and the hemodialysis room. CONCLUSION: The results in our series may serve as a helpful guide to physicians with the difficult task of deciding when not to resuscitate or when to stop resuscitation efforts.

  8. Easy-to-learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation training programme: a randomised controlled trial on laypeople’s resuscitation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Rachel Jia Min; Lim, Swee Han; Wu, Vivien Xi; Leong, Tak Yam; Liaw, Sok Ying

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Simplifying the learning of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is advocated to improve skill acquisition and retention. A simplified CPR training programme focusing on continuous chest compression, with a simple landmark tracing technique, was introduced to laypeople. The study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the simplified CPR training in improving lay rescuers’ CPR performance as compared to standard CPR. METHODS A total of 85 laypeople (aged 21–60 years) were recruited and randomly assigned to undertake either a two-hour simplified or standard CPR training session. They were tested two months after the training on a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Participants’ performance on the sequence of CPR steps was observed and evaluated using a validated CPR algorithm checklist. The quality of chest compression and ventilation was assessed from the recording manikins. RESULTS The simplified CPR group performed significantly better on the CPR algorithm when compared to the standard CPR group (p CPR. However, a significantly higher number of compressions and proportion of adequate compressions was demonstrated by the simplified group than the standard group (p CPR group than in the standard CPR group (p CPR by focusing on continuous chest compressions, with simple hand placement for chest compression, could lead to better acquisition and retention of CPR algorithms, and better quality of chest compressions than standard CPR. PMID:29167910

  9. Attitude and skill levels of graduate health professionals in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebreegziabher Gebremedhn E

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endale Gebreegziabher Gebremedhn,1 Gebremedhn Berhe Gebregergs,2 Bernard Bradley Anderson,3,† Vidhya Nagaratnam1 1Department of Anaesthesia, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, 2Department of Public Health, Bahir Dar College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, 3Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia †Dr Bernard Bradley Anderson passed away on January 2, 2014 Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an emergency procedure used to treat victims following cardiopulmonary arrest. Graduate health professionals at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital manage many trauma and critically ill patients. The chance of survival after cardiopulmonary arrest may be increased with sufficient attitude and skill levels. The study aimed to assess the attitude and skill levels of graduate health professionals in performing CPR.Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted from May 1 to 30, 2013, at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital. The mean attitude and skill scores were compared for sex, original residence, and department of the participants using Student’s t-test and analysis of variance (Scheffe’s test. P-values <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant.Results: Of the 506 graduates, 461 were included in this study with a response rate of 91.1%. The mean attitude scores of nurse, interns, health officer, midwifery, anesthesia, and psychiatric nursing graduates were 1.15 (standard deviation [SD] =1.67, 8.21 (SD =1.24, 7.2 (SD =1.49, 6.69 (SD =1.83, 8.19 (SD =1.77, and 7.29 (SD =2.01, respectively, and the mean skill scores were 2.34 (SD =1.95, 3.77 (SD =1.58, 1.18 (SD =1.52, 2.16 (SD =1.93, 3.88 (SD =1.36, and 1.21 (SD =1.77, respectively.Conclusion and recommendations: Attitude and skill level of graduate health professionals with regard

  10. Relationship between chest compression depth and novice rescuer body weight during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Je Hyeok; Kim, Chan Woong

    2016-12-01

    This study determined if rescuer body weight is a major determinant of chest compression depth (CCD) among novice rescuers by analyzing the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skill tests among medical students and determined the body weight threshold for those unable to achieve adequate CCD. Retrospective analysis of CPR test results was performed. A total of 107 medical students completed the tests, which included 5 cycles of CPR. Data were collected using a ResusciAnne SkillReporter. Anthropometric data including participant body weight, body mass index, and height were also collected. The relationships between CCD and anthropometric data were evaluated by Pearson correlation coefficient. In addition, univariate linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between body weight and CCD. The highest positive correlation was found between CCD and body weight (r = 0.636, P compression should preferentially be performed by rescuers of healthy weight or overweight. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. What are the barriers to implementation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in secondary schools?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinckernagel, Line; Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rod, Morten Hulvej

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in schools is recommended to increase bystander CPR and thereby survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but despite mandating legislation, low rates of implementation have been observed in several countries, including Denmark. The purpose...... of the study was to explore barriers to implementation of CPR training in Danish secondary schools. DESIGN: A qualitative study based on individual interviews and focus groups with school leadership and teachers. Thematic analysis was used to identify regular patterns of meaning both within and across...... the interviews. SETTING: 8 secondary schools in Denmark. Schools were selected using strategic sampling to reach maximum variation, including schools with/without recent experience in CPR training of students, public/private schools and schools near to and far from hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: The study population...

  12. Recognising out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls increases bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated...... with bystander CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and 30-day survival. Our secondary aim was to identify patient-, setting-, and dispatcher-related predictors of OHCA recognition. METHODS: We performed an observational study of all OHCA patients' emergency calls in the Capital Region of Denmark from...... the association between OHCA recognition and bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of OHCA recognition. RESULTS: We included 779 emergency calls in the analyses. During the emergency calls, 70.1% (n=534) of OHCAs were recognised...

  13. Examining critical care nurses' critical incident stress after in hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, T

    2001-05-01

    The object of this study was to determine if critical care nurses' emotional responses to having performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation were indicative of critical incident stress. A descriptive approach was employed using a survey questionnaire of 31 critical care nurses, with supportive interview data from 18 of those participants. Analysis of the data generated from the questionnaire indicated that the respondents experienced thought intrusion and avoidance behaviour. A majority of those interviewed disclosed that they had experienced a wide range of emotional stressors and physical manifestations in response to having performed the procedure. The findings from both questionnaire and interview data were congruent with signs of critical incident stress, as described in the literature. This has been found to be detrimental to employees' mental health status and, for this reason, employers have a duty of care to minimise the risk of its occurrence and to manage problems as they arise.

  14. [Training program on cardiopulmonary resuscitation with the use of automated external defibrillator in a university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Ana Paula; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue

    2012-03-01

    Early defibrillation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) receives increasing emphasis on its priority and rapidity. This is an experience report about the implementation of a training program in CPR using a defibrillator in a private university. The training program in basic CPR maneuvers was based on global guidelines, including a theorical course with practical demonstration of CPR maneuvers with the defibrillator, individual practical training and theoretical and practical assessments. About the performance of students in the practical assessment the mean scores obtained by students in the first stage of the course was 26.4 points, while in the second stage the mean was 252.8 points, in the theoretical assessment the mean in the first stage was 3.06 points and in the second 9.0 points. The implementation of programs like this contribute to the effective acquisition of knowledge (theory) and skill (pratice) for the care of CPR victims.

  15. Association of cardiopulmonary resuscitation psychomotor skills with knowledge and self-efficacy in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Issenberg, S Barry

    2014-12-01

    Effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills are essential for better patient survival, but whether these skills are associated with knowledge of and self-efficacy in CPR is not well known. The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of CPR skills and identify the association of the psychomotor skills with knowledge and self-efficacy at the time of CPR skills training. A convenience sample of 124 nursing students participated in a one-group posttest-only study. The quality of CPR psychomotor skills, as assessed by structured observation using a manikin, was suboptimal. Nursing students who performed correct chest compression skills reported higher self-efficacy, but there was no association between CPR psychomotor skills and total knowledge. Rigorous skills training sessions with more objective feedback on performance and individual coaching are warranted to enable mastery learning and self-efficacy. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. A novel educational outreach approach to teach Hands-Only Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation to the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mary P; Gent, Lana M; Sweet, Merrilee; Potts, Jerry; Ahtone, Jeral; Idris, Ahamed H

    2017-07-01

    The American Heart Association set goals in 2010 to train 20 million people annually in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and to double bystander response by 2020. These ambitious goals are difficult to achieve without new approaches. The main objective is to evaluate a new approach to cardiopulmonary resuscitation instruction using a self-instructional kiosk to teach Hands-Only CPR to people at a busy international airport. This is a prospective, observational study evaluating a new approach to teach Hands-Only CPR to the public from July 2013 to February 2016. The American Heart Association developed a Hands-Only CPR Kiosk for this project. We assessed the number of participants who viewed the instructional video and practiced chest compressions as well as the quality metrics of the chest compressions. In a 32-month period, there were 23478 visits to the Hands-Only CPR Kiosk and 9006 test sessions; of those practice sessions, 26.2% achieved correct chest compression rate, 60.2% achieved correct chest compression depth, and 63.5% had the correct hand position. There is noticeable public interest in learning Hands-Only CPR by using an airport kiosk and an airport is an opportune place to engage a layperson in learning Hands-Only CPR. The average quality of Hands-Only CPR by the public needs improvement and adding kiosks to other locations in the airport could reach more people and could be replicated in other major airports in the United States. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. MRI evaluation of maternal cardiac displacement in pregnancy: implications for cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Signy; Kirkpatrick, Iain D C; Zelop, Carolyn M; Jassal, Davinder S

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, whether there is vertical displacement of the heart during pregnancy. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines during pregnancy recommend placing the hands 2-3 cm higher on the sternum than in nonpregnant individuals. This recommendation is based on the presumption that the heart is displaced superiorly by the diaphragm during the third trimester. Whether there is true cardiac displacement because of the expanding uterus in pregnancy remains unknown. A total of 34 healthy female volunteers 18-35 years old were enrolled prospectively from 2010-2012 at 2 tertiary care centers. The conditions of all participants were evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in the one-half left lateral decubitus position during the third trimester of pregnancy and again at a minimum of 3 months after delivery (surrogate for the nonpregnant state). Superior displacement of the heart was determined by measurement of the distance between the inferior aspect of the clavicular heads and the coronary sinus at both time points. The study population included 34 women (mean age, 29 ± 3 years; body mass index, 24 ± 4 kg/m(2)). The mean gestational age at third-trimester imaging was 237 ± 16 days (34 weeks ± 16 days); the mean number of days for postpartum imaging (baseline) was 107 ± 25 days (16 weeks ± 25 days). There was no statistical difference between the cardiac position at baseline (10.1 ± 1.2 cm) and during the third trimester (10.3 ± 1.1 cm; P = .22). Contrary to popular assumption, there is no significant vertical displacement of the heart in the third trimester of pregnancy relative to the nonpregnant state. Accordingly, there is no need to alter hand placement for chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for Patient Outcomes and their Predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swati; Grewal, Anju; Gautam, Parshotam L; Luthra, Neeru; Tanwar, Gayatri; Kaur, Amarpreet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac arrest continues to be a common cause of in-hospital deaths. Even small improvements in survival can translate into thousands of lives saved every year. Aim The aim of our prospective observational study was to elicit the outcomes and predictors of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation among adult patients. Settings and Design All in-hospital adult patients (age >14) who suffered cardiac arrest & were attended by a Code Blue Team between 1st January 2012 & 30th April 2013 were part of the study. Materials and Methods The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was assessed in terms of: Response time, Presenting initial rhythm, Time to first defibrillation, Duration of CPR and Outcome (Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) at discharge). Statistical Analysis Age, GOS and mean response time were analysed using t-test and ANOVA. Logistic regression was applied to determine the significance of the various factors in determining mortality. Results ROSC was achieved in 44% of a total of 127 patients included in our study. Asystole/Pulseless electrical activity (PEA) was the most common presenting rhythm (87.5%). The survival to discharge was seen in 7.1% patients of whom only 3.9% patients had good neurological outcome. Regression and survival analysis depicted achievement of ROSC during CPR, absence of co-morbidities and shorter response time of code blue team as predictors of good outcome. Conclusion We found poor outcome of CPR after in-hospital cardiac arrest. This was mainly attributed to an initial presenting rhythm of Asystole/PEA in most cases and delayed response times. PMID:26894150

  19. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a Danish health region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjølner, J; Greisen, J; Jørgensen, M R S; Terkelsen, C J; Ilkjaer, L B; Hansen, T M; Eiskjaer, H; Christensen, S; Gjedsted, J

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (ECPR) has emerged as a feasible rescue therapy for refractory, normothermic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Reported survival rates vary and comparison between studies is hampered by heterogeneous study populations, differences in bystander intervention and in pre-hospital emergency service organisation. We aimed to describe the first experiences, treatment details, complications and outcome with ECPR for OHCA in a Danish health region. Retrospective study of adult patients admitted at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark between 1 January 2011 and 1 July 2015 with witnessed, refractory, normothermic OHCA treated with ECPR. OHCA was managed with pre-hospital advanced airway management and mechanical chest compression during transport. Relevant pre-hospital and in-hospital data were collected with special focus on low-flow time and ECPR duration. Survival to hospital discharge with Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) of 1 and 2 at hospital discharge was the primary endpoint. Twenty-one patients were included. Median pre-hospital low-flow time was 54 min [range 5-100] and median total low-flow time was 121 min [range 55-192]. Seven patients survived (33%). Survivors had a CPC score of 1 or 2 at hospital discharge. Five survivors had a shockable initial rhythm. In all survivors coronary occlusion was the presumed cause of cardiac arrest. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation is feasible as a rescue therapy in normothermic refractory OHCA in highly selected patients. Low-flow time was longer than previously reported. Survival with favourable neurological outcome is possible despite prolonged low-flow duration. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Current and Future Status of Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Rohit K; Singal, Deepa; Bednarczyk, Joseph; Lamarche, Yoan; Singh, Gurmeet; Rao, Vivek; Kanji, Hussein D; Arora, Rakesh C; Manji, Rizwan A; Fan, Eddy; Nagpal, A Dave

    2017-01-01

    Numerous series, propensity-matched trials, and meta-analyses suggest that appropriate use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) for in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) can be lifesaving. Even with an antecedent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration in excess of 45 minutes, 30-day survival with favourable neurologic outcome using E-CPR is approximately 35%-45%. Survival may be related to age, duration of CPR, or etiology. Associated complications include sepsis, renal failure, limb and neurologic complications, hemorrhage, and thrombosis. However, methodological biases-including small sample size, selection bias, publication bias, and inability to control for confounders-in these series prevent definitive conclusions. As such, the 2015 American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support guidelines update recommended E-CPR as a Level of Evidence IIb recommendation in appropriate cases. The absence of high-quality evidence presents an opportunity for clinician/scientists to generate practice-defining data through collaborative investigation and prospective trials. A multidisciplinary dialogue is required to standardize the field and promote multicentre investigation of E-CPR with data sharing and the development of a foundation for high-quality trials. The objectives of this review are to (1) provide an overview of the strengths and limitations of currently available studies investigating the use of E-CPR in patients with IHCA and highlight knowledge gaps; (2) create a framework for the standardization of terminology, clinical practice, data collection, and investigation of E-CPR for patients with IHCA that will help ensure congruence in future work in this area; and (3) propose suggestions to guide future research by the cardiovascular community to advance this important field. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neural injury after use of vasopressin and adrenaline during porcine cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

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    Halvorsen, Peter; Sharma, Hari Shanker; Basu, Samar; Wiklund, Lars

    2015-03-01

    Our aim was to investigate cerebral and cardiac tissue injury subsequent to use of vasopressin and adrenaline in combination compared with vasopressin alone during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In a randomized, prospective, laboratory animal study 28 anesthetized piglets were subject to a 12-min untreated cardiac arrest and subsequent CPR. After 1 min of CPR, 10 of the piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg(8)-vasopressin (V group), and 10 piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg(8)-vasopressin, 1 min later followed by 20 µg/kg body weight of adrenaline, and another 1 min later continuous administration (10 µg/kg/min) of adrenaline (VA group). After 8 min of CPR, the piglets were defibrillated and monitored for another 3 h. Then they were killed and the brain immediately removed pending histological analysis. During CPR, the VA group had higher mean blood pressure and cerebral cortical blood flow (CCBF) but similar coronary perfusion pressure. After restoration of spontaneous circulation there was no difference in the pressure variables, but CCBF tended to be (36% ± 16%) higher in the V group. Neuronal injury and signs of a disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) were greater, 20% ± 4% and 21% ± 4%, respectively, in the VA group. In a background study of repeated single doses of adrenaline every third minute after 5 min arrest but otherwise the same protocol, histological measurements showed even worse neural injury and disruption of the BBB. Combined use of vasopressin and adrenaline caused greater signs of cerebral and cardiac injury than use of vasopressin alone during experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  2. Exploring How Lay Rescuers Overcome Barriers to Provide Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiesen, Wenche Torunn; Bjørshol, Conrad Arnfinn; Høyland, Sindre; Braut, Geir Sverre; Søreide, Eldar

    2017-02-01

    Survival rates after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) vary considerably among regions. The chance of survival is increased significantly by lay rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) before Emergency Medical Services (EMS) arrival. It is well known that for bystanders, reasons for not providing CPR when witnessing an OHCA incident may be fear and the feeling of being exposed to risk. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of why barriers to providing CPR are overcome. Using a semi-structured interview guide, 10 lay rescuers were interviewed after participating in eight OHCA incidents. Qualitative content analysis was used. The lay rescuers were questioned about their CPR-knowledge, expectations, and reactions to the EMS and from others involved in the OHCA incident. They also were questioned about attitudes towards providing CPR in an OHCA incident in different contexts. The lay rescuers reported that they were prepared to provide CPR to anybody, anywhere. Comprehending the severity in the OHCA incident, both trained and untrained lay rescuers provided CPR. They considered CPR provision to be the expected behavior of any community citizen and the EMS to act professionally and urgently. However, when asked to imagine an OHCA in an unclear setting, they revealed hesitation about providing CPR because of risk to their own safety. Mutual trust between community citizens and towards social institutions may be reasons for overcoming barriers in providing CPR by lay rescuers. A normative obligation to act, regardless of CPR training and, importantly, without facing any adverse legal reactions, also seems to be an important factor behind CPR provision. Mathiesen WT , Bjørshol CA , Høyland S , Braut GS , Søreide E . Exploring how lay rescuers overcome barriers to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a qualitative study. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(1):27-32.

  3. Factors affecting the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in inpatient units: perception of nurses

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    Clairton Marcos Citolino Filho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify, in the perception of nurses, the factors that affect the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in adult inpatient units, and investigate the influence of both work shifts and professional experience length of time in the perception of these factors. METHOD A descriptive, exploratory study conducted at a hospital specialized in cardiology and pneumology with the application of a questionnaire to 49 nurses working in inpatient units. RESULTS The majority of nurses reported that the high number of professionals in the scenario (75.5%, the lack of harmony (77.6% or stress of any member of staff (67.3%, lack of material and/or equipment failure (57.1%, lack of familiarity with the emergency trolleys (98.0% and presence of family members at the beginning of the cardiopulmonary arrest assistance (57.1% are factors that adversely affect the quality of care provided during CPR. Professional experience length of time and the shift of nurses did not influence the perception of these factors. CONCLUSION The identification of factors that affect the quality of CPR in the perception of nurses serves as parameter to implement improvements and training of the staff working in inpatient units.

  4. Effect of Prior Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Knowledge on Compression Performance by Hospital Providers

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    Joshua N. Burkhardt

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR knowledge of hospital providers and whether knowledge affects performance of effective compressions during a simulated cardiac arrest. Methods: This cross-sectional study evaluated the CPR knowledge and performance of medical students and ED personnel with current CPR certification. We collected data regarding compression rate, hand placement, depth, and recoil via a questionnaire to determine knowledge, and then we assessed performance using 60 seconds of compressions on a simulation mannequin. Results: Data from 200 enrollments were analyzed by evaluators blinded to subject knowledge. Regarding knowledge, 94% of participants correctly identified parameters for rate, 58% for hand placement, 74% for depth, and 94% for recoil. Participants identifying an effective rate of ≥100 performed compressions at a significantly higher rate than participants identifying <100 (µ=117 vs. 94, p<0.001. Participants identifying correct hand placement performed significantly more compressions adherent to guidelines than those identifying incorrect placement (µ=86% vs. 72%, p<0.01. No significant differences were found in depth or recoil performance based on knowledge of guidelines. Conclusion: Knowledge of guidelines was variable; however, CPR knowledge significantly impacted certain aspects of performance, namely rate and hand placement, whereas depth and recoil were not affected. Depth of compressions was poor regardless of prior knowledge, and knowledge did not correlate with recoil performance. Overall performance was suboptimal and additional training may be needed to ensure consistent, effective performance and therefore better outcomes after cardiopulmonary arrest.

  5. 30 : 2: A Game Designed to Promote the Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol

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    Imma Boada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is a first-aid key survival technique used to stimulate breathing and keep blood flowing to the heart. Its effective administration can significantly increase the survival chances of cardiac arrest victims. We propose 30 : 2, a videogame designed to introduce the main steps of the CPR protocol. It is not intended for certification and training purpose. Driven by the 2010 European Resuscitation Council guidelines we have designed a game composed of eight mini games corresponding to the main steps of the protocol. The player acts as a helper and has to solve a different challenge. We present a detailed description of the game creation process presenting the requirements, the design decisions, and the implementation details. In addition, we present some first impressions of our testing users (25 children, five of each age from 8 to 12 years old and 12 males and 13 females. We evaluated clarity of instructions and three settings of the game: the aesthetics of scenarios, the playability, and the enjoyability of each mini game. All games were well punctuated, and there are no significantly differences between their sex. The proposed game can be a suitable tool to disseminate and promote CPR knowledge.

  6. In-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Trainees' worst and most memorable experiences.

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    Myint, P K; Rivas, C A; Bowker, L K

    2010-11-01

    To examine the personal experiences of higher specialist trainees in Geriatric Medicine (GM) with regard to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) decision making. UK. Two hundred and thirty-five higher trainee members of the British Geriatrics Society (BGS) at the Specialist Registrar (SpR) level. Postal questionnaire survey. We distributed a questionnaire examining the various issues around DNAR decision making among the trainee members of the BGS in November 2003. In one of the questions, we asked the participants, 'Briefly describe your worst or most memorable experience of DNAR'. Responses to this question were analysed by thematic schema and are presented. Overall the response rate was 62% (251/408) after second mailing and 235 of these were at SpR grade. One hundred and ninety-eight participants provided an answer to the above question, providing diverse and often detailed accounts, most of which were negative experiences and which appeared to have had a powerful influence on their ongoing clinical practice. The emerging themes demonstrated areas of conflict between trainees and other doctors as well as patients and relatives. SpR grade geriatricians are exposed to extreme and varied experiences of DNAR decision making in the UK. Efforts to improve support and training in this area should embrace the complexity of the subject.

  7. Optimal chest compression rate in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a prospective, randomized crossover study using a manikin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Hwa; Ryu, Ji Ho; Min, Mun Ki; Kim, Yong In; Park, Maeng Real; Yeom, Seok Ran; Han, Sang Kyoon; Park, Seong Wook

    2016-08-01

    When performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the 2010 American Heart Association guidelines recommend a chest compression rate of at least 100 min, whereas the 2010 European Resuscitation Council guidelines recommend a rate of between 100 and 120 min. The aim of this study was to examine the rate of chest compression that fulfilled various quality indicators, thereby determining the optimal rate of compression. Thirty-two trainee emergency medical technicians and six paramedics were enrolled in this study. All participants had been trained in basic life support. Each participant performed 2 min of continuous compressions on a skill reporter manikin, while listening to a metronome sound at rates of 100, 120, 140, and 160 beats/min, in a random order. Mean compression depth, incomplete chest recoil, and the proportion of correctly performed chest compressions during the 2 min were measured and recorded. The rate of incomplete chest recoil was lower at compression rates of 100 and 120 min compared with that at 160 min (P=0.001). The numbers of compressions that fulfilled the criteria for high-quality CPR at a rate of 120 min were significantly higher than those at 100 min (P=0.016). The number of high-quality CPR compressions was the highest at a compression rate of 120 min, and increased incomplete recoil occurred with increasing compression rate. However, further studies are needed to confirm the results.

  8. The Success Rate of Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Ahvaz Training Hospitals

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    Shideh Assar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Objective. This study determined the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR after in-hospital cardiac arrest and factors influencing it in two training hospitals in Ahvaz. Method. Patients hospitalized in the pediatric wards and exposed to CPR during hospital stay were included in the study (September 2013 to May 2014. The primary outcome of CPR was assumed to be the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and the secondary outcome was assumed to be survival to discharge. The neurological outcome of survivors was assessed using the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (PCPC method. Results. Of the 279 study participants, 138 patients (49.4% showed ROSC, 81 patients (29% survived for 24 hours after the CPR, and 33 patients (11.8% survived to discharge. Of the surviving patients, 16 (48.5% had favorable neurological outcome. The resuscitation during holidays resulted in fewer ROSC. Multivariate analysis showed that longer CPR duration, CPR by junior residents, growth deficiency, and prearrest vasoactive drug infusion were associated with decreased survival to discharge (p<0.05. Infants and patients with respiratory disease had higher survival rates. Conclusion. The rate of successful CPR in our study was lower than rates reported by developed countries. However, factors influencing the outcome of CPR were similar. These results reflect the necessity of paying more attention to pediatric CPR training, postresuscitation conditions, and expansion of intensive care facilities.

  9. HOW DO KNOWLEDGE AND SELF-EFFICACY OF INTERNSHIP NURSING STUDENTS IN PERFORMING CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION?

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    Selly Desiani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR is the emergency first aid in cardiac arrest. CPR delivery is influenced by knowledge and self-efficacy. Internship students can be the first responder of cardiac arrest in hospital and expected on having knowledge and high self-efficacy of CPR early. But there is no data on self-efficacy of internship students in performing CPR. Objective: The purpose of this research was to identify knowledge and self-efficacy of internship students in performing CPR. Methods: The method in this research was descriptive quantitative with cross-sectional approach on 76 internship students selected by simple random sampling. Knowledge questionnaire and Resuscitation Self-Efficacy Scale instrument were used in this research, with validity score 0.56-0.84 (α=0.91. Data were analysed by distribution frequency. Results: The results showed that 49 respondents (64.5% had moderate knowledge and 73 respondents (96.1% had high self-efficacy. The lowest domain in knowledge was conceptual knowledge, while in self-efficacy were reporting, debriefing and recording. Conclusions: Therefore, it becomes important to increase information on the conceptual knowledge and enhances training on the self-efficacy domain: reporting; debriefing and recording.

  10. Paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training program in Latin-America: the RIBEPCI experience.

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    López-Herce, Jesús; Matamoros, Martha M; Moya, Luis; Almonte, Enma; Coronel, Diana; Urbano, Javier; Carrillo, Ángel; Del Castillo, Jimena; Mencía, Santiago; Moral, Ramón; Ordoñez, Flora; Sánchez, Carlos; Lagos, Lina; Johnson, María; Mendoza, Ovidio; Rodriguez, Sandra

    2017-09-12

    To describe the design and to present the results of a paediatric and neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program adapted to Latin-America. A paediatric CPR coordinated training project was set up in several Latin-American countries with the instructional and scientific support of the Spanish Group for Paediatric and Neonatal CPR. The program was divided into four phases: CPR training and preparation of instructors; training for instructors; supervised teaching; and independent teaching. Instructors from each country participated in the development of the next group in the following country. Paediatric Basic Life Support (BLS), Paediatric Intermediate (ILS) and Paediatric Advanced (ALS) courses were organized in each country adapted to local characteristics. Five Paediatric Resuscitation groups were created sequentially in Honduras (2), Guatemala, Dominican Republican and Mexico. During 5 years, 6 instructors courses (94 students), 64 Paediatric BLS Courses (1409 students), 29 Paediatrics ILS courses (626 students) and 89 Paediatric ALS courses (1804 students) were given. At the end of the program all five groups are autonomous and organize their own instructor courses. Training of autonomous Paediatric CPR groups with the collaboration and scientific assessment of an expert group is a good model program to develop Paediatric CPR training in low- and middle income countries. Participation of groups of different countries in the educational activities is an important method to establish a cooperation network.

  11. Extensive cardiopulmonary resuscitation for VLBW and ELBW infants: a systematic review and meta-analyses.

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    Shah, P S

    2009-10-01

    Studies of the outcomes of preterm infants after the receipt of extensive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at birth or in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have yielded varied results. A systematic review of the outcomes of very low birth weight (VLBW) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants who received extensive resuscitation at birth or in the NICU was carried out. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL databases were searched for studies of extensive CPR in the delivery room (DR-CPR) and in NICU (NICU-CPR) that have reported neonatal or long-term outcomes. A total of 20 eligible studies were identified (11 of DR-CPR, 7 of NICU-CPR and 2 had combined data). DR-CPR was associated with an increased risk of mortality (odds ratio (OR) 2.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.92, 4.16) and severe neurological injury (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.40, 3.67) compared with infants who did not receive extensive CPR. NICU-CPR was associated with an increased risk of mortality (OR 55, 95% CI 15, 195) compared with infants who did not receive CPR; however, confidence limits were wide. The long-term outcome of survivors was reported in a limited number of studies. Extensive CPR at birth or in the NICU for VLBW or ELBW infants was associated with higher risk of mortality.

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnet, Frederic; Triba, Mohamed N; Borron, Stephen W; Lapostolle, Frederic; Hubert, Hervé; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; Escutnaire, Josephine; Guenin, Aurelien; Hoogvorst, Astrid; Marbeuf-Gueye, Carol; Reuter, Paul-Georges; Javaud, Nicolas; Vicaut, Eric; Chevret, Sylvie

    2017-02-01

    Relationship between cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation (CPR) durations and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remain unclear. Our primary aim was to determine the association between survival without neurologic sequelae and cardiac arrest intervals in the setting of witnessed OHCA. We analyzed 27,301 non-traumatic, witnessed OHCA patients in France included in the national registry from June 1, 2011 through December 1, 2015. We analyzed cardiac arrest intervals, designated as no-flow (NF; from collapse to start of CPR) and low-flow (LF; from start of CPR to cessation of resuscitation) in relation to 30-day survival without sequelae. We determined the influence of recognized prognostic factors (age, gender, initial rhythm, location of cardiac arrest) on this relation. For the entire cohort, the area delimited by a value of NF greater than 12min (95% confidence interval: 11-13min) and LF greater than 33min (95% confidence interval: 29-45min), yielded a probability of 30-day survival of less than 1%. These sets of values were greatly influenced by initial cardiac arrest rhythm, age, sex and location of cardiac arrest. Extended CPR duration (greater than 40min) in the setting of initial shockable cardiac rhythm is associated with greater than 1% survival with NF less than 18min. The NF interval was highly influential on the LF interval regardless of outcome, whether return of spontaneous circulation (padvanced techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Outcomes of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Among Patients With Cancer.

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    Zafar, Waleed; Ghafoor, Irum; Jamshed, Arif; Gul, Sabika; Hafeez, Haroon

    2017-04-01

    To review all episodes where an emergency code was called in a cancer-specialized hospital in Pakistan and to assess survival to discharge among patients who received a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reviewed demographic and clinical data related to all "code blue" calls over 3 years. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the association of clinical characteristics with the primary outcome of survival to discharge. A total of 646 code blue calls were included in the analysis. The CPR was performed in 388 (60%) of these calls. For every 20 episodes of CPR among patients with cancer of all ages, only 1 resulted in a patient's survival to discharge, even though in 52.2% episodes there was a return of spontaneous circulation. No association was found between the type of rhythm at initiation of CPR and likelihood of survival to discharge. The proportion of patients with advanced cancer surviving to discharge after in-hospital CPR in a low-income country was in line with the reported international experience. Most patients with cancer who received in-hospital CPR did not survive to discharge and did not appear to benefit from resuscitation. Advance directives by patients with cancer limiting aggressive interventions at end of life and proper documentation of these directives will help in provision of care that is humane and consonant with patients' wishes for a dignified death. Patients' early appreciation of the limited benefits of CPR in advanced cancer is likely to help them formulate such advance directives.

  14. Smaller self-inflating bags produce greater guideline consistent ventilation in simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehme, Ziad; Boyle, Malcolm J

    2009-02-20

    Suboptimal bag ventilation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has demonstrated detrimental physiological outcomes for cardiac arrest patients. In light of recent guideline changes for resuscitation, there is a need to identify the efficacy of bag ventilation by prehospital care providers. The objective of this study was to evaluate bag ventilation in relation to operator ability to achieve guideline consistent ventilation rate, tidal volume and minute volume when using two different capacity self-inflating bags in an undergraduate paramedic cohort. An experimental study using a mechanical lung model and a simulated adult cardiac arrest to assess the ventilation ability of third year Monash University undergraduate paramedic students. Participants were instructed to ventilate using 1600 ml and 1000 ml bags for a length of two minutes at the correct rate and tidal volume for a patient undergoing CPR with an advanced airway. Ventilation rate and tidal volume were recorded using an analogue scale with mean values calculated. Ethics approval was granted. Suboptimal ventilation with the use of conventional 1600 ml bag was common, with 77% and 97% of participants unable to achieve guideline consistent ventilation rates and tidal volumes respectively. Reduced levels of suboptimal ventilation arouse from the use of the smaller bag with a 27% reduction in suboptimal tidal volumes (p = 0.015) and 23% reduction in suboptimal minute volumes (p = 0.045). Smaller self-inflating bags reduce the incidence of suboptimal tidal volumes and minute volumes and produce greater guideline consistent results for cardiac arrest patients.

  15. Disseminating cardiopulmonary resuscitation training by distributing 9,200 personal manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva, Edison Ferreira; Padilha, Roberto de Queiroz; Sgobero, Jenny Karol Gomes Sato; Ganem, Fernando; Cardoso, Luiz Francisco

    2014-08-01

    Community members should be trained so that witnesses of cardiac arrests are able to trigger the emergency system and perform adequate resuscitation. In this study, the authors evaluated the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training of communities in four Brazilian cities, using personal resuscitation manikins. In total, 9,200 manikins were distributed in Apucarana, Itanhaém, Maringá, and São Carlos, which are cities where the populations range from 80,000 to 325,000 inhabitants. Elementary and secondary school teachers were trained on how to identify a cardiac arrest, trigger the emergency system, and perform chest compressions. The teachers were to transfer the training to their students, who would then train their families and friends. In total, 49,131 individuals were trained (6.7% of the population), but the original strategy of using teachers and students as multipliers was responsible for only 27.9% of the training. A total of 508 teachers were trained, and only 88 (17.3%) transferred the training to the students. Furthermore, the students have trained only 45 individuals of the population. In Maringá and São Carlos, the strategy was changed and professionals in the primary health care system were prepared and used as multipliers. This strategy proved extremely effective, especially in Maringá, where 39,041 individuals were trained (79.5% of the total number of trainings). Community health care providers were more effective in passing the training to students than the teachers (odds ratio [OR] = 7.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.74 to 10.69; p CPR using personal manikins by professionals in the primary health care system seems to be a more efficient strategy for training the community than creating a training network in the schools. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  16. How effectively can young people perform dispatcher-instructed cardiopulmonary resuscitation without training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Matthew; Swain, Andrew; Dunning, Andrew; Baine, Julie; Burrowes, Corey

    2015-05-01

    Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is increased by bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Bystander performance can be improved when CPR instructions are delivered by a calltaker at the Emergency Communications Centre. Little is known about a young person's ability to understand these instructions and perform CPR correctly. We assessed the ability of a group of untrained young people to effectively apply these directions to an adult resuscitation manikin. 87 youngsters aged 7-15 years with no previous training in CPR were separately equipped with a mobile phone and an adult assessment manikin. They phoned the emergency number (111) and were automatically diverted to a senior emergency medical dispatcher (EMD). The EMD delivered resuscitation instructions which complied fully with Medical Priority Dispatch System (version 12.1). Performance was monitored using a Laerdal Computerised Skill Reporting System. Average compression depth increased with age from 10.3 mm to 30 mm for 8 and 15 year olds respectively. 100 compressions per minute was achieved in youngsters aged 10 years and older but the rate fatigued over time and improved after interruption for two ventilations. Those aged 11 years and older consistently compressed the chest from 31 mm to 50mm. Only one participant could successfully ventilate the manikin by mouth-to-mouth. This study demonstrates that untrained youngsters should perform compression-only CPR. From 11 years of age, they can effectively perform dispatcher-directed CPR by compressing the chest at an appropriate rate and depth. However, their technique benefits from formal training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence of systemic air-embolism after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation in newborns: A pilot study.

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    Halbertsma, Feico J J; Mohns, Thilo; Bok, Levinus A; Niemarkt, Hendrik J; Kramer, Boris W

    2015-08-01

    Chest compressions (CC) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are the cornerstone of adult CPR protocols and are meant to restore circulation and improve outcome. Although adverse effects such as air-embolisms have been reported, these are rare and considered to be outweighed by beneficial effect. In newborns, however, the lung tissue is more fragile. Thus, the high intra-thoracic pressures resulting from CC may make the newborns more vulnerable for air-embolisms. We studied the postmortem prevalence of air-embolism in neonates that have received CPR. Prospective cohort analysis of newborns receiving CC during CPR. CPR was performed by trained staff according to ILCOR guidelines, in a tertiary hospital. Air-embolisms were sought after using CT/MRI and autopsy. During a 61/2 year period (2007-2014), n = 56 newborns received CC. Newborns were resuscitated following severe perinatal hypoxia, or due to complications during NICU treatment. In n = 14 (25.0%) circulation could not be restored (mean CPR duration: 32.7 ± 15.2 min). Post-mortem CT/MRI was performed in n = 9, of whom n = 8 (88.9%) had air-embolisms. Autopsy was performed in n = 9. The air-embolisms could not be retraced on autopsy except for n = 1 patient. In patients with CPR resulting in restored circulation (n = 42), no CT or MRI was performed for comparison due to radiation and/or hemodynamic instability. Cerebral ultrasound could not identify or exclude air-embolisms in this subgroup. Post-mortem CT after prolonged resuscitation showed a high prevalence of intravascular air-embolism. Autopsy was not suited to detect air-embolism. The clinical importance of air-embolisms on the lethal outcome needs further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Incidence, characteristics, and survival following cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the quaternary neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, Elizabeth E; Langeveld, Robert; Heimall, Lauren; Deveney, Alyson; Ades, Anne; Jensen, Erik A; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2017-01-01

    The contemporary characteristics and outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are poorly described. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence, interventions, and outcomes of CPR in a quaternary referral NICU. Retrospective observational study of infants who received chest compressions for resuscitation in the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia NICU between April 1, 2011 and June 30, 2015. Patient, event, and survival characteristics were abstracted from the medical record and the hospital-wide resuscitation database. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify patient and event factors associated with survival to discharge. There were 1.2 CPR events per 1000 patient days. CPR was performed in 113 of 5046 (2.2%) infants admitted to the NICU during the study period. The median duration of chest compressions was 2min (interquartile range 1, 6min). Adrenaline was administered in 34 (30%) CPR events. Of 113 infants with at least one CPR event, 69 (61%) survived to hospital discharge. Factors independently associated with decreased survival to hospital discharge were inotrope treatment prior to CPR (adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] 0.14, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.04, 0.54), and adrenaline administration during CPR (aOR 0.14, 95% CI 0.04, 0.50). Although it was not uncommon, the incidence of CPR was low (CPR and adrenaline administration during CPR were less likely to survive to hospital discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Knowledge and attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation amongst Asian primary health care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Eh Ong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Marcus Eh Ong1, Susan Yap1, Kim P Chan1, Papia Sultana2, Venkataraman Anantharaman11Department of Emergency Medicine, 2Department of Clinical Research, Singapore General Hospital, SingaporeObjective: To assess the knowledge and attitudes of local primary health care physicians in relation to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and defibrillation.Methods: We conducted a survey on general practitioners in Singapore by using a self-administered questionnaire that comprised 29 questions.Results: The response rate was 80%, with 60 of 75 physicians completing the questionnaire. The average age of the respondents was 52 years. Sixty percent of them reported that they knew how to operate an automated external defibrillator (AED, and 38% had attended AED training. Only 36% were willing to perform mouth-to-mouth ventilation during CPR, and 53% preferred chest compression-only resuscitation (CCR to standard CPR. We found those aged <50 years were more likely to be trained in basic cardiac life support (BCLS (P < 0.001 and advanced cardiac life support (P = 0.005 or to have ever attended to a patient with cardiac arrest (P = 0.007. Female physicians tended to agree that all clinics should have AEDs (P = 0.005 and support legislation to make AEDs compulsory in clinics (P < 0.001. We also found that a large proportion of physicians who were trained in BCLS (P = 0.006 were willing to perform mouth-to-mouth ventilation.Conclusion: Most local primary care physicians realize the importance of defibrillation, and the majority prefer CCR to standard CPR.Keywords: general practitioners, cardiac arrest, resuscitation, defibrillation, attitude, knowledge

  20. Patient-centric Blood Pressure–targeted Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Improves Survival from Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, Stuart H.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Lampe, Joshua W.; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R.; Garuccio, Mia; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Although current resuscitation guidelines are rescuer focused, the opportunity exists to develop patient-centered resuscitation strategies that optimize the hemodynamic response of the individual in the hopes to improve survival. Objectives: To determine if titrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to blood pressure would improve 24-hour survival compared with traditional CPR in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods: After 7 minutes of asphyxia, followed by VF, 20 female 3-month-old swine randomly received either blood pressure–targeted care consisting of titration of compression depth to a systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg and vasopressors to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mm Hg (BP care); or optimal American Heart Association Guideline care consisting of depth of 51 mm with standard advanced cardiac life support epinephrine dosing (Guideline care). All animals received manual CPR for 10 minutes before first shock. Primary outcome was 24-hour survival. Measurements and Main Results: The 24-hour survival was higher in the BP care group (8 of 10) compared with Guideline care (0 of 10); P = 0.001. Coronary perfusion pressure was higher in the BP care group (point estimate +8.5 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.9–13.0 mm Hg; P < 0.01); however, depth was higher in Guideline care (point estimate +9.3 mm; 95% confidence interval, 6.0–12.5 mm; P < 0.01). Number of vasopressor doses before first shock was higher in the BP care group versus Guideline care (median, 3 [range, 0–3] vs. 2 [range, 2–2]; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Blood pressure–targeted CPR improves 24-hour survival compared with optimal American Heart Association care in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated VF cardiac arrest. PMID:25321490

  1. Patient-centric blood pressure-targeted cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves survival from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M; Friess, Stuart H; Naim, Maryam Y; Lampe, Joshua W; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R; Garuccio, Mia; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Becker, Lance B; Berg, Robert A

    2014-12-01

    Although current resuscitation guidelines are rescuer focused, the opportunity exists to develop patient-centered resuscitation strategies that optimize the hemodynamic response of the individual in the hopes to improve survival. To determine if titrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to blood pressure would improve 24-hour survival compared with traditional CPR in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF). After 7 minutes of asphyxia, followed by VF, 20 female 3-month-old swine randomly received either blood pressure-targeted care consisting of titration of compression depth to a systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg and vasopressors to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mm Hg (BP care); or optimal American Heart Association Guideline care consisting of depth of 51 mm with standard advanced cardiac life support epinephrine dosing (Guideline care). All animals received manual CPR for 10 minutes before first shock. Primary outcome was 24-hour survival. The 24-hour survival was higher in the BP care group (8 of 10) compared with Guideline care (0 of 10); P = 0.001. Coronary perfusion pressure was higher in the BP care group (point estimate +8.5 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.9-13.0 mm Hg; P < 0.01); however, depth was higher in Guideline care (point estimate +9.3 mm; 95% confidence interval, 6.0-12.5 mm; P < 0.01). Number of vasopressor doses before first shock was higher in the BP care group versus Guideline care (median, 3 [range, 0-3] vs. 2 [range, 2-2]; P = 0.003). Blood pressure-targeted CPR improves 24-hour survival compared with optimal American Heart Association care in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated VF cardiac arrest.

