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Sample records for cardiac rehabilitation training

  1. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab References Anderson L, Taylor RS. Cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart disease: ... of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  2. Do Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs Offer Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training in Australia and New Zealand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartledge, Susie H; Bray, Janet E; Stub, Dion; Krum, Henry; Finn, Judith

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation may provide an ideal environment to train high-risk cardiac patients and their families in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, whether this training is currently offered is unknown. The aims of this study were to: 1) describe the prevalence of CPR training in cardiac rehabilitation programs in Australia and New Zealand (NZ); and 2) examine perceived barriers and attitudes of cardiac rehabilitation coordinators towards providing CPR training. We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of Australian and NZ cardiac rehabilitation coordinators. We received 253 completed surveys (46.7% response rate) (Australia n=208, NZ n=45). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training was included in 23.9% of Australian programs and 56.6% in NZ. Common barriers to CPR training included lack of resources (49.7%) and a lack of awareness to provide CPR training for this high-risk group (33.7%). The majority of coordinators believed that lay people should be trained in CPR (96.3%) and were comfortable with recommending CPR training to this high-risk group (89.4%). While cardiac rehabilitation coordinators have positive attitudes towards CPR training, it is not currently part of most programs - particularly in Australia. Organisations formulating cardiac rehabilitation recommendations and guidelines should give consideration to include the provision of CPR training. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Incorporating cardiopulmonary resuscitation training into a cardiac rehabilitation programme: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartledge, Susie; Finn, Judith; Bray, Janet E; Case, Rosalind; Barker, Lauren; Missen, Diane; Shaw, James; Stub, Dion

    2018-02-01

    Patients with a cardiac history are at future risk of cardiac events, including out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Targeting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to family members of cardiac patients has long been advocated, but is an area in need of contemporary research evidence. An environment yet to be investigated for targeted training is cardiac rehabilitation. To evaluate the feasibility of providing CPR training in a cardiac rehabilitation programme among patients, their family members and staff. A prospective before and after study design was used. CPR training was delivered using video self-instruction CPR training kits, facilitated by a cardiac nurse. Data was collected pre-training, post-training and at one month. Cardiac patient participation rates in CPR classes were high ( n = 56, 72.7% of eligible patients) with a further 27 family members attending training. Patients were predominantly male (60.2%), family members were predominantly female (81.5%), both with a mean age of 65 years. Confidence to perform CPR and willingness to use skills significantly increased post-training (both ptraining participants demonstrated a mean compression rate of 112 beats/min and a mean depth of 48 mm. Training reach was doubled as participants shared the video self-instruction kit with a further 87 people. Patients, family members and cardiac rehabilitation staff had positive feedback about the training. We demonstrated that cardiac rehabilitation is an effective and feasible environment to provide CPR training. Using video self-instruction CPR training kits enabled further training reach to the target population.

  4. Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: physical activity counselling and exercise training: key components of the position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corrà, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Carré, François

    2010-01-01

    , exercise training, diet/nutritional counselling, weight control management, lipid management, blood pressure monitoring, smoking cessation, and psychosocial management. Cardiac rehabilitation services are by definition multi-factorial and comprehensive, with physical activity counselling and exercise...... training as central components in all rehabilitation and preventive interventions. Many of the risk factor improvements occurring in CR can be mediated through exercise training programmes. This call-for-action paper presents the key components of a CR programme: physical activity counselling and exercise...

  5. Measurement of Functional Capacity Requirements of Farmers: IMPLICATIONS FOR A CARDIAC REHABILITATION TRAINING PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Shannon; Karcher, Justin; Rogers, Rebecca; Kennedy, Kathleen; Lawrence, Anne; Adams, Jenny

    2017-03-01

    Updated cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and return-to-work guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) now include specificity of training for industrial athletes (exercise training that involves the muscle groups, movements, and energy systems that these patients use during occupational tasks). However, many CR facilities do not apply this principle, relying instead on the traditional protocol that consists primarily of aerobic exercise. This study was conducted to measure the metabolic cost of typical farming tasks and to compare 2 methods of calculating training intensities. Metabolic data were collected from 28 participants (23 men and 5 women, aged 18 to 57 years) while they loaded 10 hay bales, dug a fence posthole, filled 8 seed hoppers, and shoveled grain. Mean metabolic equivalent levels during these activities were 5.9 to 7.6 and participants reached 60% to 70% of heart rate reserve (HRR). By comparison, their mean resting heart rate + 30 beats per minute (RHR+30, a traditional CR intensity level) represented only 28% of HRR. Participants in the current study performed farming tasks within the ACSM's recommended range of 40% to 80% of HRR, and the results suggest that training at RHR+30 would have been inadequate for helping a farmer return to work after a cardiac event. Using the study tasks as a basis, we described exercises that would be appropriate for the supervised resistance training of farmers in a CR setting.

  6. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed...... and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  7. Cardiac Acceleration at the Onset of Exercise : A Potential Parameter for Monitoring Progress During Physical Training in Sports and Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, Florentina J.; Monden, Paul G.; van Meeteren, Nico L. U.; Daanen, Hein A. M.

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were

  8. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: A potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical training in sports and rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, F.J.; Monden, P.G.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were

  9. Basic life support training into cardiac rehabilitation programs: A chance to give back. A community intervention controlled manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Salvado, Violeta; Abelairas-Gómez, Cristian; Peña-Gil, Carlos; Neiro-Rey, Carmen; Barcala-Furelos, Roberto; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio

    2018-03-12

    Early basic life support is crucial to enhance survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest but rates remain low, especially in households. High-risk groups' training has been advocated, but the optimal method is unclear. The CArdiac REhabilitation and BAsic life Support (CAREBAS) project aims to compare the effectiveness of two basic life support educational strategies implemented in a cardiac rehabilitation program. A community intervention study including consecutive patients enrolled on an exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program after acute coronary syndrome or revascularization was conducted. A standard basic life support training (G-Stan) and a novel approach integrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation hands-on rolling refreshers (G-CPR) were randomly assigned to each group and compared. Basic life support performance was assessed by means of simulation at baseline, following brief instruction and after the 2-month program. 114 participants were included and 108 completed the final evaluation (G-Stan:58, G-CPR:50). Basic life support performance was equally poor at baseline and significantly improved following a brief instruction. A better skill retention was found after the 2-month program in G-CPR, significantly superior for safety and sending for an automated external defibrillator. Confidence and self-perceived preparation were also significantly greater in G-CPR after the program. Integrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation hands-on rolling refreshers in the training of an exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program is feasible and improves patients' skill retention and confidence to perform a basic life support sequence, compared to conventional training. Exporting this formula to other programs may result in increased numbers of trained citizens, enhanced social awareness and bystander resuscitation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt

    2012-01-01

    in recruitment and participation among low educated and socially vulnerable patients must be addressed to lower inequality in post-MI health. Our aim was to improve referral, attendance, and adherence rates among socially vulnerable patients by systematic screening and by offering a socially differentiated...... to a standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements......%. Patients were equally distributed to the SRP and the ERP. No inequality was found in attendance and adherence among referred patients. Conclusions: It seems possible to overcome unequal referral, attendance, and adherence in cardiac rehabilitation by organisation of systematic screening and social...

  11. Cardiac Rehabilitation in the Mid-1980s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, John D.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes a state-of-the-art cardiac rehabilitation program consisting of training and supervision in exercise, nutrition, and stress management. Inpatient, postdischarge, and late postdischarge regimens are presented. (MT)

  12. Exercise training characteristics in cardiac rehabilitation programmes: a cross-sectional survey of Australian practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Bridget; Glasziou, Paul; Briffa, Tom; Hoffmann, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training is a core component of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), however, little information exists regarding the specific exercise interventions currently provided for coronary heart disease in Australian practice. We aimed to analyse the current status of exercise-based CR services across Australia. Cross-sectional survey. Australian sites offering exercise-based CR were identified from publically available directories. All sites were invited by email to participate in an online Survey Monkey questionnaire between October 2014 and March 2015, with reminders via email and phone follow-up. Questions investigated the demographics and format of individual programmes, as well as specific exercise training characteristics. 297 eligible programmes were identified, with an 82% response rate. Most sites (82%) were based at hospital or outpatient centres, with home (15%), community (18%) or gym-based options (5%) less common. While CR was most often offered in a comprehensive format (72% of sites), the level of exercise intervention varied greatly among programmes. Most frequently, exercise was prescribed 1-2 times per week for 60 min over 7 weeks. Almost one-quarter (24%) had a sole practitioner supervising exercise, although the majority used a nurse/physiotherapist combination. Low to moderate exercise intensities were used in 60% of programmes, however, higher intensity prescriptions were not uncommon. Few sites (technology, such as mobile phones or the internet, to deliver or support exercise training. While advances have been made towards providing flexible and accessible exercise-based CR, much of Australia's service remains within traditional models of care. A continuing focus on service improvement and evidence-based care should, therefore, be considered a core aim of those providing exercise for CR in order to improve health service delivery and optimise outcomes for patients.

  13. [Cardiac rehabilitation: current status and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahmann, H W

    2012-02-01

    The goal of cardiac rehabilitation is to support heart patients using a multidisciplinary team in order to obtain the best possible physical and mental health and achieve long-term social reintegration. In addition to improving physical fitness, cardiac rehabilitation restores self-confidence, thus better equipping patients to deal with mental illness and improving their social reintegration ("participation"). Once the causes of disease have been identified and treated as effectively as possible, drug and lifestyle changes form the focus of cardiac rehabilitation measures. In particular diseases, rehabilitation offers the opportunity for targeted educational courses for diabetics or drug dose escalation, as well as special training for heart failure patients. A nationwide network of outpatient heart groups is available for targeted follow-up. Cardiac patients predominantly rehabilitated in follow-up rehabilitation are older and have greater morbidity than in the past; moreover, they generally come out of acute clinical care earlier and are discharged from hospital more quickly. The proportion of severely ill and multimorbid patients presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in cardiac rehabilitation, although cardiac rehabilitation was not initially conceived for this patient group. The benefit of cardiac rehabilitation has been a well documented reduction in morbidity and mortality. However, hurdles remain, partly due to the patients themselves, partly due to the health insurers. Some insurance providers still refuse rehabilitation for non-ST-segment elevation infarction. In principle rehabilitation can be carried out in an inpatient or an outpatient setting. Specific allocation criteria have not yet been established, but the structure and process quality of outpatient rehabilitation should correspond to that of the inpatient setting. The choice between the two settings should be based on pragmatic criteria. Both settings should be possible for an individual

  14. Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: physical activity counselling and exercise training: key components of the position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corrà, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Carré, François

    2010-01-01

    of a healthy lifestyle. These secondary prevention targets are included in the overall goal of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Cardiac rehabilitation can be viewed as the clinical application of preventive care by means of a professional multi-disciplinary integrated approach for comprehensive risk reduction...... and global long-term care of cardiac patients. The CR approach is delivered in tandem with a flexible follow-up strategy and easy access to a specialized team. To promote implementation of cardiac prevention and rehabilitation, the CR Section of the EACPR (European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention...... and Rehabilitation) has recently completed a Position Paper, entitled 'Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: A condition-oriented approach'. Components of multidisciplinary CR for seven clinical presentations have been addressed. Components include patient assessment, physical activity counselling...

  15. Cardiac Rehabilitation Series: Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L.; Bennett, Stephanie; Ardern, Chris I.; Clark, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in Canada. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has a long robust history here, and there are established clinical practice guidelines. While the effectiveness of CR in the Canadian context is clear, only 34% of eligible patients participate, and strategies to increase access for under-represented groups (e.g., women, ethnic minority groups) are not yet universally applied. Identified CR barriers include lack of referral and physician recommendation, travel and distance, and low perceived need. Indeed there is now a national policy position recommending systematic inpatient referral to CR in Canada. Recent development of 30 CR Quality Indicators and the burgeoning national CR registry will enable further measurement and improvement of the quality of CR care in Canada. Finally, the Canadian Association of CR is one of the founding members of the International Council of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, to promote CR globally. PMID:24607018

  16. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: a potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical training in sports and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinga, Florentina J; Monden, Paul G; van Meeteren, Nico L U; Daanen, Hein A M

    2014-05-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were searched to retrieve studies investigating HRonset. In total 652 studies were retrieved. These articles were then classified as having emphasis on HRonset in a sports or rehabilitation setting, which resulted in 8 of 112 studies with a sports application and 6 of 68 studies with a rehabilitation application that met inclusion criteria. Two co-existing mechanisms underlie HRonset: feedforward (central command) and feedback (mechanoreflex, metaboreflex, baroreflex) control. A number of studies investigated HRonset during the first few seconds of exercise (HRonsetshort), in which central command and the mechanoreflex determine vagal withdrawal, the major mechanism by which heart rate (HR) increases. In subsequent sports and rehabilitation studies, interest focused on HRonset during dynamic exercise over a longer period of time (HRonsetlong). Central command, mechanoreflexes, baroreflexes, and possibly metaboreflexes contribute to HRonset during the first seconds and minutes of exercise, which in turn leads to further vagal withdrawal and an increase in sympathetic activity. HRonset has been described as the increase in HR compared with resting state (delta HR) or by exponential modeling, with measurement intervals ranging from 0-4 s up to 2 min. Delta HR was used to evaluate HRonsetshort over the first 4 s of exercise, as well as for analyzing HRonsetlong. In exponential modeling, the HR response to dynamic exercise is biphasic, consisting of fast (parasympathetic, 0-10 s) and slow (sympathetic, 1-4 min) components. Although available studies differed largely in measurement protocols, cross-sectional and longitudinal training studies showed that studies analyzing HRonset

  17. Upper-body progressive resistance training improves strength and household physical activity performance in women attending cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke, Lola A; Staffileno, Beth A; Braun, Lynne T; Gulanick, Meg

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of moderate-intensity, progressive, upper-body resistance training (RT) on muscle strength and perceived performance of household physical activities (HPA) among women in cardiac rehabilitation. The 10-week, pretest-posttest, experiment randomized women to either usual care (UC) aerobic exercise or RT. Muscle strength for 5 upper-body RT exercises (chest press, shoulder press, biceps curl, lateral row, and triceps extension) was measured using the 1-Repetition Maximum Assessment. The RT group progressively increased weight lifted using 40%, 50%, and 60% of obtained 1-Repetition Maximum Assessment at 3-week intervals. Perceived performance of HPA was measured with the Kimble Household Activities Scale. The RT group (n = 16, mean age 64 +/- 11) significantly increased muscle strength in all 5 exercises in comparison with the UC group (n = 14, mean age 65 +/- 10) (chest press, 18% vs 11%; shoulder press, 24% vs 14%; biceps curl, 21% vs 12%; lateral row, 32% vs 9%; and triceps extension, 28% vs 20%, respectively). By study end, Household Activities Scale scores significantly increased (F = 13.878, P = .001) in the RT group (8.75 +/- 3.19 vs 11.25 +/- 2.14), whereas scores in the UC group decreased (8.60 +/- 3.11 vs 6.86 +/- 4.13). Progressive upper-body RT in women shows promise as an effective tool to increase muscle strength and improve the ability to perform HPA after a cardiac event. Beginning RT early after a cardiac event in a monitored cardiac rehabilitation environment can maximize the strengthening benefit.

  18. The Johannesburg cardiac rehabilitation programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-16

    Feb 16, 1991 ... sion 72,9% of patients were smokers, 26,3% had hypertension and 34,3% had ... Cardiac rehabilitation, including supervised exercise therapy, has become a .... sions on risk factor modification, diet, aspects of heart disease,.

  19. Cardiac rehabilitation costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghei, Mahshid; Turk-Adawi, Karam; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Oh, Paul; Chessex, Caroline; Grace, Sherry L

    2017-10-01

    Despite the clinical benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and its cost-effectiveness, it is not widely received. Arguably, capacity could be greatly increased if lower-cost models were implemented. The aims of this review were to describe: the costs associated with CR delivery, approaches to reduce these costs, and associated implications. Upon finalizing the PICO statement, information scientists were enlisted to develop the search strategy of MEDLINE, Embase, CDSR, Google Scholar and Scopus. Citations identified were considered for inclusion by the first author. Extracted cost data were summarized in tabular format and qualitatively synthesized. There is wide variability in the cost of CR delivery around the world, and patients pay out-of-pocket for some or all of services in 55% of countries. Supervised CR costs in high-income countries ranged from PPP$294 (Purchasing Power Parity; 2016 United States Dollars) in the United Kingdom to PPP$12,409 in Italy, and in middle-income countries ranged from PPP$146 in Venezuela to PPP$1095 in Brazil. Costs relate to facilities, personnel, and session dose. Delivering CR using information and communication technology (mean cost PPP$753/patient/program), lowering the dose and using lower-cost personnel and equipment are important strategies to consider in containing costs, however few explicitly low-cost models are available in the literature. More research is needed regarding the costs to deliver CR in community settings, the cost-effectiveness of CR in most countries, and the economic impact of return-to-work with CR participation. A low-cost model of CR should be standardized and tested for efficacy across multiple healthcare systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurement of functional capacity requirements to aid in development of an occupation-specific rehabilitation training program to help firefighters with cardiac disease safely return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jenny; Roberts, Joanne; Simms, Kay; Cheng, Dunlei; Hartman, Julie; Bartlett, Charles

    2009-03-15

    We designed a study to measure the functional capacity requirements of firefighters to aid in the development of an occupation-specific training program in cardiac rehabilitation; 23 healthy male firefighters with no history of heart disease completed a fire and rescue obstacle course that simulated 7 common firefighting tasks. They wore complete personal protective equipment and portable metabolic instruments that included a data collection mask. We monitored each subject's oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and working heart rate, then calculated age-predicted maximum heart rates (220 - age) and training target heart rates (85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate). During performance of the obstacle course, the subjects' mean working heart rates and peak heart rates were higher than the calculated training target heart rates (t(22) = 5.69 [working vs target, p functional capacity greatly exceeded that typically attained by patients in traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs (5 to 8 METs). In conclusion, our results indicate the need for intense, occupation-specific cardiac rehabilitation training that will help firefighters safely return to work after a cardiac event.

  1. Measurement of functional capacity requirements of police officers to aid in development of an occupation-specific cardiac rehabilitation training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jenny; Schneider, Jonna; Hubbard, Matthew; McCullough-Shock, Tiffany; Cheng, Dunlei; Simms, Kay; Hartman, Julie; Hinton, Paul; Strauss, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to measure the functional capacity of healthy subjects during strenuous simulated police tasks, with the goal of developing occupation-specific training for cardiac rehabilitation of police officers. A calibrated metabolic instrument and an oxygen consumption data collection mask were used to measure the oxygen consumption and heart rates of 30 Dallas Police Academy officers and cadets as they completed an 8-event obstacle course that simulated chasing, subduing, and handcuffing a suspect. Standard target heart rates (85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate, or 0.85 x [220 - age]) and metabolic equivalents (METs) were calculated; a matched-sample t test based on differences between target and achieved heart rate and MET level was used for statistical analysis. Peak heart rates during the obstacle course simulation were significantly higher than the standard target heart rates (those at which treadmill stress tests in physicians' offices are typically stopped) (t(29) = 12.81, P requires a functional capacity greater than that typically attained in traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs. Rehabilitation professionals should consider performing maximal stress tests and increasing the intensity of cardiac rehabilitation workouts to effectively train police officers who have had a cardiac event.

  2. Automatic referral to cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jane P

    2008-01-01

    The pervasive negative impact of cardiovascular disease in the United States is well documented. Although advances have been made, the campaign to reduce the occurrence, progression, and mortality continues. Determining evidence-based data is only half the battle. Implementing new and updated clinical guidelines into daily practice is a challenging task. Cardiac rehabilitation is an example of a proven intervention whose benefit is hindered through erratic implementation. The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR), the American College of Cardiology (ACC), and the American Heart Association (AHA) have responded to this problem by publishing the AACVPR/ACC/AHA 2007 Performance Measures on Cardiac Rehabilitation for Referral to and Delivery of Cardiac Rehabilitation/Secondary Prevention Services. This new national guideline recommends automatic referral to cardiac rehabilitation for every eligible patient (performance measure A-1). This article offers guidance for the initiation of an automatic referral system, including individualizing your protocol with regard to electronic or paper-based order entry structures.

  3. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne

    2016-01-01

    hospitals annually, with 75% receiving one or more outpatient rehabilitation services by 2015. The database has not yet been running for a full year, which explains the use of approximations. CONCLUSION: The DHRD is an online, national quality improvement database on CR, aimed at patients with CHD......AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). STUDY POPULATION: Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated...... with percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, or medication alone. Reporting is mandatory for all hospitals in Denmark delivering CR. The database was initially implemented in 2013 and was fully running from August 14, 2015, thus comprising data at a patient level from the latter date...

  4. High-intensity interval training versus moderate-intensity continuous training within cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Amanda L; Hing, Wayne; Simas, Vini; Climstein, Mike; Coombes, Jeff S; Jayasinghe, Rohan; Byrnes, Joshua; Furness, James

    2018-01-01

    Aerobic capacity has been shown to be inversely proportionate to cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and there is growing evidence that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) appears to be more effective than moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in improving cardiorespiratory fitness within the cardiac population. Previously published systematic reviews in cardiovascular disease have neither investigated the effect that the number of weeks of intervention has on cardiorespiratory fitness changes, nor have adverse events been collated. We aimed to undertake a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) within the cardiac population that investigated cardiorespiratory fitness changes resulting from HIIT versus MICT and to collate adverse events. A critical narrative synthesis and meta-analysis was conducted after systematically searching relevant databases up to July 2017. We searched for RCTs that compared cardiorespiratory fitness changes resulting from HIIT versus MICT interventions within the cardiac population. Seventeen studies, involving 953 participants (465 for HIIT and 488 for MICT) were included in the analysis. HIIT was significantly superior to MICT in improving cardiorespiratory fitness overall (SMD 0.34 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval [CI; 0.2-0.48]; p HIIT intervention (n=9). However, some adverse events (n=5) were not classified by intervention group. HIIT is superior to MICT in improving cardiorespiratory fitness in participants of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness are significant for CR programs of >6-week duration. Programs of 7-12 weeks' duration resulted in the largest improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness for patients with coronary artery disease. HIIT appears to be as safe as MICT for CR participants.

  5. High-intensity interval training versus moderate-intensity continuous training within cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Amanda L; Hing, Wayne; Simas, Vini; Climstein, Mike; Coombes, Jeff S; Jayasinghe, Rohan; Byrnes, Joshua; Furness, James

    2018-01-01

    Background Aerobic capacity has been shown to be inversely proportionate to cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and there is growing evidence that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) appears to be more effective than moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in improving cardiorespiratory fitness within the cardiac population. Previously published systematic reviews in cardiovascular disease have neither investigated the effect that the number of weeks of intervention has on cardiorespiratory fitness changes, nor have adverse events been collated. Objective We aimed to undertake a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) within the cardiac population that investigated cardiorespiratory fitness changes resulting from HIIT versus MICT and to collate adverse events. Methods A critical narrative synthesis and meta-analysis was conducted after systematically searching relevant databases up to July 2017. We searched for RCTs that compared cardiorespiratory fitness changes resulting from HIIT versus MICT interventions within the cardiac population. Results Seventeen studies, involving 953 participants (465 for HIIT and 488 for MICT) were included in the analysis. HIIT was significantly superior to MICT in improving cardiorespiratory fitness overall (SMD 0.34 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval [CI; 0.2–0.48]; pHIIT intervention (n=9). However, some adverse events (n=5) were not classified by intervention group. Conclusion HIIT is superior to MICT in improving cardiorespiratory fitness in participants of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness are significant for CR programs of >6-week duration. Programs of 7–12 weeks’ duration resulted in the largest improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness for patients with coronary artery disease. HIIT appears to be as safe as MICT for CR participants. PMID:29416382

  6. Cardiac rehabilitation: a comprehensive review

    OpenAIRE

    Lear, Scott A; Ignaszewski, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a commonly used treatment for men and women with cardiovascular disease. To date, no single study has conclusively demonstrated a comprehensive benefit of CR. Numerous individual studies, however, have demonstrated beneficial effects such as improved risk-factor profile, slower disease progression, decreased morbidity, and decreased mortality. This paper will review the evidence for the use of CR and discuss the implications and limitations of these stu...

  7. High-intensity interval training versus moderate-intensity continuous training within cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannan AL

    2018-01-01

    for HIIT and 488 for MICT were included in the analysis. HIIT was significantly superior to MICT in improving cardiorespiratory fitness overall (SMD 0.34 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval [CI; 0.2–0.48]; p<0.00001; I2=28%. There were no deaths or cardiac events requiring hospitalization reported in any study during training. Overall, there were more adverse events reported as a result of the MICT (n=14 intervention than the HIIT intervention (n=9. However, some adverse events (n=5 were not classified by intervention group. Conclusion: HIIT is superior to MICT in improving cardiorespiratory fitness in participants of cardiac rehabilitation (CR. Improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness are significant for CR programs of >6-week duration. Programs of 7–12 weeks’ duration resulted in the largest improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness for patients with coronary artery disease. HIIT appears to be as safe as MICT for CR participants. Keywords: coronary artery disease, cardiac rehabilitation, interval training, exercise, intensity, physical therapy, cardiovascular disease

  8. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lets you work longer and harder. • Possibly begin strength training, if your doctor says you can. • Have your ... heartinsight.org . Connect with others sharing similar journeys with heart disease and stroke by join-ing our Support Network ...

  9. Australian cardiac rehabilitation exercise parameter characteristics and perceptions of high-intensity interval training: a cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Amanda L; Hing, Wayne; Climstein, Mike; Coombes, Jeff S; Furness, James; Jayasinghe, Rohan; Byrnes, Joshua

    2018-01-01

    Purpose This study explored current demographics, characteristics, costs, evaluation methods, and outcome measures used in Australian cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. It also determined the actual usage and perceptions of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Methods A cross-sectional observational web-based survey was distributed to 328 Australian CR programs nationally. Results A total of 261 programs completed the survey (79.6% response rate). Most Australian CR programs were located in a hospital setting (76%), offered exercise sessions once a week (52%) for 6–8 weeks (49%) at moderate intensity (54%) for 46–60 min (62%), and serviced 101–500 clients per annum (38%). HIIT was reported in only 1% of programs, and 27% of respondents believed that it was safe while 42% of respondents were unsure. Lack of staff (25%), monitoring resources (20%), and staff knowledge (18%) were the most commonly reported barriers to the implementation of HIIT. Overall, Australian CR coordinators are unsure of the cost of exercise sessions. Conclusion There is variability in CR delivery across Australia. Only half of programs reassess outcome measures postintervention, and cost of exercise sessions is unknown. Although HIIT is recommended in international CR guidelines, it is essentially not being used in Australia and clinicians are unsure as to the safety of HIIT. Lack of resources and staff knowledge were perceived as the biggest barriers to HIIT implementation, and there are inconsistent perceptions of prescreening and monitoring requirements. This study highlights the need to educate health professionals about the benefits and safety of HIIT to improve its usage and patient outcomes. PMID:29750058

  10. Exercise-related cardiac arrest in cardiac rehabilitation - The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescribed physical activity plays a major role in the rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease, and as with any other form of treatment its benefits must be weighed against its possible risks. This study attempted to establish the safety of cardiac rehabilitation as a medical intervention at the Johannesburg Cardiac ...

  11. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne; Foghmar, Sussie; Eichhorst, Regina; Prescott, Eva; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Gislason, Gunnar H; Larsen, Mogens Lytken; Andersen, Ulla Overgaard; Gustafsson, Ida; Thomsen, Kristian K; Boye Hansen, Lene; Hammer, Signe; Viggers, Lone; Christensen, Bo; Kvist, Birgitte; Lindström Egholm, Cecilie; May, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated with percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, or medication alone. Reporting is mandatory for all hospitals in Denmark delivering CR. The database was initially implemented in 2013 and was fully running from August 14, 2015, thus comprising data at a patient level from the latter date onward. Patient-level data are registered by clinicians at the time of entry to CR directly into an online system with simultaneous linkage to other central patient registers. Follow-up data are entered after 6 months. The main variables collected are related to key outcome and performance indicators of CR: referral and adherence, lifestyle, patient-related outcome measures, risk factor control, and medication. Program-level online data are collected every third year. Based on administrative data, approximately 14,000 patients with CHD are hospitalized at 35 hospitals annually, with 75% receiving one or more outpatient rehabilitation services by 2015. The database has not yet been running for a full year, which explains the use of approximations. The DHRD is an online, national quality improvement database on CR, aimed at patients with CHD. Mandatory registration of data at both patient level as well as program level is done on the database. DHRD aims to systematically monitor the quality of CR over time, in order to improve the quality of CR throughout Denmark to benefit patients.

  12. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe Stelling; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Johansen, Pernille Palm

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation may benefit adults with atrial fibrillation or those who had been treated for atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is caused by multiple micro re-entry circuits within the atrial tissue, which result in chaotic rapid activity in the atria....... OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of exercise-based rehabilitation programmes, alone or with another intervention, compared with no-exercise training controls in adults who currently have AF, or have been treated for AF. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following electronic databases; CENTRAL...... the benefits and harms of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation on patient-relevant outcomes....

  13. Motivational factors of adherence to cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Hooman; Shahriari, Mohsen; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2012-05-01

    Main suggested theories about patients' adherence to treatment regimens recognize the importance of motivation in positive changes in behaviors. Since cardiac diseases are chronic and common, cardiac rehabilitation as an effective prevention program is crucial in management of these diseases. There is always concern about the patients' adherence to cardiac rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to describe the motivational factors affecting the patients' participation and compliance to cardiac rehabilitation by recognizing and understanding the nature of patients' experiences. The participants were selected among the patients with cardiac diseases who were referred to cardiac rehabilitation in Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Iran. The purposive sampling method was used and data saturation achieved after 8 semi-structured interviews. The three main concepts obtained from this study are "beliefs", "supporters" and "group cohesion". In cardiac rehabilitation programs, emphasis on motivational factors affects the patient's adherence. It is suggested that in cardiac rehabilitation programs more attention should be paid to patients' beliefs, the role of patients' supporters and the role of group-based rehabilitation.

  14. Psychosocial aspects in cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pogosova, Nana; Saner, Hugo; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2015-01-01

    A large body of empirical research shows that psychosocial risk factors (PSRFs) such as low socio-economic status, social isolation, stress, type-D personality, depression and anxiety increase the risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and also contribute to poorer health-related quality....... Stress, anxiety and depression affect the cardiovascular system through immune, neuroendocrine and behavioural pathways. In turn, CHD and its associated treatments may lead to distress in patients, including anxiety and depression. In clinical practice, PSRFs can be assessed with single-item screening...... of life (HRQoL) and prognosis in patients with established CHD. PSRFs may also act as barriers to lifestyle changes and treatment adherence and may moderate the effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Furthermore, there appears to be a bidirectional interaction between PSRFs and the cardiovascular system...

  15. Psychosocial aspects in cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pogosova, N. V.; Saner, H.; Pedersen, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    A large body of empirical research shows that psychosocial risk factors (PSRFs) such as low socio-economic status, social isolation, stress, type-D personality, depression and anxiety increase the risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and also contribute to poorer health- related quality....... Stress, anxiety and depression affect the cardiovascular system through immune, neuroendocrine and behavioural pathways. In turn, CHD and its associated treatments may lead to distress in patients, including anxiety and depression. In clinical practice, PSRFs can be assessed with single-item screening...... of life (HRQoL) and prognosis in patients with establishedCHD. PSRFs may also act as barriers to lifestyle changes and treatment adherence and may moderate the effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Furthermore, there appears to be a bidirectional interaction between PSRFs and the cardiovascular system...

  16. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwisler AD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ann-Dorthe Zwisler,1 Henriette Knold Rossau,1 Anne Nakano,2,3 Sussie Foghmar,4 Regina Eichhorst,5 Eva Prescott,6 Charlotte Cerqueira,7 Anne Merete Boas Soja,4 Gunnar H Gislason,8–10 Mogens Lytken Larsen,5 Ulla Overgaard Andersen,11 Ida Gustafsson,4 Kristian K Thomsen,12 Lene Boye Hansen,13 Signe Hammer,14 Lone Viggers,15 Bo Christensen,16 Birgitte Kvist,17 Cecilie Lindström Egholm,18 Ole May19 On behalf of the Working Group of Preventive Cardiology and Rehabilitation, Danish Society of Cardiology, and the Working Group of Cardiac Clinical Registries, Danish Society of Cardiology 1Danish Centre for Rehabilitation and Palliative Care, Odense University Hospital and University of Southern Denmark, Odense, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, 3Registry Support Centre (West – Clinical Quality Improvement & Health Informatics, Aarhus, 4Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, 5Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, 6Department of Cardiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 7Registry Support Centre (East – Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, the Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, 8Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, 9The Danish Heart Foundation, Copenhagen, 10The National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, 11Department of Cardiology, Holbaek Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 12Department of Cardiology, Hospital of Southwest Jutland, Esbjerg, 13Department of Cardiology, Gentofte Hospital, Gentofte, 14Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, 15Department of Nutrition, Regional Hospital West Jutland, Holstebro, 16Department of General Medicine, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, 17Department of Health Care and Prevention, Municipality of Frederikshavn, Frederikshavn, 18

  17. Initial Efficacy of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Transition Program: Cardiac TRUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Melissa; Boxer, Rebecca; Moore, Shirley M.

    2012-01-01

    Patients recovering from cardiac events are increasingly using postacute care, such as home health care and skilled nursing facility services. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the initial efficacy, feasibility, and safety of a specially designed postacute care transitional rehabilitation intervention for cardiac patients. Cardiac Transitional Rehabilitation Using Self- Management Techniques (Cardiac TRUST) is a family-focused intervention that includes progressive low-intensity walking and education in self-management skills to facilitate recovery following a cardiac event. Using a randomized two-group design, exercise self-efficacy, steps walked, and participation in an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program were compared in a sample of 38 older adults; 17 who received the Cardiac TRUST program and 21 who received usual care only. At discharge from postacute care, the intervention group had a trend for higher levels of self-efficacy for exercise outcomes (X=39.1, SD=7.4) than the usual care group (X=34.5; SD=7.0) (t-test 1.9, p=.06). During the 6 weeks following discharge, compared with the usual care group, the intervention group had more attendance in out-patient cardiac rehabilitation (33% compared to 11.8%, F=7.1, p=.03) and a trend toward more steps walked during the first week (X=1,307, SD=652 compared to X=782, SD=544, t-test 1.8, p=.07). The feasibility of the intervention was better for the home health participants than for those in the skilled nursing facility and there were no safety concerns. The provision of cardiac-focused rehabilitation during postacute care has the potential to bridge the gap in transitional services from hospitalization to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation for these patients at high risk for future cardiac events. Further evidence of the efficacy of Cardiac TRUST is warranted. PMID:22084960

  18. Gender and age-dependent differences in body composition changes in response to cardiac rehabilitation exercise training in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Socha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac rehabilitation (CR is the standard procedure in persons after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Its basic aim is to combat coronary heart disease (CHD risk factors through physical activity and normalization of body mass. Many authors highlight the differences in response to training in CR as dependent on gender, age and occurrence of accompanying disease. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a three-week early CR in reference to changing body composition parameters in patients over 50 years of age. The study involved a random group of 65 patients (44 men and 21 women between the ages of 50–76 (average: 62.6 ± 7.2 years with CHD following CABG. Anthropometric and body composition (bioelectrical impedance method measurements were taken at the commencement of CR and after the training programme. After CR, body mass and body mass index were reduced in men < 65 and ≥ 65 years, and in women <65 years. A reduction % body fat and increase % fat free mass and % total body water was observed only in patients <65. years. Furthermore, in men < 65 years, an increase in % body cell mass was observed. In women ≥ 65 years, no statistically significant changes were observed in body fat indices and body composition features between initial and final study. Patients ≥ 65 years of age following surgery over a period of hospital cardiac rehabilitation do not experience the same significant improvement in body composition parameters associated with risk of CHD as middle-aged adults. Older women post-cardiac surgery are characterized by a higher disability index in relation to tolerance to physical stress in comparison with men of the same age and persons < 65 years of age.

  19. Cardiac Rehabilitation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Spanish Electrocardiogram (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Cardiac Rehabilitation updates ... How to take your pulse Pulse Related Health Topics Heart Attack Heart Diseases How to Prevent Heart ...

  20. A randomised controlled trial of cardiac rehabilitation after revascularisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugemann, Johan; Poels, Bas J. J.; Oosterwijk, Mieke H.; van der Schans, Cees P.; Postema, Klaas; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    Background: It is unclear if psycho- education on top of physical training is of additional value regarding quality of life in revascularised patients. Design: Prospective randomised study comparing two types of cardiac rehabilitation: exercise based versus a more comprehensive approach including

  1. Psychosocial aspects of cardiac rehabilitation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, S

    1992-11-01

    While the present objectives of cardiac rehabilitation include recovery or restoration of everyday behaviour and secondary prevention, the effects of the traditional exercise-based, cardiac rehabilitation programmes are quite modest. It is argued that psychological interventions may affect these targets more easily, since there is evidence from controlled studies that psychological interventions may have beneficial effects on psychosocial recovery, compliance with medical advice and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. As a consequence one may expect that psychologists would be at least part-time members of most cardiac rehabilitation teams in European countries. In order to get an impression of the position of psychologists and the share of psychosocial care in cardiac rehabilitation in Europe, a questionnaire was sent out to two or three individuals in each European country. Health care professionals from 16 European countries returned their completed questionnaires on time. Among other things, the results show that in general social workers and psychologists, who may be considered the main potential agents for psychosocial care, are largely underrepresented in cardiac rehabilitation teams. As far as psychologists are concerned, the number involved in cardiac rehabilitation varies significantly from country to country. Three groups of countries could be distinguished: a group consisting of The Netherlands, Austria, and Italy, where psychologists are fairly well represented; a second one consisting of Norway, Finland and Belgium, where small numbers of psychologists are involved in cardiac rehabilitation; and a third group (the largest) consisting of Switzerland, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden, the UK, Greece, Portugal and Turkey, where the number of psychologists is negligible.

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation: an effective secondary prevention intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Fiona

    A combination of quantitative and qualitative research was used to determine the effectiveness of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme in a cohort of patients referred to the service at a London hospital. Quantitative data analysis provided evidence of effectiveness of participation in CR in reduced hospital readmission rates and use of recognised pharmacological management strategies. Self-reported physical activity levels and quality of life (QOL) in individuals who participated in the cardiac rehabilitation programme were qualitatively measured with questionnaires. Results provided evidence of benefit in continued participation in exercise. However, there was no evidence of benefit to QOL status post participation at 1 year. A p-value of 0.001 provided significant statistical evidence supporting the hypothesis of benefit in continued participation in exercise in participants following attendance at a cardiac rehabilitation programme. QOL status; a statistically significant p-value of 0.001 rejected the hypothesis (H1) of benefit. This would imply that participation CR programmes does not appear to provide sustained benefits in QOL. A number of moderating variables were suggested as explaining the finding such as homogeneity of respondents, age, mood bias and the timeframe of 1 year between participation in rehabilitation and self-reporting. CR appears to be an effective but time-limited intervention in relation to improvements in QOL. Collaborative working partnerships between specialist interventions, such as CR with chronic disease management strategies may provide greater sustainability of benefits gained from participation in cardiac rehabilitation programmes.

  3. Social inequality in phase II cardiac rehabilitation attendance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maria; Egerod, Ingrid; Overgaard, Dorthe

    2018-01-01

    : Thirty per cent attended full cardiac rehabilitation. Patients with low educational attainment, comorbidities, long commute to cardiac rehabilitation centre, and lone dwelling were less likely to attend full cardiac rehabilitation, whereas patients with high anxiety and depression score were more likely...

  4. Health Literacy Predicts Cardiac Knowledge Gains in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Colleen C.; Rawson, Katherine; Hughes, Joel W.; Waechter, Donna; Rosneck, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Health literacy is increasingly recognised as a potentially important patient characteristic related to patient education efforts. We evaluated whether health literacy would predict gains in knowledge after completion of patient education in cardiac rehabilitation. Method: This was a re-post observational analysis study design based on…

  5. High-intensity Interval Training Dosage for Heart Failure and Coronary Artery Disease Cardiac Rehabilitation. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesta García, Ismael; Rubio Arias, Jacobo Ángel; Ramos Campo, Domingo Jesús; Martínez González-Moro, Ignacio; Carrasco Poyatos, María

    2018-04-09

    High-interval intensity training (HIT) has been suggested to improve peak VO 2 in cardiac rehabilitation programs. However, the optimal HIT protocol is unknown. The objective of this study was to identify the most effective doses of HIT to optimize peak VO 2 in coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure (HF) patients. A search was conducted in 6 databases (MEDLINE, Web of Science, LILACS, CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, and SportDiscus). Studies using a HIT protocol in CAD or HF patients and measuring peak VO 2 were included. The PEDro Scale and Cochrane Collaboration tools were used. Analyses reported significant improvements in peak VO 2 after HIT in both diseases (P = .000001), with a higher increase in HF patients (P = .03). Nevertheless, in HF patients, there were no improvements when the intensity recovery was ≤ 40% of peak VO 2 (P = .19) and the frequency of training was ≤ 2 d/wk (P = .07). There were significant differences regarding duration in CAD patients, with greater improvements in peak VO 2 when the duration was < 12 weeks (P = .05). In HF, programs lasting < 12 weeks did not significantly improve peak VO 2 (P = .1). The HIT is an effective method for improving peak VO 2 in HF and CAD, with a significantly greater increase in HF patients. The recovery intervals should be active and be between 40% and 60% of peak VO 2 in HF patients. Training frequency should be ≥ 2 d/wk for CAD patients and ≥ 3 d/wk for HF patients. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of the items and services furnished under the plan. (iii) The goals set for the individual under the... prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, psychosocial assessment, and outcomes assessment... section. Intensive cardiac rehabilitation site means a hospital outpatient setting or physician's office...

  7. Cardiac Rehabilitation Enhancing Programs in Patients with Myocardial Infarction: A literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahyana Ahyana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR is a process that involves a multidisciplinary team of health professionals in order to optimize the status of patients’ physical, psychological, social, and vocational well being. The CR program has been proven to influence health outcomes in patients with cardiac diseases, particularly myocardial infarction (MI and stable angina. However, patients’ compliance with cardiac rehabilitation programs remains a challenge.Purpose: The purpose of this study is to review and identify interventions that enhance cardiac rehabilitation behaviors in MI patients.Method: A literature review was conducted by analyzing related research reports published since 2000 to 2012. Only English language articles were included.Result: There were 10 experimental studies and 2 meta-analysis studies. Interventions widely used to enhance cardiac rehabilitation behaviors in MI patients were self-efficacy and self management derived programs. These programs involved interventions that enhance cardiac rehabilitation behaviors, including training exercise, behavioral change, education and psychological support, and lifestyle changing strategies. None have reported the use of culturally tailored intervention. Four phases of cardiac rehabilitation were accepted as each phase represents a different aspect of care: inpatient care, early post discharge period, exercise training, and long term follow up. Critical factors for patients in maintaining an optimum health condition after a cardiac event are, in order, status of patient’s physical, psychological, social, and vocational well being.Conclusion: Cardiac Rehabilitation program has been shown to improve quality of life and decrease mortality in MI patients. The development of culturally specific interventions to increase cardiac rehabilitation behaviors will provide a significant improvement for cardiac patient’s care that ultimately results in better health outcomes. Health care

  8. Learning and coping strategies versus standard education in cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tayyari Dehbarez, Nasrin; Lynggaard, Vibeke; May, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Background Learning and coping education strategies (LC) was implemented to enhance patient attendance in the cardiac rehabilitation programme. This study assessed the cost-utility of LC compared to standard education (standard) as part of a rehabilitation programme for patients with ischemic heart...... disease and heart failure. Methods The study was conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial with 825 patients who were allocated to LC or standard rehabilitation and followed for 5 months. The LC approach was identical to the standard approach in terms of physical training and education...... to estimate the net benefit of the LC and to illustrate cost effectiveness acceptability curves. The statistical analysis was based on means and bootstrapped standard errors. Results An additional cost of DKK 6,043 (95 % CI −5,697; 17,783) and a QALY gain of 0.005 (95 % CI −0.001; 0.012) was estimated for LC...

  9. [Nutritional care in the cardiac rehabilitation program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Vico, Letizia; Biffi, Barbara; Masini, Maria Luisa; Fattirolli, Francesco

    2007-06-01

    There is some evidence of the efficacy of nutritional care in modifying eating habits and behavior in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation: nutritional care has a relevant role in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. The dietitian is the qualified sanitary professional for nutritional care. The aim of this study was to define the role of dietitians within a health care team in programs of cardiac rehabilitation. In this setting, nutritional care starts with a dietary assessment, which includes a measurement of the anthropometric parameters, and a survey of the patient knowledge and eating habits. If there is no need for change in the patient lifestyle, the patient is addressed to the normal cardiac rehabilitation program with no further nutritional intervention except one session of counseling. When lifestyle changes are needed, the dietitian defines, together with the patient, therapeutic aims and expected results. The following phase is represented by group session with patients and their relatives during which nutritional topics are discussed and nutritional education is provided Afterwards, self-monitoring sheets of eating habits are individually discussed in one visit; a last individual visit is used for a final assessment of nutritional knowledge, dietary habits, and anthropometric parameters. In case of unsatisfactory results, patients are invited to participate to three group session to be held biweekly, during which they interact with the dietitian and take part to exercises and group discussions. When the established targets are reached, the nutritional program includes individual follow up visits at six and twelve months for further assessment of medium term results.

  10. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in twelve European countries results of the European cardiac rehabilitation registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benzer, Werner; Rauch, Bernhard; Schmid, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Results from EuroCaReD study should serve as a benchmark to improve guideline adherence and treatment quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in Europe. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data from 2.054 CR patients in 12 European countries were derived from 69 centres. 76% were male. Indication for CR...

  11. Cardiac Rehabilitation After Heart Valve Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollmann, Agathe Gerwina Elena; Frederiksen, Marianne; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evidence of the effect of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after heart valve surgery is scarce, but nevertheless CR is recommended for this group of patients. Therefore, this study assessed the effect of CR on exercise capacity, cardiovascular risk factors, and long-term mortality and morbidity...... ((Equation is included in full-text article.)O2peak) or 6-minute walk test (6MWT). A composite endpoint of all-cause mortality and hospital admission due to myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, endocarditis, revascularization, or reoperation was used to assess the hazard ratio between CR attenders...

  12. Biofeedback on heart rate variability in cardiac rehabilitation: practical feasibility and psycho-physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climov, Daniela; Lysy, Camille; Berteau, Sylvain; Dutrannois, Jacques; Dereppe, Hubert; Brohet, Christian; Melin, Jacques

    2014-06-01

    Biofeedback is a self-regulation therapy by which the patient learns how to optimize the functioning of his autonomic nervous system. It has been applied to patients with various cardiovascular disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the practical feasibility and the psychophysiological effects of biofeedback applied to heart rate variability (HRV biofeedback) in order to increase cardiac coherence in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients participating in a cardiac rehabilitation programme. In this randomised and controlled study, 31 CAD patients were randomly assigned to an experimental or to a control group. The experimental group participated in a programme of 10 sessions of cardiac coherence biofeedback training, in addition to the rehabilitation programme. The control group participated in the usual cardiac rehabilitation programme only. Physiological variables (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, SDNN) and psychosocial variables (anxiety, depression, type D personality) were measured at the start and at the end of the programme in both groups. Statistical comparisons assessed the inter and intra group differences. The small sample size precludes any firm conclusions concerning the effect of cardiac coherence biofeedback on physiological or psychological variables. However, we observed a significant increase of the percentage of cardiac coherence, in relation with an increased SDNN index. Our study demonstrated the practical feasibility of cardiac coherence biofeedback training in CAD patients. Further research is desirable to investigate the potential benefit of cardiac coherence biofeedback as an adjunct to stress management in cardiac rehabilitation.

  13. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heran, Balraj S; Chen, Jenny MH; Ebrahim, Shah; Moxham, Tiffany; Oldridge, Neil; Rees, Karen; Thompson, David R; Taylor, Rod S

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) worldwide is one of great concern to patients and healthcare agencies alike. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation aims to restore patients with heart disease to health. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (exercise training alone or in combination with psychosocial or educational interventions) on mortality, morbidity and health-related quality of life of patients with CHD. Search methods RCTs have been identified by searching CENTRAL, HTA, and DARE (using The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2009), as well as MEDLINE (1950 to December 2009), EMBASE (1980 to December 2009), CINAHL (1982 to December 2009), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to December 2009). Selection criteria Men and women of all ages who have had myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), or who have angina pectoris or coronary artery disease defined by angiography. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected and data extracted independently by two reviewers. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Main results This systematic review has allowed analysis of 47 studies randomising 10,794 patients to exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation or usual care. In medium to longer term (i.e. 12 or more months follow-up) exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduced overall and cardiovascular mortality [RR 0.87 (95% CI 0.75, 0.99) and 0.74 (95% CI 0.63, 0.87), respectively], and hospital admissions [RR 0.69 (95% CI 0.51, 0.93)] in the shorter term (< 12 months follow-up) with no evidence of heterogeneity of effect across trials. Cardiac rehabilitation did not reduce the risk of total MI, CABG or PTCA. Given both the heterogeneity in outcome measures and methods of reporting findings, a meta-analysis was not undertaken for health-related quality of life. In seven out of 10 trials reporting health

  14. Investigating patients' preferences for cardiac rehabilitation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Trine; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Willaing, Ingrid

    2006-01-01

    the preferences for the offer of participation in various cardiac rehabilitation program activities: smoking cessation course, physical exercise program, personal meetings with cardiac nurse, group meetings managed by cardiac nurses, and nutritional counseling guidance. The questionnaire was sent to 742 former...

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease is a New Target of Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kohzuki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure is increasingly prevalent worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The Cochrane review demonstrated that cardiac rehabilitation (CR resulted in improvements in QOL and a reduction in long-term mortality. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is another worldwide public health problem. This review focuses on the importance and efficacy of rehabilitation for CKD patients as a new target of CR. Patients with CKD on hemodialysis (HD have a high mortality rate, with cardiovascular diseases, such as chronic heart failure. A new systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials reported that exercise-based renal rehabilitation improved aerobic capacity, muscular functioning, cardiovascular function, walking capacity, and QOL in CKD patients with HD. Moreover, exercise training may have renal protective effects, not only in some animal models of pre-HD CKD, but also in pre-HD CKD patients. Exercise therapy could be an effective clinical strategy in improving renal function, lowering the need for renal replacement therapy, such as HD, and reducing renal transplant risk in pre-HD CKD patients. This led the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan to extend renal rehabilitation partial coverage to stage 4 pre-HD CKD patients for the first time in the world in 2016.