  2. Comparison of different inspiratory triggering settings in automated ventilators during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dingyu; Xu, Jun; Shao, Shihuan; Fu, Yangyang; Sun, Feng; Zhang, Yazhi; Hu, Yingying; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong; Yu, Xuezhong

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation via automated in-hospital ventilators is quite common during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It is not known whether different inspiratory triggering sensitivity settings of ordinary ventilators have different effects on actual ventilation, gas exchange and hemodynamics during resuscitation. 18 pigs enrolled in this study were anaesthetized and intubated. Continuous chest compressions and mechanical ventilation (volume-controlled mode, 100% O2, respiratory rate 10/min, and tidal volumes 10ml/kg) were performed after 3 minutes of ventricular fibrillation. Group trig-4, trig-10 and trig-20 (six pigs each) were characterized by triggering sensitivities of 4, 10 and 20 (cmH2O for pressure-triggering and L/min for flow-triggering), respectively. Additionally, each pig in each group was mechanically ventilated using three types of inspiratory triggering (pressure-triggering, flow-triggering and turned-off triggering) of 5 minutes duration each, and each animal matched with one of six random assortments of the three different triggering settings. Blood gas samples, respiratory and hemodynamic parameters for each period were all collected and analyzed. In each group, significantly lower actual respiratory rate, minute ventilation volume, mean airway pressure, arterial pH, PaO2, and higher end-tidal carbon dioxide, aortic blood pressure, coronary perfusion pressure, PaCO2 and venous oxygen saturation were observed in the ventilation periods with a turned-off triggering setting compared to those with pressure- or flow- triggering (all PVentilation with pressure- or flow-triggering tends to induce hyperventilation and deteriorating gas exchange and hemodynamics during CPR. A turned-off patient triggering or a pressure-triggering of 20 cmH2O is preferred for ventilation when an ordinary inpatient hospital ventilator is used during resuscitation.

  3. Psychological impact on dispatched local lay rescuers performing bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, Jolande A; Beesems, Stefanie G; De Haan, Rob J; Koster, Rudolph W

    2015-07-01

    We studied the short-term psychological impact and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related symptoms in lay rescuers performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after a text message (TM)-alert for out-of-hospital-cardiac arrest, and assessed which factors contribute to a higher level of PTSD-related symptoms. The lay rescuers received a TM-alert and simultaneously an email with a link to an online questionnaire. We analyzed all questionnaires from February 2013 until October 2014 measuring the short-term psychological impact. We interviewed by telephone all first arriving lay rescuers performing bystander CPR and assessed PTSD-related symptoms with the Impact of Event Scale (IES) 4-6 weeks after the resuscitation. IES-scores 0-8 reflected no stress, 9-25 mild, 26-43 moderate, and 44-75 severe stress. A score ≥ 26 indicated PTSD symptomatology. Of all alerted lay rescuers, 6572 completed the online questionnaire. Of these, 1955 responded to the alert and 507 assisted in the resuscitation. We interviewed 203 first arriving rescuers of whom 189 completed the IES. Of these, 41% perceived no/mild short-term impact, 46% bearable impact and 13% severe impact. On the IES, 81% scored no stress and 19% scored mild stress. None scored moderate or severe stress. Using a multivariable logistic regression model we identified three factors with an independent impact on mild stress level: no automated external defibrillator connected by the lay rescuer, severe short-term impact, and no (very) positive experience. Lay rescuers alerted by text messages, do not show PTSD-related symptoms 4-6 weeks after performing bystander CPR, even if they perceive severe short-term psychological impact. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the elderly: analysis of the events in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Tricerri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing number of old people in all western countries and increasing life expectancy at birth, many seniors spend the last period of their life with various afflictions that may lead to cardiac arrest. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR increases survival rates. Octogenarians are the fastest growing segment of the population and despite empirical evidence that CPR is of questionable effectiveness in seniors with comorbidities, it is still the only treatment among life-sustaining ones. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is frequently unsuccessful, but if survival is achieved, a fairly good quality of life can be expected. Various papers analyzed the effect of CPR in hospitalized patients or in cardiac arrest occurring at home or in public places, while less is known about events occurring in the emergency room (ER. We performed a retrospective analysis of cardiac arrest events occurred in ER within 54 months: we analyzed 415,001 records of ER visits (from 01/01/1999 to 30/06/2003 in San Giovanni Addolorata Hospital. Data were analyzed in terms of age and outcome. We identified 475 records with the outcome of death in ER or death on arrival. Out of them, we selected 290 medical records which had sufficient data to be analyzed. Of the 290 patients evaluated, 225 died in ER, 18 were deemed to die on arrival, and 47 survived the cardiac arrest and were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU. The overall mortality was 0.11%, while the incidence of the selected events was 0.072%. The mean age of the analyzed population was 71.3 years. The only possible diagnosis was often cardiac arrest, though most of the times we could specify and group the diagnosis even better. The analysis of the procedures showed that cardiac arrest treated by direct current (DC shock was similarly distributed in different age groups, and no difference was detectable between the two groups. The mean age of the patients who underwent tracheal intubation (TI was

  5. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Refractory Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The State of the Evidence and Framework for Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunau, Brian; Hornby, Laura; Singal, Rohit K; Christenson, Jim; Ortega-Deballon, Ivan; Shemie, Sam D; Bashir, Jamil; Brooks, Steve C; Callaway, Clifton W; Guadagno, Elena; Nagpal, Dave

    2018-02-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) affects 134 per 100,000 citizens annually. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR), providing mechanical circulatory support, may improve the likelihood of survival among those with refractory OHCA. Compared with in-hospital ECPR candidates, those in the out-of-hospital setting tend to be sudden unexpected arrests in younger and healthier patients. The aims of this review were to summarize, and identify the limitations of, the evidence evaluating ECPR for OHCA, and to provide an approach for ECPR program application. Although there are many descriptions of ECPR-treated cohorts, we identified a paucity of robust data showing ECPR effectiveness compared with conventional resuscitation. However, it is highly likely that ECPR, provided after a prolonged attempt with conventional resuscitation, does benefit select patient populations compared with conventional resuscitation alone. Although reliable data showing the optimal patient selection criteria for ECPR are lacking, most implementations sought young previously healthy patients with rapid high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Carefully planned development of ECPR programs, in high-performing emergency medical systems at experienced extracorporeal membrane oxygenation centres, may be reasonable as part of systematic efforts to determine ECPR effectiveness and globally improve care. Protocol evaluation requires regional-level assessment, examining the incremental benefit of survival compared with standard care, while accounting for resource utilization. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Case of a cardiac arrest patient who survived after extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 1.5 hours of resuscitation: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seong Ho; Kim, Jong Woo; Byun, Joung Hun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Nyun; Choi, Jun Young; Jang, In Seok; Lee, Chung Eun; Yang, Jun Ho; Kang, Dong Hun; Park, Hyun Oh

    2017-11-01

    Per the American Heart Association guidelines, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation should be considered for in-hospital patients with easily reversible cardiac arrest. However, there are currently no consensus recommendations regarding resuscitation for prolonged cardiac arrest cases. We encountered a 48-year-old man who survived a cardiac arrest that lasted approximately 1.5 hours. He visited a local hospital's emergency department complaining of chest pain and dyspnea that had started 3 days earlier. Immediately after arriving in the emergency department, a cardiac arrest occurred; he was transferred to our hospital for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Resuscitation was performed with strict adherence to the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology advanced cardiac life support guidelines until ECMO could be placed. On hospital day 7, he had a full neurologic recovery. On hospital day 58, additional treatments, including orthotopic heart transplantation, were considered necessary; he was transferred to another hospital. To our knowledge, this is the first case in South Korea of patient survival with good neurologic outcomes after resuscitation that lasted as long as 1.5 hours. Documenting cases of prolonged resuscitation may lead to updated guidelines and improvement of outcomes of similar cases in future. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Retention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills after hands-only training versus conventional training in novices: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young Joon; Cho, Youngsuk; Cho, Gyu Chong; Ji, Hyun Kyung; Han, Song Yi; Lee, Jin Hyuck

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training can improve performance during simulated cardiac arrest; however, retention of skills after training remains uncertain. Recently, hands-only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR. The purpose of this study is to compare the retention rate of CPR skills in laypersons after hands-only or conventional CPR training. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 CPR training methods: 80 minutes of hands-only CPR tra...

  8. End-tidal CO2 Detection of an Audible Heart Rate During Neonatal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Following Asystole in Asphyxiated Piglets

    OpenAIRE

    Chalak, Lina F.; Barber, Chad A.; Hynan, Linda; Garcia, Damian; Christie, Lucy; Wyckoff, Myra H.

    2011-01-01

    Even brief interruption of cardiac compressions significantly reduces critical coronary perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) monitoring may provide a continuous non-invasive method of assessing return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) without stopping to auscultate for heart rate (HR). However, the ETCO2 value that correlates with an audible HR is unknown. Our objective was to determine the threshold ETCO2 that is associated with ROSC following ...

  9. Effect of socioemotional stress on the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation during advanced life support in a randomized manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørshol, Conrad Arnfinn; Myklebust, Helge; Nilsen, Kjetil Lønne; Hoff, Thomas; Bjørkli, Cato; Illguth, Eirik; Søreide, Eldar; Sunde, Kjetil

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether socioemotional stress affects the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation during advanced life support in a simulated manikin model. A randomized crossover trial with advanced life support performed in two different conditions, with and without exposure to socioemotional stress. The study was conducted at the Stavanger Acute Medicine Foundation for Education and Research simulation center, Stavanger, Norway. Paramedic teams, each consisting of two paramedics and one assistant, employed at Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. A total of 19 paramedic teams performed advanced life support twice in a randomized fashion, one control condition without socioemotional stress and one experimental condition with exposure to socioemotional stress. The socioemotional stress consisted of an upset friend of the simulated patient who was a physician, spoke a foreign language, was unfamiliar with current Norwegian resuscitation guidelines, supplied irrelevant clinical information, and repeatedly made doubts about the paramedics' resuscitation efforts. Aural distractions were supplied by television and cell telephone. The primary outcome was the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation: chest compression depth, chest compression rate, time without chest compressions (no-flow ratio), and ventilation rate after endotracheal intubation. As a secondary outcome, the socioemotional stress impact was evaluated through the paramedics' subjective workload, frustration, and feeling of realism. There were no significant differences in chest compression depth (39 vs. 38 mm, p = .214), compression rate (113 vs. 116 min⁻¹, p = .065), no-flow ratio (0.15 vs. 0.15, p = .618), or ventilation rate (8.2 vs. 7.7 min⁻¹, p = .120) between the two conditions. There was a significant increase in the subjective workload, frustration, and feeling of realism when the paramedics were exposed to socioemotional stress. In this advanced life

  10. Dispatcher-assisted compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation provides best quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation by laypersons: A randomised controlled single-blinded manikin trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelten, Oliver; Warnecke, Tobias; Wetsch, Wolfgang A; Schier, Robert; Böttiger, Bernd W; Hinkelbein, Jochen

    2016-08-01

    High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by laypersons is a key determinant of both outcome and survival for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Dispatcher-assisted CPR (telephone-CPR, T-CPR) increases the frequency and correctness of bystander-CPR but results in prolonged time to first chest compressions. However, it remains unclear whether instructions for rescue ventilation and/or chest compressions should be recommended for dispatcher-assisted CPR. The aim of this study was to evaluate both principles of T-CPR with respect to CPR quality. Randomised controlled single-blinded manikin trial. University Hospital of Cologne, Germany, 1 July 2012 to 30 September 2012. Sixty laypersons between 18 and 65 years. Medically educated individuals, medical professionals and pregnant women were excluded. Participants were asked to resuscitate a manikin and were randomised into three groups: not dispatcher-assisted (uninstructed) CPR (group 1; U-CPR; n = 20), dispatcher-assisted compression-only CPR (group 2; DACO-CPR; n = 19) and full dispatcher-assisted CPR with rescue ventilation (group 3; DAF-CPR; n = 19). Specific parameters of CPR quality [i.e. no-flow-time (NFT) as well as compression and ventilation parameters] were analysed. To compare different groups we used Student's t test and P less than 0.05 was considered significant. Initial NFT was lowest in the DACO-CPR group (mean 21.3 ± 14.4%), followed by dispatcher-assisted full CPR (mean 49.1 ± 8.5%) and by unassisted CPR (mean 55.0 ± 12.9%). Initial NFT covering the time of instruction was lower in DACO-CPR (12.1 ± 5.4%) as compared to dispatcher-assisted full CPR (20.7 ± 8.1%). Compression depth was similar in all three groups: 40.6 ± 13.0 mm (unassisted CPR), 41.0 ± 12.2 mm (DACO-CPR) and 38.8 ± 15.8 mm (dispatcher-assisted full CPR). Average compression frequency was highest in the DACO-CPR group (65.2 ± 22.4 min) compared with the unassisted CPR

  11. Mindfulness Meditation and Interprofessional Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Mixed-Methods Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelm, Diana J; Ridgeway, Jennifer L; Gas, Becca L; Mohan, Monali; Cook, David A; Nelson, Darlene R; Benzo, Roberto P

    2018-05-18

    Mindfulness training includes mindfulness meditation, which has been shown to improve both attention and self-awareness. Medical providers in the intensive care unit often deal with difficult situations with strong emotions, life-and-death decisions, and both interpersonal and interprofessional conflicts. The effect of mindfulness meditation training on healthcare providers during acute care tasks such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation remains unknown. Mindfulness meditation has the potential to improve provider well-being and reduce stress in individuals involved in resuscitation teams, which could then translate into better team communication and delivery of care under stress. A better understanding of this process could lead to more effective training approaches, improved team performance, and better patient outcomes. All participants were instructed to use a mindfulness meditation device (Muse™ headband) at home for 7 min twice a day or 14 min daily over the 4-week training period. This device uses brainwave sensors to monitor active versus relaxing brain activity and provides real-time feedback. We conducted a single-group pretest-posttest convergent mixed-methods study. We enrolled 24 healthcare providers, comprising 4 interprofessional code teams, including physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and pharmacists. Each team participated in a simulation session immediately before and after the mindfulness training period. Each session consisted of two simulated cardiopulmonary arrest scenarios. Both quantitative and qualitative outcomes were assessed. The median proportion of participants who used the device as prescribed was 85%. Emotional balance, as measured by the critical positivity ratio, improved significantly from pretraining to posttraining (p = .02). Qualitative findings showed that mindfulness meditation changed how participants responded to work-related stress, including stress in real-code situations. Participants described the value of

  12. Post-cardiotomy extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neonates with complex single ventricle: analysis of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimenakos, Anastasios C; Wojtyla, Patrice; Smith, Pamela J; Rizzo, Vincent; Nater, Melissa; El Zein, Chawki F; Ilbawi, Michel N

    2011-12-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) in children with cardiac arrest refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been reported with encouraging results. We sought to review outcomes of neonates with functional single ventricle (FSV) receiving post-cardiotomy ECPR. Forty-eight patients who required post-cardiotomy extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) since the introduction of our ECPR protocol (January 2007-December 2009) were identified. Twenty-seven were neonates. Review of records and survival analysis were conducted. Of 27 neonates receiving post-cardiotomy ECMO 20 had FSV. Fourteen had ECPR. Ten underwent Norwood operation (NO) for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Four had FSV other than HLHS. Three underwent Damus-Kay-Stansel or modified NO with systemic-to-pulmonary shunt (SPS) and one SPS with anomalous pulmonary venous connection repair. Mean age and weight were 7.8 ± 2.9 days and 3.44 ± 1.78 kg, respectively. ECMO median duration was 6 days (interquartile range (IQR) 3-14). Survival to ECMO discontinuation was 79% (11 of 14 patients) and at hospital discharge was 57% (8 of 14 patients). The most common cause of death was multi-organ failure (four of six deaths). At last follow-up (median: 11 months (1-34)) 43% of patients were alive. CPR mean duration for patients with favorable versus unfavorable outcome was 38.6 ± 6.3 versus 42.1 ± 7.7 min (p = 0.12). Previously reported determinants for poorer prognosis in conventional non-rescue ECMO (such as pre-ECMO pH0.05). ECMO support in neonates with FSV requiring ECPR can result in favorable outcome in more than half of patients at hospital discharge. Aggressive strategy toward timely application of ECPR is justified. Expeditious ECPR deployment after proper patients' selection, refinement of CPR quality and use of adjunctive neuroprotective interventions, such as induced hypothermia, might further improve outcomes. Copyright © 2011 European Association for

  13. Awareness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in medical-students and doctors in Rawalpindi-Islamabad, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamir, Q.; Nadeem, A.; Rizvi, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the level of awareness regarding basic and practical knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and its importance in the eyes of medical/dental students and doctors. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted in medical and dental colleges as well as hospitals of Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan, from June to September 2011. Non-probability convenience sampling was used and structured questionnaires on basic and practical knowledge of the procedure were distributed. The questionnaire had 26 items related to basic and advanced knowledge of the required skills. Doctors were divided into two groups based on their years of service and practice. Those with less than 5 years' experience were grouped as junior doctors, while rest as senior doctors. Descriptive statistics were employed to analyse the data using SPPS version 17 and Microsoft Excel. Percentages were worked out and the results were interpreted. Result: Of the 1000 questionnaires distributed, 646 (64.6%) were received duly filled and represented the study sample. Of the 646 participants, 34 (5.26%) were dentists, 424 (65.63%) were medical students, 92 (14.24%) were doctors and 96 (14.86%) were dental students. Basic knowledge of doctors was found to be better than that of dentists (n=96; 50% vs. n=8; 23%). Similarly, the advance knowledge of doctors was better than the dentists (n=53; 58% vs. n=11; 31%). The basic knowledge of junior doctors was found to be almost equal to the senior doctors (n=26; 44.75% vs. n=15; 45.5%). The advance knowledge of junior doctors was found to be better than the senior doctors (n=27; 45.37% vs. n=10; 29.48%). Among the students, 157 (37%) of the medical students had basic knowledge of CPR, while 36 (38%) dental students had basic knowledge of the topic. Medical students had more advanced knowledge (n=157; 37%) than dental students (n=34; 35%). Conclusion: The awareness of basic and advance knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills in medical

  14. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in high school using avatars in virtual worlds: an international feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt, Johan; Hedman, Leif; Heinrichs, LeRoy; Youngblood, Patricia; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2013-01-14

    Approximately 300,000 people suffer sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) annually in the United States. Less than 30% of out-of-hospital victims receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) despite the American Heart Association training over 12 million laypersons annually to conduct CPR. New engaging learning methods are needed for CPR education, especially in schools. Massively multiplayer virtual worlds (MMVW) offer platforms for serious games that are promising learning methods that take advantage of the computer capabilities of today's youth (ie, the digital native generation). Our main aim was to assess the feasibility of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in high school students by using avatars in MMVM. We also analyzed experiences, self-efficacy, and concentration in response to training. In this prospective international collaborative study, an e-learning method was used with high school students in Sweden and the United States. A software game platform was modified for use as a serious game to train in emergency medical situations. Using MMVW technology, participants in teams of 3 were engaged in virtual-world scenarios to learn how to treat victims suffering cardiac arrest. Short debriefings were carried out after each scenario. A total of 36 high school students (Sweden, n=12; United States, n=24) participated. Their self-efficacy and concentration (task motivation) were assessed. An exit questionnaire was used to solicit experiences and attitudes toward this type of training. Among the Swedish students, a follow-up was carried out after 6 months. Depending on the distributions, t tests or Mann-Whitney tests were used. Correlation between variables was assessed by using Spearman rank correlation. Regression analyses were used for time-dependent variables. The participants enjoyed the training and reported a self-perceived benefit as a consequence of training. The mean rating for self-efficacy increased from 5.8/7 (SD 0.72) to 6.5/7 (SD 0.57, Ponline MMVWs

  15. Clinical experience does not correlate with the perceived need for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunz, Dirk; Brandl, Anita; Lang, Klaus; Weiss, Berthold; Haneya, Assad; Pühler, Thomas; Graf, Bernhard M; Zausig, York A

    2013-02-01

    The efficiency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training is dependent upon different influencing factors, such as the presented concepts, the participants' willingness to learn, and the interval between training sessions. However, the optimal interval for refreshing CPR training is less clear. We evaluated the perceived need of simulator-based CPR training for nurses and correlated it with their clinical experience. The 60 invited nurses were trained in simulator-based CPR. Knowledge about adult advanced life support was evaluated using a questionnaire after training, and participants rated their desired individual frequency of simulator-based training as well as the value of the presented training using a six-point Likert scale. The same questions were asked again after 1 year. All participants agreed about the usefulness of this type of simulator-based training. The average number of correct answers about typical facts in adult advanced life support showed an almost bell-shaped distribution, with the highest point at 6-15 years of clinical experience and the lowest points at≤5 and≥21 years. The desired training-frequency need was inversely correlated with clinical experience. There is a high interest in CPR training among nursing staff. Self-assessment about the training-frequency need was inversely correlated with clinical experience. However, the average number of correct answers on resuscitation questions decreased with clinical experience. Therefore, the training effectiveness seems to be extremely dependent on clinical experience, and therefore, training experienced senior nurses might be more challenging than training novice nurses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Knowledge and willingness to teach cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a survey amongst 4273 teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpotos, Nicolas; Vekeman, Eva; Monsieurs, Koenraad; Derese, Anselm; Valcke, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Schoolteachers are expected to play a role in teaching cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to schoolchildren, but little is known about their attitudes, actual knowledge and willingness to do so. We conducted a survey about CPR knowledge, preparedness to perform and teach CPR as well as attitude towards an alternative self-learning strategy amongst Flemish teachers. A questionnaire was developed consisting of four distinct parts: (1) Demographics; (2) CPR knowledge and skills level; (3) Attitude towards training and (4) Resuscitation experience. Content experts screened the questionnaire in view of content validity. One hundred and seventy-one students in Educational Sciences were each asked to interview 25 different teachers. A total of 4273 teachers participated in the study (primary school n=856; secondary school n=2562; higher education n=855). Of all respondents, 59% (2539/4273) had received previous CPR training with the highest proportion observed in primary schoolteachers (69%) and in the age group 21-30 years (68%). Mandatory CPR training at school was supported by 41% (1751/4273) of the teachers and only 36% was aware that CPR is now formally included in the secondary education curriculum. Sixty-one percent (2621/4273) did not feel capable and was not willing to teach CPR, mainly because of a perceived lack of knowledge in 50% (2151/2621). In addition 69% (2927/4273) felt incompetent to perform correct CPR and 73% (3137/4273) wished more training. Feeling incompetent and not willing to teach was related to the absence of previous training. Primary schoolteachers and the age group 21-30 years were most willing to teach CPR. Although many teachers mentioned previous CPR training, only a minority of mostly young and primary schoolteachers felt competent in CPR and was willing to teach it to their students. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Smartphone apps for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and real incident support: a mixed-methods evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalz, Marco; Lenssen, Niklas; Felzen, Marc; Rossaint, Rolf; Tabuenca, Bernardo; Specht, Marcus; Skorning, Max

    2014-03-19

    No systematic evaluation of smartphone/mobile apps for resuscitation training and real incident support is available to date. To provide medical, usability, and additional quality criteria for the development of apps, we conducted a mixed-methods sequential evaluation combining the perspective of medical experts and end-users. The study aims to assess the quality of current mobile apps for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training and real incident support from expert as well as end-user perspective. Two independent medical experts evaluated the medical content of CPR apps from the Google Play store and the Apple App store. The evaluation was based on pre-defined minimum medical content requirements according to current Basic Life Support (BLS) guidelines. In a second phase, non-medical end-users tested usability and appeal of the apps that had at least met the minimum requirements. Usability was assessed with the System Usability Scale (SUS); appeal was measured with the self-developed ReactionDeck toolkit. Out of 61 apps, 46 were included in the experts' evaluation. A consolidated list of 13 apps resulted for the following layperson evaluation. The interrater reliability was substantial (kappa=.61). Layperson end-users (n=14) had a high interrater reliability (intraclass correlation 1 [ICC1]=.83, Ptraining and real incident support are available, very few are designed according to current BLS guidelines and offer an acceptable level of usability and hedonic quality for laypersons. The results of this study are intended to optimize the development of CPR mobile apps. The app ranking supports the informed selection of mobile apps for training situations and CPR campaigns as well as for real incident support.

  18. Rescuer fatigue under the 2010 ERC guidelines, and its effect on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Catherine H; Heggie, James; Jones, Christopher M; Thorne, Christopher J; Hulme, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    Updated life-support guidelines were published by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) in 2010, increasing the required depth and rate of chest compression delivery. This study sought to determine the impact of these guidelines on rescuer fatigue and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance. 62 Health science students performed 5 min of conventional CPR in accordance with the 2010 ERC guidelines. A SkillReporter manikin was used to objectively assess temporal change in determinants of CPR quality. Participants subjectively reported their end-fatigue levels, using a visual analogue scale, and the point at which they believed fatigue was affecting CPR delivery. 49 (79%) participants reported that fatigue affected their CPR performance, at an average of 167 s. End fatigue averaged 49.5/100 (range 0-95). The proportion of chest compressions delivered correctly decreased from 52% in min 1 to 39% in min 5, approaching significance (p=0.071). A significant decline in chest compressions reaching the recommended depth occurred between the first (53%) and fifth (38%) min (p=0.012). Almost half this decline (6%) was between the first and second minutes of CPR. Neither chest compression rate, nor rescue breath volume, were affected by rescuer fatigue. Fatigue affects chest compression delivery within the second minute of CPR under the 2010 ERC guidelines, and is poorly judged by rescuers. Rescuers should, therefore, be encouraged to interchange after 2 min of CPR delivery. Team leaders should be advised to not rely on rescuers to self-report fatigue, and should, instead, monitor for its effects.

  19. Is pulseless electrical activity a reason to refuse cardiopulmonary resuscitation with ECMO support?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Dirk; Brehm, Christoph E

    2018-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with ECMO support (ECPR) has shown to improve outcome in patients after cardiac arrest under resuscitation. Most current recommendations for ECPR do not include patients with a non-shockable rhythm such as PEA and asystole. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of 3 patient groups separated by initial rhythm at time of ECMO placement during CPR: asystole, PEA and shockable rhythm. We made a retrospective single-center study of adults who underwent ECPR for in-hospital cardiac arrest between June 2008 and January 2017. Outcome and survival were identified in 3 groups of patients regarding to the heart rhythm at the time decision for ECMO support was made: 1. patients with asystole, 2. patients with pulseless electrical activity, 3. patients with a shockable rhythm. 63 patients underwent ECPR in the mentioned time frame. Five patients were excluded due to incomplete data. Under the 58 included patients the number of cases for asystole, PEA, shockable rhythm was 7, 21 and 30 respectively. The means of CPR-time in these groups were 37, 41 and 37min. Survival to discharge was 0.0%, 23.8% and 40.0% respectively (p=0.09). All survivors to discharge had a good neurological outcome, defined as cerebral performance category 1or 2. Survival to discharge in patients with PEA as initial rhythm at the time of decision for ECPR is 23.8% while no patients with asystole as initial rhythm survived discharge. Patients with PEA should be carefully considered for ECPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Smaller self-inflating bags produce greater guideline consistent ventilation in simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation

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    Boyle Malcolm J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suboptimal bag ventilation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR has demonstrated detrimental physiological outcomes for cardiac arrest patients. In light of recent guideline changes for resuscitation, there is a need to identify the efficacy of bag ventilation by prehospital care providers. The objective of this study was to evaluate bag ventilation in relation to operator ability to achieve guideline consistent ventilation rate, tidal volume and minute volume when using two different capacity self-inflating bags in an undergraduate paramedic cohort. Methods An experimental study using a mechanical lung model and a simulated adult cardiac arrest to assess the ventilation ability of third year Monash University undergraduate paramedic students. Participants were instructed to ventilate using 1600 ml and 1000 ml bags for a length of two minutes at the correct rate and tidal volume for a patient undergoing CPR with an advanced airway. Ventilation rate and tidal volume were recorded using an analogue scale with mean values calculated. Ethics approval was granted. Results Suboptimal ventilation with the use of conventional 1600 ml bag was common, with 77% and 97% of participants unable to achieve guideline consistent ventilation rates and tidal volumes respectively. Reduced levels of suboptimal ventilation arouse from the use of the smaller bag with a 27% reduction in suboptimal tidal volumes (p = 0.015 and 23% reduction in suboptimal minute volumes (p = 0.045. Conclusion Smaller self-inflating bags reduce the incidence of suboptimal tidal volumes and minute volumes and produce greater guideline consistent results for cardiac arrest patients.

  1. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography for confirmation of endotracheal tube placement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hao-Chang; Chong, Kah-Meng; Sim, Shyh-Shyong; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Liu, Shih-Hung; Chen, Nai-Chuan; Wu, Meng-Che; Fu, Chia-Ming; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Chien-Chang; Lien, Wan-Ching; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of tracheal ultrasonography for assessing endotracheal tube position during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We performed a prospective observational study of patients undergoing emergency intubation during CPR. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography was performed during the intubation with the transducer placed transversely just above the suprasternal notch, to assess for endotracheal tube positioning and exclude esophageal intubation. The position of trachea was identified by a hyperechoic air-mucosa (A-M) interface with posterior reverberation artifact (comet-tail artifact). The endotracheal tube position was defined as endotracheal if single A-M interface with comet-tail artifact was observed. Endotracheal tube position was defined as intraesophageal if a second A-M interface appeared, suggesting a false second airway (double tract sign). The gold standard of correct endotracheal intubation was the combination of clinical auscultation and quantitative waveform capnography. The main outcome was the accuracy of tracheal ultrasonography in assessing endotracheal tube position during CPR. Among the 89 patients enrolled, 7 (7.8%) had esophageal intubations. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of tracheal ultrasonography were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94.4-100%), 85.7% (95% CI: 42.0-99.2%), 98.8% (95% CI: 92.5-99.0%) and 100% (95% CI: 54.7-100%), respectively. Positive and negative likelihood ratios were 7.0 (95% CI: 1.1-43.0) and 0.0, respectively. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography is an accurate method for identifying endotracheal tube position during CPR without the need for interruption of chest compression. Tracheal ultrasonography in resuscitation management may serve as a powerful adjunct in trained hands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. "Please. Don't. Die.": A Grounded Theory Study of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausz, Justin; Snobelen, Paul; Tavares, Walter

    2018-02-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important determinant of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), yet rates of bystander CPR are highly variable. In an effort to promote bystander CPR, the procedure has been streamlined, and ultrashort teaching modalities have been introduced. CPR has been increasingly reconceptualized as simple, safe, and easy to perform; however, current methods of CPR instruction may not adequately prepare lay rescuers for the various logistical, conceptual, and emotional challenges of resuscitating a victim of cardiac arrest. We adopted a constructivist grounded theory methodology to qualitatively explore bystander CPR and invited lay rescuers who had recently (ie, within 1 week) intervened in an OHCA to participate in semistructured interviews and focus groups. We used constant comparative analysis until theoretical saturation to derive a midrange explanatory theory of bystander CPR. We constructed a 3-stage theoretical model describing a common experiential process for lay rescuer intervention in OHCA: Being called to act is disturbing, causing panic, shock, and disbelief that must ultimately be overcome. Taking action to save the victim is complicated by several misconceptions about cardiac arrest, where victims are mistakenly believed to be choking, and agonal respirations are misinterpreted to mean the victim is alive. Making sense of the experience is challenging, at least in the short term, where lay rescuers have to contend with self-doubt, unanswered questions, and uncomfortable emotional reactions to a traumatic event. Our study suggests that current CPR training programs may not adequately prepare lay rescuers for the reality of an OHCA and identifies several key knowledge gaps that should be addressed. The long-term psychological consequences of bystander intervention in OHCA remain poorly understood and warrant further study. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. The Value of Serum NR2 Antibody in Prediction of Post-Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Survival

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    Ali Bidari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits antibody (NR2-ab is a sensitive marker of ischemic brain damage in clinical circumstances, such as cerebrovascular accidents. We aimed to assess the value of serum NR2-ab in predicting the post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR survival. Methods: In this cohort study, we examined serum NR2-ab levels 1 hour after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC in 49 successfully resuscitated patients. Patients with traumatic or asphyxic arrests, prior neurological insults, or major medical illnesses were excluded. Participants were followed until death or hospital discharge. Demographic data, coronary artery disease risk factors, time before initiation of CPR, and CPR duration were documented.  In addition, Glasgow coma scale (GCS, blood pressure, and survival status of patients were recorded at 1, 6, 24, and 72 hour(s after ROSC. Descriptive analyses were performed, and the Cox proportional hazard model was applied to assess if NR2-ab level is an independent predictive factor of survival. Results: 49 successfully resuscitated patients were evaluated; 27 (55% survived to hospital discharge, 4 (8.1% were in vegetative state, 10 (20.4% were physically disabled, and 13 (26.5% were physically functional. Within 72 hours of ROSC all of the 12 NR2-ab positive patients died. In contrast, 31 (84% of the NR2-ab negative patients survived. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios of NR2-ab in prediction of survival were 54.5% (95%CI=32.7%-74.9%, 100% (95%CI=84.5%-100%, infinite, and 45.5% (95%CI=28.8%-71.8%, respectively. Subsequent analysis showed that both NR2-ab status and GCS were independent risk factors of death. Conclusions: A positive NR2-ab serum test 1 hour after ROSC correlated with lower 72-hour survival. Further studies are required to validate this finding and demonstrate the value of a quantitative NR2-ab assay and its optimal time of measurement.

  4. Is increased positive end-expiratory pressure the culprit? Autoresuscitation in a 44-year-old man after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Henning; Oelmann, Katrin; Stangl, Robert; Michels, Guido

    2016-12-20

    The phenomenon of autoresuscitation is rare, yet it is known to most emergency physicians. However, the pathophysiology of the delayed return of spontaneous circulation remains enigmatic. Among other causes hyperinflation of the lungs and excessively high positive end-expiratory pressure have been suggested, but reports including cardiopulmonary monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are scarce to support this hypothesis. We report a case of autoresuscitation in a 44-year-old white man after 80 minutes of advanced cardiac life support accompanied by continuous capnometry and repeated evaluation by ultrasound and echocardiography. After prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation, refractory electromechanical dissociation on electrocardiogram and ventricular akinesis were recorded. In addition, a precipitous drop in end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide was noted and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was discontinued. Five minutes after withdrawal of all supportive measures his breathing resumed and a perfusing rhythm ensued. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology of autoresuscitation is hampered by a lack of reports including extensive cardiopulmonary monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a preclinical setting. In this case, continuous capnometry was combined with repetitive ultrasound evaluation, which ruled out most assumed causes of autoresuscitation. Our observation of a rapid decline in end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide supports the hypothesis of increased intrathoracic pressure. Continuous capnometry can be performed easily during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, also in a preclinical setting. Knowledge of the pathophysiologic mechanisms may lead to facile interventions to be incorporated into cardiopulmonary resuscitation algorithms. A drop in end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide, for example, might prompt disconnection of the ventilation to allow left ventricular filling. Further reports and research on this topic

  5. A simple accurate chest-compression depth gauge using magnetic coils during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandori, Akihiko; Sano, Yuko; Zhang, Yuhua; Tsuji, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a new method for calculating chest compression depth and a simple chest-compression gauge for validating the accuracy of the method. The chest-compression gauge has two plates incorporating two magnetic coils, a spring, and an accelerometer. The coils are located at both ends of the spring, and the accelerometer is set on the bottom plate. Waveforms obtained using the magnetic coils (hereafter, "magnetic waveforms"), which are proportional to compression-force waveforms and the acceleration waveforms were measured at the same time. The weight factor expressing the relationship between the second derivatives of the magnetic waveforms and the measured acceleration waveforms was calculated. An estimated-compression-displacement (depth) waveform was obtained by multiplying the weight factor and the magnetic waveforms. Displacements of two large springs (with similar spring constants) within a thorax and displacements of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation training manikin were measured using the gauge to validate the accuracy of the calculated waveform. A laser-displacement detection system was used to compare the real displacement waveform and the estimated waveform. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the real displacement using the laser system and the estimated displacement waveforms were calculated. The estimated displacement error of the compression depth was within 2 mm (compression gauge, based on a new calculation method, provides an accurate compression depth (estimation error < 2 mm).

  6. Transthoracic impedance for the monitoring of quality of manual chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hehua; Yang, Zhengfei; Huang, Zitong; Chen, Bihua; Zhang, Lei; Li, Heng; Wu, Baoming; Yu, Tao; Li, Yongqin

    2012-10-01

    The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), especially adequate compression depth, is associated with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and is therefore recommended to be measured routinely. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between changes of transthoracic impedance (TTI) measured through the defibrillation electrodes, chest compression depth and coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. In 14 male pigs weighing between 28 and 34 kg, ventricular fibrillation (VF) was electrically induced and untreated for 6 min. Animals were randomized to either optimal or suboptimal chest compression group. Optimal depth of manual compression in 7 pigs was defined as a decrease of 25% (50 mm) in anterior posterior diameter of the chest, while suboptimal compression was defined as 70% of the optimal depth (35 mm). After 2 min of chest compression, defibrillation was attempted with a 120-J rectilinear biphasic shock. There were no differences in baseline measurements between groups. All animals had ROSC after optimal compressions; this contrasted with suboptimal compressions, after which only 2 of the animals had ROSC (100% vs. 28.57%, p=0.021). The correlation coefficient was 0.89 between TTI amplitude and compression depth (pcompression depth and CPP in this porcine model of cardiac arrest. The TTI measured from defibrillator electrodes, therefore has the potential to serve as an indicator to monitor the quality of chest compression and estimate CPP during CPR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Relationship between weight of rescuer and quality of chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Daikoku, Rie; Saito, Shin; Saito, Yayoi

    2014-06-24

    According to the guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the rotation time for chest compression should be about 2 min. The quality of chest compressions is related to the physical fitness of the rescuer, but this was not considered when determining rotation time. The present study aimed to clarify associations between body weight and the quality of chest compression and physical fatigue during CPR performed by 18 registered nurses (10 male and 8 female) assigned to light and heavy groups according to the average weight for each sex in Japan. Five-minute chest compressions were then performed on a manikin that was placed on the floor. Measurement parameters were compression depth, heart rate, oxygen uptake, integrated electromyography signals, and rating of perceived exertion. Compression depth was evaluated according to the ratio (%) of adequate compressions (at least 5 cm deep). The ratio of adequate compressions decreased significantly over time in the light group. Values for heart rate, oxygen uptake, muscle activity defined as integrated electromyography signals, and rating of perceived exertion were significantly higher for the light group than for the heavy group. Chest compression caused increased fatigue among the light group, which consequently resulted in a gradual fall in the quality of chest compression. These results suggested that individuals with a lower body weight should rotate at 1-min intervals to maintain high quality CPR and thus improve the survival rates and neurological outcomes of victims of cardiac arrest.

  8. Effect of flashlight guidance on manual ventilation performance in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A randomized controlled simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Beom, Jin Ho; You, Je Sung; Cho, Junho; Min, In Kyung; Chung, Hyun Soo

    2018-01-01

    Several auditory-based feedback devices have been developed to improve the quality of ventilation performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but their effectiveness has not been proven in actual CPR situations. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of visual flashlight guidance in maintaining high-quality ventilation performance. We conducted a simulation-based, randomized, parallel trial including 121 senior medical students. All participants were randomized to perform ventilation during 2 minutes of CPR with or without flashlight guidance. For each participant, we measured mean ventilation rate as a primary outcome and ventilation volume, inspiration velocity, and ventilation interval as secondary outcomes using a computerized device system. Mean ventilation rate did not significantly differ between flashlight guidance and control groups (P = 0.159), but participants in the flashlight guidance group exhibited significantly less variation in ventilation rate than participants in the control group (Pguidance group. Our results demonstrate that flashlight guidance is effective in maintaining a constant ventilation rate and interval. If confirmed by further studies in clinical practice, flashlight guidance could be expected to improve the quality of ventilation performed during CPR.

  9. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital

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    Renata Maria de Oliveira Botelho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Method: case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60 was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condition before cardiac arrest, the immediate cause, initial arrest rhythm, whether epinephrine was used, and the duration of CPR. The case group (n=51 received conventional CPR guided by a metronome set at 110 beats/min. Chi-square and likelihood ratio were used to compare ROSC rates considering p≤0.05. Results: ROSC occurred in 57.7% of the cases, though 92.8% of these patients died in the following 24 hours. No statistically significant difference was found between groups in regard to ROSC (p=0.2017 or the occurrence of death (p=0.8112. Conclusion: the outcomes of patients after cardiac arrest with and without the use of a metronome during CPR were similar and no differences were found between groups in regard to survival rates and ROSC.

  10. A higher chest compression rate may be necessary for metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; You, Je Sung; Cho, Young Soon; Chung, Sung Phil; Park, Incheol

    2012-01-01

    Metronome guidance is a simple and economical feedback system for guiding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, a recent study showed that metronome guidance reduced the depth of chest compression. The results of previous studies suggest that a higher chest compression rate is associated with a better CPR outcome as compared with a lower chest compression rate, irrespective of metronome use. Based on this finding, we hypothesized that a lower chest compression rate promotes a reduction in chest compression depth in the recent study rather than metronome use itself. One minute of chest compression-only CPR was performed following the metronome sound played at 1 of 4 different rates: 80, 100, 120, and 140 ticks/min. Average compression depths (ACDs) and duty cycles were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance, and the values in the absence and presence of metronome guidance were compared. Both the ACD and duty cycle increased when the metronome rate increased (P = .017, metronome rates of 80 and 100 ticks/min were significantly lower than those for the procedures without metronome guidance. The ACD and duty cyle for chest compression increase as the metronome rate increases during metronome-guided CPR. A higher rate of chest compression is necessary for metronome-guided CPR to prevent suboptimal quality of chest compression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Knowledge and attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation among university students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Turki, Yousef A.; Al-Fraih, Yasser S.; Jalalay, Jalal B.; Al-Maghlouth, Ibrahim A.; Al-Rashoudi, Fahad H.; Al-Otaibi, Azzam F.; Al-Thnayan, Anas A.; Trabzoni, Abdulmohsin I.; Al-Shaykh, Abdulaziz S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to assess the knowledge and attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) among the students of King Saud University. This study was a cross sectional survey among King Saud University students, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, which took place on December 17-20, 2006. The data was collected from self-administered questionnaires prepared in Arabic. The questionnaires were distributed to all 15 colleges of the university. Out of a study sample of 2250 students, 31% did not have prior CPR information. Of those with previous knowledge, 85% feel that it is inadequate. The most common sources of information were television and movies. The 12.7% of individuals encountered a situation that required the use of CPR. However, 14% of them performed it. This was mostly due to lack of knowledge (42.8%). Eighty-eight percent of students would like to learn how to perform CPR. Out of all King Saud University students, 45% believe that CPR training should be a graduation requirement. It was found that overall attitude towards CPR was positive. However, the knowledge on the topic was insufficient. Thus, more focus should be placed on the improvement of CPR skills. In addition, more studies are needed to assess knowledge and attitudes towards CPR in the community. (author)

  12. Results achieved by emergency physicians in teaching basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation to secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Fábrega, Xavier; Escalada-Roig, Xavier; Sánchez, Miquel; Culla, Alexandre; Díaz, Núria; Gómez, Xavier; Villena, Olga; Rodríguez, Esther; Gaspar, Alberto; Molina, José Emilio; Salvador, Jordi; Miró, Oscar

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the results obtained with a basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (b-CPR) program (PROCES) specifically designed for secondary school students (14-16 years old) and taught by emergency physicians. We used a multiple-choice test with 20 questions (10 on theory and 10 on skills) answered before and immediately after and 1 year after receiving the b-CPR course. Satisfactory learning was considered when at least 8 out of 10 skill questions were correctly answered. We investigated student variables associated with better immediate and deferred (1 year after) PROCES performance. We compared the results with those obtained using a more standardized program to teach b-CPR to police cadets. We enrolled 600 high school students. PROCES achieved significant improvement in overall, theory and skill marks immediately after the course (PSatisfactory learning was achieved by 57% of school students immediately after PROCES and by 37% when assessed 1 year later. Students without pending study subjects (P=0.001) and those from private schools (Pstudents achieved greater performance 1 year after the course (Psatisfactory learning of school students was lower (79 vs. 57%, respectively; Psatisfactory learning was higher (23 vs. 37%, respectively; Pschool students in b-CPR using PROCES, and this specific program achieves a reasonable amount of satisfactory learning.

  13. Motivating people to learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of automated external defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Martin, Deborah; Foley, Diane; Baker, Lee; Hintz, Deborah; Faure, Lauren; Erman, Nancy; Palozie, Jessica; Lundquist, Kathleen; O'Brien, Kara; Prior, Laura; Songco, Narra; Muscillo, Gwyn; Graziani, Denise; Tomczyk, Michael; Price, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effect of a motivational message on the intention of laypersons to learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) use. A pretest-posttest, double-blind, randomized design was used with 220 community-dwelling adults. Participants were randomly assigned to the treatment group reading the CPR and AED pamphlet emphasizing learning CPR and AED use to save someone they love and the 3-minute window for response time; or to the comparison group reading the identical pamphlet without the 2 motivational statements. Intention to learn CPR and AED use and to look for AEDs in public areas was measured before and after reading the respective pamphlet. No significant difference emerged between the groups for the number of participants planning to learn CPR and AED use. A significant number of participants in both groups increased intention to learn CPR and AED use. Significantly more treatment participants than comparison participants planned to routinely look for AEDs in public areas after reading the pamphlet, however. Teaching critical facts such as the low survival rate for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest might encourage laypersons to learn CPR and AED use. Routinely teaching family members of people at risk for a cardiac arrest about the short window of time in which CPR and AED use must begin and encouraging them to learn about CPR and AEDs to save someone they love may encourage family members to identify the location of AEDs in public places.

  14. High dose naloxone does not improve cerebral or myocardial blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, H W; Eberle, B; Hennes, H J; Grimm, W; Kilian, A; Konietzke, D; Massing, C; Dick, W

    1997-06-01

    In a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial we tested the hypothesis that naloxone given during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) enhances cerebral and myocardial blood flow. Twenty-one anesthetized, normoventilated pigs were instrumented for measurements of right atrial and aortic pressures, and regional organ blood flow (radiolabeled microspheres). After 5 min of untreated fibrillatory arrest, CPR was commenced using a pneumatic chest compressor/ventilator. With onset of CPR, an i.v. bolus of 40 micrograms/kg b.w. of epinephrine was given, followed by an infusion of 0.4 micrograms/kg per min. After 5 min of CPR, either naloxone, 10 mg/kg b.w. (group N, n = 11) or normal saline (group S, n = 10) was given i.v. Prior to, and after 1, 15, and 30 min of CPR, hemodynamic and blood flow measurements were obtained. After 30 min of CPR, mean arterial pressure was significantly higher in group N (26 +/- 5 vs. 13 +/- 3 mmHg, P CPR.

  15. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training in Schools: A Comparison of Trainee Satisfaction among Different Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Shingo; Suzuki, Masaru; Yamazaki, Motoyasu; Aikawa, Naoki; Yamazaki, Hajime

    2016-09-25

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has recently been added to the school curriculum worldwide and is currently taught to students between the ages of 10 and 16 years. The effect of the age of trainees on their satisfaction with CPR training has yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the satisfaction of trainees of different ages who participated in CPR training in schools in Japan. In total, 392 primary school students (10-11 years old), 1798 junior high school students (12-13 years old), and 4162 high schools students (15-16 years old) underwent the same 3-h course of CPR training, according to the guidelines of 2000 for Emergency Cardiovascular Care and CPR. The course was evaluated by a questionnaire completed by the participants. Primary school students responded most positively to all questions, including those reflecting enjoyment and the confidence of participants to apply CPR (Jonckheere-Terpstra test: P CPR training was strongly related to their age. Primary school students enjoyed CPR training more and were more confident in their ability to perform CPR than junior high and high school students were. Therefore, children aged 10-11 years may be the most appropriate candidates for the introduction of CPR training in schools.

  16. Evaluation of Smartphone Applications for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiwon Ahn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. There are many smartphone-based applications (apps for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR training. We investigated the conformity and the learnability/usability of these apps for CPR training and real-life supports. Methods. We conducted a mixed-method, sequential explanatory study to assess CPR training apps downloaded on two apps stores in South Korea. Apps were collected with inclusion criteria as follows, Korean-language instruction, training features, and emergency supports for real-life incidents, and analyzed with two tests; 15 medical experts evaluated the apps’ contents according to current Basic Life Support guidelines in conformity test, and 15 nonmedical individuals examined the apps using System Usability Scale (SUS in the learnability/usability test. Results. Out of 79 selected apps, five apps were included and analyzed. For conformity (ICC, 0.95, p<0.001, means of all apps were greater than 12 of 20 points, indicating that they were well designed according to current guidelines. Three of the five apps yielded acceptable level (greater than 68 of 100 points for learnability/usability. Conclusion. All the included apps followed current BLS guidelines and a majority offered acceptable learnability/usability for layperson. Current and developmental smartphone-based CPR training apps should include accurate CPR information and be easy to use for laypersons that are potential rescuers in real-life incidents. For Clinical Trials. This is a clinical trial, registered at the Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS, cris.nih.go.kr, number KCT0001840.

  17. Passive ultra-brief video training improves performance of compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Justin L; Vogele, Jennifer; Hart, Kimberly W; Lindsell, Christopher J; McMullan, Jason T

    2017-06-01

    Bystander compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. To broaden CPR training, 1-2min ultra-brief videos have been disseminated via the Internet and television. Our objective was to determine whether participants passively exposed to a televised ultra-brief video perform CPR better than unexposed controls. This before-and-after study was conducted with non-patients in an urban Emergency Department waiting room. The intervention was an ultra-brief CPR training video displayed via closed-circuit television 3-6 times/hour. Participants were unaware of the study and not told to watch the video. Pre-intervention, no video was displayed. Participants were asked to demonstrate compression-only CPR on a manikin. Performance was scored based on critical actions: check for responsiveness, call for help, begin compressions immediately, and correct hand placement, compression rate and depth. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants who performed all actions correctly. There were 50 control and 50 exposed participants. Mean age was 37, 51% were African-American, 52% were female, and 10% self-reported current CPR certification. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline characteristics between groups. The number of participants who performed all actions correctly was 0 (0%) control vs. 10 (20%) exposed (difference 20%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 8.9-31.1%, ptraining is associated with improved performance of compression-only CPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Diffusion of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training to Chinese Immigrants with Limited English Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Po Yip

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an effective intervention for prehospital cardiac arrest. Despite all available training opportunities for CPR, disparities exist in participation in CPR training, CPR knowledge, and receipt of bystander CPR for certain ethnic groups. We conducted five focus groups with Chinese immigrants who self-reported limited English proficiency (LEP. A bilingual facilitator conducted all the sessions. All discussions were taped, recorded, translated, and transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed by content analysis guided by the theory of diffusion. The majority of participants did not know of CPR and did not know where to get trained. Complexity of CPR procedure, advantages of calling 9-1-1, lack of confidence, and possible liability discourage LEP individuals to learn CPR. LEP individuals welcome simplified Hands-Only CPR and are willing to perform CPR with instruction from 9-1-1 operators. Expanding the current training to include Hands-Only CPR and dispatcher-assisted CPR may motivate Chinese LEP individuals to get trained for CPR.

  19. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana hospitals: Nurse managers’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Rajeswaran

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accident victims, as well as persons experiencing cardiac and other medical emergencies, might lose their lives due to the non-availability of trained personnel to provide effective cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR with functional equipment and adequate resources.The objectives of the study were to identify unit managers’ perceptions about challenges encountered when performing CPR interventions in the two referral public hospitals in Botswana. These results could be used to recommend more effective CPR strategies for Botswana’s hospitals. Interviews, comprising two quantitative sections with closed ended questions and one qualitative section with semi-structured questions, were conducted with 22 unit managers. The quantitative data indicated that all unit managers had at least eight years’ nursing experience, and could identify CPR shortcomings in their hospitals. Only one interviewee had never performed CPR. The qualitative data analysis revealed that the hospital units sometimes had too few staff members and did not have fully equipped emergency trolleys and/or equipment. No CPR teams and no CPR policies and guidelines existed. Nurses and doctors reportedly lacked CPR knowledge and skills. No debriefing services were provided after CPR encounters. The participating hospitals should address the following challenges that might affect CPR outcomes: shortages of staff, overpopulation of hospital units, shortcomings of the emergency trolleys and CPR equipment, absence of CPR policies and guidelines, absence of CPR teams, limited CPR competencies of doctors and nurses and the lack of debriefing sessions after CPR attempts.

  20. The Knowledge of and Attitudes Toward First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Among Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míguez-Navarro, Concepción; Ponce-Salas, Beatriz; Guerrero-Márquez, Gloria; Lorente-Romero, Jorge; Caballero-Grolimund, Elena; Rivas-García, Arístides; Almagro-Colorado, María Ana

    2018-03-27

    To determine the level of knowledge of first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) among the parents of children who attended our Pediatric Emergency Department and to identify the factors that affect this knowledge. Descriptive, transversal study. A questionnaire was distributed anonymously among parents to collect data about their previous CPR training, knowledge and experience. A total 405 valid questionnaires were returned. The mean age of the sample was 38.08 (SD 7.1) years, and 66.9% of participants were female. The mean score of correctly answered questions was 6.76 out of 19 questions. Parents with a university education received a mean score of 7.16 versus 6.24 for those with a primary education (p = 0.022). Parents with previous training received a higher mean score (8.04 vs 6.17, respectively, p training. Knowledge of first aid among the general population is lacking. Parents with previous training in this field, those with a university-level education, and those who are healthcare providers and educational professionals received significantly higher scores. Studies based on surveys can be useful in estimating a population's knowledge base, allowing the development of community-based training activities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of knowledge of students in paediatric dentistry concerning cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mauro, L M; Oliveira, L B; Bergamaschi, C De Cássia; Ramacciato, J C; Motta, R H L

    2018-05-10

    The study evaluated the theoretical knowledge and practical ability of students in paediatric dentistry concerning basic life support (BLS) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in children and babies. Seventy paediatric dentistry students answered a questionnaire and also performed a simulation of the manoeuvres of BLS and CPR on baby and child manikins. The results showed that 41 (58%) students had never received BLS training. When questioned about the correct ratio of compression and ventilation during CPR, most students answered incorrectly. For the CPR of babies in the presence of a first responder only 19 (27.1%) answered correctly (30 × 2), and for babies with two rescuers, 23 (32.8%) answered correctly (15 × 2); in relation to the correct rhythm of chest compressions, 38 (54.4%) answered incorrectly; when asked if they felt prepared to deal with a medical emergency in their dental surgeries, only 12 (17.1%) stated "yes". In the practice evaluation, 51 (73%) students who had been assessed in CPR manoeuvres for children and 55 (78%) in the manoeuvres for babies scored inadequately. The evaluated students did not have adequate knowledge about CPR in children and babies.

  2. Computed tomography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation using automated chest compression devices - an initial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, Stefan; Koerner, Markus; Treitl, Marcus; Linsenmaier, Ulrich; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Leidel, Bernd A.; Jaschkowitz, Thomas; Kanz, Karl G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate both CT image quality in a phantom study and feasibility in an initial case series using automated chest compression (A-CC) devices for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Multidetector CT (MDCT) of a chest/heart phantom (Thorax-CCI, QRM, Germany) was performed with identical protocols of the phantom alone (S), the phantom together with two different A-CC devices (A: AutoPulse, Zoll, Germany; L: LUCAS, Jolife, Sweden), and the phantom with a LUCAS baseplate, but without the compression unit (L-bp). Nine radiologists evaluated image noise quantitatively (n=244 regions, Student's t-test) and also rated image quality subjectively (1-excellent to 6-inadequate, Mann-Whitney U-test). Additionally, three patients during prolonged CPR underwent CT with A-CC devices. Mean image noise of S was increased by 1.21 using L-bp, by 3.62 using A, and by 5.94 using L (p<0.01 each). Image quality was identical using S and L-bp (1.64 each), slightly worse with A (1.83), and significantly worse with L (2.97, p<0.001). In all patient cases the main lesions were identified, which led to clinical key decisions. Image quality was excellent with L-bp and good with A. Under CPR conditions initial cases indicate that MDCT diagnostics supports either focused treatment or the decision to terminate efforts. (orig.)

  3. Rescuers' physical fatigue with different chest compression to ventilation methods during simulated infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldingh, Anne Marthe; Jensen, Thomas Hagen; Bjørbekk, Ane Torvik; Solevåg, Anne Lee; Nakstad, Britt

    2016-10-01

    To assess development of objective, subjective and indirect measures of fatigue during simulated infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with two different methods. Using a neonatal manikin, 17 subject-pairs were randomized in a crossover design to provide 5-min CPR with a 3:1 chest compression (CC) to ventilation (C:V) ratio and continuous CCs at a rate of 120 min(-1) with asynchronous ventilations (CCaV-120). We measured participants' changes in heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP); perceived level of fatigue on a validated Likert scale; and manikin CC measures. CCaV-120 compared with a 3:1 C:V ratio resulted in a change during 5-min of CPR in HR 49 versus 40 bpm (p = 0.01), and MAP 1.7 versus -2.8 mmHg (p = 0.03); fatigue rated on a Likert scale 12.9 versus 11.4 (p = 0.2); and a significant decay in CC depth after 90 s (p = 0.03). The results indicate a trend toward more fatigue during simulated CPR in CCaV-120 compared to the recommended 3:1 C:V CPR. These results support current guidelines.

  4. Respiratory function and near infrared spectroscopy recording during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an extremely preterm newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Elliott S; Cheung, Po-Yin; Pichler, Gerhard; Aziz, Khalid; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case highlighting several controversial and important topics regarding neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Current neonatal guidelines recommend a 3:1 compression:ventilation ratio; however, the most effective ratio of delivering chest compressions (CC) remains controversial. We report a case of a male infant at 24 weeks' postmenstrual age weighing 650 g on a background of preterm labor. At initial assessment the infant appeared floppy and apneic with a heart rate (HR) of 50-60 beats/min. Mask ventilation was ineffective, thus continuous CC (90/min) with asynchronous ventilations (60/min) was started. HR, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, cerebral oxygenation, respiratory function, and exhaled carbon dioxide (ECO2) were continuously measured during CPR. Return of spontaneous circulation defined as HR >60/min was achieved after 90 s of CPR. Mask leak significantly increased during CC. During bradycardia (HR ∼50/min), ECO2 indicated correct tube placement and an increase of ECO2 >12 mm Hg was associated with rapid increase in HR >60/min. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Reliability of pulse oximetry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a piglet model of neonatal cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohammad Ahmad; Mendler, Marc; Maurer, Miriam; Waitz, Markus; Huang, Li; Hummler, Helmut D

    2015-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is widely used in intensive care and emergency conditions to monitor arterial oxygenation and to guide oxygen therapy. To study the reliability of pulse oximetry in comparison with CO-oximetry in newborn piglets during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In a prospective cohort study in 30 healthy newborn piglets, cardiac arrest was induced, and thereafter each piglet received CPR for 20 min. Arterial oxygen saturation was monitored continuously by pulse oximetry (SpO2). Arterial blood was analyzed for functional oxygenation (SaO2) every 2 min. SpO2 was compared with coinciding SaO2 values and bias considered whenever the difference (SpO2 - SaO2) was beyond ±5%. Bias values were decreased at the baseline measurements (mean: 2.5 ± 4.6%) with higher precision and accuracy compared with values across the experiment. Two minutes after cardiac arrest, there was a marked decrease in precision and accuracy as well as an increase in bias up to 13 ± 34%, reaching a maximum of 45.6 ± 28.3% after 10 min over a mean SaO2 range of 29-58%. Pulse oximetry showed increased bias and decreased accuracy and precision during CPR in a model of neonatal cardiac arrest. We recommend further studies to clarify the exact mechanisms of these false readings to improve reliability of pulse oximetry during the marked desaturation and hypoperfusion found during CPR. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Training neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation: can it be improved by playing a musical prompt? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, Simone K; Schmölzer, Georg M; Kelm, Marcus; Davis, Peter G; Schmalisch, Gerd; Roehr, Charles Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Effective neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) requires 3:1 coordinated manual inflations (MI) and chest compressions (CC). We hypothesized that playing a musical prompt would help coordinate CC and MI during CPR. In this pilot trial we studied the effect the "Radetzkymarsch" (110 beats per minute) on neonatal CPR. Thirty-six medical professionals performed CPR on a neonatal manikin. CC and MI were recorded with and without the music played, using a respiratory function monitor and a tally counter. Statistical analysis included Wilcoxon test. Without music, the median (interquartile range) rate of CC was 115 (100 to 129) per minute and the rate of MI was 38 (32 to 42) per minute. When listening to the auditory prompt, the rate of CC decreased significantly to 96 (96 to 100) per minute (p = 0.002) and the rate of MI to 32 (30 to 34) per minute (p = 0.001). The interquartile range of interoperator variability decreased up to 86%. Listening to an auditory prompt improved compliance with the recommended delivery rates of CC and MI during neonatal CPR. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. [Basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation program for high school students (PROCES). Results from the pilot program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Oscar; Jiménez-Fábrega, Xavier; Díaz, Núria; Coll-Vinent, Blanca; Bragulat, Ernest; Jiménez, Sònia; Espinosa, Gerard; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; García-Alfranca, Fernando; Alvarez, M Teresa; Salvador, Jordi; Millá, José; Sánchez, Miquel

    2005-01-15

    The PROCES (Programa de Reanimació Cardiopulmonar Orientat a Centres d'Ensenyament Secundari) program is aimed at teaching basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (b-CPR) to teenagers within high school. Our aim was to analyze the results obtained from the pilot program. PROCES was splitted in 7 sessions: 5 of them (5 hours) were taught by teachers at high school and 2 of them (4 hours, including how to perform b-CPR) were taught by emergency physicians. To assess the degree of students' learning, they were administered a 20-question test before and after the program. Epidemiological characteristics and students' opinions (all them were requested to rate the program from 0 to 10) were also collected. Students were 14 years-old in 38%, 15 in 38% and 16 or more in 24%. Before PROCES, the mean mark (over 20 points) was 8.5 (2.4). After PROCES, marks improved up to 13.5 (3.2) (p knowledge and skills in b-CPR, with no exceptions associated with teenagers' characteristics.

  8. Assessment of nursing records on cardiopulmonary resuscitation based on the utstein model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Lopes Grisante

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional study that assessed the quality of nursing records on cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Forty-two patients’ charts were reviewed in an intensive care unit, using the Utstein protocol. There was a predominance of men (54.8%, aged from 21-70 years old (38.1%, correction of acquired heart diseases (42.7%, with more than one pre-existing device (147. As immediate cause of cardiac arrest, hypotension predominated (48.3% and as the initial rhythm, bradycardia (37.5%. Only the time of death and time of arrest were recorded in 100% of the sample. Professional training in Advanced Life Support was not recorded. The causes of arrest and initial rhythm were recorded in 69% and 76.2% of the sample. Chest compressions, patent airway obtainment and defibrillation were recorded in less than 16%. Records were considered of low quality and may cause legal sanctions to professionals and do not allow the comparison of the effectiveness of the maneuvers with other centers.

  9. Knowledge and psychomotor skills of nursing students in North Cyprus in the area of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal, Umran; Sarpkaya, Dilek

    2013-07-01

    Objective : The aim of the study was to determine the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge and skill levels of nursing students in North Cyprus. Methods : The study design was quasi-experimental and longitudinal. A questionnaire was applied to the students before the CPR lecture. Then the students were informed about adult CPR by the researchers and all of the students practiced CPR on a Resusci-Anne manikin. One and six months after this training the same questionnaire and skills checklist of CPR were applied. Results : Eighty three third year students of nursing participated in the study. While the average CPR knowledge score of these students was 9.3 ± 2.9 out of 23 before the lecture, this average increased to 17.0 ± 1.8 one month after the CPR lecture and decreased by two points back to 14.9 ± 3.8 after six months. Skill score of the students one month after the CPR skills training was 18.4 out of 21, and that this average decreased to 13.8 after six months (p<0.05). Nursing students tend to forget theoretical and applied CPR training after couple of months. Hence there is a need for continuous CPR training and education and repeating the skills at regular intervals even after they have graduated to ensure sustainability in the CPR skills.

  10. The effects of flipped learning for bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation on undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Taizo; Goto, Tadahiro; Kobuchi, Taketsune; Kimura, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2017-12-22

    To compare bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills retention between conventional learning and flipped learning for first-year medical students. A post-test only control group design. A total of 108 participants were randomly assigned to either the conventional learning or flipped learning. The primary outcome measures of time to the first chest compression and the number of total chest compressions during a 2-minute test period 6 month after the training were assessed with the Mann-Whitney U test. Fifty participants (92.6%) in the conventional learning group and 45 participants (83.3%) in the flipped learning group completed the study. There were no statistically significant differences 6 months after the training in the time to the first chest compression of 33.0 seconds (interquartile range, 24.0-42.0) for the conventional learning group and 31.0 seconds (interquartile range, 25.0-41.0) for the flipped learning group (U=1171.0, p=0.73) or in the number of total chest compressions of 101.5 (interquartile range, 90.8-124.0) for the conventional learning group and 104.0 (interquartile range, 91.0-121.0) for the flipped learning group (U=1083.0, p=0.75). The 95% confidence interval of the difference between means of the number of total chest compressions 6 months after the training did not exceed a clinically important difference defined a priori. There were no significant differences between the conventional learning group and the flipped learning group in our main outcomes. Flipped learning might be comparable to conventional learning, and seems a promising approach which requires fewer resources and enables student-centered learning without compromising the acquisition of CPR skills.

  11. Effect of vehicle on the nasal absorption of epinephrine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleske, B E; Rice, T L; Warren, E W; Giacherio, D A; Gilligan, L J; Massey, K D; Chrisp, C E; Tait, A R

    1996-01-01

    We have shown in previous studies that epinephrine administered intranasally is a feasible route of administration during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). To promote the absorption of epinephrine we administered phentolamine prior to epinephrine and used a bile salt as a vehicle to dissolve the epinephrine. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of two different vehicles (bile salt vs surfactant) in promoting the absorption of nasally administered epinephrine during CPR and to determine their effects on the nasal mucosa. A randomized, blinded study. A controlled laboratory environment. Eleven mongrel dogs. Each dog underwent 3 minutes of unassisted ventricular fibrillation (VF) followed by 7 minutes of VF with CPR. Five minutes after the start of VF, 10 dogs received intranasal phentolamine 0.25 mg/kg/nostril followed 1 minute later by intranasal epinephrine 7.5 mg/kg/nostril. The epinephrine was dissolved in a randomly assigned vehicle consisting of either taurodeoxycholic acid (group A, bile salt) or polyoxyethylene-9-lauryl ether (group B, surfactant). One animal acted as a control and received 0.9% sodium chloride nasally. Data from eight dogs (one control) were included for analysis. Histology of the nasal cavity demonstrated severe multifocal erosion and ulceration of the respiratory epithelium for groups A and B compared with the control. The severity was similar between the two groups. In addition, no significant differences in plasma epinephrine concentrations or blood pressure responses were seen between the groups. Based on histology, polyoxyethylene-9-lauryl ether offered no advantage over taurodeoxycholic acid in its effect on the nasal mucosa. The data available for changes in epinephrine concentration and pressure also suggest no difference between the two vehicles in promoting the absorption of epinephrine during CPR in an animal model.

  12. Outcome of extremely low birth weight infants who received delivery room cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Myra H; Salhab, Walid A; Heyne, Roy J; Kendrick, Douglas E; Stoll, Barbara J; Laptook, Abbot R

    2012-02-01

    To determine whether delivery room cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DR-CPR) independently predicts morbidities and neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in extremely low birth weight infants. We conducted a cohort study of infants born with birth weight of 401 to 1000 g and gestational age of 23 to 30 weeks. DR-CPR was defined as chest compressions, medications, or both. Logistic regression was used to determine associations among DR-CPR and morbidities, mortality, and NDI at 18 to 24 months of age (Bayley II mental or psychomotor index blindness, or deafness). Data are adjusted ORs with 95% CIs. Of 8685 infants, 1333 (15%) received DR-CPR. Infants who received DR-CPR had lower birth weight (708±141 g versus 764±146g, PCPR had more pneumothoraces (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.48-2.99), grade 3 to 4 intraventricular hemorrhage (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.23-1.74), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.13-1.59), death by 12 hours (OR, 3.69; 95% CI, 2.98-4.57), and death by 120 days after birth (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.93-2.57). Rates of NDI in survivors (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02-1.49) and death or NDI (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.46-1.99) were higher for DR-CPR infants. Only 14% of DR-CPR recipients with 5-minute Apgar score CPR is a prognostic marker for higher rates of mortality and NDI for extremely low birth weight infants. New DR-CPR strategies are needed for this population. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. "Push as hard as you can" instruction for telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tulder, Raphael; Roth, Dominik; Havel, Christof; Eisenburger, Philip; Heidinger, Benedikt; Chwojka, Christof Constantin; Novosad, Heinz; Sterz, Fritz; Herkner, Harald; Schreiber, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    The medical priority dispatch system (MPDS®) assists lay rescuers in protocol-driven telephone-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Our aim was to clarify which CPR instruction leads to sufficient compression depth. This was an investigator-blinded, randomized, parallel group, simulation study to investigate 10 min of chest compressions after the instruction "push down firmly 5 cm" vs. "push as hard as you can." Primary outcome was defined as compression depth. Secondary outcomes were participants exertion measured by Borg scale, provider's systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and quality values measured by the skill-reporting program of the Resusci(®) Anne Simulator manikin. For the analysis of the primary outcome, we used a linear random intercept model to allow for the repeated measurements with the intervention as a covariate. Thirteen participants were allocated to control and intervention. One participant (intervention) dropped out after min 7 because of exhaustion. Primary outcome showed a mean compression depth of 44.1 mm, with an inter-individual standard deviation (SDb) of 13.0 mm and an intra-individual standard deviation (SDw) of 6.7 mm for the control group vs. 46.1 mm and a SDb of 9.0 mm and SDw of 10.3 mm for the intervention group (difference: 1.9; 95% confidence interval -6.9 to 10.8; p = 0.66). Secondary outcomes showed no difference for exhaustion and CPR-quality values. There is no difference in compression depth, quality of CPR, or physical strain on lay rescuers using the initial instruction "push as hard as you can" vs. the standard MPDS(®) instruction "push down firmly 5 cm." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation instruction: animation versus dispatcher through a cellular phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choa, Minhong; Park, Incheol; Chung, Hyun Soo; Yoo, Sun K; Shim, Hoshik; Kim, Seungho

    2008-04-01

    We developed a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction programme using motion capture animation integrated into cellular phones. We compared the effectiveness of animation-assisted CPR instruction with dispatcher-assisted instruction in participants with no previous CPR training. This study was a single blind cluster randomized trial. Participants were allocated to either animation-assisted CPR (AA-CPR; 8 clusters, 44 participants) group or dispatcher-assisted CPR (DA-CPR; 8 clusters, 41 participants). The overall performance and time of each step of CPR cycle were recorded on a checklist by 3 assessors. The objective performances were evaluated using the Resusci Anne SkillReporter Manikin. Differences between the groups were compared using an independent t-test adjusted for the effect of clustering. The AA-CPR group had a significantly better checklist score (pCPR cycle (pCPR group. In an objective assessment of psychomotor skill, the AA-CPR group demonstrated more accurate hand positioning (68.8+/-3.6%, p=0.033) and compression rate (72.4+/-3.7%, p=0.015) than DA-CPR group. However, the accuracy of compression depth (p=0.400), ventilation volume (p=0.977) and flow rate (p=0.627) were below 30% in both groups. Audiovisual animated CPR instruction through a cellular phone resulted in better scores in checklist assessment and time interval compliance in participants without CPR skill compared to those who received CPR instructions from a dispatcher; however, the accuracy of important psychomotor skill measures was unsatisfactory in both groups.

  15. Death before disco: the effectiveness of a musical metronome in layperson cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, John W; Jou, Andrew C; Wang, Huaping; Bleess, Brandon B; Tham, Stephanie K

    2015-01-01

    A novel musical memory aid has been proposed for aiding laypersons in complying with the American Heart Association (AHA) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines of 100 compressions per minute (cpm). This study tested usefulness of such a memory aid to improve layperson long-term compliance with CPR compression rate guidelines. A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted using CPR-untrained laypersons. Subjects received either a standard CPR educational experience (AHA Heartsaver® CPR class) or an experimental CPR educational experience (AHA Heartsaver® CPR class augmented with a musical metronome). Experimental group subjects were taught to perform compressions to the cadence of a pop music song (The Bee Gees "Stayin' Alive"; Saturday Night Fever, The Original Movie Soundtrack; Polygram International Music, 1977) with a tempo of 100 beats/min. Compression rates, depth of compressions, and correct compressions were measured initially and upon retesting ≥6 weeks post-training. Control subjects had a higher mean compression rate both immediately (121 [standard deviation {SD} = 21] vs. 109 [SD = 15] cpm; 95% confidence interval [CI] of mean difference 4-19; p = 0.002) and at follow-up (120 [SD = 20] vs. 111 [SD = 13] cpm; 95% CI of mean difference 2-16; p = 0.014). Compression rates stratified to 100-120 cpm demonstrated no difference between groups initially (39% vs. 48%; p = 0.382), but more experimental subjects maintained these rates at follow-up (43% vs. 74%; p = 0.003). Subjects trained to use a musical metronome more often maintained a compression rate of 100-120 cpm at ≥6-week follow-up, suggesting the memory aid may improve long-term guideline adherence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Kirkpatrick evaluation model for in-service training on cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoura Dorri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several evaluation models that can be used to evaluate the effect of in-service training; one of them is the Kirkpatrick model. The aim of the present study is to assess the in-service training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR for nurses based on the Kirkpatrick′s model. Materials and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study based on the Kirkpatrick′s model in which the efficacy of in-service training of CPR to nurses was assessed in the Shahadaye Lenjan Hospital in Isfahan province in 2014. 80 nurses and Nurse′s aides participated in the study after providing informed consent. The in-service training course was evaluated in reaction, learning, behavior, and results level of the Kirkpatrick model. Data were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire. Results: The mean age of the participants was 35 ± 8.5 years. The effectiveness score obtained in the reaction level (first level in the Kirkpatrick model was 4.2 ± 0.32. The effectiveness score in the second level of model or the learning level was 4.70 ± 0.09, which is statistically significant (P < 0.001. The effectiveness score at the third and fourth level were 4.1 ± 0.34 and 4.3 ± 0.12, respectively. Total effectiveness score was 4.35. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that CPR in-service training has a favorable effect on all four levels of the Kirkpatrick model for nurses and nurse′s aides.

  17. Training mothers in infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation with an instructional DVD and manikin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Gavin C; Rupp, Valerie A; Hamilton, Kimberly M; Worrilow, Charles C; Reed, James F; Friel, Kristin S; Dusza, Stephen W; Greenberg, Marna Rayl

    2013-07-01

    Classes in infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be time consuming and costly. To determine whether mothers in an obstetric unit could learn infant CPR by using a 22-minute instructional kit and to assess the value and confidence they gained by learning CPR. Quasi-experimental study with enrollment between January and December 2008. Obstetric unit in Lehigh Valley Hospital, a suburban teaching hospital in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Mothers at least 18 years old who had given birth within the previous 24 hours. The experimental group included mothers without prior CPR training who watched a 22-minute instructional DVD and practiced on a manikin. The control group included mothers with prior conventional CPR training. In both groups, knowledge and proficiency were assessed with written and practical examinations developed by certified CPR instructors. Participant surveys were conducted at 3 times: immediately before dissemination of course materials, within 24 hours after the mother agreed to participate in the study, and 6 months after initial evaluation. A total of 126 mothers were enrolled in the study: 79 in the experimental group, 25 in the control group, and 22 who withdrew from the study. Written and practical examinations were used to determine proficiency, and composite scores were generated, with a maximum composite score of 12. The composite scores were statistically significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group, with median scores of 10 and 7, respectively (PCPR training. In the experimental group, 76 mothers (96%) felt more confident as caregivers after learning CPR. Before training in both groups, 84 mothers (81%) stated that learning CPR was extremely important, compared with 100 mothers (96%) after training (P=.001). Use of an instructional kit is an effective method of teaching CPR to new mothers. Mothers reported that learning CPR is extremely important and that it increases their confidence as caregivers.

  18. Assessment of long-term impact of formal certified cardiopulmonary resuscitation training program among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramma, P P; Raj, L Suja; Dash, P K; Sarma, P S

    2016-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care guidelines are periodically renewed and published by the American Heart Association. Formal training programs are conducted based on these guidelines. Despite widespread training CPR is often poorly performed. Hospital educators spend a significant amount of time and money in training health professionals and maintaining basic life support (BLS) and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) skills among them. However, very little data are available in the literature highlighting the long-term impact of these training. To evaluate the impact of formal certified CPR training program on the knowledge and skill of CPR among nurses, to identify self-reported outcomes of attempted CPR and training needs of nurses. Tertiary care hospital, Prospective, repeated-measures design. A series of certified BLS and ACLS training programs were conducted during 2010 and 2011. Written and practical performance tests were done. Final testing was undertaken 3-4 years after training. The sample included all available, willing CPR certified nurses and experience matched CPR noncertified nurses. SPSS for Windows version 21.0. The majority of the 206 nurses (93 CPR certified and 113 noncertified) were females. There was a statistically significant increase in mean knowledge level and overall performance before and after the formal certified CPR training program (P = 0.000). However, the mean knowledge scores were equivalent among the CPR certified and noncertified nurses, although the certified nurses scored a higher mean score (P = 0.140). Formal certified CPR training program increases CPR knowledge and skill. However, significant long-term effects could not be found. There is a need for regular and periodic recertification.

  19. Blood Pressure Directed Booster Trainings Improve Intensive Care Unit Provider Retention of Excellent Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Heather; Maltese, Matthew R; Niles, Dana E; Fischman, Elizabeth; Legkobitova, Veronika; Leffelman, Jessica; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Sutton, Robert M

    2015-11-01

    Brief, intermittent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training sessions, "Booster Trainings," improve CPR skill acquisition and short-term retention. The objective of this study was to incorporate arterial blood pressure (ABP) tracings into Booster Trainings to improve CPR skill retention. We hypothesized that ABP-directed CPR "Booster Trainings" would improve intensive care unit (ICU) provider 3-month retention of excellent CPR skills without need for interval retraining. A CPR manikin creating a realistic relationship between chest compression depth and ABP was used for training/testing. Thirty-six ICU providers were randomized to brief, bedside ABP-directed CPR manikin skill retrainings: (1) Booster Plus (ABP visible during training and testing) versus (2) Booster Alone (ABP visible only during training, not testing) versus (3) control (testing, no intervention). Subjects completed skill tests pretraining (baseline), immediately after training (acquisition), and then retention was assessed at 12 hours, 3 and 6 months. The primary outcome was retention of excellent CPR skills at 3 months. Excellent CPR was defined as systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg or higher and compression rate 100 to 120 per minute. Overall, 14 of 24 (58%) participants acquired excellent CPR skills after their initial training (Booster Plus 75% vs 50% Booster Alone, P = 0.21). Adjusted for age, ABP-trained providers were 5.2× more likely to perform excellent CPR after the initial training (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.3-21.2; P = 0.02), and to retain these skills at 12 hours (adjusted odds ratio, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.3-14.9; P = 0.018) and 3 months (adjusted odds ratio, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.2-13.9; P = 0.023) when compared to baseline performance. The ABP-directed CPR booster trainings improved ICU provider 3-month retention of excellent CPR skills without the need for interval retraining.

  20. Incorporating cardiopulmonary resuscitation training into a cardiac rehabilitation programme: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartledge, Susie; Finn, Judith; Bray, Janet E; Case, Rosalind; Barker, Lauren; Missen, Diane; Shaw, James; Stub, Dion

    2018-02-01

    Patients with a cardiac history are at future risk of cardiac events, including out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Targeting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to family members of cardiac patients has long been advocated, but is an area in need of contemporary research evidence. An environment yet to be investigated for targeted training is cardiac rehabilitation. To evaluate the feasibility of providing CPR training in a cardiac rehabilitation programme among patients, their family members and staff. A prospective before and after study design was used. CPR training was delivered using video self-instruction CPR training kits, facilitated by a cardiac nurse. Data was collected pre-training, post-training and at one month. Cardiac patient participation rates in CPR classes were high ( n = 56, 72.7% of eligible patients) with a further 27 family members attending training. Patients were predominantly male (60.2%), family members were predominantly female (81.5%), both with a mean age of 65 years. Confidence to perform CPR and willingness to use skills significantly increased post-training (both ptraining participants demonstrated a mean compression rate of 112 beats/min and a mean depth of 48 mm. Training reach was doubled as participants shared the video self-instruction kit with a further 87 people. Patients, family members and cardiac rehabilitation staff had positive feedback about the training. We demonstrated that cardiac rehabilitation is an effective and feasible environment to provide CPR training. Using video self-instruction CPR training kits enabled further training reach to the target population.

  1. What are the barriers to implementation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in secondary schools? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinckernagel, Line; Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rod, Morten Hulvej; Folke, Fredrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2016-04-25

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in schools is recommended to increase bystander CPR and thereby survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but despite mandating legislation, low rates of implementation have been observed in several countries, including Denmark. The purpose of the study was to explore barriers to implementation of CPR training in Danish secondary schools. A qualitative study based on individual interviews and focus groups with school leadership and teachers. Thematic analysis was used to identify regular patterns of meaning both within and across the interviews. 8 secondary schools in Denmark. Schools were selected using strategic sampling to reach maximum variation, including schools with/without recent experience in CPR training of students, public/private schools and schools near to and far from hospitals. The study population comprised 25 participants, 9 school leadership members and 16 teachers. School leadership and teachers considered it important for implementation and sustainability of CPR training that teachers conduct CPR training of students. However, they preferred external instructors to train students, unless teachers acquired the CPR skills which they considered were needed. They considered CPR training to differ substantially from other teaching subjects because it is a matter of life and death, and they therefore believed extraordinary skills were required for conducting the training. This was mainly rooted in their insecurity about their own CPR skills. CPR training kits seemed to lower expectations of skill requirements to conduct CPR training, but only among those who were familiar with such kits. To facilitate implementation of CPR training in schools, it is necessary to have clear guidelines regarding the required proficiency level to train students in CPR, to provide teachers with these skills, and to underscore that extensive skills are not required to provide CPR. Further, it is important to familiarise

  2. Effects of flashlight guidance on chest compression performance in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a noisy environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Chang, Chul Ho; Park, Incheol; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, SeungHo; Lee, Hahn Shick

    2013-08-01

    In real cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), noise can arise from instructional voices and environmental sounds in places such as a battlefield and industrial and high-traffic areas. A feedback device using a flashing light was designed to overcome noise-induced stimulus saturation during CPR. This study was conducted to determine whether 'flashlight' guidance influences CPR performance in a simulated noisy setting. We recruited 30 senior medical students with no previous experience of using flashlight-guided CPR to participate in this prospective, simulation-based, crossover study. The experiment was conducted in a simulated noisy situation using a cardiac arrest model without ventilation. Noise such as patrol car and fire engine sirens was artificially generated. The flashlight guidance device emitted light pulses at the rate of 100 flashes/min. Participants also received instructions to achieve the desired rate of 100 compressions/min. CPR performances were recorded with a Resusci Anne mannequin with a computer skill-reporting system. There were significant differences between the control and flashlight groups in mean compression rate (MCR), MCR/min and visual analogue scale. However, there were no significant differences in correct compression depth, mean compression depth, correct hand position, and correctly released compression. The flashlight group constantly maintained the pace at the desired 100 compressions/min. Furthermore, the flashlight group had a tendency to keep the MCR constant, whereas the control group had a tendency to decrease it after 60 s. Flashlight-guided CPR is particularly advantageous for maintaining a desired MCR during hands-only CPR in noisy environments, where metronome pacing might not be clearly heard.

  3. Recognising out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls increases bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Bækgaard, Josefine Stokholm; Claesson, Andreas; Hollenberg, Jacob; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy K

    2017-06-01

    Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated with bystander CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and 30-day survival. Our secondary aim was to identify patient-, setting-, and dispatcher-related predictors of OHCA recognition. We performed an observational study of all OHCA patients' emergency calls in the Capital Region of Denmark from 01/01/2013-31/12/2013. OHCAs were collected from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry and the Mobile Critical Care Unit database. Emergency call recordings were identified and evaluated. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to all OHCAs and witnessed OHCAs only to analyse the association between OHCA recognition and bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of OHCA recognition. We included 779 emergency calls in the analyses. During the emergency calls, 70.1% (n=534) of OHCAs were recognised; OHCA recognition was positively associated with bystander CPR (odds ratio [OR]=7.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.10-12.05) in all OHCAs; and ROSC (OR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.13-3.06) and 30-day survival (OR=2.80, 95% CI: 1.58-4.96) in witnessed OHCA. Predictors of OHCA recognition were addressing breathing (OR=1.76, 95% CI: 1.17-2.66) and callers located by the patient's side (OR=2.16, 95% CI: 1.46-3.19). Recognition of OHCA during emergency calls was positively associated with the provision of bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival in witnessed OHCA. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Protective head-cooling during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation: the original animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W. Brader

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR does not reliably sustain brain viability during cardiac arrest. Pre-hospital adjuncts to standard CPR are needed in order to improve outcomes. A preliminary dog study demonstrated that surface cooling of the head during arrest and CPR can achieve protective levels of brain hypothermia (30°C within 10 minutes. We hypothesized that protective head-cooling during cardiac arrest and CPR improves neurological outcomes. Twelve dogs under light ketamine-halothane-nitrous oxide anesthesia were arrested by transthoracic fibrillation. The treated group consisted of six dogs whose shaven heads were moistened with saline and packed in ice immediately after confirmation of ventricular fibrillation. Six control dogs remained at room temperature. All 12 dogs were subjected to four minutes of ventricular fibrillation and 20 minutes of standard CPR. Spontaneous circulation was restored with drugs and countershocks. Intensive care was provided for five hours post-arrest and the animals were observed for 24 hours. In both groups, five of the six dogs had spontaneous circulation restored. After three hours, mean neurological deficit was significantly lower in the treated group (P=0.016, with head-cooled dogs averaging 37% and the normothermic dogs 62%. Two of the six head-cooled dogs survived 24 hours with neurological deficits of 9% and 0%, respectively. None of the control group dogs survived 24 hours. We concluded that head-cooling attenuates brain injury during cardiac arrest with prolonged CPR. We review the literature related to the use of hypothermia following cardiac arrest and discuss some promising approaches for the pre-hospital setting.