  16. Guidelines for postdoctoral training in rehabilitation psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiers, William; Hanson, Stephanie; Turner, Aaron P; Stucky, Kirk; Barisa, Mark; Brownsberger, Mary; Van Tubbergen, Marie; Ashman, Teresa; Kuemmel, Angela

    2012-11-01

    This article describes the methods and results of a national conference that was held to (1) develop consensus guidelines about the structure and process of rehabilitation psychology postdoctoral training programs and (2) create a Council of Rehabilitation Psychology Postdoctoral Training Programs to promote training programs' abilities to implement the guidelines and to formally recognize programs in compliance with the guidelines. Forty-six conference participants were chosen to include important stakeholders in rehabilitation psychology, representatives of rehabilitation psychology training and practice communities, representatives of psychology accreditation and certification bodies, and persons involved in medical education practice and research. Consensus guidelines were developed for rehabilitation psychology postdoctoral training program structure and process and for establishing the Council of Rehabilitation Psychology Postdoctoral Training Programs. The Conference developed aspirational guidelines for postdoctoral education and training programs in applied rehabilitation psychology and established a Council of Rehabilitation Psychology Postdoctoral Training Programs as a means of promoting their adoption by training programs. These efforts are designed to promote quality, consistency, and excellence in the education and training of rehabilitation psychology practitioners and to promote competence in their practice. It is hoped that these efforts will stimulate discussion, assist in the development of improved teaching and evaluation methods, lead to interesting research questions, and generally facilitate the continued systematic development of the profession of rehabilitation psychology. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved

  17. CARDIAC REHABILITATION IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Saeidi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractINTRODUCTION: Prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD is 19.4% in Iran anddiabetes mellitus is an important CVD risk factor in this country. Non-insulin-dependentdiabetes mellitus (type II DM is associated with increased morbidity and mortality due toatherosclerosis. With cardiac rehabilitation (CR we can modify CVD risk factors such astype II DM and play an important role in decreasing its mortality and morbidity. Weinvestigated the effects of CR on cardiac patients with and without type II DM.METHODS: In this retrospective before-and-after study we analyzed data from 496 cardiacpatients (419 with type II DM and 77 without type II DM. All of the subjects completeddemographic data questionnaires and underwent weight and height measurement, exercisetest to assess exercise capacity (EC, echocardiography, and blood test to assess lipidprofile and fasting blood glucose. The subjects then participated in a 24-session CRprogram. Each session consisted of 10 minutes warm-up, 40 minutes aerobic exercise, 10minutes cool-down and 20 minutes relaxation. They also took part in 8 educational sessionson life style modification, diet therapy and stress management supervised by CR team (acardiologist, a physician, a physiotherapist, a nurse, a nutritionist and a psychiatrist. At theend of the program, all measurements, exams and tests were repeated. Data were analyzedwith SPSS11.5 using independent t-test at level of P<0.05.RESULTS: We studied 419 non-diabetics (mean age: 55.61±9.41 years and 77 diabetics(mean age: 58.59±7.76 years. Mean EC increased significantly after CR in both groups. Inthe diabetic group, EC increased significantly compared to the non-diabetic group(62.21±133.40 vs. 33.68±31/42, P=0.02. Mean levels of triglyceride, cholesterol, LDLcholesterol,as well as body mass index and heart rate decreased significantly after CR inboth groups. However, no significant difference was seen between the two groups in respectof these variables

  18. High-intensity interval training versus moderate-intensity steady-state training in UK cardiac rehabilitation programmes (HIIT or MISS UK): study protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Gordon; Nichols, Simon; Hamborg, Thomas; Bryning, Lucy; Tudor-Edwards, Rhiannon; Markland, David; Mercer, Jenny; Birkett, Stefan; Ennis, Stuart; Powell, Richard; Begg, Brian; Haykowsky, Mark J; Banerjee, Prithwish; Ingle, Lee; Shave, Rob; Backx, Karianne

    2016-11-16

    Current international guidelines for cardiac rehabilitation (CR) advocate moderate-intensity exercise training (MISS, moderate-intensity steady state). This recommendation predates significant advances in medical therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD) and may not be the most appropriate strategy for the 'modern' patient with CHD. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) appears to be a safe and effective alternative, resulting in greater improvements in peak oxygen uptake (VO 2 peak ). To date, HIIT trials have predominantly been proof-of-concept studies in the laboratory setting and conducted outside the UK. The purpose of this multicentre randomised controlled trial is to compare the effects of HIIT and MISS training in patients with CHD attending UK CR programmes. This pragmatic study will randomly allocate 510 patients with CHD to 8 weeks of twice weekly HIIT or MISS training at 3 centres in the UK. HIIT will consist of 10 high-intensity (85-90% peak power output (PPO)) and 10 low-intensity (20-25% PPO) intervals, each lasting 1 min. MISS training will follow usual care recommendations, adhering to currently accepted UK guidelines (ie, >20 min continuous exercise at 40-70% heart rate reserve). Outcome measures will be assessed at baseline, 8 weeks and 12 months. The primary outcome for the trial will be change in VO 2 peak as determined by maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Secondary measures will assess physiological, psychosocial and economic outcomes. The study protocol V.1.0, dated 1 February 2016, was approved by the NHS Health Research Authority, East Midlands-Leicester South Research Ethics Committee (16/EM/0079). Recruitment will start in August 2016 and will be completed in June 2018. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals, presented at national and international scientific meetings and are expected to inform future national guidelines for exercise training in UK CR. NCT02784873; pre-results. Published by the BMJ

  19. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rod S; Dalal, Hayes; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Zawada, Anna

    2010-01-20

    The burden of cardiovascular disease world-wide is one of great concern to patients and health care agencies alike. Traditionally centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes are offered to individuals after cardiac events to aid recovery and prevent further cardiac illness. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes have been introduced in an attempt to widen access and participation. To determine the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes compared with supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health-related quality of life and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. We updated the search of a previous review by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2007, Issue 4), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL from 2001 to January 2008. We checked reference lists and sought advice from experts. No language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (e.g. hospital, gymnasium, sports centre) with home-based programmes, in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone revascularisation. Studies were selected independently by two reviewers, and data extracted by a single reviewer and checked by a second one. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Twelve studies (1,938 participants) met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies recruited a lower risk patient following an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and revascularisation. There was no difference in outcomes of home- versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation in mortality risk ratio (RR) was1.31 (95% confidence interval (C) 0.65 to 2.66), cardiac events, exercise capacity standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.11 (95% CI -0.35 to 0.13), as well as in modifiable risk factors (systolic blood pressure; diastolic blood pressure; total cholesterol

  20. Barriers to participation in a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Y M W; Chan, W K; Yue, C S S

    2005-12-01

    To identify barriers to participation in a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme and measures that may enhance participation. Prospective study. Regional hospital, Hong Kong. Cardiac patients recruited for a phase I cardiac rehabilitation programme from July 2002 to January 2003. Reasons for not participating in a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme. Of the 193 patients recruited for a phase I cardiac rehabilitation programme, 152 (79%) patients, with a mean age of 70.3 years (standard deviation, 11.9 years), did not proceed to phase II programme. Eleven (7%) deaths occurred before commencement of phase II and 74 (49%) patients were considered physically unfit. Reasons for the latter included fractures, pain, or degenerative changes in the lower limbs (24%), and co-morbidities such as cerebrovascular accident (19%), chronic renal failure (11%), congestive heart failure (9%), and unstable angina (8%). Phase II rehabilitation was postponed until after completion of scheduled cardiac interventions in 13% of patients. Failure of physicians to arrange the pre-phase II exercise stress test as per protocol was reported in 7% of patients. Other reasons were reported: work or time conflicts (16%), non-compliance with cardiac treatment (5%), financial constraints (4%), self-exercise (3%), fear after exercise stress testing (3%), and patients returning to their original cardiologists for treatment (3%). A significant (79%) proportion of patients did not proceed to a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme for a variety of reasons. These included physical unfitness, work or time conflicts, and need to attend scheduled cardiac interventions. Further studies are required to determine how to overcome obstacles to cardiac rehabilitation.

  1. Dealing with existential anxiety in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte; Pedersen, Birthe D; Dreyer, Pia

    2015-01-01

    rehabilitation. Focus group interviews were conducted at the programme end, and individual interviews were performed one to two months later. The interpretation comprised three methodological steps: naïve reading, structural analysis, and comprehensive interpretation and discussion. Findings Although both......Aims and objectives To investigate patients' lived experiences of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. Background Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is used to enable patients with cardiac problems to move forward to lead satisfying lives. However, knowledge of patients' concerns while...... it requires specific care. Recognising this anxiety also highlights how participating in the programme can be very demanding, which can help us understand aspects of adherence problems. Of greatest importance is that exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation enables patients to find a new foothold, which...

  2. Need for Rehabilitation Teamwork Training in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Eldar, Reuben; Marincek, Crt; Kullmann, Lajos

    2008-01-01

    Teamwork is the cornerstone of rehabilitation medicine. Rehabilitation workers in European countries are well educated in their own disciplines and attain appropriate professional knowledge; however, they lack educational opportunities for acquiring skills and attitudes necessary for effective teamwork, mainly communication, cooperation, and leadership. Consequently, teamwork is compromised and rehabilitation effectiveness reduced. Therefore, training in these components of professional compe...

  3. Manual for Training Leprosy Rehabilitation Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Masayoshi; Eason, Alice L.

    The purpose of this manual is to introduce the general concepts and techniques in leprosy rehabilitation to physical therapy aides. Because of the lack of well-trained, qualified, physical therapists, the committee on leprosy rehabilitation considers it necessary to publish a teaching manual outlining leprosy rehabilitation for those who work with…

  4. Sexual Dysfunction before and after Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schumann

    2010-01-01

    variables. Methods. Analysis of patients participating in a 12-week exercise-based outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (OCR between April 1999 and December 2007. Exercise capacity (ExC and quality of life including sexual function were assessed before and after OCR. Results. Complete data were available in 896 male patients. No sexual activity at all was indicated by 23.1% at baseline and 21.8% after OCR, no problems with sexual activity by 40.8% at baseline and 38.6% after OCR. Patients showed an increase in specific problems (erectile dysfunction and lack of orgasm from 18% to 23% (<.0001 during OCR. We found the following independent positive and negative predictors of sexual problems after OCR: hyperlipidemia, age, CABG, baseline ExC and improvement of ExC, subjective physical and mental capacity, and sense of affiliation. Conclusions. Sexual dysfunction is present in over half of the patients undergoing OCR with no overall improvement during OCR. Age, CABG, low exercise capacity are independent predictors of sexual dysfunction after OCR.

  5. Some Results from Rehabilitation Team Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Robert B.; Crisler, Jack R.

    Provision of training for an interdisciplinary rehabilitation team in a center serving mental patients was investigated. An autonomous service delivery rehabilitation team was formed and provided training in cooperative function. Findings indicate that the experimental team became a particularly cohesive functional unit, and that their support of…

  6. Cost-utility analysis of cardiac rehabilitation after conventional heart valve surgery versus usual care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2017-01-01

    and effect differences were presented in a cost-effectiveness plane and were transformed into net benefit and presented in cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Results No statistically significant differences were found in total societal costs (-1609 Euros; 95% CI: -6162 to 2942 Euros) or in quality......Background While cardiac rehabilitation in patients with ischaemic heart disease and heart failure is considered cost-effective, this evidence may not be transferable to heart valve surgery patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation following...... heart valve surgery. Design We conducted a cost-utility analysis based on a randomised controlled trial of 147 patients who had undergone heart valve surgery and were followed for 6 months. Methods Patients were randomised to cardiac rehabilitation consisting of 12 weeks of physical exercise training...

  7. Differential effects of high-frequency versus low-frequency exercise training in rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwland, W.; Berkhuysen, M.A.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Brugemann, J.; Landsman, M.L.J.; van Sonderen, E.; Lie, K.I.; Crijns, H.J.G.M.; Rispens, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We sought to study the influence of frequency of exercise training during cardiac rehabilitation on functional capacity (i.e., peak oxygen consumption [VO2] and ventilatory anaerobic threshold [VAT]) and quality of life (QoL). BACKGROUND Although the value of cardiac rehabilitation is now

  8. [Third phase of cardiac rehabilitation: a nurse-based "home-control" model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, Sara; Ciocca, Antonella; Opasich, Cristina; Pinna, Gian Domenico; Cobelli, Franco

    2011-12-01

    Phase 3 is a critical point for cardiac rehabilitation: many problems don't allow achieving a correct secondary prevention, in particular regarding the relationship between patient and cardiologist. Aiming at ensuring continuity of care of phase 3 cardiac rehabilitation patients, we have developed a telemetric educational program to stimulate in them the will and capacity to become active comanagers of their disease. Nurses specialized in cardiac rehabilitation, with the collaboration of the general practitioners, contact the patients by scheduled phone calls to collect questionnaires about their health status and the result of biochemistry. All the results are analyzed by the nurses and discussed with each patient (educational reinforcement). The effects of this program of comanagement of cardiac disease and secondary prevention are analyzed comparing each patient data at the discharge with data after one year and those coming from our archive (retrospective analysis). The patients enrolled in this study pay much more attention to the amount of food they eat; they tend not to gain weight, and they restart smoking in a reduced proportion compared to patients not enrolled in the study. However, despite having received better information on their cardiac disease, their compliance to physical training, consumption of healthy food, and pharmacological therapy is not improved. This study focuses on the role of a continuous educational program of a cardiac rehabilitation unit after the patient's discharge. This home control program conducted by nurses specialized in cardiac rehabilitation, with the assistance of cardiologists, psychologists and physiotherapists, and in collaboration with the general practitioner, was quite cheap, and helped maximizing the knowledge of the disease and reinforcing correct life style in the patients. The results are not as good as expected, probably because one year does not represent a sufficient time, or because the educational

  9. A rehabilitation training partnership in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianabela, Sonia; Hariharan, Ram; Ford, Helen L; Chamberlain, M Anne

    2015-09-01

    We describe here the development of a mid-level training programme for doctors in Madagascar to direct regional and national rehabilitation services. Eight doctors enrolled and all gained their diplomas and have gone on to form the Association of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine of Madagascar, which is leading further training and service developments. The course was specific to Madagascar's needs, and was devised according to the vision of the senior rehabilitation specialist in the Ministry of Health in Madagascar with support from the University of Antananarivo. The syllabus was developed with a senior Rehabilitation Medicine consultant responsible for setting up a comprehensive range of services and teaching in a University teaching hospital in the UK. Major barriers to success include the economic and political situation in Madagascar, which worsened steadily over the period of the training, the lack of resources for health, rehabilitation and rehabilitation workshops, and the withdrawal of aid. The sustainability of the training and the improved services that have been initiated will be evaluated, but these will be influenced by the situation of the country. It is hoped that this description of a highly practical training using modern teaching methods will be of use in other low-resource countries. Much of the teaching input was given by clinicians from a UK teaching hospital, and this resource will continue to be needed.

  10. e-Coaching for Intensive Cardiac Rehabilitation : a Requirement Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooitgedagt, A.; Beun, R.J.; Dignum, F.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the rationale and requirements are presented for an e-coaching system in the domain of intensive cardiac rehabilitation. It is argued that there is a need for a personalized program with close monitoring of the patient based on medical needs and needed lifestyle changes in a setting

  11. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann Dorthe Olsen; Norten, RJ; Dean, SG

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for heart failure compared to either usual medical care (i.e. no CR) or centre-based CR on mortality, morbidity, exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, drop out, adherence rates, and costs. METHODS: Randomised...

  12. Expanded cardiac rehabilitation in socially vulnerable patients with myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has been shown to reduce cardiovascular risk. A research project performed at a university hospital in Denmark offered an expanded CR intervention to socially vulnerable patients. One-year follow-up showed significant improvements concerning medicine...

  13. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Strength and Balance in Patients after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Nazari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common method for improving the quality of life especially in chronic heart disease is rehabilitation. For increasing the level of knowledge about effect of rehabilitation and its' impression on improving the quality of life in patients. This study evaluates effect of one month cardiac rehabilitation on lower limb strength and the static and dynamic balance of CABG patients. Materials and Methods: This study is based on clinical trial before and after rehabilitation. the exercise protocol lasted for one month, three times per week, each session lasting 1 hour, on 30 male patients in two groups in control (N=15 and experimental group (N=15 after CABG in the centre of rehabilitation in Javad-Alaeme Heart Hospital, Mashhad. The strength of lower limb by chair standing test, the static balance by standing on one leg and dynamic balance by time up and go (TUG test, was evaluated before and after 1 month rehabilitation in training group and detraining in control group. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 and used t-test analysis (p≤0.054T. Results: The strength of lower limb (p=0.001, static balance (p=0.023 and dynamic balance (p=0.037 increased significantly after one month of cardiac rehabilitation4T. Conclusion: The result of this study indicates that cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery causes significant increase in strength of lower limb and balance in patients, the more muscle strength is associated with an increase in ability of performing daily activities and so it causes improved quality of life4T.

  14. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Strength and Balance in Patients after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Nazari

    Full Text Available Background: The most common method for improving the quality of life especially in chronic heart disease is rehabilitation. For increasing the level of knowledge about effect of rehabilitation and its' impression on improving the quality of life in patients. This study evaluates effect of one month cardiac rehabilitation on lower limb strength and the static and dynamic balance of CABG patients. Materials and Methods: This study is based on clinical trial before and after rehabilitation. the exercise protocol lasted for one month, three times per week, each session lasting 1 hour, on 30 male patients in two groups in control (N=15 and experimental group (N=15 after CABG in the centre of rehabilitation in Javad-Alaeme Heart Hospital, Mashhad. The strength of lower limb by chair standing test, the static balance by standing on one leg and dynamic balance by time up and go (TUG test, was evaluated before and after 1 month rehabilitation in training group and detraining in control group. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 and used t-test analysis (p≤0.05.Results: The strength of lower limb (p=0.001, static balance (p=0.023 and dynamic balance (p=0.037 increased significantly after one month of cardiac rehabilitation.Conclusion: The result of this study indicates that cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery causes significant increase in strength of lower limb and balance in patients, the more muscle strength is associated with an increase in ability of performing daily activities and so it causes improved quality of life.

  15. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Tang, Lars Hermann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation may benefit heart valve surgery patients. We conducted a systematic review to assess the evidence for the use of exercise-based intervention programmes following heart valve surgery. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of exercise......-based cardiac rehabilitation compared with no exercise training intervention, or treatment as usual, in adults following heart valve surgery. We considered programmes including exercise training with or without another intervention (such as a psycho-educational component). SEARCH METHODS: We searched...... handsearched Web of Science, bibliographies of systematic reviews and trial registers (ClinicalTrials.gov, Controlled-trials.com, and The World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform). SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised clinical trials that investigated exercise...

  16. [Robot-aided training in rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachisuka, Kenji

    2010-02-01

    Recently, new training techniques that involve the use of robots have been used in the rehabilitation of patients with hemiplegia and paraplegia. Robots used for training the arm include the MIT-MANUS, Arm Trainer, mirror-image motion enabler (MIME) robot, and the assisted rehabilitation and measurement (ARM) Guide. Robots that are used for lower-limb training are the Rehabot, Gait Trainer, Lokomat, LOPES Exoskeleton Robot, and Gait Assist Robot. Robot-aided therapy has enabled the functional training of the arm and the lower limbs in an effective, easy, and comfortable manner. Therefore, with this type of therapy, the patients can repeatedly undergo sufficient and accurate training for a prolonged period. However, evidence of the benefits of robot-aided training has not yet been established.

  17. National Registry of Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs in Mexico II (RENAPREC II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilarraza-Lomelí, Hermes; García-Saldivia, Marianna; Rojano-Castillo, Jessica; Justiniano, Samuel; Cerón, Norma; Aranda-Ayala, Zulema-L; Rodríguez, Azucena; Hernández, Alejandro; Cassaigne, María-Elena; Cantero, Raúl; Gasca, Pablo; Hinojosa, Tania; Alonso, Jesús; Romo, Ricardo; Lara, Jorge; Pimentel, Elizabeth; Zavala, Juana; Rius-Suárez, María-Dolores; Cherebetiu, Gabriel; Cortés, Othniel; Almaraz, Alejandro; Mendoza, Pedro; Silva, Jesús; Tirado, Enrique; Martínez, Leonel

    The aim of this paper is to compare the state of Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) in 2009 with 2015. Focus is directed on health care, training of health-providers, research, and the barriers to their implementation. All authors of RENAPREC-2009, and other cardiac rehabilitation leaders in Mexico were requested to participate. These centres were distributed into two groups: RENAPREC-2009 centres that participated in 2015, and the new CRP units. In 2009 there were 14 centres, two of which disappeared and another two did not respond. CRP-units increased by 71% (n=24), and their geographic distribution shows a centripetal pattern. The coverage of CRP-units was 0.02 centres per 100,000 inhabitants. Only 4.4% of eligible patients were referred to CRP, with a rate of 10.4 patients/100,000 inhabitants in 2015. The ratio of Clinical Cardiologists to Cardiac Rehabilitation Specialists was 94:1, and the ratio of Intervention Specialists to cardiac rehabilitation experts was 16:1. Cardiac rehabilitation activities and costs varied widely. Patient dropout rate in phase II was 12%. Several barriers were identified: financial crisis (83%), lack of skilled personnel (67%), deficient equipment (46%), inadequate areas (42%), and a reduced number of operating centres (38%). CRPs in Mexico are still in the process of maturing. Mexican CRP-centres have several strengths, like the quality of the education of the professionals and the multidisciplinary programs. However, the lack of referral of patients and the heterogeneity of procedures are still their main weaknesses. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Making an APPropriate Care Program for Indigenous Cardiac Disease: Customization of an Existing Cardiac Rehabilitation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, DanaKai; Hansen, David; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major health problem for all Australians and is the leading cause of death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. In 2010, more then 50% of all heart attack deaths were due to repeated events. Cardiac rehabilitation programs have been proven to be effective in preventing the recurrence of cardiac events and readmission to hospitals. There are however, many barriers to the use of these programs. To address these barriers, CSIRO developed an IT enabled cardiac rehabilitation program delivered by mobile phone through a smartphone app and succesfully trialed it in an urban general population. If these results can be replicated in Indigenous populations, the program has the potential to significantly improve life expectancy and help close the gap in health outcomes. The challenge described in this paper is customizing the existing cardiac health program to make it culturally relevant and suitable for Indigenous Australians living in urban and remote communities.

  19. Inpatient and outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programmes improve cardiometabolic risk in revascularized coronary patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Avram

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evaluate cardiometabolic risk reduction of diabetic patients following coronary revascularizationprocedures after participation in outpatients or inpatients cardiac rehabilitation programmes. Materials and methods: weperformed a retrospective analytical study which included a group of 103 revascularized coronary patients with diabetesmellitus. Depending on participation in a cardiac rehabilitation program we have defined the following subgroups of patients:Group O (N=37 - attended the outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program; Group H (N=37 - attended the inpatient cardiacrehabilitation program; Group C (N=34 - did not participate in any cardiac rehabilitation program. Between those two momentsof assessment: T0 - revascularization / early post-revascularization and T1 - time of the interview (16±2.3 months afterrevascularization, patients in groups A and S participated in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (12 weeks, 3sessions/week of exercise training, with clinical and paraclinical evaluation scheduled at 1, 6, 12 months afterrevascularization, or inpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (3 weeks, intensive sessions, scheduled at 1, 3, 6 and 12months after revascularization. Results: at the end of the study, we found significant differences among the three groups forthe following parameters: body mass index (p=0.01, systolic blood pressure (p=0.002, total cholesterol (p<0.001, LDLcholesterol(p<0.001 and non-HDL cholesterol (p=0.004 in favor of groups A and S, that have participated in comprehensivecardiac rehabilitation programs. Conclusions: comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation programmes, performed outpatient orinpatient, are effective methods of reducing the high cardiometabolic risk, specific in revascularized coronary patients withdiabetes.

  20. Cardiac rehabilitation services in Denmark: still room for expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O; Traeden, Ulla I; Videbaek, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    support, dietary counselling, smoking cessation, and pharmaceutical risk factor management) were available during each of three phases: (I) in hospital; (II) outpatient; and (II) community-based services. RESULTS: Many hospitals offered one or more of the CR components during phases I and II: physical......AIM: European cardiologists agree that cardiac rehabilitation (CR) should be offered as an integrated part of cardiac care, and CR guidelines have been published. The authors aimed to ascertain the potential for expanding CR coverage at hospitals in Denmark. METHOD: A cross-sectional questionnaire...

  1. Evaluation of exercise tolerance patients in cardiac rehabilitation D model based on 6 Minute Walk Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielawa Lukasz.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the results of 6-minute walk test depending on gender, age, left ventricular ejection fraction, the primary disease and BMI. Patients underwent assessment of Cardiac Rehabilitation Department in Szymbark in 2012 (80 people. Duration of rehabilitation for all patients was 21 days. The test was performed at the beginning and end of the cycle. Following the 3-week cardiac rehabilitation in the model D in a group of 80 patients with a mean age of 72 years achieved a statistically significant improvement in exercise capacity, expressed in the increase in test 6MWT distance by an average of 52 meters. In the study, men received final results statistically superior to women. The largest increase in the distance gained to patients after aortic valve prosthesis. People who are obese with a body mass index BMI over 30 have an average trip distance underperform both at baseline, final, and in the resulting increase of the distance than those with a BMI under 30. Prevention of obesity, one of the modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease should be the goal of training during cardiac rehabilitation patient education.

  2. Benefit of cardiac rehabilitation programme in revascularized coronary patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Crăciun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluating the cardiovascular risk profile in revascularized coronary patients at 16 months after revascularization(PCI+CABG. Material and method: We evaluated the cardiovascular risk profile, compliance to the secondary preventionmeasures and reaching guideline targets in revascularized coronary patients included in EuroASpire III Romania. The patientswere divided in two groups: the selection criteria was the adherence to cardiac rehabilitation programme (CRP+/CRP-. Result:The prevelence of cardiovascular risk factors was about 76%, with an increased significance in CRP- group (p0.05, OR>1. Conclusion: At 16 months after revascularisation, the patientsstill present a high risk. The level of cardio-metabolic and hemodynamic risk are maintained the same by unreaching thetargeted values recomended by ESC prevention guideline. The patients in CPR+ group had a significant improvement ofcardiovascular risk factors. Indication but also compliance to structured cardiac rehabilitation programme after myocardialrevascularisation remains at a suboptimal level.

  3. Impact of cardiac rehabilitation on health related quality of life.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Riaz, A

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs are recognized as integral part of the comprehensive care of patients with cardiovascular disease and are recommended as useful and effective (Class I) by the American Heart Association (AHA). In this study we used serial administration of the short form 36 (SF36) to evaluate patient\\'s response to CR in terms of improvement in Health related Quality of Life. A total of 49 patients were included in the analysis. There was a significant improvement observed after CR in the Physical Capacity Score (42.3 vs 49.9 p = 0.0005). There was no significant improvement in the Mental Capacity Score (54.8 vs 54.9 p = 0.96). We conclude that Cardiac Rehabilitation Program causes a significant improvement in the health related quality of life of patients by improving their physical health and well being but does not improve the mental capacity which is already at a healthy level before CR.

  4. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T B; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Berg, S K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Owing to a lack of evidence, patients undergoing heart valve surgery have been offered exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) since 2009 based on recommendations for patients with ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of CR...... expensive outpatient visits. Further studies should investigate the benefits of CR to heart valve surgery patients as part of a formal cost-utility analysis....

  5. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Lindsey; Thompson, David R; Oldridge, Neil; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rees, Karen; Martin, Nicole; Taylor, Rod S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single most common cause of death globally. However, with falling CHD mortality rates, an increasing number of people live with CHD and may need support to manage their symptoms and prognosis. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) aims to improve the health and outcomes of people with CHD. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of exercise...

  6. Impact of exercise rehabilitation on cardiac neuronal function in heart failure. An iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, D.; Bouvard, G. [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, CHU Cote de Nacre, Caen (France); Lecluse, E.; Grollier, G.; Potier, J.C. [Service de Cardiologie, CHU Cote de Nacre, Caen (France); Belin, A. [Service de Readaptation Cardiaque, CHU Cote de Nacre, Caen (France); Babatasi, G. [Service de Chirurgie Cardio-Thoracique, CHU Cote de Nacre, Caen (France); Amar, M.H. [Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France). Service de Recherche Clinique

    1998-03-01

    Exercise training can induce important haemodynamic and metabolic adaptations in patients with chronic heart failure due to severe left ventricular dysfunction. This study examined the impact of exercise rehabilitation on cardiac neuronal function using iodine-123 metaiobodenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. Fourteen patients (11 men, 3 women; mean age 48 years; range: 36-66 years) with stable chronic heart failure of NYHA class II-III and an initial resting radionuclide left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50% were enrolled in the study. Patients underwent progressive, supervised endurance training (treadmill test, Bruce protocol) during a 6-month period (60 sessions, 3 sessions per week) at a cardiac rehabilitation referral centre in order to measure exercise parameters. Planar {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy provided measurements of cardiac neuronal uptake (heart-mediastinum ratio activity, 4 h after intravenous injection of 185 MBq of MIBG). Radionuclide LVEF was also assessed at the outset and after 6 months of exercise training. Workload (801{+-}428 vs 1229{+-}245 kpm.min{sup -1}, P=0.001), exercise duration (504{+-}190 vs 649{+-}125 s, P=0.02), and myocardial MIBG uptake (135%{+-}19% vs 156%{+-}25%, P=0.02) increased significantly after rehabilitation. However, LVEF did not change significantly (23%{+-}9% vs 21%{+-}10%, p=NS). It is concluded that exercise rehabilitation induces improvement of cardiac neuronal function without having negative effects on cardiac contractility in patients with stable chronic heart failure. (orig.)

  7. Factors affecting cardiac rehabilitation referral by physician specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L; Grewal, Keerat; Stewart, Donna E

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is widely underutilized because of multiple factors including physician referral practices. Previous research has shown CR referral varies by type of provider, with cardiologists more likely to refer than primary care physicians. The objective of this study was to compare factors affecting CR referral in primary care physicians versus cardiac specialists. A cross-sectional survey of a stratified random sample of 510 primary care physicians and cardiac specialists (cardiologists or cardiovascular surgeons) in Ontario identified through the Canadian Medical Directory Online was administered. One hundred four primary care physicians and 81 cardiac specialists responded to the 26-item investigator-generated survey examining medical, demographic, attitudinal, and health system factors affecting CR referral. Primary care physicians were more likely to endorse lack of familiarity with CR site locations (P negatively impacting CR referral practices than cardiac specialists. Cardiac specialists were significantly more likely to perceive that their colleagues and department would regularly refer patients to CR than primary care physicians (P Marketing CR site locations, provision of standardized referral forms, and ensuring discharge summaries are communicated to primary care physicians may improve their willingness to refer to CR.

  8. Respuesta hemodinámica con el entrenamiento en resistencia y fuerza muscular de miembros superiores en rehabilitación cardiaca Hemodynamic response to training in resistance and muscular strength of upper limbs in cardiac rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M Camargo

    2007-08-01

    de 1,92 ± 2,49 lb (pAntecedentes: training of muscular strength in patients with cardiovascular events was totally contraindicated because of the risk of incrementing the systolic and diastolic arterial pressure values, as well as the submission to a myocardial overload. Objective: evaluate the hemodynamic response (heart rate, arterial pressure during the resistance to muscular strength training in patients assisting to a heart rehabilitation program. Design: quasi experimental prospective study. Setting: resistance training to muscular strength in upper limbs to patients during stage II of cardiac rehabilitation was realized. Subjects: 175 patients were included. 135 men and 40 women with mean age 58.79 years with coronary disease, with or without revascularization procedures, valvular surgery, syncope and surgical correction of congenital heart disease. Procedure: previous aerobic training (treadmill or static bicycle, muscular strength evaluation was realized through maximal repetition and the strength training was initiated at 30%-50% of this, in a three different exercise circuit in upper limbs, 10 repetitions in three series with a twice a week frequency. Besides, monitoring of heart frequency, electrocardiogram by telemetry (V5, arterial pressure recording before, during and after the session, and subjective perception of the effort by the Borg scale were made, and signs and symptoms of intolerance to the activity or decompensation were observed. For the statistical analysis, measures of central tendency with the cardiovascular changes were used and in order to compare the change in muscular strength, a paired t test with significance level 0.05 was utilized. Results: mean muscular strength with maximal repetition evidenced a significant increase of 1.92 ± 2.49 lb (p<0.001 in the general population, with an increment of 2.03 ± 2.57 lb (p<0.001 in men and of 1.46 ± 2.1 lb (p<0.001 in women. The muscular resistance training was realized with a mean load of

  9. Speech Training for Inmate Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Michael G.; Dobkins, David H.

    1982-01-01

    Using a computerized content analysis, the authors demonstrate changes in speech behaviors of prison inmates. They conclude that two to four hours of public speaking training can have only limited effect on students who live in a culture in which "prison speech" is the expected and rewarded form of behavior. (PD)

  10. The Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, John; Boninger, Michael; Helkowski, Wendy; Braddom-Ritzler, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Physician scientists are seen as important in healthcare research. However, the number of physician scientists and their success in obtaining NIH funding have been declining for many years. The shortage of physician scientists in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation is particularly severe, and can be attributed to many of the same factors that affect physician scientists in general, as well as to the lack of well developed models for research training. In 1995, the Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program (RMSTP) was funded by a K12 grant from the National Center of Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR), as one strategy for increasing the number of research-productive physiatrists. The RMSTP's structure was revised in 2001 to improve the level of preparation of incoming trainees, and to provide a stronger central mentorship support network. Here we describe the original and revised structure of the RMSTP and review subjective and objective data on the productivity of the trainees who have completed the program. These data suggest that RMSTP trainees are, in general, successful in obtaining and maintaining academic faculty positions and that the productivity of the cohort trained after the revision, in particular, shows impressive growth after about 3 years of training. PMID:19847126

  11. PATHway: Decision Support in Exercise Programmes for Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filos, Dimitris; Triantafyllidis, Andreas; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Buys, Roselien; Cornelissen, Véronique; Budts, Werner; Walsh, Deirdre; Woods, Catherine; Moran, Kieran; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2016-01-01

    Rehabilitation is important for patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) to improve health outcomes and quality of life. However, adherence to current exercise programmes in cardiac rehabilitation is limited. We present the design and development of a Decision Support System (DSS) for telerehabilitation, aiming to enhance exercise programmes for CVD patients through ensuring their safety, personalising the programme according to their needs and performance, and motivating them toward meeting their physical activity goals. The DSS processes data originated from a Microsoft Kinect camera, a blood pressure monitor, a heart rate sensor and questionnaires, in order to generate a highly individualised exercise programme and improve patient adherence. Initial results within the EU-funded PATHway project show the potential of our approach.

  12. A systematic review of economic evaluations of cardiac rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Wai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation (CR, a multidisciplinary program consisting of exercise, risk factor modification and psychosocial intervention, forms an integral part of managing patients after myocardial infarction (MI, revascularization surgery and percutaneous coronary interventions, as well as patients with heart failure (HF. This systematic review seeks to examine the cost-effectiveness of CR for patients with MI or HF and inform policy makers in Singapore on published cost-effectiveness studies on CR. Methods Electronic databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, NHS EED, PEDro, CINAHL were searched from inception to May 2010 for published economic studies. Additional references were identified through searching bibliographies of included studies. Two independent reviewers selected eligible publications based on the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Quality assessment of economic evaluations was undertaken using Drummond’s checklist. Results A total of 22 articles were selected for review. However five articles were further excluded because they were cost-minimization analyses, whilst one included patients with stroke. Of the final 16 articles, one article addressed both centre-based cardiac rehabilitation versus no rehabilitation, as well as home-based cardiac rehabilitation versus no rehabilitation. Therefore, nine studies compared cost-effectiveness between centre-based supervised CR and no CR; three studies examined that between centre- and home based CR; one between inpatient and outpatient CR; and four between home-based CR and no CR. These studies were characterized by differences in the study perspectives, economic study designs and time frames, as well as variability in clinical data and assumptions made on costs. Overall, the studies suggested that: (1 supervised centre-based CR was highly cost-effective and the dominant strategy when compared to no CR; (2 home-based CR was no different from centre-based CR; (3 no difference existed

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: can its failure be predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irzmański, Robert; Kapusta, Joanna; Obrębska-Stefaniak, Agnieszka; Urzędowicz, Beata; Kowalski, Jan

    2017-07-01

    The prognosis in patients after acute coronary syndromes (ACS) is significantly burdened by coexisting anaemia, leukocytosis and low glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Hyperglycaemia in the early stages of ACS is a strong predictor of death and heart failure in non-diabetic subjects. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of hyperglycaemia, anaemia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopaenia and decreased GFR on the risk of the failure of cardiac rehabilitation (phase II at the hospital) in post-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. The study included 136 post-STEMI patients, 96 men and 40 women, aged 60.1 ± 11.8 years, admitted for cardiac rehabilitation (phase II) to the Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiac Rehabilitation, WAM University Hospital in Lodz, Poland. On admission fasting blood cell count was performed and serum glucose and creatinine level was determined (GFR assessment). The following results were considered abnormal: glucose ⩾ 100 mg/dl, GFR 10 × 103/μl; platelets (PLTs) failure of cardiac rehabilitation. This risk has been defined on the basis of the patient's inability to tolerate workload increment >5 Watt in spite of the applied program of cardiac rehabilitation. As a result of building a logistic regression model, the most statistically significant risk factors were selected, on the basis of which cardiac rehabilitation failure index was determined. leukocytosis and reduced GFR determined most significantly the risk of failure of cardiac rehabilitation (respectively OR = 6.42 and OR = 3.29, p = 0.007). These parameters were subsequently utilized to construct a rehabilitation failure index. Peripheral blood cell count and GFR are important in assessing the prognosis of cardiac rehabilitation effects. leukocytosis and decreased GFR determine to the highest degree the risk of cardiac rehabilitation failure. Cardiac rehabilitation failure index may be useful in classifying patients into an appropriate model of

  14. Information and communication technology-based cardiac rehabilitation homecare programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varnfield M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marlien Varnfield, Mohanraj KarunanithiAustralian eHealth Research Centre, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR has, for many years, been a highly recommended approach to secondary prevention for patients recovering after a heart attack or heart surgery. These programs are traditionally delivered from a hospital outpatient center. Despite demonstrated benefits and guideline recommendations, CR utilization has been poor, particularly in women, older patients, and ethnic minority groups. To overcome some of the barriers to the traditional delivery of CR, different delivery platforms and approaches have been developed in recent years. In general, Telehealth solutions which have been used to address the delivery of CR services remotely include: 1 patient–provider contact delivered by telephone systems; 2 the Internet, with the majority of patient–provider contact for risk factor management taking place online; and 3 interventions using Smartphones as tools to deliver CR through (independently or in combination with short message service messaging, journaling applications, connected measurement devices, and remote coaching. These solutions have been shown to overcome some of the barriers in CR participation and show potential as alternative or complementary options for individuals that find traditional center-based CR programs difficult to commit to. The major benefits of remote platforms for CR delivery are the ability to deliver these interventions without ongoing face-to-face contact, which provides an opportunity to reach large numbers of people, and the convenience of selecting the timing of cardiovascular disease management sessions. Furthermore, technologies have the potential to deliver long-term follow-up, which programs delivered by health professionals cannot afford to do due to staff shortages and budget restrictions

  15. Lifestyle after Cardiac Rehabilitation: Did the Message Come across, and Was It Feasible? An Analysis of Patients’ Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Marie Veje; Laustsen, Sussie; Petersen, Annemette Krintel

    2014-01-01

    Lifestyle following heart disease is considered important to prevent and reduce cardiovascular risk factors. Thus, cardiac rehabilitation is focused on potential lifestyle changes. Further insight into patients’ perspective on lifestyle after cardiac rehabilitation is needed as changing habits fo...

  16. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with stable angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Linda; Anderson, Lindsey; Dewhirst, Alice M; He, Jingzhou; Bridges, Charlene; Gandhi, Manish; Taylor, Rod S

    2018-02-02

    A previous Cochrane review has shown that exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) can benefit myocardial infarction and post-revascularisation patients. However, the impact on stable angina remains unclear and guidance is inconsistent. Whilst recommended in the guidelines of American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology, in the UK the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) states that there is "no evidence to suggest that CR is clinically or cost-effective for managing stable angina". To assess the effects of exercise-based CR compared to usual care for adults with stable angina. We updated searches from the previous Cochrane review 'Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary heart disease' by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, DARE, CINAHL and Web of Science on 2 October 2017. We searched two trials registers, and performed reference checking and forward-citation searching of all primary studies and review articles, to identify additional studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with a follow-up period of at least six months, which compared structured exercise-based CR with usual care for people with stable angina. Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Two review authors also independently assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE principles and we presented this information in a 'Summary of findings' table. Seven studies (581 participants) met our inclusion criteria. Trials had an intervention length of 6 weeks to 12 months and follow-up length of 6 to 12 months. The comparison group in all trials was usual care (without any form of structured exercise training or advice) or a no-exercise comparator. The mean age of participants within the trials ranged from 50 to 66 years, the

  17. Heart shaking transitions - A phenomenological-hermeneutic study of patients´ experiences in cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D.

    enrolled in the cardiac rehabilitation programme. The data underwent interpretation consisting of three phases: naïve reading, structural analysis and comprehensive interpretation. Results. The preliminary findings are that the patients go through a Heart Shaking Journey in Cardiac Rehabilitation. Three......-patient cardiac rehabilitation during 1-2 months is offered after the acute treatment. Knowledge of the patients’ experiences of cardiac problems when receiving the current standards of treatment is needed in order to develop sufficient care. Hence the aim was to investigate how patients with new onset unstable...

  18. LC-REHAB: randomised trial assessing the effect of a new patient education method--learning and coping strategies--in cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynggaard, Vibeke; May, Ole; Beauchamp, Alison; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Wittrup, Inge

    2014-12-13

    Due to improved treatments and ageing population, many countries now report increasing prevalence in rates of ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Cardiac rehabilitation has potential to reduce morbidity and mortality, but not all patients complete. In light of favourable effects of cardiac rehabilitation it is important to develop patient education methods which can enhance adherence to this effective program. The LC-REHAB study aims to compare the effect of a new patient education strategy in cardiac rehabilitation called 'learning and coping' to that of standard care. Further, this paper aims to describe the theoretical basis and details of this intervention. Open parallel randomised controlled trial conducted in three hospital units in Denmark among patients recently discharged with ischemic heart disease or heart failure. Patients are allocated to either the intervention group with learning and coping strategies incorporated into standard care in cardiac rehabilitation or the control group who receive the usual cardiac rehabilitation program. Learning and coping consists of two individual clarifying interviews, participation of experienced patients as educators together with health professionals and theory based, situated and inductive teaching. Usual care in cardiac rehabilitation is characterised by a structured deductive teaching style with use of identical pre-written slides in all hospital units. In both groups, cardiac rehabilitation consists of training three times a week and education once a week over eight weeks. The primary outcomes are adherence to cardiac rehabilitation, morbidity and mortality, while secondary outcomes are quality of life (SF-12, Health education impact questionnaire and Major Depression Inventory) and lifestyle and risk factors (Body Mass Index, waist circumference, blood pressure, exercise work capacity, lipid profile and DXA-scan). Data collection occurs four times; at baseline, at immediate completion of cardiac

  19. Extended cardiac rehabilitation for socially vulnerable patients improves attendance and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2013-01-01

    Patients living alone or having a low socioeconomic status are likely to quit cardiac rehabilitation. We aimed to compare patients being offered extended rehabilitation (ERP) with those being offered standard rehabilitation (SRP) as concerns 1) attendance rates and 2) achievement of treatment goals...

  20. Chondromalacia patellae treated by warming needle and rehabilitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ling; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Ji; Gao, Le-Nv; Chen, Da-wei; Liu, Jun; She, Jia-yi; Wang, Ling; Yu, Jin-yan; Huang, Le-ping; Bai, Yang

    2009-06-01

    To observe the effect of warming needle combined with rehabilitation training on chondromalacia patellae in a randomized controlled trial. The 92 cases were randomly divided into a treatment group treated by warming needle plus rehabilitation training (47 cases) and a control group treated by medication plus rehabilitation training (45 cases), and the therapeutic effect was compared after 20 sessions. The pain was relieved more obviously in the treatment group than in the control group (P chondromalacia patellae.

  1. Tai Chi Chuan for Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with Coronary Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Maria Nery

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that Tai Chi Chuan can improve cardiac function in patients with heart disease. Objective: To conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess the effects of Tai Chi Chuan on cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: We performed a search for studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish in the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by three independent investigators, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the manuscripts. Results: The initial search found 201 studies that, after review of titles and abstracts, resulted in a selection of 12 manuscripts. They were fully analyzed and of these, nine were excluded. As a final result, three randomized controlled trials remained. The studies analyzed in this systematic review included patients with a confirmed diagnosis of coronary artery disease, all were clinically stable and able to exercise. The three experiments had a control group that practiced structured exercise training or received counseling for exercise. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 12 months. Conclusion: Preliminary evidence suggests that Tai Chi Chuan can be an unconventional form of cardiac rehabilitation, being an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, the methodological quality of the included articles and the small sample sizes clearly indicate that new randomized controlled trials are needed in this regard.

  2. Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs' exercise therapy for patients undergoing cardiac surgery: National Korean Questionnaire Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yong Gon; Jang, Mi Ja; Park, Won Hah; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Sung, Jidong

    2017-02-01

    Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (ICR) has been commonly conducted after cardiac surgery in many countries, and has been reported a lots of results. However, until now, there is inadequacy of data on the status of ICR in Korea. This study described the current status of exercise therapy in ICR that is performed after cardiac surgery in Korean hospitals. Questionnaires modified by previous studies were sent to the departments of thoracic surgery of 10 hospitals in Korea. Nine replies (response rate 90%) were received. Eight nurses and one physiotherapist completed the questionnaire. Most of the education on wards after cardiac surgery was conducted by nurses. On postoperative day 1, four sites performed sitting on the edge of bed, sit to stand, up to chair, and walking in the ward. Only one site performed that exercise on postoperative day 2. One activity (stairs up and down) was performed on different days at only two sites. Patients received education preoperatively and predischarge for preventing complications and reducing muscle weakness through physical inactivity. The results of the study demonstrate that there are small variations in the general care provided by nurses after cardiac surgery. Based on the results of this research, we recommended that exercise therapy programs have to conduct by exercise specialists like exercise physiologists or physiotherapists for patients in hospitalization period.

  3. Cardiac rehabilitation: a good measure to improve quality of life in peri- and postmenopausal women with microvascular angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Szot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX was considered a stable coronary syndrome, yet due to its nature, CSX symptoms often have a great impact on patients’ Quality of Life (QoL. According to ESC 2013 stable coronary artery disease criteria, CSX was replaced by Microvascular Angina (MA.Unfortunately, most CSX or MA patients, after classical angina (involving main coronary vessels has been ruled out, often do not receive proper treatment. Indications for pharmacological treatment of MA patients were introduced only recently. Another problematic issue is that scientists describing the pathophysiology of both CSX and MA stress a lack of a deeper insight into the multifactorial etiology of the source of pain associated with this disease. In the presented article we have attempted to study the influence of cardiac rehabilitation (3 months programme on the QoL of patients recognized as suffering from MA, as well as to check if changes in myocardial perfusion in these patients at baseline and after completion of cardiac rehabilitation match changes in their QoL. Therefore, after screening 436 women for MA, we studied 55 of them who were confirmed as having MA and who agreed to participate in the study. Exercise tests, Myocardial Perfusion Imaging, and QoL questionnaires were studied at baseline and after completing 3 months period of cardiac rehabilitation. Results were subsequently compared, which showed a link between improved perfusion score in SPECT study and improved overall physical capacity, on one hand, and improved QoL score on the other. These results confirm that cardiac rehabilitation is a very useful treatment option for MA patients. It seems that training during cardiac rehabilitation is a very important factor (improved physical efficiency –> increase in self-belief, and that taking into consideration the multifactor pathophysiology of pain, it is connected with a better quality of life for MA patients.

  4. Cardiac rehabilitation: a good measure to improve quality of life in peri- and postmenopausal women with microvascular angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Szot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX was considered a stable coronary syndrome, yet due to its nature, CSX symptoms often have a great impact on patients’ Quality of Life (QoL. According to ESC 2013 stable coronary artery disease criteria, CSX was replaced by Microvascular Angina (MA.Unfortunately, most CSX or MA patients, after classical angina (involving main coronary vessels has been ruled out, often do not receive proper treatment. Indications for pharmacological treatment of MA patients were introduced only recently. Another problematic issue is that scientists describing the pathophysiology of both CSX and MA stress a lack of a deeper insight into the multifactorial etiology of the source of pain associated with this disease. In the presented article we have attempted to study the influence of cardiac rehabilitation (3 months programme on the QoL of patients recognized as suffering from MA, as well as to check if changes in myocardial perfusion in these patients at baseline and after completion of cardiac rehabilitation match changes in their QoL. Therefore, after screening 436 women for MA, we studied 55 of them who were confirmed as having MA and who agreed to participate in the study. Exercise tests, Myocardial Perfusion Imaging, and QoL questionnaires were studied at baseline and after completing 3 months period of cardiac rehabilitation. Results were subsequently compared, which showed a link between improved perfusion score in SPECT study and improved overall physical capacity, on one hand, and improved QoL score on the other. These results confirm that cardiac rehabilitation is a very useful treatment option for MA patients. It seems that training during cardiac rehabilitation is a very important factor (improved physical efficiency –> increase in self-belief, and that taking into consideration the multifactor pathophysiology of pain, it is connected with a better quality of life for MA patients.

  5. One-year adherence to exercise in elderly patients receiving postacute inpatient rehabilitation after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Claudio; Polcaro, Paola; Cecchi, Francesca; Zipoli, Renato; Sofi, Francesco; Romanelli, Antonella; Pepi, Liria; Sibilio, Maurizio; Lipoma, Mario; Petrilli, Mario; Molino-Lova, Raffaele

    2009-09-01

    Promoting an active lifestyle through an appropriate physical exercise prescription is one of the major targets of cardiac rehabilitation. However, information on the effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation in promoting lifestyle changes in elderly patients is still scant. In 131 patients over the age of 65 yrs (86 men, and 45 women, mean age 75 yrs +/- 6 SD) who have attended postacute inpatient cardiac rehabilitation after cardiac surgery, we tested the 1-yr adherence to the physical exercise prescription received at the end of the cardiac rehabilitation by using a questionnaire on physical activity and the 6-min walk test. All of the 36 patients who reported an active lifestyle and 49 of the 95 patients who reported a sedentary lifestyle in the year preceding the cardiac operation reported at least 1 hr/day on 5 days each week of light regular physical activity in the year after the cardiac rehabilitation. Further, the distance walked at the follow-up 6-min walk test was significantly related to the physical activity score gathered from the questionnaire. Our data show that 65% of the elderly patients who have attended postacute inpatient cardiac rehabilitation after cardiac surgery are still capable of recovering or even increasing their regular physical activity and of maintaining these favorable lifestyle changes at least for 1 yr.