  5. Dispatcher-assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Shibuta, Hidetoshi; Hasegawa, Manabu; Nagata, Takashi

    2018-04-19

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is critical to the survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, it is unknown whether bystander CPR with or without dispatcher assistance is more effective or why. Thus, we evaluated the association between dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR (vs. bystander CPR without dispatcher assistance) and survival of patients with OHCA. This is a retrospective, nonrandomized, observational study using national registry data for all OHCAs. We performed a propensity analysis. Patients with OHCA of cardiac origin were 18-100 years of age and received bystander chest compression in Japan between 2005 and 2014. Outcome measures were bystander rescue breathing, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) before hospital arrival, and survival and Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) 1 or 2 at 1 month after the event. During the study period, 1,176,351 OHCAs occurred, and 87,400 cases met the inclusion criteria. Among propensity-matched patients, a negative association was observed between dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR and outcome measures in a fully-adjusted model [odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) for ROSC = 0.87 (0.78-0.97), P < 0.05; OR (95% CI) for 1-month survival = 0.81 (0.65-1.00), P < 0.05; OR (95% CI) for CPC 1 or 2 = 0.64 (0.43-0.93), P < 0.05]. OR of survival for dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR tended to decrease as the emergency medical services response time increased. Survival benefit was less for dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR with dispatcher assistance than without dispatcher assistance. Low quality is hypothesized to be the cause of the reduced benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of epinephrine on cerebral and myocardial perfusion in an infant animal preparation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleien, C L; Dean, J M; Koehler, R C; Michael, J R; Chantarojanasiri, T; Traystman, R; Rogers, M C

    1986-04-01

    We assessed the efficacy of conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in 2-week-old piglets. We determined intrathoracic vascular pressures, cerebral (CBF) and myocardial blood flows (MBF), and cerebral oxygen uptake during conventional CPR in this infant animal preparation and contrasted these results with those of previous work on adult animals. We further examined the effects of the infusion of epinephrine on these pressures and flows and on cerebral oxygen uptake, which has not been previously evaluated in adult preparations. Conventional CPR was performed on pentobarbital-anesthetized piglets with a 20% sternal displacement with the use of a pneumatic piston compressor. Chest recoil was incomplete, leading to an 18% to 27% reduction in anteroposterior diameter during the relaxation phase. Aortic and right atrial pressures in excess of 80 mm Hg were generated. These pressures are greater than those generally obtained in adult animals with similar percent pulsatile displacements. CBF and MBF were also initially greater than those reported in adult animals undergoing conventional CPR. However, when CPR was prolonged beyond 20 min, aortic pressure fell and CBF and MBF declined to the near-zero levels seen in adult preparations. At 5 min of CPR, CBF and MBF were 24 +/- 7 and 27 +/- 7 ml . min-1 x 100 g-1 (50% and 17% of the values during cardiac arrest), respectively. With the continuous infusion of epinephrine (4 micrograms/kg/min) in another group of animals, MBF was significantly greater at 20 min of CPR and CBF and cerebral O2 uptake were greater at 35 min of CPR as a result of higher perfusion pressures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Human or monitor feedback to improve mask ventilation during simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Corinna; Schmölzer, Georg M; O'Reilly, Megan; Schwaberger, Bernhard; Urlesberger, Berndt; Pichler, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    To investigate if external chest compressions (ECC) increase mask leak, and if human or technical feedback improves mask ventilation during simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In this observational study, 32 participants delivered positive pressure ventilation (PPV) to a modified, leak-free manikin via facemask. Mask leak, tidal volume (VT), positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) and respiratory rate (RR) were measured with a respiratory function monitor (RFM). Participants had to perform four studies. In the first study, participants performed PPV alone as baseline. Thereafter, three studies were performed in random order. In the PPV+ECC+manometer group, participants had to observe the manometer while the RFM was covered; in the PPV+ECC+RFM group, the RFM was used while the manometer was covered; and in the PPV+ECC+verbal feedback group, the RFM and manometer were covered while a team leader viewed the RFM and provided verbal feedback to the participants. Median (IQR) mask leak of all studies was 15% (5-47%). Comparing the studies, PPV+ECC+RFM and PPV+ECC+verbal feedback had significantly less mask leak than PPV+ECC+manometer. Mean (SD) VT of all studies was 9.5±3.5 mL. Comparing all studies, PPV+ECC+RFM had a significantly higher VT than PPV and PPV+ECC+manometer. As well, PPV+ECC+verbal feedback had a significantly higher VT than PPV. PEEP and RR were within our target, mean (SD) PEEP was 6±2 cmH2O and RR was 36±13/min. During simulated neonatal CPR, ECCs did not influence mask leak, and a RFM and verbal feedback were helpful methods to reduce mask leak and increase VT significantly.

  8. Arterial blood gases during and their dynamic changes after cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindelboeck, Walter; Gemes, Geza; Strasser, Christa; Toescher, Kathrin; Kores, Barbara; Metnitz, Philipp; Haas, Josef; Prause, Gerhard

    2016-09-01

    An arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) yields important diagnostic information in the management of cardiac arrest. This study evaluated ABG samples obtained during out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (OHCPR) in the setting of a prospective multicenter trial. We aimed to clarify prospectively the ABG characteristics during OHCPR, potential prognostic parameters and the ABG dynamics after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). ABG samples were collected and instantly processed either under ongoing OHCPR performed according to current advanced life support guidelines or immediately after ROSC and data ware entered into a case report form along with standard CPR parameters. During a 22-month observation period, 115 patients had an ABG analysis during OHCPR. In samples obtained under ongoing CPR, an acidosis was present in 98% of all cases, but was mostly of mixed hypercapnic and metabolic origin. Hypocapnia was present in only 6% of cases. There was a trend towards higher paO2 values in patients who reached sustained ROSC, and a multivariate regression analysis revealed age, initial rhythm, time from collapse to CPR initiation and the arterio-alveolar CO2 difference (AaDCO2) to be associated with sustained ROSC. ABG samples drawn immediately after ROSC demonstrated higher paO2 and unaltered pH and base excess levels compared with samples collected during ongoing CPR. Our findings suggest that adequate ventilation and oxygenation deserve more research and clinical attention in the management of cardiac arrest and that oxygen uptake improves within minutes after ROSC. Hyperventilation resulting in arterial hypocapnia is not a major problem during OHCPR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Patients With Terminal Illness: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehatzadeh, S

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was first introduced in 1960 for people who unexpectedly experience sudden cardiac arrest. Over the years, it became routine practice in all institutions to perform CPR for all patients even though, for some patients with fatal conditions, application of CPR only prolongs the dying process through temporarily restoring cardiac function. Objectives This analysis aims to systematically review the literature to provide an accurate estimate of survival following CPR in patients with terminal health conditions. Data Sources A literature search was performed for studies published from January 1, 2004, until January 10, 2014. The search was updated monthly to March 1, 2014. Review Methods Abstracts and full text of studies that met eligibility criteria were reviewed. Reference lists were also examined for any additional relevant studies not identified through the search. Results Cancer patients have lower survival rates following CPR than patients with conditions other than cancer, and cancer patients who receive CPR in intensive care units have one-fifth the rate of survival to discharge of cancer patients who receive CPR in general wards. While the meta-analysis of studies published between 1967 and 2005 reported a lower survival to discharge for cancer patients (6.2%), more recent studies reported higher survival to discharge or to 30-day survival for these patients. Higher survival rates in more recent studies could originate with more “do not attempt resuscitation” orders for patients with end-stage cancer in recent years. Older age does not significantly decrease the rate of survival following CPR while the degree, the type, and the number of chronic health conditions; functional dependence; and multiple CPRs (particularly in advanced age) do reduce survival rates. Emergency Medical Services response time have a significant impact on survival following out-of-hospital CPR. Conclusions Survival after CPR depends on

  10. Computational simulation of passive leg-raising effects on hemodynamics during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Ah; Park, Jiheum; Lee, Jung Chan; Shin, Sang Do; Kim, Hee Chan

    2017-03-01

    The passive leg-raising (PLR) maneuver has been used for patients with circulatory failure to improve hemodynamic responsiveness by increasing cardiac output, which should also be beneficial and may exert synergetic effects during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the impact of the PLR maneuver on CPR remains unclear due to difficulties in monitoring cardiac output in real-time during CPR and a lack of clinical evidence. We developed a computational model that couples hemodynamic behavior during standard CPR and the PLR maneuver, and simulated the model by applying different angles of leg raising from 0° to 90° and compression rates from 80/min to 160/min. The simulation results showed that the PLR maneuver during CPR significantly improves cardiac output (CO), systemic perfusion pressure (SPP) and coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) by ∼40-65% particularly under the recommended range of compression rates between 100/min and 120/min with 45° of leg raise, compared to standard CPR. However, such effects start to wane with further leg lifts, indicating the existence of an optimal angle of leg raise for each person to achieve the best hemodynamic responses. We developed a CPR-PLR model and demonstrated the effects of PLR on hemodynamics by investigating changes in CO, SPP, and CPP under different compression rates and angles of leg raising. Our computational model will facilitate study of PLR effects during CPR and the development of an advanced model combined with circulatory disorders, which will be a valuable asset for further studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Survival and neurological outcome following in-hospital paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Vinay; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C; Singhi, Pratibha; Muralidharan, Jayashree

    2016-05-01

    Data on outcome of children undergoing in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in low- and middle-income countries are scarce. To describe the clinical profile and outcome of children undergoing in-hospital CPR. This prospective observational study was undertaken in the Advanced Pediatric Center, PGIMER, Chandigarh. All patients aged 1 month to 12 years who underwent in-hospital CPR between July 2010 and March 2011 were included. Data were recorded using the 'Utstein style'. Outcome variables included 'sustained return of spontaneous circulation' (ROSC), survival at discharge and neurological outcome at 1 year. The incidence of in-hospital CPR in all hospital admissions (n = 4654) was 6.7% (n = 314). 64.6% (n = 203) achieved ROSC, 14% (n = 44) survived to hospital discharge and 11.1% (n = 35) survived at 1 year. Three-quarters of survivors had a good neurological outcome at 1-year follow-up. Sixty per cent of patients were malnourished. The Median Pediatric Risk of Mortality-III (PRISM-III) score was 16 (IQR 9-25). Sepsis (71%), respiratory (39.5%) and neurological (31.5%) illness were the most common diagnoses. The most common initial arrhythmia was bradycardia (52.2%). On multivariate logistic regression, duration of CPR, diagnosis of sepsis and requirement for vasoactive support prior to arrest were independent predictors of decreased hospital survival. The requirement for in-hospital CPR is common in PGIMER. ROSC was achieved in two-thirds of children, but mortality was higher than in high-income countries because of delayed presentation, malnutrition and severity of illness. CPR >15 min was associated with death. Survivors had good long-term neurological outcome, demonstrating the value of timely CPR.

  12. Ambulance cardiopulmonary resuscitation: outcomes and associated factors in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell Ortiz, Fernando; García Del Águila, Javier; Fernández Del Valle, Patricia; J Mellado-Vergel, Francisco; Vergara-Pérez, Santiago; R Ruiz-Montero, María; Martínez-Lara, Manuela; J Gómez-Jiménez, Francisco; Gonzáez-Lobato, Ismael; García-Escudero, Guillermo; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Caballero-García, Auxiliadora; Vivar-Díaz, Itziar; Olavarría-Govantes, Luis

    2018-06-01

    To assess factors associated with survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during ambulance transport. Retrospective analysis of a registry of OHCA cases treated between 2008 and 2014. We included patients who had not recovered circulation at the time it was decided to transport to a hospital and who were rejected as non-heart-beating donors. Multivariate analysis was used to explore factors associated with the use of ambulance CPR, survival, and neurologic outcome. Out of a total of 7241 cases, 259 (3.6%) were given CPR during emergency transport. The mean (SD) age was 51.6 (23.6) years; 27 (10.1%) were aged 16 years or younger. The following variables were associated with the use of CPR during transport: age 16 years or under (odds ratio [OR], 6.48; 95% CI, 3.91-10.76); P<.001)], witnessed OHCA (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.16-2.26; P=.004), cardiac arrest outside the home (OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 2.38-4.21; P<.001), noncardiac cause (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.07-2.02; P=.019], initially shockable rhythm (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.17-2.37; P=.004), no prior basic life support (OR, 3.48; 95% CI, 2.58-4.70; P<.001), and orotracheal intubation (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.24-2.99; P=.003). One patient (0.38%) survived to discharge with good neurologic outcome. Ambulance CPR by a physician on board is applied in few OHCA cases. Young patient age, cardiac arrest outside the home, the presence of a witness, lack of a shockable rhythm on responder arrival, lack of basic life support prior to responder arrival, noncardiac cause, and orotracheal intubation are associated with the use of ambulance CPR, a strategy that can be considered futile.

  13. Haemodynamic effects of adrenaline (epinephrine) depend on chest compression quality during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytte, Morten; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Eilevstjønn, Joar; Eriksen, Morten; Strømme, Taevje A; Godang, Kristin; Wik, Lars; Steen, Petter Andreas; Sunde, Kjetil

    2006-12-01

    Adrenaline (epinephrine) is used during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) based on animal experiments without supportive clinical data. Clinically CPR was reported recently to have much poorer quality than expected from international guidelines and what is generally done in laboratory experiments. We have studied the haemodynamic effects of adrenaline during CPR with good laboratory quality and with quality simulating clinical findings and the feasibility of monitoring these effects through VF waveform analysis. After 4 min of cardiac arrest, followed by 4 min of basic life support, 14 pigs were randomised to ClinicalCPR (intermittent manual chest compressions, compression-to-ventilation ratio 15:2, compression depth 30-38 mm) or LabCPR (continuous mechanical chest compressions, 12 ventilations/min, compression depth 45 mm). Adrenaline 0.02 mg/kg was administered 30 s thereafter. Plasma adrenaline concentration peaked earlier with LabCPR than with ClinicalCPR, median (range), 90 (30, 150) versus 150 (90, 270) s (p = 0.007), respectively. Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and cortical cerebral blood flow (CCBF) increased and femoral blood flow (FBF) decreased after adrenaline during LabCPR (mean differences (95% CI) CPP 17 (6, 29) mmHg (p = 0.01), FBF -5.0 (-8.8, -1.2) ml min(-1) (p = 0.02) and median difference CCBF 12% of baseline (p = 0.04)). There were no significant effects during ClinicalCPR (mean differences (95% CI) CPP 4.7 (-3.2, 13) mmHg (p = 0.2), FBF -0.2 (-4.6, 4.2) ml min(-1)(p = 0.9) and CCBF 3.6 (-1.8, 9.0)% of baseline (p = 0.15)). Slope VF waveform analysis reflected changes in CPP. Adrenaline improved haemodynamics during laboratory quality CPR in pigs, but not with quality simulating clinically reported CPR performance.

  14. Follow-up into young adulthood after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in term and near-term newborn infants. II. Neuropsychological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggedal, G; Lundälv, E; Carlsson, G; Kjellmer, I

    2002-01-01

    Brain injury after neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the term baby is often described as an all-or-nothing phenomenon, but little is known about possible late cognitive consequences. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate whether children who needed cardiopulmonary resuscitation because of presumed mild and moderate intra-partum asphyxia with no evidence of neurological impairments at 18 mo of age may display neuropsychological impairments later in life. A long-term follow-up of young adults was carried out. A blinded comprehensive neuropsychological assessment of the main aspects of cognitive functions was made. The subjects who were resuscitated were divided into two groups according to the clinical course: 20 cases with mild asphyxia and 11 cases with moderate asphyxia, all followed prospectively and compared with 18 healthy controls. The 31 subjects were born at term or near-term and selected randomly from 59 infants born in 1969-1978 at Sahlgren's Hospital, Göteborg. All infants with early neurological impairments were excluded. No major differences could be established between the two clinical groups and normal controls in any aspects of cognitive function or intelligence. All the groups performed within the normal range in all tests. A tendency toward minor deficits in verbal ability in the mild group compared to the controls was found. Only one subject had a clear, defined memory deficit. Infants who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitatation at birth without neurological deficits at 18 mo of age did not show any cognitive deficits or neuropsychological impairments in adulthood even though inferior performance on some verbal subtests was observed compared to the control group.

  15. The Stop-Only-While-Shocking algorithm reduces hands-off time by 17% during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Koch; Mohammed, Anna; Pedersen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reducing hands-off time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is believed to increase survival after cardiac arrests because of the sustaining of organ perfusion. The aim of our study was to investigate whether charging the defibrillator before rhythm analyses and shock delivery...... significantly reduced hands-off time compared with the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2010 CPR guideline algorithm in full-scale cardiac arrest scenarios. METHODS: The study was designed as a full-scale cardiac arrest simulation study including administration of drugs. Participants were randomized...... compressions. RESULTS: Sample size was calculated with an α of 0.05 and 80% power showed that we should test four scenarios with each algorithm. Twenty-nine physicians participated in 11 scenarios. Hands-off time was significantly reduced 17% using the SOWS algorithm compared with ERC2010 [22.1% (SD 2.3) hands...

  16. Minimal invasive treatment of life-threatening bleeding caused by cardiopulmonary resuscitation-associated liver injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Næss, Pål Aksel; Engeseth, Kristian; Grøtta, Ole; Andersen, Geir Øystein; Gaarder, Christine

    2016-05-29

    Life-threatening bleeding caused by liver injury due to chest compressions is a rare complication in otherwise successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Surgical intervention has been suggested to achieve bleeding control; however, reported mortality is high. In this report, we present a brief literature review and a case report in which use of a less invasive strategy was followed by an uneventful recovery. A 37-year-old white woman was admitted after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation was immediately performed, followed by advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation that included tracheal intubation, mechanical chest compressions, and external defibrillation with return of spontaneous circulation. Upon hospital admission, the patient's blood pressure was 94/45 mmHg and her heart rate was 110 beats per minute. Her electrocardiogram showed no signs of ST-segment elevations or Q-wave development. Coronary angiography revealed a proximal thrombotic occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Successful recanalization, after thrombus aspiration and balloon dilation followed by stent implant, was verified with normalized anterograde flow. Immediately after the patient's arrival in the intensive cardiac care unit, a drop in her blood pressure to 60/30 mmHg and a hemoglobin concentration of 4.5 g/dl were noticed. Transfusion was started, and bedside abdominal ultrasound examination revealed free intraperitoneal fluid. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed liver injury with active extravasation from the cranial surface of the right lobe and a massive hemoperitoneum. The patient was coagulopathic and acidotic with a body temperature of 33.5 °C. A minimally invasive treatment strategy, including angiography and selective trans-catheter arterial embolization, were performed in combination with percutaneous evacuation of 4.5 L of intraperitoneal blood. After completion of these procedures, the patient was

  17. [Motor capacities involved in the psychomotor skills of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation technique: recommendations for the teaching-learning process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyadahira, A M

    2001-12-01

    It is a bibliographic study about the identification of the motor capacities involved in the psychomotor skills of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) which aims to obtain subsidies to the planning of the teaching-learning process of this skill. It was found that: the motor capacities involved in the psychomotor skill of the CPR technique are predominantly cognitive and motor, involving 9 perceptive-motor capacities and 8 physical proficiency capacities. The CPR technique is a psychomotor skill classified as open, done in series and categorized as a thin and global skill and the teaching-learning process of the CPR technique has an elevated degree of complexity.

  18. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation; use, training and self-confidence in skills. A self-report study among hospital personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopstock Laila A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immediate start of basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and early defibrillation have been highlighted as crucial for survival from cardiac arrest, but despite new knowledge, new technology and massive personnel training the survival rates from in-hospital cardiac arrest are still low. National guidelines recommend regular intervals of CPR training to make all hospital personnel able to perform basic CPR till advanced care is available. This study investigates CPR training, resuscitation experience and self-confidence in skills among hospital personnel outside critical care areas. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed at three Norwegian hospitals. Data on CPR training and CPR use were collected by self-reports from 361 hospital personnel. Results A total of 89% reported training in CPR, but only 11% had updated their skills in accordance with the time interval recommended by national guidelines. Real resuscitation experience was reported by one third of the respondents. Both training intervals and use of skills in resuscitation situations differed among the professions. Self-reported confidence decreased only after more than two years since last CPR training. Conclusion There is a gap between recommendations and reality in CPR training among hospital personnel working outside critical care areas.

  19. The Use of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation-Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Prolonged Cardiac Arrest in Pediatric Patients: Is it Time to Expand It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absi, Mohammed; Kumar, Susheel Tk; Sandhu, Hitesh

    2017-09-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was instituted as an aid to in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) nearly 23 years ago, this led to remarkable improvement in survival considering the mortality rate associated with conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Given this success, one begins to wonder whether the time has come for expanding the use of E-CPR to outside hospital cardiac arrests especially in the light of development of newer extracorporeal life support devices that are small, mobile, and easy to assemble. This editorial will review recent studies on this subject and address some key guidelines and limitations of this evolving and promising technology.

  20. Is increased positive end-expiratory pressure the culprit? Autoresuscitation in a 44-year-old man after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Hagmann, Henning; Oelmann, Katrin; Stangl, Robert; Michels, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Background The phenomenon of autoresuscitation is rare, yet it is known to most emergency physicians. However, the pathophysiology of the delayed return of spontaneous circulation remains enigmatic. Among other causes hyperinflation of the lungs and excessively high positive end-expiratory pressure have been suggested, but reports including cardiopulmonary monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are scarce to support this hypothesis. Case presentation We report a case of autoresuscita...

  1. Obstacles delaying the prompt deployment of piston-type mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation devices during emergency department resuscitation: a video-recording and time-motion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Edward Pei-Chuan; Wang, Hui-Chih; Ko, Patrick Chow-In; Chang, Anna Marie; Fu, Chia-Ming; Chen, Jiun-Wei; Liao, Yen-Chen; Liu, Hung-Chieh; Fang, Yao-De; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chiang, Wen-Chu; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2013-09-01

    The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is important to survival after cardiac arrest. Mechanical devices (MD) provide constant CPR, but their effectiveness may be affected by deployment timeliness. To identify the timeliness of the overall and of each essential step in the deployment of a piston-type MD during emergency department (ED) resuscitation, and to identify factors associated with delayed MD deployment by video recordings. Between December 2005 and December 2008, video clips from resuscitations with CPR sessions using a MD in the ED were reviewed using time-motion analyses. The overall deployment timeliness and the time spent on each essential step of deployment were measured. There were 37 CPR recordings that used a MD. Deployment of MD took an average 122.6 ± 57.8s. The 3 most time-consuming steps were: (1) setting the device (57.8 ± 38.3s), (2) positioning the patient (33.4 ± 38.0 s), and (3) positioning the device (14.7 ± 9.5s). Total no flow time was 89.1 ± 41.2s (72.7% of total time) and associated with the 3 most time-consuming steps. There was no difference in the total timeliness, no-flow time, and no-flow ratio between different rescuer numbers, time of day of the resuscitation, or body size of patients. Rescuers spent a significant amount of time on MD deployment, leading to long no-flow times. Lack of familiarity with the device and positioning strategy were associated with poor performance. Additional training in device deployment strategies are required to improve the benefits of mechanical CPR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of blind intubation through the I-gel and ILMA Fastrach by nurses during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissopoulou, Theodora; Stroumpoulis, Konstantinos; Sampanis, Michail A; Vrachnis, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Chalkias, Athanasios; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether nursing staff can successfully use the I-gel and the intubating laryngeal mask Fastrach (ILMA) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Although tracheal intubation is considered to be the optimal method for securing the airway during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, laryngoscopy requires a high level of skill. Forty five nurses inserted the I-gel and the ILMA in a manikin, with continuous and without chest compressions. Mean intubation times for the ILMA and I-gel without chest compressions were 20.60 ± 3.27 and 18.40 ± 3.26 s, respectively (p < 0.0005). ILMA proved more successful than the I-gel regardless of compressions. Continuation of compressions caused a prolongation in intubation times for both the I-gel (p < 0.0005) and the ILMA (p < 0.0005). In this mannequin study, nursing staff can successfully intubate using the I-gel and the ILMA as conduits with comparable success rates, regardless of whether chest compressions are interrupted or not. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of the impact of training of registered nurses in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a tertiary care centre on patient mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayureshkumar Pareek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Nurses should have cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR knowledge and skills to be able to implement effective interventions during in-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess mortality impact after nurses' CPR training with pre-CPR training data at our institute. Methods: Training regarding CPR was given to nurses, and CPR mortality 1-year before basic life support (BLS and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS training were collected and compared with post-training 1-year CPR mortality. Results: A total of 632 adult patients suffering in-hospital cardiac arrest over the study period. CPR was attempted in 294 patients during the pre-BLS/ACLS training period and in 338 patients in the post-BLS/ACLS training period. In the pre-BLS/ACLS training period, 58 patients (19.7% had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, while during the post-BLS/ACLS training period, 102 patients (30.1% had ROSC (P = 0.003. Sixteen of the 58 patients (27.5% who achieved ROSC during the pre-BLS/ACLS training period survived to hospital discharge, compared 54 out of 102 patients (52.9% in the post-BLS/ACLS training period (P < 0.0001. There was no significant association between either the age or sex with the outcomes in the study. Conclusion: Training nurses in cardiopulmonary resuscitation resulted in a significant improvement in survival to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrest.

  4. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation with defibrillation (ACPRD-C) among female hospital nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsing-Long; Lin, Mei-Hsiang; Ho, Chao-Chung; Fu, Chin-Hua; Koo, Malcolm

    2017-07-01

    Nurses are often the first responders to in-hospital cardiac emergencies. A positive attitude towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation with defibrillation may contribute to early cardiopulmonary resuscitation and rapid defibrillation, which are associated with enhanced long-term survival. The aim of this study was to translate and adapt the 31-item attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation with defibrillation and the national resuscitation guidelines (ACPRD) instrument into Chinese and to evaluate its psychometric properties in a sample of Taiwanese hospital nurses. The ACPRD instrument was translated into Chinese using professional translation services. Content validity index based on five experts to refine the translated instrument. The final instrument was applied to a sample of 290 female nurses, recruited from a regional hospital in southern Taiwan, to assess its internal consistency, factor structure, and discriminative validity. The Chinese ACPRD instrument showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.87). Seven factors emerged from the factor analysis. The instrument showed good discriminative validity and were able to differentiate the attitudes of nurses with more experience of defibrillation or cardiopulmonary resuscitation from those with less experience. Nurses working in emergency ward or intensive care unit also showed significantly higher overall scores compared to those working in other units. The Chinese ACPRD demonstrated adequate content validity, internal consistency, sensible factor structure, and good discriminative validity. Among Chinese-speaking nurses, it may be used as a tool for assessing the effectiveness of educational programs that aim to improve their confidence in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation with defibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploring virtual worlds for scenario-based repeated team training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt, Johan; Hedman, Leif; Medin, Christopher; Heinrichs, Wm LeRoy; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2010-09-03

    Contemporary learning technologies, such as massively multiplayer virtual worlds (MMVW), create new means for teaching and training. However, knowledge about the effectiveness of such training is incomplete, and there are no data regarding how students experience it. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a field within medicine in high demand for new and effective training modalities. In addition to finding a feasible way to implement CPR training, our aim was to investigate how a serious game setting in a virtual world using avatars would influence medical students' subjective experiences as well as their retention of knowledge. An MMVW was refined and used in a study to train 12 medical students in CPR in 3-person teams in a repeated fashion 6 months apart. An exit questionnaire solicited reflections over their experiences. As the subjects trained in 4 CPR scenarios, measurements of self-efficacy, concentration, and mental strain were made in addition to measuring knowledge. Engagement modes and coping strategies were also studied. Parametric and nonparametric statistical analyses were carried out according to distribution of the data. The majority of the subjects reported that they had enjoyed the training, had found it to be suitable, and had learned something new, although several asked for more difficult and complex scenarios as well as a richer virtual environment. The mean values for knowledge dropped during the 6 months from 8.0/10 to 6.25/10 (P = .002). Self-efficacy increased from before to after each of the two training sessions, from 5.9/7 to 6.5/7 (P = .01) after the first and from 6.0/7 to 6.7/7 (P = .03) after the second. The mean perceived concentration value increased from 54.2/100 to 66.6/100 (P = .006), and in general the mental strain was found to be low to moderate (mean = 2.6/10). Using scenario-based virtual world team training with avatars to train medical students in multi-person CPR was feasible and showed promising results. Although we

  6. Brief compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation training video and simulation with homemade mannequin improves CPR skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Gregory K; Osborne, Arayel; Greene, Charlotte H

    2016-11-29

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training has traditionally involved classroom-based courses or, more recently, home-based video self-instruction. These methods typically require preparation and purchase fee; which can dissuade many potential bystanders from receiving training. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching compression-only CPR to previously untrained individuals using our 6-min online CPR training video and skills practice on a homemade mannequin, reproduced by viewers with commonly available items (towel, toilet paper roll, t-shirt). Participants viewed the training video and practiced with the homemade mannequin. This was a parallel-design study with pre and post training evaluations of CPR skills (compression rate, depth, hand position, release), and hands-off time (time without compressions). CPR skills were evaluated using a sensor-equipped mannequin and two blinded CPR experts observed testing of participants. Twenty-four participants were included: 12 never-trained and 12 currently certified in CPR. Comparing pre and post training, the never-trained group had improvements in average compression rate per minute (64.3 to 103.9, p = 0.006), compressions with correct hand position in 1 min (8.3 to 54.3, p = 0.002), and correct compression release in 1 min (21.2 to 76.3, p 100/min), but an improved number of compressions with correct release (53.5 to 94.7, p 50 mm) remained problematic in both groups. Comparisons made between groups indicated significant improvements in compression depth, hand position, and hands-off time in never-trained compared to CPR-certified participants. Inter-rater agreement values were also calculated between the CPR experts and sensor-equipped mannequin. A brief internet-based video coupled with skill practice on a homemade mannequin improved compression-only CPR skills, especially in the previously untrained participants. This training method allows for widespread compression-only CPR

  7. Availability and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation information for Spanish-speaking population on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kirsten Y; Haukoos, Jason S; Sasson, Comilla

    2014-01-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a vital link in the chain of survival for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA); however, there are racial/ethnic disparities in the provision of bystander CPR. Approximately 32% of Hispanics perform CPR when confronted with cardiac arrest, whereas approximately 41% of non-Hispanics perform CPR. Public education, via the Internet, may be critical in improving the performance of bystander CPR among Hispanics. The objective of this study was to evaluate the availability and quality of CPR-related literature for primary Spanish-speaking individuals on the Internet. Two search engines (Google and Yahoo!) and a video-site (YouTube) were searched using the following terms: "resucitacion cardiopulmonar" and "reanimacion cardiopulmonar." Inclusion criteria were: education of CPR technique. Exclusion criteria were: instruction on pediatric CPR technique, failure to provide any instruction on CPR technique, or duplicated website. Data elements were collected on the content and quality of the websites and videos, such as assessing scene safety, verifying responsiveness, activating EMS, properly positioning hands on chest, performing accurate rate and depth of compressions. Of the 515 websites or videos screened, 116 met criteria for inclusion. The majority of websites (86%; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 79-92%) educated viewers on traditional bystander CPR (primarily, 30:2 CPR), while only 14% (95% CI 9-21%) taught hands-only CPR. Of websites that used video (N=62), 84% were conducted in Spanish and 16% in English. The quality of CPR education was generally poor (median score of 3/6, IQR of 3.0). Only half of websites properly educated on how to check responsiveness, activate EMS and position hands on chest. Eighty-eight percent of websites failed to educate viewers on assessing scene safety. The majority of websites had improper or no education on both rate and depth of compressions (59% and 63%, respectively). Only 16% of

  8. Evaluation of upper body muscle activity during cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waye, A. B.; Krygiel, R. G.; Susin, T. B.; Baptista, R.; Rehnberg, L.; Heidner, G. S.; de Campos, F.; Falcão, F. P.; Russomano, T.

    2013-09-01

    Performance of efficient single-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is vital to maintain cardiac and cerebral perfusion during the 2-4 min it takes for deployment of advanced life support during a space mission. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential differences in upper body muscle activity during CPR performance at terrestrial gravity (+1Gz) and in simulated microgravity (μG). Muscle activity of the triceps brachii, erector spinae, rectus abdominis and pectoralis major was measured via superficial electromyography in 20 healthy male volunteers. Four sets of 30 external chest compressions (ECCs) were performed on a mannequin. Microgravity was simulated using a body suspension device and harness; the Evetts-Russomano (ER) method was adopted for CPR performance in simulated microgravity. Heart rate and perceived exertion via Borg scores were also measured. While a significantly lower depth of ECCs was observed in simulated microgravity, compared with +1Gz, it was still within the target range of 40-50 mm. There was a 7.7% decrease of the mean (±SEM) ECC depth from 48 ± 0.3 mm at +1Gz, to 44.3 ± 0.5 mm during microgravity simulation (p < 0.001). No significant difference in number or rate of compressions was found between the two conditions. Heart rate displayed a significantly larger increase during CPR in simulated microgravity than at +1Gz, the former presenting a mean (±SEM) of 23.6 ± 2.91 bpm and the latter, 76.6 ± 3.8 bpm (p < 0.001). Borg scores were 70% higher post-microgravity compressions (17 ± 1) than post +1Gz compressions (10 ± 1) (p < 0.001). Intermuscular comparisons showed the triceps brachii to have significantly lower muscle activity than each of the other three tested muscles, in both +1Gz and microgravity. As shown by greater Borg scores and heart rate increases, CPR performance in simulated microgravity is more fatiguing than at +1Gz. Nevertheless, no significant difference in muscle activity between conditions

  9. Intrathoracic pressure regulation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a feasibility case-series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Nicolas; Parquette, Brent; Ziehr, Jonathon; Yannopoulos, Demetris; Lindstrom, David

    2013-04-01

    Intrathoracic pressure regulation (IPR) is a novel, noninvasive therapy intended to increase cardiac output and blood pressure in hypotensive states by generating a negative end expiratory pressure of -12 cm H2O between positive pressure ventilations. In this first feasibility case-series, we tested the hypothesis that IPR improves End tidal (ET) CO2 during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). ETCO2 was used as a surrogate measure for circulation. All patients were treated initially with manual CPR and an impedance threshold device (ITD). When IPR-trained medics arrived on scene the ITD was removed and an IPR device (CirQLATOR™) was attached to the patient's advanced airway (intervention group). The IPR device lowered airway pressures to -9 mmHg after each positive pressure ventilation for the duration of the expiratory phase. ETCO2, was measured using a capnometer incorporated into the defibrillator system (LifePak™). Values are expressed as mean ± SEM. Results were compared using paired and unpaired Student's t test. p values of <0.05 were considered statistically significant. ETCO2 values in 11 patients in the case series were compared pre and during IPR therapy and also compared to 74 patients in the control group not treated with the new IPR device. ETCO2 values increased from an average of 21 ± 1 mmHg immediately before IPR application to an average value of 32 ± 5 mmHg and to a maximum value of 45 ± 5mmHg during IPR treatment (p<0.001). In the control group ETCO2 values did not change significantly. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) rates were 46% (34/74) with standard CPR and ITD versus 73% (8/11) with standard CPR and the IPR device (p<0.001). ETCO2 levels and ROSC rates were significantly higher in the study intervention group. These findings demonstrate that during CPR circulation may be significantly augmented by generation of a negative end expiratory pressure between each breath. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  10. Basic life support skills of high school students before and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation training: a longitudinal investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Theresa M; Kloppe, Cordula; Hanefeld, Christoph

    2012-04-14

    Immediate bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) significantly improves survival after a sudden cardiopulmonary collapse. This study assessed the basic life support (BLS) knowledge and performance of high school students before and after CPR training. This study included 132 teenagers (mean age 14.6 ± 1.4 years). Students completed a two-hour training course that provided theoretical background on sudden cardiac death (SCD) and a hands-on CPR tutorial. They were asked to perform BLS on a manikin to simulate an SCD scenario before the training. Afterwards, participants encountered the same scenario and completed a questionnaire for self-assessment of their pre- and post-training confidence. Four months later, we assessed the knowledge retention rate of the participants with a BLS performance score. Before the training, 29.5% of students performed chest compressions as compared to 99.2% post-training (P training, respectively, P training, 99.2% stated that they felt confident about performing CPR, as compared to 26.9% (P training. BLS training in high school seems highly effective considering the minimal amount of previous knowledge the students possess. We observed significant improvement and a good retention rate four months after training. Increasing the number of trained students may minimize the reluctance to conduct bystander CPR and increase the number of positive outcomes after sudden cardiopulmonary collapse.

  11. Basic life support skills of high school students before and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation training: a longitudinal investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meissner Theresa M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immediate bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR significantly improves survival after a sudden cardiopulmonary collapse. This study assessed the basic life support (BLS knowledge and performance of high school students before and after CPR training. Methods This study included 132 teenagers (mean age 14.6 ± 1.4 years. Students completed a two-hour training course that provided theoretical background on sudden cardiac death (SCD and a hands-on CPR tutorial. They were asked to perform BLS on a manikin to simulate an SCD scenario before the training. Afterwards, participants encountered the same scenario and completed a questionnaire for self-assessment of their pre- and post-training confidence. Four months later, we assessed the knowledge retention rate of the participants with a BLS performance score. Results Before the training, 29.5% of students performed chest compressions as compared to 99.2% post-training (P P Conclusions BLS training in high school seems highly effective considering the minimal amount of previous knowledge the students possess. We observed significant improvement and a good retention rate four months after training. Increasing the number of trained students may minimize the reluctance to conduct bystander CPR and increase the number of positive outcomes after sudden cardiopulmonary collapse.

  12. Pre-recorded instructional audio vs. dispatchers’ conversational assistance in telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A randomized controlled simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkun, Alexei; Glotov, Maksim; Ndjamen, Herman Franklin; Alaiye, Esther; Adeleke, Temidara; Samarin, Sergey

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the effectiveness of the telephone chest-compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guided by a pre-recorded instructional audio when compared with dispatcher-assisted resuscitation. METHODS: It was a prospective, blind, randomised controlled study involving 109 medical students without previous CPR training. In a standardized mannequin scenario, after the step of dispatcher-assisted cardiac arrest recognition, the participants performed compression-only resuscitation guided over the telephone by either: (1) the pre-recorded instructional audio (n=57); or (2) verbal dispatcher assistance (n=52). The simulation video records were reviewed to assess the CPR performance using a 13-item checklist. The interval from call reception to the first compression, total number and rate of compressions, total number and duration of pauses after the first compression were also recorded. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the recording-assisted and dispatcher-assisted groups based on the overall performance score (5.6±2.2 vs. 5.1±1.9, P>0.05) or individual criteria of the CPR performance checklist. The recording-assisted group demonstrated significantly shorter time interval from call receipt to the first compression (86.0±14.3 vs. 91.2±14.2 s, PCPR. Future studies are warranted to further assess feasibility of using instructional audio aid as a potential alternative to dispatcher assistance.

  13. The effects of changes to the ERC resuscitation guidelines on no flow time and cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: a randomised controlled study on manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäntti, H; Kuisma, M; Uusaro, A

    2007-11-01

    The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines changed in 2005. We investigated the impact of these changes on no flow time and on the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Simulated cardiac arrest (CA) scenarios were managed randomly in manikins using ERC 2000 or 2005 guidelines. Pairs of paramedics/paramedic students treated 34 scenarios with 10min of continuous ventricular fibrillation. The rhythm was analysed and defibrillation shocks were delivered with a semi-automatic defibrillator, and breathing was assisted with a bag-valve-mask; no intravenous medication was given. Time factors related to human intervention and time factors related to device, rhythm analysis, charging and defibrillation were analysed for their contribution to no flow time (time without chest compression). Chest compression quality was also analysed. No flow time (mean+/-S.D.) was 66+/-3% of CA time with ERC 2000 and 32+/-4% with ERC 2005 guidelines (PERC 2000) versus 107+/-4s (ERC 2005) during 600-s scenarios (P=0.237). Device factor interventions took longer using ERC 2000 guidelines: 290+/-19s versus 92+/-15s (PERC 2005 guidelines (808+/-92s versus 458+/-90s, P<0.001), but the quality of CPR did not differ between the groups. The use of a single shock sequence with guidelines 2005 has decreased the no flow time during CPR when compared with guidelines 2000 with multiple shocks.

  14. Prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Folke, Fredrik; Kragholm, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: It is unclear whether prolonged resuscitation can result in successful outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA). We assessed associations between duration of pre-hospital resuscitation on survival and functional outcome following OHCA in patients achieving pre-hospital return...

  15. Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of Automated External Defibrillators by laypersons in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using an SMS alert service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Annemieke C.; van Manen, Jeanette Gabrielle; van der Worp, Wim E.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate an SMS service (SMS = short message service = text message) with which laypersons are alerted to go to patients with suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and perform early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). This study is the

  16. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana hospitals: Nurse managers’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Rajeswaran

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accident victims, as well as persons experiencing cardiac and other medical emergencies, might lose their lives due to the non-availability of trained personnel to provide effective cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR with functional equipment and adequate resources. The objectives of the study were to identify unit managers’ perceptions about challenges encountered when performing CPR interventions in the two referral public hospitals in Botswana. These results could be used to recommend more effective CPR strategies for Botswana’s hospitals. Interviews, comprising two quantitative sections with closed ended questions and one qualitative section with semi-structured questions, were conducted with 22 unit managers. The quantitative data indicated that all unit managers had at least eight years’ nursing experience, and could identify CPR shortcomings in their hospitals. Only one interviewee had never performed CPR. The qualitative data analysis revealed that the hospital units sometimes had too few staff members and did not have fully equipped emergency trolleys and/or equipment. No CPR teams and no CPR policies and guidelines existed. Nurses and doctors reportedly lacked CPR knowledge and skills. No debriefing services were provided after CPR encounters. The participating hospitals should address the following challenges that might affect CPR outcomes: shortages of staff, overpopulation of hospital units, shortcomings of the emergency trolleys and CPR equipment, absence of CPR policies and guidelines, absence of CPR teams, limited CPR competencies of doctors and nurses and the lack of debriefing sessions after CPR attempts. Die slagoffers van padongelukke, asook persone wat hart- en ander mediese noodtoestande ervaar, kan hulle lewens verloor omdat daar nie opgeleide personeel met funksionele toerusting en voldoende hulpbronne beskikbaar is om effektiewe kardiopulmonale resussitasie (KPR te doen nie. Die studie het ten doel

  17. Cultural and ethical considerations for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in chinese patients with cancer at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Meng-Lei; Gu, Xiao-Li; Liu, Ming-Hui; Cheng, Wen-Wu

    2015-03-01

    End-of-life (EOL) decision making is based on the values and wishes of terminally ill patients. However, little is known on the extent to which cultural factors affect personal attitudes toward life-sustaining treatments (LSTs) such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in China. This study evaluated the cultural and ethical considerations during EOL decisions and assessed the factors that affect pursuing LSTs in China. We used a case-control study design and compared their baseline characteristics with the provided EOL care and treatments. The CPR treatment among patients with cancer at EOL was affected by Chinese family traditions and Western influences. Our results reflect the need to improve EOL care and treatment in China. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. The effect of formal training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR skills on medical students perceived self-sufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaghaghi A

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Experience of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in real clinical setting is not easily possible for all medical students. Purpose: To assess medical student perceived self-sufficiency on three procedural skill on internship courses after they had taken a training course in clerkship period. Methods: Forty three medical students who had attended a workshop on CPR, tracheal intubations and venopuncture answered the questionnaires on their perceived self-sufficiency in performing these procedures after serving a few months as interns. Results: The mean score for perceived self-sufficiency (PSS was 75.84 (±18.63.Thre were a high correlation between the score given for the applicability of training in real life situation and the stress reduction scores on first time performing the procedure. Conclusion: The high degree of correlation between PSS scores and applicability scores, may warrant the consideration of new methods in procedural skills. Keywords: SKILL TRAINING, CPR TRAINING, PERCEIVED SELF-SUFFICIENCY

  19. Lay bystanders' perspectives on what facilitates cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of automated external defibrillators in real cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rosenkranz, Simone Mørk; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    is crucial in improving survival, cannot cause substantial harm, and that the AED will provide guidance through CPR; prior hands-on training in AED use; during CPR performance, teamwork (ie, support), using the AED voice prompt and a ventilation mask, as well as demonstrating leadership and feeling a moral......BACKGROUND: Many patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest will fail to receive bystander intervention (cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR] or defibrillation) despite widespread CPR training and the dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). We sought to investigate what......, until data saturation. We used cross-sectional indexing (using software), and inductive in-depth thematic analyses, to identify those factors that facilitated CPR and AED use. In addition to prior hands-on CPR training, the following were described as facilitators: prior knowledge that intervention...