  6. Punjabi Sikh patients' cardiac rehabilitation experiences following myocardial infarction: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdas, Paul M; Kang, H Bindy K

    2010-11-01

    To explore the cardiac rehabilitation experiences of Punjabi Sikh patients post myocardial infarction. Punjabi Sikh people are at significantly higher risk of mortality from myocardial infarction compared with those of European descent. Punjabi Sikh patients' participation in cardiac rehabilitation post myocardial infarction is therefore likely to yield considerable benefits. However, uptake of cardiac rehabilitation by South Asian people has been reported to be modest. Previous investigators have seldom provided insight into experiences of Punjabi Sikh patients post myocardial infarction and the steps that can be taken to improve the appropriateness of cardiac rehabilitation programmes for this at-risk patient group. Interpretive qualitative design. In-depth interviews, based on the McGill Illness Narrative Interview schedule, with 15 Punjabi Sikh patients post myocardial infarction attending a cardiac rehabilitation programme in British Columbia, Canada, were conducted; thematic analysis using grounded theory methods of coding and constant comparative analysis was employed. Four mutually exclusive themes emerged relating to the salient aspects of participants' cardiac rehabilitation experience: 'making sense of the diagnosis', 'practical dietary advice', 'ongoing interaction with peers and the multi-disciplinary team' and 'transport and attendance'. The themes identified point towards some of the ingredients necessary for providing culturally appropriate cardiac rehabilitation interventions for Punjabi Sikh patients following myocardial infarction. The findings highlight the importance of providing culturally relevant rehabilitation advice about diet and lifestyle changes and providing time for ongoing dialogue with support from health care professionals and peers. The findings from this study also illustrate the need to avoid generalisations about the impact religious beliefs may have on South Asian individuals' willingness to adhere to cardiac rehabilitation

  7. 38 CFR 21.294 - Selecting the training or rehabilitation facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under... the veteran's preference for a particular training or rehabilitation facility but VA has final...

  8. Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation for Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Oldridge, Neil; Thompson, David R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although recommended in guidelines for the management of coronary heart disease (CHD), concerns have been raised about the applicability of evidence from existing meta-analyses of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study is to update the Cochrane...... systematic review and meta-analysis of exercise-based CR for CHD. METHODS: The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Science Citation Index Expanded were searched to July 2014. Retrieved papers, systematic reviews, and trial registries were hand-searched. We included...... randomized controlled trials with at least 6 months of follow-up, comparing CR to no-exercise controls following myocardial infarction or revascularization, or with a diagnosis of angina pectoris or CHD defined by angiography. Two authors screened titles for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk...

  9. Expanded cardiac rehabilitation in socially vulnerable patients with myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2018-01-01

    ). The patients were defined as socially vulnerable or non-socially vulnerable according to their educational level and their social network. A complete follow-up was achieved. INTERVENTION: A socially differentiated CR intervention. The intervention consisted of standard CR and additionally a longer phase II......OBJECTIVE: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has been shown to reduce cardiovascular risk. A research project performed at a university hospital in Denmark offered an expanded CR intervention to socially vulnerable patients. One-year follow-up showed significant improvements concerning medicine...... compliance, lipid profile, blood pressure and body mass index when compared with socially vulnerable patients receiving standard CR. The aim of the study was to perform a long-term follow-up on the socially differentiated CR intervention and examine the impact of the intervention on all-cause mortality...

  10. Impact of exercise rehabilitation on cardiac neuronal function in heart failure. An iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostini, D.; Bouvard, G.; Lecluse, E.; Grollier, G.; Potier, J.C.; Belin, A.; Babatasi, G.; Amar, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    Exercise training can induce important haemodynamic and metabolic adaptations in patients with chronic heart failure due to severe left ventricular dysfunction. This study examined the impact of exercise rehabilitation on cardiac neuronal function using iodine-123 metaiobodenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. Fourteen patients (11 men, 3 women; mean age 48 years; range: 36-66 years) with stable chronic heart failure of NYHA class II-III and an initial resting radionuclide left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy provided measurements of cardiac neuronal uptake (heart-mediastinum ratio activity, 4 h after intravenous injection of 185 MBq of MIBG). Radionuclide LVEF was also assessed at the outset and after 6 months of exercise training. Workload (801±428 vs 1229±245 kpm.min -1 , P=0.001), exercise duration (504±190 vs 649±125 s, P=0.02), and myocardial MIBG uptake (135%±19% vs 156%±25%, P=0.02) increased significantly after rehabilitation. However, LVEF did not change significantly (23%±9% vs 21%±10%, p=NS). It is concluded that exercise rehabilitation induces improvement of cardiac neuronal function without having negative effects on cardiac contractility in patients with stable chronic heart failure. (orig.)

  11. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heewon; Ko, Hoon; Thap, Tharoeun; Jeong, Changwon; Noh, Se-Eung; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR) with the target heart rate zone (THZ). The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone's built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone's built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient's HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis.

  12. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Chung

    Full Text Available We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR with the target heart rate zone (THZ. The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone's built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone's built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient's HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis.

  13. Update in cardiology: vascular risk and cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galve, Enrique; Cordero, Alberto; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; Fácila, Lorenzo; Mazón, Pilar; Alegría, Eduardo; Fernández de Bobadilla, Jaime; García-Porrero, Esteban; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-02-01

    As in other fields, understanding of vascular risk and rehabilitation is constantly improving. The present review of recent epidemiological update shows how far we are from achieving good risk factor control: in diet and nutrition, where unhealthy and excessive societal consumption is clearly increasing the prevalence of obesity; in exercise, where it is difficult to find a balance between benefit and risk, despite systemization efforts; in smoking, where developments center on programs and policies, with the electronic cigarette seeming more like a problem than a solution; in lipids, where the transatlantic debate between guidelines is becoming a paradigm of the divergence of views in this extensively studied area; in hypertension, where a nonpharmacological alternative (renal denervation) has been undermined by the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 setback, forcing a deep reassessment; in diabetes mellitus, where the new dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors and glucagon like peptide 1 analogues have contributed much new information and a glimpse of the future of diabetes treatment, and in cardiac rehabilitation, which continues to benefit from new information and communication technologies and where clinical benefit is not hindered by advanced diseases, such as heart failure. Our summary concludes with the update in elderly patients, whose treatment criteria are extrapolated from those of younger patients, with the present review clearly indicating that should not be the case. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: from knowledge to implementation. A position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piepoli, Massimo Francesco; Corrà, Ugo; Benzer, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Increasing awareness of the importance of cardiovascular prevention is not yet matched by the resources and actions within health care systems. Recent publication of the European Commission's European Heart Health Charter in 2008 prompts a review of the role of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to card......Increasing awareness of the importance of cardiovascular prevention is not yet matched by the resources and actions within health care systems. Recent publication of the European Commission's European Heart Health Charter in 2008 prompts a review of the role of cardiac rehabilitation (CR......) to cardiovascular health outcomes. Secondary prevention through exercise-based CR is the intervention with the best scientific evidence to contribute to decrease morbidity and mortality in coronary artery disease, in particular after myocardial infarction but also incorporating cardiac interventions and chronic...... makers and consumers in the recognition of the comprehensive nature of CR. Those charged with responsibility for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, whether at European, national or individual centre level, need to consider where and how structured programmes of CR can be delivered to all...

  15. Correlation between changes in diastolic dysfunction and health-related quality of life after cardiac rehabilitation program in dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherin H.M. Mehani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure (CHF is a complex syndrome characterized by progressive decline in left ventricular function, low exercise tolerance and raised mortality and morbidity. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction plays a major role in CHF and progression of most cardiac diseases. The current recommended goals can theoretically be accomplished via exercise and pharmacological therapy so the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of cardiac rehabilitation program on diastolic dysfunction and health related quality of life and to determine the correlation between changes in left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and domains of health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Forty patients with chronic heart failure were diagnosed as having dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM with systolic and diastolic dysfunction. The patients were equally and randomly divided into training and control groups. Only 30 of them completed the study duration. The training group participated in rehabilitation program in the form of circuit-interval aerobic training adjusted according to 55–80% of heart rate reserve for a period of 7 months. Circuit training improved both diastolic and systolic dysfunction in the training group. On the other hand, only a significant correlation was found between improvement in diastolic dysfunction and health related quality of life measured by Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire. It was concluded that improvement in diastolic dysfunction as a result of rehabilitation program is one of the important underlying mechanisms responsible for improvement in health-related quality of life in DCM patients.

  16. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Thompson, David R; Oldridge, Neil; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rees, Karen; Martin, Nicole; Taylor, Rod S

    2016-01-05

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single most common cause of death globally. However, with falling CHD mortality rates, an increasing number of people live with CHD and may need support to manage their symptoms and prognosis. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) aims to improve the health and outcomes of people with CHD. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011. To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of exercise-based CR (exercise training alone or in combination with psychosocial or educational interventions) compared with usual care on mortality, morbidity and HRQL in patients with CHD.To explore the potential study level predictors of the effectiveness of exercise-based CR in patients with CHD. We updated searches from the previous Cochrane review, by searching Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 6, 2014) from December 2009 to July 2014. We also searched MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO) and Science Citation Index Expanded (December 2009 to July 2014). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of exercise-based interventions with at least six months' follow-up, compared with a no exercise control. The study population comprised men and women of all ages who have had a myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or who have angina pectoris, or coronary artery disease. We included RCTs that reported at least one of the following outcomes: mortality, MI, revascularisations, hospitalisations, health-related quality of life (HRQL), or costs. Two review authors independently screened all identified references for inclusion based on the above inclusion and exclusion criteria. One author extracted data from the included trials and assessed their risk of bias; a second review author checked data. We stratified meta-analysis by the duration of follow up of trials, i.e. short-term: 6

  17. Effect of Endurance Training on Physical Capacity and Anthropometry of Cardiac Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Nikou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to measure of cardiac rehabilitation program (Endurance & Resistance training effect on physical functioning as well as its exact effect on lipid profile and fasting blood sugar of cardiovascular patients. Materials & Methods: In this quasi experimental and interventional study 20 patients who arrived to phase II cardiac rehabilitation after their first cardiovascular accident were selected conveniently and participated in this prospective study. Anthropometrics' measurements, FBS and blood lipid, 6–MWT were performed at the beginning and at the end of 8 weeks program (3 days per week for 24 sessions. Data were analyzed by Paired T test. Results: Except for low–density lipoprotein (LDL (P=0.087 and FBS (P=0.072, all other biochemical indices [total cholesterol (TC (P=0.019, high–density lipoprotein (HDL (P=0.019, and triglyceride (TG (P=0.009], functional capacity (6MWT (P<0.001 and measurment of rate pressure product with Borg scale (P=0.008, and also obesity indices including weight (P=0.031 and subcutaneus fat (P=0.017 had significant response to cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP. Conclusion: These results support the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation program such as endurance and resistance training to reduce overall risk in obese patients with coronary heart disease, and increase physical capacity.

  18. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Heart Rate and Functional Capacity in Patients After Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Parvand

    2016-09-01

    Discussion: Cardiac rehabilitation can increase the performance of blood circulation and uptake of oxygen in body. Due to these changes, there was a significant increase in the functional capacity and an insignificant reduction in the heart rate.

  19. Patient perceptions of experience with cardiac rehabilitation after isolated heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina B; Berg, Selina K; Sibilitz, Kirstine L

    2018-01-01

    in a cardiac rehabilitation programme, and none have analysed their experiences with it. AIMS: The purpose of this qualitative analysis was to gain insight into patients' experiences in cardiac rehabilitation, the CopenHeartVR trial. This trial specifically assesses patients undergoing isolated heart valve...... to take active personal responsibility for their health. Despite these benefits, participants experienced existential and psychological challenges and musculoskeletal problems. Participants also sought additional advice from healthcare professionals both inside and outside the healthcare system....... CONCLUSIONS: Even though the cardiac rehabilitation programme reduced insecurity and helped participants take active personal responsibility for their health, they experienced existential, psychological and physical challenges during recovery. The cardiac rehabilitation programme had several limitations...

  20. Gender matters in cardiac rehabilitation and diabetes: Using Bourdieu's concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Jan E; Dale, Craig M; Nielsen, Lisa Seto; Kramer-Kile, Marnie; Lapum, Jennifer; Pritlove, Cheryl; Abramson, Beth; Price, Jennifer A; Marzolini, Susan; Oh, Paul; Clark, Alex

    2018-03-01

    Habitual practices are challenged by chronic illness. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) involves changes to habits of diet, activity and tobacco use, and although it is effective for people with diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), some participants are reportedly less likely to complete programs and adopt new health related practices. Within the first three months of enrolling in CR, attrition rates are highest for women and for people with diabetes. Previous studies and reviews indicate that altering habits is very difficult, and the social significance of such change requires further study. The purpose of the study was to use Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, capital and field to analyse the complexities of adopting new health practices within the first three months after enrolling in a CR program. We were particularly interested in gender issues. Thirty-two men and women with diabetes and CVD were each interviewed twice within the first three months of their enrolment in one of three CR programs in Toronto, Canada. Attention to CR goals was not always the primary consideration for study participants. Instead, a central concern was to restore social dignity within other fields of activity, including family, friendships, and employment. Thus, study participants evolved improvised tactical approaches that combined both physical and social rehabilitation. These improvised tactics were socially embedded and blended new cultural capital with existing (often gendered) cultural capital and included: concealment, mobilizing cooperation, re-positioning, and push-back. Our findings suggest that success in CR requires certain baseline levels of capital - including embodied, often gendered, cultural capital - and that efforts to follow CR recommendations may alter social positioning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Case Report: Cardiac Rehabilitation in a Patient with MVR & AVR & Tricuspid Valve Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Gousheh

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient is a 24 year .old male with valvular heart disease, severe mitral & aortic & tricuspid valve stenosis and regurgitation. After MVR & AVR & tricuspid surgical repair, he has undergone cardiac rehabilitation for 8 weeks (24 sittings. After completion of a cardiac rehabilitation, review of cardiovascular tests showed obvious improvement in the functional capacity, blood pressure and heart rate. Physically and mentally patient feels very comfortable and hopeful of a good healthy life.

  2. Very short/short-term benefit of inpatient/outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiroski, Dejan; Andjić, Mojsije; Stojanović, Olivera Ilić; Lazović, Milica; Dikić, Ana Djordjević; Ostojić, Miodrag; Beleslin, Branko; Kostić, Snežana; Zdravković, Marija; Lović, Dragan

    2017-05-01

    Exercise-based rehabilitation is an important part of treatment patients following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. To evaluate effect of very short/short-term exercise training on cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) parameters. We studied 54 consecutive patients with myocardial infarction (MI) treated with CABG surgery referred for rehabilitation. The study population consisted of 50 men and 4 women (age 57.72 ± 7.61 years, left ventricular ejection fraction 55% ± 5.81%), who participated in a 3-week clinical and 6-month outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program. The Inpatient program consisted of cycling 7 times/week and daily walking for 45 minutes. The outpatient program consisted mainly of walking 5 times/week for 45 minutes and cycling 3 times/week. All patients performed symptom-limited CPET on a bicycle ergometer with a ramp protocol of 10 W/minute at the start, for 3 weeks, and for 6 months. After 3 weeks of an exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program, exercise tolerance improved as compared to baseline, as well as peak respiratory exchange ratio. Most importantly, peak VO 2 (16.35 ± 3.83 vs 17.88 ± 4.25 mL/kg/min, respectively, P exercise training in patients with MI treated with CABG surgery is safe and improves functional capacity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Atrioventricular node reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) after mitral valvuloplasty during cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallavollita, Luca; Santillo, Elpidio; Marini, Luciano; Balestrini, Fabrizio

    2012-12-01

    We descrive a patient who presents palpitations during cardiac rehabilitation after mitral valvuloplasty. ECG showed regular narrow QRS tachycardia compatible with Atrioventricular Node Reentrant Tachycardia. After slow pathway radiofrequency catheter ablation, the patient completed the rehabilitation program remained tachycardia and palpitations-free.

  4. The patient education - Learning and Coping Strategies - improves adherence in cardiac rehabilitation (LC-REHAB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Vibeke; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite proven benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), adherence to CR remains suboptimal. This trial aimed to assess the impact of the patient education 'Learning and Coping Strategies' (LC) on patient adherence to an eight-week CR program. METHODS: 825 patients with ischaemic heart...... and education. Patients with heart failure, low levels of education and household income appear to benefit most from this adherence promoting intervention. TRIAL REGISTRATION: www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01668394....... disease or heart failure were open label randomised to either the LC arm (LC plus CR) or the control arm (CR alone) across three hospital units in Denmark. Both arms received same amount of training and education hours. LC consisted of individual clarifying interviews, participation of experienced...

  5. Smart rehabilitation garment design for arm-hand training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Q.; Markopoulos, P.; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a smart rehabilitation garment (SRG) to support posture correction during rehabilitation training. The garment is equipped with accelerometers in various positions and is controlled by an Arduino processor. It connects with Bluetooth to a smartphone or a personal

  6. Building Employment Training Partnerships between Vocational Rehabilitation and Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Lauren E.; Flannery, K. Brigid; Benz, Michael R.; Olszewski, Brandon; Slovic, Roz

    2009-01-01

    This article examined the implementation of an occupational skills training partnership developed between the Oregon Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services and four local community colleges. Case study methods were used to describe the pattern of services provided to rehabilitation consumers and document the resulting changes in the…

  7. Cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients treated with catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe S; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt

    2016-01-01

    ) versus 20.7mL kg(-1) min(-1), p of main effect=0.003, p of interaction between time and intervention=0.020). No significant difference between groups on Short Form-36 was found (53.8 versus 51.9 points, P=.20). Two serious adverse events (atrial fibrillation in relation to physical exercise and death...... unrelated to rehabilitation) occurred in the cardiac rehabilitation group versus one in the usual care group (death unrelated to intervention) (P=.56). In the cardiac rehabilitation group 16 patients versus 7 in the usual care group reported non-serious adverse events (P=.047). CONCLUSION: Comprehensive...

  8. Final priority. Rehabilitation Training: Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-19

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Rehabilitation Training program to establish a Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center (JDVRTAC). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to focus on training in an area of national need. Specifically, this priority responds to the Presidential Memorandum to Federal agencies directing them to take action to address job-driven training for the Nation's workers. The JDVRTAC will provide technical assistance (TA) to State vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies to help them develop for individuals with disabilities training and employment opportunities that meet the needs of today's employers.

  9. Graded Cycling Test Combined With the Talk Test Is Responsive in Cardiac Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Grøn; Vinther, Anders

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate clinical assessment outcome of cardiac rehabilitation, a simple and reliable submaximal exercise test, not based on heart rate, is warranted. The Talk Test (TT) has been found to correlate well with the ventilatory threshold, and excellent reliability was observed for TT...... combined with the Graded Cycling Test (GCT-TT) in cardiac patients. The purpose was to investigate responsiveness of GCT-TT in cardiac rehabilitation patients. METHODS: Patients (n = 93) referred to 8 weeks of cardiac rehabilitation were included. Pre- and posttests were performed using GCT-TT. Mean test...... changes in watts (W) were compared with the standard error of measurement (SEM95) for groups and the smallest real difference (SRD) for individuals. Minimal clinically important difference was assessed by comparing patient perceived changes in physical fitness with the test changes. RESULTS...

  10. [Organization and methodology of early rehabilitation of the patients with cardioembolic stroke complicated by cardiac insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaeva, T V

    2013-01-01

    The present work was focused on the safety and effectiveness of the combined rehabilitative treatment in the case of pre-acute and acute cardioembolic stroke in 45 patients with varying degree of cardiac decompensation. The study showed that the use of "passive" remediation, such as the postural treatment, breathing exercises, selective massage, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, is safe and can be recommended to the patients with stroke and cardiac decompensation of different severity (II and III FC of chronic cardiac insufficiency). The introduction of such active measures as verticalization into the program of comprehensive rehabilitation may cause decompensation of cardiac insufficiency. The rehabilitation strategy used in the present study improved performance and exercise tolerance in the majority of the patients. Moreover, it resulted in the significant reduction of the severity of stroke, improved the motor function, and increased functional independence of the patients.

  11. Gaps in referral to cardiac rehabilitation of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragam, Krishna G; Dai, Dadi; Neely, Megan L; Bhatt, Deepak L; Roe, Matthew T; Rumsfeld, John S; Gurm, Hitinder S

    2015-05-19

    Rates of referral to cardiac rehabilitation after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have been historically low despite the evidence that rehabilitation is associated with lower mortality in PCI patients. This study sought to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with referral to cardiac rehabilitation in a national PCI cohort, and to assess the association between insurance status and referral patterns. Consecutive patients who underwent PCI and survived to hospital discharge in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry between July 1, 2009 and March 31, 2012 were analyzed. Cardiac rehabilitation referral rates, and patient and institutional factors associated with referral were evaluated for the total study population and for a subset of Medicare patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction. Patients who underwent PCI (n = 1,432,399) at 1,310 participating hospitals were assessed. Cardiac rehabilitation referral rates were 59.2% and 66.0% for the overall population and the AMI/Medicare subgroup, respectively. In multivariable analyses, presentation with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (odds ratio 2.99; 95% confidence interval: 2.92 to 3.06) and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (odds ratio: 1.99; 95% confidence interval: 1.94 to 2.03) were associated with increased odds of referral to cardiac rehabilitation. Models adjusted for insurance status showed significant site-specific variability in referral rates, with more than one-quarter of all hospitals referring rehabilitation. Site-specific variation in referral rates is significant and is unexplained by insurance coverage. These findings highlight the potential need for hospital-level interventions to improve cardiac rehabilitation referral rates after PCI. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Sexual Dysfunction of Post Myocardial Infarction Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Najafian

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The common sexual complains in patients with coronary heart disease and post myocardial infarction are decrease in libido, impotence, and premature or delay ejaculation. Cardiac rehabilitation could decrease many of the psychological features of myocardial infarction and also increase exercise capacity of patients. Rehabilitation may also improve sexual disturbances in these patients directly or indirectly. This study is a clinical trial that evaluate the effect of rehabilitation on sexual problem of post MI patients. Materials & Methods: 60 patients took part in this study. All of them were men aged between 35 and 65. All patients had myocardial infarction one month ago. 30 patients were referred for cardiac rehabilitation (Case, and 30 people were patients who were not recommended to take part in rehabilitation because their physician did not believe on rehabilitation. Questioner for anxiety, depression, impotency, libido and premature ejaculation were evaluated by before and after study period. The cardiac rehabilitation composed of 24 sessions. Each session consisted of one hour of aerobic exercise (10 min warm up, 10 min cool down and 40 min isotonic exercise. Results: After cardiac rehabilitation the scores for anxiety, depression, premature ejaculation and impotency were decreased and the scores of libido were increased. In both case and control groups, the changes were significant by paired t test P<0.05. The differences between case and control were significant for depression, libido and impotency by independent t test. Conclusion: Cardiac rehabilitation could improve sexual problems in post myocardial infarction patients directly and indirectly by effect on psychological characteristics.

  13. Structure, Function, and Training the Rehabilitation Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Robert B.; Crisler, Jack R.

    The traditional team concept in rehabilitation is a differentiated team in which each member performs a different function. In practice, such teams are rarely cooperative and their additive services are disjointed. Presented is the philosophic rationale for the revitalization of a large rehabilitation center serving mental patients. Reorganization…

  14. Core competencies for cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention professionals: 2010 update: position statement of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Larry F; Sanderson, Bonnie K; Ades, Philip A; Berra, Kathy; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Roitman, Jeffrey L; Williams, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention (CR/SP) services are typically delivered by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals. The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR) recognizes that to provide high-quality services, it is important for these health care professionals to possess certain core competencies. This update to the previous statement identifies 10 areas of core competencies for CR/SP health care professionals and identifies specific knowledge and skills for each core competency. These core competency areas are consistent with the current list of core components for CR/SP programs published by the AACVPR and the American Heart Association and include comprehensive cardiovascular patient assessment; management of blood pressure, lipids, diabetes, tobacco cessation, weight, and psychological issues; exercise training; and counseling for psychosocial, nutritional, and physical activity issues.

  15. Does Cardiac Rehabilitation After an Acute Cardiac Syndrome Lead to Changes in Physical Activity Habits? Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Hoeve, Nienke; Huisstede, Bionka M. A.; Stam, Henk J.; van Domburg, Ron T.; Sunamura, Madoka; van den Berg-Emons, Rita J. G.

    Background. Optimal physical activity levels have health benefits for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and are an important goal of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Purpose. The purpose of this study was to systematically review literature regarding short-term effects (= 6 months after

  16. Improvement of myocardial perfusion detected by 201Tl scintigraphy on cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Linxue; Nohara, Ryuji; Makita, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cardiac rehabilitation (mean 70±48 months) on myocardial perfusion was assessed using thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) exercise study in 63 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Subjects were those in a rehabilitation group (Rh=42) participating in supervised sports training two to three times per week and the control group (Ct=21) not taking active daily exercise. The interval between two 201 Tl SPECT studies was 19±16 months. After physical training, total duration of the exercise test increased from 443±112 to 536±121 seconds (+19%) in the Rh group, and from 484±129 to 432±115 seconds in the Ct group (-10.7%) (p 2 to 269.8±58 x 10 2 in the Rh group and decreased from 218.7±40 x 10 2 to 216.6±76 x 10 2 (p 201 Tl myocardial perfusion defect on exercise improved more in 54.8% (stress 59.5%, rest 35.7%) in the Rh group than in the Ct group (9.5%, p 201 Tl perfusion defect decreased from 68 (23.1%) to 49 regions (16.7%) of 294 total myocardial regions in the Rh group on exercise. However. it increased from 39 (26.5%) to 44 (29.9%) regions of 147 regions in the Ct group (p<0.01). Thus, cardiac rehabilitation increases exercise tolerance with improvement of myocardial perfusion. suggesting that cardiac rehabilitation is an advisable and effective treatment for patients with ischemic heart disease. (author)

  17. Influence of Low Peak Respiratory Exchange Ratio on Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul; Choi, Hee Eun; Lee, Ki Hoon; Kim, Young Joo; Lee, Sang Jae

    2016-12-01

    To compare and analyze the effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in two groups based on the peak respiratory exchange ratio (RER peak ) 1.1 values using the exercise tolerance test (ETT) results, and to investigate the reasons for early termination of ETT. Patients with acute coronary syndrome who participated in CR exercise training were selected and all subjects underwent 6 weeks of CR exercise training. ETT was performed on a treadmill using a Modified Bruce Protocol before and after CR exercise training. According to the result of the first ETT, the subjects were divided into two groups: those with an RER peak ≥1.1 (n=33) and those with an RER peak rate of perceived exertion (RPE) and RPP (rate pressure product) at stage 3 decreased in both the RER peak means that patients with a lower exercise tolerance could also benefit from the effects of CR. Thoughtful consideration to identify the direct and indirect causes for the early termination of ETT would be necessary to improve the efficiency of CR.

  18. Web-based home rehabilitation gaming system for balance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleh Kachmar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, most systems for virtual rehabilitation and motor training require quite complex and expensive hardware and can be used only in clinical settings. Now, a low-cost rehabilitation game training system has been developed for patients with movement disorders; it is suitable for home use under the distant supervision of a therapist. It consists of a patient-side application installed on a home computer and the virtual rehabilitation Game Server in the Internet. System can work with different input gaming devices connected through USB or Bluetooth, such as a Nintendo Wii balance board, a Nintendo Wii remote, a MS Kinect sensor, and custom made rehabilitation gaming devices based on a joystick. The same games can be used with all training devices. Assessment of the Home Rehabilitation Gaming System for balance training was performed on six patients with Cerebral Palsy, who went through daily training sessions for two weeks. Preliminary results showed balance improvement in patients with Cerebral Palsy after they had completed home training courses. Further studies are needed to establish medical requirements and evidence length.

  19. A Review of Training Opportunities for Singing Voice Rehabilitation Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, Julia

    2016-05-01

    Training opportunities for singing voice rehabilitation specialists are growing and changing. This is happening despite a lack of agreed-on guidelines or an accredited certification acknowledged by the governing bodies in the fields of speech-language pathology and vocal pedagogy, the American Speech-Language Hearing Association and the National Association of Teachers of Singing, respectively. The roles of the speech-language pathologist, the singing teacher, and the person who bridges this gap, the singing voice rehabilitation specialist, are now becoming better defined and more common among the voice care community. To that end, this article aims to review the current opportunities for training in the field of singing voice rehabilitation. A review of available university training programs, private training programs and mentorships, clinical fellowships, professional organizations, conferences, vocal training across genres, and self-study opportunities was conducted. All institutional listings are with permission from program leaders. Although many avenues are available for training of singing voice rehabilitation specialists, there is no accredited comprehensive training program at this point. This review gathers information on current training opportunities from across various modalities. The listings are not intended to be comprehensive but rather representative of possibilities for interested practitioners. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Task-oriented training in rehabilitation after stroke : systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Marijke; Schuurmans, Marieke; Lindeman, Eline; Hafsteinsdottir, Thora

    Task-oriented training in rehabilitation after stroke: systematic review. This paper is a report of a review conducted to provide an overview of the evidence in the literature on task-oriented training of stroke survivors and its relevance in daily nursing practice. Stroke is the second leading

  1. Effect of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on mobility and self-esteem of persons after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, J Y; Tam, S F

    2000-08-01

    This study adopted an experimental design with using a nonequivalent, posttest only control group to study the rehabilitation outcomes of 152 persons who received cardiac surgery. 37 subjects in a rehabilitation group participated in a 2-mo. exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation programme, and another 115 subjects who did not attend the programme formed the control group. The subjects' self-esteem was measured on the Adult Source of Self-esteem Inventory by Elvoson and Fleming, and their mobility skill was measured by a simple mobility test based on New York Heart Association Classification. Analysis of covariance (with covariance analysis of the subjects' age, years of education, occupational skill, and mobility skill) indicated that the experimental group scored higher on positive self esteem and showed significantly better improvement in mobility skill. The exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation programme positively affected physical and psychological outcomes. Also, subjects' self-esteem was significantly correlated with their mobility skills (r=.21, p<.05) among those aged under 60 years (n=96) but not among those aged 60 or above (n=53).

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation following an acute coronary syndrome: Trends in referral, predictors and mortality outcome in a multicenter national registry between years 2006-2013: Report from the Working Group on Cardiac Rehabilitation, the Israeli Heart Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomordik, Fernando; Sabbag, Avi; Tzur, Boaz; Kopel, Eran; Goldkorn, Ronen; Matetzky, Shlomi; Goldenberg, Ilan; Shlomo, Nir; Klempfner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background Utilization of cardiac rehabilitation is suboptimal. The aim of the study was to assess referral trends over the past decade, to identify predictors for referral to a cardiac rehabilitation program, and to evaluate the association with one-year mortality in a large national registry of acute coronary syndrome patients. Design and methods Data were extracted from the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey national surveys between 2006-2013. A total of 6551 patients discharged with a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome were included. Results Referral to cardiac rehabilitation following an acute coronary syndrome increased from 38% in 2006 to 57% in 2013 ( p for trend acute coronary syndrome. However, cardiac rehabilitation is still under-utilized in important high-risk subsets of this population. Patients referred to cardiac rehabilitation have a lower adjusted mortality risk.

  3. The effect of cardiac rehabilitation on anxiety and depression in patients undergoing cardiac bypass graft surgery in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif Farkhondeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients experience anxiety and depression after cardiac bypass surgery. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of cardiac rehabilitation on anxiety and depression in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting in hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in southern Iran. Methods For this randomized controlled trial, 80 patients who met the inclusion criteria were recruited and randomly assigned to case and control groups. Anxiety was measured with the Spielberger Anxiety Scale and depression was measured using Beck’s Depression Inventory at three points in time: on discharge from the hospital, immediately after the intervention, and 2 months after cardiac rehabilitation. After measuring anxiety and depression in both groups upon discharge, the experimental group participated in 8 cardiac rehabilitation sessions over a 4-week period. The control group received only the routine follow-up care. Results There was a statistically significant difference in depression scores between groups at all three time-points (Mean score from 19.6 to 10 in the intervention group and from 19.5 to 14 in the control group, P = 0.0014. However, no significant difference was seen in anxiety scores between the groups (Mean score from 37 to 28 in the intervention group and from 38 to 32 in the control group, P = 0.079. Conclusions Cardiac rehabilitation was effective in reducing depression 2 months after surgery in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Trial registration IRCTN201203262812N8

  4. Type D patients report poorer health status prior to and after cardiac rehabilitation compared to non-type D patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelle, Aline J; Erdman, Ruud A M; van Domburg, Ron T

    2008-01-01

    Type D personality is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves outcomes, but little is known about the effects of CR on Type D patients.......Type D personality is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves outcomes, but little is known about the effects of CR on Type D patients....

  5. Analysis of steps adapted protocol in cardiac rehabilitation in the hospital phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Dallazen, Fernanda; Bronzatti, Angela Beerbaum Steinke; Lorenzoni, Juliara Cristina Werner; Windmöller, Pollyana

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze a cardiac rehabilitation adapted protocol in physical therapy during the postoperative hospital phase of cardiac surgery in a service of high complexity, in aspects regarded to complications and mortality prevalence and hospitalization days. Methods This is an observational cross-sectional, retrospective and analytical study performed by investigating 99 patients who underwent cardiac surgery for coronary artery bypass graft, heart valve replacement or a combination of both. Step program adapted for rehabilitation after cardiac surgery was analyzed under the command of the physiotherapy professional team. Results In average, a patient stays for two days in the Intensive Care Unit and three to four days in the hospital room, totalizing six days of hospitalization. Fatalities occurred in a higher percentage during hospitalization (5.1%) and up to two years period (8.6%) when compared to 30 days after hospital discharge (1.1%). Among the postoperative complications, the hemodynamic (63.4%) and respiratory (42.6%) were the most prevalent. 36-42% of complications occurred between the immediate postoperative period and the second postoperative day. The hospital discharge started from the fifth postoperative day. We can observe that in each following day, the patients are evolving in achieving the Steps, where Step 3 was the most used during the rehabilitation phase I. Conclusion This evolution program by steps can to guide the physical rehabilitation at the hospital in patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:25859866

  6. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins; Mostarda, Cristiano; Figueroa, Diego Mendrot; Angelis, Kátia De; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats

  7. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Figueiredo Grans

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. Objective: To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week. At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. Results: The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32% and trained infarcted (+46% in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%, myocardial performance index (-39% and systolic blood pressure (+6% improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%, as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46% in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Conclusion: Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

  8. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins [Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mostarda, Cristiano [Departamento de Educação Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão (UFMA), São Luís, MA (Brazil); Figueroa, Diego Mendrot [Laboratório de Hipertensão Experimental, Instituto do Coração (InCor), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Angelis, Kátia De [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Universidade Nove de Julho (Uninove), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia [Laboratório de Hipertensão Experimental, Instituto do Coração (InCor), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rodrigues, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.rodrigues@incor.usp.br [Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu (USJT), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

  9. Resistance Training After Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Its Role on Cardiac and Autonomic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grans, Camilla Figueiredo; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Abssamra, Marcos Elias Vergilino; Rocha, Leandro Yanase; Carrozzi, Nicolle Martins; Mostarda, Cristiano; Figueroa, Diego Mendrot; Angelis, Kátia De; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Background Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction. Objective To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made. Results The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted. Conclusion Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats. PMID:25014059

  10. [Cyclic movement training versus conventional physiotherapy for rehabilitation of hemiparetic gait after stroke: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podubecka, J; Scheer, S; Theilig, S; Wiederer, R; Oberhoffer, R; Nowak, D A

    2011-07-01

    Recovery of impaired motor functions following stroke is commonly incomplete in spite of intensive rehabilitation programmes. At 6 months following a stroke up to 60 % of affected individuals still suffer from permanent motor deficits, in particular hemiparetic gait, that are relevant for daily life. Novel innovative therapeutic strategies are needed to enhance the recovery of impaired gait function following stroke. This pilot study has investigated the effectiveness of conventional physiotherapy in comparison to an apparative cyclic movement training over a period of 4 weeks to improve (i) power during a submaximal cyclic movement training of the lower limbs, (ii) cardiac fitness, (iii) balance and gait ability, and (iv) quality of life in stroke patients. In comparison to physiotherapy apparative cyclic movement training improved power, balance, cardiac fitness and quality of life to a greater extent. However, there was a statistically significant difference between both intervention groups only for balance but not for the other parameters assessed. The present pilot study should inspire future research with larger patient cohorts to allow appropriate judgement on the effectiveness of apparative cyclic movement training in stroke rehabilitation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Comorbidities and Psychosocial Characteristics as Determinants of Dropout in Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardaens, Sofie; De Smedt, Delphine; De Bacquer, Dirk; Willems, Anne-Marie; Verstreken, Sofie; De Sutter, Johan

    Despite the clear benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), a considerable number of patients drop out early. Therefore, we wanted to evaluate dropout in CR with a special focus on comorbidities and psychosocial background. Patients who attended CR after acute coronary syndrome, cardiac surgery, or heart failure (N = 489) were prospectively included. Dropout was defined as attending 50% of the training sessions or less (n = 96 [20%]). Demographic and clinical characteristics, exercise parameters, and psychosocial factors were analyzed according to dropout, and those with a trend toward a significant difference (P dropout, and a comparable trend was seen for the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (2.55 [0.99-6.54]). Attending the training program only twice per week also implicated a higher risk of an early withdrawal (3.76 [2.23-6.35]). In contrast, patients on β-blockers were less likely to withdraw prematurely (0.47 [0.22-0.98]). Singles were more likely to drop out (2.89 [1.56-5.35]), as well as those patients who were dependent on others to get to CR (2.01 [1.16-3.47]). Finally, the reporting of severe problems on the anxiety/depression subscale of the EuroQOL-5D questionnaire involved a higher odds for dropout (7.17 [1.46-35.29]). Neither demographic characteristics nor clinical status or exercise capacity could independently identify patients who were at risk of dropout. The presence of comorbidities and a vulnerable psychosocial background rather seem to play a key role in dropout.

  12. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with ICD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2015-01-01

    (rehabilitation: 47.7 points [SD 10.1] vs 54.8 points [7.1] and usual care: 48.1 points [SD 10.9] vs 51.9 points [SD 9.6], P = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: After ICD implantation, significant gender differences were found in physical health, mental health, and QoL. Effects of rehabilitation were found among men only...... in physical component scale, mental component scale, social functioning, physical functioning, bodily pain, vitality, mental health, and QoL with men having higher scores. Among men only, significant differences were found in VO2 (rehabilitation: 20.9 mL/min/kg [standard deviation (SD) 8.1] vs 23.4 m...... and gender predicted effect of rehabilitation on the mental component scale....

  13. Feasibility of a Facebook Intervention for Exercise Motivation and Cardiac Rehabilitation Adherence: Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Lee Anne; Ahmed, Haitham M; Crawford, Michael Todd; Bena, James Frank

    2017-08-18

    While cardiac rehabilitation has been shown to be effective at improving coronary heart disease (CHD), participation is generally poor. Attempts to increase uptake and adherence often fail. Use of a Facebook intervention for this population may be a unique opportunity to support self-determined motivation and affect adherence. To evaluate the impact of a Facebook intervention on motivation for exercise and adherence to cardiac rehabilitation in patients with CHD during a 12-week, Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. A prospective, randomized controlled pilot study, grounded in Self-Determination Theory, will be conducted. Participants will be recruited from inpatient, or the intake visit to outpatient, cardiac rehabilitation, and then randomly assigned to the intervention or comparison group. Participants in the intervention group will take part in a private Facebook group. Weekly posts will be designed to support self-determined motivation, measured at baseline and postcardiac rehabilitation by the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-3 (BREQ-3). The Psychological Need Satisfaction for Exercise (PNSE) scale will measure fulfillment of needs that affect motivation. Participants in the comparison group will be given the same materials, but these will be supplied via handouts and email. The number of sessions attended will be tallied and analyzed using t tests. Overall motivation will be evaluated using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) models. Multivariate analysis of variance models will be used to evaluate differences in the change across motivation subtypes. If significant, ANCOVA models for each subtype will be fit. ANCOVA models will be used to compare changes in needs satisfaction, overall and separately among the three subscales, between groups. Engagement in the Facebook group will be measured by number of "likes" and self-report of weekly visits to the group. This project was funded in July 2017 and recruitment is currently underway. The

  14. Introducing a feedback training system for guided home rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disselhorst-Klug Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As the number of people requiring orthopaedic intervention is growing, individualized physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and adequate postoperative care becomes increasingly relevant. The chances of improvement in the patients condition is directly related to the performance and consistency of the physiotherapeutic exercises. In this paper a smart, cost-effective and easy to use Feedback Training System for home rehabilitation based on standard resistive elements is introduced. This ensures high accuracy of the exercises performed and offers guidance and control to the patient by offering direct feedback about the performance of the movements. 46 patients were recruited and performed standard physiotherapeutic training to evaluate the system. The results show a significant increase in the patient's ability to reproduce even simple physiotherapeutic exercises when being supported by the Feedback Training System. Thus physiotherapeutic training can be extended into the home environment whilst ensuring a high quality of training.

  15. Introducing a feedback training system for guided home rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Fabian; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Disselhorst-Klug, Catherine

    2010-01-15

    As the number of people requiring orthopaedic intervention is growing, individualized physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and adequate postoperative care becomes increasingly relevant. The chances of improvement in the patients condition is directly related to the performance and consistency of the physiotherapeutic exercises.In this paper a smart, cost-effective and easy to use Feedback Training System for home rehabilitation based on standard resistive elements is introduced. This ensures high accuracy of the exercises performed and offers guidance and control to the patient by offering direct feedback about the performance of the movements.46 patients were recruited and performed standard physiotherapeutic training to evaluate the system. The results show a significant increase in the patient's ability to reproduce even simple physiotherapeutic exercises when being supported by the Feedback Training System. Thus physiotherapeutic training can be extended into the home environment whilst ensuring a high quality of training.

  16. Process and Outcome in Cardiac Rehabilitation: An Examination of Cross-Lagged Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evon, Donna M.; Burns, John W.

    2004-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation patients improve cardiorespiratory fitness and quality of life, yet therapeutic processes that produce these changes remain unknown. A cross-lagged panel design was used to determine whether early-treatment enhancement of self-efficacy regarding abilities to change diet and exercise habits and the quality of the…

  17. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with coronary heart disease: a practice guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achttien, R. J.; Staal, J. B.; van der Voort, S.; Kemps, H. M. C.; Koers, H.; Jongert, M. W. A.; Hendriks, E. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    To improve the quality of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) the CR guideline from the Dutch Royal Society for Physiotherapists (KNGF) has been updated. This guideline can be considered an addition to the 2011 Dutch Multidisciplinary CR

  18. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with chronic heart failure: a Dutch practice guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achttien, R.J.; Staal, J.B.; Voort, S. van der; Kemps, H.M.; Koers, H.; Jongert, M.W.; Hendriks, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: To improve the quality of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) a practice guideline from the Dutch Royal Society for Physiotherapy (KNGF) has been developed. GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT: A systematic literature search was performed to formulate

  19. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with coronary heart disease: a practice guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achttien, R.J.; Staal, J.B.; Voort, S. van der; Kemps, H.M.; Koers, H.; Jongert, M.W.; Hendriks, E.J.; Development, G. Practice Recomm

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To improve the quality of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) the CR guideline from the Dutch Royal Society for Physiotherapists (KNGF) has been updated. This guideline can be considered an addition to the 2011 Dutch Multidisciplinary

  20. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with chronic heart failure: a Dutch practice guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achttien, R. J.; Staal, J. B.; van der Voort, S.; Kemps, H. M.; Koers, H.; Jongert, M. W. A.; Hendriks, E. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    To improve the quality of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) a practice guideline from the Dutch Royal Society for Physiotherapy (KNGF) has been developed. A systematic literature search was performed to formulate conclusions on the efficacy of

  1. Effect of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery (CopenHeartVR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine Laerum; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Hansen, Tina Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    replacement or repair, remains the treatment of choice. However, post surgery, the transition to daily living may become a physical, mental and social challenge. We hypothesise that a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation programme can improve physical capacity and self-assessed mental health and reduce...

  2. The effect of a 6-month cardiac rehabilitation programme on serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and forty-two cardiac rehabilitation patients were followed up over a p.eriod of 6 months and the percentage change over time was recorded for various lipid fractions including apoprotein AI (apo AI), apoprotein B (apo B) and lipoprotein a (Lp(a)). Data were analysed to see if improvement in peak oxygen ...

  3. PATIENTS OVERCOME ANXIETY AND ARE ENCOURAGED TO BE PHYSICAL ACTIVETHROUGH EXERCISE-BASED CARDIAC REHABILITATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D.

    2015-01-01

    interviews were performed 1-2 months later. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was conducted, comprising three methodological steps: naïve reading, structural analysis and comprehensive interpretation. Results. The preliminary findings are that although physically and especially mentally......Purpose. Patients face demanding and challenging processes when they experience cardiac problems. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is established to enable these patients to move forward to lead a satisfying life. It is recognised that patients fail to join all sessions of the rehabilitation...... resulting in an alarming problem. It is outlined that barriers for better adherence are related to the fact that the services do not sufficiently address the patients’ specific situations. Thus, the request for firmly addressing rehabilitation as responsive to the patients’ needs is of paramount importance...

  4. PATIENTS OVERCOME ANXIETY AND ARE ENCOURAGED TO BE PHYSICAL ACTIVE THROUGH EXERCISE-BASED CARDIAC REHABILITATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D.

    interviews were performed 1-2 months later. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was conducted, comprising three methodological steps: naïve reading, structural analysis and comprehensive interpretation. Results. The preliminary findings are that although physically and especially mentally......Purpose. Patients face demanding and challenging processes when they experience cardiac problems. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is established to enable these patients to move forward to lead a satisfying life. It is recognised that patients fail to join all sessions of the rehabilitation...... resulting in an alarming problem. It is outlined that barriers for better adherence are related to the fact that the services do not sufficiently address the patients’ specific situations. Thus, the request for firmly addressing rehabilitation as responsive to the patients’ needs is of paramount importance...

  5. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe Stelling; Zwisler, Anne Dorthe; Palm Johansen, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The aim of this review is to assess the benefits and harms of rehabilitation programmes consisting of a physical exercise component that focuses on increasing exercise capacity, and may include a psychoeduca......This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The aim of this review is to assess the benefits and harms of rehabilitation programmes consisting of a physical exercise component that focuses on increasing exercise capacity, and may include...

  6. Exercise self-efficacy and symptoms of depression after cardiac rehabilitation: predicting changes over time using a piecewise growth curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarter, Alisha D; Bennett, Kymberley K; Barber, Carolyn E; Gessner, Stacia N; Clark, Jillian M R

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation is often recommended after experiencing a cardiac event and has been shown to significantly improve health outcomes among patients. Several psychosocial variables have been linked with cardiac rehabilitation program success, including exercise self-efficacy. However, little is known about temporal patterns in patients' exercise self-efficacy after program completion. This study examined changes in exercise self-efficacy among 133 cardiac rehabilitation patients and whether symptoms of depression impacted the rate of change in exercise self-efficacy. Participants completed questionnaires at the beginning and end of cardiac rehabilitation and at 6-month intervals for 2 years. Growth curve analyses showed that exercise self-efficacy levels were highest at the beginning of cardiac rehabilitation, significantly declined 6 months after cardiac rehabilitation, and leveled off over the next 18 months. Results also showed that baseline depressive symptoms interacted with time: Compared with participants with fewer symptoms, participants high in depressive symptoms began cardiac rehabilitation with lower levels of exercise self-efficacy and evidenced significant declines 6 months after cardiac rehabilitation. At no time were they equal to their counterparts in exercise self-efficacy, and their means were lower 2 years after cardiac rehabilitation than before cardiac rehabilitation. Our findings imply that patients show unrealistic optimism surrounding the ease of initiating and maintaining an exercise program and that integrating efficacy-building activities into cardiac rehabilitation, especially for patients who show signs of distress, is advisable.

  7. [Consideration of early rehabilitation in the treatment of post-cardiac arrest syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Masaki; Ogasawara, Sadanobu; Kadowaki, Aya; Onizuka, Shouzaburou; Samejima, Mituhiro

    2011-04-01

    Resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest is an unnatural pathophysiological state. In 2008, ILCOR has proposed "post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS)". Clinicians must focus on treating to reverse the pathophysiological manifestations of PCAS in bed. Immobility, deconditioning, and weakness are common problems in patients with critical illness. Therapeutic strategies have to be identified to give patients after ROSC the best chance for survival with good neurological function. Concerning the beneficial effects of early mobilization after stroke, and the efficacy of a strategy for whole-body rehabilitation in the earliest days of critical illness on functional outcomes, the intervention of early rehabilitation care by an interdisciplinary team seems to contribute to good long-time outcome of post-cardiac arrest patients.

  8. Muscular coordination and strength training. Implications for injury rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, O M

    1988-03-01

    Strength training is commonly used in the rehabilitation of muscles atrophied as a result of injury and/or disuse. Studies on the effects of conventional leg extension training in healthy subjects have shown the changes to be very task-specific to the training manoeuvre itself. After conventional leg extension training for the quadriceps muscle the major improvement was in weightlifting ability with only small increases in isometric strength. The maximum dynamic force and power output during sprint cycling showed no improvement. These results suggest that the major benefit of this type of training is learning to coordinate the different muscle groups involved in the training movement rather than intrinsic increases in strength of the muscle group being trained. Other studies have shown changes in strength to be specific to the length and speed at which the muscle has been trained. The implication for rehabilitation is that strength training for isolated muscle groups may not be the most effective way of increasing functional ability. As the major changes are task-specific it may be better to incorporate the training into task-related practice. This would have the advantage of strengthening the muscle groups affected whilst increasing performance in those activities which are required in daily life.

  9. Training Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors in Group Dynamics: A Psychoeducational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Timothy R.

    1990-01-01

    Describes a six-session psychoeducational program for training vocational rehabilitation counselors in group dynamics. Presents evaluation of program by counselors (N=15) in which leadership styles, conflict management, and typology of group tasks concepts were rated as most beneficial. (Author/ABL)

  10. Visual rehabilitation: visual scanning, multisensory stimulation and vision restoration trainings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil M. Dundon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological training methods of visual rehabilitation for homonymous vision loss caused by postchiasmatic damage fall into two fundamental paradigms: compensation and restoration. Existing methods can be classified into three groups: Visual Scanning Training (VST, Audio-Visual Scanning Training (AViST and Vision Restoration Training (VRT. VST and AViST aim at compensating vision loss by training eye scanning movements, whereas VRT aims at improving lost vision by activating residual visual functions by training light detection and discrimination of visual stimuli. This review discusses the rationale underlying these paradigms and summarizes the available evidence with respect to treatment efficacy. The issues raised in our review should help guide clinical care and stimulate new ideas for future research uncovering the underlying neural correlates of the different treatment paradigms. We propose that both local within-system interactions (i.e., relying on plasticity within peri-lesional spared tissue and changes in more global between-system networks (i.e., recruiting alternative visual pathways contribute to both vision restoration and compensatory rehabilitation that ultimately have implications for the rehabilitation of cognitive functions.

  11. Perceiving Cardiac Rehabilitation Staff as Mainly Responsible for Exercise: A Dilemma for Future Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora, Parminder K; McMahon, Casey J; Locke, Sean R; Brawley, Lawrence R

    2018-03-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) exercise therapy facilitates patient recovery and better health following a cardiovascular event. However, post-CR adherence to self-managed (SM)-exercise is suboptimal. Part of this problem may be participants' view of CR staff as mainly responsible for help and program structure. Does post-CR exercise adherence for those perceiving high CR staff responsibility suffer as a consequence? Participants in this prospective, observational study were followed over 12 weeks of CR and one month afterward. High perceived staff responsibility individuals were examined for a decline in the strength of adherence-related social cognitions and exercise. Those high and low in perceived staff responsibility were also compared. High perceived staff responsibility individuals reported significant declines in anticipated exercise persistence (d = .58) and number of different SM-exercise options (d = .44). High versus low responsibility comparisons revealed a significant difference in one-month post-CR SM-exercise volume (d = .67). High perceived staff responsibility individuals exercised half of the amount of low responsibility counterparts at one month post-CR. Perceived staff responsibility and CR SRE significantly predicted SM-exercise volume, R 2 adj = .10, and persistence, R 2 adj = .18, one month post-CR. Viewing helpful well-trained CR staff as mainly responsible for participant behavior may be problematic for post-CR exercise maintenance among those more staff dependent. © 2017 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  12. 76 FR 22084 - Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... absolute priorities, one competitive preference priority, and one invitational priority. In order to... priority and Absolute Priority 1. This priority is: Partnership with the State Vocational Rehabilitation... knowledge of students of the role and responsibilities of the vocational rehabilitation (VR) counselor and...

  13. Cardiac parasympathetic reactivation following exercise: implications for training prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jamie; Peake, Jonathan M; Buchheit, Martin

    2013-12-01

    The objective of exercise training is to initiate desirable physiological adaptations that ultimately enhance physical work capacity. Optimal training prescription requires an individualized approach, with an appropriate balance of training stimulus and recovery and optimal periodization. Recovery from exercise involves integrated physiological responses. The cardiovascular system plays a fundamental role in facilitating many of these responses, including thermoregulation and delivery/removal of nutrients and waste products. As a marker of cardiovascular recovery, cardiac parasympathetic reactivation following a training session is highly individualized. It appears to parallel the acute/intermediate recovery of the thermoregulatory and vascular systems, as described by the supercompensation theory. The physiological mechanisms underlying cardiac parasympathetic reactivation are not completely understood. However, changes in cardiac autonomic activity may provide a proxy measure of the changes in autonomic input into organs and (by default) the blood flow requirements to restore homeostasis. Metaboreflex stimulation (e.g. muscle and blood acidosis) is likely a key determinant of parasympathetic reactivation in the short term (0-90 min post-exercise), whereas baroreflex stimulation (e.g. exercise-induced changes in plasma volume) probably mediates parasympathetic reactivation in the intermediate term (1-48 h post-exercise). Cardiac parasympathetic reactivation does not appear to coincide with the recovery of all physiological systems (e.g. energy stores or the neuromuscular system). However, this may reflect the limited data currently available on parasympathetic reactivation following strength/resistance-based exercise of variable intensity. In this review, we quantitatively analyse post-exercise cardiac parasympathetic reactivation in athletes and healthy individuals following aerobic exercise, with respect to exercise intensity and duration, and fitness/training

  14. Short-term results of a 5-week comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program after first-time myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallavollita, Luca; Marsili, Bruno; Castelli, Sandro; Cucchi, Francesca; Santillo, Elpidio; Marini, Luciano; Balestrini, Fabrizio

    2016-03-01

    A prospective single-center interventional cohort study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a 5-week comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program on terms exercise capacity, quality of life, echocardiographic findings and autonomic modulation after first-time myocardial infarction. We studied 37 consecutive post-myocardial infartion patients (mean age 66 years). All patients began a 5-week cardiac rehabilitation supervised training. The exercise program consisted of 40 minutes of training, three times a week, on a cycle ergometer at 60-80% of the maximal heart rate. At baseline and after training program we analyzed: the distance walked after the Six-Minutes Walking Test (6MWT); quality of life (QoL) assesed using the Psychological General Well-Being Inventory (PGWBI) questionnaire; echocardiographic finding and autonomic balance assesed heart rate variability (HRV). We observed statistically significant improvement in exercise capacity (from 423±94 to 496±13 m; P<0.05). Also we observed statistically significant improvements in the many PGWBI dimensions; particularly, anxiety +5.8% (from 18.11±5.2 to 19.12±4.4); depression +6.0% (from 12.00±3.0 to 12.73±2.4); positive well-being +6% (from 11.55±3.5 to 12.23±4.0); general health +10.3% (from 9.48±3.5 to 10.46±2.87); vitality +6.8% (from 12.96±4.2 to 13.85±4.2). Finally, we observed changes in HRV indices after training program: RR (from 903±169 ms to 952±163 ms; P<0.05), pNN50% (from 4.74±4.89 to 6.23±5.53; P<0.05), in time-domain; LF (from 274±169 to 362±233 ms2; P<0,05); HF (from 214±154 to 314±194 ms2; P<0.05) and LF/HF (from 1.53±0.54 to 1.24±0.47; P<0.05) in frequency-domain. The study suggest that a cardiac rehabilitation program in postmyocardial infarction improves exercise capacity, QoL and autonomic modulation.

  15. A patient self-assessment tool for cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, C; Finnell, M D; Mottla, K A

    1989-01-01

    A patient self-assessment tool was designed, tested, and implemented to promote cardiac-specific data collection, based on Gordon's Functional Health Patterns, to maximize patient/family involvement in determining a plan of care, and to streamline primary nurses' documentation requirements. Retrospective and concurrent chart reviews provided data for quality assurance monitoring. The results of the monitoring demonstrated that the self-assessment tool markedly improved the patient-specific data base.

  16. A practical review for cardiac rehabilitation professionals of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices: historical and current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compostella, Leonida; Russo, Nicola; Setzu, Tiziana; Bottio, Tomaso; Compostella, Caterina; Tarzia, Vincenzo; Livi, Ugolino; Gerosa, Gino; Iliceto, Sabino; Bellotto, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of patients with end-stage heart failure are being treated with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (cf-LVADs). These patients provide new challenges to the staff in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. Even though experience remains limited, it seems that patients supported by cf-LVADs may safely engage in typical rehabilitative activities, provided that some attention is paid to specific aspects, such as the presence of a short external drive line. In spite of initial physical deconditioning, CR allows progressive improvement of symptoms such as fatigue and dyspnea. Intensity of rehabilitative activities should ideally be based on measured aerobic capacity and increased appropriately over time. Regular, long-term exercise training results in improved physical fitness and survival rates. Appropriate adjustment of cf-LVAD settings, together with maintenance of adequate blood volume, provides maximal output, while avoiding suction effects. Ventricular arrhythmias, although not necessarily constituting an immediate life-threatening situation, deserve treatment as they could lead to an increased rate of hospitalization and poorer quality of life. Atrial fibrillation may worsen symptoms of right ventricular failure and reduce exercise tolerance. Blood pressure measurements are possible in cf-LVAD patients only using a Doppler technique, and a mean blood pressure ≤80 mmHg is considered "ideal." Some patients may present with orthostatic intolerance, related to autonomic dysfunction. While exercise training constitutes the basic rehabilitative tool, a comprehensive intervention that includes psychological and social support could better meet the complex needs of patients in which cf-LVAD may offer prolonged survival.

  17. Feasibility and effectiveness of circuit training in acute stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Dorian; Paris, Trevor; Crews, Erin; Wu, Samuel S; Sun, Anqi; Behrman, Andrea L; Duncan, Pamela

    2011-02-01

    Task-specificity, repetition and progression are key variables in the acquisition of motor skill however they have not been consistently implemented in post-stroke rehabilitation. To evaluate the effectiveness of a stroke rehabilitation plan of care that incorporated task-specific practice, repetition and progression to facilitate functional gain compared to standard physical therapy for individuals admitted to an inpatient stroke unit. Individuals participated in either a circuit training (CTPT) model (n = 72) or a standard (SPT) model (n = 108) of physical therapy, 5 days/week. Each 60 minute circuit training session, delivered according to severity level, consisted of four functional mobility tasks. Daily exercise logs documented both task repetition and progression. The CTPT model was successfully implemented in an acute rehabilitation setting. The CTPT group showed a significantly greater improved change in gait speed from hospital admission to discharge than the SPT group (0.21 ± 0.25 m/sec vs. 0.13 ± 0.22 m/sec; p = 0.03). The difference between groups occurred primarily among those who were ambulatory upon admission. There were no significant differences between the two cohorts at 90 days post-stroke as measured by the FONE-FIM, SF-36 and living location. Therapy focused on systematically progressed functional tasks can be successfully implemented in an inpatient rehabilitation stroke program. This circuit-training model resulted in greater gains in gait velocity over the course of inpatient rehabilitation compared to the standard model of care. Community-based services following hospital discharge to maintain these gains should be included in the continuum of post-stroke care.

  18. Effects of obstructive sleep apnea on hemodynamic parameters in patients entering cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, Trent A; Aron, Adrian; Newsome, Laura J; Austin, Joseph L; Shafer, Brooke M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent form of sleep-disordered breathing. Evidence suggests that OSA may lead to cardiac remodeling, although the literature is equivocal. Previous literature suggests a high percentage of individuals entering a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program also have OSA. The objective of this study was to determine whether resting hemodynamic variables were altered in OSA subjects entering CR compared with those without OSA, as determined by impedance cardiography. Subjects entering an early outpatient CR program were screened for OSA using an at-home screening device and verified by a sleep physician. Subjects were divided into an OSA group (n = 48) or a control group (n = 25) on the basis of the screening results. Hemodynamic variables were measured during supine rest using impedance cardiography. A 6-minute walk test was performed to assess functional capacity. The proportion of cardiac diagnoses was similar between groups. Overall, 66% of the subjects were positive for OSA. Subject groups did not differ by age, body mass index, heart rate, diastolic blood pressure, or functional capacity. Cardiac output, cardiac index, stroke volume, contractility index, and left cardiac work index were all significantly decreased in the OSA group compared with the control group (P disadvantage in recovering from their cardiac event, and place them at increased risk for secondary complications.

  19. Validation of a Portuguese version of the Information Needs in Cardiac Rehabilitation (INCR) scale in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisi, Gabriela Lima de Melo; Dos Santos, Rafaella Zulianello; Bonin, Christiani Batista Decker; Roussenq, Suellen; Grace, Sherry L; Oh, Paul; Benetti, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    To translate, culturally adapt and psychometrically validate the Information Needs in Cardiac Rehabilitation (INCR) tool to Portuguese. The identification of information needs is considered the first step to improve knowledge that ultimately could improve health outcomes. The Portuguese version generated was tested in 300 cardiac rehabilitation patients (CR) (34% women; mean age = 61.3 ± 2.1 years old). Test-retest reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), the internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha, and the criterion validity was assessed with regard to patients' education and duration in CR. All 9 subscales were considered internally consistent (á > 0.7). Significant differences between mean total needs and educational level (p validity. The overall mean (4.6 ± 0.4), as well as the means of the 9 subscales were high (emergency/safety was the greatest need). The Portuguese INCR was demonstrated to have sufficient reliability, consistency and validity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transforming cardiac rehabilitation into broad-based healthy lifestyle programs to combat noncommunicable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J; Cahalin, Lawrence P; Briggs, Paige D; Guizilini, Solange; Daugherty, John; Chan, Wai-Man; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The current incidence and prevalence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is currently a cause for great concern on a global scale; future projections are no less disconcerting. Unhealthy lifestyle patterns are at the core of the NCD crisis; physical inactivity, excess body mass, poor nutrition and tobacco use are the primary lifestyle factors that substantially increase the risk of developing one or more NCDs. We have now come to recognize that healthy lifestyle interventions are a medical necessity that should be prescribed to all individuals. Perhaps the most well-established model for healthy lifestyle interventions in the current healthcare model is cardiac rehabilitation. To have any hope of improving the outlook for NCDs on a global scale, what is currently known as cardiac rehabilitation must transform into broad-based healthy lifestyle programing, with a shifted focus on primordial and primary prevention.

  1. Proposal of quality indicators for cardiac rehabilitation after acute coronary syndrome in Japan: a modified Delphi method and practice test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtera, Shosuke; Kanazawa, Natsuko; Ozasa, Neiko; Ueshima, Kenji; Nakayama, Takeo

    2017-01-27

    Cardiac rehabilitation is underused and its quality in practice is unclear. A quality indicator is a measurable element of clinical practice performance. This study aimed to propose a set of quality indicators for cardiac rehabilitation following an acute coronary event in the Japanese population and conduct a small-size practice test to confirm feasibility and applicability of the indicators in real-world clinical practice. This study used a modified Delphi technique (the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method), a consensus method which involves an evidence review, a face-to-face multidisciplinary panel meeting and repeated anonymous rating. Evidence to be reviewed included clinical practice guidelines available in English or Japanese and existing quality indicators. Performance of each indicator was assessed retrospectively using medical records at a university hospital in Japan. 10 professionals in cardiac rehabilitation for the consensus panel. In the literature review, 23 clinical practice guidelines and 16 existing indicators were identified to generate potential indicators. Through the consensus-building process, a total of 30 indicators were assessed and finally 13 indicators were accepted. The practice test (n=39) revealed that 74% of patients underwent cardiac rehabilitation. Median performance of process measures was 93% (IQR 46-100%). 'Communication with the doctor who referred the patient to cardiac rehabilitation' and 'continuous participation in cardiac rehabilitation' had low performance (32% and 38%, respectively). A modified Delphi technique identified a comprehensive set of quality indicators for cardiac rehabilitation. The single-site, small-size practice test confirmed that most of the proposed indicators were measurable in real-world clinical practice. However, some clinical processes which are not covered by national health insurance in Japan had low performance. Further studies will be needed to clarify and improve the quality of care in cardiac

  2. Cardiac Auscultation for Noncardiologists: Application in Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs: PART I: PATIENTS AFTER ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROMES AND HEART FAILURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compostella, Leonida; Compostella, Caterina; Russo, Nicola; Setzu, Tiziana; Iliceto, Sabino; Bellotto, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    During outpatient cardiac rehabilitation after an acute coronary syndrome or after an episode of congestive heart failure, a careful, periodic evaluation of patients' clinical and hemodynamic status is essential. Simple and traditional cardiac auscultation could play a role in providing useful prognostic information.Reduced intensity of the first heart sound (S1), especially when associated with prolonged apical impulse and the appearance of added sounds, may help identify left ventricular (LV) dysfunction or conduction disturbances, sometimes associated with transient myocardial ischemia. If both S1 and second heart sound (S2) are reduced in intensity, a pericardial effusion may be suspected, whereas an increased intensity of S2 may indicate increased pulmonary artery pressure. The persistence of a protodiastolic sound (S3) after an acute coronary syndrome is an indicator of severe LV dysfunction and a poor prognosis. In patients with congestive heart failure, the association of an S3 and elevated heart rate may indicate impending decompensation. A presystolic sound (S4) is often associated with S3 in patients with LV failure, although it could also be present in hypertensive patients and in patients with an LV aneurysm. Careful evaluation of apical systolic murmurs could help identifying possible LV dysfunction or mitral valve pathology, and differentiate them from a ruptured papillary muscle or ventricular septal rupture. Friction rubs after an acute myocardial infarction, due to reactive pericarditis or Dressler syndrome, are often associated with a complicated clinical course.During cardiac rehabilitation, periodic cardiac auscultation may provide useful information about the clinical-hemodynamic status of patients and allow timely detection of signs, heralding possible complications in an efficient and low-cost manner.

  3. Analysis of agreement between cardiac risk stratification protocols applied to participants of a center for cardiac rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana A. S. Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Cardiac risk stratification is related to the risk of the occurrence of events induced by exercise. Despite the existence of several protocols to calculate risk stratification, studies indicating that there is similarity between these protocols are still unknown. Objective To evaluate the agreement between the existing protocols on cardiac risk rating in cardiac patients. Method The records of 50 patients from a cardiac rehabilitation program were analyzed, from which the following information was extracted: age, sex, weight, height, clinical diagnosis, medical history, risk factors, associated diseases, and the results from the most recent laboratory and complementary tests performed. This information was used for risk stratification of the patients in the protocols of the American College of Sports Medicine, the Brazilian Society of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the protocol designed by Frederic J. Pashkow, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, the Société Française de Cardiologie, and the Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and the analysis of agreement between the protocols was calculated using the Kappa coefficient. Differences were considered with a significance level of 5%. Results Of the 21 analyses of agreement, 12 were considered significant between the protocols used for risk classification, with nine classified as moderate and three as low. No agreements were classified as excellent. Different proportions were observed in each risk category, with significant differences between the protocols for all risk categories. Conclusion The agreements between the protocols were considered low and moderate and the risk proportions differed between protocols.

  4. A mobile phone-based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: the care assessment platform (CAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation programs offer effective means to prevent recurrence of a cardiac event, but poor uptake of current programs have been reported globally. Home based models are considered as a feasible alternative to avoid various barriers related to care centre based programs. This paper sets out the study design for a clinical trial seeking to test the hypothesis that these programs can be better and more efficiently supported with novel Information and Communication Technologies (ICT. Methods/Design We have integrated mobile phones and web services into a comprehensive home- based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Mobile phones with a built-in accelerometer sensor are used to measure physical exercise and WellnessDiary software is used to collect information on patients' physiological risk factors and other health information. Video and teleconferencing are used for mentoring sessions aiming at behavioural modifications through goal setting. The mentors use web-portal to facilitate personal goal setting and to assess the progress of each patient in the program. Educational multimedia content are stored or transferred via messaging systems to the patients phone to be viewed on demand. We have designed a randomised controlled trial to compare the health outcomes and cost efficiency of the proposed model with a traditional community based rehabilitation program. The main outcome measure is adherence to physical exercise guidelines. Discussion The study will provide evidence on using mobile phones and web services for mentoring and self management in a home-based care model targeting sustainable behavioural modifications in cardiac rehabilitation patients. Trial registration The trial has been registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR with number ACTRN12609000251224.

  5. Examining the challenges of recruiting women into a cardiac rehabilitation clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckie, Theresa M; Mendonca, Mary Ann; Fletcher, Gerald F; Schocken, Douglas D; Evans, Mary E; Banks, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    To examine the challenges of recruiting women for a 5-year cardiac rehabilitation randomized clinical trial; the aims of the study were to describe the range of recruitment sources, examine the myriad of factors contributing to ineligibility and nonparticipation of women during protocol screening, and discuss the challenges of enrolling women in the trial. The Women's-Only Phase II Cardiac Rehabilitation program used an experimental design with 2 treatment groups. Eligible participants included women who were (1) diagnosed with a myocardial infarction or stable angina or had undergone coronary revascularization within the last 12 months; (2) able to read, write, and speak English; and (3) older than 21 years. Responses to multiple recruitment strategies including automatic hospital referrals, physician office referrals, mass mailings, media advertisements, and community outreach are described. Reasons for ineligibility and nonparticipation in the trial are explored. Automatic hospital order was the largest source of referral (n = 1,367, 81%) accounting for the highest enrollment rate of women (n = 184, 73%). The barriers to enrollment into the cardiac rehabilitation clinical trial included patient-oriented, provider-oriented, and programmatic factors. Of the referral sources, 52% were screened ineligible for provider-oriented reasons, 31% were ineligible due to patient-oriented factors, and 17.4% were linked to the study protocol. Study nonparticipation of those eligible (73.8%) was largely associated with patient-oriented factors (65.2%), with far less due to provider-related factors (4%) or study-related factors (3.4%). Standing hospital orders facilitated enrollment to the cardiac rehabilitation clinical trial, yet women failed to participate predominantly due to significant patient-oriented biopsychosocial barriers.

  6. Behaviour change techniques in home-based cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Heron, Neil; Kee, Frank; Donnelly, Michael; Cardwell, Christopher; Tully, Mark A; Cupples, Margaret E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes offering secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease (CVD) advise healthy lifestyle behaviours, with the behaviour change techniques (BCTs) of goals and planning, feedback and monitoring, and social support recommended. More information is needed about BCT use in home-based CR to support these programmes in practice.AIM: To identify and describe the use of BCTs in home-based CR programmes.DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomised controlled trials o...

  7. A secondary meta-synthesis of qualitative studies of gender and access to cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Jan E; King-Shier, Kathryn M; Spaling, Melisa A; Duncan, Amanda S; Jaglal, Susan B; Stone, James A; Clark, Alexander M

    2015-08-01

    To discuss issues in the theorization and study of gender observed during a qualitative meta-synthesis of influences on uptake of secondary prevention and cardiac rehabilitation services. Women and men can equally benefit from secondary prevention/cardiac rehabilitation and there is a need to understand gender barriers to uptake. Meta-method analysis secondary to meta-synthesis. For the meta-synthesis, a systematic search was performed to identify and retrieve studies published as full papers during or after 1995 and contained: a qualitative research component wholly or in a mixed method design, extractable population specific data or themes for referral to secondary prevention programmes and adults ≥18 years. Databases searched between January 1995-31 October 2011 included: CSA Sociological Abstracts, EBSCOhost CINAHL, EBSCOhost Gender Studies, EBSCOhost Health Source Nursing: Academic Edition, EBSCOhost SPORTDiscus, EBSCOhost SocINDEX. Studies were reviewed against inclusion/exclusion criteria. Included studies were subject to quality appraisal and standardized data extraction. Of 2264 screened articles, 69 were included in the meta-method analysis. Only four studies defined gender or used gender theories. Findings were mostly presented as inherently the characteristic of gendered worldviews of participants. The major themes suggest a mismatch between secondary prevention/cardiac rehabilitation services and consumers' needs, which are usually portrayed as differing according to gender but may also be subject to intersecting influences such as age or socioeconomic status. There is a persistent lack of theoretically informed gender analysis in qualitative literature in this field. Theory-driven gender analysis will improve the conceptual clarity of the evidence base for gender-sensitive cardiac rehabilitation programme development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Exercise through a cardiac rehabilitation program attenuates oxidative stress in patients submitted to coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taty Zau, José Francisco; Costa Zeferino, Rodrigo; Sandrine Mota, Nádia; Fernandes Martins, Gerez; Manoel Serra, Salvador; Bonates da Cunha, Therezil; Medeiros Lima, Daniel; Bragança Pereira, Basilio de; Matos do Nascimento, Emília; Filho, Danilo Wilhelm; Curi Pedrosa, Rozangela; Pedrosa, Roberto Coury

    2018-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in the world and oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis. Cardiac rehabilitation in patients with coronary artery disease submitted to coronary artery bypass grafting may prevent cardiovascular events probably through the attenuation of oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits of a cardiac rehabilitation program in the control of the systemic oxidative stress. The studied population consisted of 40 patients, with chronic stable coronary artery disease submitted to coronary artery bypass grafting, who attended a cardiac rehabilitation program. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were evaluated in the blood of these patients at different moments. After the onset of cardiac rehabilitation, there was a significant and progressive decrease in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels and protein carbonyls, an initial increase and subsequent decrease in superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities. Also, a progressive increase of uric acid, while ferric reducing antioxidant power levels increased only at the end of the cardiac rehabilitation and a tendency to increase of glutathione contents. The results suggest that regular exercise through a cardiac rehabilitation program can attenuate oxidative stress in chronic coronary artery disease patients submitted to coronary artery bypass grafting.

  9. Effects of exercise rehabilitation on cardiac electrical instability assessed by T-wave alternans during ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring in coronary artery disease patients without and with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenttä, Tuomas; Tulppo, Mikko P; Nearing, Bruce D; Karjalainen, Jaana J; Hautala, Arto J; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Huikuri, Heikki V; Verrier, Richard L

    2014-09-15

    Effects of exercise rehabilitation on electrocardiographic markers of risk for sudden cardiac death have not been adequately studied. We examined effects of controlled exercise training on T-wave alternans (TWA) in 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram recordings in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) without and with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Consecutive patients with angiographically confirmed CAD were recruited to join the ARTEMIS (Innovation to Reduce Cardiovascular Complications of Diabetes at the Intersection) study. Exercise (n = 65) and control groups (n = 65) were matched on age, sex, DM, and previous myocardial infarction. Ambulatory electrocardiograms were recorded before and after a 2-year training period. TWA was assessed using time domain-modified moving average method by an investigator blinded to patients' clinical status. Average TWA values decreased in the rehabilitation group but not in control patients (rehabilitation [mean ± SEM]: 52.8 ± 1.7 μV vs 48.7 ± 1.5 μV, p exercise versus 10% (n = 2 of 20) of controls (p = 0.020). In CAD patients, 30% (n = 8 of 27) of positive TWA cases were converted with exercise versus 4% (n = 1 of 28) of controls (p = 0.012). In conclusion, this is the first report of the effectiveness of exercise rehabilitation to reduce TWA, a marker of sudden cardiac death risk, in patients with stable CAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cardiac rehabilitation increases physical capacity but not mental health after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine L.; Berg, Selina K.; Rasmussen, Trine B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The evidence for cardiac rehabilitation after valve surgery remains sparse. Current recommendations are therefore based on patients with ischaemic heart disease. The aim of this randomised clinical trial was to assess the effects of cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care after heart......-educational consultations (intervention) versus usual care without structured physical exercise or psycho-educational consultations (control). Primary outcome was physical capacity measured by VO2 peak and secondary outcome was self-reported mental health measured by Short Form-36. Results: 76% were men, mean age 62 years......, with aortic (62%), mitral (36%) or tricuspid/pulmonary valve surgery (2%). Cardiac rehabilitation compared with control had a beneficial effect on VO2 peak at 4 months (24.8 mL/kg/min vs 22.5 mL/kg/min, p=0.045) but did not affect Short Form-36 Mental Component Scale at 6 months (53.7 vs 55.2 points, p=0...

  11. Exercise training restores cardiac protein quality control in heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane C Campos

    Full Text Available Exercise training is a well-known coadjuvant in heart failure treatment; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects remain elusive. Despite the primary cause, heart failure is often preceded by two distinct phenomena: mitochondria dysfunction and cytosolic protein quality control disruption. The objective of the study was to determine the contribution of exercise training in regulating cardiac mitochondria metabolism and cytosolic protein quality control in a post-myocardial infarction-induced heart failure (MI-HF animal model. Our data demonstrated that isolated cardiac mitochondria from MI-HF rats displayed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced maximum calcium uptake and elevated H₂O₂ release. These changes were accompanied by exacerbated cardiac oxidative stress and proteasomal insufficiency. Declined proteasomal activity contributes to cardiac protein quality control disruption in our MI-HF model. Using cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, we showed that either antimycin A or H₂O₂ resulted in inactivation of proteasomal peptidase activity, accumulation of oxidized proteins and cell death, recapitulating our in vivo model. Of interest, eight weeks of exercise training improved cardiac function, peak oxygen uptake and exercise tolerance in MI-HF rats. Moreover, exercise training restored mitochondrial oxygen consumption, increased Ca²⁺-induced permeability transition and reduced H₂O₂ release in MI-HF rats. These changes were followed by reduced oxidative stress and better cardiac protein quality control. Taken together, our findings uncover the potential contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction and cytosolic protein quality control disruption to heart failure and highlight the positive effects of exercise training in re-establishing cardiac mitochondrial physiology and protein quality control, reinforcing the importance of this intervention as a non-pharmacological tool for heart failure therapy.

  12. The Influence of Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation on Heart Rate Variability Indices after CABG is More Effective than after PCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmigielska, Katarzyna; Szmigielska-Kapłon, Anna; Jegier, Anna

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on heart rate variability (HRV) indices in men with coronary artery disease (CAD) treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). The study population consisted of 131 male patients with CAD prospectively and consecutively admitted to CR after PCI n = 72, or CABG n = 59. Participants performed cycle ergometer interval training for 45 min three times a week for 8 weeks. At baseline and after 8 weeks, all patients underwent the HRV assessment. HRV indices in CAGB survivals were significantly lower in comparison to PCI patients at baseline. Significant increases were seen for SDNN, rMSSD, and HF in the CABG group and only in HF component in PCI group after 8 weeks of CR. Eight weeks of CR seems to be more effective in CABG patients than patients after PCI.

  13. 78 FR 66271 - Final Priority; Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training Program-Vocational...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... social and electronic media, especially as it relates to confidentiality and appropriateness of the use... Counselor Certification Code of Professional Ethics; (2) VR services to transition-age youth; (3... Rehabilitation Act, as amended, and the Social Security Act and their accompanying regulations; (5) basic...

  14. Impaired cerebrovascular function in coronary artery disease patients and recovery following cardiac rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udunna C Anazodo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD poses a risk to the cerebrovascular function of older adults and has been linked to impaired cognitive abilities. Using magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, we investigated changes in resting cerebral blood flow (CBF and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR to hypercapnia in 34 coronary artery disease (CAD patients and 21 age-matched controls. Gray matter volume images were acquired and used as a confounding variable to separate changes in structure from function. Compared to healthy controls, CAD patients demonstrated reduced CBF in the superior frontal, anterior cingulate, insular, pre- and post-central gyri, middle temporal and superior temporal regions. Subsequent analysis of these regions demonstrated decreased CVR in the anterior cingulate, insula, postcentral and superior frontal regions. Except in the superior frontal and precentral regions, regional reductions in CBF and CVR were identified in brain areas where no detectable reductions in gray matter volume were observed, demonstrating that these vascular changes were independent of brain atrophy. Because aerobic fitness training can improve brain function, potential changes in regional CBF were investigated in the CAD patients after completion of a 6-month exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program. Increased CBF was observed in the bilateral anterior cingulate, as well as recovery of CBF in the dorsal aspect of the right anterior cingulate, where the magnitude of increased CBF was roughly equal to the reduction in CBF at baseline compared to controls. These exercise-related improvements in CBF in the anterior cingulate is intriguing given the role of this area in cognitive processing and regulation of cardiovascular autonomic control.

  15. Outcome quality of in-patient cardiac rehabilitation in elderly patients--identification of relevant parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzwedel, Annett; Nosper, Manfred; Röhrig, Bernd; Linck-Eleftheriadis, Sigrid; Strandt, Gert; Völler, Heinz

    2014-02-01

    Outcome quality management requires the consecutive registration of defined variables. The aim was to identify relevant parameters in order to objectively assess the in-patient rehabilitation outcome. From February 2009 to June 2010 1253 patients (70.9 ± 7.0 years, 78.1% men) at 12 rehabilitation clinics were enrolled. Items concerning sociodemographic data, the impairment group (surgery, conservative/interventional treatment), cardiovascular risk factors, structural and functional parameters and subjective health were tested in respect of their measurability, sensitivity to change and their propensity to be influenced by rehabilitation. The majority of patients (61.1%) were referred for rehabilitation after cardiac surgery, 38.9% after conservative or interventional treatment for an acute coronary syndrome. Functionally relevant comorbidities were seen in 49.2% (diabetes mellitus, stroke, peripheral artery disease, chronic obstructive lung disease). In three key areas 13 parameters were identified as being sensitive to change and subject to modification by rehabilitation: cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides), exercise capacity (resting heart rate, maximal exercise capacity, maximal walking distance, heart failure, angina pectoris) and subjective health (IRES-24 (indicators of rehabilitation status): pain, somatic health, psychological well-being and depression as well as anxiety on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). The outcome of in-patient rehabilitation in elderly patients can be comprehensively assessed by the identification of appropriate key areas, that is, cardiovascular risk factors, exercise capacity and subjective health. This may well serve as a benchmark for internal and external quality management.

  16. "Just-In-Time" Simulation Training Using 3-D Printed Cardiac Models After Congenital Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Laura J; Su, Lillian; Hynes, Conor F; Krieger, Axel; Alfares, Fahad A; Ramakrishnan, Karthik; Zurakowski, David; Marshall, M Blair; Kim, Peter C W; Jonas, Richard A; Nath, Dilip S

    2016-03-01

    High-fidelity simulation using patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) models may be effective in facilitating pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) provider training for clinical management of congenital cardiac surgery patients. The 3D-printed heart models were rendered from preoperative cross-sectional cardiac imaging for 10 patients undergoing congenital cardiac surgery. Immediately following surgical repair, a congenital cardiac surgeon and an intensive care physician conducted a simulation training session regarding postoperative care utilizing the patient-specific 3D model for the PCICU team. After the simulation, Likert-type 0 to 10 scale questionnaire assessed participant perception of impact of the training session. Seventy clinicians participated in training sessions, including 22 physicians, 38 nurses, and 10 ancillary care providers. Average response to whether 3D models were more helpful than standard hand off was 8.4 of 10. Questions regarding enhancement of understanding and clinical ability received average responses of 9.0 or greater, and 90% of participants scored 8 of 10 or higher. Nurses scored significantly higher than other clinicians on self-reported familiarity with the surgery (7.1 vs. 5.8; P = .04), clinical management ability (8.6 vs. 7.7; P = .02), and ability enhancement (9.5 vs. 8.7; P = .02). Compared to physicians, nurses and ancillary providers were more likely to consider 3D models more helpful than standard hand off (8.7 vs. 7.7; P = .05). Higher case complexity predicted greater enhancement of understanding of surgery (P = .04). The 3D heart models can be used to enhance congenital cardiac critical care via simulation training of multidisciplinary intensive care teams. Benefit may be dependent on provider type and case complexity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Does Resistance Training Stimulate Cardiac Muscle Hypertrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the left ventricular structural adaptations induced by resistance/strength exercise, focusing on human work, particularly well-trained strength athletes engaged in regular, moderate- to high-intensity resistance training (RT). The article discusses both genders and examines the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids in…

  18. The patient education - Learning and Coping Strategies - improves adherence in cardiac rehabilitation (LC-REHAB): A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynggaard, Vibeke; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Taylor, Rod S; May, Ole

    2017-06-01

    Despite proven benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), adherence to CR remains suboptimal. This trial aimed to assess the impact of the patient education 'Learning and Coping Strategies' (LC) on patient adherence to an eight-week CR program. 825 patients with ischaemic heart disease or heart failure were open label randomised to either the LC arm (LC plus CR) or the control arm (CR alone) across three hospital units in Denmark. Both arms received same amount of training and education hours. LC consisted of individual clarifying interviews, participation of experienced patients as co-educators, situational, reflective and inductive teaching. The control arm received structured deductive teaching. The primary outcomes were patient adherence to at least 75% of the exercise training or education sessions. We tested for subgroup effects on the primary outcomes using interaction terms. The primary outcomes were compared across arms using logistic regression. More patients in the LC arm adhered to at least 75% of the exercise training sessions than control (80% versus 73%, adjusted odds ratio (OR):1.48; 95% CI:1.07 to 2.05, P=0.018) and 75% of education sessions (79% versus 70%, adjusted OR:1.61, 1.17 to 2.22, P=0.003). Some evidence of larger effects of LC on adherence was seen for patients with heart failure, low education and household income. Addition of LC strategies improved adherence in rehabilitation both in terms of exercise training and education. Patients with heart failure, low levels of education and household income appear to benefit most from this adherence promoting intervention. www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01668394. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An alternative view of psychological well-being in cardiac rehabilitation: Considering temperament and character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, David; Douglas, Kitrina; Fox, Kenneth; McKenna, Jim

    2006-09-01

    Research suggests that personality is related to recovery from cardiac events, yet few conceptions of personality provide hope or possibility of improvement for patients with the least adaptive personality types. Psychobiological theory of personality has potential in this regard, but, to date, no research has investigated temperament and character in cardiac settings. To explore relationships between temperament, character and psychological well-being among cardiac patients. Self-report questionnaires were distributed to a convenience sample of 81 cardiac patients to obtain data on personality (TCI [Cloninger CR, Przybeck T, Svrakic D, & Wetzel RD. The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI): A guide to its development and use. St Louis (MO), Center for Psychobiology of Personality, Washington University;1994]), anxiety and depression (HADS [Zigmond AS, Snaith RP. The hospital anxiety and depression scale. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1983;67(6): 361-70]) and satisfaction with life [Diener E, Emmons RA, Larsen RJ, Griffin S. The satisfaction with life scale. J Pers Assess 1985;49(1):71-5]. The interaction of two personality dimensions (harm avoidance and self-directedness) was significantly related to measures of psychological well-being. Patients with low self-directedness combined with high harm avoidance reported significantly higher levels of anxiety, depression and lower levels of satisfaction with life. This exploratory study suggests that psychobiological theory of personality may be useful for practitioners in cardiac rehabilitation seeking to identify patients at risk of poor psychological well-being.

  20. [Current provision of cardiac rehabilitation intervention in the Lombardy Region, Italy: a benchmark study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, Marco; Porazzi, Emanuele; Diaco, Tommaso; Febo, Oreste; Tramarin, Roberto; Malinverni, Claudio; Zaniboni, Daniela; Passera, Martina; Marchetti, Paolo

    2010-11-01

    Benchmarking is a process of comparison between the performance characteristics of separate, often competing organizations, intended to enable each participant to improve its own performance in the marketplace. Benchmarking could be translated to the health system from the management field, in order to improve quality and health outcomes. This benchmarking study focused on structural and process aspects regarding the current delivery of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) interventions in the Lombardy Region. Data for analysis were derived from the ISYDE-2008 (Italian Survey on Cardiac Rehabilitation) project of the Italian Association for Cardiovascular Prevention, Rehabilitation, and Epidemiology. Thirty-eight CR units accepted to provide open information about types of supply of CR interventions, organization, location, number of active beds, personnel, duty services, expectancy days before admission, and complexity of patient populations. As a major finding, in-hospital programs actually represent the largest part of CR interventions delivered in the Lombardy Region, generally in well-defined cardiovascular departments, and patients are mostly referred in the short period after a major cardiovascular event. This model could help healthcare organizations to understand where they have strengths and weaknesses depending upon changes in supply, demand and market conditions.

  1. Referral to Cardiac Rehabilitation After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery, and Valve Surgery: Data From the Clinical Outcomes Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Alexis L; Bradley, Steven M; Maynard, Charles; McCabe, James M

    2017-06-01

    Despite guideline recommendations that patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery, or valve surgery be referred to cardiac rehabilitation, cardiac rehabilitation is underused. The objective of this study was to examine hospital-level variation in cardiac rehabilitation referral after PCI, coronary artery bypass surgery, and valve surgery. We analyzed data from the Clinical Outcomes Assessment Program, a registry of all nonfederal hospitals performing PCI and cardiac surgery in Washington State. We included eligible PCI, coronary artery bypass surgery, and valve surgery patients from 2010 to 2015. We analyzed PCI and cardiac surgery separately by performing multivariable hierarchical logistic regression for the outcome of cardiac rehabilitation referral at discharge, clustered by hospital. Patient-level covariates included age, sex, race/ethnicity, comorbidities, and procedure indication/status. Cardiac rehabilitation referral was reported in 48% (34 047/71 556) of PCI patients and 91% (21 831/23 972) of cardiac surgery patients. The hospital performing the procedure was a stronger predictor of referral than any individual patient characteristic for PCI (hospital referral range 3%-97%; median odds ratio, 5.94; 95% confidence interval, 4.10-9.49) and cardiac surgery (range 54%-100%; median odds ratio, 7.09; 95% confidence interval, 3.79-17.80). Hospitals having an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program explained only 10% of PCI variation and 0% of cardiac surgery variation. Cardiac rehabilitation referral at discharge was less prevalent after PCI than cardiac surgery. The strongest predictor of cardiac rehabilitation referral was the hospital performing the procedure. Efforts to improve cardiac rehabilitation referral should focus on increasing referral after PCI, especially in low referral hospitals. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Stress, anxiety and depression in heart disease patients: A major challenge for cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet-Gelinier, Jean-Christophe; Bonin, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular events and emotional disorders share a common epidemiology, thus suggesting fundamental pathways linking these different diseases. Growing evidence in the literature highlights the influence of psychological determinants in somatic diseases. A patient's socio-economic aspects, personality traits, health behavior and even biological pathways may contribute to the course of cardiovascular disease. Cardiac events often occur suddenly and the episode can be traumatic for people not prepared for such an event. In this review of the literature, the authors tackle the question of psychobiological mechanisms of stress, in a pathophysiological approach to fundamental pathways linking the brain to the heart. Various psychological, biological and genetic arguments are presented in support of the hypothesis that various etiological mechanisms may be involved. The authors finally deal with biological and psychological strategies in a context of cardiovascular disease. Indeed, in this context, cardiac rehabilitation, with its global approach, seems to be a good time to diagnose emotional disorders like anxiety and depression, and to help people to cope with stressful events. In this field, cardiac rehabilitation seems to be a crucial step in order to improve patients' outcomes, by helping them to understand the influence of psychobiological risk factors, and to build strategies in order to manage daily stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Unhealthy behaviour modification, psychological distress, and 1-year survival in cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostoli, Sara; Roncuzzi, Renzo; Urbinati, Stefano; Morisky, Donald E; Rafanelli, Chiara

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is considered the recommended secondary prevention treatment for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), in terms of health behaviours and, secondarily, better cardiac outcomes promotion. However, the role of psychiatric and psychosomatic distress on the efficacy of CR is unclear. This research aimed to evaluate the impact of CR on unhealthy behaviour modification and cardiac course, considering the moderating role of depression, anxiety, and psychosomatic syndromes. A longitudinal design between and within groups was employed. The assessment was repeated four times: at admission to CR (T1), at discharge (T2), 6 (T3) and 12 months following CR completion (T4). One hundred and eight patients undergoing CR versus 85 patients with CVD not referred to CR, underwent psychiatric, psychosomatic, and health behaviour assessment. The assessment included the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (depression and anxiety), the interview based on Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research, GOSPEL Study questionnaire (health behaviours), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Cardiac rehabilitation was associated with maintenance of physical activity, improvement of behavioural aspects related to food consumption, stress management, and sleep quality. On the contrary, CR was not associated with weight loss, healthy diet, and medication adherence. Depression and psychosomatic syndromes seem to moderate the modification of specific health-related behaviours (physical activity, behavioural aspects of food consumption, stress management, and pharmacological adherence). In CR settings, an integrated assessment including both psychiatric and psychosomatic syndromes is needed to address psychological factors associated with unhealthy behaviour modification. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is considered a class 1A treatment recommendation and the most cost

  4. Design and Implementation study of Remote Home Rehabilitation Training Operating System based on Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jin; Chung Gun, Jang

    2018-03-01

    The proportion of rehabilitation doctors and patients mismatch is very grim in the context of social aging. The Family Rehabilitation System captures the profound information of the trainer’s movements through the kinect bone tracing technique, allowing the doctor to remotely master the patient’s training progress. With the help of computers and the Internet, the patient can consult a physician, while the physician can remotely guide and launch the training “prescription” through the Internet according to the training effect. Patients can have rehabilitated training at home. The results of the test showed that the system has a positive effect on the rehabilitation of the patient.

  5. Are there meaningful longitudinal changes in health related quality of life--SF36, in cardiac rehabilitation patients?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKee, Gabrielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to observe changes in quality of life and minimal clinical important differences of quality of life over time in cardiac rehabilitation patients and to compare these with published normal data. METHODS: In this non-randomised study, SF36 questionnaires were completed by 187 patients recruited to a Phase III cardiac rehabilitation multidisciplinary outpatient programme. Data was collected at beginning, end and six months after Phase III cardiac rehabilitation programme. RESULTS: There were significant improvements in physical functioning, role limitation due to physical function, pain and general health perception scales, over the above time frame, from both a statistically and a mean clinical important difference point of view. These improvements occurred mainly during the cardiac rehabilitation programme phase. CONCLUSIONS: These improvements meant that patients six months post-cardiac rehabilitation were only 5% below the quality of life for an aged matched normal group. However patients still had significant deficits in physical role and emotional role limitations. Suitable measurement of quality of life on an individual basis, supported by normal values is needed. This would facilitate the identification of shortfalls in patient quality of life and the subsequent tailoring of care to address these individualised patient needs.

  6. Endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and increased intravascular nitric oxide in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jonathan D; Powell, Tiffany M; Thompson, Michael; Benjamin, Moshe; Rodrigo, Maria; Carlow, Andrea; Annavajjhala, Vidhya; Shiva, Sruti; Dejam, Andre; Gladwin, Mark T; McCoy, J Philip; Zalos, Gloria; Press, Beverly; Murphy, Mandy; Hill, Jonathan M; Csako, Gyorgy; Waclawiw, Myron A; Cannon, Richard O

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether cardiac rehabilitation participation increases circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and benefits vasculature in patients already on stable therapy previously shown to augment EPCs and improve endothelial function. Forty-six of 50 patients with coronary artery disease completed a 36-session cardiac rehabilitation program: 45 were treated with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) therapy > or = 1 month (average baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol = 81 mg/dL). Mononuclear cells isolated from blood were quantified for EPCs by flow cytometry (CD133/VEGFR-2 cells) and assayed in culture for EPC colony-forming units (CFUs). In 23 patients, EPCs were stained for annexin-V as a marker of apoptosis, and nitrite was measured in blood as an indicator of intravascular nitric oxide. Endothelial progenitor cells increased from 35 +/- 5 to 63 +/- 10 cells/mL, and EPC-CFUs increased from 0.9 +/- 0.2 to 3.1 +/- 0.6 per well (both P < .01), but 11 patients had no increase in either measure. Those patients whose EPCs increased from baseline showed significant increases in nitrite and reduction in annexin-V staining (both P < .01) versus no change in patients without increase in EPCs. Over the course of the program, EPCs increased prior to increase in nitrite in the blood. Cardiac rehabilitation in patients receiving stable statin therapy and with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol at goal increases EPC number, EPC survival, and endothelial differentiation potential, associated with increased nitric oxide in the blood. Although this response was observed in most patients, a significant minority showed neither EPC mobilization nor increased nitric oxide in the blood.

  7. EFFECT OF SUPERVISED MODERATE INTENSITY EXERCISE PROGRAM IN PHASE ONE CARDIAC REHABILITATION OF POST OPERATIVE CABG PATIENTS - A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Modi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the increasing number of cases for CABG, the cardiac rehabilitation has gained importance. The trends in rehabilitation of a coronary artery disease patient are changing by incorporating a variety of aerobic exercises and resisted training in to their rehabilitation program. The outcome of any exercise chiefly depends on the training parameters like intensity, frequency and duration. Hence the present study focused to know the effects of supervised moderate intensity exercises on patients during hospital discharge following CABG. The objective of is to study the effectiveness of supervised moderate intensity exercise on distance walked and Quality of Life at hospital discharge following CABG. Methods: Study recruited randomly 46 patients between age group 40-65 years who were posted for non-emergency CABG for the first time. Pre-operative assessment was done thoroughly and was divided in to two groups, Group A conventional treatment and Group B Moderate intensity exercise group. The patients were treated using different protocols in terms of intensity for 8-10 days immediate post CABG. Then the outcome parameters of 6MWT and sf-36 were compared for analysis. Results: Both groups individually showed extremely significant results for two outcome measures. 6 MWD difference between two treatment groups showed significant results with unpaired t test (t = 8.5720,p<0.001. Quality of life score difference within group showed very significant results but there is no difference found between both groups. Conclusion: Moderate intensity exercises can also be included in the immediate post-operative phase of CABG, as they reduce the length of hospital stay and quicken the cardiac rehabilitation process. But there need to be a lot of randomized control trails to confirm the benefits of moderate intensity exercises in phase one rehabilitation program after CABG.

  8. P-wave dispersion and its relationship to aortic stiffness in patients with acute myocardial infarction after cardiac rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezzan Deniz Acar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of our study was to investigate the P-wave dispersion from standard electrocardiograms (ECGs in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI after cardiac rehabilitation (CR and determine its relation to arterial stiffness. METHODS: This is a prospective study included 33 patients with AMI and successfully re-vascularized by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI underwent CR. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was measured by biplane Simpson’s method. Left atrium (LA volume was calculated. The maximum and minimum durations of P-waves (Pmax and Pmin, respectively were detected, and the difference between Pmax and Pmin was defined as P-wave dispersion (Pd = Pmax–Pmin. Aortic elasticity parameters were measured. RESULTS: LVEF was better after CR. The systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased after CR, these differences were statistically significant. With exercise training, LA volume decreased significantly. Pmax and Pd values were significantly shorter after the CR program. The maximum and minimum P-waves and P-wave dispersion after CR were 97 ± 6 ms, 53 ± 5 ms, and 44 ± 5 ms, respectively. Aortic strain and distensibility increased and aortic stiffness index was decreased significantly. Aortic stiffness index was 0.4 ± 0.2 versus 0.3 ± 0.2, P = 0.001. Aortic stiffness and left atrial volume showed a moderate positive correlation with P-wave dispersion (r = 0.52, P = 0.005; r = 0.64, P = 0.000, respectively. CONCLUSION: This study showed decreased arterial stiffness indexes in AMI patient’s participated CR, with a significant relationship between the electromechanical properties of the LA that may raise a question of the preventive effect of CR from atrial fibrillation and stroke in patients with acute myocardial infarction.   Keywords: Cardiac Rehabilitation, P-Wave Dispersion, Aortic Stiffness, Acute Myocardial Infarction 

  9. Implementing international sexual counselling guidelines in hospital cardiac rehabilitation: development of the CHARMS intervention using the Behaviour Change Wheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Sharry, J; Murphy, P J; Byrne, M

    2016-10-10

    Decreased sexual activity and sexual problems are common among people with cardiovascular disease, negatively impacting relationship satisfaction and quality of life. International guidelines recommend routine delivery of sexual counselling to cardiac patients. The Cardiac Health and Relationship Management and Sexuality (CHARMS) baseline study in Ireland found, similar to international findings, limited implementation of sexual counselling guidelines in practice. The aim of the current study was to develop the CHARMS multi-level intervention to increase delivery of sexual counselling by healthcare professionals. We describe the methods used to develop the CHARMS intervention following the three phases of the Behaviour Change Wheel approach: understand the behaviour, identify intervention options, and identify content and implementation options. Survey (n = 60) and focus group (n = 14) data from two previous studies exploring why sexual counselling is not currently being delivered were coded by two members of the research team to understand staff's capability, opportunity, and motivation to engage in the behaviour. All potentially relevant intervention functions to change behaviour were identified and the APEASE (affordability, practicability, effectiveness, acceptability, side effects and equity) criteria were used to select the most appropriate. The APEASE criteria were then used to choose between all behaviour change techniques (BCTs) potentially relevant to the identified functions, and these BCTs were translated into intervention content. The Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist was used to specify details of the intervention including the who, what, how and where of proposed intervention delivery. Providing sexual counselling group sessions by cardiac rehabilitation staff to patients during phase III cardiac rehabilitation was identified as the target behaviour. Education, enablement, modelling, persuasion and

  10. Perceptions of exercise among people who have not attended cardiac rehabilitation following myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorry, Noleen K; Corrigan, Mairead; Tully, Mark A; Dempster, Martin; Downey, Bernadette; Cupples, Margaret E

    2009-10-01

    Perceptions of exercise among nonattenders of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) were explored using semi-structured interviews. Analysis indicated that participants did not recognize the cardiovascular benefits of exercise, and perceived keeping active through daily activities as sufficient for health. Health professionals were perceived to downplay the importance of exercise and CR, and medication was viewed as being more important than exercise for promoting health. The content of CR programmes and the benefits of exercise need to be further explained to patients post-MI, and in a manner that communicates to patients that these programmes are valued by significant others, particularly health professionals.