  20. Lay Bystanders' Perspectives on What Facilitates Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Use of Automated External Defibrillators in Real Cardiac Arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rosenkranz, Simone Mørk; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest will fail to receive bystander intervention (cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR] or defibrillation) despite widespread CPR training and the dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). We sought to investigate what...... factors encourage lay bystanders to initiate CPR and AED use in a cohort of bystanders previously trained in CPR techniques who were present at an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS AND RESULTS: One-hundred and twenty-eight semistructured qualitative interviews with CPR-trained lay bystanders...... to consecutive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, where an AED was present were conducted (from January 2012 to April 2015, in Denmark). Purposive maximum variation sampling was used to establish the breadth of the bystander perspective. Twenty-six of the 128 interviews were chosen for further in-depth analyses...

  1. Effectiveness of chest compression feedback during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in lateral tilted and semirecumbent positions: a randomised controlled simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y; Oh, J; Chee, Y; Cho, Y; Lee, S; Lim, T H

    2015-11-01

    Feedback devices have been shown to improve the quality of chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients in the supine position, but no studies have reported the effects of feedback devices on chest compression when the chest is tilted. Basic life support-trained providers were randomly assigned to administer chest compressions to a manikin in the supine, 30° left lateral tilt and 30° semirecumbent positions, with or without the aid of a feedback device incorporated into a smartphone. Thirty-six participants were studied. The feedback device did not affect the quality of chest compressions in the supine position, but improved aspects of performance in the tilted positions. In the lateral tilted position, the median (IQR [range]) chest compression rate was 99 (99-100 [96-117]) compressions.min(-1) with and 115 (95-128 [77-164]) compressions.min(-1) without feedback (p = 0.05), and the proportion of compressions of correct depth was 55 (0-96 [0-100])% with and 1 (0-30 [0-100])% without feedback (p = 0.03). In the semirecumbent position, the proportion of compressions of correct depth was 21 (0-87 [0-100])% with and 1 (0-26 [0-100])% without feedback (p = 0.05). Female participants applied chest compressions at a more accurate rate using the feedback device in the lateral tilted position but were unable to increase the chest compression depth, whereas male participants were able to increase the force of chest compression using the feedback device in the lateral tilted and semirecumbent positions. We conclude that a feedback device improves the application of chest compressions during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation when the chest is tilted. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  2. Simulation exercise to improve retention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation priorities for in-hospital cardiac arrests: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Nancy J; Duval-Arnould, Jordan; Twilley, Marida; Smith, Sarah P; Aksamit, Deborah; Boone-Guercio, Pam; Jeffries, Pamela R; Hunt, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Traditional American Heart Association (AHA) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum focuses on teams of two performing quality chest compressions with rescuers on their knees but does not include training specific to In-Hospital Cardiac Arrests (IHCA), i.e. patient in hospital bed with large resuscitation teams and sophisticated technology available. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with the primary goal of evaluating the effectiveness and ideal frequency of in-situ training on time elapsed from call for help to; (1) initiation of chest compressions and (2) successful defibrillation in IHCA. Non-intensive care unit nurses were randomized into four groups: standard AHA training (C) and three groups that participated in 15 min in-situ IHCA training sessions every two (2M), three (3M) or six months (6M). Curriculum included specific choreography for teams to achieve immediate chest compressions, high chest compression fractions and rapid defibrillation while incorporating use of a backboard, stepstool. More frequent training was associated with decreased median (IQR) seconds to: starting compressions: [C: 33(25-40) vs. 6M: 21(15-26) vs. 3M: 14(10-20) vs. 2M: 13(9-20); p training sessions: [C:5%(1/18) vs. 6M: 23%(4/17) vs. 3M: 56%(9/16) vs. 2M: 73%(11/15); p training sessions conducted every 3 months are effective in improving timely initiation of chest compressions and defibrillation in IHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of Iranian nurses and emergency medical personnel in terms of cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge based on the 2010 guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Pourmirza Kalhori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR knowledge of hospital nurses and emergency medical personnel in Kermanshah, Iran. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 330 hospital nurses and 159 emergency medical personnel working in educational hospitals and emergency medical centers in Kermanshah. Data were collected using a validated and reliable (r = 0.74 researcher-made questionnaire consisting of a demographic characteristics questionnaire and the 2010 CPR knowledge questionnaire. Results: Based on the most recent CPR guidelines, the knowledge of 19.5%, 78.6%, and 1.9% of the emergency medical staff was excellent, good, and moderate, respectively. None of the participants had poor knowledge. In addition, the knowledge of 20.2%, 65.4%, 14%, and 0.4% of the nurses in this study was excellent, good, moderate, and poor, respectively. There was no significant difference in CPR knowledge between hospital nurses and emergency medical staff. Moreover, no significant association was found between CPR knowledge and gender, age, work experience, field of study, previous occupation, and advanced resuscitation courses. However, CPR knowledge of individuals with training in basic CPR courses was higher than participants without training in these courses (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Based on the findings of this study, CPR knowledge among Iranian nurses and emergency medical personnel was in an acceptable range. Nevertheless, it is strongly recommended that nurses and emergency staff receive training according to the most recent CPR guidelines.

  4. End-tidal CO2 Detection of an Audible Heart Rate During Neonatal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Following Asystole in Asphyxiated Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalak, Lina F.; Barber, Chad A.; Hynan, Linda; Garcia, Damian; Christie, Lucy; Wyckoff, Myra H.

    2011-01-01

    Even brief interruption of cardiac compressions significantly reduces critical coronary perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) monitoring may provide a continuous non-invasive method of assessing return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) without stopping to auscultate for heart rate (HR). However, the ETCO2 value that correlates with an audible HR is unknown. Our objective was to determine the threshold ETCO2 that is associated with ROSC following asphyxia-induced asystole. Neonatal swine (n=46) were progressively asphyxiated until asystole occurred. Resuscitation followed current neonatal guidelines with initial ventilation with 100% O2 followed by cardiac compressions followed by epinephrine for continued asystole. HR was auscultated every 30 sec and ETCO2 was continuously recorded. A receiver operator curve was generated using the calculated sensitivity and specificity for various ETCO2 values where a positive test was defined as the presence of HR >60 bpm by auscultation. An ETCO2 cut off value of 14 mmHg is the most sensitive ETCO2 value with the least false positives. When using ETCO2 to guide uninterrupted CPR in this model of asphyxia-induced asystole, auscultative confirmation of return of an adequate HR should be performed when ETCO2 ≥14 mmHg is achieved. Correlation during human neonatal CPR needs further investigation. PMID:21283051

  5. End-tidal CO₂ detection of an audible heart rate during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation after asystole in asphyxiated piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalak, Lina F; Barber, Chad A; Hynan, Linda; Garcia, Damian; Christie, Lucy; Wyckoff, Myra H

    2011-05-01

    Even brief interruption of cardiac compressions significantly reduces critical coronary perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). End-tidal CO₂ (ETCO₂) monitoring may provide a continuous noninvasive method of assessing return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) without stopping to auscultate for heart rate (HR). However, the ETCO₂ value that correlates with an audible HR is unknown. Our objective was to determine the threshold ETCO₂ that is associated with ROSC after asphyxia-induced asystole. Neonatal swine (n = 46) were progressively asphyxiated until asystole occurred. Resuscitation followed current neonatal guidelines with initial ventilation with 100% O₂ followed by cardiac compressions followed by epinephrine for continued asystole. HR was auscultated every 30 s, and ETCO₂ was continuously recorded. A receiver operator curve was generated using the calculated sensitivity and specificity for various ETCO₂ values, where a positive test was defined as the presence of HR >60 bpm by auscultation. An ETCO₂ cut-off value of 14 mm Hg is the most sensitive ETCO₂ value with the least false positives. When using ETCO₂ to guide uninterrupted CPR in this model of asphyxia-induced asystole, auscultative confirmation of return of an adequate HR should be performed when ETCO₂ ≥ 14 mm Hg is achieved. Correlation during human neonatal CPR needs further investigation.

  6. Efficacy of Feed Forward and Feedback Signaling for Inflations and Chest Compression Pressure During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Newborn Mannequin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriessen, Peter; Oetomo, Sidarto Bambang; Chen, Wei; Feijs, Loe MG

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to evaluate a device that supports professionals during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The device features a box that generates an audio-prompted rate guidance (feed forward) for inflations and compressions, and a transparent foil that is placed over the chest with marks for inter nipple line and sternum with LED’s incorporated in the foil indicating the exerted force (feedback). Methods Ten pairs (nurse/doctor) performed CPR on a newborn resuscitation mannequin. All pairs initially performed two sessions. Thereafter two sessions were performed in similar way, after randomization in 5 pairs that used the device and 5 pairs that performed CPR without the device (controls). A rhythm score was calculated based on the number of CPR cycles that were performed correctly. Results The rhythm score with the device improved from 85 ± 14 to 99 ± 2% (P CPR device compared to the controls. Conclusion Feed forward and feedback signaling leads to a more constant rhythm and chest compression pressure during CPR. PMID:22870175

  7. Randomized controlled trial of a video decision support tool for cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision making in advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volandes, Angelo E; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Mitchell, Susan L; El-Jawahri, Areej; Davis, Aretha Delight; Barry, Michael J; Hartshorn, Kevan L; Jackson, Vicki Ann; Gillick, Muriel R; Walker-Corkery, Elizabeth S; Chang, Yuchiao; López, Lenny; Kemeny, Margaret; Bulone, Linda; Mann, Eileen; Misra, Sumi; Peachey, Matt; Abbo, Elmer D; Eichler, April F; Epstein, Andrew S; Noy, Ariela; Levin, Tomer T; Temel, Jennifer S

    2013-01-20

    Decision making regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is challenging. This study examined the effect of a video decision support tool on CPR preferences among patients with advanced cancer. We performed a randomized controlled trial of 150 patients with advanced cancer from four oncology centers. Participants in the control arm (n = 80) listened to a verbal narrative describing CPR and the likelihood of successful resuscitation. Participants in the intervention arm (n = 70) listened to the identical narrative and viewed a 3-minute video depicting a patient on a ventilator and CPR being performed on a simulated patient. The primary outcome was participants' preference for or against CPR measured immediately after exposure to either modality. Secondary outcomes were participants' knowledge of CPR (score range of 0 to 4, with higher score indicating more knowledge) and comfort with video. The mean age of participants was 62 years (standard deviation, 11 years); 49% were women, 44% were African American or Latino, and 47% had lung or colon cancer. After the verbal narrative, in the control arm, 38 participants (48%) wanted CPR, 41 (51%) wanted no CPR, and one (1%) was uncertain. In contrast, in the intervention arm, 14 participants (20%) wanted CPR, 55 (79%) wanted no CPR, and 1 (1%) was uncertain (unadjusted odds ratio, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.7 to 7.2; P advanced cancer who viewed a video of CPR were less likely to opt for CPR than those who listened to a verbal narrative.

  8. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and opinions on end of life decision making of older adults admitted to an acute medical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rupali; Jayathissa, Sisira; Weatherall, Mark

    2016-01-08

    To determine the knowledge in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) process, preference for CPR, and desire to participate in end-of-life decision making amongst older hospitalised patients. We prospectively interviewed 100 participants above 65 years of age awaiting discharge from acute medical ward and collected demographics, knowledge of CPR and opinion on CPR in various clinical scenarios. Amongst the participants, 58% had good understanding of all components of CPR and 91% overestimated its success. Fifty-eight percent wished to have CPR in current health status, but this declined if they were presented a hypothetical scenario of critical illness (46%), functional impairment (17%), terminal illness (13%) and dementia (13%). Tertiary education, male gender and not living alone were associated with accepting CPR. Ninety-three percent were comfortable discussing CPR and 84% felt comfortable documenting their wishes in the medical notes. Seventy percent wished such discussion to include themselves and their family. Older inpatients have a reasonable understanding of the components of CPR and wish to be involved in CPR decision-making. Clinical scenarios with poor prognosis may lead to patients declining CPR. Discussion and documentation of resuscitation wishes is useful in routine assessment process among elderly hospitalised patients.

  9. Survival of the very-low-birth-weight infants after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostelanetz, Anna S; Dhanireddy, Ramasubbareddy

    2004-05-01

    To assess whether advances in neonatal care in the last decade have altered the outcome of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Medical records of all VLBW infants (n=283, body weight (BW)=1066+/-281 g, gestational age (GA)=28.3+/-2.9 weeks) admitted to the NICU between 1999 and 2002 were reviewed. In all, 29 (10.25%) infants received CPR in the NICU. Only one of these infants survived. After adjusting for GA, the clinical variables significantly associated with the need for CPR in the NICU were (adjusted odds ratio; 95% CI): pulmonary hemorrhage (7.89; 3.06 to 20.28), pulmonary air leak syndrome (23.90; 7.58 to 75.4), and delivery by Cesarian section (0.26; 0.1 to 0.66). The results were similar when the data were reanalyzed matching the 28 infants in the CPR group with 28 infants of identical GA in the non-CPR group. Survival rate for the infants who require CPR in the NICU remains extremely poor. This poor outcome needs to be discussed with parents and the option of the "do not resuscitate" (DNR) order may be appropriate for these infants, especially for those infants with multiple organ failure unresponsive to therapy.

  10. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automatic external defibrillator training in schools: "is anyone learning how to save a life?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Devin; Flores-Medrano, Oscar; Brooks, Steve; Buick, Jason E; Morrison, Laurie J

    2013-09-01

    Bystander resuscitation efforts, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use of an automatic external defibrillator (AED), save lives in cardiac arrest cases. School training in CPR and AED use may increase the currently low community rates of bystander resuscitation. The study objective was to determine the rates of CPR and AED training in Toronto secondary schools and to identify barriers to training and training techniques. This prospective study consisted of telephone interviews conducted with key school staff knowledgeable about CPR and AED teaching. An encrypted Web-based tool with prespecified variables and built-in logic was employed to standardize data collection. Of 268 schools contacted, 93% were available for interview and 83% consented to participate. Students and staff were trained in CPR in 51% and 80% of schools, respectively. Private schools had the lowest training rate (39%). Six percent of schools provided AED training to students and 47% provided AED training to staff. Forty-eight percent of schools had at least one AED installed, but 25% were unaware if their AED was registered with emergency services dispatch. Cost (17%), perceived need (11%), and school population size (10%) were common barriers to student training. Frequently employed training techniques were interactive (32%), didactic instruction (30%) and printed material (16%). CPR training rates for staff and students were moderate overall and lowest in private schools, whereas training rates in AED use were poor in all schools. Identified barriers to training include cost and student population size (perceived to be too small to be cost-effective or too large to be implemented). Future studies should assess the application of convenient and cost-effective teaching alternatives not presently in use.

  11. End-tidal carbon dioxide output in manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation versus active compression-decompression device during prehospital quality controlled resuscitation: a case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setälä, Piritta Anniina; Virkkunen, Ilkka Tapani; Kämäräinen, Antti Jaakko; Huhtala, Heini Sisko Annamari; Virta, Janne Severi; Yli-Hankala, Arvi Mikael; Hoppu, Sanna Elisa

    2018-05-16

    Active compression-decompression (ACD) devices have enhanced end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO 2 ) output in experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) studies. However, the results in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients have shown inconsistent outcomes, and earlier studies lacked quality control of CPR attempts. We compared manual CPR with ACD-CPR by measuring ETCO 2 output using an audiovisual feedback defibrillator to ensure continuous high quality resuscitation attempts. 10 witnessed OHCAs were resuscitated, rotating a 2 min cycle with manual CPR and a 2 min cycle of ACD-CPR. Patients were intubated and the ventilation rate was held constant during CPR. CPR quality parameters and ETCO 2 values were collected continuously with the defibrillator. Differences in ETCO 2 output between manual CPR and ACD-CPR were analysed using a linear mixed model where ETCO 2 output produced by a summary of the 2 min cycles was included as the dependent variable, the patient as a random factor and method as a fixed effect. These comparisons were made within each OHCA case to minimise confounding factors between the cases. Mean length of the CPR episodes was 37 (SD 8) min. Mean compression depth was 76 (SD 1.3) mm versus 71 (SD1.0) mm, and mean compression rate was 100 per min (SD 6.7) versus 105 per min (SD 4.9) between ACD-CPR and manual CPR, respectively. For ETCO 2 output, the interaction between the method and the patient was significant (P<0.001). ETCO 2 output was higher with manual CPR in 6 of the 10 cases. This study suggests that quality controlled ACD-CPR is not superior to quality controlled manual CPR when ETCO 2 is used as a quantitative measure of CPR effectiveness. NCT00951704; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Resuscitation training.

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, A.

    1995-01-01

    All physicians, dentists, nurses and health care personnel should be adequately and regularly trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Guidelines for acquiring the necessary skills in basic and advanced life support are now available.

  13. 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of pediatric and neonatal patients: pediatric basic life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    This publication presents the 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of the pediatric patient and the 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics/AHA guidelines for CPR and ECC of the neonate. The guidelines are based on the evidence evaluation from the 2005 International Consensus Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations, hosted by the American Heart Association in Dallas, Texas, January 23-30, 2005. The "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" contain recommendations designed to improve survival from sudden cardiac arrest and acute life-threatening cardiopulmonary problems. The evidence evaluation process that was the basis for these guidelines was accomplished in collaboration with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). The ILCOR process is described in more detail in the "International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations." The recommendations in the "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" confirm the safety and effectiveness of many approaches, acknowledge that other approaches may not be optimal, and recommend new treatments that have undergone evidence evaluation. These new recommendations do not imply that care involving the use of earlier guidelines is unsafe. In addition, it is important to note that these guidelines will not apply to all rescuers and all victims in all situations. The leader of a resuscitation attempt may need to adapt application of the guidelines to unique circumstances. The following are the major pediatric advanced life support changes in the 2005 guidelines: There is further caution about the use of endotracheal tubes. Laryngeal mask airways are acceptable when used by experienced

  14. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Renata Maria de Oliveira; Campanharo, Cássia Regina Vancini; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-11-21

    to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60) was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condition before cardiac arrest, the immediate cause, initial arrest rhythm, whether epinephrine was used, and the duration of CPR. The case group (n=51) received conventional CPR guided by a metronome set at 110 beats/min. Chi-square and likelihood ratio were used to compare ROSC rates considering p≤0.05. ROSC occurred in 57.7% of the cases, though 92.8% of these patients died in the following 24 hours. No statistically significant difference was found between groups in regard to ROSC (p=0.2017) or the occurrence of death (p=0.8112). the outcomes of patients after cardiac arrest with and without the use of a metronome during CPR were similar and no differences were found between groups in regard to survival rates and ROSC. comparar a taxa de retorno da circulação espontânea e óbito após parada cardiorrespiratória, com e sem a utilização do metrônomo durante ressuscitação cardiopulmonar. estudo caso-controle aninhado a estudo de coorte, com 285 adultos atendidos em parada cardíaca em um serviço de emergência e submetidos à ressuscitação cardiopulmonar. Os dados foram coletados por meio do In-hospital Utstein Style. O grupo controle (n=60) foi selecionado pelo pareamento dos pacientes considerando-se o estado neurológico pré-parada cardiorrespiratória, causa imediata e ritmo inicial da parada, utilização de epinefrina e duração da ressuscitação. O grupo caso (n=51) foi submetido à ressuscitação cardiopulmonar convencional com a utilização do metrônomo a 110sons/min. Para comparar

  15. Implementation of a High-Performance Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol at a Collegiate Emergency Medical Services Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefos, Kathryn A.; Nable, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a significant public health issue. Although OHCA occurs relatively infrequently in the collegiate environment, educational institutions with on-campus emergency medical services (EMS) agencies are uniquely positioned to provide high-quality resuscitation care in an expedient fashion. Georgetown University's…

  16. Smartphone Apps for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training and Real Incident Support: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Lenssen, Niklas; Felzen, Marco; Rossaint, Rolf; Tabuenca, Bernardo; Specht, Marcus; Skorning, Max

    2014-01-01

    Background: No systematic evaluation of smartphone/mobile apps for resuscitation training and real incident support is available to date. To provide medical, usability, and additional quality criteria for the development of apps, we conducted a mixed-methods sequential evaluation combining the

  17. The prevalence of chest compression leaning during in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, David A.; Leary, Marion; Smith, Douglas A.; Sutton, Robert M.; Niles, Dana; Herzberg, Daniel L.; Becker, Lance B.; Abella, Benjamin S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest requires the delivery of high-quality chest compressions, encompassing parameters such as adequate rate, depth, and full recoil between compressions. The lack of compression recoil (“leaning” or “incomplete recoil”) has been shown to adversely affect hemodynamics in experimental arrest models, but the prevalence of leaning during actual resuscitation is poorly understood. We hypothesized that leaning varies across resuscitation events, possibly due to rescuer and/or patient characteristics and may worsen over time from rescuer fatigue during continuous chest compressions. Methods This was an observational clinical cohort study at one academic medical center. Data were collected from adult in-hospital and Emergency Department arrest events using monitor/defibrillators that record chest compression characteristics and provide real-time feedback. Results We analyzed 112,569 chest compressions from 108 arrest episodes from 5/2007 to 2/2009. Leaning was present in 98/108 (91%) cases; 12% of all compressions exhibited leaning. Leaning varied widely across cases: 41/108 (38%) of arrest episodes exhibited 20% compression leaning. When evaluating blocks of continuous compressions (>120 sec), only 4/33 (12%) had an increase in leaning over time and 29/33 (88%) showed a decrease (presuscitation care and exhibited a wide distribution, with most leaning within a subset of resuscitations. Leaning decreased over time during continuous chest compression blocks, suggesting that either leaning may not be a function of rescuer fatiguing, or that it may have been mitigated by automated feedback provided during resuscitation episodes. PMID:21482010

  18. Adherence to AHA Guidelines When Adapted for Augmented Reality Glasses for Assisted Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Johan N; Ehrler, Frederic; Gervaix, Alain; Haddad, Kevin; Lacroix, Laurence; Schrurs, Philippe; Sahin, Ayhan; Lovis, Christian; Manzano, Sergio

    2017-05-29

    The American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are nowadays recognized as the world's most authoritative resuscitation guidelines. Adherence to these guidelines optimizes the management of critically ill patients and increases their chances of survival after cardiac arrest. Despite their availability, suboptimal quality of CPR is still common. Currently, the median hospital survival rate after pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest is 36%, whereas it falls below 10% for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Among emerging information technologies and devices able to support caregivers during resuscitation and increase adherence to AHA guidelines, augmented reality (AR) glasses have not yet been assessed. In order to assess their potential, we adapted AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) guidelines for AR glasses. The study aimed to determine whether adapting AHA guidelines for AR glasses increased adherence by reducing deviation and time to initiation of critical life-saving maneuvers during pediatric CPR when compared with the use of PALS pocket reference cards. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with two parallel groups of voluntary pediatric residents, comparing AR glasses to PALS pocket reference cards during a simulation-based pediatric cardiac arrest scenario-pulseless ventricular tachycardia (pVT). The primary outcome was the elapsed time in seconds in each allocation group, from onset of pVT to the first defibrillation attempt. Secondary outcomes were time elapsed to (1) initiation of chest compression, (2) subsequent defibrillation attempts, and (3) administration of drugs, as well as the time intervals between defibrillation attempts and drug doses, shock doses, and number of shocks. All these outcomes were assessed for deviation from AHA guidelines. Twenty residents were randomized into 2 groups. Time to first defibrillation attempt (mean: 146 s) and adherence to AHA guidelines in terms of time to other

  19. Induction of a shorter compression phase is correlated with a deeper chest compression during metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Bae, Jinkun; Kim, Eui Chung; Cho, Yun Kyung; You, Je Sung; Choi, Sung Wook; Kim, Ok Jun

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that there may be an interaction between duty cycle and other factors related to the quality of chest compression. Duty cycle represents the fraction of compression phase. We aimed to investigate the effect of shorter compression phase on average chest compression depth during metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Senior medical students performed 12 sets of chest compressions following the guiding sounds, with three down-stroke patterns (normal, fast and very fast) and four rates (80, 100, 120 and 140 compressions/min) in random sequence. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare the average chest compression depth and duty cycle among the trials. The average chest compression depth increased and the duty cycle decreased in a linear fashion as the down-stroke pattern shifted from normal to very fast (pmetronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  20. Effect of the rate of chest compression familiarised in previous training on the depth of chest compression during metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomised crossover trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Jinkun; Chung, Tae Nyoung; Je, Sang Mo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess how the quality of metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was affected by the chest compression rate familiarised by training before the performance and to determine a possible mechanism for any effect shown. Design Prospective crossover trial of a simulated, one-person, chest-compression-only CPR. Setting Participants were recruited from a medical school and two paramedic schools of South Korea. Participants 42 senior students of a medical school and two pa...

  1. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions-A nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2010-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...... providers assisted by paramedics, nurse anesthetists or physician-manned ambulances (Advanced Life Support (ALS) capability) in a nationwide, unselected cohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases....

  2. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions--a nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2011-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...... providers assisted by paramedics, nurse anesthetists or physician-manned ambulances (Advanced Life Support (ALS) capability) in a nationwide, unselected cohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases....

  3. Evaluation of an impedance threshold device in patients receiving active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, Patrick; Lurie, Keith G; Vicaut, Eric; Martin, Dominique; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; Petit, Jean-Luc; Payen, Didier

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this multicentre clinical randomized controlled blinded prospective trial was to determine whether an inspiratory impedance threshold device (ITD), when used in combination with active compression-decompression (ACD) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), would improve survival rates in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Patients were randomized to receive either a sham (n = 200) or an active impedance threshold device (n = 200) during advanced cardiac life support performed with active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The primary endpoint of this study was 24 h survival. The 24 h survival rates were 44/200 (22%) with the sham valve and 64/200 (32%) with the active valve (P = 0.02). The number of patients who had a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and hospital discharge rates was 77 (39%), 57 (29%), and 8 (4%) in the sham valve group versus 96 (48%) (P = 0.05), 79 (40%) (P = 0.02), and 10 (5%) (P = 0.6) in the active valve group. Six out of ten survivors in the active valve group and 1/8 survivors in the sham group had normal neurological function at hospital discharge (P = 0.1). The use of an impedance valve in patients receiving active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest significantly improved 24 h survival rates.

  4. Improving cardiopulmonary resuscitation with a CPR feedback device and refresher simulations (CPR CARES Study): a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Brown, Linda L; Duff, Jonathan P; Davidson, Jennifer; Overly, Frank; Tofil, Nancy M; Peterson, Dawn T; White, Marjorie L; Bhanji, Farhan; Bank, Ilana; Gottesman, Ronald; Adler, Mark; Zhong, John; Grant, Vincent; Grant, David J; Sudikoff, Stephanie N; Marohn, Kimberly; Charnovich, Alex; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Kessler, David O; Wong, Hubert; Robertson, Nicola; Lin, Yiqun; Doan, Quynh; Duval-Arnould, Jordan M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2015-02-01

    The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) affects hemodynamics, survival, and neurological outcomes following pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). Most health care professionals fail to perform CPR within established American Heart Association guidelines. To determine whether "just-in-time" (JIT) CPR training with visual feedback (VisF) before CPA or real-time VisF during CPA improves the quality of chest compressions (CCs) during simulated CPA. Prospective, randomized, 2 × 2 factorial-design trial with explicit methods (July 1, 2012, to April 15, 2014) at 10 International Network for Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research, & Education (INSPIRE) institutions running a standardized simulated CPA scenario, including 324 CPR-certified health care professionals assigned to 3-person resuscitation teams (108 teams). Each team was randomized to 1 of 4 permutations, including JIT training vs no JIT training before CPA and real-time VisF vs no real-time VisF during simulated CPA. The proportion of CCs with depth exceeding 50 mm, the proportion of CPR time with a CC rate of 100 to 120 per minute, and CC fraction (percentage CPR time) during simulated CPA. The quality of CPR was poor in the control group, with 12.7% (95% CI, 5.2%-20.1%) mean depth compliance and 27.1% (95% CI, 14.2%-40.1%) mean rate compliance. JIT training compared with no JIT training improved depth compliance by 19.9% (95% CI, 11.1%-28.7%; P 89.0%) in all groups. Combining both interventions showed the highest compliance with American Heart Association guidelines but was not significantly better than either intervention in isolation. The quality of CPR provided by health care professionals is poor. Using novel and practical technology, JIT training before CPA or real-time VisF during CPA, alone or in combination, improves compliance with American Heart Association guidelines for CPR that are associated with better outcomes. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02075450.

  5. A Turbine-Driven Ventilator Improves Adherence to Advanced Cardiac Life Support Guidelines During a Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Scott G; Brewer, Lara; Gillis, Erik S; Pace, Nathan L; Sakata, Derek J; Orr, Joseph A

    2017-09-01

    Research has shown that increased breathing frequency during cardiopulmonary resuscitation is inversely correlated with systolic blood pressure. Rescuers often hyperventilate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Current American Heart Association advanced cardiac life support recommends a ventilation rate of 8-10 breaths/min. We hypothesized that a small, turbine-driven ventilator would allow rescuers to adhere more closely to advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines. Twenty-four ACLS-certified health-care professionals were paired into groups of 2. Each team performed 4 randomized rounds of 2-min cycles of CPR on an intubated mannikin, with individuals altering between compressions and breaths. Two rounds of CPR were performed with a self-inflating bag, and 2 rounds were with the ventilator. The ventilator was set to deliver 8 breaths/min, pressure limit 22 cm H 2 O. Frequency, tidal volume (V T ), peak inspiratory pressure, and compression interruptions (hands-off time) were recorded. Data were analyzed with a linear mixed model and Welch 2-sample t test. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) frequency with the ventilator was 7.98 (7.98-7.99) breaths/min. Median (IQR) frequency with the self-inflating bag was 9.5 (8.2-10.7) breaths/min. Median (IQR) ventilator V T was 0.5 (0.5-0.5) L. Median (IQR) self-inflating bag V T was 0.6 (0.5-0.7) L. Median (IQR) ventilator peak inspiratory pressure was 22 (22-22) cm H 2 O. Median (IQR) self-inflating bag peak inspiratory pressure was 30 (27-35) cm H 2 O. Mean ± SD hands-off times for ventilator and self-inflating bag were 5.25 ± 2.11 and 6.41 ± 1.45 s, respectively. When compared with a ventilator, volunteers ventilated with a self-inflating bag within ACLS guidelines. However, volunteers ventilated with increased variation, at higher V T levels, and at higher peak pressures with the self-inflating bag. Hands-off time was also significantly lower with the ventilator. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT

  6. Assessment Of Nurses Performance During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In Intensive Care Unit And Cardiac Care Unit At The Alexandria Main University Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Nagla Hamdi Kamal Khalil El- Meanawi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation one of the most emergency management the nurse has a pivotal role and should be highly qualified in performing these procedures. The aim of the study is to assess performance of nurses during Cardio pulmonary resuscitation for patient with cardiac arrest In Intensive Care Unit and Cardiac Care Unit at the Alexandria main university hospital. To answer the question what are the most common area of satisfactory and area of neglection in nurses performance during Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation. The sample consists of 53 staff nurses working in Intensive care unit amp cardiac care unit at Alexandria main university hospital. The tools of data collection were structured of questionnaire sheet and observational cheek list. The results showed that unsatisfactory performance between nurses in both units. The study concluded that all nurses need to improve their performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patient with cardiac arrest it is crucial for nursing staff to participate in CPR courses in order to refresh and update their theoretical knowledge and performance skills and consequently to improve the safety and effectiveness of care. The study recommended that continuous evaluation of nurses knowledge and performance is essential the optimal frequency with which CPR training should be implemented at least every 6 months in order to avoid deterioration in nurses CPR knowledge and skills.

  7. A randomized trial of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for medical students: voice advisory mannequin compared to guidance provided by an instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Nieves; Rodríguez-Díez, María-Cristina; Nagore, David; Fernández, Secundino; Ferrer, Marta; Beunza, Juan-Jose

    2013-08-01

    Current European Resuscitation Guidelines 2010 recommend the use of prompt/feedback devices when training for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We aimed to assess the quality of CPR training among second-year medical students with a voice advisory mannequin (VAM) compared to guidance provided by an instructor. Forty-three students received a theoretical reminder about CPR followed by a 2-minute pretest on CPR (compressions/ventilations cycle) with Resusci Anne SkillReporter (Laerdal Medical). They were then randomized into a control group (n = 22), trained by an instructor for 4 minutes per student, and an intervention group (n = 21) trained individually with VAM CPR mannequin for 4 minutes. After training, the students performed a 2-minute posttest, with the same method as the pretest. Participants in the intervention group (VAM) performed more correct hand position (73% vs. 37%; P = 0.014) and tended to display better compression rate (124 min vs. 135 min; P = 0.089). In a stratified analyses by sex we found that only among women trained with VAM was there a significant improvement in compression depth before and after training (36 mm vs. 46 mm, P = 0.018) and in the percentage of insufficient compressions before and after training (56% vs. 15%; P = 0.021). In comparison to the traditional training method involving an instructor, training medical students in CPR with VAM improves the quality of chest compressions in hand position and in compression rate applied to mannequins. Only among women was VAM shown to be superior in compression depth training. This technology reduces costs in 14% in our setup and might potentially release instructors' time for other activities.

  8. Reliability of Pulse Oximetry during Progressive Hypoxia, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, and Recovery in a Piglet Model of Neonatal Hypoxic Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohammad Ahmad; Weber, Claudia; Waitz, Markus; Huang, Li; Hummler, Helmut D; Mendler, Marc Robin

    2017-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is widely used in intensive care and emergency conditions to monitor arterial oxygenation and to guide oxygen therapy. To study the reliability of pulse oximetry in comparison with CO-oximetry in newborn piglets during progressive hypoxia, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Thirty-three newborn piglets were exposed to hypoxia until asystole occurred and then resuscitated until ROSC. Arterial oxygen saturation was monitored continuously by pulse oximetry (SpO2) with one sensor applied to the wrist of the right forelimb (FL) and another to the thigh of the left hind limb (HL). Arterial functional oxygen saturation (SaO2) was measured at baseline and at predefined intervals during each phase of the experiment. SpO2 was compared with coinciding SaO2 values and bias considered whenever the difference (SpO2 - SaO2) was beyond ±5%. Bias values were lower at the baseline measurements (-3.7 ± 2.3% in FL and -4.1 ± 3.4% in HL) as well as after ROSC (1.5 ± 4.2% in FL and 0.2 ± 4.6% in HL) with higher precision and accuracy than during other experiment phases. During hypoxia induction, cardiac arrest, and CPR, there was a marked decrease in precision and accuracy as well as an increase in bias up to 43 ± 26 and 56 ± 27% in FL and HL, respectively, over a range of SaO2 from 13 to 51%. Pulse oximetry showed increased bias and decreased accuracy and precision during marked hypoxemia in a model of neonatal hypoxic cardiac arrest. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Factors associated with delayed defibrillation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A prospective simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Castan

    Full Text Available Early defibrillation is an important factor of survival in cardiac arrest. However, novice resuscitators often struggle with cardiac arrest patients. We investigated factors leading to delayed defibrillation performed by final-year medical students within a simulated bystander cardiac arrest situation.Final-year medical students received a refresher lecture and basic life support training before being confronted with a simulated cardiac arrest situation in a simulation ambulance. The scenario was analyzed for factors leading to delayed defibrillation. We compared the time intervals the participants needed for various measures with a benchmark set by experienced resuscitators. After training, the participants were interviewed regarding challenges and thoughts during the scenario.The median time needed for defibrillation was 158 s (n = 49, interquartile range: 107-270 s, more than six-fold of the benchmark time. The major part of total defibrillation time (49%; median, n = 49 was between onset of ventricular fibrillation and beginning to prepare the defibrillator, more specifically the time between end of preparation of the defibrillator and actual delivery of the shock, with a mean proportion of 26% (n = 49, SD = 17% of the overall time needed for defibrillation (maximum 67%. Self-reported reasons for this delay included uncertainty about the next step to take, as reported by 73% of the participants. A total of 35% were unsure about which algorithm to follow. Diagnosing the patient was subjectively difficult for 35% of the participants. Overall, 53% of the participants felt generally confused.Our study shows that novice resuscitators rarely achieve guideline-recommended defibrillation times. The most relative delays were observed when participants had to choose what to do next or which algorithm to follow, and thus i.e. performed extensive airway management before a life-saving defibrillation. Our data provides a first insight in the process of

  10. Different Techniques of Respiratory Support Do Not Significantly Affect Gas Exchange during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Newborn Piglet Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendler, Marc R; Maurer, Miriam; Hassan, Mohammad A; Huang, Li; Waitz, Markus; Mayer, Benjamin; Hummler, Helmut D

    2015-01-01

    There are no evidence-based recommendations on the use of different techniques of respiratory support and chest compressions (CC) during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We studied the short-term effects of different ventilatory support strategies along with CC representing clinical practice on gas exchange [arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2)], hemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation. We hypothesized that in newborn piglets with cardiac arrest, use of a T-piece resuscitator (TPR) providing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves gas exchange as measured by SaO2 during CPR as compared to using a self-inflating bag (SIB) without PEEP. Furthermore, we explored the effects of a mechanical ventilator without synchrony to CC. Thirty newborn piglets with asystole were randomized into three groups and resuscitated for 20 min [fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.21 for 10 min and 1.0 thereafter]. Group 1 received ventilation using a TPR [peak inspiratory pressure (PIP)/PEEP of 20/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min] with inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio). Group 2 received ventilation using a SIB (PIP of 20 cm H2O without PEEP, rate 30/min) with inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio). Group 3 received ventilation using a mechanical ventilator (PIP/PEEP of 20/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min). CC were applied with a rate of 120/min without synchrony to inflations. We found no significant differences in SaO2 between the three groups. However, there was a trend toward a higher SaO2 [TPR: 28.0% (22.3-40.0); SIB: 23.7% (13.4-52.3); ventilator: 44.1% (39.2-54.3); median (interquartile range)] and a lower PaCO2 [TPR: 95.6 mm Hg (82.1-113.6); SIB: 100.8 mm Hg (83.0-108.0); ventilator: 74.1 mm Hg (68.5-83.1); median (interquartile range)] in the mechanical ventilator group. We found no significant effect on gas exchange using different respiratory support strategies

  11. Pushing Harder, Pushing Faster, Minimizing Interruptions… But Falling Short of 2010 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Targets During In-hospital Pediatric and Adolescent Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M.; Wolfe, Heather; Nishisaki, Akira; Leffelman, Jessica; Niles, Dana; Meaney, Peter A.; Donoghue, Aaron; Maltese, Matthew R.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of instituting the 2010 Basic Life Support Guidelines on in-hospital pediatric and adolescent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality. We hypothesized that quality would improve, but that targets for chest compression (CC) depth would be difficult to achieve. Methods Prospective in-hospital observational study comparing CPR quality 24 months before and after release of the 2010 Guidelines. CPR recording/feedback-enabled defibrillators collected CPR data (rate (CC/min), depth (mm), CC fraction (CCF, %), leaning (% > 2.5 kg.)). Audiovisual feedback for depth was: 2005 ≥ 38mm; 2010 ≥ 50mm; for rate: 2005 ≥ 90 and ≤ 120 CC/min; 2010 ≥ 100 and ≤ 120 CC/min. The primary outcome was average event depth compared with Student’s t-test. Results 45 CPR events (25 before; 20 after) occurred, resulting in 1336 thirty-second epochs (909 before; 427 after). Compared to 2005, average event depth (50 ± 13 vs. 43 ± 9 mm; p=0.047), rate (113 ± 11 vs. 104 ± 8 CC/min; p<0.01), and CCF (0.94 [0.93, 0.96] vs. 0.9 [0.85, 0.94]; p=0.013) increased during 2010. CPR epochs during the 2010 period more likely to meet Guidelines for CCF (OR 1.7; CI 95: 1.2–2.4; p<0.01), but less likely for rate (OR 0.23; CI 95: 0.12–0.44; p<0.01), and depth (OR 0.31; CI 95: 0.12–0.86; p=0.024). Conclusions Institution of the 2010 Guidelines was associated with increased CC depth, rate, and CC fraction; yet, achieving 2010 targets for rate and depth was difficult. PMID:23954664

  12. Prolonged Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Process and Lower Frequency of Medical Staff Visit Predicts Independently In-hospital Resuscitation Success in the Elderly Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Chen Tsai

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Although the initial resuscitation success rate was not affected by age, a longer time interval between the last medical staffs’ visit and the onset of resuscitation did result in a worse success rate in elderly patients. Our data suggest that more frequent staff visits to the elderly population during hospitalization could alter initial resuscitation results.

  13. Willingness to Perform Chest Compression Only in Witnessed Cardiac Arrest Victims versus Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesreen Yaghmour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performing immediate bystander Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR is the most important factor that determines survival from cardiac arrest. Recommended mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver during CPR has led to lower rate of CPR performance in the population. Objectives: The present survey aimed to evaluate the willingness of nurses at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for performing CPR versus chest-compression-only CPR. Patients and Methods: During a CPR course, we performed a survey on 25 nurses from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. This survey included age and gender of the participants. In the first question, they were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with mouth to mouth breathing for witnessed cardiac arrest victims. In the second question, they were asked about their willingness to perform chest compression only for cardiac arrest victims. Results: Among the participating nurses, 96% were female with a mean age of 31 years. Only 40% were willing to perform CPR that requires mouth to mouth ventilation. On the other hand, 92% were willing to perform chest compression only without mouth to mouth ventilation. The mean age of the nurses who would do CPR was lower compared to those who would not. Conclusions: In this survey, we demonstrated that eliminating mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver could lead to markedly higher willingness to perform CPR for witnessed cardiac arrest victims in CPR trained nursing personnel. Our study is in agreement with other studies advocating that chest-compression-only CPR could lead to higher bystander resuscitation efforts.

  14. A national survey of prevalence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and knowledge of the emergency number in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, S

    2009-07-06

    AIM: The aim of this survey was to establish prevalence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training within the last 5 years and reasons preventing training and initiation of CPR in Ireland as well as awareness of the emergency numbers. METHODS: An in-home omnibus survey was undertaken in 2008 with quota sampling reflecting the age, gender, social class and geography of Ireland. RESULTS: Of the 974 respondents, 23.5% had undergone CPR training in the previous 5 years with lower social class and age 65 years and older significantly less likely to be trained. The workplace was both a major source of awareness as well as training for those trained. In the untrained group lack of awareness of the need for CPR training was the most significant reason for non-training. Cost was not cited as a barrier. 88.9% of people gave a correct emergency number with geographical variation. Notably, the European emergency number 112 was not well known. CONCLUSION: Previous Irish and American population targets for CPR training have been surpassed in Ireland in 2008. New internationally agreed targets are now required. Meanwhile older people and those in lower socio-economic groups should be targeted for training. Awareness of at least one emergency number is very high in Ireland. Some geographical variation was found and this should be studied further.