  11. The effect of referral for cardiac rehabilitation on survival following acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewinter, Christian; Bland, John M; Crouch, Simon

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: International guidelines recommend referral for cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, the impact on long-term survival after CR referral has not been adjusted by time-variance. We compared the effects of CR referral after hospitalization for AMI......% CI, 0.66 to 0.96, p = 0.02 in 2003) when patients entered the model at three months after discharge and had a common exit at 90 months. Significant positive and negative predictors for CR referral were beta-blocker prescription (+), reperfusion (+) and age (-) in 1995, and reperfusion...... (+), revascularization (+), heart failure (HF) (+), antiplatelets (+), angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I) (+), statins (+), diabetes (-), and the modified Global Registry of Acute Cardiac Events (GRACE) risk score (-) in 2003. CONCLUSIONS: CR referral was associated with improved survival in 2003...

  12. Effects of a cardiac rehabilitation course on psychological stresses in an Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Roohafza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The complications of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs include psychological stresses such as anxiety, depression, and hostility. They cause disease exacerbation and prolongation and delayed improvement. Some studies have reported rehabilitation and stress management interventions to be helpful in reducing such stresses. Due to the high prevalence of CVDs in Isfahan, Iran, the present study evaluated the effects of a cardiac rehabilitation course on psychological stresses in an Iranian population. METHODS: A total number of 190 patients (40 females and 150 males, who have been introduced by cardiologists to Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center for rehabilitation following the myocardial infarction and open heart surgery, participated in this study. Patients all took part in an exercise program including 24 one-hour sessions (three sessions per week. Each session consisted of warm-up (20 minutes, aerobic exercise and relaxation (40 minutes. Cognitive-therapeutic group therapy sessions, supervised by a psychiatrist, were also held for 1-2 hours weekly. Furthermore, patients' nutritional pattern was controlled by a nutritionist. All the individuals underwent exercise test at the beginning and the end of the exercise. In addition, anxiety, depression, and hostility were assessed by symptom checklist-90 (SCL-90 before and after the course. The data was analyzed by paired-t and independent-t tests in SPSS. RESULTS: The exercise volume in all the patients (42.7 ± 81.56 in males and 39.88 ± 33.36 in females significantly increased at the end of the course. Moreover, scores of anxiety (-17.86 ± 68.49 in males and -32.33 ± 49.53 in females, depression (-12.80 ± 67.4 in males and -16.50 ± 57.84 in females, and hostility (-19.26 ± 71.86 in males and -12.80 ± 123.60 in females showed a significant reduction at the end of the course (P < 0.001. Similar results were seen in both sexes. CONCLUSION: According to the changes found after

  13. Commentary on Stiers and colleagues' guidelines for competency development and measurement in rehabilitation psychology postdoctoral training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Robert L

    2015-05-01

    Comments on the article, "Guidelines for competency development and measurement in rehabilitation psychology postdoctoral training," by Stiers et al. (see record 2014-55195-001). Stiers and colleagues have provided a thorough and well-conceived set of guidelines that lay out the competencies expected for graduates of postdoctoral residencies in rehabilitation psychology, accompanied by a set of more specific, observable indicators of the residents' competence level. This work is an important aspect of the broader project of the Rehabilitation Psychology Specialty Council (APA Division 22, the American Board of Rehabilitation Psychology, the Foundation for Rehabilitation Psychology, the Academy of Rehabilitation Psychology, and the Council of Rehabilitation Psychology Postdocotral Training Programs) to develop overall guidelines for programs providing postdoctoral training in this field (Stiers et al., 2012). (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Prevalence and characteristics of impaired glucose metabolism in patients referred to comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation: the DANSUK study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas Soja, Anne Merete; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Melchior, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    and mortality. We studied the prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism (T2DM, IGT and impaired fasting glucose; IFG) in patients referred to cardiac rehabilitation, and further studied whether we could identify groups in which an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) need not be performed. METHODS: As part...... of a cardiac rehabilitation trial, 201 patients participated. Patients without a diagnosis of T2DM (N=159) underwent an OGTT 3 months after inclusion. RESULTS: Forty-two patients (21%) had known T2DM at enrolment. Based on the OGTT, 26 patients (13%) had unrecognized T2DM, 36 (18%) had IGT and 19 (9%) were...... predictive value of 39%. CONCLUSION: More than 60% of the patients (123/201) referred to cardiac rehabilitation had impaired glucose metabolism and 18% of the screened patients (29/159) would be misclassified if an OGTT was omitted. IFG and IGT did not identify the same patients or the same cardiovascular...

  15. Prescribing exercise training in pulmonary rehabilitation: A clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bernard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Built around exercise training, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR is a multidisciplinary, evidence‐based, comprehensive approach to working with the patient as a whole and not just the pulmonary component of the disease. Integrated into the individualized treatment, this intervention aims to reduce symptoms, optimize functional status, increase participation in daily life, and reduce health care costs through stabilizing or reversing systemic manifestations of the disease. Although there are many other components that should be considered to manage the impairment and symptom burden, supervised exercise training is considered the cornerstone of effective pulmonary rehabilitation. This paper addresses our clinical experience at Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec to assess and manage exercise training in line with the current recommendations and guidelines surrounding PR. Resumo: Construída com base no exercício físico, a reabilitação pulmonar (RP é uma abordagem multidisciplinar, fundamentada e abrangente para trabalhar com o doente como um todo, e não apenas com a componente pulmonar da doença. Integrado no tratamento individual, esta intervenção visa reduzir os sintomas, optimizar o estado funcional, aumentar a participação na vida diária e reduzir os custos do tratamento de saúde, através da estabilização ou inversão das manifestações sistémicas da doença. Embora existam muitos outros componentes que devem ser tidos em consideração para gerir o peso da incapacidade e dos sintomas, o exercício físico supervisionado é considerado o fundamento da reabilitação pulmonar eficiente. Este documento trata da nossa experiência clínica no Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec para avaliar e gerir o exercício físico em linha com as recomendações e orientações actuais envolvendo a RP

  16. Self-rating level of perceived exertion for guiding exercise intensity during a 12-week cardiac rehabilitation programme and the influence of heart rate reducing medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lars H.; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Taylor, Rod S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether self-rating level of perceived exertion can adequately guide exercise intensity during a 12-week cardiac rehabilitation programme. DESIGN: Linear regression analysis using rehabilitation data from two randomised controlled trials. METHODS: Patients undergoing ra......-led and self-regulated model using rating of perceived exertion can help guide exercise intensity in everyday clinical practice among patients with heart disease, irrespective if they are taking heart rate-reducing medication....... radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation or following heart valve surgery and participating in exercise-based rehabilitation were included. The 12-week rehabilitation outpatient programme comprised three weekly training sessions, each consisting of 20min aerobic exercise divided into three steps. Patients...... were asked to base their exercise intensity for each step on a predefined rating of perceived exertion specified in a training diary. Exercise intensity was objectively measured by heart rate during the last 2min for each exercise step. Comparative analysis and linear regression of the rating...

  17. The Efficacy of Goal Setting in Cardiac Rehabilitation-a Gender-Specific Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm-Balderjahn, Sabine; Brünger, Martin; Michel, Anne; Bongarth, Christa; Spyra, Karla

    2016-08-08

    Patients with coronary heart disease undergo cardiac rehabilitation in order to reduce their cardiovascular risk factors. Often, however, the benefit of rehabilitation is lost over time. It is unclear whether this happens in the same way to men and women. We studied whether the setting of gender-specific behavior goals with an agreement between the doctor and the patient at the end of rehabilitation can prolong its positive effects. This study was performed with a mixed-method design. It consisted of qualitative interviews and group discussions with patients, doctors and other treating personnel, and researchers, as well as a quantitative, randomized, controlled intervention trial in which data were acquired at four time points (the beginning and end of rehabilitation and then 6 and 12 months later). 545 patients, 262 of them women (48.1%), were included. The patients were assigned to a goal checking group (n = 132), a goal setting group (n = 143), and a control group (n = 270). The primary endpoints were health-related behavior (exercise, diet, tobacco consumption), subjective state of health, and medication adherence. The secondary endpoints included physiological protection and risk factors such as blood pressure, cholesterol (HDL, LDL, and total), blood sugar, HbA1c, and body-mass index. The intervention had no demonstrable effect on the primary or secondary endpoints. The percentage of smokers declined to a similar extent in all groups from the beginning of rehabilitation to 12 months after its end (overall figures: 12.4% to 8.6%, p exercise behavior, diet, and subjective state of health also improved over the entire course of the study. Women had a healthier diet than men. Subgroup analyses indicated a possible effect of the intervention on exercise behavior in women who were employed and in men who were not (pgoal setting was not demonstrated. Therefore, no indication for its routine provision can be derived from the study results.

  18. Intention to abstain from smoking among cardiac rehabilitation patients: the role of attitude, self-efficacy, and craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Esther C; Nijkamp, Marjan D; Sloot, Caroline; Berndt, Nadine C; Bolman, Catherine A W

    2015-01-01

    Smoking cessation after developing coronary heart disease improves disease prognosis more than any other treatment. However, many cardiac patients continue to smoke after hospital discharge. The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with the intention to (permanently) abstain from smoking among cardiac rehabilitation patients 2 to 4 weeks after discharge from hospital. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 149 cardiac rehabilitation patients recruited from 2 cardiac rehabilitation centers in The Netherlands 2 to 4 weeks after hospital discharge, at the start of the cardiac rehabilitation period. Psychosocial cognitions including attitude toward nonsmoking, social influence, and self-efficacy were measured with a standardized and validated Dutch questionnaire based on the Attitude-Social Influence-Self-efficacy model. Anxiety was measured using the shortened version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Craving for cigarettes was assessed with 6 items measuring the urge to smoke. Intention toward nonsmoking was assessed with 2 visual analog scales indicating the strength and probability of the intention to permanently refrain from smoking. Of all patients, 31% still smoked after hospital discharge. The smokers had a lower self-efficacy and intention to abstain from smoking and reported higher craving. Logistic regression analyses revealed that attitudes that embraced the advantages of not smoking, self-efficacy, and craving were significantly related to the intention to (permanently) abstain from smoking, whereas social influence and anxiety were not. Actual smoking behavior moderated the relation between self-efficacy and intention: only the quitters showed a significant positive relation. Anxiety did not moderate the relationship between psychosocial cognitive factors and intention. The intention to (permanently) abstain from smoking, measured 2 to 4 weeks after hospitalization for a cardiac event, predominantly depends on attitude, self

  19. Study of High Sensitive C-Reactive Protein (HS-CRP) After Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Patients Undergoing Isolated CABG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari Moghadam, Adel; Azizinejad, Saied

    2016-12-01

    Although cardiac rehabilitation is known as a tool to reduce the overall risk of cardiovascular complications, its specific role in the reduction of hs-CRP as a marker of inflammation and a proven marker of cardiovascular risk needs further investigation. The present study aims at elucidating the effects of a full course of conventional cardiac rehabilitation program for the period of eight weeks, on the levels of hs-CRP in patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass surgery. In this case study, 30 consecutive patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass surgery (isolated CABGS), and a full 8-week cardiac rehabilitation program in Tehran Heart Center, were investigated. A group of 30 similar patients, who enrolled in the same period of rehabilitation program but did not participate in practice, was considered as a control group. Serum levels of hs-CRP in both groups were measured retrospectively and in similar days before the start of rehabilitation program and at the end of it (or 8 weeks after initial registration for the control group). Levels of hs-CRP in the rehabilitation group and control group were 5.9 7.7 and 6.3 6.9 respectively before start of the program which was not statistically meaningful ( P -Value = 0.833). However, after the program, level of hs-CRP in the two tested groups changed to 2.3 5.1 and 5.7 6.1 respectively which showed a meaningful correlation ( P -Value = 0.023). These results also showed that decrease in hs-CRP level in the rehabilitated group but not in the control group was statistically meaningful (with P -Value of 0.037 and 0.0723 respectively). In patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery, participating in a full course of cardiac rehabilitation for 8 weeks has resulted in a significant reduction in hs-CRP levels as a marker of cardiovascular risk.

  20. Development and impact of exercise self-efficacy types during and after cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Wendy M; Murray, Terra C; Selzler, Anne-Marie; Norman, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the developed world. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a comprehensive treatment program centered on structured exercise that has been demonstrated to achieve significant decreases in mortality and morbidity in cardiac patients, yet few patients adhere to exercise post-CR and so fail to maintain any health benefits accrued during rehabilitation. One reason for the lack of adherence might be that CR fails to address the challenges to adherence faced by patients when they no longer have the resources and structure of CR to support them. Self-efficacy (SE) is a robust predictor of behavioral persistence. This study therefore focuses on changes in different types of SE during CR and the relationship of SE to subsequent levels of physical activity. A sample of 63 CR patients completed assessments of task, scheduling and coping SE at baseline and the end of CR, as well as self-reported exercise behavior at the end of CR and 1-month post-CR. Task SE (for performing elemental aspects of the behavior) was found to be most changed type of SE during CR and was strongly related to self-reported exercise at the end of CR. However, scheduling SE (for performing the behavior regularly) was most strongly related to self-reported exercise post-CR. These results are theoretically consistent and suggest that scheduling SE should be targeted during CR to improve post-CR exercise adherence.

  1. Community-based exercise training for people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease: a mixed-methods evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNamara RJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Renae J McNamara,1,2 Zoe J McKeough,3 Laura R Mo,3 Jamie T Dallimore,4 Sarah M Dennis3 1Physiotherapy Department, 2Respiratory and Sleep Medicine Department, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, 3Discipline of Physiotherapy, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, 4Eastern Sydney Medicare Local, Rosebery, NSW, Australia Background: Poor uptake and adherence are problematic for hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation programs, often because of access difficulties. The aims of this mixed-methods study were to determine the feasibility of a supervised exercise training program in a community gymnasium in people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease, to explore the experiences of participants and physiotherapists and to determine if a community venue improved access and adherence to rehabilitation. Methods: Adults with chronic respiratory and/or chronic cardiac disease referred to a hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation program were screened to determine their suitability to exercise in a community venue. Eligible patients were offered the opportunity to attend supervised exercise training for 8 weeks in a community gymnasium. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and physiotherapists at the completion of the program. Results: Thirty-one people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease (34% males, mean [standard deviation] age 72 [10] years commenced the community-based exercise training program. Twenty-two (71% completed the program. All participants who completed the program, and the physiotherapists delivering the program, were highly satisfied, with reports of the community venue being well-equipped, convenient, and easily accessible. Using a community gymnasium promoted a sense of normality and instilled confidence in some to continue exercising at a similar venue post rehabilitation. However, factors such as cost and lack of motivation continue to be barriers

  2. Type D patients report poorer health status prior to and after cardiac rehabilitation compared to non-type D patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pelle, Aline; Erdman, Ruud; Domburg, Ron; Spiering, Marquita; Kazemier, Marten; Pedersen, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Type D personality is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves outcomes, but little is known about the effects of CR on Type D patients. Purpose: We examined (1) variability in Type D caseness following CR, (2) Type D as a determinant of health status, and (3) the clinical relevance of Type D as a determinant of health status compared to cardiac history. Methods: CAD patients (n = 368) participating in CR completed ...

  3. VA FitHeart, a Mobile App for Cardiac Rehabilitation: Usability Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Alexis L; Magnusson, Sara L; Fortney, John C; Sayre, George G; Whooley, Mary A

    2018-01-15

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves outcomes for patients with ischemic heart disease or heart failure but is underused. New strategies to improve access to and engagement in CR are needed. There is considerable interest in technology-facilitated home CR. However, little is known about patient acceptance and use of mobile technology for CR. The aim of this study was to develop a mobile app for technology-facilitated home CR and seek to determine its usability. We recruited patients eligible for CR who had access to a mobile phone, tablet, or computer with Internet access. The mobile app includes physical activity goal setting, logs for tracking physical activity and health metrics (eg, weight, blood pressure, and mood), health education, reminders, and feedback. Study staff demonstrated the mobile app to participants in person and then observed participants completing prespecified tasks with the mobile app. Participants completed the System Usability Scale (SUS, 0-100), rated likelihood to use the mobile app (0-100), questionnaires on mobile app use, and participated in a semistructured interview. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology and the Theory of Planned Behavior informed the analysis. On the basis of participant feedback, we made iterative revisions to the mobile app between users. We conducted usability testing in 13 participants. The first version of the mobile app was used by the first 5 participants, and revised versions were used by the final 8 participants. From the first version to revised versions, task completion success rate improved from 44% (11/25 tasks) to 78% (31/40 tasks; P=.05), SUS improved from 54 to 76 (P=.04; scale 0-100, with 100 being the best usability), and self-reported likelihood of use remained high at 76 and 87 (P=.30; scale 0-100, with 100 being the highest likelihood). In interviews, patients expressed interest in tracking health measures ("I think it'll be good to track my exercise and to see what I'm doing

  4. Gender differences in the factors predicting initial engagement at cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdas, Paul Michael; Harrison, Alexander Stephen; Doherty, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    To determine whether there are gender differences in the factors that predict attendance at the initial cardiac rehabilitation baseline assessment (CR engagement) after referral. Using data from the National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation, we analysed data on 95 638 patients referred to CR following a cardiovascular diagnosis/treatment between 2013 and 2016. Eighteen factors that have been shown in previous research to be important predictors of CR participation were investigated and grouped into four categories: sociodemographic factors, cardiac risk factors, patient medical status and service-level factors. Logistic binary regression models were built for male patients and female patients, assessing the likelihood for CR engagement. Each included predictors such as age, number of comorbidities and social deprivation score. There were no important differences in the factors that predict the likelihood of CR engagement in men and women. Seven factors associated with a reduced probability of CR engagement, and eight factors associated with increased probability, were identified. Fourteen of the 15 factors identified as predicting the likelihood for engagement/non-engagement were the same for both men and women. Increasing age, being South Asian or non-white ethnicity (other than Black) and being single were all associated with a reduced likelihood of attending an initial CR baseline assessment in both men and women. Male patients with diabetes were 11% less likely to engage with CR; however, there was no significant association in women. Results showed that the overwhelmingly important determinant of CR engagement observed in both men and women was receiving an invitation to attend an assessment session (OR 4.223 men/4.033women; pgender differences in predictors of CR uptake should probably be more nuanced and informed by the stage of the patient care pathway.

  5. Physicians' tacit and stated policies for determining patient benefit and referral to cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Jason W; Pezzo, Mark V; Beckie, Theresa M; Shahraki, Farnaz; Kentner, Amanda C; Grace, Sherry L

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of prescribing cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for patients following heart surgery is well documented; however, physicians continue to underuse CR programs, and disparities in the referral of women are common. Previous research into the causes of these problems has relied on self-report methods, which presume that physicians have insight into their referral behavior and can describe it accurately. In contrast, the research presented here used clinical judgment analysis (CJA) to discover the tacit judgment and referral policies of individual physicians. The specific aims were to determine 1) what these policies were, 2) the degree of self-insight that individual physicians had into their own policies, 3) the amount of agreement among physicians, and 4) the extent to which judgments were related to attitudes toward CR. Thirty-six Canadian physicians made judgments and decisions regarding 32 hypothetical cardiac patients, each described on 5 characteristics (gender, age, type of cardiovascular procedure, presence/absence of musculoskeletal pain, and degree of motivation) and then completed the 19 items of the Attitude towards Cardiac Rehabilitation Referral scale. Consistent with previous studies, there was wide variation among physicians in their tacit and stated judgment policies, and self-insight was modest. On the whole, physicians showed evidence of systematic gender bias as they judged women as less likely than men to benefit from CR. Insight data suggest that 1 in 3 physicians were unaware of their own bias. There was greater agreement among physicians in how they described their judgments (stated policies) than in how they actually made them (tacit policies). Correlations between attitude statements and CJA measures were modest. These findings offer some explanation for the slow progress of efforts to improve CR referrals and for gender disparities in referral rates.

  6. Physicians’ Tacit and Stated Policies for Determining Patient Benefit and Referral to Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Jason W.; Pezzo, Mark V.; Beckie, Theresa M.; Shahraki, Farnaz; Kentner, Amanda C.; Grace, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The benefits of prescribing cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for patients following heart surgery is well documented. However physicians continue to underutilize CR programs and disparities in the referral of women are common. Previous research into the causes of these problems has relied on self-report methods which presume that physicians have insight into their referral behavior and can describe it accurately. In contrast, the research presented here employed clinical judgment analysis (CJA) to discover the tacit judgment and referral policies of individual physicians. Purpose The specific aims were to determine 1) what these policies were, 2) the degree of self-insight that individual physicians had into their own policies, 3) the amount of agreement among physicians, and 4) the extent to which judgments were related to attitudes toward CR. Method Thirty-six Canadian physicians made judgments and decisions regarding 32 hypothetical cardiac patients, each described on five characteristics (gender, age, type of surgical procedure, presence/absence of musculoskeletal pain, and degree of motivation) and then completed the 19 items of the Attitude towards Cardiac Rehabilitation Referral instrument. Results There was wide variation among physicians in their tacit and stated judgment policies. Physicians exhibited greater agreement in what they believed they were doing (stated policies) than in what they actually did (tacit policies). Nearly one-third of the physicians showed evidence of systematic, and perhaps subliminal, gender bias as they judged women as less likely than men to benefit from CR. Correlations between attitude statements and CJA measures were modest. Conclusions These findings offer some explanation for the slow progress of efforts to improve CR referrals and for gender disparities in referral rates. PMID:23784848

  7. Cardiac rehabilitation adapted to transient ischaemic attack and stroke (CRAFTS: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Catherine

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary Heart Disease and Cerebrovascular Disease share many predisposing, modifiable risk factors (hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and lipoproteins, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity and diabetes mellitus. Lifestyle interventions and pharmacological therapy are recognised as the cornerstones of secondary prevention. Cochrane review has proven the benefits of programmes incorporating exercise and lifestyle counselling in the cardiac disease population. A Cochrane review highlighted as priority, the need to establish feasibility and efficacy of exercise based interventions for Cerebrovascular Disease. Methods A single blind randomised controlled trial is proposed to examine a primary care cardiac rehabilitation programme for adults post transient ischemic attack (TIA and stroke in effecting a positive change in the primary outcome measures of cardiac risk scores derived from Blood Pressure, lipid profile, smoking and diabetic status and lifestyle factors of habitual smoking, exercise and healthy eating participation. Secondary outcomes of interest include health related quality of life as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Stroke Specific Quality of Life scale and WONCA COOP Functional Health Status charts and cardiovascular fitness as measured by a sub-maximal fitness test. A total of 144 patients, over 18 years of age with confirmed diagnosis of ischaemic stroke or TIA, will be recruited from Dublin community stroke services and two tertiary T.I.A clinics. Exclusion criteria will include oxygen dependence, unstable cardiac conditions, uncontrolled diabetes, major medical conditions, claudication, febrile illness, pregnancy or cognitive impairment. Participants will be block-statified, randomly allocated to one of two groups using a pre-prepared computer generated randomisation schedule. Both groups will receive a two hour education class on risk reduction post stroke. The

  8. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation is as effective as centre-based cardiac rehabilitation among elderly with coronary heart disease: results from a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oerkild, Bodil; Frederiksen, Marianne; Hansen, Jorgen Fischer

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: participation in centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is known to reduce morbidity and mortality but participation rates among the elderly are low. Establishing alternative programmes is important, and home-based CR is the predominant alternative. However, no studies have...... investigated the effect of home-based CR among a group of elderly patients with coronary heart disease with a long-term follow-up. METHODS: randomised clinical trial comparing home-based CR with comprehensive centre-based CR among patients = 65 years with coronary heart disease. RESULTS: seventy-five patients...... in the secondary outcomes of systolic blood pressure (-0.6 mmHg, 95% CI -11.3, 10.0), LDL cholesterol (0.3 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.04, 0.7), HDL cholesterol (0.2 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.01, 0.3), body composition, proportion of smokers and health-related quality of life. A group of patients who did not have an effect...

  9. Changes in the cardiac rehabilitation workflow process needed for the implementation of a self-management system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, Anne-Marieke; Vosbergen, Sandra; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik; Jaspers, Monique; Peek, Niels

    2013-01-01

    E-health interventions are of a growing importance for self-management of chronic conditions. This study aimed to describe the process adaptions that are needed in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to implement a self-management system, called MyCARDSS. We created a generic workflow model based on

  10. Type D patients report poorer health status prior to and after cardiac rehabilitation compared to non-type D patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Pelle (Aline); R.A.M. Erdman (Ruud); R.T. van Domburg (Ron); M. Spiering (Marquita); M. Kazemier (Marten); S.S. Pedersen (Susanne)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Type D personality is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves outcomes, but little is known about the effects of CR on Type D patients. Purpose: We examined (1) variability in Type D caseness following CR, (2) Type D as a

  11. Is the MacNew quality of life questionnaire a useful diagnostic and evaluation instrument for cardiac rehabilitation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maes, Stan; de Gucht, Véronique; Goud, Rick; Hellemans, Irene; Peek, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The MacNew health-related quality of life questionnaire is internationally used as a standard for psychosocial assessment in many cardiac rehabilitation centres. This study investigates its discriminating capacity between diagnostic disease categories, sex and age at entry (T1) and at the

  12. Perspectives on Current Training Guidelines for Cardiac Imaging and Recommendations for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, James A; Kilic, Sena; Haines, Philip G

    2018-04-23

    To summarize current training guidelines for cardiac imaging and provide recommendations for future guidelines. The current structure of training in cardiac imaging is largely dictated by modality-specific guidelines. While there has been debate on how to define the advanced cardiac imager for over a decade, a uniform consensus has not emerged. We report the perspectives of three key stakeholders in this debate: a senior faculty member-former fellowship program director, a cardiology fellow, and an academic junior faculty imaging expert. The observations of these stakeholders suggest that there is no consensus on the definition of advanced cardiac imaging, leading to ambiguity in training guidelines. This may have negative impact on recruitment of fellows into cardiac imaging careers. Based on the current status of training in cardiac imaging, the authors suggest that the relevant professional groups reconvene to form a consensus in defining advanced cardiac imaging, in order to guide future revisions of training guidelines.

  13. Prevalence and predictors of depressive symptoms and wellbeing during and up to nine years after outpatient cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçer, O; Wachter, M; Zellweger, M; Piazzalonga, S; Hoffmann, A

    2011-07-30

    Depression is an important independent prognostic variable in cardiac patients. The prevalence and predictors of depressive symptoms up to nine years after cardiac rehabilitation were studied. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to 2199 patients who had completed a 12-week exercise-based outpatient cardiac rehabilitation (OCR) programme between June 1999 and March 2006. Medical outcome, general wellbeing, and depressive symptoms were assessed, the latter by using two screening questions according to Arrol. Patients with incomplete data due to language problems, lack of compliance and non-response were excluded. Complete data for analysis was available for 710 patients. The median follow up period was 46 months (Interquartile range (IQR) 22-71, min. 6 months). At follow-up, 132 patients (19%) indicated low wellbeing, whereas 81 (11%) were having depressive symptoms. Multivariate analyses revealed impaired quality of life (p wellbeing at follow-up. Persistent smoking (p = 0.045) as well as negative mood (p = 0.022) at the end of OCR were independent predictors of depressive symptoms at follow-up. In a selected patient population a mean of four years after OCR, persistent smoking, diabetes, low exercise capacity and impaired quality of life at the end of OCR were independent long term predictors of low wellbeing and depressive symptoms, rather than specific cardiac variables. This highlights the need for close cooperation between cardiovascular and psychological specialists in cardiac rehabilitation.

  14. Home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction or revascularisation: design and rationale of the Birmingham Rehabilitation Uptake Maximisation Study (BRUM: a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN72884263

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane Deirdre

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation following myocardial infarction reduces subsequent mortality, but uptake and adherence to rehabilitation programmes remains poor, particularly among women, the elderly and ethnic minority groups. Evidence of the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation remains limited. This trial evaluates the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home-based compared to hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation. Methods/design A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of home-based compared with hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation in four hospitals serving a multi-ethnic inner city population in the United Kingdom was designed. The home programme is nurse-facilitated, manual-based using the Heart Manual. The hospital programmes offer comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in an out-patient setting. Patients We will randomise 650 adult, English or Punjabi-speaking patients of low-medium risk following myocardial infarction, coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft who have been referred for cardiac rehabilitation. Main outcome measures Serum cholesterol, smoking cessation, blood pressure, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, distance walked on Shuttle walk-test measured at 6, 12 and 24 months. Adherence to the programmes will be estimated using patient self-reports of activity. In-depth interviews with non-attendees and non-adherers will ascertain patient views and the acceptability of the programmes and provide insights about non-attendance and aims to generate a theory of attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. The economic analysis will measure National Health Service costs using resource inputs. Patient costs will be established from the qualitative research, in particular how they affect adherence. Discussion More data are needed on the role of home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation for patients following myocardial infarction and revascularisation, which would be provided by the

  15. Profile of atrial fibrillation inpatients: Cardiovascular risk factors and cardiac rehabilitation programme delivery and referral patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robyn; Zhang, Ling; Roach, Kellie; Sadler, Leonie; Belshaw, Julie; Kirkness, Ann; Proctor, Ross; Neubeck, Lis

    2015-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasingly common; however, the cardiovascular risk factor profile and the patterns of delivery and referral to cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in this population are poorly described. We conducted an audit of medical records (n = 145) of patients admitted with AF in one local health district in Sydney, Australia. Patients were aged a mean 72 years, and 51% were male. Lack of risk factor documentation was common. Despite this, 65% had two or more modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension (63%) and hypercholesterolaemia (52%). Referral to Phase II CR occurred for 25% and was decreased with permanent AF diagnosis and increased with more risk factors. AF patients admitted to hospital have multiple cardiovascular risk factors but limited risk factor screening and/or referral to outpatient CR programmes. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. A EUropean study on effectiveness and sustainability of current Cardiac Rehabilitation programmes in the Elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Eva; Meindersma, Esther P; van der Velde, Astrid E

    2016-01-01

    of EU-CaRE is to map the efficiency of current CR of the elderly in Europe, and to investigate whether mCR is an effective alternative in terms of efficacy, adherence and sustainability. METHODS AND RESULTS: The EU-CaRE study includes patients aged 65 years or older with ischaemic heart disease or who...... on effectiveness and sustainability of current cardiac rehabilitation programmes in the elderly (EU-CaRE) project consists of an observational study and an open prospective, investigator-initiated multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) involving mobile telemonitoring guided CR (mCR). OBJECTIVE: The aim...... and sustainability. CONCLUSION: The study will provide important information to improve CR in the elderly. The EU-CaRE RCT is the first European multicentre study of mCR as an alternative for elderly patients not attending usual CR....

  17. Evaluation of an intervention to increase self-efficacy for independent exercise in cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Sherry A; Fahrenwald, Nancy L

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to independent exercise is an essential outcome of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), yet limited theory-based interventions to improve adherence exist. This study tested the effects of an intervention based on Bandura's conceptualization of self-efficacy. The self-efficacy coaching intervention (SCI), a supplement to standard care, was designed to increase self-efficacy for independent exercise and independent exercise behavior in CR. We examined whether the SCI vs. attention control (AC) resulted in improved exercise self-efficacy (ESE), barriers self-efficacy (BARSE), and minutes of independent exercise for CR participants (n = 65). While between-group differences did not reach significance (p > .10) for any of the outcome measures, significant within-group changes were noted in BARSE scores and independent exercise (p exercise for the AC group was also significant (p =. 006). Further study is needed to explore whether short-term changes translate into maintenance of independent exercise participation after program completion.

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation: impact of graded exercise in the recovery period following myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White S

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Simon WhiteSchool of Pharmacy, Keele University, Staffordshire, UKAbstract: This paper reviews the impact of graded exercise undertaken as part of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR program in the recovery period following a myocardial infarction, focusing on how CR may be best provided and the evidence-base relating to exercise-based CR. Essential components of CR are considered here to include education about healthy behavior, lifestyle modification where necessary (especially in relation to smoking, diet, and physical exercise, medical risk factor management, use of cardioprotective medicines and implantable devices, and psychosocial health management. It is argued that the totality of the evidence continues to demonstrate benefits of exercise-based CR in terms of mortality and morbidity, despite the debate about the magnitude of that benefit. However, given the wide variance in the quality and nature of CR service provision, there is no guarantee that patients eligible for CR will benefit fully. In line with national and international standards, CR should be tailored to the patient's individual needs, but structured exercise is recommended for most patients. Exercise sessions, whether based in hospital, in the community, or at home, should be designed to vary the frequency, intensity, duration, and type of exercise. They must include an initial warm-up period, before a conditioning period, and finish with a cool-down period. Patients should be taught to self-monitor so that they can exercise safely on their own. In designing interventions to support patients to change health behavior, health professionals should recognize that patients may only make lifestyle modifications to aspects of lifestyle perceived as causes of their cardiovascular disease and so, for example, may not do the recommended amount of exercise if they do not perceive lack of exercise to be a cause of their cardiovascular disease.Keywords: cardiovascular disease, public health

  19. Expanding the Haitian rehabilitation workforce: employment situation and perceptions of graduates from three rehabilitation technician training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descôteaux, Nancy; Chagnon, Valérie; Di Dong, Xin; Ellemo, Eric; Hamelin, Alessandra; Juste, Evans; Laplante, Xavier; Miron, Allison; Morency, Philippe; Samuel, Katherine; Charles, David; Hunt, Matthew

    2018-05-01

    This article examines the employment situation and perceptions of graduates from three rehabilitation technician (RT) programs in Haiti. In this mixed method study, 74 of 93 recent graduates completed a questionnaire, and 20 graduates participated in an in-depth qualitative interview. We analyzed survey results using descriptive statistics. We used a qualitative description approach and analyzed the interviews using constant comparative techniques. Of the 48 survey respondents who had completed their training more than six months prior to completing the questionnaire, 30 had found work in the rehabilitation sector. Most of these technicians were working in hospitals in urban settings and the patient population they treated most frequently were patients with neurological conditions. Through the interviews, we explored the participants' motivations for becoming a RT, reflections on the training program, process of finding work, current employment, and plans for the future. An analysis of qualitative and quantitative findings provides insights regarding challenges, including availability of supervision for graduated RTs and the process of seeking remunerated work. This study highlights the need for stakeholders to further engage with issues related to formal recognition of RT training, expectations for supervision of RTs, concerns for the precariousness of their employment, and uncertainty about their professional futures. Implications for Rehabilitation The availability of human resources in the rehabilitation field in Haiti has increased with the implementation of three RT training programs over the past 10 years. RTs who found work in the rehabilitation sector were more likely to work in a hospital setting, in the province where their training had taken place, to treat a diverse patient clientele, and to be employed by a non-governmental organization. The study underlines challenges related to the long-term sustainability of RT training programs, as well as the

  20. Enhancing Behavioral Change with Motivational Interviewing: a case study in a Cardiac Rehabilitation Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada ePietrabissa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: psychological interventions in Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR programs appear relevant in as much they significantly contribute to achieve the goals of rehabilitation, to reduce the risk of relapses and to improve patients’ adherence to therapy. To this aim, Motivational Interviewing (MI has shown promising results in improving motivation to change and individuals’ confidence in their ability to do so. Objective: the purpose of this article is to integrate theory with practice by describing a 3-session case scenario. It illustrates how the use of MI’s skills and strategies can be used to enhance health. MI may be synergistic with other treatment approaches and it is used here in conjunction with Brief Strategic Therapy (BST. Conclusions: by the use of Motivational Interviewing principles and technique, the patient reported an increase in his motivation and ability to change, developing a post discharge plan that incorporates self-care behaviors. Clinical Implications: Motivational Interviewing may be effective in motivating and facilitating health behavior change in patients suffering from heart failure.

  1. Attitude toward the out-patient cardiac rehabilitation program and facilitators for maintenance of exercise behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eliza M L; Zhong, Xue Bing; Sit, Janet W H; Chair, Sek Ying; Leung, Doris Y P; Leung, Carmen; Leung, K C

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the attitudes of Chinese patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) toward the outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (OCRP), as well as their exercise behavior, intention, maintenance and related factors. A qualitative descriptive study design was used, and 22 CHD patients were recruited in Hong Kong in 2014. In-depth interviews and content analyses were conducted. The tripartite model of attitudes was adopted as research framework. Two themes were identified: (1) informant attitude (perception, affection, and practice) toward the OCRP and (2) Exercise Behavior - intention, maintenance and its related factors. Most informants showed positive perception and affection regarding the outpatient rehabilitation program, leading to regular practice of exercise in the program and at home. Peer, group dynamic, social support and Chinese culture influences on exercise behavior may serve as major facilitators to maintain exercise behavior. Positive attitude toward the OCRP enhanced the participation rate, whereas peer and social support from the family and workplace were useful to improve the maintenance of exercise behavior. Overall, this study provides insights into strategic planning for the OCRP and continual support for CHD patients in the community.

  2. [Implementation of control system and software design for limbs rehabilitation training based on PCI-1240].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenchao; Xu, Xiulin; Hu, Xiufang; An, Meijun

    2017-06-01

    This article presents the design of a motion control system for seated lower-limb rehabilitation training. The system is composed of lower limb exoskeleton, motor drive circuit, program of motion control, and so forth. The power of lower limbs joints is provided by six motors. The PCI-1240 motion control card is used as the core. This study achieved repetitive rotation training and gait trajectory training of lower limbs joints, of which the velocity, angle and time can be accurately controlled and adjusted. The experimental results showed that the motion control system can meet the requirement of repetitive rehabilitation training for patients with lower limb dysfunction. This article provides a new method to the research of motion control system in rehabilitation training, which can promote industrial automation technique to be used for health care, and conducive to the further study of the rehabilitation robot.

  3. Structures, processes and outcomes of the Aussie Heart Guide Program: A nurse mentor supported, home based cardiac rehabilitation program for rural patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohmader, Terence J; Lin, Frances; Chaboyer, Wendy P

    2018-03-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation has a number of benefits for patients, yet participation in it is sub-optimal, especially in regional Australia. Innovative models of cardiac rehabilitation are needed to improve participation. Providing nurse mentors to support patients transitioning from hospital to home represents a new model of service delivery in Australia. To explore the impact of a home-based cardiac rehabilitation program in assisting patients to recover from Acute Coronary Syndrome and meeting the expectations of nurse mentors delivering the program. This case study was underpinned by the structure, process and outcomes model and occurred in three Australian hospitals 2008-2011. Thirteen patients recovering from acute coronary syndrome were interviewed by telephone and seven nurse mentors completed a survey after completing the program. Mentor perceptions concerning the structures of the home-based CR program included the timely recruitment of patients, mentor training to operationalise the program, commitment to development of the mentor role, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills about cognitive behavioural therapy and patient centred care. Processes included the therapeutic relationship between mentors and patients, suitability of the program and the promotion of healthier lifestyle behaviours. Outcomes identified that patients were satisfied with the program's audiovisual resources, and the level of support and guidance provided by their nurse mentors. Mentors believed that the program was easy to use in terms of its delivery. Patients believed the program assisted their recovery and were satisfied with the information, guidance and support received from mentors. There were positive signs that the program influenced patients' decisions to change unhealthy lifestyle behaviours. Outcomes highlighted both rewards and barriers associated with mentoring patients in their homes by telephone. Experience gained from developing a therapeutic relationship with

  4. Group therapy task training versus individual task training during inpatient stroke rehabilitation: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Caroline Ie; Outermans, Jacqueline; Ludwig, Ricarda; Brendel, Christiane; Kwakkel, Gert; Hummelsheim, Horst

    2016-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of intensive daily applied progressive group therapy task training with equally dosed individual progressive task training on self-reported mobility for patients with moderate to severe stroke during inpatient rehabilitation. Randomized controlled clinical trial. In-patient rehabilitation center. A total of 73 subacute patients with stroke who were not able to walk without physical assistance at randomisation. Patients were allocated to group therapy task training (GT) or individual task training (IT). Both interventions were intended to improve walking competency and comprised 30 sessions of 90 minutes over six weeks. Primary outcome was the mobility domain of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS-3.0). Secondary outcomes were the other domains of SIS-3.0, standing balance, gait speed, walking distance, stair climbing, fatigue, anxiety and depression. No adverse events were reported in either arm of the trial. There were no significant differences between groups for the SIS mobility domain at the end of the intervention (Z= -0.26, P = 0.79). No significant differences between groups were found in gait speed improvements (GT:0.38 ±0.23; IT:0.26±0.35), any other gait related parameters, or in non-physical outcomes such as depression and fatigue. Inpatient group therapy task training for patients with moderate to severe stroke is safe and equally effective as a dose-matched individual task training therapy. Group therapy task training may be delivered as an alternative to individual therapy or as valuable adjunct to increase time spent in gait-related activities. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Patient perspectives on the Hula Empowering Lifestyle Adaptation Study: benefits of dancing hula for cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskarinec, Gregory G; Look, Mele; Tolentino, Kalehua; Trask-Batti, Mililani; Seto, Todd; de Silva, Mapuana; Kaholokula, Joseph Keawe'aimoku

    2015-01-01

    The Hula Empowering Lifestyle Adaption Study, funded by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, was a 5-year research trial evaluating the impact of the traditional Native Hawaiian dance form, hula, as an exercise modality for cardiac rehabilitation, compared with usual care, on individuals recently hospitalized for a cardiac event or who had recently undergone coronary artery bypass surgery. Seeking to learn what physical, mental, spiritual, and social effects the intervention may have had for participants, we interviewed 20 of a total of 35 patients who were enrolled in the dance arm of the study. Classical thematic triangulation analysis was used. Participants recognized that hula's coordination of body, mind, and spirit as a group activity deepened their appreciation of and connections to Hawaiian culture. This was true for those who were Native Hawaiian, connecting to their own cultural heritage, as well as for non-Native Hawaiians, who found that it improved their appreciation of the surrounding cultural traditions of the host culture where they now live. Not only was hula a safe activity that improved functional capacity, participants also regarded its significant sociocultural aspects-even for participants who are not Native Hawaiian -as enhancing its value and meaningfulness. Learning the words of well-known Hawaiian songs provided additional long-term cues that encouraged "ownership" of the therapy and acted as practical reminders of the importance of exercise and lifestyle moderation while also offering new spiritual connections to the surrounding social environment. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  6. Current state of cardiac rehabilitation in Germany: patient characteristics, risk factor management and control status, by education level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestehorn, Kurt; Jannowitz, Christina; Horack, Martin; Karmann, Barbara; Halle, Martin; Völler, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    After the acute hospital stay, most cardiac patients in Germany are transferred for a 3-4-week period of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. We aim to describe patient characteristics and risk factor management of cardiac rehabilitation patients with a focus on drug treatment and control status, differentiated by education level (low level, elementary school; intermediate level, secondary modern school; high level, grammar school/university). Data covering a time period between 2003 and 2008 from 68,191 hospitalized patients in cardiac rehabilitation from a large-scale registry (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline- Oriented Risk Factor Management) were analyzed descriptively. Further, a multivariate model was applied to assess factors associated with good control of risk factors. In the total cohort, patients with a manifestation of coronary artery disease (mean age 63.7 years, males 71.7%) were referred to cardiac rehabilitation after having received percutaneous coronary intervention (51.6%) or coronary bypass surgery (39.5%). Statin therapy increased from 76.3% at entry to 88.9% at discharge, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol education. In contrast with patients having high education, those with low education had more diabetes, hypertension, and peripheral arterial disease, had lower exercise capacity, and received less treatment with statins and guideline-orientated therapy in general. In the multivariate model, good control was significantly more likely in men (odds ratio 1.38; 95% confidence interval 1.30-1.46), less likely in patients of higher age (0.99; 0.99-0.99), with diabetes (0.90; 0.85-0.95), or peripheral arterial disease (0.88; 0.82-0.95). Compared with a low level education, a mid level education was associated with poor control (0.94; 0.89-0.99), while high education did not have a significant effect (1.08; 0.99-1.17). Patients with different levels of education treated in cardiac rehabilitation did not differ relevantly in terms of

  7. Older Adults' Music Listening Preferences to Support Physical Activity Following Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Imogen N; Baker, Felicity A; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2016-01-01

    Music listening during exercise is thought to increase physiological arousal and enhance subjective experience, and may support physical activity participation among older adults with cardiac disease. However, little is known about how music preferences, or perceptions of music during exercise, inform clinical practice with this population. Identify predominant musical characteristics of preferred music selected by older adults, and explore participants' music listening experiences during walking-based exercise following cardiac rehabilitation. Twenty-seven participants aged 60 years and older (21 men, 6 women; mean age = 67.3 years) selected music to support walking over a 6-month intervention period, and participated in post-intervention interviews. In this two-phase study, we first identified predominant characteristics of participant-selected music using the Structural Model of Music Analysis. Second, we used inductive thematic analysis to explore participant experiences. Predominant characteristics of participant-selected music included duple meter, consistent rhythm, major key, rounded melodic shape, legato articulation, predictable harmonies, variable volume, and episodes of tension with delayed resolution. There was no predominant tempo, with music selections ranging from slow through to medium and fast. Four themes emerged from thematic analysis of participant interviews: psycho-emotional responses, physical responses, influence on exercise behavior, and negative experiences. Findings are consistent with theory and research explaining influences from music listening on physiological arousal and subjective experience during exercise. Additionally, for older adults with cardiac disease, a holistic approach to music selection considering general well-being and adjustment issues, rather than just exercise performance, may improve long-term lifestyle changes and compliance with physical activity guidelines. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All

  8. Guidelines for competency development and measurement in rehabilitation psychology postdoctoral training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiers, William; Barisa, Mark; Stucky, Kirk; Pawlowski, Carey; Van Tubbergen, Marie; Turner, Aaron P; Hibbard, Mary; Caplan, Bruce

    2015-05-01

    This study describes the results of a multidisciplinary conference (the Baltimore Conference) that met to develop consensus guidelines for competency specification and measurement in postdoctoral training in rehabilitation psychology. Forty-six conference participants were chosen to include representatives of rehabilitation psychology training and practice communities, representatives of psychology accreditation and certification bodies, persons involved in medical education practice and research, and consumers of training programs (students). Consensus education and training guidelines were developed that specify the key competencies in rehabilitation psychology postdoctoral training, and structured observation checklists were developed for their measurement. This study continues the development of more than 50 years of thinking about education and training in rehabilitation psychology and builds on the existing work to further advance the development of guidelines in this area. The conference developed aspirational guidelines for competency specification and measurement in rehabilitation psychology postdoctoral training (i.e., for studying the outcomes of these training programs). Structured observation of trainee competencies allows examination of actual training outcomes in relation to intended outcomes and provides a methodology for studying how program outcomes are related to program structures and processes so that program improvement can occur. Best practices in applying program evaluation research methods to the study of professional training programs are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Training in Vocational Assessment: Preparing Rehabilitation Counselors and Meeting the Requirements of the CORE Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Timothy N.

    2008-01-01

    Assessment represents a foundational component of rehabilitation counseling services. The revised Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards implemented in 2004 resulted in the redesign of the knowledge and outcomes under the Assessment standard. The author reviews the current CORE standard for training in assessment within the context…

  10. Medical Information for the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor--A Training Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, William R.

    This paper presents information helpful to the vocational rehabilitation counselor and can be utilized in training programs for the newly employed untrained vocational rehabilitation practitioner. Areas covered include medical terminology, common prefixes and suffixes, speciality boards; paramedic professions, and medical education. Undergraduate…

  11. Is Training Essential for Interpreting Cardiac Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripsweden, J.; Brolin, E. Bacsovics; Brismar, T.; Nilsson, T.; Svensson, A.; Werner, C.; Cederlund, K.; Mir-Akbari, H.; Rueck, A.; Rasmussen, E.; Winter, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has gained increasing acceptance for diagnosing obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Several guidelines have been published on required education for proficiency in the interpretation of these examinations. Purpose: To describe the learning-curve effect of the interpretation of 100 consecutive cardiac CT examinations aimed at diagnosing CAD. The diagnostic accuracy of radiologists and radiographers was also compared. Material and Methods: Two radiologists and two radiographers, all with no prior experience in evaluation of cardiac CT, independently underwent a dedicated training program of 100 examinations randomized into 10 blocks (sessions), with 10 cases in each. They independently evaluated the coronary arteries regarding significant obstructive CAD. After every session, individual feedback on diagnostic accuracy and comparison with the corresponding invasive coronary angiography (currently regarded as the gold standard to detect coronary lesions) was given. The time required for interpretation was recorded. Results: The mean review time decreased (P<0.0001) successively during the 10 sessions for all the observers together. The first session had a mean review time of 32 min, and the last session 16 min. No significant improvement in sensitivity, specificity, or negative predictive value (NPV) was observed. For positive predictive value (PPV), there was an improvement for the radiologists (P<0.05), but not for the radiographers. The radiographers had a higher total specificity compared to the radiologists (P<0.01). Conclusion: The review time for novices in cardiac CT was approximately halved during the first 100 cases, with maintained accuracy. There was a learning-curve effect in PPV for the radiologists. The diagnostic accuracy of dedicated radiographers indicates that they might be considered to be included as part of the evaluation team

  12. Gender-specific issues in cardiac rehabilitation: do women with ischaemic heart disease need specially tailored programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; Grande, Gesine; Loewel, Hannelore; Völler, Heinz; Mittag, Oskar

    2007-04-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) has changed from a disease of middle-aged men in the late 1970s to a disease of elderly women in the 2000s. Most clinical studies during the past three decades have been conducted with men. Cardiac rehabilitation programmes were also developed with special regard to improving the rate of return to work in middle-aged men. The rehabilitation needs of older patients and women in particular have been largely neglected. The aim of this review is briefly to outline our present knowledge on gender issues in cardiac rehabilitation, and to specify barriers with regard to physical activities especially in (older) women. Coping with a cardiac event, women tend to minimize or play down the impact of their health situation and avoid burdening their social contacts. After a first cardiac event, women report greater psychological distress and lower self-efficacy and self-esteem. In addition, older age, lower exercise levels and reduced functional capacity or co-morbid conditions such as osteoporosis and urinary incontinence are barriers to physical activities in women with IHD. Recent studies on psychosocial intervention revealed less favourable results in women compared with men. These findings have not yet been well explained. This emphasizes our current lack of knowledge about the processes and determinants of successful psychosocial interventions in men and women with IHD. A large (European) trial on gender-specific coping styles, needs, and preferences of older women, and the effects of psychosocial intervention is proposed.

  13. Impact of Obesity and Other Chronic Conditions on Lifestyle Exercise During the Year After Completion of Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Abdus; Josephson, Richard; Moore, Shirley M

    2017-07-01

    Patients who attend cardiac rehabilitation programs have a high prevalence of multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). The extent to which different constellations of MCC influence lifestyle exercise in the year after completion of an outpatient phase 2 cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) is unknown. Our objective was to examine the effects of MCC on lifestyle exercise in the year after completion of a CRP. The effects of different constellations of comorbidities on objectively measured lifestyle exercise were examined using data from a randomized controlled trial testing lifestyle behavior change interventions in patients with cardiac events (n = 379) who completed a phase 2 CRP. Adjusting for important covariates, the relationships between the primary outcome, exercise amount, and the presence of common chronic conditions (hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and arthritis) were studied using robust linear mixed-effects models. Diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and their dyads, triads, and quads have a negative impact on amount of exercise. For example, the cooccurrences of obesity and hypertension reduced lifestyle exercise by 2.83 hours per month (95% CI, 1.33-4.33) after adjustment for the effects of covariates. The presence of obesity was a major factor in the comorbid constellations affecting lifestyle exercise. The presence of obesity and other chronic conditions negatively impacts lifestyle exercise in the year after a CRP. The magnitude of the effect depends on the comorbidities. Different constellations of comorbid conditions can be used to identify those persons at greatest risk for not exercising after cardiac rehabilitation.