  15. The specific effect of metronome guidance on the quality of one-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation and rescuer fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; You, Je Sung; Cho, Young Soon; Chung, Sung Phil; Park, Incheol; Kim, Seung Ho

    2012-12-01

    Metronome guidance is a simple and economic feedback method of guiding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). It has been proven for its usefulness in regulating the rate of chest compression and ventilation, but it is not yet clear how metronome use may affect compression depth or rescuer fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess the specific effect that metronome guidance has on the quality of CPR and rescuer fatigue. One-person CPRs were performed by senior medical students on Resusci Anne® manikins (Laerdal, Stavanger, Norway) with personal-computer skill-reporting systems. Half of the students performed CPR with metronome guidance and the other half without. CPR performance data, duration, and before-after trial differences in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were compared between groups. Average compression depth (ACD) of the first five cycles, compression rate, no-flow fraction, and ventilation count were significantly lower in the metronome group (p=0.028, Metronome guidance is associated with lower chest compression depth of the first five cycles, while shortening the no-flow fraction and the ventilation count in a simulated one-person CPR model. Metronome guidance does not have an obvious effect of intensifying rescuer fatigue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inspiratory impedance during active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized evaluation in patients in cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, P; Lurie, K G; Payen, D

    2000-03-07

    Blood pressure is severely reduced in patients in cardiac arrest receiving standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although active compression-decompression (ACD) CPR improves acute hemodynamic parameters, arterial pressures remain suboptimal with this technique. We performed ACD CPR in patients with a new inspiratory threshold valve (ITV) to determine whether lowering intrathoracic pressures during the "relaxation" phase of ACD CPR would enhance venous blood return and overall CPR efficiency. This prospective, randomized, blinded trial was performed in prehospital mobile intensive care units in Paris, France. Patients in nontraumatic cardiac arrest received ACD CPR plus the ITV or ACD CPR alone for 30 minutes during advanced cardiac life support. End tidal CO(2) (ETCO(2)), diastolic blood pressure (DAP) and coronary perfusion pressure, and time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) were measured. Groups were similar with respect to age, gender, and initial rhythm. Mean maximal ETCO(2), coronary perfusion pressure, and DAP values, respectively (in mm Hg), were 13.1+/-0.9, 25.0+/-1.4, and 36.5+/-1.5 with ACD CPR alone versus 19.1+/-1.0, 43.3+/-1.6, and 56.4+/-1.7 with ACD plus valve (PCPR alone after 26.5+/-0.7 minutes versus 4 of 11 patients with ACD CPR plus ITV after 19.8+/-2.8 minutes (PCPR increases the efficiency of CPR, leading to diastolic arterial pressures of >50 mm Hg. The long-term benefits of this new CPR technology are under investigation.

  17. Instructions to "push as hard as you can" improve average chest compression depth in dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Muzna; Brown, Todd B; Saini, Devashish; Pepper, Tracy L; Nandigam, Hari Krishna; Kaza, Niroop; Cofield, Stacey S

    2008-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with adequate chest compression depth appears to improve first shock success in cardiac arrest. We evaluate the effect of simplification of chest compression instructions on compression depth in dispatcher-assisted CPR protocol. Data from two randomized, double-blinded, controlled trials with identical methodology were combined to obtain 332 records for this analysis. Subjects were randomized to either modified Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS) v11.2 protocol or a new simplified protocol. The main difference between the protocols was the instruction to "push as hard as you can" in the simplified protocol, compared to "push down firmly 2in. (5cm)" in MPDS. Data were recorded via a Laerdal ResusciAnne SkillReporter manikin. Primary outcome measures included: chest compression depth, proportion of compressions without error, with adequate depth and with total release. Instructions to "push as hard as you can", compared to "push down firmly 2in. (5cm)", resulted in improved chest compression depth (36.4 mm vs. 29.7 mm, pCPR instructions by changing "push down firmly 2in. (5cm)" to "push as hard as you can" achieved improvement in chest compression depth at no cost to total release or average chest compression rate.

  18. Effectiveness of a simplified cardiopulmonary resuscitation training program for the non-medical staff of a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Tomoya; Iwami, Taku; Ogura, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Hisatake; Sakai, Tomohiko; Yamamoto, Kouji; Mano, Toshiaki; Fujino, Yuji; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2014-05-10

    The 2010 Consensus on Science and Treatment Recommendations Statement recommended that short video/computer self-instruction courses, with minimal or no instructor coaching, combined with hands-on practice can be considered an effective alternative to instructor-led basic life support courses. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a simplified cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program for non-medical staff working at a university hospital. Before and immediately after a 45-min CPR training program consisting of instruction on chest compression and automated external defibrillator (AED) use with a personal training manikin, CPR skills were automatically recorded and evaluated. Participants' attitudes towards CPR were evaluated by a questionnaire survey. From September 2011 through March 2013, 161 participants attended the program. We evaluated chest compression technique in 109 of these participants. The number of chest compressions delivered after the program versus that before was significantly greater (110.8 ± 13.0/min vs 94.2 ± 27.4/min, p CPR training program on chest compression and AED use improved CPR quality and the attitude towards CPR and AED use of non-medical staff of a university hospital.

  19. Retention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills after hands-only training versus conventional training in novices: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Joon; Cho, Youngsuk; Cho, Gyu Chong; Ji, Hyun Kyung; Han, Song Yi; Lee, Jin Hyuck

    2017-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training can improve performance during simulated cardiac arrest; however, retention of skills after training remains uncertain. Recently, hands-only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR. The purpose of this study is to compare the retention rate of CPR skills in laypersons after hands-only or conventional CPR training. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 CPR training methods: 80 minutes of hands-only CPR training or 180 minutes of conventional CPR training. Each participant's CPR skills were evaluated at the end of training and 3 months thereafter using the Resusci Anne manikin with a skill-reporting software. In total, 252 participants completed training; there were 125 in the hands-only CPR group and 127 in the conventional CPR group. After 3 months, 118 participants were randomly selected to complete a post-training test. The hands-only CPR group showed a significant decrease in average compression rate (P=0.015), average compression depth (P=0.031), and proportion of adequate compression depth (P=0.011). In contrast, there was no difference in the skills of the conventional CPR group after 3 months. Conventional CPR training appears to be more effective for the retention of chest compression skills than hands-only CPR training; however, the retention of artificial ventilation skills after conventional CPR training is poor.

  20. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training of family members before hospital discharge using video self-instruction: a feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewer, Audrey L; Leary, Marion; Decker, Christopher S; Andersen, James C; Fredericks, Amanda C; Bobrow, Bentley J; Abella, Benjamin S

    2011-09-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), yet rates of bystander CPR are low. This is especially the case for SCA occurring in the home setting, as family members of at-risk patients are often not CPR trained. To evaluate the feasibility of a novel hospital-based CPR education program targeted to family members of patients at increased risk for SCA. Prospective, multicenter, cohort study. Inpatient wards at 3 hospitals. Family members of inpatients admitted with cardiac-related diagnoses. Family members were offered CPR training via a proctored video-self instruction (VSI) program. After training, CPR skills and participant perspectives regarding their training experience were assessed. Surveys were conducted one month postdischarge to measure the rate of "secondary training" of other individuals by enrolled family members. At the 3 study sites, 756 subjects were offered CPR instruction; 280 agreed to training and 136 underwent instruction using the VSI program. Of these, 78 of 136 (57%) had no previous CPR training. After training, chest compression performance was generally adequate (mean compression rate 90 ± 26/minute, mean depth 37 ± 12 mm). At 1 month, 57 of 122 (47%) of subjects performed secondary training for friends or family members, with a calculated mean of 2.1 persons trained per kit distributed. The hospital setting offers a unique "point of capture" to provide CPR instruction to an important, undertrained population in contact with at-risk individuals. Copyright © 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  1. Effect of one-rescuer compression/ventilation ratios on cardiopulmonary resuscitation in infant, pediatric, and adult manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikantan, Shoba Krishnan; Berg, Robert A; Cox, Tim; Tice, Lisa; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2005-05-01

    Optimal chest compression to ventilation ratio (C:V) for one-rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not known, with current American Heart Association recommendations 3:1 for newborns, 5:1 for children, and 15:2 for adults. C:V ratios influence effectiveness of CPR, but memorizing different ratios is educationally cumbersome. We hypothesized that a 10:2 ratio might provide adequate universal application for all age arrest victims. Clinical study. Tertiary care children's hospital. Thirty-five health care providers. Thirty-five health care providers performed 5-min epochs of one-rescuer CPR at C:V ratios of 3:1, 5:1, 10:2, and 15:2 in random order on infant, pediatric, and adult manikins. Compressions were paced at 100/min by metronome. The number of effective compressions and ventilations delivered per minute was recorded by a trained basic life support instructor. Subjective assessments of fatigue (self-report) and exertion (change in rescuer pulse rate compared with baseline) were assessed. Analysis was by repeated measures analysis of variance and paired Student's t-test. Effective infant compressions per minute did not differ by C:V ratio, but ventilations per minute were greater at 3:1 vs. 5:1, 10:2, and 15:2 (p 15:2 (p educational value and technique retention.

  2. Afraid of being "witchy with a 'b'": a qualitative study of how gender influences residents' experiences leading cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolehmainen, Christine; Brennan, Meghan; Filut, Amarette; Isaac, Carol; Carnes, Molly

    2014-09-01

    Ineffective leadership during cardiopulmonary resuscitation ("code") can negatively affect a patient's likelihood of survival. In most teaching hospitals, internal medicine residents lead codes. In this study, the authors explored internal medicine residents' experiences leading codes, with a particular focus on how gender influences the code leadership experience. The authors conducted individual, semistructured telephone or in-person interviews with 25 residents (May 2012 to February 2013) from 9 U.S. internal medicine residency programs. They audio recorded and transcribed the interviews and then thematically analyzed the transcribed text. Participants viewed a successful code as one with effective leadership. They agreed that the ideal code leader was an authoritative presence; spoke with a deep, loud voice; used clear, direct communication; and appeared calm. Although equally able to lead codes as their male colleagues, female participants described feeling stress from having to violate gender behavioral norms in the role of code leader. In response, some female participants adopted rituals to signal the suspension of gender norms while leading a code. Others apologized afterwards for their counternormative behavior. Ideal code leadership embodies highly agentic, stereotypical male behaviors. Female residents employed strategies to better integrate the competing identities of code leader and female gender. In the future, residency training should acknowledge how female gender stereotypes may conflict with the behaviors required to enact code leadership and offer some strategies, such as those used by the female residents in this study, to help women integrate these dual identities.

  3. Comparison of superior vena caval and inferior vena caval access using a radioisotope technique during normal perfusion and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalsey, W.C.; Barsan, W.G.; Joyce, S.M.; Hedges, J.R.; Lukes, S.J.; Doan, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    Recent studies of thoracic pressure changes during external cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) suggest that there may be a significant difference in the rate of delivery of intravenous drugs when they are administered through the extrathoracic inferior vena cava (IVC) rather than the intrathoracic superior vena cava (SVC). Comparison of delivery of a radionuclide given using superior and inferior vena caval access sites was made during normal blood flow and during CPR. Mean times from injection to peak emission count in each ventricle were determined. There were no significant differences between mean peak times for SVC or IVC routes during normal flow or CPR. When peak times were corrected for variations in cardiac output, there were no significant differences between IVC and SVC peak times during normal flow. During CPR, however, mean left ventricular peak time, when corrected for cardiac output, was significantly shorter (P less than .05) when the SVC route was used. The mean time for the counts to reach half the ventricular peak was statistically shorter (P less than .05) in both ventricles with the SVC route during the low flow of CPR. This suggests that during CPR, increased drug dispersion may occur when drugs are infused by the IVC route and thus may modify the anticipated effect of the drug bolus. These results suggest that during CPR, both the cardiac output and the choice of venous access are important variables for drug delivery

  4. Basic life support and cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for pharmacy students and the community by a pharmacy student committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Kara B; Eppert, Heather D; Underwood, Elizabeth L; McLean, Katie Maxwell; Finks, Shannon W; Rogers, Kelly C

    2010-08-10

    To create a self-sufficient, innovative method for providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) education within a college of pharmacy using a student-driven committee, and disseminating CPR education into the community through a service learning experience. A CPR committee comprised of doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students at the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy provided CPR certification to all pharmacy students. The committee developed a service learning project by providing CPR training courses in the community. Participants in the course were required to complete an evaluation form at the conclusion of each training course. The CPR committee successfully certified more than 1,950 PharmD students and 240 community members from 1996 to 2009. Evaluations completed by participants were favorable, with 99% of all respondents (n = 351) rating the training course as either "excellent" or "good" in each of the categories evaluated. A PharmD student-directed committee successfully provided CPR training to other students and community members as a service learning experience.

  5. Influence of chest compression artefact on capnogram-based ventilation detection during out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leturiondo, Mikel; Ruiz de Gauna, Sofía; Ruiz, Jesus M; Julio Gutiérrez, J; Leturiondo, Luis A; González-Otero, Digna M; Russell, James K; Zive, Dana; Daya, Mohamud

    2018-03-01

    Capnography has been proposed as a method for monitoring the ventilation rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A high incidence (above 70%) of capnograms distorted by chest compression induced oscillations has been previously reported in out-of-hospital (OOH) CPR. The aim of the study was to better characterize the chest compression artefact and to evaluate its influence on the performance of a capnogram-based ventilation detector during OOH CPR. Data from the MRx monitor-defibrillator were extracted from OOH cardiac arrest episodes. For each episode, presence of chest compression artefact was annotated in the capnogram. Concurrent compression depth and transthoracic impedance signals were used to identify chest compressions and to annotate ventilations, respectively. We designed a capnogram-based ventilation detection algorithm and tested its performance with clean and distorted episodes. Data were collected from 232 episodes comprising 52 654 ventilations, with a mean (±SD) of 227 (±118) per episode. Overall, 42% of the capnograms were distorted. Presence of chest compression artefact degraded algorithm performance in terms of ventilation detection, estimation of ventilation rate, and the ability to detect hyperventilation. Capnogram-based ventilation detection during CPR using our algorithm was compromised by the presence of chest compression artefact. In particular, artefact spanning from the plateau to the baseline strongly degraded ventilation detection, and caused a high number of false hyperventilation alarms. Further research is needed to reduce the impact of chest compression artefact on capnographic ventilation monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcome Reports: Update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From a Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gavin D; Jacobs, Ian G; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bossaert, Leo L; Brett, Stephen J; Chamberlain, Douglas; de Caen, Allan R; Deakin, Charles D; Finn, Judith C; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W; Lim, Swee Han; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; McNally, Bryan F; Morley, Peter T; Morrison, Laurie J; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Montgomery, William; Nichol, Graham; Okada, Kazuo; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Travers, Andrew H; Nolan, Jerry P

    2015-11-01

    Utstein-style guidelines contribute to improved public health internationally by providing a structured framework with which to compare emergency medical services systems. Advances in resuscitation science, new insights into important predictors of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and lessons learned from methodological research prompted this review and update of the 2004 Utstein guidelines. Representatives of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation developed an updated Utstein reporting framework iteratively by meeting face to face, by teleconference, and by Web survey during 2012 through 2014. Herein are recommendations for reporting out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Data elements were grouped by system factors, dispatch/recognition, patient variables, resuscitation/postresuscitation processes, and outcomes. Elements were classified as core or supplemental using a modified Delphi process primarily based on respondents' assessment of the evidence-based importance of capturing those elements, tempered by the challenges to collect them. New or modified elements reflected consensus on the need to account for emergency medical services system factors, increasing availability of automated external defibrillators, data collection processes, epidemiology trends, increasing use of dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emerging field treatments, postresuscitation care, prognostication tools, and trends in organ recovery. A standard reporting template is recommended to promote standardized reporting. This template facilitates reporting of the bystander-witnessed, shockable rhythm as a measure of emergency medical services system efficacy and all emergency medical services system-treated arrests as a measure of system effectiveness. Several additional important subgroups are identified that enable an estimate of the specific contribution of rhythm and bystander actions that are key determinants of outcome. Copyright © 2014 European

  7. The Fibrin-Derived Peptide Bβ15-42 (FX06) Ameliorates Vascular Leakage and Improves Survival and Neurocognitive Recovery: Implications From Two Animal Models of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergt, Stefan; Gruenewald, Matthias; Beltschany, Claudia; Grub, Andrea; Neumann, Tobias; Albrecht, Martin; Vollmar, Brigitte; Zacharowski, Kai; Roesner, Jan P; Meybohm, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    The fibrin-derived peptide Bβ15-42 (FX06) has been proven to attenuate ischemia/reperfusion injury. We tested the hypothesis that Bβ15-42 improves survival rate and neurocognitive recovery after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Pig and mouse model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Two university hospitals. Pigs and mice. Pigs (n = 16) were subjected to 8-minute cardiac arrest. Successful resuscitated pigs (n = 12) were randomized either to 3 mg/kg Bβ15-42 followed by a continuous infusion of 1 mg/kg/hr for 5 hours (pFX06; n = 6) or the control group (pCONTROL; n = 6). Cardiac damage, function, and hemodynamics were recorded up to 8 hours. Mice (n = 52) were subjected to 4-minute cardiac arrest followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and randomized either to two boli of 2.4 mg/kg Bβ15-42 (mFX06; n = 26) or the control group (mCONTROL; n = 26). Fourteen-day survival rate, neurocognitive function, and endothelial integrity (additional experiment with n = 26 mice) were evaluated. Bβ15-42 reduced cumulative fluid intake (3,500 [2,600-4,200] vs 6,800 [5,700-7,400] mL; p = 0.004) within 8 hours in pigs. In mice, Bβ15-42 improved 14-day survival rate (mFX06 vs mCONTROL; 11/26 vs 6/26; p Water-Maze test (15/26 vs 9/26 mice with competence to perform test; p < 0.05). Bβ15-42-treated mice showed a significant higher length of intact pulmonary endothelium and reduced pulmonary leukocyte infiltration. This study confirms the new concept of an important role of fibrin derivatives in global ischemia/reperfusion injury, which can be attenuated by the fibrin-derived peptide Bβ15-42.

  8. New guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation Nuevas directrices para la resucitación cardiopulmonar Novas diretrizes da ressuscitação cardiopulmonar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Celia Barcellos Dalri

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA poses a severe threat to life; cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR represents a challenge for research and assessment by nurses and their team. This study presents the most recent international recommendations for care in case of cardiopulmonary heart arrest, based on the 2005 Guidelines by the American Heart Association (AHA. These CPR guidelines are based on a large-scale review process, organized by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR. High-quality basic and advanced CPR maneuvers can save lives.La parada cardiorrespiratoria (PCR es una ocurrencia que presenta una grave amenaza a la vida; la resucitación cardiopulmonar (RCP representa un desafío para la investigación y la evaluación por parte del enfermero y su equipo. Este estudio presenta las más recientes recomendaciones internacionales sobre la atención a la parada cardiorrespiratoria, basada en las Directrices de 2005 de la American Heart Asociation (AHA. Esas directrices sobre RCP se fundamentan en un proceso de revisión extenso, organizado por el International Liasion Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR. Las maniobras básicas y avanzadas de RCP ofrecidas con calidad pueden salvar vidas.A parada cardiorrespiratória (PCR é intercorrência de grave ameaça à vida; a ressuscitação cardiopulmonar (RCP representa desafio para a investigação e a avaliação por parte do enfermeiro e sua equipe. Esse estudo apresenta as mais recentes recomendações internacionais sobre atendimento da parada cardiorrespiratória, baseado nas Diretrizes de 2005 da American Heart Association (AHA. Essas diretrizes sobre RCP fundamentam-se num processo de revisão extenso, organizado pelo International Liasion Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR. As manobras básicas e avançadas de RCP com qualidade podem salvar vidas.

  9. Effects of the administration of 2,3-butanedione monoxime during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ischaemic contracture and resuscitability in a pig model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Kook; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Choi, Sung Soo; Park, Sang Wook; Yun, Seong Woo; Lee, Sung Min; Kim, Nan Yeol; Heo, Tag; Min, Yong Il

    2015-02-01

    Ischaemic contracture compromises the haemodynamic effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and resuscitability. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime (BDM) reduced ischaemic contracture by inhibiting actin-myosin crossbridge formation in an isolated heart model. We investigated the effects of BDM on ischaemic contracture and resuscitation outcomes in a pig model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). After 15min of untreated ventricular fibrillation, followed by 8min of basic life support, 16 pigs were randomised to receive either 2mlkg(-1) of BDM solution (25gl(-1)) or 2mlkg(-1) of saline during advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). During the ACLS, the control group showed an increase in left ventricular (LV) wall thickness from 10.0mm (10.0-10.8) to 13.0mm (13.0-13.0) and a decrease in LV chamber area from 8.13cm(2) (7.59-9.29) to 7.47cm(2) (5.84-8.43). In contrast, the BDM group showed a decrease in the LV wall thickness from 10mm (9.0-10.8) to 8.5mm (7.0-9.8) and an increase in the LV chamber area from 9.86cm(2) (7.22-12.39) to 12.15 cm(2) (8.02-14.40). Mixed model analyses of the LV wall thickness and LV chamber area revealed significant group effects and group-time interactions. Spontaneous circulation was restored in four (50%) animals in the control group and in eight (100%) animals in the BDM group (p=0.077). All the resuscitated animals survived during an intensive care period of 4h. BDM administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation reversed ischaemic contracture in a pig model of OHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. “Booster” training: Evaluation of instructor-led bedside cardiopulmonary resuscitation skill training and automated corrective feedback to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation compliance of Pediatric Basic Life Support providers during simulated cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M.; Niles, Dana; Meaney, Peter A.; Aplenc, Richard; French, Benjamin; Abella, Benjamin S.; Lengetti, Evelyn L.; Berg, Robert A.; Helfaer, Mark A.; Nadkarni, Vinay

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of brief bedside “booster” cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to improve CPR guideline compliance of hospital-based pediatric providers. Design Prospective, randomized trial. Setting General pediatric wards at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Subjects Sixty-nine Basic Life Support–certified hospital-based providers. Intervention CPR recording/feedback defibrillators were used to evaluate CPR quality during simulated pediatric arrest. After a 60-sec pretraining CPR evaluation, subjects were randomly assigned to one of three instructional/feedback methods to be used during CPR booster training sessions. All sessions (training/CPR manikin practice) were of equal duration (2 mins) and differed only in the method of corrective feedback given to participants during the session. The study arms were as follows: 1) instructor-only training; 2) automated defibrillator feedback only; and 3) instructor training combined with automated feedback. Measurements and Main Results Before instruction, 57% of the care providers performed compressions within guideline rate recommendations (rate >90 min−1 and 38 mm); and 36% met overall CPR compliance (rate and depth within targets). After instruction, guideline compliance improved (instructor-only training: rate 52% to 87% [p .01], and overall CPR compliance, 43% to 78% [p CPR compliance, 35% to 96% [p training combined with automated feedback: rate 48% to 100% [p CPR compliance, 30% to 100% [p CPR instruction, most certified Pediatric Basic Life Support providers did not perform guideline-compliant CPR. After a brief bedside training, CPR quality improved irrespective of training content (instructor vs. automated feedback). Future studies should investigate bedside training to improve CPR quality during actual pediatric cardiac arrests. PMID:20625336

  11. "Booster" training: evaluation of instructor-led bedside cardiopulmonary resuscitation skill training and automated corrective feedback to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation compliance of Pediatric Basic Life Support providers during simulated cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M; Niles, Dana; Meaney, Peter A; Aplenc, Richard; French, Benjamin; Abella, Benjamin S; Lengetti, Evelyn L; Berg, Robert A; Helfaer, Mark A; Nadkarni, Vinay

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of brief bedside "booster" cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to improve CPR guideline compliance of hospital-based pediatric providers. Prospective, randomized trial. General pediatric wards at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Sixty-nine Basic Life Support-certified hospital-based providers. CPR recording/feedback defibrillators were used to evaluate CPR quality during simulated pediatric arrest. After a 60-sec pretraining CPR evaluation, subjects were randomly assigned to one of three instructional/feedback methods to be used during CPR booster training sessions. All sessions (training/CPR manikin practice) were of equal duration (2 mins) and differed only in the method of corrective feedback given to participants during the session. The study arms were as follows: 1) instructor-only training; 2) automated defibrillator feedback only; and 3) instructor training combined with automated feedback. Before instruction, 57% of the care providers performed compressions within guideline rate recommendations (rate >90 min(-1) and 38 mm); and 36% met overall CPR compliance (rate and depth within targets). After instruction, guideline compliance improved (instructor-only training: rate 52% to 87% [p .01], and overall CPR compliance, 43% to 78% [p CPR compliance, 35% to 96% [p training combined with automated feedback: rate 48% to 100% [p CPR compliance, 30% to 100% [p CPR instruction, most certified Pediatric Basic Life Support providers did not perform guideline-compliant CPR. After a brief bedside training, CPR quality improved irrespective of training content (instructor vs. automated feedback). Future studies should investigate bedside training to improve CPR quality during actual pediatric cardiac arrests.

  12. A comparative study of defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance during simulated cardiac arrest in nursing student teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eikeland Husebø Sissel I

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although nurses must be able to respond quickly and effectively to cardiac arrest, numerous studies have demonstrated poor performance. Simulation is a promising learning tool for resuscitation team training but there are few studies that examine simulation for training defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (D-CPR in teams from the nursing education perspective. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which nursing student teams follow the D-CPR-algorithm in a simulated cardiac arrest, and if observing a simulated cardiac arrest scenario and participating in the post simulation debriefing would improve team performance. Methods We studied video-recorded simulations of D-CPR performance in 28 nursing student teams. Besides describing the overall performance of D-CPR, we compared D-CPR performance in two groups. Group A (n = 14 performed D-CPR in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario, while Group B (n = 14 performed D-CPR after first observing performance of Group A and participating in the debriefing. We developed a D-CPR checklist to assess team performance. Results Overall there were large variations in how accurately the nursing student teams performed the specific parts of the D-CPR algorithm. While few teams performed opening the airways and examination of breathing correctly, all teams used a 30:2 compression: ventilation ratio. We found no difference between Group A and Group B in D-CPR performance, either in regard to total points on the check list or to time variables. Conclusion We found that none of the nursing student teams achieved top scores on the D-CPR-checklist. Observing the training of other teams did not increase subsequent performance. We think all this indicates that more time must be assigned for repetitive practice and reflection. Moreover, the most important aspects of D-CPR, such as early defibrillation and hands-off time in relation to shock, must be highlighted in team

  13. Comparison of different techniques for in microgravity-a simple mathematic estimation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality for space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunecker, S; Douglas, B; Hinkelbein, J

    2015-07-01

    Since astronauts are selected carefully, are usually young, and are intensively observed before and during training, relevant medical problems are rare. Nevertheless, there is a certain risk for a cardiac arrest in space requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Up to now, there are 5 known techniques to perform CPR in microgravity. The aim of the present study was to analyze different techniques for CPR during microgravity about quality of CPR. To identify relevant publications on CPR quality in microgravity, a systematic analysis with defined searching criteria was performed in the PubMed database (http://www.pubmed.com). For analysis, the keywords ("reanimation" or "CPR" or "resuscitation") and ("space" or "microgravity" or "weightlessness") and the specific names of the techniques ("Standard-technique" or "Straddling-manoeuvre" or "Reverse-bear-hug-technique" or "Evetts-Russomano-technique" or "Hand-stand-technique") were used. To compare quality and effectiveness of different techniques, we used the compression product (CP), a mathematical estimation for cardiac output. Using the predefined keywords for literature search, 4 different publications were identified (parabolic flight or under simulated conditions on earth) dealing with CPR efforts in microgravity and giving specific numbers. No study was performed under real-space conditions. Regarding compression depth, the handstand (HS) technique as well as the reverse bear hug (RBH) technique met parameters of the guidelines for CPR in 1G environments best (HS ratio, 0.91 ± 0.07; RBH ratio, 0.82 ± 0.13). Concerning compression rate, 4 of 5 techniques reached the required compression rate (ratio: HS, 1.08 ± 0.11; Evetts-Russomano [ER], 1.01 ± 0.06; standard side straddle, 1.00 ± 0.03; and straddling maneuver, 1.03 ± 0.12). The RBH method did not meet the required criteria (0.89 ± 0.09). The HS method showed the highest cardiac output (69.3% above the required CP), followed by the ER technique (33

  14. Effects of adenosine monophosphate on induction of therapeutic hypothermia and neuronal damage after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Jürgen; Schneider, Andreas; Nees, Corinna; Bruckner, Thomas; Böttiger, Bernd W; Popp, Erik

    2014-09-01

    Animal studies and pathophysiological considerations suggest that therapeutic hypothermia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation is the more effective the earlier it is induced. Therefore this study is sought to examine whether pharmacological facilitated hypothermia by administration of 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is neuroprotective in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Sixty-one rats were subjected to CA. After 6 min of ventricular fibrillation advanced cardiac life support was started. After successful return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, n=40), animals were randomized either to placebo group (n=14) or AMP group (800 mg/kg body weight, n=14). Animals were kept at an ambient temperature of 18°C for 12 h after ROSC and core body temperature was measured using a telemetry temperature probe. Neuronal damage was analyzed by counting Nissl-positive (i.e. viable) neurons and TUNEL-positive (i.e. apoptotic) cells in coronal brain sections 7 days after ROSC. Functional status evaluated on days 1, 3 and 7 after ROSC by a tape removal test. Time until core body temperature dropped to <34.0°C was 31 min [28; 45] in AMP-treated animals and 125 min [90; 180] in the control group (p=0.003). Survival until 7 days after ROSC was comparable in both groups. Also number of Nissl-positive cells (AMP: 1 [1; 7] vs. placebo: 2 [1; 3] per 100 pixel; p=0.66) and TUNEL-positive cells (AMP: 56 [44; 72] vs. placebo: 53 [41; 67] per 100 pixel; p=0.70) did not differ. Neither did AMP affect functional neurological outcome up to 7 days after ROSC. Mean arterial pressure 20 min after ROSC was 49 [45; 55] mmHg in the AMP group in comparison to 91 [83; 95] mmHg in the control group (p<0.001). Although application of AMP reduced the time to reach a core body temperature of <34°C neither survival was improved nor neuronal damage attenuated. Reason for this is probably induction of marked hypotension as an adverse reaction to AMP treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  15. Advanced vs. Basic Life Support in the Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Michael Christopher; Schmicker, Robert H; Leroux, Brian; Nichol, Graham; Aufderheide, Tom P; Cheskes, Sheldon; Grunau, Brian; Jasti, Jamie; Kudenchuk, Peter; Vilke, Gary M; Buick, Jason; Wittwer, Lynn; Sahni, Ritu; Straight, Ronald; Wang, Henry E

    2018-04-30

    Prior observational studies suggest no additional benefit from advanced life support (ALS) when compared with providing basic life support (BLS) for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We compared the association of ALS care with OHCA outcomes using prospective clinical data from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC). Included were consecutive adults OHCA treated by participating emergency medical services (EMS) agencies between June 1, 2011, and June 30, 2015. We defined BLS as receipt of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and/or automated defibrillation and ALS as receipt of an advanced airway, manual defibrillation, or intravenous drug therapy. We compared outcomes among patients receiving: 1) BLS-only; 2) BLS + late ALS; 3) BLS + early ALS; and 4) ALS-first care. Using multivariable logistic regression, we evaluated the associations between level of care and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival to hospital discharge, and survival with good functional status, adjusting for age, sex, witnessed arrest, bystander CPR, shockable initial rhythm, public location, EMS response time, CPR quality, and ROC site. Among 35,065 patients with OHCA, characteristics were median age 68 years (IQR 56-80), male 63.9%, witnessed arrest 43.8%, bystander CPR 50.6%, and shockable initial rhythm 24.2%. Care delivered was: 4.0% BLS-only, 31.5% BLS + late ALS, 17.2% BLS + early ALS, and 47.3% ALS-first. ALS care with or without initial BLS care was independently associated with increased adjusted ROSC and survival to hospital discharge unless delivered greater than 6 min after BLS arrival (BLS + late ALS). Regardless of when it was delivered, ALS care was not associated with significantly greater functional outcome. ALS care was associated with survival to hospital discharge when provided initially or within six minutes of BLS arrival. ALS care, with or without initial BLS care, was associated with increased ROSC, however it was

  16. Learning cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills: does the type of mannequin make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordergraaf, G J; Van Gelder, J M; Van Kesteren, R G; Diets, R F; Savelkoul, T J

    1997-12-01

    Resuscitation (CPR) courses stress acquisition of psychomotor skills. The number of mannequins may limit the 'hands-on' time available for each trainee to practise CPR and impede acquisition of skill. This may occur because expensive, sophisticated mannequins are favoured over individual, simple mannequins. In a blind, prospective, controlled study we compared one-rescuer CPR skills of 165 trainees in two cohorts using their own individual light-weight torso mannequins (Actar 911 and Laerdal Little Anne) and a control cohort with four to five trainees sharing a sophisticated mannequin (Laerdal Recording Resusci Anne). No major significant differences (p = 0.18) were found when using the 'Berden scoring system'. Both the Actar 911 and the Little Anne were compatible with the Recording Resusci Anne. Trainees preferred the individual mannequins. We conclude that the results indicate that the use of individual mannequins in conjunction with a sophisticated mannequin neither results in trainees learning incorrect skills nor in significant improvement. Further analysis of the actual training in lay person CPR training courses and evaluation of course didactics to optimize training time appear indicated.

  17. Simple CPR: A randomized, controlled trial of video self-instructional cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in an African American church congregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, K H; Heron, S L; Thompson, M; Dennis, R; O'Connor, J; Kellermann, A L

    1999-12-01

    Despite the proven efficacy of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), only a small fraction of the population knows how to perform it. As a result, rates of bystander CPR and rates of survival from cardiac arrest are low. Bystander CPR is particularly uncommon in the African American community. Successful development of a simplified approach to CPR training could boost rates of bystander CPR and save lives. We conducted the following randomized, controlled study to determine whether video self-instruction (VSI) in CPR results in comparable or better performance than traditional CPR training. This randomized, controlled trial was conducted among congregational volunteers in an African American church in Atlanta, GA. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either 34 minutes of VSI or the 4-hour American Heart Association "Heartsaver" CPR course. Two months after training, blinded observers used explicit criteria to assess CPR performance in a simulated cardiac arrest setting. A recording manikin was used to measure ventilation and chest compression characteristics. Participants also completed a written test of CPR-related knowledge and attitudes. VSI trainees displayed a comparable level of performance to that achieved by traditional trainees. Observers scored 40% of VSI trainees competent or better in performing CPR, compared with only 16% of traditional trainees (absolute difference 24%, 95% confidence interval 8% to 40%). Data from the recording manikin confirmed these observations. VSI trainees and traditional trainees achieved comparable scores on tests of CPR-related knowledge and attitudes. Thirty-four minutes of VSI can produce CPR of comparable quality to that achieved by traditional training methods. VSI provides a simple, quick, consistent, and inexpensive alternative to traditional CPR instruction, and may be used to extend CPR training to historically underserved populations.

  18. The effect of basic life support education on laypersons' willingness in performing bystander hands only cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Gyu Chong; Sohn, You Dong; Kang, Ku Hyun; Lee, Won Woong; Lim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Won; Oh, Bum Jin; Choi, Dai Hai; Yeom, Seok Ran; Lim, Hoon

    2010-06-01

    Recently, hands only CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) has been proposed as an alternative to standard CPR for bystanders. The present study was performed to identify the effect of basic life support (BLS) training on laypersons' willingness in performing standard CPR and hands only CPR. The participants for this study were non-medical personnel who applied for BLS training program that took place in 7 university hospitals in and around Korea for 6 months. Before and after BLS training, all the participants were given questionnaires for bystander CPR, and 890 respondents were included in the final analyses. Self-assessed confidence score for bystander CPR, using a visual analogue scale from 0 to 100, increased from 51.5+/-30.0 before BLS training to 87.0+/-13.7 after the training with statistical significance (p 0.001). Before the training, 19% of respondents reported willingness to perform standard CPR on a stranger, and 30.1% to perform hands only CPR. After the training, this increased to 56.7% of respondents reporting willingness to perform standard CPR, and 71.9%, hands only CPR, on strangers. Before and after BLS training, the odds ratio of willingness to perform hands only CPR versus standard CPR were 1.8 (95% CI 1.5-2.3) and 2.0 (95% CI 1.7-2.6) for a stranger, respectively. Most of the respondents, who reported they would decline to perform standard CPR, stated that fear of liability and fear of disease transmission were deciding factors after the BLS training. The BLS training increases laypersons' confidence and willingness to perform bystander CPR on a stranger. However, laypersons are more willing to perform hands only CPR rather than to perform standard CPR on a stranger regardless of the BLS training. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Regions With Low Rates of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Have Lower Rates of CPR Training in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Janet E; Straney, Lahn; Smith, Karen; Cartledge, Susie; Case, Rosalind; Bernard, Stephen; Finn, Judith

    2017-06-05

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) more than doubles the chance of surviving an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Recent data have shown considerable regional variation in bystander CPR rates across the Australian state of Victoria. This study aims to determine whether there is associated regional variation in rates of CPR training and willingness to perform CPR in these communities. We categorized each Victorian postcode as either a low or high bystander CPR region using data on adult, bystander-witnessed, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of presumed cardiac etiology (n=7175) from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry. We then surveyed adult Victorians (n=404) and compared CPR training data of the respondents from low and high bystander CPR regions. Of the 404 adults surveyed, 223 (55%) resided in regions with low bystander CPR. Compared with respondents from high bystander CPR regions, respondents residing in regions with low bystander CPR had lower rates of CPR training (62% versus 75%, P =0.009) and lower self-ratings for their overall knowledge of CPR (76% versus 84%, P =0.04). There were no differences between the regions in their reasons for not having undergone CPR training or in their willingness to perform CPR. Rates of survival for bystander-witnessed, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests were significantly lower in low bystander CPR regions (15.7% versus 17.0%, P CPR training and lower survival in regions with lower rates of bystander CPR in Victoria, Australia. Targeting these regions with CPR training programs may improve bystander CPR rates and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  20. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation training experience and self-efficacy of age and gender group: a nationwide community survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Young Sun; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Hong, Sung Ok; Kim, Young Taek; Cho, Sung-Il

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesized that recent hands-on practice for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) would be strongly associated with a higher likelihood of self-efficacy in bystander CPR among laypersons according to age and gender group. We used the National Korean Community Health Survey database of 228921 representatively sampled responders from 253 counties in 2012. Laypersons who had previous CPR training were eligible. Exposure variables were having had CPR training with hands-on practice session with a manikin (Practical-CPR-Training) and CPR training within the last 2 years (Recent-CPR-Training). Primary outcome was self-efficacy in bystander CPR. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed. The final model with an interaction term was evaluated to compare the effects of CPR training across different age and gender groups. Of 62425 eligible respondents who have had CPR training, 20213 (32.4%) had Practical-CPR-Training. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for self-efficacy were 4.08 (3.78-4.41) in Practical-CPR-Training, 2.61 (2.50-2.73) in male, 1.26 (1.16-1.36) in good self-rated health, 1.19 (1.10-1.29) in high school graduate, 1.19 (1.01-1.39) in persons living with stroke patients in household, and 1.17 (1.10-1.24) in Recent-CPR-Training. In interaction models, Practical-CPR-Training showed higher self-efficacy in all age and gender groups, whereas Recent-CPR-Training was not associated with better self-efficacy in elderly group, male (AOR, 0.90 [0.69-1.18]) and female (AOR, 0.94 [0.72-1.23]). Self-efficacy in bystander CPR was higher in person with recent CPR training with hands-on practice with a manikin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protocol of a Multicenter International Randomized Controlled Manikin Study on Different Protocols of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for laypeople (MANI-CPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Enrico; Contri, Enrico; Burkart, Roman; Borrelli, Paola; Ferraro, Ottavia Eleonora; Tonani, Michela; Cutuli, Amedeo; Bertaia, Daniele; Iozzo, Pasquale; Tinguely, Caroline; Lopez, Daniel; Boldarin, Susi; Deiuri, Claudio; Dénéréaz, Sandrine; Dénéréaz, Yves; Terrapon, Michael; Tami, Christian; Cereda, Cinzia; Somaschini, Alberto; Cornara, Stefano; Cortegiani, Andrea

    2018-04-19

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of death in industrialised countries. Survival depends on prompt identification of cardiac arrest and on the quality and timing of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation. For laypeople, there has been a growing interest on hands-only CPR, meaning continuous chest compression without interruption to perform ventilations. It has been demonstrated that intentional interruptions in hands-only CPR can increase its quality. The aim of this randomised trial is to compare three CPR protocols performed with different intentional interruptions with hands-only CPR. This is a prospective randomised trial performed in eight training centres. Laypeople who passed a basic life support course will be randomised to one of the four CPR protocols in an 8 min simulated cardiac arrest scenario on a manikin: (1) 30 compressions and 2 s pause; (2) 50 compressions and 5 s pause; (3) 100 compressions and 10 s pause; (4) hands-only. The calculated sample size is 552 people. The primary outcome is the percentage of chest compression performed with correct depth evaluated by a computerised feedback system (Laerdal QCPR). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: . Due to the nature of the study, we obtained a waiver from the Ethics Committee (IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy). All participants will sign an informed consent form before randomisation. The results of this study will be published in peer-reviewed journal. The data collected will also be made available in a public data repository. NCT02632500. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation during prolonged basic life support in military medical university students: A manikin study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Zhuo, Chao-nan; Zhang, Lei; Gong, Yu-shun; Yin, Chang-lin; Li, Yong-qin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The quality of chest compressions can be significantly improved after training of rescuers according to the latest national guidelines of China. However, rescuers may be unable to maintain adequate compression or ventilation throughout a response of average emergency medical services because of increased rescuer fatigue. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in training of military medical university students during a prolonged basic life support (BLS). METHODS: A 3-hour BLS training was given to 120 military medical university students. Six months after the training, 115 students performed single rescuer BLS on a manikin for 8 minutes. The qualities of chest compressions as well as ventilations were assessed. RESULTS: The average compression depth and rate were 53.7±5.3 mm and 135.1±15.7 compressions per minute respectively. The proportion of chest compressions with appropriate depth was 71.7%±28.4%. The average ventilation volume was 847.2±260.4 mL and the proportion of students with adequate ventilation was 63.5%. Compared with male students, significantly lower compression depth (46.7±4.8 vs. 54.6±4.8 mm, PCPR was found to be related to gender, body weight, and body mass index of students in this study. The quality of chest compressions was well maintained in male students during 8 minutes of conventional CPR but declined rapidly in female students after 2 minutes according to the latest national guidelines. Physical fitness and rescuer fatigue did not affect the quality of ventilation. PMID:26401177

  3. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)-related posterior rib fractures in neonates and infants following recommended changes in CPR techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, I; Pingen, A; Schiffmann, H; Vogel, M; Vlajnic, D; Ganschow, R; Born, M

    2014-07-01

    Posterior rib fractures are highly indicative of non-accidental trauma (NAT) in infants. Since 2000, the "two-thumbs" technique for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of newborns and infants has been recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA). This technique is similar to the grip on an infant's thorax while shaking. Is it possible that posterior rib fractures in newborns and infants could be caused by the "two-thumbs" technique? Using computerized databases from three German children's hospitals, we identified all infants less than 12 months old who underwent professional CPR within a 10-year period. We included all infants with anterior-posterior chest radiographs taken after CPR. Exclusion criteria were sternotomy, osteopenia, various other bone diseases and NAT. The radiographs were independently reviewed by the Chief of Pediatric Radiology (MB) and a Senior Pediatrician, Head of the local Child Protection Team (IF). Eighty infants with 546 chest radiographs were identified, and 50 of those infants underwent CPR immediately after birth. Data concerning the length of CPR was available for 41 infants. The mean length of CPR was 11min (range: 1-180min, median: 3min). On average, there were seven radiographs per infant. A total of 39 infants had a follow-up radiograph after at least 10 days. No rib fracture was visible on any chest X-ray. The results of this study suggest rib fracture after the use of the "two-thumbs" CPR technique is uncommon. Thus, there should be careful consideration of abuse when these fractures are identified, regardless of whether CPR was performed and what technique used. The discovery of rib fractures in an infant who has undergone CPR without underlying bone disease or major trauma warrants a full child protection investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of inclined step stool on the quality of chest compression during in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seong-Woo; Lee, Byung Kook; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Park, Sang Wook; Choi, Sung Soo; Lee, Chang-Hee; Ryu, So-Yeon

    2014-08-01

    A step stool is an ordinary device to improve the quality of chest compression (CC) during in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We investigated the effect of an inclined step stool on the quality of CC during CPR on a hospital bed. We conducted a randomized crossover study of simulation using a manikin. Two different methods of CC were performed and compared: CC using a flat stool and CC using an inclined (20°) stool. Each session of CC was performed for 2 minutes using a metronome at a rate of 110 beats per minute. The primary outcome was the depth of CC. The adequate CC rate, duty cycle, rate of incomplete recoil, and the angle between the arm of the participants and the bed were also measured. The median value of the mean depth of CC was 50.5 mm (45.0-57.0 mm) in the flat stool group and 54.5 mm (47.0-58.3 mm) in the inclined stool group (P = .014). The adequate CC rate was significantly higher in the inclined stool group (84.2% [37.6%-99.1%] vs 57.0% [15.2%-95.0%]; P = .016). The duty cycle and the rate of incomplete recoil were comparable between the 2 groups. The angles between the arm of the participants and the bed were more vertical in the inclined stool group (84.0° ± 5.2° vs 81.0° ± 4.8°; P = .014). Using an inclined stool resulted in an improvement in the depth of CC and the adequate CC rate without increasing the rate of incomplete chest recoil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Adequate performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques during simulated cardiac arrest over and under protective equipment in football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waninger, Kevin N; Goodbred, Andrew; Vanic, Keith; Hauth, John; Onia, Joshua; Stoltzfus, Jill; Melanson, Scott

    2014-07-01

    To investigate (1) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) adequacy during simulated cardiac arrest of equipped football players and (2) whether protective football equipment impedes CPR performance measures. Exploratory crossover study performed on Laerdal SimMan 3 G interactive manikin simulator. Temple University/St Luke's University Health Network Regional Medical School Simulation Laboratory. Thirty BCLS-certified ATCs and 6 ACLS-certified emergency department technicians. Subjects were given standardized rescuer scenarios to perform three 2-minute sequences of compression-only CPR. Baseline CPR sequences were captured on each subject. Experimental conditions included 2-minute sequences of CPR either over protective football shoulder pads or under unlaced pads. Subjects were instructed to adhere to 2010 American Heart Association guidelines (initiation of compressions alone at 100/min to 51 mm). Dependent variables included average compression depth, average compression rate, percentage of time chest wall recoiled, and percentage of hands-on contact during compressions. Differences between subject groups were not found to be statistically significant, so groups were combined (n = 36) for analysis of CPR compression adequacy. Compression depth was deeper under shoulder pads than over (P = 0.02), with mean depths of 36.50 and 31.50 mm, respectively. No significant difference was found with compression rate or chest wall recoil. Chest compression depth is significantly decreased when performed over shoulder pads, while there is no apparent effect on rate or chest wall recoil. Although the clinical outcomes from our observed 15% difference in compression depth are uncertain, chest compression under the pads significantly increases the depth of compressions and more closely approaches American Heart Association guidelines for chest compression depth in cardiac arrest.