  14. A Meta-Analysis of Skills Training Programs for Rehabilitation Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Brian; Akridge, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    Summarized the results of 15 experimental studies of 10 small-group skills training interventions developed for use with vocational rehabilitation clients. Concluded that the typical participant in skills training interventions received substantial benefit from the activity. Skills training programs should be implemented more widely with clients…

  15. Training preferences and motivation for rehabilitation in patients with neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    Verbrugghe, Jonas; Cuyvers, Bert

    2014-01-01

    MP2 scientific research "Training preferences and motivation for rehabilitation in patients with neck pain" by Bert Cuyvers & Jonas Verbrugghe Aim: The aim of this investigation is the inventory of training preferences and motives for motor rehabilitation of patients with neck pain. The second aim of this study is to evaluate to which extent patients with neck pain are familiar with the use of technologies. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted based on the Neck Disa...

  16. Combining Mental Training and Physical Training With Goal-Oriented Protocols in Stroke Rehabilitation: A Feasibility Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the leading causes of permanent disability in adults. The literature suggests that rehabilitation is key to early motor recovery. However, conventional therapy is labor and cost intensive. Robotic and functional electrical stimulation (FES devices can provide a high dose of repetitions and as such may provide an alternative, or an adjunct, to conventional rehabilitation therapy. Brain-computer interfaces (BCI could augment neuroplasticity by introducing mental training. However, mental training alone is not enough; but combining mental with physical training could boost outcomes. In the current case study, a portable rehabilitative platform and goal-oriented supporting training protocols were introduced and tested with a chronic stroke participant. A novel training method was introduced with the proposed rehabilitative platform. A 37-year old individual with chronic stroke participated in 6-weeks of training (18 sessions in total, 3 sessions a week, and 1 h per session. In this case study, we show that an individual with chronic stroke can tolerate a 6-week training bout with our system and protocol. The participant was actively engaged throughout the training. Changes in the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT suggest that the training positively affected arm motor function (12% improvement in WMFT score.

  17. Prevalence of mild cognitive impairment in employable patients after acute coronary event in cardiac rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salzwedel A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Annett Salzwedel,1 Maria-Dorothea Heidler,1,2 Kathrin Haubold,1 Martin Schikora,2 Rona Reibis,3 Karl Wegscheider,4 Michael Jöbges,2 Heinz Völler1,5 1Center for Rehabilitation Research, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, 2Brandenburg Klinik, Bernau, 3Cardiological Outpatient Clinic, Am Park Sanssouci, Potsdam, 4Institute for Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, 5Klinik am See, Rüdersdorf, Germany Introduction: Adequate cognitive function in patients is a prerequisite for successful implementation of patient education and lifestyle coping in comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR programs. Although the association between cardiovascular diseases and cognitive impairments (CIs is well known, the prevalence particularly of mild CI in CR and the characteristics of affected patients have been insufficiently investigated so far. Methods: In this prospective observational study, 496 patients (54.5 ± 6.2 years, 79.8% men with coronary artery disease following an acute coronary event (ACE were analyzed. Patients were enrolled within 14 days of discharge from the hospital in a 3-week inpatient CR program. Patients were tested for CI using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA upon admission to and discharge from CR. Additionally, sociodemographic, clinical, and physiological variables were documented. The data were analyzed descriptively and in a multivariate stepwise backward elimination regression model with respect to CI. Results: At admission to CR, the CI (MoCA score < 26 was determined in 182 patients (36.7%. Significant differences between CI and no CI groups were identified, and CI group was associated with high prevalence of smoking (65.9 vs 56.7%, P = 0.046, heavy (physically demanding workloads (26.4 vs 17.8%, P < 0.001, sick leave longer than 1 month prior to CR (28.6 vs 18.5%, P = 0.026, reduced exercise capacity (102.5 vs 118.8 W, P = 0.006, and a shorter 6-min walking distance

  18. Cardiac Rehabilitation After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in a Multiethnic Asian Country: Enrollment and Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Ruth; Ng, Hsuen-Nin; Loo, Germaine; Ooi, Lean-See; Yeo, Tee-Joo; Wong, Raymond; Lee, Chi-Hang

    2015-09-01

    To determine the enrollment or barriers to cardiac rehabilitation (CR) among Asian patients who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Prospective observational study. Department of cardiology at a university hospital. Patients (N=795) who underwent PCI between January 2012 and December 2013 at a tertiary medical institution. Not applicable. Data on enrollment in phase 2 CR and its barriers were collected by dedicated CR nurses. Of 795 patients, 351 patients (44.2%) were ineligible for CR because of residual coronary stenosis, while 30 patients (3.8%) were not screened because of either early discharge or death. Of the remaining 416 patients (90.8% men; mean age, 55 y), 365 (87.7%) declined CR participation and 51 (12.3%) agreed to participate. Of these 51 patients, 20 (39%) did not proceed to enroll and 4 (8%) dropped out, leaving 27 patients (53%) who completed at least 6 sessions of the CR program. The top 3 reasons provided by patients who declined to participate in CR were (1) busy work schedules (37.5%), (2) no specific reason (26.7%), and (3) preference for self-exercise (20.1%). Nonsmokers were more likely to participate in CR (P=.001). CR participation of Asian patients after PCI was found to be lower than that reported in Western countries. The exclusion criteria used in the institution under study differed from those provided by international associations. A busy work schedule was the most common reason for declining CR after PCI. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence to service gap: cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention in rural and remote Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Sandra; Mills, Belynda; McRae, Shelley; Thompson, Sandra

    2018-01-30

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, has similar incidence in metropolitan and rural areas but poorer cardiovascular outcomes for residents living in rural and remote Australia. Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) is an evidence-based intervention that helps reduce subsequent cardiovascular events and rehospitalisation. Unfortunately CR attendance rates are as low as 10-30% with rural/remote populations under-represented. This in-depth assessment investigated the provision of CR and secondary prevention services in Western Australia (WA) with a focus on rural and remote populations. CR and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services were identified through the Directory of Western Australian Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention Services 2012. Structured interviews with CR coordinators included questions specific to program delivery, content, referral and attendance. Of the 38 CR services identified, 23 (61%) were located in rural (n = 11, 29%) and remote (n = 12, 32%) regions. Interviews with coordinators from 34 CR services (10 rural, 12 remote, 12 metropolitan) found 77% of rural/remote services were hospital-based, with no service providing a comprehensive home-based or alternative method of program delivery. The majority of rural (60%) and remote (80%) services provided CR through chronic condition exercise programs compared with 17% of metropolitan services; only 27% of rural/remote programs provided education classes. Rural/remote coordinators were overwhelmingly physiotherapists, and only 50% of rural and 33% of remote programs had face-to-face access to multidisciplinary support. Patient referral and attendance rates differed greatly across WA and referrals to rural/remote services generally numbered less than 5 per month. Program evaluation was reported by 33% of rural/remote coordinators. Geography, population density and service availability limits patient access to CR services in rural/remote WA. Current

  20. Mobile Technology Use Across Age Groups in Patients Eligible for Cardiac Rehabilitation: Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robyn; Roach, Kellie; Sadler, Leonie; Glinatsis, Helen; Belshaw, Julie; Kirkness, Ann; Zhang, Ling; Gallagher, Patrick; Paull, Glenn; Gao, Yan; Partridge, Stephanie Ruth; Parker, Helen; Neubeck, Lis

    2017-10-24

    Emerging evidence indicates mobile technology-based strategies may improve access to secondary prevention and reduce risk factors in cardiac patients. However, little is known about cardiac patients' use of mobile technology, particularly for health reasons and whether the usage varies across patient demographics. This study aimed to describe cardiac patients' use of mobile technology and to determine variations between age groups after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence with using mobile technology. Cardiac patients eligible for attending cardiac rehabilitation were recruited from 9 hospital and community sites across metropolitan and rural settings in New South Wales, Australia. Participants completed a survey on the use of mobile technology devices, features used, confidence with using mobile technology, willingness and interest in learning, and health-related use. The sample (N=282) had a mean age of 66.5 (standard deviation [SD] 10.6) years, 71.9% (203/282) were male, and 79.0% (223/282) lived in a metropolitan area. The most common diagnoses were percutaneous coronary intervention (33.3%, 94/282) and myocardial infarction (22.7%, 64/282). The majority (91.1%, 257/282) used at least one type of technology device, 70.9% (200/282) used mobile technology (mobile phone/tablet), and 31.9% (90/282) used all types. Technology was used by 54.6% (154/282) for health purposes, most often to access information on health conditions (41.4%, 117/282) and medications (34.8%, 98/282). Age had an important independent association with the use of mobile technology after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence. The youngest group (mobile technology than the oldest (>69 years) age group (odds ratio [OR] 4.45, 95% CI 1.46-13.55), 5 times more likely to use mobile apps (OR 5.00, 95% CI 2.01-12.44), and 3 times more likely to use technology for health-related reasons (OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.34-8.18). Compared with the older group, the middle age group (56

  1. Current state of cardiac rehabilitation in Germany: patient characteristics, risk factor management and control status, by education level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bestehorn K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Kurt Bestehorn1, Christina Jannowitz2, Martin Horack3, Barbara Karmann2, Martin Halle4, Heinz Völler5 1Institute for Clinical Pharmacology, Technical University, Dresden; 2Medical Department, MSD Sharp and Dohme GmbH, Haar; 3Institut für Herzinfarktforschung Ludwigshafen an der Universität Heidelberg, Ludwigshafen; 4Center for Prevention and Sports Medicine, Technical University, Munich; 5Klinik am See, Rehabilitation Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Rüdersdorf, Germany Background: After the acute hospital stay, most cardiac patients in Germany are transferred for a 3–4-week period of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. We aim to describe patient characteristics and risk factor management of cardiac rehabilitation patients with a focus on drug treatment and control status, differentiated by education level (low level, elementary school; intermediate level, secondary modern school; high level, grammar school/university. Methods: Data covering a time period between 2003 and 2008 from 68,191 hospitalized patients in cardiac rehabilitation from a large-scale registry (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline-Oriented Risk Factor Management were analyzed descriptively. Further, a multivariate model was applied to assess factors associated with good control of risk factors. Results: In the total cohort, patients with a manifestation of coronary artery disease (mean age 63.7 years, males 71.7% were referred to cardiac rehabilitation after having received percutaneous coronary intervention (51.6% or coronary bypass surgery (39.5%. Statin therapy increased from 76.3% at entry to 88.9% at discharge, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol <100 mg/dL rates increased from 31.1% to 69.6%. Mean fasting blood glucose decreased from 108 mg/dL to 104 mg/dL, and mean exercise capacity increased from 78 W to 95 W. Age and gender did not differ by education. In contrast with patients having high education, those with low education had more diabetes

  2. Primary care provider perceptions of intake transition records and shared care with outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamnik Veronica

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While it is recommended that records are kept between primary care providers (PCPs and specialists during patient transitions from hospital to community care, this communication is not currently standardized. We aimed to assess the transmission of cardiac rehabilitation (CR program intake transition records to PCPs and to explore PCPs' needs in communication with CR programs and for intake transition record content. Method 144 PCPs of consenting enrollees from 8 regional and urban Ontario CR programs participated in this cross-sectional study. Intake transition records were tracked from the CR program to the PCP's office. Sixty-six PCPs participated in structured telephone interviews. Results Sixty-eight (47.6% PCPs received a CR intake transition record. Fifty-eight (87.9% PCPs desired intake transition records, with most wanting it transmitted via fax (n = 52, 78.8%. On a 5-point Likert scale, PCPs strongly agreed that the CR transition record met their needs for providing patient care (4.32 ± 0.61, with 48 (76.2% reporting that it improved their management of patients' cardiac risk. PCPs rated the following elements as most important to include in an intake transition record: clinical status (4.67 ± 0.64, exercise test results (4.61 ± 0.52, and the proposed patient care plan (4.59 ± 0.71. Conclusions Less than half of intake transition records are reaching PCPs, revealing a large gap in continuity of patient care. PCP responses should be used to develop an evidence-based intake transition record, and procedures should be implemented to ensure high-quality transitional care.

  3. Mandatory criteria for cardiac rehabilitation programs: 2018 guidelines from the Portuguese Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Ana; Mendes, Miguel; Dores, Hélder; Silveira, Conceição; Fontes, Paulo; Teixeira, Madalena; Santa Clara, Helena; Morais, João

    2018-04-30

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a multidisciplinary process for patients recovering after an acute cardiac event or with chronic cardiovascular disease that reduces mortality and morbidity and improves quality of life. It is considered a cost-effective intervention and is expressly indicated in the guidelines of the major medical societies. In Portugal, only 8% of patients discharged from hospital after myocardial infarction are included in CR programs. In Europe overall, the percentage admitted to CR programs is 30%, while in the USA it is 20-30%. In view of the underuse of CR in Portugal, we call the attention of the health authorities to the need to increase the number and national coverage of CR programs, while maintaining high quality standards. The aim is for all patients resident in Portugal who are eligible for CR programs to have the same opportunities for access and attendance. In order to preserve the benefits and safety of this intervention, CR needs to be performed according to international guidelines. The fact that various initiatives in this field have been developed by different professional groups, some of them non-medical, that do not follow the European guidelines, has prompted us to prepare a series of norms defining mandatory criteria for CR, based on current knowledge and evidence. In this way we aim to ensure that the required increase in the number of CR programs, linked in a national network of CR centers, does not detract from the need to maintain their efficacy and quality. These criteria should serve as the basis for the future accreditation of CR centers in Portugal. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  4. Barriers for Nonparticipation and Dropout of Women in Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resurrección, Davinia M; Motrico, Emma; Rigabert, Alina; Rubio-Valera, Maria; Conejo-Cerón, Sonia; Pastor, Luis; Moreno-Peral, Patricia

    2017-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major health problem worldwide. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs are effective in reducing mortality and improving the quality of life of patients with CVD. Women are under-represented in CR and have a higher dropout rate than men. We aimed to systematically review the literature on barriers perceived by women with CVD affecting their nonparticipation in and/or dropping out from CR programs. Systematic review was done using MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, Open Grey, and Cochrane Database from inception to September 2016. Search terms included (1) heart disease and other cardiac conditions, (2) CR and secondary prevention, and (3) nonparticipation in and/or dropout. Databases were searched following the "participants, interventions, comparisons, outcomes, and study design" method. A total of 24 studies (17 descriptive, 6 qualitative, and 1 randomized controlled trial) reporting several barriers were grouped into five broad categories: intrapersonal barriers (self-reported health, health beliefs, lack of time, motivation, and religious reasons); interpersonal barriers (lack of family/social support and work conflicts); logistical barriers (transport, distance, and availability of personal/community resources); CR program barriers (services offered, group format, exercise component, and CR sessions); and health system barriers (lack of referral, cost, negative experiences with the health system, and language). We found differences between the barriers related to nonparticipation in and dropout from CR programs. Women reported multilevel barriers for nonparticipation in and dropout from CR programs. Future clinical guidelines should evaluate and eliminate these barriers to improve adherence to CR programs in women. In addition, understanding the barriers for nonparticipation and dropout may be beneficial for future intervention trials.

  5. Vagus nerve stimulation during rehabilitative training improves forelimb strength following ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaparast, N; Hays, S A; Sloan, A M; Hulsey, D R; Ruiz, A; Pantoja, M; Rennaker, R L; Kilgard, M P

    2013-12-01

    Upper limb impairment is a common debilitating consequence of ischemic stroke. Physical rehabilitation after stroke enhances neuroplasticity and improves limb function, but does not typically restore normal movement. We have recently developed a novel method that uses vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) paired with forelimb movements to drive specific, long-lasting map plasticity in rat primary motor cortex. Here we report that VNS paired with rehabilitative training can enhance recovery of forelimb force generation following infarction of primary motor cortex in rats. Quantitative measures of forelimb function returned to pre-lesion levels when VNS was delivered during rehab training. Intensive rehab training without VNS failed to restore function back to pre-lesion levels. Animals that received VNS during rehab improved twice as much as rats that received the same rehabilitation without VNS. VNS delivered during physical rehabilitation represents a novel method that may provide long-lasting benefits towards stroke recovery. © 2013.

  6. Reference values for the incremental shuttle walk test in patients with cardiovascular disease entering exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernando M F; Almodhy, Meshal; Pepera, Garyfalia; Stasinopoulos, Dimitrios M; Sandercock, Gavin R H

    2017-01-01

    The incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) is used to assess functional capacity of patients entering cardiac rehabilitation. Factors such as age and sex account for a proportion of the variance in test performance in healthy individuals but there are no reference values for patients with cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to produce reference values for the ISWT. Participants were n = 548 patients referred to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation who underwent a clinical examination and performed the ISWT. We used regression to identify predictors of performance and produced centile values using the generalised additive model for location, scale and shape model. Men walked significantly further than women (395 ± 165 vs. 269 ± 118 m; t = 9.5, P < 0.001) so data were analysed separately by sex. Age (years) was the strongest predictor of performance in men (β = -5.9; 95% CI: -7.1 to -4.6 m) and women (β = -4.8; 95% CI: -6.3 to 3.3). Centile curves demonstrated a broadly linear decrease in expected ISWT values in males (25-85 years) and a more curvilinear trend in females. Patients entering cardiac rehabilitation present with highly heterogeneous ISWT values. Much of the variance in performance can be explained by patients' age and sex. Comparing absolute values with age-and sex-specific reference values may aid interpretation of ISWT performance during initial patient assessment at entry to cardiac rehabilitation.

  7. The feasibility of meta-cognitive strategy training in acute inpatient stroke rehabilitation: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Elizabeth R; Holm, Margo B; Whyte, Ellen M; Dew, Mary Amanda; Dawson, Deirdre; Becker, James T

    2011-04-01

    Meta-cognitive strategy training may be used to augment inpatient rehabilitation to promote active engagement and subsequent benefit for individuals with cognitive impairments after stroke. We examined the feasibility of administering a form of meta-cognitive strategy training, Cognitive Orientation to daily Occupational Performance (CO-OP), during inpatient rehabilitation. We trained an individual with cognitive impairments after right hemisphere stroke to identify performance problems, set self-selected goals, develop plans to address goals, and evaluate performance improvements. To assess feasibility, we examined the number of meta-cognitive training sessions attended, the number of self-selected goals, and changes in goal-related performance. We also examined changes in rehabilitation engagement and disability. The participant used the meta-cognitive strategy to set eight goals addressing physically oriented, instrumental, and work-related activities. Mean improvement in Canadian Occupational Performance Measure Performance Scale scores was 6.1. Pittsburgh Rehabilitation Participation Scale scores (measuring rehabilitation engagement) improved from 3.2 at admission to 4.9 at discharge. Functional Independence Measure scores (measuring disability) improved from 68 at admission, to 97 at discharge. Performance Assessment of Self-Care Skills scores improved from 1.1 at admission to 2.9 at discharge. The results indicate that meta-cognitive strategy training was feasible during inpatient rehabilitation and warrants further evaluation to determine its effectiveness.

  8. Development and Psychometric Validation of HIPER-Q to Assess Knowledge of Hypertensive Patients in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rafaella Zulianello Dos; Bonin, Christiani Decker Batista; Martins, Eliara Ten Caten; Pereira Junior, Moacir; Ghisi, Gabriela Lima de Melo; Macedo, Kassia Rosangela Paz de; Benetti, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    The absence of instruments capable of measuring the level of knowledge of hypertensive patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs about their disease reflects the lack of specific recommendations for these patients. To develop and validate a questionnaire to evaluate the knowledge of hypertensive patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs about their disease. A total of 184 hypertensive patients (mean age 60.5 ± 10 years, 66.8% men) were evaluated. Reproducibility was assessed by calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient using the test-retest method. Internal consistency was assessed by the Cronbach's alpha and the construct validity by the exploratory factorial analysis. The final version of the instrument had 17 questions organized in areas considered important for patient education. The instrument proposed showed a clarity index of 8.7 (0.25). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.804 and the Cronbach's correlation coefficient was 0.648. Factor analysis revealed five factors associated with knowledge areas. Regarding the criterion validity, patients with higher education level and higher family income showed greater knowledge about hypertension. The instrument has a satisfactory clarity index and adequate validity, and can be used to evaluate the knowledge of hypertensive participants in cardiac rehabilitation programs.

  9. Development and Psychometric Validation of HIPER-Q to Assess Knowledge of Hypertensive Patients in Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Zulianello dos Santos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The absence of instruments capable of measuring the level of knowledge of hypertensive patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs about their disease reflects the lack of specific recommendations for these patients. Objective: To develop and validate a questionnaire to evaluate the knowledge of hypertensive patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs about their disease. Methods: A total of 184 hypertensive patients (mean age 60.5 ± 10 years, 66.8% men were evaluated. Reproducibility was assessed by calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient using the test-retest method. Internal consistency was assessed by the Cronbach’s alpha and the construct validity by the exploratory factorial analysis. Results: The final version of the instrument had 17 questions organized in areas considered important for patient education. The instrument proposed showed a clarity index of 8.7 (0.25. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.804 and the Cronbach’s correlation coefficient was 0.648. Factor analysis revealed five factors associated with knowledge areas. Regarding the criterion validity, patients with higher education level and higher family income showed greater knowledge about hypertension. Conclusion: The instrument has a satisfactory clarity index and adequate validity, and can be used to evaluate the knowledge of hypertensive participants in cardiac rehabilitation programs.

  10. Nurse mentor perceptions in the delivery of a home-based cardiac rehabilitation program to support patients living in rural areas: An interpretive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohmader, Terence J; Lin, Frances; Chaboyer, Wendy P

    2017-05-01

    Home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs improve health outcomes for people diagnosed with heart disease. Mentoring of patients by nurses trained in CR has been proposed as an innovative model of cardiac care. Little is known however, about the experience of mentors facilitating such programs and adapting to this new role. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore nurse mentor perceptions of their role in the delivery of a home-based CR program for rural patients unable to attend a hospital or outpatient CR program. Seven nurses mentored patients by telephone providing patients with education, psychosocial support and lifestyle advice during their recovery. An open-ended survey was administered to mentors by email and findings revealed mentors perceived their role to be integral to the success of the program. Nurses were satisfied with the development of their new role as patient mentors. They believed their collaborative skills, knowledge and experience in coronary care, timely support and guidance of patients during their recovery and use of innovative audiovisual resources improved the health outcomes of patients not able to attend traditional programs. Cardiac nurses in this study perceived that they were able to successfully transition from their normal work practices in hospital to mentoring patients in their homes. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A national survey of cardiac rehabilitation services in New Zealand: 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, Geoff; Doolan-Noble, Fiona; Humphreys, Grace; Williams, Gina; O'Shaughnessy, Helen; Devlin, Gerry

    2016-05-27

    Guidelines for cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes inform best practice. In Aotearoa NewZealand, little information exists about the structure and services provided by CR programmes and there is a poor understanding of how existing CR programmes are delivered with respect to evidence-based national guidelines. All 46 CR providers in New Zealand were invited to participate in a national survey in 2015. The survey sought information on the following: unit structure; referral processes; patient assessment; audit (including quality assurance activity); Phase 2 CR content; and support for special populations. Simple descriptive analysis of the responses was conducted, involving forming counts and percentages. Thirty-six distinct units completed the survey and 94% provided Phase 2. Assessment tools, Phase 2 educational components, and the methods of providing the exercise component varied. Most units audited their services, 25% audited their programme six-monthly or more frequently. Just over half of the units (56%) reported key performance indicators. The survey identified variations in delivery and content of CR in New Zealand, with poor understanding of the impact on patient outcomes. This is likely due to the absence of standardised audit practices and routine collection of key performance indicators on a national basis.

  12. Patient satisfaction with cardiac rehabilitation: association with utilization, functional capacity, and heart-health behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Saba; Chessex, Caroline; Bassett-Gunter, Rebecca; Grace, Sherry L

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) societies recommend assessment of patient satisfaction given its association with health care utilization and outcomes. Recently, the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC, Glasgow) was recommended as an appropriate tool for the CR setting. The objectives of this study were to 1) describe patient satisfaction with CR, 2) test the psychometric properties of the PACIC in the CR setting, and 3) assess the association of patient satisfaction with CR utilization and outcomes. Methods Secondary analysis was conducted on an observational, prospective CR program evaluation cohort. A convenience sample of patients from 1 of 3 CR programs was approached at their first CR visit, and consenting participants completed a survey. Clinical data were extracted from charts pre- and post-program. Participants were e-mailed surveys again 6 months (including the PACIC) and 1 and 2 years later. Results Of 411 consenting patients, 247 (60.2%) completed CR. The mean PACIC score was 2.8±1.1/5. Internal reliability was α=0.95. The total PACIC score varied significantly by site (F=3.12, P=0.046), indicating discriminant validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly related to greater CR adherence (r=0.22, Ppatient satisfaction with CR. PMID:28479853

  13. Fatalism and short-termism as cultural barriers to cardiac rehabilitation among underprivileged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Mathieu; Dumas, Alex; Stuart, Stephen A

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of death and disability in Canada, and individuals of low socioeconomic status appear particularly vulnerable to such disorders. Although many health-related institutions have promoted cardiovascular health and have created cardiac rehabilitation programmes, they have not attained their desired outcomes, especially amongst socioeconomically deprived men. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu's sociocultural theory, this qualitative study aims to understand the social mechanisms underpinning the lifestyles and health practices of men who had suffered a cardiovascular incident requiring hospitalisation. In all, 20 interviews were conducted with francophone men aged 40 to 65 years living in the province of Québec, Canada. The analysis strongly suggests that the respondents' living conditions and disease were significant obstacles to their adoption of a healthy lifestyle. Their despair and pessimism, apparently originating in the harshness of their financial realities, physical limitations and social networks, led them to believe that they could do little to control their lives, thereby limiting the fulfillment of any long-term ambitions. Therefore, the adoption of a habitus characterised by fatalistic and short-term perceptions of health influenced their lifestyle choices, leading them to maintain lives that were in stark contrast with the recommendations made by health promotion experts. © 2013 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2013 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Different Tempos of Music During Exercise in Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jarad S; Terbizan, Donna J

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of stimulating and sedative music on ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and feeling status during exercise in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) patients. Twenty-two male and female older adults age 64 ± 8.0 y currently enrolled in phase III CR completed the study. Repeated measures crossover designs guided data collection. The manipulated independent variable was music condition (sedative, stimulating, and non-music control). The dependent variables were RPE, BP, HR, and feeling status with each represented by four repeated measures ANOVAs over time via SAS 9.3. Data analysis indicated significant differences for all exercise related variables besides BP. While standardizing the exercise, we observed that sedative music is the best choice to manipulate for decreases in RPE (p=.0019), increases in feeling status (p=.0192), and decreases in HR (pmusic is the best choice to observe decreases in RPE, increases in feeling status, and decreases HR. Stimulating music would only be the correct choice to observe increases in HR, and does not have as much of a beneficial effect on RPE and feeling status as sedative music. There were no significant effects of either type of music on BP.

  15. Mental Distress Factors and Exercise Capacity in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Attending Cardiac Rehabilitation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazukauskiene, Nijole; Burkauskas, Julius; Macijauskiene, Jurate; Duoneliene, Inga; Gelziniene, Vaidute; Jakumaite, Vilija; Brozaitiene, Julija

    2018-02-01

    There is still insufficient data on mental distress factors contributing to exercise capacity (EC) improvement before and after cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of our study was to evaluate the associations between various mental distress factors and EC before and after exercise-based CR (EBCR). Over 12 months, 223 CAD patients (70% men, mean age 58 ± 9 years) were evaluated for socio-demographic, clinical, and mental distress symptoms as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Patients were tested for EC at baseline and after EBCR. In a multivariate linear regression model, EC before EBCR was associated with HADS anxiety subscale (β = -.186, p = .002) and BDI-II somatic/affective subscale (β = -.249, p Mental distress and somatic/affective symptoms of depression are strongly associated with EC both at the beginning and after EBCR. Analysis of possible mediating or moderating factors was beyond the scope of our study. Future studies should focus on comprehensive evaluation of EC risk factors including other mental distress characteristics, subjectively experienced fatigue, and post-operative CAD symptoms.

  16. Perceived heart risk factors can predict experienced psychological stress in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Saeidi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study was done to investigate the role of perceived heart risk factors (PHRFs in the prediction of psychological symptoms of cardiac rehabilitation (CR patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 124 CR patients referred to Kermanshah Hospital of Imam Ali were assessed during April–July 2015. PHRFs scale and Depression, Anxiety, and Stress scale-21 used for data collection. The data were analyzed using linear multiple regression analysis. Results: The mean age of samples (69.4% male was 58.9 ± 9.7 years. The results of regression analysis evidenced that there is no significant relationship between any of the PHRFs with depression and anxiety (P > 0.05; however, biological (P = 0.018 and psychological (P = 0.019 risk factors significantly can predict stress. The model generally can explain 6.4% of the stress variance. Conclusion: PHRFs are included some significant predictors for experienced stress among the CR patients. Given that the biological and psychological risk factors are more effective in experienced stress by the patients, it is recommended that specialists pay more attention to the potential psychological outcomes of this group of patients.

  17. Work-related outcome after acute coronary syndrome: Implications of complex cardiac rehabilitation in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Monica; Ratti, Gennaro; Gerardi, Donato; Capogrosso, Cristina; Ricciardi, Gianfranco; Fulgione, Cosimo; Latte, Salvatore; Tammaro, Paolo; Covino, Gregorio; Nienhaus, Albert; Grazillo, Elpidio Maria; Mallardo, Mario; Capogrosso, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is frequent in the working-age population. Traditional outcomes, such as mortality and hospital readmission, are useful for evaluating prognosis. Fit-for-work is an emerging outcome with clinical as well as socioeconomic significance. We describe the possible benefit of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program for return to work (RTW) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We evaluated 204 patients with recent ACS. They were divided into 4 groups on the basis of their occupational work load: very light (VL), light (L), moderate (M), and heavy (H). Work-related outcomes were assessed with the Work Performance Scale (WPS) of the Functional Status Questionnaire and as "days missed from work" (DMW) in the previous 4 weeks. The variables considered for outcomes were percent ejection fraction, functional capacity expressed in metabolic equivalents (METs), and participation or non-participation in the CR program (CR+ and CR-). One hundred thirty (66%) patients took part in the CR program. Total WPS scores for CR+ and CR- subgroups were VL group: 18±4 vs. 14±4 (p workplace, in particular among clerical workers. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  18. [Efficiency of autogenous training in medical rehabilitation of patients with irritable colon syndrome with constipation dominance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomova, I V; Aĭvazian, T A; Zaĭtsev, V P; Gusakova, E V; Molina, L P

    2008-01-01

    It was established that use of autogenous training makes possible to increase efficiency of the therapy, leading to considerable more evident improvement of somatic and psychotic state, decrease of pain syndrome. Predictors of efficiency of autogenous training were marked out. Indications for use the method in medical rehabilitation of patients with irritable colon syndrome with constipation dominance were elaborated.

  19. Screening for depression: integrating training into the professional development programme for low vision rehabilitation staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Gwyneth; Holloway, Edith E; Craig, Graeme; Hepi, Niky; Coad, Samantha; Keeffe, Jill E; Lamoureux, Ecosse L

    2012-12-01

    To describe the integration of depression screening training into the professional development programme for low vision rehabilitation staff and report on staff evaluation of this training. Pre-post intervention study, in a single population of low vision rehabilitation staff. Three hundred and thirty-six staff from Australia's largest low vision rehabilitation organization, Vision Australia. Staff completed the depression screening and referral training as part of a wider professional development programme. A pre-post-training questionnaire was administered to all staff. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to determine differences in self-reported knowledge, confidence, barriers to recognition and management of depression between baseline and post training. One hundred and seventy-two participants completed both questionnaires. Following training, participants reported an increased knowledge of depression, were more likely to respond to depression in their clients and reported to be more confident in managing depression (P training incorporating more active and 'hands-on' sessions are likely to be required. This training is a promising first step in integrating a depression screening tool into low vision rehabilitation practice. Further work is needed to determine the barriers and facilitators to implementation in practice and to assess clients' acceptability and outcomes. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  20. Hospital-based versus hybrid cardiac rehabilitation program in coronary bypass surgery patients in western Iran: effects on exercise capacity, risk factors, psychological factors, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Farid; Nalini, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of alternative delivery models for a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) in low- and middle-income countries is not well documented. This study compared the traditional hospital-based CRP with a hybrid CRP in western Iran. This observational study was conducted with postcoronary surgery patients in Imam-Ali Hospital in Kermanshah, Iran. Both program models included 2 phases: (1) a common preliminary phase (2-4 weeks) involving exercise training and a plan to control cardiac risk factors; and (2) a complementary phase (8 weeks) consisting of group educational classes and exercise training conducted 3 times a week in the hospital or once a week accompanied by phone calls in the hybrid program. Changes in exercise capacity, blood pressure, lipids, resting heart rate, body mass index, waist circumference, smoking, depression, anxiety, and quality of life as well as differences in attendance at hospital sessions were investigated. From a total of 887 patients, 780 (87.9%) completed the programs. There was no association between course completion and type of CRP. Mean age of patients completing the programs was 55.6 ± 8.7 years and 23.8% were female. The hospital-based (n = 585) and hybrid (n = 195) programs resulted in a significant increase in exercise capacity (P countries where there are no appropriate health facilities in remote areas.

  1. Time to adapt exercise training regimens in pulmonary rehabilitation – a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee AL

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Annemarie L Lee,1–4 Anne E Holland1–3 1Physiotherapy, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Physiotherapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 4Westpark Healthcare Centre, ON, Canada Abstract: Exercise intolerance, exertional dyspnea, reduced health-related quality of life, and acute exacerbations are features characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Patients with a primary diagnosis of COPD often report comorbidities and other secondary manifestations, which diversifies the clinical presentation. Pulmonary rehabilitation that includes whole body exercise training is a critical part of management, and core programs involve endurance and resistance training for the upper and lower limbs. Improvement in maximal and submaximal exercise capacity, dyspnea, fatigue, health-related quality of life, and psychological symptoms are outcomes associated with exercise training in pulmonary rehabilitation, irrespective of the clinical state in which it is commenced. There may be benefits for the health care system as well as the individual patient, with fewer exacerbations and subsequent hospitalization reported with exercise training. The varying clinical profile of COPD may direct the need for modification to traditional training strategies for some patients. Interval training, one-legged cycling (partitioning and non-linear periodized training appear to be equally or more effective than continuous training. Inspiratory muscle training may have a role as an adjunct to whole body training in selected patients. The benefits of balance training are also emerging. Strategies to ensure that health enhancing behaviors are adopted and maintained are essential. These may include training for an extended duration, alternative environments to undertake the initial program, maintenance programs following initial exercise training, program repetition

  2. Efficacy of a Multimodal Cognitive Rehabilitation Including Psychomotor and Endurance Training in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Reuter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild cognitive impairment, especially executive dysfunction might occur early in the course of Parkinson's disease. Cognitive training is thought to improve cognitive performance. However, transfer of improvements achieved in paper and pencil tests into daily life has been difficult. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether a multimodal cognitive rehabilitation programme including physical exercises might be more successful than cognitive training programmes without motor training. 240 PD-patients were included in the study and randomly allocated to three treatment arms, group A cognitive training, group B cognitive training and transfer training and group C cognitive training, transfer training and psychomotor and endurance training. The primary outcome measure was the ADAS-Cog. The secondary outcome measure was the SCOPA-Cog. Training was conducted for 4 weeks on a rehabilitation unit, followed by 6 months training at home. Caregivers received an education programme. The combination of cognitive training using paper and pencil and the computer, transfer training and physical training seems to have the greatest effect on cognitive function. Thus, patients of group C showed the greatest improvement on the ADAS-Cog and SCOPA-COG and were more likely to continue with the training programme after the study.

  3. Fun During Knee Rehabilitation: Feasibility and Acceptability Testing of a New Android-Based Training Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Spickschen, Thomas Sanjay; Colcuc, Christian; Hanke, Alexander; Clausen, Jan-Dierk; James, Paul Abraham; Horstmann, Hauke

    2017-01-01

    The initial goals of rehabilitation after knee injuries and operations are to achieve full knee extension and to activate quadriceps muscle. In addition to regular physiotherapy, an android-based knee training device is designed to help patients achieve these goals and improve compliance in the early rehabilitation period. This knee training device combines fun in a computer game with muscular training or rehabilitation. Our aim was to test the feasibility and acceptability of this new device. 50 volunteered subjects enrolled to test out the computer game aided device. The first game was the high-striker game, which recorded maximum knee extension power. The second game involved controlling quadriceps muscular power to simulate flying an aeroplane in order to record accuracy of muscle activation. The subjects evaluated this game by completing a simple questionnaire. No technical problem was encountered during the usage of this device. No subjects complained of any discomfort after using this device. Measurements including maximum knee extension power, knee muscle activation and control were recorded successfully. Subjects rated their experience with the device as either excellent or very good and agreed that the device can motivate and monitor the progress of knee rehabilitation training. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first android-based tool available to fast track knee rehabilitation training. All subjects gave very positive feedback to this computer game aided knee device.

  4. Outcomes in a Community-Based Intensive Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Comparison with Hospital-Based and Academic Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenberg, Charles; Silva, Edna; Young, M Jean; Gilles, Greg

    2018-04-13

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a community-based intensive cardiac rehabilitation program could produce positive changes in risk factor profile and outcomes in an at-risk population. Participants seeking either primary or secondary coronary artery disease prevention voluntarily enrolled in the 12-week intensive cardiac rehabilitation program. Data were obtained at baseline and 6-12 months after completion of the program. A total of 142 individuals, mean age 69 years, completed the Heart Series between 2012 and 2016. Follow-up data were available in 105 participants (74%). Participants showed statistically significant improvements in mean weight (165 to 162 lbs, P = .0005), body mass index (26 to 25 kg/m 2 , P = .001), systolic blood pressure (126 to 122 mm Hg, P = .01), diastolic blood pressure (73 to 70 mm Hg, P = .0005), total cholesterol (175 to 168 mg/dL, P = .03), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (100 to 93 mg/dL, P = .005), LDL-C/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio (1.8 to 1.6, P = .005), and cholesterol/HDL-C ratio (3.2 to 3.0, P = .003). Changes in HDL-C, triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose did not reach statistical significance, but all trended in favorable directions. Adverse cardiovascular disease outcomes were rare (one stent placement, no deaths). A total of 105 participants completed our 12-week community-based intensive cardiac rehabilitation program and showed significant positive changes in several measures of cardiac risk, with only 1 adverse event. These results compare favorably with those of hospital-based and academic institutional programs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A mHealth cardiac rehabilitation exercise intervention: findings from content development studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfaeffli Leila

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Involving stakeholders and consumers throughout the content and study design ensures interventions are engaging and relevant for end-users. The aim of this paper is to present the content development process for a mHealth (mobile phone and internet-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR exercise intervention. Methods An innovative mHealth intervention was developed with patient input using the following steps: conceptualization, formative research, pre-testing, and pilot testing. Conceptualization, including theoretical and technical aspects, was undertaken by experts. For the formative component, focus groups and interviews with cardiac patients were conducted to discuss their perceptions of a mHealth CR program. A general inductive thematic approach identified common themes. A preliminary library of text and video messages were then developed. Participants were recruited from CR education sessions to pre-test and provide feedback on the content using an online survey. Common responses were extracted and compiled. An iterative process was used to refine content prior to pilot testing and conduct of a randomized controlled trial. Results 38 CR patients and 3 CR nurses participated in the formative research and 20 CR patients participated in the content pre-testing. Participants perceived the mHealth program as an effective approach to inform and motivate patients to exercise. For the qualitative study, 100% (n = 41 of participants thought it to be a good idea, and 11% of participants felt it might not be useful for them, but would be for others. Of the 20 participants who completed the online survey, 17 out of 20 (85% stated they would sign up to a program where they could receive information by video messages on a website, and 12 out of 20 (60% showed interest in a texting program. Some older CR patients viewed technology as a potential barrier as they were unfamiliar with text messaging or did not have mobile phones. Steps to

  6. A meta-analysis of mental health treatments and cardiac rehabilitation for improving clinical outcomes and depression among patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Thomas; Redwine, Laura S; Linke, Sarah E; Mills, Paul J

    2013-05-01

    To quantify the efficacy of mental health (antidepressants & psychotherapies) and cardiac rehabilitation treatments for improving secondary event risk and depression among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Using meta-analytic methods, we evaluated mental health and cardiac rehabilitation therapies for a) reducing secondary events and 2) improving depression severity in patients with CHD. Key word searches of PubMed and Psychlit databases and previous reviews identified relevant trials. Eighteen mental health trials evaluated secondary events and 22 trials evaluated depression reduction. Cardiac rehabilitation trials for the same categories numbered 17 and 13, respectively. Mental health treatments did not reduce total mortality (absolute risk reduction [ARR] = -0.001, confidence interval [95% CI] = -0.016 to 0.015; number needed to treat [NNT] = ∞), showed moderate efficacy for reducing CHD events (ARR = 0.029, 95% CI = 0.007 to 0.051; NNT = 34), and a medium effect size for improving depression (Cohen d = 0.297). Cardiac rehabilitation showed similar efficacy for treating depression (d = 0.23) and reducing CHD events (ARR = 0.017, 95% CI = 0.007 to 0.026; NNT = 59) and reduced total mortality (ARR = 0.016, 95% CI = 0.005 to 0.027; NNT = 63). Among patients with CHD, mental health treatments and cardiac rehabilitation may each reduce depression and CHD events, whereas cardiac rehabilitation is superior for reducing total mortality risk. The results support a continued role for mental health treatments and a larger role for mental health professionals in cardiac rehabilitation.

  7. Developing complex interventions: lessons learned from a pilot study examining strategy training in acute stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Elizabeth R; Dawson, Deirdre R; Whyte, Ellen M; Butters, Meryl A; Dew, Mary Amanda; Grattan, Emily S; Becker, James T; Holm, Margo B

    2014-04-01

    To examine the feasibility of a strategy training clinical trial in a small group of adults with stroke-related cognitive impairments in inpatient rehabilitation, and to explore the impact of strategy training on disability. Non-randomized two-group intervention pilot study. Two inpatient rehabilitation units within an academic health centre. Individuals with a primary diagnosis of acute stroke, who were admitted to inpatient rehabilitation and demonstrated cognitive impairments were included. Individuals with severe aphasia; dementia; major depressive disorder, bipolar, or psychotic disorder; recent drug or alcohol abuse; and anticipated length of stay less than five days were excluded. Participants received strategy training or an attention control session in addition to usual rehabilitation care. Sessions in both groups were 30-40 minutes daily, five days per week, for the duration of inpatient rehabilitation. We assessed feasibility through participants' recruitment and retention; research intervention session number and duration; participants' comprehension and engagement; intervention fidelity; and participants' satisfaction. We assessed disability at study admission, inpatient rehabilitation discharge, 3 and 6 months using the Functional Independence Measure. Participants in both groups (5 per group) received the assigned intervention (>92% planned sessions; >94% fidelity) and completed follow-up testing. Strategy training participants in this small sample demonstrated significantly less disability at six months (M (SE) = 117 (3)) than attention control participants (M(SE) = 96 (14); t 8 = 7.87, P = 0.02). It is feasible and acceptable to administer both intervention protocols as an adjunct to acute inpatient rehabilitation, and strategy training shows promise for reducing disability.

  8. Using a Combined Platform of Swarm Intelligence Algorithms and GIS to Provide Land Suitability Maps for Locating Cardiac Rehabilitation Defibrillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    KAFFASH-CHARANDABI, Neda; SADEGHI-NIARAKI, Abolghasem; PARK, Dong-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiac arrest is a condition in which the heart is completely stopped and is not pumping any blood. Although most cardiac arrest cases are reported from homes or hospitals, about 20% occur in public areas. Therefore, these areas need to be investigated in terms of cardiac arrest incidence so that places of high incidence can be identified and cardiac rehabilitation defibrillators installed there. Methods: In order to investigate a study area in Petersburg, Pennsylvania State, and to determine appropriate places for installing defibrillators with 5-year period data, swarm intelligence algorithms were used. Moreover, the location of the defibrillators was determined based on the following five evaluation criteria: land use, altitude of the area, economic conditions, distance from hospitals and approximate areas of reported cases of cardiac arrest for public places that were created in geospatial information system (GIS). Results: The A-P HADEL algorithm results were more precise about 27.36%. The validation results indicated a wider coverage of real values and the verification results confirmed the faster and more exact optimization of the cost function in the PSO method. Conclusion: The study findings emphasize the necessity of applying optimal optimization methods along with GIS and precise selection of criteria in the selection of optimal locations for installing medical facilities because the selected algorithm and criteria dramatically affect the final responses. Meanwhile, providing land suitability maps for installing facilities across hot and risky spots has the potential to save many lives. PMID:26587471

  9. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease who are not suitable for revascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Demerdash, Salah [Department of Cardiology, Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Khorshid, Hazem, E-mail: hazemkhorshid@yahoo.com [Department of Cardiology, Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Salah, Iman; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed A. [Department of Cardiology, Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Salem, Alaa M. [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Division, National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-07-15

    Background: Ischemic heart diseases including stable angina & acute events, represent a huge burden on both the individual & the society and represent an important source of disability. Aim: We aimed to identify the effect of cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) on the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) unsuitable for coronary revascularization. Methods: The study included 40 patients with IHD who were not suitable for coronary revascularization either by PCI or CABG (due to unsuitable coronary anatomy, co morbidities, high surgical/procedural risk or patient preference). All patients were subjected to sophisticated CRP protocols, including patient education, nutritional, medical, psychological and sexual counseling and group smoking cessation. All patients participated in low intensity exercise program twice weekly. The patient’s symptoms, vitals and medications were evaluated at each visit and clinical and laboratory data, echocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT) were evaluated before and 3 months after the end of the study. Results: The mean age was 56.8 ± 3.1 years and only 2 patients (5%) were females. 22 (55%) patients were diabetic, 21 (53%) were hypertensive and 30 (75%) were smokers. It was found that 3 months after completion of CRP, there was a significant decrease in BMI (30.3 ± 2.9 vs. 31.2 ± 1.9, p < 0.001), and mean blood pressure (93.4 ± 11 vs. 105 ± 10.6 mmHg, p < 0.001). There was also a favorable effect on lipid profile and a significant improvement of the functional capacity in terms of NYHA functional class (2.1 ± 0.62 vs. 1.4 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). Despite that wall motion score index did not significantly change after CRP, there was a strong trend toward a better ejection fraction (53.7 ± 7.8 vs. 54.5 ± 6.3 %, p = 0.06) and significant improvement of Canadian cardiovascular class (1.42 ± 0.6 vs. 1.95 ± 0.5, p < 0.001) post CRP. Importantly, the difference between the SPECT

  10. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease who are not suitable for revascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Demerdash, Salah; Khorshid, Hazem; Salah, Iman; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed A.; Salem, Alaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ischemic heart diseases including stable angina & acute events, represent a huge burden on both the individual & the society and represent an important source of disability. Aim: We aimed to identify the effect of cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) on the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) unsuitable for coronary revascularization. Methods: The study included 40 patients with IHD who were not suitable for coronary revascularization either by PCI or CABG (due to unsuitable coronary anatomy, co morbidities, high surgical/procedural risk or patient preference). All patients were subjected to sophisticated CRP protocols, including patient education, nutritional, medical, psychological and sexual counseling and group smoking cessation. All patients participated in low intensity exercise program twice weekly. The patient’s symptoms, vitals and medications were evaluated at each visit and clinical and laboratory data, echocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT) were evaluated before and 3 months after the end of the study. Results: The mean age was 56.8 ± 3.1 years and only 2 patients (5%) were females. 22 (55%) patients were diabetic, 21 (53%) were hypertensive and 30 (75%) were smokers. It was found that 3 months after completion of CRP, there was a significant decrease in BMI (30.3 ± 2.9 vs. 31.2 ± 1.9, p < 0.001), and mean blood pressure (93.4 ± 11 vs. 105 ± 10.6 mmHg, p < 0.001). There was also a favorable effect on lipid profile and a significant improvement of the functional capacity in terms of NYHA functional class (2.1 ± 0.62 vs. 1.4 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). Despite that wall motion score index did not significantly change after CRP, there was a strong trend toward a better ejection fraction (53.7 ± 7.8 vs. 54.5 ± 6.3 %, p = 0.06) and significant improvement of Canadian cardiovascular class (1.42 ± 0.6 vs. 1.95 ± 0.5, p < 0.001) post CRP. Importantly, the difference between the SPECT

  11. Rehabilitation Policy and Practice in Romania: Implications for Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Eniko C.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive account of the Romanian rehabilitation service delivery system. After a short presentation of disability issues during communism, the article shifts focus to a detailed review of current advancements in disability policy and legislation, prevalence, diagnosis, service delivery system and procedures, and…

  12. Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation for Coronary Heart Disease: Cochrane Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Oldridge, Neil; Thompson, David R; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rees, Karen; Martin, Nicole; Taylor, Rod S

    2016-01-05

    Although recommended in guidelines for the management of coronary heart disease (CHD), concerns have been raised about the applicability of evidence from existing meta-analyses of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The goal of this study is to update the Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis of exercise-based CR for CHD. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Science Citation Index Expanded were searched to July 2014. Retrieved papers, systematic reviews, and trial registries were hand-searched. We included randomized controlled trials with at least 6 months of follow-up, comparing CR to no-exercise controls following myocardial infarction or revascularization, or with a diagnosis of angina pectoris or CHD defined by angiography. Two authors screened titles for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Studies were pooled using random effects meta-analysis, and stratified analyses were undertaken to examine potential treatment effect modifiers. A total of 63 studies with 14,486 participants with median follow-up of 12 months were included. Overall, CR led to a reduction in cardiovascular mortality (relative risk: 0.74; 95% confidence interval: 0.64 to 0.86) and the risk of hospital admissions (relative risk: 0.82; 95% confidence interval: 0.70 to 0.96). There was no significant effect on total mortality, myocardial infarction, or revascularization. The majority of studies (14 of 20) showed higher levels of health-related quality of life in 1 or more domains following exercise-based CR compared with control subjects. This study confirms that exercise-based CR reduces cardiovascular mortality and provides important data showing reductions in hospital admissions and improvements in quality of life. These benefits appear to be consistent across patients and intervention types and were independent of study quality, setting, and publication date. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology

  13. In-class Active Video Game Supplementation and Adherence to Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruivo, Jorge Manuel Arsénio Dos Santos; Karim, Kay; OʼShea, Roisin; Oliveira, Rosa Celeste Santos; Keary, Louis; OʼBrien, Claire; Gormley, John Patrick

    2017-07-01

    The application of active video games (AVGs) during cardiac rehabilitation (CR) sessions could potentially facilitate patient adherence. The feasibility, safety, and efficacy of in-class AVG supplementation as an alternative to conventional phase 2 programs were investigated. A pilot, evaluator-blinded, intention-to-treat, randomized controlled trial recruited 32 low-moderate risk CR participants and allocated them to conventional or AVG-supplemented exercise. Both groups experienced equal exercise loads for 6 weeks. Patients were assessed at baseline, end of the program, and after an 8-week followup. Adherence and safety-related outcomes were the primary endpoints. Secondary outcomes included change in exercise capacity, daily physical activity (PA), energy expenditure (EE), and psychometric profiling. Patients (males 81%; 60 ± 10 years) presented with typical cardiovascular risk factors and similar baseline characteristics. Participants did not perceive an increased risk of injury and were more interactive. At the end of the program, there was a lower tendency for dropping out (6% vs 19%, P > .05), a significant improvement in PA (322 vs 247 arbitrary acceleration units/min, P = .047) and related EE per body weight (13 vs 11 kcal/kg/d, P = .04) among AVG participants compared with controls. No significant differences between groups for adverse medical events, exercise capacity, affect toward exercise, anxiety, depression, or quality-of-life changes were reported. The additional use of AVGs during CR sessions is feasible, safe, and significantly improved daily PA and EE. A dropout reduction trend among its users, which needs to be confirmed in a larger trial, raises awareness to AVG supplementation as a promising strategy to increase CR adherence.

  14. Telehealth exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstorn, Jonathan C; Gant, Nicholas; Direito, Artur; Beckmann, Christina; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Despite proven effectiveness, participation in traditional supervised exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (exCR) remains low. Telehealth interventions that use information and communication technologies to enable remote exCR programme delivery can overcome common access barriers while preserving clinical supervision and individualised exercise prescription. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the benefits of telehealth exCR on exercise capacity and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors compared with traditional exCR and usual care, among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, Embase, MEDLINE, PubMed and PsycINFO were searched from inception through 31 May 2015 for randomised controlled trials comparing telehealth exCR with centre-based exCR or usual care among patients with CHD. Outcomes included maximal aerobic exercise capacity, modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and exercise adherence. 11 trials (n=1189) met eligibility criteria and were included in the review. Physical activity level was higher following telehealth exCR than after usual care. Compared with centre-based exCR, telehealth exCR was more effective for enhancing physical activity level, exercise adherence, diastolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Telehealth and centre-based exCR were comparably effective for improving maximal aerobic exercise capacity and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Telehealth exCR appears to be at least as effective as centre-based exCR for improving modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and functional capacity, and could enhance exCR utilisation by providing additional options for patients who cannot attend centre-based exCR. Telehealth exCR must now capitalise on technological advances to provide more comprehensive, responsive and interactive interventions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Women's experiences accessing a women-centered cardiac rehabilitation program: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Danielle E; Sutton, Erica J; Landry, Mireille; Sternberg, Len; Price, Jennifer A D

    2010-01-01

    The health benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for women living with heart disease are well documented, yet women remain underrepresented in traditionally structured CR programs. This health service delivery gap has been attributed to a number of sex-related factors experienced by women, including lower rates of physician referral, travel-related barriers, competing work and caregiving responsibilities, greater cardiovascular disease severity, and number of comorbid health conditions. Whether a program specifically designed for women is able to address these barriers and facilitate women's participation is a question that has seldom been explored in the CR literature. As part of a larger study exploring whether 6 predefined principles of women's health (empowerment of women, accessible programs, broad definition of health care, high-quality of care, collaborative planning, and innovative and creative approaches) are reflected in the practices of the Women's Cardiovascular Health Initiative (WCHI) (a comprehensive CR and primary prevention program designed for women), the objective of this analysis was to explore how the principle of "accessible programs" is experienced by women participating in the WCHI. Fourteen women previously enrolled in the WCHI program participated in a single, in-person qualitative interview. Transcripts were analyzed using a constant-comparative approach to identify relevant themes related to program accessibility. Key themes identified included participants' experiences with acquiring physician referral, negotiating transportation issues, and navigating program schedules. Women discussed how peer support and staff members' willingness to address their health-related concerns facilitated their participation. While a women-centered CR/primary prevention program may facilitate and encourage women's participation by providing flexible program schedules as well as peer and professional support, efforts are still required to address

  16. Patient preferences for types of community-based cardiac rehabilitation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Shermain; Wong, Xin Yi; Toon, Min Li; Seah, Yi; Yap, Angela Frances; Lim, Cindy; Tay, Hung Yong; Fong, Warren; Low, Lian Leng; Kwan, Yu Heng

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves mortality, morbidity and quality of life of cardiovascular patients. However, its uptake is poor especially in the hospitals due to long travel distances and office hours constraints. Community-based CR is a possible solution. To understand the type of community-based CR preferred and identify patient characteristics associated with certain programme combinations. A cross-sectional survey was administered to a randomised list of patients at risk for or with cardiovascular diseases at two community-based CR centres. Participants were presented with nine hypothetical choice sets and asked to choose only one of the two alternative programme combinations in each choice set. Attributes include support group presence, cash incentives, upfront deposit and out-of-pocket cost. The counts for each combination were tallied and corrected for repeats. Chi-square test and logistic regression were performed to understand the characteristics associated with the preferred CR combination. After correcting for repeats, patients most (85.2%) prefer CR programmes with new group activities, support group, cash rewards, deposit and out-of-pocket cost, and few exercise equipment with physiotherapist presence without the need for monitoring equipment. Patients with more than three bedrooms in their house are less likely (OR 0.367; CI 0.17 to 0.80; P=0.011) to choose the choice with no physiotherapist and few equipment available. This is the first study to explore patients' preferences for different types of community CR. Higher income patients prefer physiotherapist presence and are willing to settle for less equipment. Our study serves as a guide for designing future community-based CR programmes.

  17. Impact of cardiac rehabilitation on metabolic syndrome in Iranian patients with coronary heart disease: the role of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Ali; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Amini, Afshin; Aryan, Reza Safi; Kerahroodi, Fahimeh Habibi; Rabiei, Katayoun; Taghipour, Hamid Reza; Moghimi, Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    Due to high prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease (CHD) in Iran, and their mutual relationship, we evaluated how comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) can affect MetS in patients with CHD. In this study (1998-2003), we evaluated 547 patients with CHD undergoing comprehensive CR. Cases with MetS decreased from 42.8% to 33.3% after CR program (p < .001). Decrease in high fasting plasma glucose, triglyceridemia, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and increase in HDL cholesterol, functional capacity, and left ventricular ejection fraction was more prominent in the "MetS but not obese" group. However, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, weight, body mass index, and waist circumference showed a greater decrease in groups with obesity. Cardiac rehabilitation is an effective treatment of MetS, particularly in the absence of obesity. This represents an additional argument for the prevention of obesity and the linked insulin resistance. © 2012 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  18. Gameplay as a Source of Intrinsic Motivation for Individuals in Need of Ankle Training or Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Injuries to the ankle may be a source of great discomfort and the long-term effects can negatively influence the future health of the individual who has suffered the injury. Wobble boards represent a relatively inexpensive type of equipment that may be used to train one’s ankles preventively...... or as part of the rehabilitation process once the damage has been done. However, individuals in need of such training frequently lack the motivation necessary in order to successfully complete the training or rehabilitation process. This paper details the design and implementation of a prototype intended...... to alleviate this problem by leveraging games’ potential as a source of intrinsic motivation. More specifically, the prototype enables users to control a game by means of a wobble board, thus allowing them to perform the necessary exercises while playing. An expert on ankle rehabilitation assessed the efficacy...

  19. [Rehabilitation in undergraduate education and advanced professional training of the participating professional groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Wilfried; Bengel, Jürgen; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    In the German health care system, multiprofessional and coordinated rehabilitation care provides support for successful disease management. Against a background of the conditions and strong dynamics of the provision, this article gives an overview of some of the pertinent developments in rehabilitation-related undergraduate education and advanced professional training of physicians, psychologists, and exercise therapy professions in Germany. Frequently, there are few provisions and great variation between different locations. New conditions, such as the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education, the National Guidelines for Graduate Medical Education, and the ongoing reform of the psychotherapists' law emphasizing training in psychotherapy at university, allow the expectation of a positive effect on the competence of rehabilitation professionals. Education in physiotherapy is developing according to international standards aimed at improved evidence-based care. For the widely evidence-based undergraduate education and advanced professional training in sports and exercise therapy better profiling and professionalization should be sought.

  20. Effect of early rehabilitation training on oxygen free radical generation and nerve injury in patients with cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Shu Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of early rehabilitation training combined with edaravone on oxygen free radical generation and nerve injury in patients with cerebral hemorrhage. Methods: A total of 56 patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage who were treated in Zigong Third People’s Hospital between July 2014 and March 2017 were selected and randomly divided into early rehabilitation group and routine rehabilitation group, the early rehabilitation group began the rehabilitation training 2 d after cerebral hemorrhage condition was stabilized, and routine rehabilitation group began the rehabilitation training 14 d after cerebral hemorrhage. Serum contents of oxygen free radicals, nerve injury markers and neurotrophic molecules were detected 28 d and 56 d after cerebral hemorrhage. Results: 28 d and 56 d after cerebral hemorrhage, serum MDA, AOPP, 8-OHdG, GFAP, NSE, Tf, Ft and S100B levels of early rehabilitation group were significantly lower than those of routine rehabilitation group while BDNF, NGF, NTF-α and IGF-I levels were significantly higher than those of routine rehabilitation group. Conclusion: Early rehabilitation training combined with edaravone for cerebral hemorrhage can inhibit the oxygen free radical generation, reduce the degree of nerve injury and improve the neurotrophic state.

  1. Participant-selected music and physical activity in older adults following cardiac rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Imogen N; Baker, Felicity A; Peiris, Casey L; Shoebridge, Georgie; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate effects of participant-selected music on older adults' achievement of activity levels recommended in the physical activity guidelines following cardiac rehabilitation. A parallel group randomized controlled trial with measurements at Weeks 0, 6 and 26. A multisite outpatient rehabilitation programme of a publicly funded metropolitan health service. Adults aged 60 years and older who had completed a cardiac rehabilitation programme. Experimental participants selected music to support walking with guidance from a music therapist. Control participants received usual care only. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants achieving activity levels recommended in physical activity guidelines. Secondary outcomes compared amounts of physical activity, exercise capacity, cardiac risk factors, and exercise self-efficacy. A total of 56 participants, mean age 68.2 years (SD = 6.5), were randomized to the experimental ( n = 28) and control groups ( n = 28). There were no differences between groups in proportions of participants achieving activity recommended in physical activity guidelines at Week 6 or 26. Secondary outcomes demonstrated between-group differences in male waist circumference at both measurements (Week 6 difference -2.0 cm, 95% CI -4.0 to 0; Week 26 difference -2.8 cm, 95% CI -5.4 to -0.1), and observed effect sizes favoured the experimental group for amounts of physical activity (d = 0.30), exercise capacity (d = 0.48), and blood pressure (d = -0.32). Participant-selected music did not increase the proportion of participants achieving recommended amounts of physical activity, but may have contributed to exercise-related benefits.

  2. A Lower Limb Rehabilitation Robot in Sitting Position with a Review of Training Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiammanussakul, Trinnachoke; Sangveraphunsiri, Viboon

    2018-01-01

    Robots for stroke rehabilitation at the lower limbs in sitting/lying position have been developed extensively. Some of them have been applied in clinics and shown the potential of the recovery of poststroke patients who suffer from hemiparesis. These robots were developed to provide training at different joints of lower limbs with various activities and modalities. This article reviews the training activities that were realized by rehabilitation robots in literature, in order to offer insights for developing a novel robot suitable for stroke rehabilitation. The control system of the lower limb rehabilitation robot in sitting position that was introduced in the previous work is discussed in detail to demonstrate the behavior of the robot while training a subject. The nonlinear impedance control law, based on active assistive control strategy, is able to define the response of the robot with more specifications while the passivity property and the robustness of the system is verified. A preliminary experiment is conducted on a healthy subject to show that the robot is able to perform active assistive exercises with various training activities and assist the subject to complete the training with desired level of assistance.

  3. A Lower Limb Rehabilitation Robot in Sitting Position with a Review of Training Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinnachoke Eiammanussakul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Robots for stroke rehabilitation at the lower limbs in sitting/lying position have been developed extensively. Some of them have been applied in clinics and shown the potential of the recovery of poststroke patients who suffer from hemiparesis. These robots were developed to provide training at different joints of lower limbs with various activities and modalities. This article reviews the training activities that were realized by rehabilitation robots in literature, in order to offer insights for developing a novel robot suitable for stroke rehabilitation. The control system of the lower limb rehabilitation robot in sitting position that was introduced in the previous work is discussed in detail to demonstrate the behavior of the robot while training a subject. The nonlinear impedance control law, based on active assistive control strategy, is able to define the response of the robot with more specifications while the passivity property and the robustness of the system is verified. A preliminary experiment is conducted on a healthy subject to show that the robot is able to perform active assistive exercises with various training activities and assist the subject to complete the training with desired level of assistance.

  4. The effect of the cardiac rehabilitation program on obese and non-obese females with coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Esteki Ghashghaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is strongly associated with coronary heart disease and it is known as an independent risk factor. So, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of phase II comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program on obesity indexes, functional capacity, lipid profiles, and fasting blood sugar in obese and non-obese female patients with coronary heart disease and to compare changes in these groups. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and five women with coronary heart disease participated in our study. At the beginning of study, body mass index, functional capacity, and lipid profiles and fasting blood sugar were evaluated; then, these patients were divided into two groups, patients who had BMI≥30 were known as obese and who had BMI<30 were known as non-obese patients. All of them completed the period of cardiac rehabilitation program, and 2 months later, all risk factors were examined for the second time in each group. Data were analyzed with SPSS software version 15. For comparing the mean of outcomes, independent t-tests and paired t-tests were used. Results: Data revealed that unless in weight (P=0.00 and functional capacity (P=0.001, there were no significant differences in obese and non-obese female patients, at baseline. As a result of the cardiac rehabilitation program, both groups had significant improvement in functional capacity (P=0.00, weight reduction (P=0.00, triglyceride (P=0.01 and P=0.02, respectively, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.01, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (P=0.00 and P=0.003, respectively. As well, significant improvement was observed in high-density lipoprotein (P=0.01 only in obese female, and non-obese female had significant differences in total cholesterol (P=0.003. However, there were not significant changes in total cholesterol (P=0.05 and fasting blood sugar (P=0.09 in obese female. Also, non-obese females didn′t have

  5. Medicare Program; Advancing Care Coordination Through Episode Payment Models (EPMs); Cardiac Rehabilitation Incentive Payment Model; and Changes to the

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-19

    This final rule finalizes May 20, 2017 as the effective date of the final rule titled "Advancing Care Coordination Through Episode Payment Models (EPMs); Cardiac Rehabilitation Incentive Payment Model; and Changes to the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model (CJR)" originally published in the January 3, 2017 Federal Register. This final rule also finalizes a delay of the applicability date of the regulations at 42 CFR part 512 from July 1, 2017 to January 1, 2018 and delays the effective date of the specific CJR regulations listed in the DATES section from July 1, 2017 to January 1, 2018.

  6. Goal conflict and goal facilitation in community-based cardiac rehabilitation: a theory-based interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presseau, Justin; Boyd, Emily; Francis, Jill J; Sniehotta, Falko F

    2015-01-01

    Theories often consider behaviors in isolation of conflicting and facilitating personal goals. We conducted interviews with 13 people in cardiac rehabilitation, investigating whether eliciting physical activity (PA) control beliefs sufficiently captures goal conflict and goal facilitation. We assessed PA, intention, and control beliefs using standard elicitation methods and then assessed goal conflict and goal facilitation. Twelve participants described conflicting, and all described facilitating, personal goals. Most goal facilitation (94%) and conflict (82%) beliefs were identified beyond the control belief elicitation. Goal facilitation and conflict are not captured in a standard control belief elicitation and may supplement single-behavior models to understand PA.

  7. Effectiveness of computerized cognitive rehabilitation training on symptomatological, neuropsychological and work function in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Kyeong

    2013-06-01

    There has been plenty of interest in cognitive rehabilitation for schizophrenia here in Korea since the year 2000. But the efficacy studies of cognitive remediation intervention are still deficient. The primary purpose of this study was to develop a computer-assisted cognitive remediation program and conduct a clinical trial in a group of schizophrenic patients. Sixty patients with schizophrenia were randomly assigned to a computerized cognitive rehabilitation (Cog-trainer) group plus usual rehabilitation (UR) or to a usual rehabilitation (UR) group only. Clinical, neuropsychological and functional outcome variables were assessed at baseline and after intervention. The Cog-trainer group received 20 sessions of computerized cognitive remediation training over 3 months. This training program consists of 10 units, with each unit being divided into three stages: (i) practice; (ii) application; and (iii) advanced. Compared to the UR group, the Cog-trainer exhibited a significant improvement in attention, concentration and working memory. The Cog-trainer group also showed improvement in the work quality subscale of the work behavior inventory. However, there were no significant benefits of computerized cognitive remediation where symptoms were concerned. These results indicate that computerized cognitive rehabilitation training can contribute to an improvement in the cognitive function of people with schizophrenia. The changes in cognitive outcomes can also contribute to improvement in job functioning. Further study of generalization to other functional outcome measures will be necessary. Long-term follow-up studies are needed to confirm the maintenance of such improvements. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Rehabilitation engineering training for the future: influence of trends in academics, technology, and health reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, J M

    1995-01-01

    A perspective is offered on rehabilitation engineering educational strategies, with a focus on the bachelor's and master's levels. Ongoing changes in engineering education are summarized, especially as related to the integration of design and computers throughout the curriculum; most positively affect rehabilitation engineering training. The challenge of identifying long-term "niches" for rehabilitation engineers within a changing rehabilitation service delivery process is addressed. Five key training components are identified and developed: core science and engineering knowledge, synthesized open-ended problem-solving skill development, hands-on design experience, rehabilitation breadth exposure, and a clinical internship. Two unique abilities are identified that help demarcate the engineer from other providers: open-ended problem-solving skills that include quantitative analysis when appropriate, and objective quantitative evaluation of human performance. Educational strategies for developing these abilities are addressed. Finally, a case is made for training "hybrid" engineers/therapists, in particular bachelor-level engineers who go directly to graduate school to become certified orthotists/prosthetists or physical/occupational therapists, pass the RESNA-sponsored assistive technology service provision exam along the way, then later in life obtain a professional engineer's license and an engineering master's degree.

  9. Can cardiac rehabilitation programs improve functional capacity and left ventricular diastolic function in patients with mechanical reperfusion after ST elevation myocardial infarction?: A double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Golabchi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend cardiac rehabilitation programs (CRP as a means to improve functional status of patients after coronary revascularization. However, research supporting this recommendation has been limited and positive effects of CRP on diastolic function are controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an 8-week CRP on left ventricular diastolic function.    METHODS: This randomized, clinical trial included 29 men with ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI who had received reperfusion therapy, i.e. coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. They were randomized to a training group (n = 15; mean age: 54.2 ± 9.04 years old and a control group (n = 14; mean age: 51.71 ± 6.98 years old. Patients in the training group performed an 8-week CRP with an intensity of 60-85% of maximum heart rate. Exercise sessions lasted 60-90 minutes and were held three times a week. At the start and end of the study, all patients performed symptom-limited exercise test based on Naughton treadmill protocol. Pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography was also used to determine peak velocity of early (E and late (A waves, E/A ratios, and the deceleration time of E (DT.    RESULTS: Left ventricular diastolic indices (E, A, E/A ratio, DT did not change significantly after the CRP. Compared to baseline, patients in the training group had significant improvements in functional capacity (8.30 ± 1.30 vs. 9.7 ± 1.7 and maximum heart rate (118.50 ± 24.48 vs. 126.85 ± 22.75. Moreover, resting heart rate of the training group was significantly better than the control group at the end of the study (75.36 ± 7.94 vs. 79.80 ± 7.67; P < 0.001.    CONCLUSION: An 8-week CRP in post-MI patients revascularized with PCI or CABG led to improved exercise capacity. However, the CRP failed to enhance diastolic function.      Keywords: Cardiac Rehabilitation, Diastolic Function, Functional Capacity

  10. Proprioception rehabilitation training system for stroke patients using virtual reality technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun I; Song, In-Ho; Cho, Sangwoo; Kim, In Young; Ku, Jeonghun; Kang, Youn Joo; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated a virtual reality (VR) proprioceptive rehabilitation system that could manipulate the visual feedback of upper-limb during training and could do training by relying on proprioception feedback only. Virtual environments were designed in order to switch visual feedback on/off during upper-limb training. Two types of VR training tasks were designed for evaluating the effect of the proprioception focused training compared to the training with visual feedback. In order to evaluate the developed proprioception feedback virtual environment system, we recruited ten stroke patients (age: 54.7± 7.83years, on set: 3.29± 3.83 years). All patients performed three times PFVE task in order to check the improvement of proprioception function just before training session, after one week training, and after all training. In a comparison between FMS score and PFVE, the FMS score had a significant relationship with the error distance(r = -.662, n=10, p = .037) and total movement distance(r = -.726, n=10, p = .018) in PFVE. Comparing the training effect between in virtual environment with visual feedback and with proprioception, the click count, error distance and total error distance was more reduced in PFVE than VFVE. (Click count: p = 0.005, error distance: p = 0.001, total error distance: p = 0.007). It suggested that the proprioception feedback rather than visual feedback could be effective means to enhancing motor control during rehabilitation training. The developed VR system for rehabilitation has been verified in that stroke patients improved motor control after VR proprioception feedback training.

  11. Correlation between synaptic plasticity, associated proteins, and rehabilitation training in a rat model of cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Yang; Qian Yu

    2008-01-01

    All motions provide sensory, motoric, and reflexive input to the central nervous system, as well as playing an important role in cerebral functional plasticity and compensation. Cerebral plasticity has become the theoretical basis of neurorehabilitation. Studies of cerebrovascular disease, in particular, demonstrate that regeneration is accompanied by multiple forms of plasticity, such as functional and structural, in different phases of stroke rehabilitation. This study was designed to measure synaptic plasticity and expression of associated proteins to analyze the effect of rehabilitation training on learning and memory in a rat model of cerebral infarction. Results suggest that rehabilitation training increases expression of nerve growth factor associated protein 43, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neural cell adhesion molecules, and also promotes cerebral functional plasticity.

  12. Improvements in Key Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing Variables Following Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Dejana; Kumar, Nikhil; Chaudhry, Sundeep; Bagai, Akshay; Arena, Ross; Kumar, Naresh

    2018-05-11

    Improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak) post-cardiac rehabilitation (post-CR) are used to gauge therapeutic efficacy. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of supervised CR on other cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) variables, specifically those that reflect ventilatory efficiency and VO2 changes in relation to changes in work rate (WR). Patients (n = 142; mean age 63 ± 9 y; 23% female) with coronary artery disease (CAD) participated in supervised CR for 3 to 6 mo completing 60 ± 17 sessions (range: 32-96 sessions), with intensity derived from the baseline CPX. CPX was completed at baseline and post-CR on a cycle ergometer. The minimum heart rate (HR) during cycling was set 5 to 10 beats/min above the HR at ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) while the maximum HR remained below the ischemic threshold observed during CPX, and this intensity was maintained for 25 min. VO2peak, peak O2 pulse, the minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2) slope, the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES), and the ΔVO2/ΔWR slope were determined at baseline and post-CR. Following CR, there were significant improvements (all P < .001) in VO2peak (17.7 ± 4.7 mL/kg/min vs 20.9 ± 5.4 mL/kg/min), peak O2 pulse (11.6 ± 3.2 mL/beat vs 13.4 ± 3.6 mL/beat), VE/VCO2 slope (28.4 ± 5.3 vs 27.5 ± 4.7), OUES (1.8 ± 0.5 vs 2.0 ± 0.6), and ΔVO2/ΔWR slope (9.1 ± 1.2 mL/min/W vs 9.6 ± 1.1 mL/min/W). Key markers of ventilatory efficiency and VO2 kinetics during CPX significantly improve following CR. Expanding the list of variables assessed via CPX may provide better resolution in validation of CR therapeutic efficacy in patients with CAD.

  13. Digitally enhanced recovery: Investigating the use of digital self-tracking for monitoring leisure time physical activity of cardiovascular disease (CVD patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Vogel

    Full Text Available Research has shown that physical activity is essential in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease (CVD. Smart wearables (e.g., smartwatches are increasingly used to foster and monitor human behaviour, including physical activity. However, despite this increased usage, little evidence is available on the effects of smart wearables in behaviour change. The little research which is available typically focuses on the behaviour of healthy individuals rather than patients. In this study, we investigate the effects of using smart wearables by patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation. A field experiment involving 29 patients was designed and participants were either assigned to the study group (N = 13 patients who finished the study and used a self-tracking device or the control group (N = 16 patients who finished the study and did not use a device. For both groups data about physiological performance during cardiac stress test was collected at the beginning (baseline, in the middle (in week 6, at the end of the rehabilitation in the organized rehabilitation setting, and at the end of the study (after 12 weeks, at the end of the rehabilitation, including the organized rehabilitation plus another 6 weeks of self-organized rehabilitation. Comparing the physiological performance of both groups, the data showed significant differences. The participants in the study group not only maintained the same performance level as during the midterm examination in week 6, they improved performance even further during the six weeks that followed. The results presented in this paper provide evidence for positive effects of digital self-tracking by patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation on performance of the cardiovascular system. In this way, our study provides novel insight about the effects of the use of smart wearables by CVD patients. Our findings have implications for the design of self-management approaches in a patient

  14. Predicting non-return to work in patients attending cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samkange-Zeeb, Florence; Altenhöner, Thomas; Berg, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    programme which can be integrated into existing rehabilitation programmes, we developed a screening instrument for the identification of persons at risk of not returning to work at the onset of the rehabilitation process. More than 65% of the participants who had not returned to work 6 and 12 months...

  15. 76 FR 37336 - Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Research and Training Center-Interventions To Promote...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ...-funded research and development activities in refereed journals. The percentage of new NIDRR grants that... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Research and Training Center... regulations in 34 CFR part 86 apply to institutions of higher education (IHEs) only. II. Award Information...

  16. Sport-specific Outdoor Rehabilitation in a Group Setting : Do the Intentions Match Actual Training Load?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Jeroen; van der Worp, Henk; Korte, Mark; de Vries, Astrid J; Nijland, Rick; Brink, Michel S

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: Previous research has shown a weak relationship between intended and actual training load in various sports. Due to variety in group and content, this relationship is expected to be even weaker during group rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: The goal of our study was to examine the relationship

  17. Tendon neuroplastic training: changing the way we think about tendon rehabilitation: a narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Rio, Ebonie; Kidgell, Dawson; Moseley, G Lorimer; Gaida, Jamie; Docking, Sean; Purdam, Craig; Cook, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathy can be resistant to treatment and often recurs, implying that current treatment approaches are suboptimal. Rehabilitation programmes that have been successful in terms of pain reduction and return to sport outcomes usually include strength training. Muscle activation can induce analgesia, improving self-efficacy associated with reducing one's own pain. Furthermore, strength training is beneficial for tendon matrix structure, muscle properties and limb biomechanics. However, curre...

  18. Eccentric and concentric cardiac hypertrophy induced by exercise training: microRNAs and molecular determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, T; Soci, U P R; Oliveira, E M

    2011-09-01

    Among the molecular, biochemical and cellular processes that orchestrate the development of the different phenotypes of cardiac hypertrophy in response to physiological stimuli or pathological insults, the specific contribution of exercise training has recently become appreciated. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy involves complex cardiac remodeling that occurs as an adaptive response to static or dynamic chronic exercise, but the stimuli and molecular mechanisms underlying transduction of the hemodynamic overload into myocardial growth are poorly understood. This review summarizes the physiological stimuli that induce concentric and eccentric physiological hypertrophy, and discusses the molecular mechanisms, sarcomeric organization, and signaling pathway involved, also showing that the cardiac markers of pathological hypertrophy (atrial natriuretic factor, β-myosin heavy chain and α-skeletal actin) are not increased. There is no fibrosis and no cardiac dysfunction in eccentric or concentric hypertrophy induced by exercise training. Therefore, the renin-angiotensin system has been implicated as one of the regulatory mechanisms for the control of cardiac function and structure. Here, we show that the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor is locally activated in pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy, although with exercise training it can be stimulated independently of the involvement of angiotensin II. Recently, microRNAs (miRs) have been investigated as a possible therapeutic approach since they regulate the translation of the target mRNAs involved in cardiac hypertrophy; however, miRs in relation to physiological hypertrophy have not been extensively investigated. We summarize here profiling studies that have examined miRs in pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy. An understanding of physiological cardiac remodeling may provide a strategy to improve ventricular function in cardiac dysfunction.

  19. Eccentric and concentric cardiac hypertrophy induced by exercise training: microRNAs and molecular determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fernandes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the molecular, biochemical and cellular processes that orchestrate the development of the different phenotypes of cardiac hypertrophy in response to physiological stimuli or pathological insults, the specific contribution of exercise training has recently become appreciated. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy involves complex cardiac remodeling that occurs as an adaptive response to static or dynamic chronic exercise, but the stimuli and molecular mechanisms underlying transduction of the hemodynamic overload into myocardial growth are poorly understood. This review summarizes the physiological stimuli that induce concentric and eccentric physiological hypertrophy, and discusses the molecular mechanisms, sarcomeric organization, and signaling pathway involved, also showing that the cardiac markers of pathological hypertrophy (atrial natriuretic factor, β-myosin heavy chain and α-skeletal actin are not increased. There is no fibrosis and no cardiac dysfunction in eccentric or concentric hypertrophy induced by exercise training. Therefore, the renin-angiotensin system has been implicated as one of the regulatory mechanisms for the control of cardiac function and structure. Here, we show that the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1 receptor is locally activated in pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy, although with exercise training it can be stimulated independently of the involvement of angiotensin II. Recently, microRNAs (miRs have been investigated as a possible therapeutic approach since they regulate the translation of the target mRNAs involved in cardiac hypertrophy; however, miRs in relation to physiological hypertrophy have not been extensively investigated. We summarize here profiling studies that have examined miRs in pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy. An understanding of physiological cardiac remodeling may provide a strategy to improve ventricular function in cardiac dysfunction.

  20. Gradually Increased Training Intensity Benefits Rehabilitation Outcome after Stroke by BDNF Upregulation and Stress Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical training is necessary for effective rehabilitation in the early poststroke period. Animal studies commonly use fixed training intensity throughout rehabilitation and without adapting it to the animals' recovered motor ability. This study investigated the correlation between training intensity and rehabilitation efficacy by using a focal ischemic stroke rat model. Eighty male Sprague-Dawley rats were induced with middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion surgery. Sixty rats with successful stroke were then randomly assigned into four groups: control (CG, n=15, low intensity (LG, n=15, gradually increased intensity (GIG, n=15, and high intensity (HG, n=15. Behavioral tests were conducted daily to evaluate motor function recovery. Stress level and neural recovery were evaluated via plasma corticosterone and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF concentration, respectively. GIG rats significantly (P<0.05 recovered motor function and produced higher hippocampal BDNF (112.87 ± 25.18 ng/g. GIG and LG rats exhibited similar stress levels (540.63 ± 117.40 nM/L and 508.07 ± 161.30 nM/L, resp., which were significantly lower (P<0.05 than that (716.90 ± 156.48 nM/L of HG rats. Training with gradually increased intensity achieved better recovery with lower stress. Our observations indicate that a training protocol that includes gradually increasing training intensity should be considered in both animal and clinical studies for better stroke recovery.

  1. Translation, Cross-cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Validation of the Korean-Language Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale (CRBS-K).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sora; Park, Hee-Won; Lee, Yookyung; Grace, Sherry L; Kim, Won-Seok

    2017-10-01

    To perform a translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale (CRBS) for use in Korea, followed by psychometric validation. The CRBS was developed to assess patients' perception of the degree to which patient, provider and health system-level barriers affect their cardiac rehabilitation (CR) participation. The CRBS consists of 21 items (barriers to adherence) rated on a 5-point Likert scale. The first phase was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the CRBS to the Korean language. After back-translation, both versions were reviewed by a committee. The face validity was assessed in a sample of Korean patients (n=53) with history of acute myocardial infarction that did not participate in CR through semi-structured interviews. The second phase was to assess the construct and criterion validity of the Korean translation as well as internal reliability, through administration of the translated version in 104 patients, principle component analysis with varimax rotation and cross-referencing against CR use, respectively. The length, readability, and clarity of the questionnaire were rated well, demonstrating face validity. Analysis revealed a six-factor solution, demonstrating construct validity. Cronbach's alpha was greater than 0.65. Barriers rated highest included not knowing about CR and not being contacted by a program. The mean CRBS score was significantly higher among non-attendees (2.71±0.26) than CR attendees (2.51±0.18) (pKorea.

  2. Gender Differences in Patients' Beliefs About Biological, Environmental, Behavioral, and Psychological Risk Factors in a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Saeidi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are significant gender differences in the epidemiology and presentation of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, physiological aspects of CVDs, response to diagnostic tests or interventions, and prevalence or incidence of the associated risk factors. Considering the independent influence of gender on early dire consequences of such diseases, this study was conducted to investigate gender differences in patients' beliefs about biological, environmental, behavioral, and psychological risk factors in a cardiac rehabilitation program. Materials and Methods: This study has cross sectional design. The sample was composed of 775 patients referred to cardiac rehabilitation unit in Imam Ali Hospital in Kermanshah, Iran. The data were collected using clinical interview and patients’ medical records. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics such as mean, standard deviation, and chi-square test​​. To do the statistical analysis, SPSS version 20 was utilized. Results: As the results indicated, there was a significant difference between the beliefs of men and women about risk factors of heart disease (X2= 48.36; P

  3. The Digital Heart Manual: A pilot study of an innovative cardiac rehabilitation programme developed for and with users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deighan, C; Michalova, L; Pagliari, C; Elliott, J; Taylor, L; Ranaldi, H

    2017-08-01

    Patients are seeking greater choice and flexibility in how they engage with self-management programmes. While digital innovations offer opportunities to deliver supportive interventions to patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation little is known about how accessible, useful and acceptable they are for this group. This project developed a digital version of a leading evidenced cardiac rehabilitation programme, the Heart Manual (HM). The prototype was developed and evaluated iteratively in collaboration with end users. Using a mixed methods design 28 participants provided feedback using semi-structured questionnaires and telephone interviews. Rich data revealed the perceived user-friendliness of the HM digital format and its effectiveness at communicating the programme's key messages. It flagged areas requiring development, such as more flexible and intuitive navigation pathways. These suggestions informed the refinement of the resource. This evaluation offers support for the new Digital Heart Manual and confirms the value of employing a user-centred approach when developing and improving online interventions. The system is now in use and recommendations from the evaluation are being translated into quality improvements. The Digital Heart Manual is user friendly and accessible to patients and health professionals, regardless of age, presenting a suitable alternative to the paper version. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Reviewing Clinical Effectiveness of Active Training Strategies of Platform-Based Ankle Rehabilitation Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangfeng Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This review aims to provide a systematical investigation of clinical effectiveness of active training strategies applied in platform-based ankle robots. Method. English-language studies published from Jan 1980 to Aug 2017 were searched from four databases using key words of “Ankle∗” AND “Robot∗” AND “Effect∗ OR Improv∗ OR Increas∗.” Following an initial screening, three rounds of discrimination were successively conducted based on the title, the abstract, and the full paper. Result. A total of 21 studies were selected with 311 patients involved; of them, 13 studies applied a single group while another eight studies used different groups for comparison to verify the therapeutic effect. Virtual-reality (VR game training was applied in 19 studies, while two studies used proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF training. Conclusion. Active training techniques delivered by platform ankle rehabilitation robots have been demonstrated with great potential for clinical applications. Training strategies are mostly combined with one another by considering rehabilitation schemes and motion ability of ankle joints. VR game environment has been commonly used with active ankle training. Bioelectrical signals integrated with VR game training can implement intelligent identification of movement intention and assessment. These further provide the foundation for advanced interactive training strategies that can lead to enhanced training safety and confidence for patients and better treatment efficacy.

  5. Rehabilitation of Upper Extremity Casualties via Firearms Training Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harvey, Karolina; Yancosek, Karthleen E

    2005-01-01

    ...%ty to remain vital assets to the American fighting force. The FATS supports training for both individual marksmanship skills and squad level skills, to include tactical exercises with a variety...

  6. Rehabilitering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caswell, Dorte; Høybye-Mortensen, Matilde; Dall, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitering som både begreb og indsats har været genstand for stigende fokus i de seneste år, på både politisk, organisatorisk og praksis-niveau. Fra januar 2013 træder en større reform af førtidspension og fleksjob i kraft, og med reformen etableres ’rehabilitering’ som både mål og middel i...

  7. The Neurorehabilitation Training Toolkit (NTT: A Novel Worldwide Accessible Motor Training Approach for At-Home Rehabilitation after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Bermúdez i Badia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available After stroke, enduring rehabilitation is required for maximum recovery, and ideally throughout life to prevent functional deterioration. Hence we developed a new concept for at-home low-cost motor rehabilitation, the NTT, an Internet-based interactive system for upper-limb rehabilitation. In this paper we present the NTT design concepts, its implementation and a proof of concept study with 10 healthy participants. The NTT brings together concepts of optimal learning, engagement, and storytelling to deliver a personalized training to its users. In this study we evaluate the feasibility of NTT as a tool capable of automatically assessing and adapting to its user. This is achieved by means of a psychometric study where we show that the NTT is able to assess movement kinematics—movement smoothness, range of motion, arm displacement and arm coordination—in healthy users. Subsequently, a modeling approach is presented to understand how the measured movement kinematics relate to training parameters, and how these can be modified to adapt the training to meet the needs of patients. Finally, an adaptive algorithm for the personalization of training considering motivational and performance aspects is proposed. In the next phase we will deploy and evaluate the NTT with stroke patients at their homes.

  8. Patients' preference for exercise setting and its influence on the health benefits gained from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lars H; Kikkenborg Berg, Selina; Christensen, Jan; Lawaetz, Jannik; Doherty, Patrick; Taylor, Rod S; Langberg, Henning; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2017-04-01

    To assess patient preference for exercise setting and examine if choice of setting influences the long-term health benefit of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. Patients participating in a randomised controlled trial following either heart valve surgery, or radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation were given the choice to perform a 12-week exercise programme in either a supervised centre-based, or a self-management home-based setting. Exercise capacity and physical and mental health outcomes were assessed for up to 24months after hospital discharge. Outcomes between settings were compared using a time×setting interaction using a mixed effects regression model. Across the 158 included patients, an equivalent proportion preferred to undertake exercise rehabilitation in a centre-based setting (55%, 95% CI: 45% to 63%) compared to a home-based setting (45%, 95% CI: 37% to 53%, p=0.233). At baseline, those who preferred a home-based setting reported better physical health (mean difference in physical component score: 5.0, 95% CI 2.3 to 7.4; p=0.001) and higher exercise capacity (mean between group difference 15.9watts, 95% CI 3.7 to 28.1; p=0.011). With the exception of the depression score in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (F(3.65), p=0.004), there was no evidence of a significant difference in outcomes between settings. The preference of patients to participate in home-based and centre-based exercise programmes appears to be equivalent and provides similar health benefits. Whilst these findings support that patients should be given the choice between exercise-settings when initiating cardiac rehabilitation, further confirmatory evidence is needed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. A Feasibility Study of SSVEP-Based Passive Training on an Ankle Rehabilitation Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangfeng Zeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aims to establish a steady-state visual evoked potential- (SSVEP- based passive training protocol on an ankle rehabilitation robot and validate its feasibility. Method. This paper combines SSVEP signals and the virtual reality circumstance through constructing information transmission loops between brains and ankle robots. The robot can judge motion intentions of subjects and trigger the training when subjects pay their attention on one of the four flickering circles. The virtual reality training circumstance provides real-time visual feedback of ankle rotation. Result. All five subjects succeeded in conducting ankle training based on the SSVEP-triggered training strategy following their motion intentions. The lowest success rate is 80%, and the highest one is 100%. The lowest information transfer rate (ITR is 11.5 bits/min when the biggest one of the robots for this proposed training is set as 24 bits/min. Conclusion. The proposed training strategy is feasible and promising to be combined with a robot for ankle rehabilitation. Future work will focus on adopting more advanced data process techniques to improve the reliability of intention detection and investigating how patients respond to such a training strategy.

  10. Cardiac hypertrophy and IGF-1 response to testosterone propionate treatment in trained male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żebrowska Aleksandra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have suggested that testosterone exerts a growth-promoting effect in the heart. Limited data are available regarding interactions between possible endocrine/paracrine effects in response to exercise training. Therefore, we examined supraphysiological testosterone-induced heart hypertrophy and cardiac insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 content in sedentary and exercise-trained rats.

  11. Rehabilitation (exercise and strength training) and osteoarthritis: A critical narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Christelle; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Poiraudeau, Serge; Rannou, François

    2016-06-01

    Rehabilitation is widely recommended in national and international guidelines for managing osteoarthritis (OA) in primary care settings. According to the 2014 OA Research Society International (OARSI) recommendations, rehabilitation is even considered the core treatment of OA and is recommended for all patients. Rehabilitation for OA widely includes land- and water-based exercise, strength training, weight management, self-management and education, biomechanical interventions, and physically active lifestyle. We performed a critical narrative review of the efficacy and safety of rehabilitation for managing OA and discuss evidence-based international recommendations. The process of article selection was unsystematic. Articles were selected based on authors' expertise, self-knowledge, and reflective practice. For the purpose of the review, we focused on land- and water-based exercise and strength training for knee, hip and hand OA. Other aspects of rehabilitation in OA are treated elsewhere in this special issue. Exercise therapy is widely recommended for managing knee, hip and hand OA. However, the level of evidence varies according to OA location. Overall, consistent evidence suggests that exercise therapy and specific strengthening exercise or strength training for the lower limb reduce pain and improve physical function in knee OA. Evidence for other OA sites are less consistent. Therefore, because of the lack of specific studies, recommendations for hip and hand OA are mainly derived from studies of knee OA. In addition, no recommendations have been established regarding the exercise regimen. The efficacy and safety of exercise therapy and strength training need to be further evaluated in randomized controlled trials of patients with hip and hand OA. The optimal delivery of exercise programs also has to be more clearly defined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. 77 FR 27035 - Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTCs) on Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... training to facilitate the advancement of knowledge and understanding of the unique needs of traditionally... Dislocated Workers with Disabilities: Perspectives from One-Stop Career Centers and Rapid Response... sector of the economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health or safety, or...

  13. The Effect of Home-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation on Functional Capacity, Behavior, and Risk Factors in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjing Ding

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the effect of home-based cardiac rehabilitation on functional capacity, health behavior, and risk factors in patients with acute coronary syndrome in China. Methods: Eighty patients with acute coronary syndrome were enrolled in this prospective randomized controlled study. Patients in the cardiac rehabilitation group (n=52 received home-based cardiac rehabilitation with a heart manual and a home exercise video for 3 months and patients in the control group (n=28 received only routine secondary prevention. The 6-min walk distance, laboratory test results, healthy behavior (questionnaire, quality of life (12-item Short Form Health Survey, anxiety (7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire, and depression (9-item Patient Health Questionnaire were evaluated at the beginning and after treatment for 3 months. Results: Compared with baseline data, 52 patients who participated in cardiac rehabilitation had longer 6-min walk distance (515.26±113.74 m vs 0.445.30±97.92 m, P<0.0002, higher proportions of “always exercise” (78.26% vs. 28%, P<0.05, “always limit food with sugar” (65.22% vs 12%, P<0.05, “always eat fruits 200–400 g every day” (82.61% vs. 4%, P<0.05. and “always eat vegetables 300–500 g every day” (21.74% vs. 12%, P<0.06 after treatment for 3 months. The low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control rate (52.17% vs. 28%, P<0.05 and the systolic blood pressure control rate (100% vs. 68%, P<0.05 were also significantly increased after treatment for 3 months in the cardiac rehabilitation group. No significant increase was found in the control group after treatment for 3 months. No cardiac-event related to home exercise was reported in both groups. Conclusion: Home-based cardiac rehabilitation is a feasible and available cardiac rehabilitation mode in China.

  14. Endurance and strength training in pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Daabis

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: PR is an effective intervention for the post-exacerbation management of COPD patients. It leads to significant improvements of dyspnea, HRQL and functional exercise capacity. When added to a program of ET, strength training confers additional benefits in muscle force, but not in overall exercise capacity or health status.

  15. 34 CFR 386.1 - What is the Rehabilitation Long-Term Training program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; (5) Rehabilitation social work; (6) Rehabilitation psychiatry; (7) Rehabilitation psychology; (8...; (12) Physical education; (13) Therapeutic recreation; (14) Community rehabilitation program personnel...; (20) Independent living; (21) Client assistance; (22) Administration of community rehabilitation...

  16. Effects of professional rehabilitation training on the recovery of neurological function in young stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-jin-zi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Young stroke patients have a strong desire to return to the society, but few studies have been conducted on their rehabilitation training items, intensity, and prognosis. We analyzed clinical data of young and middle-aged/older stroke patients hospitalized in the Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, China Rehabilitation Research Center, Capital Medical University, China from February 2014 to May 2015. Results demonstrated that hemorrhagic stroke (59.6% was the primary stroke type found in the young group, while ischemic stroke (60.0% was the main type detected in the middle-aged/older group. Compared with older stroke patients, education level and incidence of hyperhomocysteinemia were higher in younger stroke patients, whereas, incidences of hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease were lower. The average length of hospital stay was longer in the young group than in the middle-aged/older group. The main risk factors observed in the young stroke patients were hypertension, drinking, smoking, hyperlipidemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, diabetes, previous history of stroke, and heart disease. The most accepted rehabilitation program consisted of physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, acupuncture and moxibustion. Average rehabilitation training time was 2.5 hours/day. Barthel Index and modified Rankin Scale scores were increased at discharge. Six months after discharge, the degree of occupational and economic satisfaction declined, and there were no changes in family life satisfaction. The degrees of other life satisfaction (such as friendship improved. The degree of disability and functional status improved significantly in young stroke patients after professional rehabilitation, but the number of patients who returned to society within 6 months after stroke was still small.

  17. Communicative-pragmatic impairment in schizophrenia: Cognitive rehabilitative training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Marina Bosco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to verify in patients with schizophrenia, the efficacy of Cognitive Pragmatic Treatment (CPT, a new remediation program for improving communicative-pragmatic abilities. The CPT program consists of 20 group sessions, focused on several communication modalities, i.e. linguistic, extralinguistic and paralinguistic, Theory of Mind (ToM and other cognitive functions that can affect communicative performance, such as awareness and planning. A group of 17 patients with schizophrenia participated in the training. They were tested before and after training, using the equivalent forms of the Assessment Battery for Communication (ABaCo, a tool for evaluating the comprehension and production of a wide range of pragmatic phenomena such as, i.e. direct and indirect speech acts, irony and deceit, and a series of neuropsychological and ToM tests. The results showed a significant improvement in patients’ performance following the program, on both comprehension and production tasks, and in all the communication modalities assessed by the ABaCo, i.e. linguistic, extralinguistic, paralinguistic and social appropriateness. The improvement of patients’ performance persisted after three months from the end of the training, as shown by the follow-up tests. These preliminary findings support the efficacy of the CPT program in improving communicative-pragmatic abilities in the patients.

  18. Basic vital cardiac support. Training to relatives of patients with acute miocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Brandy Viera Valdés; Paula Aguila Solis; Francisco Valladares Carvajal; Marcos D. Iraola Ferrer; Pablo. A. Rodríguez

    2006-01-01

    Background: Title: Basic vital cardiac support. Training to relatives of patients with acute miocardial infarction. The cardiorespiratory reanimation is a proved procedure that can save a human life in case of a cardiorespiratory stop. For three years it is imparted in the University Hospital of Cienfuegos, a training for this procedure, to the family of patients with sharp myocardic infarction. Objective: To evaluate the knowledge acquired by the relatives of the patients during the training...

  19. Effect of a web-based audit and feedback intervention with outreach visits on the clinical performance of multidisciplinary teams: a cluster-randomized trial in cardiac rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gude, Wouter T.; van Engen-Verheul, Mariëtte M.; van der Veer, Sabine N.; Kemps, Hareld M. C.; Jaspers, Monique W. M.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; Peek, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of a web-based audit and feedback (A&F) intervention with outreach visits to support decision-making by multidisciplinary teams. We performed a multicentre cluster-randomized trial within the field of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in

  20. Effect of gender and type 2 diabetes mellitus on heart rate recovery in patients with coronary artery disease after cardiac rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soleimani, Abbas; Nejatian, Mostafa; Hajizaynali, Mohammad Ali; Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; Alidoosti, Mohammad; Sheikhfathollahi, Mahmood; Abbasi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to clarify whether type 2 diabetic patients with coronary disease are subject to similar benefits in heart rate recovery (HRR) as non-diabetic counterpatrs after cardiac rehabilitation, assessing men and women subjects separately. Material and methods: The

  1. Effect of gender and type 2 diabetes mellitus on heart rate recovery in patients with coronary artery disease after cardiac rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soleimani, A.; Abbasi, K.; Nejatian, M.; Movahhedi, N.; Hajizaynali, M. Ali; Salehiomran, A.; Abbasi, S. Hesameddin; Alidoosti, M.; Sheikhfathollahi, M.; Abbasi, A.

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether type 2 diabetic patients with coronary disease are subject to similar benefits on heart rate recovery (HRR) as non-diabetic coronary individuals after cardiac rehabilitation, assessing separately male and female subjects separately. Methods. Data

  2. 34 CFR 350.12 - What are the general requirements for an Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training Project?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... multidisciplinary, and emphasizes scientific methodology, and may involve collaboration among institutions. (3... Rehabilitation Research Training Project? 350.12 Section 350.12 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Projects Does the...

  3. Effectiveness of Hamstring Knee Rehabilitation Exercise Performed in Training Machine vs. Elastic Resistance Electromyography Evaluation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, M. D.; Sundstrup, E.; Andersen, C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate muscle activity during hamstring rehabilitation exercises performed in training machine compared with elastic resistance. Design Six women and 13 men aged 28-67 yrs participated in a crossover study. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded...... inclinometers. Results Training machines and elastic resistance showed similar high levels of muscle activity (biceps femoris and semitendinosus peak normalized EMG >80%). EMG during the concentric phase was higher than during the eccentric phase regardless of exercise and muscle. However, compared with machine.......001) during hamstring curl performed with elastic resistance (7.58 +/- 0.08) compared with hamstring curl performed in a machine (5.92 +/- 0.03). Conclusions Hamstring rehabilitation exercise performed with elastic resistance induces similar peak hamstring muscle activity but slightly lower EMG values at more...