  6. A study assessing the impact of different teaching modalities for pharmacy students in a Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Rasool, Sahibzada Tasleem

    2013-10-01

    The current study aims to assess the effectiveness of different teaching methods adopted for the practical session of Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). CPR training is one of the compulsory modules of the Public Health Pharmacy (PHP) course at Universiti Sains Malaysia. CPR training comprises of 10% of total marks of the PHP course. To test the effectiveness of the different teaching strategies, three groups were defined using a two-stage cohort distribution-i.e. based on grade point average (GPA) and different teaching modalities. Group One was instructed using images and PowerPoint lecture slides. Group Two was instructed using videos and PowerPoint lecture slides. Group Three was instructed using PowerPoint slides with white boards and videos. Students in Group Three were not provided with a hard/soft copy of the PowerPoint slides and were encouraged to write down all the information on their personal notebooks. A 20-item questionnaire was used to assess the students' understanding toward the CPR session. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Science Students, SPSS version 13®. Based on the response attained, the comparison of the final score among the groups was undertaken using one way ANOVA. Twenty-seven students have participated in this study. Final evaluation using the questionnaire revealed that student's in Group Three had a better understanding of CPR (18.1 ± 1.5, p lecture and use of traditional chalkboard teaching were found significant to improve the students' understanding and learning in the CPR session.

  7. Performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation during prolonged basic life support in military medical university students: A manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Zhuo, Chao-Nan; Zhang, Lei; Gong, Yu-Shun; Yin, Chang-Lin; Li, Yong-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The quality of chest compressions can be significantly improved after training of rescuers according to the latest national guidelines of China. However, rescuers may be unable to maintain adequate compression or ventilation throughout a response of average emergency medical services because of increased rescuer fatigue. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in training of military medical university students during a prolonged basic life support (BLS). A 3-hour BLS training was given to 120 military medical university students. Six months after the training, 115 students performed single rescuer BLS on a manikin for 8 minutes. The qualities of chest compressions as well as ventilations were assessed. The average compression depth and rate were 53.7±5.3 mm and 135.1±15.7 compressions per minute respectively. The proportion of chest compressions with appropriate depth was 71.7%±28.4%. The average ventilation volume was 847.2±260.4 mL and the proportion of students with adequate ventilation was 63.5%. Compared with male students, significantly lower compression depth (46.7±4.8 vs. 54.6±4.8 mm, P<0.001) and adequate compression rate (35.5%±26.5% vs. 76.1%±25.1%, P<0.001) were observed in female students. CPR was found to be related to gender, body weight, and body mass index of students in this study. The quality of chest compressions was well maintained in male students during 8 minutes of conventional CPR but declined rapidly in female students after 2 minutes according to the latest national guidelines. Physical fitness and rescuer fatigue did not affect the quality of ventilation.

  8. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training by Avatars: A Qualitative Study of Medical Students' Experiences Using a Multiplayer Virtual World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt, Johan; Hedman, Leif; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-12-16

    Emergency medical practices are often team efforts. Training for various tasks and collaborations may be carried out in virtual environments. Although promising results exist from studies of serious games, little is known about the subjective reactions of learners when using multiplayer virtual world (MVW) training in medicine. The objective of this study was to reach a better understanding of the learners' reactions and experiences when using an MVW for team training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Twelve Swedish medical students participated in semistructured focus group discussions after CPR training in an MVW with partially preset options. The students' perceptions and feelings related to use of this educational tool were investigated. Using qualitative methodology, discussions were analyzed by a phenomenological data-driven approach. Quality measures included negotiations, back-and-forth reading, triangulation, and validation with the informants. Four categories characterizing the students' experiences could be defined: (1) Focused Mental Training, (2) Interface Diverting Focus From Training, (3) Benefits of Practicing in a Group, and (4) Easy Loss of Focus When Passive. We interpreted the results, compared them to findings of others, and propose advantages and risks of using virtual worlds for learning. Beneficial aspects of learning CPR in a virtual world were confirmed. To achieve high participant engagement and create good conditions for training, well-established procedures should be practiced. Furthermore, students should be kept in an active mode and frequent feedback should be utilized. It cannot be completely ruled out that the use of virtual training may contribute to erroneous self-beliefs that can affect later clinical performance. ©Johan Creutzfeldt, Leif Hedman, Li Felländer-Tsai. Originally published in JMIR Serious Games (http://games.jmir.org), 16.12.2016.

  9. Impact of basic life-support training on the attitudes of health-care workers toward cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A; Alnasser, Manal A; Berhanu, Alamin N; Al-Turaif, Deema A; Alfayez, Abdulrhman I

    2017-09-22

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases the probability of survival of a person with cardiac arrest. Repeating training helps staff retain knowledge in CPR and in use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). Retention of knowledge and skills during and after training in CPR is difficult and requires systematic training with appropriate methodology. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of basic life-support (BLS) training on the attitudes of health-care providers toward initiating CPR and on use of AEDs, and to investigate the factors that influence these attitudes. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in two groups: health-care providers who had just attended a BLS-AED course (post-BLS group, n = 321), and those who had not (pre-BLS group, n = 421). All participants had previously received BLS training. Both groups were given a validated questionnaire to evaluate the status of life-support education and certification, attitudes toward use of CPR and AED and concerns regarding use of CPR and AED. Multiple linear regression analyses were applied to identify significant predictors of the attitude and concern scores. Overall positive attitudes were seen in 53.4% of pre-BLS respondents and 64.8% of post-BLS respondents (χ 2  = 9.66, p = 0.002). Positive attitude was significantly predicted by the recent completion of BLS training (β = 5.15, p attitudes toward CPR performance and the use of AEDs. Training that addressed the concerns of health-care workers could further improve these attitudes.

  10. Relationship between non-technical skills and technical performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: does stress have an influence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krage, Ralf; Zwaan, Laura; Tjon Soei Len, Lian; Kolenbrander, Mark W; van Groeningen, Dick; Loer, Stephan A; Wagner, Cordula; Schober, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    Non-technical skills, such as task management, leadership, situational awareness, communication and decision-making refer to cognitive, behavioural and social skills that contribute to safe and efficient team performance. The importance of these skills during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is increasingly emphasised. Nonetheless, the relationship between non-technical skills and technical performance is poorly understood. We hypothesise that non-technical skills become increasingly important under stressful conditions when individuals are distracted from their tasks, and investigated the relationship between non-technical and technical skills under control conditions and when external stressors are present. In this simulator-based randomised cross-over study, 30 anaesthesiologists and anaesthesia residents from the VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, participated in two different CPR scenarios in random order. In one scenario, external stressors (radio noise and a distractive scripted family member) were added, while the other scenario without stressors served as control condition. Non-technical performance of the team leader and technical performance of the team were measured using the 'Anaesthetists' Non-technical Skill' score and a recently developed technical skills score. Analysis of variance and Pearson correlation coefficients were used for statistical analyses. Non-technical performance declined when external stressors were present (adjusted mean difference 3.9 points, 95% CI 2.4 to 5.5 points). A significant correlation between non-technical and technical performance scores was observed when external stressors were present (r=0.67, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.83, ptechnical performance score (task management, team working, situation awareness, decision-making). During CPR with external stressors, the team's technical performance is related to the non-technical skills of the team leader. This may have important implications for training of

  11. Two-year survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neonatal patients after complex cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gregory; Joffe, Ari R; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Robertson, Charlene M T; Biggs, Wayne S G; Ross, David B; Rebeyka, Ivan M

    2011-03-01

    To examine survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonates having post-operative cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This inception cohort study included all neonates (6 weeks old or less) who received postoperative CPR (Group 1) after cardiac surgery from 1996 to 2005, matched for heart defect, year of surgery, chromosomal abnormality, and socioeconomic status to two neonates who did not receive postoperative CPR (Group 2). Two-year neurodevelopment was prospectively assessed with Bayley Scales of Infant Development II and Adaptive Behavior Assessment System II. Pre-, intra-, and post-operative variables were collected prospectively. Cardiac arrest variables were collected retrospectively. Predictors of mortality were analyzed by univariate analysis and conditional multiple logistic regression. There were 29 patients in Group 1, and 58 patients in Group 2. In survivors, there were no significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 in outcomes [mean (SD)] of mental developmental index [84.5 (12.2) vs. 81.0 (18.9)], psychomotor developmental index [82.8 (13.8) vs. 80.1 (21.9)], General Adaptive Composite [84.6 (15.3) vs. 84.3 (19.2)], Motor scale [8.4 (3.2) vs. 8.0 (3.8)], or delay on any of these scales. Two-year mortality [58.6% Group 1; 8.6% Group 2], was associated on conditional multiple logistic regression with CPR (OR 26.6; 95% CI, 5.4, 129.5). In Group 1, on multiple logistic regression, 2-year mortality was associated with minutes of chest compressions (OR 1.04, 95% CI, 1.01, 1.08). Among neonates having cardiac surgery, CPR is associated with greater mortality. There is no evidence that CPR survivors have different 2-year neurodevelopmental outcomes than those neonates not having CPR. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A clinical observational study analysing the factors associated with hyperventilation during actual cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang O; Shin, Dong Hyuk; Baek, Kwang Je; Hong, Dae Young; Kim, Eun Jung; Kim, Sang Chul; Lee, Kyeong Ryong

    2013-03-01

    This is the first study to identify the factors associated with hyperventilation during actual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the emergency department (ED). All CPR events in the ED were recorded by video from April 2011 to December 2011. The following variables were analysed using review of the recorded CPR data: ventilation rate (VR) during each minute and its associated factors including provider factors (experience, advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) certification), clinical factors (auscultation to confirm successful intubation, suctioning, and comments by the team leader) and time factors (time or day of CPR). Fifty-five adult CPR cases including a total of 673 min sectors were analysed. The higher rates of hyperventilation (VR>10/min) were delivered by inexperienced (53.3% versus 14.2%) or uncertified ACLS provider (52.2% versus 10.8%), during night time (61.0 versus 34.5%) or weekend CPR (53.1% versus 35.6%) and when auscultation to confirm successful intubation was performed (93.5% versus 52.8%) than not (all p<0.0001). However, experienced (25.3% versus 29.7%; p=0.448) or certified ACLS provider (20.6% versus 31.3%; p<0.0001) could not deliver high rate of proper ventilation (VR 8-10/min). Comment by the team leader was most strongly associated with the proper ventilation (odds ratio 7.035, 95% confidence interval 4.512-10.967). Hyperventilation during CPR was associated with inexperienced or uncertified ACLS provider, auscultation to confirm intubation, and night time or weekend CPR. And to deliver proper ventilation, comments by the team leader should be given regardless of providers' expert level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Poor chest compression quality with mechanical compressions in simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized, cross-over manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Hans; Gedeborg, Rolf; Berglund, Lars; Karlsten, Rolf; Johansson, Jakob

    2011-10-01

    Mechanical chest compression devices are being implemented as an aid in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), despite lack of evidence of improved outcome. This manikin study evaluates the CPR-performance of ambulance crews, who had a mechanical chest compression device implemented in their routine clinical practice 8 months previously. The objectives were to evaluate time to first defibrillation, no-flow time, and estimate the quality of compressions. The performance of 21 ambulance crews (ambulance nurse and emergency medical technician) with the authorization to perform advanced life support was studied in an experimental, randomized cross-over study in a manikin setup. Each crew performed two identical CPR scenarios, with and without the aid of the mechanical compression device LUCAS. A computerized manikin was used for data sampling. There were no substantial differences in time to first defibrillation or no-flow time until first defibrillation. However, the fraction of adequate compressions in relation to total compressions was remarkably low in LUCAS-CPR (58%) compared to manual CPR (88%) (95% confidence interval for the difference: 13-50%). Only 12 out of the 21 ambulance crews (57%) applied the mandatory stabilization strap on the LUCAS device. The use of a mechanical compression aid was not associated with substantial differences in time to first defibrillation or no-flow time in the early phase of CPR. However, constant but poor chest compressions due to failure in recognizing and correcting a malposition of the device may counteract a potential benefit of mechanical chest compressions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A quantitative comparison of physiologic indicators of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: Diastolic blood pressure versus end-tidal carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ryan W; French, Benjamin; Kilbaugh, Todd J; Naim, Maryam Y; Wolfe, Heather; Bratinov, George; Shoap, Wesley; Hsieh, Ting-Chang; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Sutton, Robert M

    2016-07-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends monitoring invasive arterial diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) when available. In intensive care unit patients, both may be available to the rescuer. The objective of this study was to compare DBP vs. ETCO2 during CPR as predictors of cardiac arrest survival. In two models of cardiac arrest (primary ventricular fibrillation [VF] and asphyxia-associated VF), 3-month old swine received either standard AHA guideline-based CPR or patient-centric, BP-guided CPR. Mean values of DBP and ETCO2 in the final 2min before the first defibrillation attempt were compared using receiver operating characteristic curves (area under curve [AUC] analysis). The optimal DBP cut point to predict survival was derived and subsequently validated in two independent, randomly generated cohorts. Of 60 animals, 37 (61.7%) survived to 45min. DBP was higher in survivors than in non-survivors (40.6±1.8mmHg vs. 25.9±2.4mmHg; pAUC analysis, DBP was superior to ETCO2 (0.82 vs. 0.60; p=0.025) in discriminating survivors from non-survivors. The optimal DBP cut point in the derivation cohort was 34.1mmHg. In the validation cohort, this cut point demonstrated a sensitivity of 0.78, specificity of 0.81, positive predictive value of 0.64, and negative predictive value of 0.89 for survival. In both primary and asphyxia-associated VF porcine models of cardiac arrest, DBP discriminates survivors from non-survivors better than ETCO2. Failure to attain a DBP >34mmHg during CPR is highly predictive of non-survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Quality of dispatch-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation by lay rescuers following a standard protocol in Japan: an observational simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Hideki; Fukushima, Hidetada; Bolstad, Francesco; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2018-04-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is essential for improving the outcomes of sudden cardiac arrest patients. It has been reported that dispatch-assisted CPR (DACPR) accounts for more than half of the incidence of CPR undertaken by bystanders. Its quality, however, can be suboptimal. We aimed to measure the quality of DACPR using a simulation study. We recruited laypersons at a shopping mall and measured the quality of CPR carried out in our simulation. Dispatchers provided instruction in accordance with the standard DACPR protocol in Japan. Twenty-three laypersons (13 with CPR training experience within the past 2 years and 10 with no training experience) participated in this study. The median chest compression rate and depth were 106/min and 33 mm, respectively. The median time interval from placing the 119 call to the start of chest compressions was 119 s. No significant difference was found between the groups with and without training experience. However, subjects with training experience more frequently placed their hands correctly on the manikin (84.6% versus 40.0%; P = 0.026). Twelve participants (52.2%, seven in trained and five in untrained group) interrupted chest compressions for 3-18 s, because dispatchers asked if the patient started breathing or moving. This current simulation study showed that the quality of DACPR carried out by lay rescuers can be less than optimal in terms of depth, hand placement, and minimization of pauses. Further studies are required to explore better DACPR instruction methods to help lay rescuers perform CPR with optimal quality.

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Video in Advance Care Planning for Progressive Pancreas and Hepatobiliary Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volandes, Angelo E.; Chen, Ling Y.; Gary, Kristen A.; Li, Yuelin; Agre, Patricia; Levin, Tomer T.; Reidy, Diane L.; Meng, Raymond D.; Segal, Neil H.; Yu, Kenneth H.; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K.; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Kelsen, David P.; O'Reilly, Eileen M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important advance directive (AD) topic in patients with progressive cancer; however such discussions are challenging. Objective This study investigates whether video educational information about CPR engenders broader advance care planning (ACP) discourse. Methods Patients with progressive pancreas or hepatobiliary cancer were randomized to an educational CPR video or a similar CPR narrative. The primary end-point was the difference in ACP documentation one month posttest between arms. Secondary end-points included study impressions; pre- and post-intervention knowledge of and preferences for CPR and mechanical ventilation; and longitudinal patient outcomes. Results Fifty-six subjects were consented and analyzed. Rates of ACP documentation (either formal ADs or documented discussions) were 40% in the video arm (12/30) compared to 15% in the narrative arm (4/26), OR=3.6 [95% CI: 0.9–18.0], p=0.07. Post-intervention knowledge was higher in both arms. Posttest, preferences for CPR had changed in the video arm but not in the narrative arm. Preferences regarding mechanical ventilation did not change in either arm. The majority of subjects in both arms reported the information as helpful and comfortable to discuss, and they recommended it to others. More deaths occurred in the video arm compared to the narrative arm, and more subjects died in hospice settings in the video arm. Conclusions This pilot randomized trial addressing downstream ACP effects of video versus narrative decision tools demonstrated a trend towards more ACP documentation in video subjects. This trend, as well as other video effects, is the subject of ongoing study. PMID:23725233

  17. Sodium bicarbonate on severe metabolic acidosis during prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Shin; Kim, Youn-Jung; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Donnino, Michael W; Kim, Won Young

    2018-04-01

    Sodium bicarbonate administration during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is controversial. Current guidelines recommend sodium bicarbonate injection in patients with existing metabolic acidosis, but clinical trials, particularly, those involving patients with acidosis, are limited. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of sodium bicarbonate administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients with severe metabolic acidosis during prolonged CPR. Prospective, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled pilot trial was conducted between January 2015 and December 2015, at a single center emergency department (ED). After 10 minutes of CPR, patients who failed to achieve return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and with severe metabolic acidosis (pH<7.1 or bicarbonate <10 mEq/L) were enrolled. Sodium bicarbonate (n=25) or normal saline (n=25) were administered. The primary end point was sustained ROSC. The secondary end points were the change of acidosis and good neurologic survival. Sodium bicarbonate group had significant effect on pH (6.99 vs. 6.90, P=0.038) and bicarbonate levels (21.0 vs. 8.0 mEq/L, P=0.007). However, no significant differences showed between sodium bicarbonate and placebo groups in sustained ROSC (4.0% vs. 16.0%, P=0.349) or good neurologic survival at 1 month (0.0% vs. 4.0%, P=1.000). The use of sodium bicarbonate improved acid-base status, but did not improve the rate of ROSC and good neurologic survival. We could not draw a conclusion, but our pilot data could be used to design a larger trial to verify the efficacy of sodium bicarbonate. NCT02303548 (http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov).

  18. Cardiocerebral resuscitation: facts and prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Dejan Kupnik; Miljenko Križmarić

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the prehospital setting still has to cope with poor lay-rescuer knowledge of resuscitation techniques, low public availability of automated external defi brillators, many detrimental interruptions of chest compressions during lay and professional resuscitation eff orts and suboptimal postresuscitation care. Th erefore the survival of patients aft er cardiac arrest remains poor. To address those fl aws, cardiopulmonary resuscitatio...

  19. The 2010 American Heart Association guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiac care: an overview of the changes to pediatric basic and advanced life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Becky; Chacko, Jisha; Sallee, Donna

    2011-06-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) has a strong commitment to implementing scientific research-based interventions for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care. This article presents the 2010 AHA major guideline changes to pediatric basic life support (BLS) and pediatric advanced life support (PALS) and the rationale for the changes. The following topics are covered in this article: (1) current understanding of cardiac arrest in the pediatric population, (2) major changes in pediatric BLS, and (3) major changes in PALS. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Comparison of continuous compression with regular ventilations versus 30:2 compressions-ventilations strategy during mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengfei; Liu, Qingyu; Zheng, Guanghui; Liu, Zhifeng; Jiang, Longyuan; Lin, Qing; Chen, Rui; Tang, Wanchun

    2017-09-01

    A compression-ventilation (C:V) ratio of 30:2 is recommended for adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by the current American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines. However, continuous chest compression (CCC) is an alternative strategy for CPR that minimizes interruption especially when an advanced airway exists. In this study, we investigated the effects of 30:2 mechanical CPR when compared with CCC in combination with regular ventilation in a porcine model. Sixteen male domestic pigs weighing 39±2 kg were utilized. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and untreated for 7 min. The animals were then randomly assigned to receive CCC combined with regular ventilation (CCC group) or 30:2 CPR (VC group). Mechanical chest compression was implemented with a miniaturized mechanical chest compressor. At the same time of beginning of precordial compression, the animals were mechanically ventilated at a rate of 10 breaths-per-minute in the CCC group or with a 30:2 C:V ratio in the VC group. Defibrillation was delivered by a single 150 J shock after 5 min of CPR. If failed to resuscitation, CPR was resumed for 2 min before the next shock. The protocol was stopped if successful resuscitation or at a total of 15 min. The resuscitated animals were observed for 72 h. Coronary perfusion pressure, end-tidal carbon dioxide and carotid blood flow in the VC group were similar to those achieved in the CCC group during CPR. No significant differences were observed in arterial blood gas parameters between two groups at baseline, VF 6 min, CPR 4 min and 30, 120 and 360 min post-resuscitation. Although extravascular lung water index of both groups significantly increased after resuscitation, no distinct difference was found between CCC and VC groups. All animals were successfully resuscitated and survived for 72 h with favorable neurologic outcomes in both groups. However, obviously more numbers of rib fracture were observed in CCC animals in comparison with VC animals. There was no

  1. Effects of Blended Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Defibrillation E-learning on Nursing Students' Self-efficacy, Problem Solving, and Psychomotor Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju Young; Woo, Chung Hee; Yoo, Jae Yong

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to identify the educational effects of a blended e-learning program for graduating nursing students on self-efficacy, problem solving, and psychomotor skills for core basic nursing skills. A one-group pretest/posttest quasi-experimental design was used with 79 nursing students in Korea. The subjects took a conventional 2-week lecture-based practical course, together with spending an average of 60 minutes at least twice a week during 2 weeks on the self-guided e-learning content for basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation using Mosby's Nursing Skills database. Self- and examiner-reported data were collected between September and November 2014 and analyzed using descriptive statistics, paired t test, and Pearson correlation. The results showed that subjects who received blended e-learning education had improved problem-solving abilities (t = 2.654) and self-efficacy for nursing practice related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (t = 3.426). There was also an 80% to 90% rate of excellent postintervention performance for the majority of psychomotor skills, but the location of chest compressions, compression rate per minute, artificial respiration, and verification of patient outcome still showed low levels of performance. In conclusion, blended E-learning, which allows self-directed repetitive learning, may be more effective in enhancing nursing competencies than conventional practice education.

  2. Use of backboard and deflation improve quality of chest compression when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is performed on a typical air inflated mattress configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaehoon; Kang, Hyunggoo; Chee, Youngjoon; Lim, Taeho; Song, Yeongtak; Cho, Youngsuk; Je, Sangmo

    2013-02-01

    No study has examined the effectiveness of backboards and air deflation for achieving adequate chest compression (CC) depth on air mattresses with the typical configurations seen in intensive care units. To determine this efficacy, we measured mattress compression depth (MCD, mm) on these surfaces using dual accelerometers. Eight cardiopulmonary resuscitation providers performed CCs on manikins lying on 4 different surfaces using a visual feedback system. The surfaces were as follows: A, a bed frame; B, a deflated air mattress placed on top of a foam mattress laid on a bed frame; C, a typical air mattress configuration with an inflated air mattress placed on a foam mattress laid on a bed frame; and D, C with a backboard. Deflation of the air mattress decreased MCD significantly (B; 14.74 ± 1.36 vs C; 30.16 ± 3.96, P deflation of the air mattress decreased MCD more than use of a backboard (B; 14.74 ± 1.36 vs D; 25.46 ± 2.89, P = 0.002). The use of a both a backboard and a deflated air mattress in this configuration reduces MCD and thus helps achieve accurate CC depth during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  3. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training in Schools Following 8 Years of Mandating Legislation in Denmark: A Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Zinckernagel, Line; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Weeke, Peter; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-03-14

    School cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training has become mandatory in many countries, but whether legislation has translated into implementation of CPR training is largely unknown. We assessed CPR training of students following 8 years of legislative mandates in Denmark. A nationwide cross-sectional survey of Danish school leadership (n=1240) and ninth-grade homeroom teachers (n=1381) was carried out for school year 2013-2014. Qualitative interviews and the Theory of Planned Behavior were used to construct the survey. Logistic regression models were employed to identify factors associated with completed CPR training. Information from 63.1% of eligible schools was collected: 49.3% (n=611) of leadership and 48.2% (n=665) of teachers responded. According to teachers, 28.4% (95% CI 25.0% to 32.0%) and 10.3% (95% CI 8.1% to 12.8%) of eligible classes had completed CPR and automated external defibrillator training, respectively. Among leadership, 60.2% (95% CI 56.2% to 64.1%) reported CPR training had occurred during the 3 years prior to the survey. Factors associated with completed CPR training included believing other schools were conducting training (odds ratio [OR] 9.68 [95% CI 4.65-20.1]), awareness of mandating legislation (OR 4.19 [95% CI 2.65-6.62]), presence of a school CPR training coordinator (OR 3.01 [95% CI 1.84-4.92]), teacher feeling competent to conduct training (OR 2.78 [95% CI 1.74-4.45]), and having easy access to training material (OR 2.08 [95% CI 1.57-2.76]). Despite mandating legislation, school CPR training has not been successfully implemented. Completed CPR training was associated with believing other schools were conducting training, awareness of mandating legislation, presence of a school CPR training coordinator, teachers teacher feeling competent to conduct training, and having easy access to training material. Facilitating these factors may increase rates of school CPR training. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the

  4. Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Is Clustered and Associated With Neighborhood Socioeconomic Characteristics: A Geospatial Analysis of Kent County, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uber, Amy; Sadler, Richard C; Chassee, Todd; Reynolds, Joshua C

    2017-08-01

    Geographic clustering of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is associated with demographic and socioeconomic features of the community where out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) occurred, although this association remains largely untested in rural areas. With a significant rural component and relative racial homogeneity, Kent County, Michigan, provides a unique setting to externally validate or identify new community features associated with bystander CPR. Using a large, countywide data set, we tested for geographic clustering of bystander CPR and its associations with community socioeconomic features. Secondary analysis of adult OHCA subjects (2010-2015) in the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) data set for Kent County, Michigan. After linking geocoded OHCA cases to U.S. census data, we used Moran's I-test to assess for spatial autocorrelation of population-weighted cardiac arrest rate by census block group. Getis-Ord Gi statistic assessed for spatial clustering of bystander CPR and mixed-effects hierarchical logistic regression estimated adjusted associations between community features and bystander CPR. Of 1,592 subjects, 1,465 met inclusion criteria. Geospatial analysis revealed significant clustering of OHCA in more populated/urban areas. Conversely, bystander CPR was less likely in these areas (99% confidence) and more likely in suburban and rural areas (99% confidence). Adjusting for clinical, demographic, and socioeconomic covariates, bystander CPR was associated with public location (odds ratio [OR] = 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-1.39), initially shockable rhythms (OR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.12-1.96), and those in urban neighborhoods (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.38-0.77). Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and bystander CPR are geographically clustered in Kent County, Michigan, but bystander CPR is inversely associated with urban designation. These results offer new insight into bystander CPR patterns in mixed urban and rural

  5. Results of rapid-response extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children with refractory cardiac arrest following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Awan, Abid; Manlhiot, Cedric; Guechef, Alexander; Al-Halees, Zohair; Al-Ahmadi, Mamdouh; McCrindle, Brian W; Kalloghlian, Avedis

    2014-02-01

    Survival of children having cardiac arrest refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is very poor. We sought to examine current era outcomes of extracorporeal CPR (ECPR) support for refractory arrest following surgical correction of congenital heart disease. Demographic, anatomical, clinical, surgical and support details of children requiring postoperative ECPR (2007-12) were included in multivariable logistic regression models to determine the factors associated with survival. Thirty-nine children, median age 44 days (4 days-10 years), required postoperative ECPR at a median interval of 1 day (up to 15 days) after surgery. Thirteen (33%) children had single-ventricle pathology; Risk Adjustment in Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS)-1 categories were 2, 3, 4 and 6 in 6, 15, 13 and 5 patients, respectively. Median CPR duration was 34 (8-125) min, while median support duration was 4 (1-17) days. Seven (18%) patients underwent cardiac re-operation, 28 (72%) survived >24 h after support discontinuation and 16 (41%) survived. Survival rates in neonates, infants and older children were 53, 39 and 17% (P=0.13). Survival rates for single- vs two-ventricle pathology patients were 54 and 35%, (P=0.25) and 50, 47, 23 and 60% in RACHS-1 2, 3, 4 and 6 patients, respectively (P=0.37). Survivors had shorter CPR duration (25 vs 34 min, P=0.05), lower pre-arrest lactate (2.6 vs 4.6 mmol/l, P=0.05) and postextracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) peak lactate (15.4 vs 20.0 mmol/l, P<0.001). On multivariable analysis, factors associated with death were higher immediate post-ECMO lactate (odds ratio, OR 1.34 per mmol/l, P=0.008) and renal failure requiring haemodialysis (OR 14.1, P=0.01). ECPR plays a valuable role in children having refractory postoperative cardiac arrest. Survival is unrelated to cardiac physiology or surgical complexity. Timely support prior to the emergence of end-organ injury and surgical correction of residual cardiac lesions might enhance

  6. Association of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Survival According to Ambulance Response Times After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gerds, Thomas A; Kragholm, Kristian; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Karlsson, Lena; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-12-20

    Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but it is unknown to what degree bystander CPR remains positively associated with survival with increasing time to potential defibrillation. The main objective was to examine the association of bystander CPR with survival as time to advanced treatment increases. We studied 7623 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients between 2005 and 2011, identified through the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between time from 911 call to emergency medical service arrival (response time) and survival according to whether bystander CPR was provided (yes or no). Reported are 30-day survival chances with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals. With increasing response times, adjusted 30-day survival chances decreased for both patients with bystander CPR and those without. However, the contrast between the survival chances of patients with versus without bystander CPR increased over time: within 5 minutes, 30-day survival was 14.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.8-16.4) versus 6.3% (95% CI: 5.1-7.6), corresponding to 2.3 times higher chances of survival associated with bystander CPR; within 10 minutes, 30-day survival chances were 6.7% (95% CI: 5.4-8.1) versus 2.2% (95% CI: 1.5-3.1), corresponding to 3.0 times higher chances of 30-day survival associated with bystander CPR. The contrast in 30-day survival became statistically insignificant when response time was >13 minutes (bystander CPR vs no bystander CPR: 3.7% [95% CI: 2.2-5.4] vs 1.5% [95% CI: 0.6-2.7]), but 30-day survival was still 2.5 times higher associated with bystander CPR. Based on the model and Danish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest statistics, an additional 233 patients could potentially be saved annually if response time was reduced from 10 to 5 minutes and 119 patients if response time was reduced from 7 (the median

  7. Estimating cost-effectiveness of mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation training strategies to improve survival from cardiac arrest in private locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swor, Robert; Compton, Scott

    2004-01-01

    Most cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) trainees are young, and most cardiac arrests occur in private residences witnessed by older individuals. To estimate the cost-effectiveness of a CPR training program targeted at citizens over the age of 50 years compared with that of current nontargeted public CPR training. A model was developed using cardiac arrest and known demographic data from a single suburban zip code (population 36,325) including: local data (1997-1999) regarding cardiac arrest locations (public vs. private); incremental survival with CPR (historical survival rate 7.8%, adjusted odds ratio for CPR 2.0); arrest bystander demographics obtained from bystander telephone interviews; zip code demographics regarding population age and distribution; and 12.50 dollars per student for the cost of CPR training. Published rates of CPR training programs by age were used to estimate the numbers typically trained. Several assumptions were made: 1) there would be one bystander per. arrest; 2) the bystander would always perform CPR if trained; 3) cardiac arrest would be evenly distributed in the population; and 4) CPR training for a proportion of the population would proportionally increase CPR provision. Rates of arrest, bystanders by age, number of CPR trainees needed to result in increased arrest survival, and training cost per life saved for a one-year study period were calculated. There were 24.3 cardiac arrests per year, with 21.9 (90%) occurring in homes. In 66.5% of the home arrests, the bystander was more than 50 years old. To yield one additional survivor using the current CPR training strategy, 12,306 people needed to be trained (3,510 bystanders aged 50 years), which resulted in CPR provision to 7.14 additional patients. The training cost per life saved for a bystander aged 50 years was 785,040 dollars. Using a strategy of training only those cost of 53,383 dollars per life saved. Using these assumptions, current CPR training strategy is not a cost

  8. Video-Only Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Education for High-Risk Families Before Hospital Discharge: A Multicenter Pragmatic Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewer, Audrey L; Putt, Mary E; Becker, Lance B; Riegel, Barbara J; Li, Jiaqi; Leary, Marion; Shea, Judy A; Kirkpatrick, James N; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Groeneveld, Peter W; Abella, Benjamin S

    2016-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training rates in the United States are low, highlighting the need to develop CPR educational approaches that are simpler, with broader dissemination potential. The minimum training required to ensure long-term skill retention remains poorly characterized. We compared CPR skill retention among laypersons randomized to training with video-only (VO; no manikin) with those trained with a video self-instruction kit (VSI; with manikin). We hypothesized that VO training would be noninferior to the VSI approach with respect to chest compression (CC) rate. We performed a prospective, cluster randomized trial of CPR education for family members of patients with high-risk cardiac conditions on hospital cardiac units, using a multicenter pragmatic design. Eight hospitals were randomized to offer either VO or VSI training before discharge using volunteer trainers. CPR skills were assessed 6 months post training. Mean CC rate among those trained with VO compared with those trained with VSI was assessed with a noninferiority margin set at 8 CC per min; as a secondary outcome, mean differences in CC depth were assessed. From February 2012 to May 2015, 1464 subjects were enrolled and 522 subjects completed a skills assessment. The mean CC rates were 87.7 (VO) CC per min and 89.3 (VSI) CC per min; we concluded noninferiority for VO based on a mean difference of -1.6 (90% confidence interval, -5.2 to 2.1). The mean CC depth was 40.2 mm (VO) and 45.8 mm (VSI) with a mean difference of -5.6 (95% confidence interval, -7.6 to -3.7). Results were similar after multivariate regression adjustment. In this large, prospective trial of CPR skill retention, VO training yielded a noninferior difference in CC rate compared with VSI training. CC depth was greater in the VSI group. These findings suggest a potential trade-off in efforts for broad dissemination of basic CPR skills; VO training might allow for greater scalability and dissemination, but with a

  9. Exploration of the impact of a voice activated decision support system (VADSS) with video on resuscitation performance by lay rescuers during simulated cardiopulmonary arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Elizabeth A; Heine, Margaret; Shilkofski, Nicole S; Bradshaw, Jamie Haggerty; Nelson-McMillan, Kristen; Duval-Arnould, Jordan; Elfenbein, Ron

    2015-03-01

    To assess whether access to a voice activated decision support system (VADSS) containing video clips demonstrating resuscitation manoeuvres was associated with increased compliance with American Heart Association Basic Life Support (AHA BLS) guidelines. This was a prospective, randomised controlled trial. Subjects with no recent clinical experience were randomised to the VADSS or control group and participated in a 5-min simulated out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest with another 'bystander'. Data on performance for predefined outcome measures based on the AHA BLS guidelines were abstracted from videos and the simulator log. 31 subjects were enrolled (VADSS 16 vs control 15), with no significant differences in baseline characteristics. Study subjects in the VADSS were more likely to direct the bystander to: (1) perform compressions to ventilations at the correct ratio of 30:2 (VADSS 15/16 (94%) vs control 4/15 (27%), p=compressor versus ventilator roles after 2 min (VADSS 12/16 (75%) vs control 2/15 (13%), p=0.001). The VADSS group took longer to initiate chest compressions than the control group: VADSS 159.5 (±53) s versus control 78.2 (±20) s, pcontrol 75.4 (±8.0), p=0.35. The use of an audio and video assisted decision support system during a simulated out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest prompted lay rescuers to follow cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines but was also associated with an unacceptable delay to starting chest compressions. Future studies should explore: (1) if video is synergistic to audio prompts, (2) how mobile technologies may be leveraged to spread CPR decision support and (3) usability testing to avoid unintended consequences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. A qualitative study about experiences and emotions of emergency medical technicians and out-of-hospital emergency nurses after performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation resulting in death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Aedo, I; Pérez-Urdiales, I; Unanue-Arza, S; García-Azpiazu, Z; Ballesteros-Peña, S

    To explore the experiences, emotions and coping skills among emergency medical technicians and emergency nurses after performing out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation manoeuvres resulting in death. An exploratory qualitative research was performed. Seven emergency medical technicians and six emergency nurses were selected by non-probability sampling among emergency medical system workers. The meetings took place up to information saturation, achieved after six individual interviews and a focal group. The meetings were then transcribed and a manual and inductive analysis of the contents performed. After a failed resuscitation several short and long-term reactions appear. They can be negatives, such as sadness or uncertainty, or positives, such as the feeling of having done everything possible to save the patient's life. Emotional stress increases when ambulance staff have to talk with the deceased's family or when the patient is a child. The workers don't know of a coping strategy other than talking about their emotions with their colleagues. Death after a failed resuscitation can be viewed as a traumatic experience for rescuers. Being in contact with the suffering of others is an emotional, stress-generating factor with direct repercussions on the working and personal lives of emergency staff. Nevertheless, structured coping techniques are not common among those professionals. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of cardiopulmonary resuscitation practices in emergency departments for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims in Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA victims in Lebanon is low. A national policy on resuscitation practice is lacking. This survey explored the practices of emergency physicians related to the resuscitation of OHCA victims in Lebanon. Methods: A sample of 705 physicians working in emergency departments (EDs was recruited and surveyed using the LimeSurvey software (Carsten Schmitz, Germany. Seventy-five participants responded, yielding 10.64% response rate. Results: The most important factors in the participants' decision to initiate or continue resuscitation were presence of pulse on arrival (93.2%, underlying cardiac rhythm (93.1%, the physician's ethical duty to resuscitate (93.2%, transport time to the ED (89%, and down time (84.9%. The participants were optimistic regarding the survival of OHCA victims (58.1% reporting > 10% survival and reported frequent resuscitation attempts in medically futile situations. The most frequently reported challenges during resuscitation decisions were related to pressure or presence of victim's family (38.8% and lack of policy (30%. Conclusion: In our setting, physicians often rely on well-established criteria for initiating/continuing resuscitation; however, their decisions are also influenced by cultural factors such as victim's family wishes. The findings support the need for a national policy on resuscitation of OHCA victims.

  12. Relationship between non-technical skills and technical performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: does stress have an influence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krage, R.; Zwaan, L.; Tjon Soei Len, L.; Kolenbrander, M.; Groeningen, D. van; Loer, S.A.; Wagner, C.; Schober, P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-technical skills, such as task management, leadership, situational awareness, communication and decision-making refer to cognitive, behavioural and social skills that contribute to safe and efficient team performance. The importance of these skills during cardiopulmonary

  13. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Infants and Children With Cardiac Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Bradley S; Tabbutt, Sarah; MacLaren, Graeme; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Adatia, Ian; Atkins, Dianne L; Checchia, Paul A; DeCaen, Allan; Fink, Ericka L; Hoffman, George M; Jefferies, John L; Kleinman, Monica; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Licht, Daniel J; Macrae, Duncan; Ravishankar, Chitra; Samson, Ricardo A; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Toms, Rune; Tweddell, James; Laussen, Peter C

    2018-04-23

    Cardiac arrest occurs at a higher rate in children with heart disease than in healthy children. Pediatric basic life support and advanced life support guidelines focus on delivering high-quality resuscitation in children with normal hearts. The complexity and variability in pediatric heart disease pose unique challenges during resuscitation. A writing group appointed by the American Heart Association reviewed the literature addressing resuscitation in children with heart disease. MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases were searched from 1966 to 2015, cross-referencing pediatric heart disease with pertinent resuscitation search terms. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association classification of recommendations and levels of evidence for practice guidelines were used. The recommendations in this statement concur with the critical components of the 2015 American Heart Association pediatric basic life support and pediatric advanced life support guidelines and are meant to serve as a resuscitation supplement. This statement is meant for caregivers of children with heart disease in the prehospital and in-hospital settings. Understanding the anatomy and physiology of the high-risk pediatric cardiac population will promote early recognition and treatment of decompensation to prevent cardiac arrest, increase survival from cardiac arrest by providing high-quality resuscitations, and improve outcomes with postresuscitation care. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Comparison of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality Between Standard Versus Telephone-Basic Life Support Training Program in Middle-Aged and Elderly Housewives: A Randomized Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Han; Lee, Yu Jin; Lee, Eui Jung; Ro, Young Sun; Lee, KyungWon; Lee, Hyeona; Jang, Dayea Beatrice; Song, Kyoung Jun; Shin, Sang Do; Myklebust, Helge; Birkenes, Tonje Søraas

    2018-02-01

    For cardiac arrests witnessed at home, the witness is usually a middle-aged or older housewife. We compared the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance of bystanders trained with the newly developed telephone-basic life support (T-BLS) program and those trained with standard BLS (S-BLS) training programs. Twenty-four middle-aged and older housewives without previous CPR education were enrolled and randomized into two groups of BLS training programs. The T-BLS training program included concepts and current instruction protocols for telephone-assisted CPR, whereas the S-BLS training program provided training for BLS. After each training course, the participants simulated CPR and were assisted by a dispatcher via telephone. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality was measured and recorded using a mannequin simulator. The primary outcome was total no-flow time (>1.5 seconds without chest compression) during simulation. Among 24 participants, two (8.3%) who experienced mechanical failure of simulation mannequin and one (4.2%) who violated simulation protocols were excluded at initial simulation, and two (8.3%) refused follow-up after 6 months. The median (interquartile range) total no-flow time during initial simulation was 79.6 (66.4-96.9) seconds for the T-BLS training group and 147.6 (122.5-184.0) seconds for the S-BLS training group (P trained with the T-BLS training program showed shorter no-flow time and fewer interruptions during bystander CPR simulation assisted by a dispatcher.

  15. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a load-distributing band external cardiac support device for in-hospital cardiac arrest: a single centre experience of AutoPulse-CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, J R; White, S; Quinn, N; Gubran, C J; Ludman, P F; Townend, J N; Doshi, S N

    2015-02-01

    Poor quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) predicts adverse outcome. During invasive cardiac procedures automated-CPR (A-CPR) may help maintain effective resuscitation. The use of A-CPR following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) remains poorly described. Firstly, we aimed to assess the efficiency of healthcare staff using A-CPR in a cardiac arrest scenario at baseline, following re-training and over time (Scenario-based training). Secondly, we studied our clinical experience of A-CPR at our institution over a 2-year period, with particular emphasis on the details of invasive cardiac procedures performed, problems encountered, resuscitation rates and in-hospital outcome (AutoPulse-CPR Registry). Scenario-based training: Forty healthcare professionals were assessed. At baseline, time-to-position device was slow (mean 59 (±24) s (range 15-96s)), with the majority (57%) unable to mode-switch. Following re-training time-to-position reduced (28 (±9) s, pCPR Registry: 285 patients suffered IHCA, 25 received A-CPR. Survival to hospital discharge following conventional CPR was 28/260 (11%) and 7/25 (28%) following A-CPR. A-CPR supported invasive procedures in 9 patients, 2 of whom had A-CPR dependant circulation during transfer to the catheter lab. A-CPR may provide excellent haemodynamic support and facilitate simultaneous invasive cardiac procedures. A significant learning curve exists when integrating A-CPR into clinical practice. Further studies are required to better define the role and effectiveness of A-CPR following IHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chest Compressions during Sustained Inflations Improve Recovery When Compared to a 3:1 Compression:Ventilation Ratio during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Neonatal Porcine Model of Asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Elliott S; Görens, Immanuel; Cheung, Po-Yin; Lee, Tze-Fun; Lu, Min; O'Reilly, Megan; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2017-01-01

    Recently, sustained inflations (SI) during chest compression (CC) (CC+SI) have been suggested as an alternative to the current approach during neonatal resuscitation. No previous study compared CC+SI using CC rates of 90/min to the current 3:1 compression:ventilation ratio (C:V). To determine whether CC+SI versus a 3:1 C:V reduces the time to the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and improves hemodynamic recovery in newborn piglets with asphyxia-induced bradycardia. Term newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 45-min normocapnic hypoxia followed by asphyxia. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated when the heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Piglets were randomized into 3 groups: CC during SI at a rate of 90 CC/min (SI+CC 90, n = 8), a 3:1 C:V using 90 CC and 30 inflations (3:1, n = 8), or a sham group (n = 6). Cardiac function, carotid blood flow, cerebral oxygenation, and respiratory parameters were continuously recorded throughout the experiment. CC+SI significantly reduced the median (IQR) time of ROSC, i.e., 34 s (28-156 s) versus 210 s (72-300 s) in the 3:1 group (p = 0.048). CC+SI also significantly reduced the requirement for 100% oxygen, improved respiratory parameters, and resulted in a similar hemodynamic recovery. CC+SI during CPR significantly improved ROSC in a porcine model of neonatal resuscitation. This is of considerable clinical relevance because improved respiratory and hemodynamic parameters potentially minimize morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Relationship between non-technical skills and technical performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Does stress have an influence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krage, R. (Ralf); L. Zwaan (Laura); Tjon Soei Len, L. (Lian); Kolenbrander, M.W. (Mark W); Van Groeningen, D. (DIck); S.A. Loer (Stephan A.); C. Wagner (Cordula); P. Schober (P.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground Non-technical skills, such as task management, leadership, situational awareness, communication and decision-making refer to cognitive, behavioural and social skills that contribute to safe and efficient team performance. The importance of these skills during cardiopulmonary

  18. Comparison of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (BCPR) Performance in the Absence and Presence of Timing Devices for Coordinating Delivery of Ventilatory Breaths and Cardiac Compressions in a Model of Adult Cardiopulmonary Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Victor, IV; West, Sarah; Austin, Paul; Branson, Richard; Beck, George

    2006-01-01

    Astronaut crew medical officers (CMO) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) receive 40 hours of medical training during the 18 months preceding each mission. Part of this training ilncludes twoperson cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) per training guidelines from the American Heart Association (AHA). Recent studies concluded that the use of metronomic tones improves the coordination of CPR by trained clinicians. Similar data for bystander or "trained lay people" (e.g. CMO) performance of CPR (BCPR) have been limited. The purpose of this study was to evailuate whether use of timing devices, such as audible metronomic tones, would improve BCPR perfomance by trained bystanders. Twenty pairs of bystanders trained in two-person BCPR performled BCPR for 4 minutes on a simulated cardiopulmonary arrest patient using three interventions: 1) BCPR with no timing devices, 2) BCPR plus metronomic tones for coordinating compression rate only, 3) BCPR with a timing device and metronome for coordinating ventilation and compression rates, respectively. Bystanders were evaluated on their ability to meet international and AHA CPR guidelines. Bystanders failed to provide the recommended number of breaths and number of compressions in the absence of a timing device and in the presence of audible metronomic tones for only coordinating compression rate. Bystanders using timing devices to coordinate both components of BCPR provided the reco number of breaths and were closer to providing the recommended number of compressions compared with the other interventions. Survey results indicated that bystanders preferred to use a metronome for delivery of compressions during BCPR. BCPR performance is improved by timing devices that coordinate both compressions and breaths.

  19. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation til behandling af hjertestop på hospital udløst af multifaktoriel hypoksi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akkawi, Ali; Petersen, Joachim Hoffmann; Riber, Lars

    2018-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency unit due to respiratory distress. Initially the blood pressure was normal. However, it decreased concomitant with low saturation (70%), and it was decided to intubate her due to hypoxia. During intubation, she developed in-hospital cardiac arrest ...... with pulseless electric activity as initial rhythm. Cardio pulmonary resuscitation was initiated, but sufficient spontaneous circulation was not obtained. We successfully initiated extracorporeal life support, and the patient survived with a good outcome....

  20. Can mass education and a television campaign change the attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a rural community?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Møller; Isbye, Dan Lou; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is improved when bystanders provide Basic Life Support (BLS). However, bystander BLS does not occur frequently. The aim of this study was to assess the effects on attitudes regarding different aspects of resuscitation of a one-year targeted media...... campaign and widespread education in a rural Danish community. Specifically, we investigated if the proportion willing to provide BLS and deploy an automated external defibrillator (AED) increased....

  1. The System-Wide Effect of Real-Time Audiovisual Feedback and Postevent Debriefing for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Keith; Kimani, Peter K; Abella, Benjamin S; Chilwan, Mehboob; Cooke, Matthew W; Davies, Robin P; Field, Richard A; Gao, Fang; Quinton, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel; Woolley, Sarah; Perkins, Gavin D

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of implementing real-time audiovisual feedback with and without postevent debriefing on survival and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality at in-hospital cardiac arrest. A two-phase, multicentre prospective cohort study. Three UK hospitals, all part of one National Health Service Acute Trust. One thousand three hundred and ninety-five adult patients who sustained an in-hospital cardiac arrest at the study hospitals and were treated by hospital emergency teams between November 2009 and May 2013. During phase 1, quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and patient outcomes were measured with no intervention implemented. During phase 2, staff at hospital 1 received real-time audiovisual feedback, whereas staff at hospital 2 received real-time audiovisual feedback supplemented by postevent debriefing. No intervention was implemented at hospital 3 during phase 2. The primary outcome was return of spontaneous circulation. Secondary endpoints included other patient-focused outcomes, such as survival to hospital discharge, and process-focused outcomes, such as chest compression depth. Random-effect logistic and linear regression models, adjusted for baseline patient characteristics, were used to analyze the effect of the interventions on study outcomes. In comparison with no intervention, neither real-time audiovisual feedback (adjusted odds ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.31-1.22; p=0.17) nor real-time audiovisual feedback supplemented by postevent debriefing (adjusted odds ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.35-1.21; p=0.17) was associated with a statistically significant improvement in return of spontaneous circulation or any process-focused outcome. Despite this, there was evidence of a system-wide improvement in phase 2, leading to improvements in return of spontaneous circulation (adjusted odds ratio, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.06-3.30; p=0.03) and process-focused outcomes. Implementation of real-time audiovisual feedback with or without postevent debriefing did not

  2. Introducing systematic dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (telephone-CPR) in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System (AMPDS): implementation process and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dami, Fabrice; Fuchs, Vincent; Praz, Laurent; Vader, John-Paul

    2010-07-01

    In order to improve the quality of our Emergency Medical Services (EMS), to raise bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates and thereby meet what is becoming a universal standard in terms of quality of emergency services, we decided to implement systematic dispatcher-assisted or telephone-CPR (T-CPR) in our medical dispatch center, a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System. The aim of this article is to describe the implementation process, costs and results following the introduction of this new "quality" procedure. This was a prospective study. Over an 8-week period, our EMS dispatchers were given new procedures to provide T-CPR. We then collected data on all non-traumatic cardiac arrests within our state (Vaud, Switzerland) for the following 12 months. For each event, the dispatchers had to record in writing the reason they either ruled out cardiac arrest (CA) or did not propose T-CPR in the event they did suspect CA. All emergency call recordings were reviewed by the medical director of the EMS. The analysis of the recordings and the dispatchers' written explanations were then compared. During the 12-month study period, a total of 497 patients (both adults and children) were identified as having a non-traumatic cardiac arrest. Out of this total, 203 cases were excluded and 294 cases were eligible for T-CPR. Out of these eligible cases, dispatchers proposed T-CPR on 202 occasions (or 69% of eligible cases). They also erroneously proposed T-CPR on 17 occasions when a CA was wrongly identified (false positive). This represents 7.8% of all T-CPR. No costs were incurred to implement our study protocol and procedures. This study demonstrates it is possible, using a brief campaign of sensitization but without any specific training, to implement systematic dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System such as our EMS that had no prior experience with systematic T-CPR. The results in terms of T-CPR delivery

  3. Coronary perfusion pressure and compression quality in maternal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in supine and left-lateral tilt positions: A prospective, crossover study using mannequins and swine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Satoshi; Ichizuka, Kiyotake; Matsuoka, Ryu; Seo, Kohei; Nagatsuka, Masaaki; Sekizawa, Akihiko

    2017-09-01

    The risk of maternal and fetal mortality is high if cardiopulmonary arrest occurs during pregnancy. To assess the best position for maternal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), a prospective randomized crossover study was undertaken, involving basic life support mannequin-based simulation (BLS-MS) and a swine model of pulseless electrical activity (an unstable cardiac state) incorporating a fetal mannequin (PEA-FM). The BLS-MS (performed by certified rescuers) served to evaluate the quality of chest compressions in 30° left lateral tilt (LLT) and supine positions. Based on a 5-point scale, each rescuer subjectively graded their experience. The PEA-FM model was used to compare coronary perfusion pressure readings during CPR in supine, supine with left uterine displacement, 30° LLT, and 30° right lateral tilt positions. Compression rate and correctness of hand position, compression depth, and recoil were measures of compression quality (BLS-MS). Compared with LLT position, supine position enabled correct hand position (rate: 0.99 vs 0.88; p<0.05) and compression depth (rate: 0.76 vs 0.36; p<0.001) significantly more often. Moreover, BLS-MS rescuers found chest compressions significantly easier to perform with the mannequin in supine (vs LLT) position (difficulty score: 1.75 vs 3.95; p<0.001). In the PEA-FM study arm, supine position with left uterine displacement and right lateral tilt positions had the highest and lowest recorded coronary perfusion pressure readings, respectively. Supine position with left uterine displacement is optimal for maternal CPR. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A prospective study to determine the circumstances, incidence and outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a referral hospital in India, in relation to various factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Cardiac arrest has multifactorial aetiology and the outcome depends on timely and correct interventions. We decided to investigate the circumstances, incidence and outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR at a tertiary hospital in India, in relation to various factors, including extensive basic life support and advanced cardiac life support training programme for all nurses and doctors. Methods: It has been over a decade and a half with periodical updates and implementation of newer guidelines prepared by various societies across the world about CPR for both in-hospital and out-of hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA and OHCA. We conducted a prospective study wherein all cardiac arrests reported in the hospital consecutively for 12 months were registered for the study and followed their survival up to 1-year. Statistical analysis was performed by using Chi-square test for significant differences in proportions applied to various parameters of the study. Results: The main outcome measures were; (following CPR return of spontaneous circulation, survival for 24 h, survival from 24 h to 6 weeks or discharge, alive at 1-year. For survivors, an assessment was made about their cerebral performance and overall performance and accordingly graded. All these data were tabulated. Totally 419 arrests were reported in the hospital, out of which 413 were in-hospital arrests. Out of this 260 patients were considered for resuscitation, we had about 27 survivors at the end of 1-year follow-up (10.38%. Conclusion: We conclude by saying there are many factors involved in good clinical outcomes following IHCAs and these variable factors need to be researched further.

  5. Effect of two additional interventions, test and reflection, added to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation training on seventh grade students' practical skills and willingness to act: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Anette; Hult, Håkan; Kreitz-Sandberg, Susanne; Herlitz, Johan; Svensson, Leif; Nilsson, Lennart

    2017-06-23

    The aim of this research is to investigate if two additional interventions, test and reflection, after standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training facilitate learning by comparing 13-year-old students' practical skills and willingness to act. Seventh grade students in council schools of two municipalities in south-east Sweden. School classes were randomised to CPR training only (O), CPR training with a practical test including feedback (T) or CPR training with reflection and a practical test including feedback (RT). Measures of practical skills and willingness to act in a potential life-threatening situation were studied directly after training and at 6 months using a digital reporting system and a survey. A modified Cardiff test was used to register the practical skills, where scores in each of 12 items resulted in a total score of 12-48 points. The study was conducted in accordance with current European Resuscitation Council guidelines during December 2013 to October 2014. 29 classes for a total of 587 seventh grade students were included in the study. The total score of the modified Cardiff test at 6 months was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were the total score directly after training, the 12 individual items of the modified Cardiff test and willingness to act. At 6 months, the T and O groups scored 32 (3.9) and 30 (4.0) points, respectively (ptraining improved the students' acquisition of practical CPR skills. Reflection did not increase further CPR skills. At 6-month follow-up, no intervention effect was found regarding willingness to make a life-saving effort. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Long-term retention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills after shortened chest compression-only training and conventional training: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Chika; Iwami, Taku; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Ando, Masahiko; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Marukawa, Seishiro; Kawamura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    It is unclear how much the length of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program can be reduced without ruining its effectiveness. The authors aimed to compare CPR skills 6 months and 1 year after training between shortened chest compression-only CPR training and conventional CPR training. Participants were randomly assigned to either the compression-only CPR group, which underwent a 45-minute training program consisting of chest compressions and automated external defibrillator (AED) use with personal training manikins, or the conventional CPR group, which underwent a 180-minute training program with chest compressions, rescue breathing, and AED use. Participants' resuscitation skills were evaluated 6 months and 1 year after the training. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of appropriate chest compressions 1 year after the training. A total of 146 persons were enrolled, and 63 (87.5%) in the compression-only CPR group and 56 (75.7%) in the conventional CPR group completed the 1-year evaluation. The compression-only CPR group was superior to the conventional CPR group regarding the proportion of appropriate chest compression (mean ± SD = 59.8% ± 40.0% vs. 46.3% ± 28.6%; p = 0.036) and the number of appropriate chest compressions (mean ± SD = 119.5 ± 80.0 vs. 77.2 ± 47.8; p = 0.001). Time without chest compression in the compression-only CPR group was significantly shorter than that in the conventional CPR group (mean ± SD = 11.8 ± 21.1 seconds vs. 52.9 ± 14.9 seconds; p CPR training program appears to help the general public retain CPR skills better than the conventional CPR training program. UMIN-CTR UMIN000001675. © 2013 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  7. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained responders versus lay persons and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A community observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Mi; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Yu Jin; Song, Kyoung Jun; Ro, Young Sun; Ahn, Ki Ok

    2017-09-01

    The study aims to compare bystander processes of care (cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation) and outcomes for witnessed presumed cardiac etiology in OHCA patients in whom initial resuscitation was provided by dedicated trained responder (TR) versus lay person (LP) bystanders. Data on witnessed and presumed cardiac OHCA in adults (15 years or older) from 2011 to 2015 in a metropolitan city with 10 million persons were collected, excluding cases in which the information on TRs, bystander CPR, defibrillation, and clinical outcomes was unknown. Exposure variables were TRs who were legally designated with CPR education and response and LPs who were bystanders who witnessed the OHCA by chance. The primary/secondary/tertiary outcomes were a good cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1 or 2, survival to discharge, and bystander defibrillation. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for potential confounders. Of 20,984 OHCA events, 6475 cases were ultimately analyzed. The TR group constituted 6.4% of the cases, and the patients showed significantly better survival and a good CPC. From the multivariable logistic regression analysis of the outcomes, by comparing the TR group with the LP group, the AOR (95% CIs) was 1.49 (1.04-2.15) for a good CPC, 1.59 (1.20-2.11) for survival to discharge, and 10.02 (7.04-14.26) for bystander defibrillation. The TR group witnessed a relatively low proportion of OHCA but was associated with better survival outcomes and good neurological recovery through higher CPR rates and defibrillation of adults older than 15 years with witnessed OHCA in a metropolitan city. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Different Compression to Ventilation Ratios (2: 1, 3: 1, and 4: 1) during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Porcine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquin, Matteo P; Cheung, Po-Yin; Patel, Sparsh; Lu, Min; Lee, Tze-Fun; Wagner, Michael; O'Reilly, Megan; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2018-04-12

    High-quality chest compression is essential during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the optimal compression to ventilation ratio (C:V) that should be used during neonatal CPR to optimize coronary and cerebral perfusion while providing adequate ventilation remains unknown. We hypothesized that different C:V ratios (e.g., 2: 1 or 4: 1) will reduce the time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in severely asphyxiated piglets. Thirty-one newborn piglets (1-4 days old) were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 50-min normocapnic hypoxia followed by asphyxia. Piglets were randomized into 4 groups: 2: 1 (n = 8), 3: 1 (n = 8), 4: 1 (n = 8) C:V ratio, or a sham group (n = 7). Cardiac function, carotid blood flow, cerebral oxygenation, and respiratory parameters were continuously recorded throughout the experiment. Thirty-one piglets were included in the study, and there was no difference in the duration of asphyxia or the degree of asphyxiation (as indicated by pH, PaCO2, and lactate) among the different groups. The median (IQR) time to ROSC was similar between the groups with 127 (82-210), 96 (88-126), and 119 (83-256) s in the 2: 1, 3: 1, and 4: 1 C:V ratio groups, respectively (p = 0.67 between groups). Similarly, there was no difference in 100% oxygen requirement or epinephrine administration between the experimental groups. Different C:V ratios resulted in similar ROSC, mortality, oxygen, and epinephrine administration during resuscitation in a porcine model of neonatal asphyxia. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Goals of patient care system change with video-based education increases rates of advance cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision-making and discussions in hospitalised rehabilitation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Claire E; Chong, Jeffrey C; Wilkinson, Anne; Hayes, Barbara; Tait, Sonia; Waldron, Nicholas

    2017-07-01

    Advance cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) discussions and decision-making are not routine clinical practice in the hospital setting. Frail older patients may be at risk of non-beneficial CPR. To assess the utility and safety of two interventions to increase CPR decision-making, documentation and communication for hospitalised older patients. A pre-post study tested two interventions: (i) standard ward-based education forums with CPR content; and (ii) a combined, two-pronged strategy with 'Goals of Patient Care' (GoPC) system change and a structured video-based workshop; against usual practice (i.e. no formal training). Participants were a random sample of patients in a hospital rehabilitation unit. The outcomes were the proportion of patients documented as: (i) not for resuscitation (NFR); and (ii) eligible for rapid response team (RRT) calls, and rates of documented discussions with the patient, family and carer. When compared with usual practice, patients were more likely to be documented as NFR following the two-pronged intervention (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 6.4, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.0; 13.6). Documentation of discussions with patients was also more likely (aOR: 3.3, 95% CI:1.8; 6.2). Characteristics of patients documented NFR were similar between the phases, but were more likely for RRT calls following Phase 3 (P 0.03). An increase in advance CPR decisions occurred following GoPC system change with education. This appears safe as NFR patients had the same level of frailty between phases but were more likely to be eligible for RRT review. Increased documentation of discussions suggests routine use of the GoPC form may improve communication with patients about their care. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  10. "You can also save a life!": children's drawings as a non-verbal assessment of the impact of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriş, Antoniu Octavian; Tatu-Chiţoiu, Gabriel; Cimpoeşu, Diana; Ionescu, Daniela Florentina; Pop, Călin; Oprea, Nadia; Ţînţ, Diana

    2017-04-01

    Drawings made by training children into cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during the special education week called "School otherwise" can be used as non-verbal means of expression and communication to assess the impact of such training. We analyzed the questionnaires and drawings completed by 327 schoolchildren in different stages of education. After a brief overview of the basic life support (BLS) steps and after watching a video presenting the dynamic performance of the BLS sequence, subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire and make a drawing to express main CPR messages. Questionnaires were filled completely in 97.6 % and drawings were done in 90.2 % cases. Half of the subjects had already witnessed a kind of medical emergency and 96.94 % knew the correct "112" emergency phone number. The drawings were single images (83.81 %) and less cartoon strips (16.18 %). Main themes of the slogans were "Save a life!", "Help!", "Call 112!", "Do not be indifferent/insensible/apathic!" through the use of drawings interpretation, CPR trainers can use art as a way to build a better relation with schoolchildren, to connect to their thoughts and feelings and obtain the highest quality education.

  11. Effect of the rate of chest compression familiarised in previous training on the depth of chest compression during metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomised crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jinkun; Chung, Tae Nyoung; Je, Sang Mo

    2016-02-12

    To assess how the quality of metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was affected by the chest compression rate familiarised by training before the performance and to determine a possible mechanism for any effect shown. Prospective crossover trial of a simulated, one-person, chest-compression-only CPR. Participants were recruited from a medical school and two paramedic schools of South Korea. 42 senior students of a medical school and two paramedic schools were enrolled but five dropped out due to physical restraints. Senior medical and paramedic students performed 1 min of metronome-guided CPR with chest compressions only at a speed of 120 compressions/min after training for chest compression with three different rates (100, 120 and 140 compressions/min). Friedman's test was used to compare average compression depths based on the different rates used during training. Average compression depths were significantly different according to the rate used in training (ptraining at a speed of 100 compressions/min and those at speeds of 120 and 140 compressions/min (both pCPR is affected by the relative difference between the rate of metronome guidance and the chest compression rate practised in previous training. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Positive impact of crisis resource management training on no-flow time and team member verbalisations during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Castelao, Ezequiel; Russo, Sebastian G; Cremer, Stephan; Strack, Micha; Kaminski, Lea; Eich, Christoph; Timmermann, Arnd; Boos, Margarete

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of video-based interactive crisis resource management (CRM) training on no-flow time (NFT) and on proportions of team member verbalisations (TMV) during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Further, to investigate the link between team leader verbalisation accuracy and NFT. The randomised controlled study was embedded in the obligatory advanced life support (ALS) course for final-year medical students. Students (176; 25.35±1.03 years, 63% female) were alphabetically assigned to 44 four-person teams that were then randomly (computer-generated) assigned to either CRM intervention (n=26), receiving interactive video-based CRM-training, or to control intervention (n=18), receiving an additional ALS-training. Primary outcomes were NFT and proportions of TMV, which were subdivided into eight categories: four team leader verbalisations (TLV) with different accuracy levels and four follower verbalisation categories (FV). Measurements were made of all groups administering simulated adult CPR. NFT rates were significantly lower in the CRM-training group (31.4±6.1% vs. 36.3±6.6%, p=0.014). Proportions of all TLV categories were higher in the CRM-training group (ptraining in undergraduate medical education reduces NFT in simulated CPR and improves TLV proportions during simulated CPR. Further research will test how these results translate into clinical performance and patient outcome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Training a Chest Compression of 6-7 cm Depth for High Quality Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Hospital Setting: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaehoon; Lim, Tae Ho; Cho, Youngsuk; Kang, Hyunggoo; Kim, Wonhee; Chee, Youngjoon; Song, Yeongtak; Kim, In Young; Lee, Juncheol

    2016-03-01

    During cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), chest compression (CC) depth is influenced by the surface on which the patient is placed. We hypothesized that training healthcare providers to perform a CC depth of 6-7 cm (instead of 5-6 cm) on a manikin placed on a mattress during CPR in the hospital might improve their proper CC depth. This prospective randomised controlled study involved 66 premedical students without CPR training. The control group was trained to use a CC depth of 5-6 cm (G 5-6), while the experimental group was taught to use a CC depth of 6-7 cm (G 6-7) with a manikin on the floor. All participants performed CCs for 2 min on a manikin that was placed on a bed 1 hour and then again 4 weeks after the training without a feedback. The parameters of CC quality (depth, rate, % of accurate depth) were assessed and compared between the 2 groups. Four students were excluded due to loss to follow-up and recording errors, and data of 62 were analysed. CC depth and % of accurate depth were significantly higher among students in the G 6-7 than G 5-6 both 1 hour and 4 weeks after the training (p0.05). Training healthcare providers to perform a CC depth of 6-7 cm could improve quality CC depth when performing CCs on patients who are placed on a mattress during CPR in a hospital setting.

  14. Frequency of rib and sternum fractures associated with out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation is underestimated by conventional chest X-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Wolfgang; Mair, Dieter; Rabl, Walter; Baubin, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Fractured ribs and sternum are frequent complications of thoracic compression during CPR in adults. This study was conducted to determine whether findings of plain chest radiography (CXR) correlate with post-mortem findings in patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. CXR findings and autopsy results of CPR-related chest injuries comprising rib and sternum fractures were compared prospectively in 19 patients. Fractures were diagnosed in nine of 19 patients by means of radiology and in 18 of 19 patients by autopsy (rib fractures in 6/19 versus 17/19, P=0.002; sternum fractures in 5/19 versus in 9/19, P=0.227. The total number of isolated bone fractures detected by CXR was 18 (12 rib and six sternum fractures) and by autopsy 92 (83 rib and nine sternum fractures). The majority of rib fractures was located in the anterior part of the thoracic cage. Sternum fractures predominantly occurred in the lower third. Eight of 19 patients received either thrombolytic or antithrombotic treatment during CPR but no major bleeding complication associated with CPR was detected by autopsy. The findings of this study indicate that fractures associated with CPR are underreported in conventional radiographic investigations. No major bleeding complications related to CPR-associated fractures was detected.

  15. Clinical assessment of heart chamber size and valve motion during cardiopulmonary resuscitation by two-dimensional echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, S; Wix, H L; Shapiro, E P

    1981-09-01

    It has been generally accepted that enhanced blood flow during closed-chest CPR is generated from compression of the heart between the sternum and the spine. To visualize the heart during closed-chest massage, we performed two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) during resuscitation efforts in four patients who had cardiac arrest. 2DE analysis showed that (1) the LV internal dimensions did not change appreciably with chest compression; (2) the mitral and aortic valves were open simultaneously during the compression phase; (3) blood flow into the right heart, as evidenced by saline bubble contrast, occurred during the relaxation phase; and (4) compression of the right ventricle and LA occurred in varying amounts in all patients. We conclude that stroke volume from the heart during CPR does not result from compression of the LV. Rather, CPR-induced improved cardiocirculatory dynamics appear to be principally the result of changes in intrathoracic pressure created by sternal compression.

  16. Sodium nitroprusside enhanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves short term survival in a porcine model of ischemic refractory ventricular fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannopoulos, Demetris; Bartos, Jason A; George, Stephen A; Sideris, George; Voicu, Sebastian; Oestreich, Brett; Matsuura, Timothy; Shekar, Kadambari; Rees, Jennifer; Aufderheide, Tom P

    2017-01-01

    Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) enhanced CPR (SNPeCPR) demonstrates increased vital organ blood flow and survival in multiple porcine models. We developed a new, coronary occlusion/ischemia model of prolonged resuscitation, mimicking the majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests presenting with shockable rhythms. SNPeCPR will increase short term (4-h) survival compared to standard 2015 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) guidelines in an ischemic refractory ventricular fibrillation (VF), prolonged CPR model. Sixteen anesthetized pigs had the ostial left anterior descending artery occluded leading to ischemic VF arrest. VF was untreated for 5min. Basic life support was performed for 10min. At minute 10 (EMS arrival), animals received either SNPeCPR (n=8) or standard ACLS (n=8). Defibrillation (200J) occurred every 3min. CPR continued for a total of 45min, then the balloon was deflated simulating revascularization. CPR continued until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or a total of 60min, if unsuccessful. SNPeCPR animals received 2mg of SNP at minute 10 followed by 1mg every 5min until ROSC. Standard ACLS animals received 0.5mg epinephrine every 5min until ROSC. Primary endpoints were ROSC and 4-h survival. All SNPeCPR animals (8/8) achieved sustained ROSC versus 2/8 standard ACLS animals within one hour of resuscitation (p=0.04). The 4-h survival was significantly improved with SNPeCPR compared to standard ACLS, 7/8 versus 1/8 respectively, p=0.0019. SNPeCPR significantly improved ROSC and 4-h survival compared with standard ACLS CPR in a porcine model of prolonged ischemic, refractory VF cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Mobile Device App to Reduce Medication Errors and Time to Drug Delivery During Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Study Protocol of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Johan N; Ehrler, Frederic; Lovis, Christian; Combescure, Christophe; Haddad, Kevin; Gervaix, Alain; Manzano, Sergio

    2017-08-22

    During pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), vasoactive drug preparation for continuous infusions is complex and time-consuming. The need for individual specific weight-based drug dose calculation and preparation places children at higher risk than adults for medication errors. Following an evidence-based and ergonomic driven approach, we developed a mobile device app called Pediatric Accurate Medication in Emergency Situations (PedAMINES), intended to guide caregivers step-by-step from preparation to delivery of drugs requiring continuous infusion. In a prior single center randomized controlled trial, medication errors were reduced from 70% to 0% by using PedAMINES when compared with conventional preparation methods. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the use of PedAMINES in both university and smaller hospitals reduces medication dosage errors (primary outcome), time to drug preparation (TDP), and time to drug delivery (TDD) (secondary outcomes) during pediatric CPR when compared with conventional preparation methods. This is a multicenter, prospective, randomized controlled crossover trial with 2 parallel groups comparing PedAMINES with a conventional and internationally used drug infusion rate table in the preparation of continuous drug infusion. The evaluation setting uses a simulation-based pediatric CPR cardiac arrest scenario with a high-fidelity manikin. The study involving 120 certified nurses (sample size) will take place in the resuscitation rooms of 3 tertiary pediatric emergency departments and 3 smaller hospitals. After epinephrine-induced return of spontaneous circulation, nurses will be asked to prepare a continuous infusion of dopamine using either PedAMINES (intervention group) or the infusion table (control group) and then prepare a continuous infusion of norepinephrine by crossing the procedure. The primary outcome is the medication dosage error rate. The secondary outcome is the time in seconds elapsed since the oral

  18. Real-time feedback can improve infant manikin cardiopulmonary resuscitation by up to 79%--a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Philip; Theobald, Peter; Kemp, Alison; Maguire, Sabine; Maconochie, Ian; Jones, Michael

    2013-08-01

    European and Advanced Paediatric Life Support training courses. Sixty-nine certified CPR providers. CPR providers were randomly allocated to a 'no-feedback' or 'feedback' group, performing two-thumb and two-finger chest compressions on a "physiological", instrumented resuscitation manikin. Baseline data was recorded without feedback, before chest compressions were repeated with one group receiving feedback. Indices were calculated that defined chest compression quality, based upon comparison of the chest wall displacement to the targets of four, internationally recommended parameters: chest compression depth, release force, chest compression rate and compression duty cycle. Baseline data were consistent with other studies, with <1% of chest compressions performed by providers simultaneously achieving the target of the four internationally recommended parameters. During the 'experimental' phase, 34 CPR providers benefitted from the provision of 'real-time' feedback which, on analysis, coincided with a statistical improvement in compression rate, depth and duty cycle quality across both compression techniques (all measures: p<0.001). Feedback enabled providers to simultaneously achieve the four targets in 75% (two-finger) and 80% (two-thumb) of chest compressions. Real-time feedback produced a dramatic increase in the quality of chest compression (i.e. from <1% to 75-80%). If these results transfer to a clinical scenario this technology could, for the first time, support providers in consistently performing accurate chest compressions during infant CPR and thus potentially improving clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The design of instructional tools affects secondary school students' learning of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in reciprocal peer learning: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserbyt, Peter; Byra, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Research investigating design effects of instructional tools for learning Basic Life Support (BLS) is almost non-existent. To demonstrate the design of instructional tools matter. The effect of spatial contiguity, a design principle stating that people learn more deeply when words and corresponding pictures are placed close (i.e., integrated) rather than far from each other on a page was investigated on task cards for learning Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) during reciprocal peer learning. A randomized controlled trial. A total of 111 students (mean age: 13 years) constituting six intact classes learned BLS through reciprocal learning with task cards. Task cards combine a picture of the skill with written instructions about how to perform it. In each class, students were randomly assigned to the experimental group or the control. In the control, written instructions were placed under the picture on the task cards. In the experimental group, written instructions were placed close to the corresponding part of the picture on the task cards reflecting application of the spatial contiguity principle. One-way analysis of variance found significantly better performances in the experimental group for ventilation volumes (P=.03, ηp2=.10) and flow rates (P=.02, ηp2=.10). For chest compression depth, compression frequency, compressions with correct hand placement, and duty cycles no significant differences were found. This study shows that the design of instructional tools (i.e., task cards) affects student learning. Research-based design of learning tools can enhance BLS and CPR education. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of metronome rates on the quality of bag-mask ventilation during metronome-guided 30:2 cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A randomized simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Ji Ung; Han, Sang Kuk; Choi, Pil Cho; Shin, Dong Hyuk

    2017-01-01

    Metronome guidance is a feasible and effective feedback technique to improve the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The rate of the metronome should be set between 100 to 120 ticks/minute and the speed of ventilation may have crucial effect on the quality of ventilation. We compared three different metronome rates (100, 110, 120 ticks/minute) to investigate its effect on the quality of ventilation during metronome-guided 30:2 CPR. This is a prospective, randomized, crossover observational study using a RespiTrainer○ r . To simulate 30 chest compressions, one investigator counted from 1 to 30 in cadence with the metronome rate (1 count for every 1 tick), and the participant performed 2 consecutive ventilations immediately following the counting of 30. Thirty physicians performed 5 sets of 2 consecutive (total 10) bag-mask ventilations for each metronome rate. Participants were instructed to squeeze the bag over 2 ticks (1.0 to 1.2 seconds depending on the rate of metronome) and deflate the bag over 2 ticks. The sequence of three different metronome rates was randomized. Mean tidal volume significantly decreased as the metronome rate was increased from 110 ticks/minute to 120 ticks/minute (343±84 mL vs. 294±90 mL, P =0.004). Peak airway pressure significantly increased as metronome rate increased from 100 ticks/minute to 110 ticks/minute (18.7 vs. 21.6 mmHg, P =0.006). In metronome-guided 30:2 CPR, a higher metronome rate may adversely affect the quality of bag-mask ventilations. In cases of cardiac arrest where adequate ventilation support is necessary, 100 ticks/minute may be better than 110 or 120 ticks/minute to deliver adequate tidal volume during audio tone guided 30:2 CPR.

  1. Comparison between exclusively school teacher-based and mixed school teacher and healthcare provider-based programme on basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation for secondary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Fábrega, X; Escalada-Roig, X; Miró, O; Sanclemente, G; Díaz, N; Gómez, X; Villena, O; Rodríguez, E; Gaspar, A; Molina, J E; Salvador, J; Sánchez, M

    2009-09-01

    To compare two teaching methodologies for PROCES (a basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (b-CPR) programme for secondary school students): one exclusively performed by school teachers (study group) and another by a mixed team of school teachers and healthcare providers (control group). According to their preferences, teachers chose either method and students were consequently assigned to the control or study group. All participants took a 10 multiple-choice question exam regarding b-CPR skills twice: immediately after PROCES and one year later. Eight or more correct answers was considered satisfactory learning. Results between groups were compared. Associations between satisfactory learning and some student characteristics were analysed. Immediately after PROCES, 442 students (219 in the study group and 223 in the control group) took the exam. The percentage of satisfactory learning was not different: 67.1% in the study group and 64.6% in the control group. Immediate satisfactory learning was related to the absence of pending subjects in the control (odds ratio (OR) 2.31, 95% CI 1.16 to 4.64) and study (OR 5.87, 95% CI 1.22 to 28.20) groups. One year later, a greater percentage of retention of b-CRP skills was detected in the study group (57.1% vs 40.6%; p = 0.01). The absence of any pending subject (OR 6.86, 95% CI 1.83 to 25.66) was independently associated with better retention in the study group, but not the control group. Secondary school teachers, previously trained in b-CPR, can teach these skills effectively to 14-16-year-old students using PROCES. The retention of b-CPR skills is greater with this methodology compared with a more standardised programme.

  2. Effects of repetitive or intensified instructions in telephone assisted, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation: an investigator-blinded, 4-armed, randomized, factorial simulation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tulder, R; Roth, D; Krammel, M; Laggner, R; Heidinger, B; Kienbacher, C; Novosad, H; Chwojka, C; Havel, C; Sterz, F; Schreiber, W; Herkner, H

    2014-01-01

    Compression depth is frequently suboptimal in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We investigated effects of intensified wording and/or repetitive target depth instructions on compression depth in telephone-assisted, protocol driven, bystander CPR on a simulation manikin. Thirty-two volunteers performed 10 min of compression only-CPR in a prospective, investigator-blinded, 4-armed, factorial setting. Participants were randomized either to standard wording ("push down firmly 5 cm"), intensified wording ("it is very important to push down 5 cm every time") or standard or intensified wording repeated every 20s. Three dispatchers were randomized to give these instructions. Primary outcome was relative compression depth (absolute compression depth minus leaning depth). Secondary outcomes were absolute distance, hands-off times as well as BORG-scale and nine-hole peg test (NHPT), pulse rate and blood pressure to reflect physical exertion. We applied a random effects linear regression model. Relative compression depth was 35 ± 10 mm (standard) versus 31 ± 11 mm (intensified wording) versus 25 ± 8 mm (repeated standard) and 31 ± 14 mm (repeated intensified wording). Adjusted for design, body mass index and female sex, intensified wording and repetition led to decreased compression depth of 13 (95%CI -25 to -1) mm (p=0.04) and 9 (95%CI -21 to 3) mm (p=0.13), respectively. Secondary outcomes regarding intensified wording showed significant differences for absolute distance (43 ± 2 versus 20 (95%CI 3-37) mm; p=0.01) and hands-off times (60 ± 40 versus 157 (95%CI 63-251) s; p=0.04). In protocol driven, telephone-assisted, bystander CPR, intensified wording and/or repetitive target depth instruction will not improve compression depth compared to the standard instruction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of the addition of vasopressin or vasopressin plus nitroglycerin to epinephrine on arterial blood pressure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducros, Laurent; Vicaut, Eric; Soleil, Christian; Le Guen, Morgan; Gueye, Papa; Poussant, Thomas; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Payen, Didier; Plaisance, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    Infusion of a vasopressor during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in humans increases end decompression (diastolic) arterial blood pressure, and consequently increases vital organ perfusion pressure and survival. Several vasoactive drugs have been tested alone or in combination, but their hemodynamic effects have not been investigated clinically in humans. We tested the hypothesis that epinephrine (1 mg) co-administered with vasopressin (40 IU) ± nitroglycerin (300 μg) results in higher diastolic blood pressure than epinephrine alone. A prospective, randomized, double-blinded controlled trial in the prehospital setting. The study included 48 patients with witnessed cardiac arrest. Patients received either epinephrine alone (E alone) or epinephrine plus vasopressin (E+V) or epinephrine plus vasopressin plus nitroglycerin (E+V+N). A femoral arterial catheter was inserted for arterial pressure measurement. The primary end point was diastolic blood pressure during CPR, 15 min after the first drug administration (T = 15 min). After exclusions, a total of 44 patients were enrolled. Diastolic blood pressures (mm Hg) at T = 15 min were not statistically different between groups (median [interquartile range]: 20 [10], 15 [6], and 15 [13] for E alone, E+V, and E+V+N, respectively. The rate of return of spontaneous circulation was 63% (n = 10) in the epinephrine group, 43% (n = 6) in the epinephrine plus vasopressin group, and 36% (n = 5) in the triple therapy group (NS). Addition of vasopressin or vasopressin plus nitroglycerin to epinephrine did not increase perfusion blood pressure compared to epinephrine alone in humans in cardiac arrest, suggesting the absence of benefit in using these drug combination(s). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Knowledge and Skill Retention of In-Service versus Preservice Nursing Professionals following an Informal Training Program in Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Repeated-Measures Quasiexperimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhuma Sankar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to compare the impact of a training program in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR on the knowledge and skills of in-service and preservice nurses at prespecified time points. This repeated-measures quasiexperimental study was conducted in the pediatric emergency and ICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital between January and March 2011. We assessed the baseline knowledge and skills of nursing staff (in-service nurses and final year undergraduate nursing students (preservice nurses using a validated questionnaire and a skill checklist, respectively. The participants were then trained on pediatric CPR using standard guidelines. The knowledge and skills were reassessed immediately after training and at 6 weeks after training. A total of 74 participants—28 in-service and 46 preservice professionals—were enrolled. At initial assessment, in-service nurses were found to have insignificant higher mean knowledge scores (6.6 versus 5.8, P=0.08 while the preservice nurses had significantly higher skill scores (6.5 versus 3.2, P<0.001. Immediately after training, the scores improved in both groups. At 6 weeks however, we observed a nonuniform decline in performance in both groups—in-service nurses performing better in knowledge test (10.5 versus 9.1, P=0.01 and the preservice nurses performing better in skill test (9.8 versus 7.4, P<0.001. Thus, knowledge and skills of in-service and preservice nurses in pediatric CPR improved with training. In comparison to preservice nurses, the in-service nurses seemed to retain knowledge better with time than skills.

  5. Public awareness and self-efficacy of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in communities and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A multi-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Young Sun; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Hong, Sung Ok; Kim, Young Taek; Lee, Dong-Woo; Cho, Sung-Il

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to test the association between capacity of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at community level and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Emergency medical service (EMS)-treated OHCAs with cardiac etiology in Korea between 2012 and 2013 were analyzed, excluding cases witnessed by EMS providers. Exposure variables were five indexes of community CPR capacity: awareness of CPR (CPR-Awareness), any training experience of CPR (CPR-Any-Training), recent CPR training within the last 2 years (CPR-Recent-Training), CPR training with a manikin (CPR-Manikin-Training), and CPR self-efficacy (CPR-Self-Efficacy). All measures of capacity were calculated as aggregated values for each county level using the national Korean Community Health Survey database of 228,921 responders sampled representatively from 253 counties in 2012. Endpoints were bystander CPR (BCPR) and survival to discharge. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (AORs) per 10% increment in community CPR capacity using multi-level logistic regression models, adjusting for potential confounders at individual levels. Of 29,052 eligible OHCAs, 11,079 (38.1%) received BCPR. Patients were more likely to receive BCPR in communities with higher proportions of residents with CPR-Awareness, CPR-Any-Training, CPR-Recent-Training, CPR-Manikin-Training, and CPR-Self-Efficacy (all pCPR-Awareness, 1.10 (1.04-1.15) for CPR-Any-Training, and 1.08 (