  4. REHABILITATION IN CARDIOLOGY AND CARDIOSURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Galtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the present time effectiveness of rehabilitation programs after heart surgery, myocardial infarction, and in some cases for coronary artery disease (CAD is undeniable. According to the researches, physical exercises, which underlie cardio rehabilitation of patients with CAD, reduce cardiac mortality. In the review accumulated scientific data about modern approaches to cardio rehabilitation is discussed: goals, indications, contraindications, its organization, advantages. Controlled training in patients with CAD, making a complex program of cardio rehabilitation, kinds of control during cardio training are described in details. In this review the second phase of physical rehabilitation after cardiac surgery – a stationary phase, protocols of which are subjective and often contested, is considered. More frequently physical rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery is doing breathing exercises, as there is data that physical exercises, in which tangential force vector in or around the sternum appears, should be avoided for at least 3 months after surgery. On the other hand, avoiding of heaving during the first weeks after surgery leads to more pronounced atrophy of the chest muscles. But there is data, according to which, early beginning of an adapted program of cardio rehabilitation (1–2 weeks after surgery is safely, it accelerates recovery and does not increase problems with the sternum. In this review the following idea is suggested: in order to follow the stages of rehabilitation after cardiac surgery it is necessary to start it on the stationary stage, and control of load rehabilitation programs must be carried out using hemodynamic changes during exercises, energy, SF-36 questionnaire. 

  5. Cancer-Related Fatigue and Rehabilitation : A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial Comparing Physical Training Combined With Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy With Physical Training Only and With No Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, E.; May, A.M.; Korstjens, I.; Post, W.J.; van der Schans, C.P.; van den Borne, B.; Mesters, I.; Ros, W.J.G.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. Objective. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancer-related fatigue of physical training combined with

  6. Cancer-related fatigue and rehabilitation: A randomized controlled multicenter trial comparing physical training combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy with physical training only and with no intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Weert (Ellen); A.M. May (Anne); I. Korstjens (Irene); W.J. Post (Wendy); C.P. van der Schans (Cees); B. van den Borne (Bart); I. Mesters (Ilse); W.J.G. Ros (Wynand); J.E.H.M. Hoekstra-Weebers (Josette)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. Objective. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancerrelated fatigue of physical training combined

  7. Effect of rehabilitation training combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy on the nerve cytokine secretion and oxidative stress in rehabilitation period of patients with cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Kong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the influence of rehabilitation training combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy on the nerve cytokine secretion and oxidative stress in rehabilitation period of patients with cerebral infarction. Methods: A total of 110 patients with cerebral infarction who received rehabilitation therapy in the hospital between January 2015 and May 2017 were divided into routine group (n=55 and hyperbaric oxygen group (n=55 according to random number table. Routine group received regular rehabilitation training, and hyperbaric oxygen group underwent rehabilitation training combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The differences in the serum contents of nerve factors, neurotransmitters and oxidative stress indexes were compared between the two groups at immediately after admission (T0 and after 14 d of treatment (T1. Results: At T0, there was no statistically significant difference in the serum contents of nerve factors, neurotransmitters and oxidative stress indexes between the two groups. At T1, serum nerve factors MBP and NSE contents of hyperbaric oxygen group were lower than those of routine group while NGF content was higher than that of routine group; serum neurotransmitter Glu content was lower than that of routine group while GABA content was higher than that of routine group; serum oxidative stress indexes ROS and LHP contents were lower than those of routine group while CAT and SOD contents were higher than those of routine group. Conclusion: Rehabilitation training combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy can effectively optimize the nerve function and inhibit the systemic oxidative stress response in rehabilitation period of patients with cerebral infarction.

  8. Changes in the cardiac rehabilitation workflow process needed for the implementation of a self-management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggers, Anne-Marieke; Vosbergen, Sandra; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik; Jaspers, Monique; Peek, Niels

    2013-01-01

    E-health interventions are of a growing importance for self-management of chronic conditions. This study aimed to describe the process adaptions that are needed in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to implement a self-management system, called MyCARDSS. We created a generic workflow model based on interviews and observations at three CR clinics. Subsequently, a workflow model of the ideal situation after implementation of MyCARDSS was created. We found that the implementation will increase the complexity of existing working procedures because 1) not all patients will use MyCARDSS, 2) there is a transfer of tasks and responsibilities from professionals to patients, and 3) information in MyCARDSS needs to be synchronized with the EPR system for professionals.

  9. Improving Synchronization and Functional Connectivity in Autism Spectrum Disorders through Plasticity-Induced Rehabilitation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    theory  of   mind :  evidence  from...Faces  in  2  and  4-­‐Year-­‐Old   Children  with   Autism  Spectrum  Disorder.   J.Autism  Dev.Disord..   Hadjikhani,  N...Connectivity in Autism Spectrum Disorders through Plasticity-Induced Rehabilitation Training PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jaime A. Pineda,

  10. Hybrid Force Control Based on ICMAC for an Astronaut Rehabilitative Training Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Lixun Zhang; Yupeng Zou; Lan Wang; Xinping Pei

    2012-01-01

    A novel Astronaut Rehabilitative Training Robot (ART) based on a cable‐driven mechanism is represented in this paper. ART, a typical passive force servo system, can help astronauts to bench press in a microgravity environment. The purpose of this paper is to design controllers to eliminate the surplus force caused by an astronaut’s active movements. Based on the dynamics modelling of the cable‐driven unit, a hybrid force controller based on improved credit assignment CMAC (ICMAC) is presented...

  11. Comparing the effects of a cardiac rehabilitation program on functional capacity of obese and non-obese women with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadeghi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available    BACKGROUND: Obesity and sedentary lifestyle are known as important risk factors of coronary artery disease. The prevalence of obesity has increased among both men and women in the world. Therefore, the present study tried to evaluate the effectiveness of a cardiac rehabilitation program on functional capacity and body mass index (BMI in obese and non-obese women with coronary artery disease.    METHODS: In an observational study during 2000-11, we evaluated a total of 205 women with coronary artery disease who referred to the cardiac rehabilitation unit of Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Institute, Isfahan, Iran. BMI and functional capacity of each patient were assessed before and after the program. The patients were categorized as obese or non-obese based on their BMI. All participants completed the full course of the program. Data was analyzed by independent t-test and paired t-test in SPSS15.    RESULTS: Our finding showed that an 8-week cardiac rehabilitation program had significant effects on functional capacity in obese and non-obese female patients (P < 0.01 for both. The program also resulted in BMI improvements in both groups (P < 0.01 for both. Comparing the changes in the two groups did not reveal any significant differences in functional capacity. However, the two groups were significantly different in terms of BMI changes.    CONCLUSION: Cardiac rehabilitation programs are a major step in restoration of functional capacity and improvement of BMI in obese and non-obese women with coronary artery disease.         Keywords: Cardiac Rehabilitation Program, Coronary Artery Disease, Obesity, Functional Capacity, Body Mass Index.

  12. Exercise training prior to myocardial infarction attenuates cardiac deterioration and cardiomyocyte dysfunction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Marchesi Bozi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The present study was performed to investigate 1 whether aerobic exercise training prior to myocardial infarction would prevent cardiac dysfunction and structural deterioration and 2 whether the potential cardiac benefits of aerobic exercise training would be associated with preserved morphological and contractile properties of cardiomyocytes in post-infarct remodeled myocardium. METHODS: Male Wistar rats underwent an aerobic exercise training protocol for eight weeks. The rats were then assigned to sham surgery (SHAM, sedentary lifestyle and myocardial infarction or exercise training and myocardial infarction groups and were evaluated 15 days after the surgery. Left ventricular tissue was analyzed histologically, and the contractile function of isolated myocytes was measured. Student's t-test was used to analyze infarct size and ventricular wall thickness, and the other parameters were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn's test or a one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: Myocardial infarctions in exercise-trained animals resulted in a smaller myocardial infarction extension, a thicker infarcted wall and less collagen accumulation as compared to myocardial infarctions in sedentary animals. Myocardial infarction-induced left ventricular dilation and cardiac dysfunction, as evaluated by +dP/dt and -dP/dt, were both prevented by previous aerobic exercise training. Moreover, aerobic exercise training preserved cardiac myocyte shortening, improved the maximum shortening and relengthening velocities in infarcted hearts and enhanced responsiveness to calcium. CONCLUSION: Previous aerobic exercise training attenuated the cardiac dysfunction and structural deterioration promoted by myocardial infarction, and such benefits were associated with preserved cardiomyocyte morphological and contractile properties.

  13. Structural and functional cardiac adaptations to 6 months of football training in untrained hypertensive men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L. J.; Randers, M. B.; Hansen, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of 3 and 6 months of regular football training on cardiac structure and function in hypertensive men. Thirty-one untrained males with mild-to-moderate hypertension were randomized 2:1 to a football training group (n = 20) and a control group receiving traditional...... training improves LV diastolic function in untrained men with mild-to-moderate arterial hypertension. Furthermore, it may improve longitudinal systolic function of both ventricles. The results suggest that football training has favorable effects on cardiac function in hypertensive men....... function improved with respect to tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (21.8 ± 3.2 to 24.5 ± 3.7 mm). Arterial blood pressure decreased in both groups, but significantly more in the football training group. No significant changes were observed in the control group. In conclusion, short-term football...

  14. Computer-Assisted Training as a Complement in Rehabilitation of Patients With Chronic Vestibular Dizziness-A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Michael Smærup; Gro¨nvall, Erik; Larsen, Simon B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare a computer exercise program with conservative home-training following printed instructions in the rehabilitation of elderly patients with vestibular dysfunction. Design Single-blind, randomized, controlled trial. Setting Geriatric Department, Aarhus University Hospital...

  15. Factors influencing change in walking ability in patients with heart failure undergoing exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Natasha; Harrison, Alexander; Doherty, Patrick

    2018-05-17

    Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is an effective intervention for patients with heart failure (HF), in which one of the main targets is to increase physical capacity. In the HF population this is traditionally assessed using distance covered during a walking test. This study aims to establish the extent to which change in walking ability, in HF patients attending CR, is determined by patient characteristics and service provision. The study utilised routine clinical data from the National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation to perform a robust analysis. Change, in metres, between pre- and post-CR six-minute walk tests was calculated. Multivariate linear regression models were used to explore the relationship between patient characteristics, service-level variables, and change in metres walked. Complete and valid data from 633 patients was analysed, and a mean change of 51.30 m was calculated. Female gender (-34.13 m, p = 0.007), being retired (-36.41 m, p = 0.001) and being married/in a relationship (-32.54 m, p = 0.023) were all significant negative predictors of change. There was an additional negative relationship with body mass index (BMI) whereby for every unit increase in BMI, predicted change reduces by 2.48 m (p = 0.006). This study identified significant patient-level characteristics strongly associated with limited improvement in walking ability following CR. Improving physical capacity is a core component of CR, therefore services should aim to account for baseline characteristics identified in this study as part of tailoring the CR intervention around the individual. Pre- and post-CR physical capacity assessments, which constitute minimum standards for CR, are worryingly low and should be given high priority. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Effects of categorization training in patients with TBI during postacute rehabilitation: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinidou, Fofi; Thomas, Robin D; Scharp, Victoria L; Laske, Kate M; Hammerly, Mark D; Guitonde, Suchita

    2005-01-01

    Previous research suggests that traumatic brain injury (TBI) interferes with the ability to extract and use attributes to describe objects. This study explored the effects of a systematic Categorization Program (CP) in participants with TBI and noninjured controls. Ten persons with moderate to severe TBI who received comprehensive postacute rehabilitation services and 13 matched noninjured controls participated in the study. All participants received CP training for 3 to 5 hours per week for 10 to 12 weeks that consisted of 8 levels and targeted concept formation, object categorization, and decision-making abilities. The Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory-3 (MPAI-3) and the Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ). Two Categorization Tests (administered pretraining and posttraining) and 3 Probe Tasks (administered at specified intervals during training) assessed skills relating to categorization. Both groups showed significant improvement in categorization performance after the CP training on the 2 Categorization Tests related to the CP. They also were able to generalize and apply categorization and sorting skills in new situations (as measured by the Probe Tasks). Participants with TBI had improved functional outcome performance measured by the MPAI-3 and the CIQ. The systematic and hierarchical structure of the CP is beneficial to participants with TBI during postacute rehabilitation. This study contributes to the growing body of evidence supporting cognitive rehabilitation after moderate to severe TBI.

  17. Modeling and Simulation to Muscle Strength Training of Lower Limbs Rehabilitation Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Yi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the issues of lower limb rehabilitation robots with single control strategies and poor training types, a training method for improving muscle strength was put forward in this paper. Patients’ muscle strength could be achieved by targeted exercises at the end of rehabilitation. This approach could be realized through programming wires’ force. On the one hand, each wires force was measured by tension sensor and force closed loop control was established to control the value of wires’ force which was acted on trainees. On the other hand, the direction of output force was changed by detecting the trainees’ state of motion and the way of putting load to patient was achieved. Finally, the target of enhancing patients’ muscle strength was realized. Dynamic model was built by means of mechanism and training types of robots. Force closed loop control strategy was established based on training pattern. In view of the characteristics of the redundance and economy of wire control, the process for simple wire's load changes was discussed. In order to confirm the characteristics of robot control system, the controller was simulated in Matlab/Simulink. It was verified that command signal could be traced by control system availably and the load during muscle training would be provided effectively.

  18. Musical training as an alternative and effective method for neuro-education and neuro-rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Clément; Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Duarte, Esther; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, important advances in the field of cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have largely contributed to improve our knowledge on brain functioning. More recently, a line of research has been developed that aims at using musical training and practice as alternative tools for boosting specific perceptual, motor, cognitive, and emotional skills both in healthy population and in neurologic patients. These findings are of great hope for a better treatment of language-based learning disorders or motor impairment in chronic non-communicative diseases. In the first part of this review, we highlight several studies showing that learning to play a musical instrument can induce substantial neuroplastic changes in cortical and subcortical regions of motor, auditory and speech processing networks in healthy population. In a second part, we provide an overview of the evidence showing that musical training can be an alternative, low-cost and effective method for the treatment of language-based learning impaired populations. We then report results of the few studies showing that training with musical instruments can have positive effects on motor, emotional, and cognitive deficits observed in patients with non-communicable diseases such as stroke or Parkinson Disease. Despite inherent differences between musical training in educational and rehabilitation contexts, these results favor the idea that the structural, multimodal, and emotional properties of musical training can play an important role in developing new, creative and cost-effective intervention programs for education and rehabilitation in the next future.

  19. MUSICAL TRAINING AS AN ALTERNATIVE AND EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR NEURO-EDUCATION AND NEURO-REHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément eFrançois

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, important advances in the field of cognitive science, psychology and neuroscience have largely contributed to improve our knowledge on brain functioning. More recently, a line of research has been developed that aims at using musical training and practice as alternative tools for boosting specific perceptual, motor, cognitive and emotional skills both in healthy population and in neurologic patients. These findings are of great hope for a better treatment of language-based learning disorders or motor impairment in chronic non-communicative diseases. In the first part of this review, we highlight several studies showing that learning to play a musical instrument can induce substantial neuroplastic changes in cortical and subcortical regions of motor, auditory and speech processing networks in healthy population. In a second part, we provide an overview of the evidence showing that musical training can be an alternative, low-cost and effective method for the treatment of language-based learning impaired populations. We then report results of the few studies showing that training with musical instruments can have positive effects on motor, emotional and cognitive deficits observed in patients with noncommunicable diseases such as stroke or Parkinson Disease. Despite inherent differences between musical training in educational and rehabilitation contexts, these results favour the idea that the structural, multimodal and emotional properties of musical training can play an important role in developing new, creative and cost-effective intervention programs for education and rehabilitation in the next future.

  20. Evaluation of a self-management patient education program for patients with chronic heart failure undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Karin; Musekamp, Gunda; Seekatz, Bettina; Glatz, Johannes; Karger, Gabriele; Kiwus, Ulrich; Knoglinger, Ernst; Schubmann, Rainer; Westphal, Ronja; Faller, Hermann

    2013-08-23

    Chronic heart failure requires a complex treatment regimen on a life-long basis. Therefore, self-care/self-management is an essential part of successful treatment and comprehensive patient education is warranted. However, specific information on program features and educational strategies enhancing treatment success is lacking. This trial aims to evaluate a patient-oriented and theory-based self-management educational group program as compared to usual care education during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. The study is a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in four cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Clusters are patient education groups that comprise HF patients recruited within 2 weeks after commencement of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Cluster randomization was chosen for pragmatic reasons, i.e. to ensure a sufficient number of eligible patients to build large-enough educational groups and to prevent contamination by interaction of patients from different treatment allocations during rehabilitation. Rehabilitants with chronic systolic heart failure (n = 540) will be consecutively recruited for the study at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation. Data will be assessed at admission, at discharge and after 6 and 12 months using patient questionnaires. In the intervention condition, patients receive the new patient-oriented self-management educational program, whereas in the control condition, patients receive a short lecture-based educational program (usual care). The primary outcome is patients' self-reported self-management competence. Secondary outcomes include behavioral determinants and self-management health behavior (symptom monitoring, physical activity, medication adherence), health-related quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Treatment effects will be evaluated separately for each follow-up time point using multilevel regression analysis, and adjusting for baseline values. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a

  1. [Clinical study of post-stroke speech apraxia treated with scalp electric acupuncture under anatomic orientation and rehabilitation training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yujuan; Yang, Yuxia; Xiang, Rong; Chang, E; Zhang, Yanchun; Zuo, Bingfang; Zhang, Qianwei

    2015-07-01

    To compare the differences in the clinical efficacy on post-stroke speech disorder between scalp electric acupuncture (EA) under anatomic orientation combined with rehabilitation training and simple rehabilitation training. Sixty patients of post-stroke speech apraxia were randomized into an observation group and a control group, 30 cases in each one. In the observation group, under anatomic orientation, the scalp EA was adopted to the dominant hemisphere Broca area on the left cerebrum. Additionally, the speech rehabilitation training was combined. In the control group, the speech rehabilitation training was simply,used. The treatment lasted for 4 weeks totally. The speech movement program module in the psychological language assessment and treatment system of Chinese aphasia was used for the evident of efficacy assessment. The scores of counting, singing scale, repeating phonetic alphabet, repeating monosyllable and repeating disyllable were observed in the patients of the two groups. The assessment was done separately on the day of grouping and 4 weeks after treatment. In 4 weeks of treatment, the scores of counting, singing scale, repeating phonetic alphabet, repeating monosyllable and repeating disyllable were all improved as compared with those before treatment in the two groups (all Pspeech rehabilitation training obviously improves speech apraxia in stroke patients so that the speech disorder cani be relieved. The efficacy is better than that in simple rehabilitation training.

  2. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation for secondary prevention after transient ischemic attack or mild stroke: I: feasibility and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Peter L; Hachinski, Vladimir; Unsworth, Karen; Chan, Richard; Mytka, Sharon; O'Callaghan, Christina; Suskin, Neville

    2011-11-01

    Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR), which integrates structured lifestyle interventions and medications, reduces morbidity and mortality among cardiac patients. CCR has not typically been used with cerebrovascular populations, despite important commonalities with heart patients. We tested feasibility and effectiveness of 6-month outpatient CCR for secondary prevention after transient ischemic attack or mild, nondisabling stroke. This article presents risk factors. A future article will discuss psychological outcomes. Consecutive consenting subjects having sustained a transient ischemic attack or mild, nondisabling stroke within the previous 12 months (mean, 11.5 weeks; event-to-CCR entry) with ≥1 vascular risk factor, were recruited from a stroke prevention clinic providing usual care. We measured 6-month CCR outcomes following a prospective cohort design. Of 110 subjects recruited from January 2005 to April 2006, 100 subjects (mean age, 64.9 years; 46 women) entered and 80 subjects completed CCR. We obtained favorable, significant intake-to-exit changes in: aerobic capacity (+31.4%; Pstroke, offering a promising model for vascular protection across chronic disease entities. We know of no similar previous investigation, and are now conducting a randomized trial.

  3. Improving cardiovascular care through outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: an analysis of payment models that would improve quality and promote use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Holly; Grantham, Sarah; Siegel, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to improving the care of patients with cardiovascular disease by focusing attention on delivery system redesign and payment reforms that encompass the healthcare spectrum, from an acute episode to maintenance of care. However, 1 area of cardiovascular disease care that has received little attention in the advancement of quality is cardiac rehabilitation (CR), a comprehensive secondary prevention program that is significantly underused despite evidence-based guidelines that recommending its use. The purpose of this article was to analyze the applicability of 2 payment and reimbursement models-pay-for-performance and bundled payments for episodes of care--that can promote the use of CR. We conclude that a payment model combining elements of both pay-for-performance and episodes of care would increase the use of CR, which would both improve quality and increase efficiency in cardiac care. Specific elements would need to be clearly defined, however, including: (a) how an episode is defined, (b) how to hold providers accountable for the care they provider, (c) how to encourage participation among CR providers, and (d) how to determine an equitable distribution of payment. Demonstrations testing new payment models must be implemented to generate empirical evidence that a melded pay-for-performance and episode-based care payment model will improve quality and efficiency.

  4. Cardiac Rehabilitation Improves the QRS Fragmentation in Patients With ST Elevatıon Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bulut

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: The existence of the fQRS decreases after CR in patients with STEMI especially in hypertensive individuals, which may be related to improved electrical stability in the myocardium as a predictor of increase in survival and decrease in major cardiac events.

  5. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation improves outcome for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2015-01-01

    year of psycho-educational follow-up focusing on modifiable factors associated with poor outcomes. Two primary outcomes, general health score (Short Form-36 (SF-36)) and peak oxygen uptake (VO2), were used. Post-hoc analyses included SF-36 and ICD therapy history.Results:Comprehensive cardiac...

  6. Waiting Time for Start of Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: Correlations of Non Compliance to Systematic Referral After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Soroush

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To assess the waiting time, number of delays, and correlations of non-commitment to the systematic referral to the outpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR among coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG patients. Methods The cross-sectional study data were gathered through evaluations related to 1,187 CABG patients who were referred to the outpatient CR of 1 hospital in western Iran during 2010 to 2014. The instruments included were demographics and actual risk factors checklist, single item of perceived risk factors, and Beck depression inventory (BDI. Data was analyzed via chi-square test, ANOVA, Bonferroni post hoc test, and binary logistic regression analysis. Results Among 1 187 patients (830 male, 27% had delayed referral, and the number of delays decreased from 2010 (49.3% to 2014 (7.6% (P < 0.001. The mean of the waiting time to receive outpatient CR in western Iran was an estimated 59 days. This mean has been reduced from 66 days (2010 to 53 days (2014 (P < 0.001. After adjustment for all demographics, the results indicated that diabetic patients (P = 0.002 and patients with biological (P = 0.002, behavioral (P = 0.003, or psychological (P = 0.002 perceived risk factors have less commitment. In addition, a family history of cardiac increases the possibility of commitment as 2.41 times (P < 0.001. Conclusions Despite the progressive process of patients’ admittance and acceptability of the present waiting time, especially after 2014, it seems that more attention to diabetic patients and patients without a family history of cardiac, and modification of attitudes about multiple risk factors can associate the self-care with more responsibility and it may also be affective in the control of harm consequences through commitment to the systematic referral.

  7. Self-Administered, Home-Based SMART (Sensorimotor Active Rehabilitation Training) Arm Training: A Single-Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Kathryn S; Neibling, Bridee A; Barker, Ruth N

    2015-01-01

    This single-case, mixed-method study explored the feasibility of self-administered, home-based SMART (sensorimotor active rehabilitation training) Arm training for a 57-yr-old man with severe upper-limb disability after a right frontoparietal hemorrhagic stroke 9 mo earlier. Over 4 wk of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training, the participant completed 2,100 repetitions unassisted. His wife provided support for equipment set-up and training progressions. Clinically meaningful improvements in arm impairment (strength), activity (arm and hand tasks), and participation (use of arm in everyday tasks) occurred after training (at 4 wk) and at follow-up (at 16 wk). Areas for refinement of SMART Arm training derived from thematic analysis of the participant's and researchers' journals focused on enabling independence, ensuring home and user friendliness, maintaining the motivation to persevere, progressing toward everyday tasks, and integrating practice into daily routine. These findings suggest that further investigation of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training is warranted for people with stroke who have severe upper-limb disability. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  8. Clinical effects and implications of cardiac rehabilitation for implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Moons, Philip; Christensen, Anne Vingaard

    2015-01-01

    rehabilitation and usual care was found in physical capacity and general and mental health. However, the clinical effect sizes of these findings were not investigated, and the findings from the quantitative and qualitative analyses were not triangulated to address the issue of whether the qualitative results...... could help explain the quantitative results and bring forward additional information. OBJECTIVES:: The objectives are to (a) determine the clinical effect sizes of the primary outcomes and (b) triangulate the quantitative and qualitative findings. METHODS:: A total of 196 patients with first...... d was calculated. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 patients representing the rehabilitation group. Triangulation was carried out by integrating the findings from the quantitative and qualitative results in light of each other. RESULTS:: Clinically meaningful effects were found between...

  9. Cardiodynamicsgram: a novel tool for monitoring cardiac function in exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xu; Guo, Bokai; Gong, Yinglan; Xia, Ling; Yu, Jie

    2018-04-27

    This study evaluated the feasibility of cardiodynamicsgram (CDG) for monitoring the cardiac functions of athletes and exercisers. CDG could provide an effective, simple, and economical tool for exercise training. Seventeen middle-distance race athletes aged 14-28 years old were recruited. CDG tests and blood test including creatine kinase (CK), CK-MB isoenzyme, and high-sensitivity troponin I (hsTnI) were performed before a high-intensity prolonged training, as well as 2 and 14 h after training, respectively. The CDG test result was unsatisfactory when the CK test result was used as standard. However, the accuracy of CDG test was about 80% when CK-MB and hsTnI were used as standards. Thus, CDG offers a noninvasive, simple, and economical approach for monitoring the cardiac function of athletes and exercisers during exercise training. Nonetheless, the applicability of CDG needs further investigation.

  10. Quantitative assessment of paretic limb dexterity and interlimb coordination during bilateral arm rehabilitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Li, Siyi; Wang, Kui; Hou, Zengguang; Yu, Ningbo

    2017-07-01

    In neuro-rehabilitation after stroke, the conventional constrained induced movement therapy (CIMT) has been well-accepted. Existing bilateral trainings are mostly on mirrored symmetrical motion. However, complementary bilateral movements are dominantly involved in activities of daily living (ADLs), and functional bilateral therapies may bring better skill transfer from trainings to daily life. Neurophysiological evidence is also growing. In this work, we firstly introduce our bilateral arm training system realized with a haptic interface and a motion sensor, as well as the tasks that have been designed to train both the manipulation function of the paretic arm and coordination of bilateral upper limbs. Then, we propose quantitative measures for functional assessment of complementary bilateral training performance, including kinematic behavior indices, smoothness, submovement and bimanual coordination. After that, we describe the experiments with healthy subjects and the results with respect to these quantitative measures. Feasibility and sensitivity of the proposed indices were evaluated through comparison of unilateral and bilateral training outcomes. The proposed bilateral training system and tasks, as well as the quantitative measures, have been demonstrated effective for training and assessment of unilateral and bilateral arm functions.

  11. Home Based Training: Main Strategy in Community Based Rehabilitation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Salamati

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Study of effectiveness of “home based training” in community based rehabilitation program on disabled people, under supervised of 21 pilot cities health and medical networks, who were trained and evaluated at the end of the course. Materials & Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 614 disabled people who had participated in “home based training” were selected with stratified random sampling method. They were evaluated according to function progress level variables by community based rehabilitation programme experts. Age, sex, disability groups, employment state and teacher’s relation variables were studied from their files and recording datas. Statistical analysis was performed with Chi-square test. Results: There was a relationship between age group and disability group with functional progress level (P = 0.014 & P <0.001. Low age groups, visional disabled group, epileptic patients and individuals with learning problems had the best results. High age groups, mixed disability group and individuals with verbal and hearing problems had the least results. There was a relationship between teacher’s relation with progress or nonprogress state (P = 0.038. Individuals that they were own teachers had the best results and individuals with teachers other than first or second relation or health worker had the least results. Conclusion: Home based training in community based rehabilitation programme is an effective method for improving disabled people in some selected groups.

  12. Range 8C Rehabilitation Demonstration Project, Hohenfels Training Area, Germany: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zellmer, S.D.; Hinchman, R.R.; Johnson, D.O.; Brent, J.J.

    1991-11-01

    More than 30 years of intensive and continual tactical training has caused extensive environmental damage at the US Army Hohenfels Training Area in Germany. The Range 8C Rehabilitation Demonstration Project, followed by a three-year monitoring effort, was conducted to develop and evaluate the environmental and economic effectiveness of seven revegetation and four erosion control prescriptions implemented at a 16-ha site. The point-intercept method was used to measure the types and amounts of vegetation established and the changes in the vegetative community during three years of military use on the seven areas treated with revegetation prescriptions. Field observations were made to determine the suitability and durability of four types of erosion control structures. Soil fertility and a source of seed appeared to be the most limiting factors in establishing vegetation, while seedbed preparation had only a minor influence. Grasses appeared to be more resistant to vehicle traffic than did other types of vegetation. Because grassed waterways were used as roads by military vehicles and a system of graded terraces was expensive, these erosion control prescriptions were unsuitable and uneconomical for use on training areas. Low-cost riprap waterbars and porous check dams slowed the velocity of runoff, trapped sediments, and were durable. Recommendations were formulated to improve the environmental and economic effectiveness of future rehabilitation efforts on tactical training areas

  13. A Case Report Examining the Feasibility of Meta-Cognitive Strategy Training in Acute Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Elizabeth R.; Holm, Margo B.; Whyte, Ellen M.; Dew, Mary Amanda; Dawson, Deirdre; Becker, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Meta-cognitive strategy training may be used to augment inpatient rehabilitation to promote active engagement and subsequent benefit for individuals with cognitive impairments after stroke. We examined the feasibility of administering a form of meta-cognitive strategy training, Cognitive Orientation to daily Occupational Performance, during inpatient rehabilitation. We trained an individual with cognitive impairments after right hemisphere stroke to identify performance problems, set self-selected goals, develop plans to address goals, and evaluate performance improvements. To assess feasibility, we examined the number of meta-cognitive training sessions attended, the number of self-selected goals, and changes in goal-related performance. We also examined changes in rehabilitation engagement and disability. The participant used the meta-cognitive strategy to set 8 goals addressing physically-oriented, instrumental, and work-related activities. Mean improvement in Canadian Occupational Performance Measure Performance Scale scores was 6.1. Pittsburgh Rehabilitation Participation Scale scores (measuring rehabilitation engagement) improved from 3.2 at admission to 4.9 at discharge. Functional Independence Measure scores (measuring disability) improved from 68 at admission, to 97 at discharge. Performance Assessment of Self-care Skills scores improved from 1.1 at admission to 2.9 at discharge. The results indicate that meta-cognitive strategy training was feasible during inpatient rehabilitation and warrants further evaluation to determine its effectiveness. PMID:21391121

  14. Global perspective on training and staffing for paediatric cardiac critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronicki, Ronald A; Pollak, Uri; Argent, Andrew C; Kumar, R Krishna; Balestrini, Maria; Cogo, Paola; Cury Borim, Bruna; De Costa, Kumi; Beca, John; Shimizu, Naoki; Dominguez, Troy E

    2017-12-01

    This manuscript provides a global perspective on physician and nursing education and training in paediatric cardiac critical care, including available resources and delivery of care models with representatives from several regions of the world including Africa, Israel, Asia, Australasia, Europe, South America, and the United States of America.

  15. Phlebotomy eliminates the maximal cardiac output response to six weeks of exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonne, Thomas Christian; Doucende, Gregory; Flück, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    With this study we tested the hypothesis that six weeks of endurance training increases maximal cardiac output (Qmax) relatively more by elevating blood volume (BV) than by inducing structural and functional changes within the heart. Nine healthy but untrained volunteers (VO2max 47 ± 5 ml.min(-1......).kg(-1)) underwent supervised training (60 min; 4 times weekly at 65% VO2max for six weeks) and Qmax was determined by inert gas re-breathing during cycle ergometer exercise before and after the training period. After the training period, blood volume (determined in duplicates by CO re......-breathing) was re-established to pre-training values by phlebotomy and Qmax was quantified again. Resting echography revealed no structural heart adaptations as a consequence of the training intervention. Following the training period, plasma volume (PV), red blood cell volume (RBCV) and BV increased (p...

  16. Intertester reliability of the talk test in a cardiac rehabilitation population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annemette Krintel; Maribo, Thomas; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The validity of the Talk Test (TT) is well documented, but the reliability of the test is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the absolute and relative intertester reliability of the TT in cardiac patients. METHODS: Cardiac patients (n = 64) who had completed an exercise...... randomized to tests. Workload in watts at the first negative stage of the TT was registered as the test result. Patients and physiotherapists were blinded to test results of the first test. Absolute reliability of the TT was assessed with Bland-Altman plot, standard error of measurement, and minimal...... detectable change. Relative reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). RESULTS: Mean difference in peak workload between test and retest was 0.8 W (95% CI: -4.8 to 3.3). Limit of agreement was estimated to be +31/-32 W. Standard error of measurement was 11 W (95% CI: 10...

  17. Effects of Exercise Training on Haematology and Maximal Cardiac Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonne, Thomas Christian

    = 0.051) and time to complete 3000 m tended (P = 0.09) to increase in LHTH but not after sea level training. In study III haematological parameters were determined weekly three times before and four times after classical altitude and sea level training and ABP thresholds for [Hb], %ret, OFF......-score and the abnormal blood profile score (ABPS) were generated using the official ABP software. After altitude training, six swimmers exceeded the 99% ABP thresholds: Two swimmers exceeded the OFF-score thresholds at day 7; One swimmer exceeded the OFF-score threshold at day 28; One swimmer exceeded the threshold...... for %ret at day 14; One swimmer surpassed the ABPS threshold at day 7 and one swimmer exceeded the ABPS threshold 28 days after altitude training. No values exceeded the individual thresholds in the control group. In conclusion, this thesis demonstrated that BV is a main determinant of the exercise induced...

  18. Correlation between athlete training intensity and cardiac performance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-03

    Sep 3, 2016 ... Department of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, 1The Third Xiang-ya Hospital, .... Under corresponding emergency situation, the body .... Bu Y, Liu D. Physical Training Process of Chinese Women's Soccer Team - Based.

  19. Early remodeling of rat cardiac muscle induced by swimming training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzola R.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of acute swimming training with an anaerobic component on matrix metallopeptidase (MMP activity and myosin heavy chain gene expression in the rat myocardium. Animals (male Wistar rats, weighing approximately 180 g were trained for 6 h/day in 3 sessions of 2 h each for 1 to 5 consecutive days (N = 5 rats per group. Rats swam in basins 47 cm in diameter and 60 cm deep filled with water at 33 to 35ºC. After the training period a significant increase (P < 0.05 was observed in the heart weight normalized to body weight by about 22 and 35% in the groups that trained for 96 and 120 h, respectively. Blood lactate levels were significantly increased (P < 0.05 in all groups after all training sessions, confirming an anaerobic component. However, lactate levels decreased (P < 0.05 with days of training, suggesting that the animals became adapted to this protocol. Myosin heavy chain-ß gene expression, analyzed by real time PCR and normalized with GAPDH gene expression, showed a significant two-fold increase (P < 0.01 after 5 days of training. Zymography analysis of myocardium extracts indicated a single ~60-kDa activity band that was significantly increased (P < 0.05 after 72, 96, and 120 h, indicating an increased expression of MMP-2 and suggesting precocious remodeling. Furthermore, the presence of MMP-2 was confirmed by Western blot analysis, but not the presence of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Taken together, our results indicate that in these training conditions, the rat heart undergoes early biochemical and functional changes required for the adaptation to the new physiological condition by tissue remodeling.

  20. Modulation of Synaptic Plasticity by Exercise Training as a Basis for Ischemic Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jingjing; Yang, Xiaosu

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, rehabilitation of ischemic stroke draws more and more attention in the world, and has been linked to changes of synaptic plasticity. Exercise training improves motor function of ischemia as well as cognition which is associated with formation of learning and memory. The molecular basis of learning and memory might be synaptic plasticity. Research has therefore been conducted in an attempt to relate effects of exercise training to neuroprotection and neurogenesis adjacent to the ischemic injury brain. The present paper reviews the current literature addressing this question and discusses the possible mechanisms involved in modulation of synaptic plasticity by exercise training. This review shows the pathological process of synaptic dysfunction in ischemic roughly and then discusses the effects of exercise training on scaffold proteins and regulatory protein expression. The expression of scaffold proteins generally increased after training, but the effects on regulatory proteins were mixed. Moreover, the compositions of postsynaptic receptors were changed and the strength of synaptic transmission was enhanced after training. Finally, the recovery of cognition is critically associated with synaptic remodeling in an injured brain, and the remodeling occurs through a number of local regulations including mRNA translation, remodeling of cytoskeleton, and receptor trafficking into and out of the synapse. We do provide a comprehensive knowledge of synaptic plasticity enhancement obtained by exercise training in this review.

  1. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults after Heart valve surgery (protocol)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lærum Sibilitz, Kristine; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Tang, Lars Hermann

    2013-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the benefits and harms of exercise-based intervention programmes (exercise-based interventions alone or in combination with psycho-educational components), compared to no intervention, or treatment...... as usual, in adults who have had heart valve surgery. In this review we will focus on programmes that include an exercise-based intervention with, or without, another rehabilitation component (such as a psycho-educational component)....

  2. The effect of protein and carbohydrate supplementation on strength training outcome of rehabilitation in ACL patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Esmarck, Birgitte; Mizuno, Masao

    2006-01-01

    supplementation groups: Protein+Carbohydrate (PC), Isocaloric-Carbohydrate (IC), or Placebo (PL), ingesting the supplementation immediately after each of 36 training sessions. Determined from images of thigh cross-sections (magnetic resonance imaging) the hypertrophy of the quadriceps muscle differed....... The results from this study demonstrate that restoration of the distal vasti muscle mass and knee extension muscle strength with resistance training is promoted further by protein-containing nutrient supplementation immediately after single exercise sessions. Thus, exercise-related protein supplementation may...... was therefore to investigate if nutrient supplementation during 12 weeks of conservative rehabilitation strength training could enhance hypertrophy and strength of the quadriceps muscle in ACL-injured patients. Twenty-six ACL-injured men and women were included and randomly distributed into three...

  3. Differential cardiac effects of aerobic interval training versus moderate continuous training in a patient with schizophrenia: a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eHerbsleb

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates for patients with schizophrenia are reported to contribute to their reduced life expectancy. Common reasons for increased cardiac mortality rates include cigarette smoking, obesity, dyslipidemia, diabetes and poorer health behavior in general. The majority of excess mortality among people with schizophrenia is caused by cardiovascular complications. Reduced vagal activity might be one important mechanism leading to this increased cardiac mortality and has been consistently described in patients and their healthy first-degree relatives.In this case study, we compared two different aerobic exercise regimes in one patient with chronic schizophrenia to investigate their effects on cardiovascular regulation. The patient completed a 6-week period of moderate continuous training followed by a 6-week period of interval training, each regime 2 times per week, on a stationary bicycle. This was followed by a 6-week period of detraining. Primary outcome measures examined heart rate (HR and heart rate variability (HRV at rest while secondary measures assessed fitness parameters such as the ventilatory threshold 1 (VT1. We observed that interval training was far more effective than moderate continuous training in increasing HRV, as indicated by RMSSD (improvement to baseline 27% vs. 18%, and reducing resting heart rate (-14% vs. 0%. Improvement in VT1 (21% vs. -1% was only observed after interval training. Our study provides preliminary data that the type of intervention is highly influential for improving cardiac function in patients with schizophrenia. While cardiovascular function might be influenced by continuous training to some degree, no such effect was present in this patient with schizophrenia. In addition, the beneficial effect of interval training on heart rate regulation vanished completely after a very short period of detraining after the intervention.

  4. Multimedia Exercise Training Program Improves Distance Walked, Heart Rate Recovery, and Self-efficacy in Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Wei; Ou, Shu-Hua; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Chang, Yue-Cune; Kao, Chi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Patient education has been shown to be more effective when delivered using multimedia than written materials. However, the effects of using multimedia to assist patients in cardiac rehabilitation have not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of an inpatient multimedia exercise training program on distance walked in the 6-minute walking test (6MWT), heart rate recovery, and walking self-efficacy of patients who had undergone heart surgery. For this longitudinal quasi-experimental study, 60 consecutive patients were assigned to an experimental (n = 20; inpatient multimedia exercise training program) or control (n = 40; routine care) group. Data were collected at 3 times (before surgery, 1 to 2 days before hospital discharge, and 1 month after hospital discharge) and analyzed with the generalized estimating equation approach. Most subjects were men (66.7%), had a mean age of 61.32 ± 13.4 years and left ventricular ejection fraction of 56.96% ± 13.28%, and underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery (n = 34, 56.7%). Subjects receiving the exercise training program showed significantly greater improvement than those in the control group in the 6MWT walking distance (P self-efficacy (P = .002) at hospital discharge. Furthermore, the intervention effects on 6MWT distance (P self-efficacy (P exercise training program safely improved distance walked in the 6MWT, heart rate recovery, and self-efficacy at hospital discharge in patients after heart surgery and maintained their improvement in 6MWT and self-efficacy 1 month later.

  5. Cardiac lipid content is unresponsive to a physical activity training intervention in type 2 diabetic patients, despite improved ejection fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiner Tim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased cardiac lipid content has been associated with diabetic cardiomyopathy. We recently showed that cardiac lipid content is reduced after 12 weeks of physical activity training in healthy overweight subjects. The beneficial effect of exercise training on cardiovascular risk is well established and the decrease in cardiac lipid content with exercise training in healthy overweight subjects was accompanied by improved ejection fraction. It is yet unclear whether diabetic patients respond similarly to physical activity training and whether a lowered lipid content in the heart is necessary for improvements in cardiac function. Here, we investigated whether exercise training is able to lower cardiac lipid content and improve cardiac function in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Eleven overweight-to-obese male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (age: 58.4 ± 0.9 years, BMI: 29.9 ± 0.01 kg/m2 followed a 12-week training program (combination endurance/strength training, three sessions/week. Before and after training, maximal whole body oxygen uptake (VO2max and insulin sensitivity (by hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp was determined. Systolic function was determined under resting conditions by CINE-MRI and cardiac lipid content in the septum of the heart by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Results VO2max increased (from 27.1 ± 1.5 to 30.1 ± 1.6 ml/min/kg, p = 0.001 and insulin sensitivity improved upon training (insulin stimulated glucose disposal (delta Rd of glucose improved from 5.8 ± 1.9 to 10.3 ± 2.0 μmol/kg/min, p = 0.02. Left-ventricular ejection fraction improved after training (from 50.5 ± 2.0 to 55.6 ± 1.5%, p = 0.01 as well as cardiac index and cardiac output. Unexpectedly, cardiac lipid content in the septum remained unchanged (from 0.80 ± 0.22% to 0.95 ± 0.21%, p = 0.15. Conclusions Twelve weeks of progressive endurance/strength training was effective in improving VO2max, insulin sensitivity

  6. Robot-Assisted Training Early After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenrath, Felix; Markendorf, Susanne; Brauchlin, Andreas E; Seifert, Burkhardt; Wilhelm, Markus J; Czerny, Martin; Riener, Robert; Falk, Volkmar; Schmied, Christian M

    2015-07-01

    To assess feasibility and safety of a robot-assisted gait therapy with the Lokomat® system in patients early after open heart surgery. Within days after open heart surgery 10 patients were subjected to postoperative Lokomat® training (Intervention group, IG) whereas 20 patients served as controls undergoing standard postoperative physiotherapy (Control group, CG). All patients underwent six-minute walk test and evaluation of the muscular strength of the lower limbs by measuring quadriceps peak force. The primary safety end-point was freedom from any device-related wound healing disturbance. Patients underwent clinical follow-up after one month. Both training methods resulted in an improvement of walking distance (IG [median, interquartile range, p-value]: +119 m, 70-201 m, p = 0.005; CG: 105 m, 57-152.5m, p force (IG left: +5 N, 3.8 7 N, p = 0.005; IG right: +3.5 N, 1.5-8.8 N, p = 0.011; CG left: +5.5 N, 4-9 N, p training were comparable to early postoperative standard in hospital training (median changes in walking distance in percent, p = 0.81; median changes in quadriceps peak force in percent, left: p = 0.97, right p = 0.61). No deep sternal wound infection or any adverse event occurred in the robot-assisted training group. Robot-assisted gait therapy with the Lokomat® system is feasible and safe in patients early after median sternotomy. Results with robot-assisted training were comparable to standard in hospital training. An adapted and combined aerobic and resistance training intervention with augmented feedback may result in benefits in walking distance and lower limb muscle strength (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT 02146196). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Antigravity treadmill training during the early rehabilitation phase following unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Hao; Schroeder, E Todd; Powers, Christopher

    2018-02-26

    Patients who have undergone unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) have been reported to exhibit altered gait 19-25 months post-surgery. The most common gait impairment in this population is inadequate knee flexion and a corresponding decrease in the knee extensor moment during loading response (i.e., quadriceps avoidance). The purpose of this case series was to determine whether incorporation of antigravity treadmill training into a standard physical therapy program can eliminate quadriceps avoidance gait during the early rehabilitation phase following UKA. Four females who underwent UKA were recruited for this study. Participants completed antigravity treadmill training three times per week for 12 weeks in addition to their standard physical therapy program. Instrumented gait analysis was performed at baseline (pre-intervention), week 6 (mid-intervention), and week 12 (post-intervention). We found that peak knee flexion and the peak knee extensor moment during the weight acceptance phase of gait increased to normal values following the 12-week intervention period (14.1 ± 6.5° to 20.6 ± 1.5° and 0.4 ± 0.3 to 0.7 ± 0.2 Nm/kg respectively). The findings of this case series suggest that a standard physical therapy program that incorporates early gait training using an antigravity treadmill may be beneficial in eliminating "quadriceps avoidance" during the early rehabilitation phase following UKA.

  8. Cardiac auscultation training of medical students: a comparison of electronic sensor-based and acoustic stethoscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høyte, Henning; Jensen, Torstein; Gjesdal, Knut

    2005-01-01

    Background To determine whether the use of an electronic, sensor based stethoscope affects the cardiac auscultation skills of undergraduate medical students. Methods Forty eight third year medical students were randomized to use either an electronic stethoscope, or a conventional acoustic stethoscope during clinical auscultation training. After a training period of four months, cardiac auscultation skills were evaluated using four patients with different cardiac murmurs. Two experienced cardiologists determined correct answers. The students completed a questionnaire for each patient. The thirteen questions were weighted according to their relative importance, and a correct answer was credited from one to six points. Results No difference in mean score was found between the two groups (p = 0.65). Grading and characterisation of murmurs and, if present, report of non existing murmurs were also rated. None of these yielded any significant differences between the groups. Conclusion Whether an electronic or a conventional stethoscope was used during training and testing did not affect the students' performance on a cardiac auscultation test. PMID:15882458

  9. Cardiac auscultation training of medical students: a comparison of electronic sensor-based and acoustic stethoscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Torstein

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether the use of an electronic, sensor based stethoscope affects the cardiac auscultation skills of undergraduate medical students. Methods Forty eight third year medical students were randomized to use either an electronic stethoscope, or a conventional acoustic stethoscope during clinical auscultation training. After a training period of four months, cardiac auscultation skills were evaluated using four patients with different cardiac murmurs. Two experienced cardiologists determined correct answers. The students completed a questionnaire for each patient. The thirteen questions were weighted according to their relative importance, and a correct answer was credited from one to six points. Results No difference in mean score was found between the two groups (p = 0.65. Grading and characterisation of murmurs and, if present, report of non existing murmurs were also rated. None of these yielded any significant differences between the groups. Conclusion Whether an electronic or a conventional stethoscope was used during training and testing did not affect the students' performance on a cardiac auscultation test.

  10. The Canadian Heart Health Strategy and Action Plan: Cardiac rehabilitation as an exemplar of chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, H M; Suskin, N; Bayley, M; Fortin, M; Howlett, J; Heckman, G; Lewanczuk, R

    2010-01-01

    In October 2006, federal funding was announced for the development of a national strategy to fight cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Canada. The comprehensive, independent, stakeholder-driven Canadian Heart Health Strategy and Action Plan (CHHS-AP) was delivered to the Minister of Health on February 24, 2009. The mandate of CHHS-AP Theme Working Group (TWG) 6 was to identify the optimal chronic disease management model that incorporated timely access to rehabilitation services and end-of-life planning and care. The purpose of the present paper was to provide an overview of worldwide approaches to CVD and cardiac rehabilitation (CR) strategies and recommendations for CR care in Canada, within the context of the well-known Chronic Care Model (CCM). A separate paper will address end-of-life issues in CVD. TWG 6 was composed of content representatives, primary care representatives and patients. Input in the area of Aboriginal and indigenous cardiovascular health was obtained through individual expert consultation. Information germane to the present paper was gathered from international literature and best practice guidelines. The CCM principles were discussed and agreed on by all. Prioritization of recommendations and overall messaging was discussed and decided on within the entire TWG. The full TWG report was presented to the CHHS-AP Steering Committee and was used to inform the recommendations of the CHHS-AP. Specific actionable recommendations for CR are made in accordance with the key principles of the CCM. The present CR blueprint, as part of the CHHS-AP, will be a first step toward reducing the health care burden of CVD in Canada.

  11. Influence of strength training on cardiac risk prevention in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has widely been shown that exercise, particularly aerobic exercise, has extensive cardioprotective benefits and is an important tool in the prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). The present investigation aimed to determine the multivariate impact of strength training, designed to prevent the development of CHD, on ...

  12. Update to the study protocol, including statistical analysis plan for a randomized clinical trial comparing comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery with control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine Laerum; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Hansen, Tina Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    , either valve replacement or repair, remains the treatment of choice. However, post-surgery, the transition to daily living may become a physical, mental and social challenge. We hypothesize that a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program can improve physical capacity and self-assessed mental health...... and reduce hospitalization and healthcare costs after heart valve surgery. METHODS: This randomized clinical trial, CopenHeartVR, aims to investigate whether cardiac rehabilitation in addition to usual care is superior to treatment as usual after heart valve surgery. The trial will randomly allocate 210...... patients 1:1 to an intervention or a control group, using central randomization, and blinded outcome assessment and statistical analyses. The intervention consists of 12 weeks of physical exercise and a psycho-educational intervention comprising five consultations. The primary outcome is peak oxygen uptake...

  13. What is role of sex and age differences in marital conflict and stress of patients under Cardiac Rehabilitation Program?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Komasi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate the role of sex and age differences in marital conflict and stress of patients who were under cardiac rehabilitation (CR program. METHODS: The data of this cross-sectional study were collected from the database of the CR Department of Imam Ali Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran. The demographics and medical data of 683 persons were collected from January 2003 and January 2010 using medical records, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hudson’s Index of Marital Stress, and the Structured Clinical Interview for axis I disorders. Data were analyzed through Analysis of Covariance and Bonferroni test. RESULTS: About 74.8% of the subjects were male. After adjustment for age, educational level, anxiety, and depression-the findings showed that women in CR program had a higher level of marital stress compared to men (54.75 ± 2.52 vs. 49.30 ± 0.89; P = 0.042. Furthermore, it was revealed that women who aged 56-65 years and more experienced higher level of marital stress compared to younger patients (P < 0.050; however, no significant difference was observed between different age groups in male patients (P > 0.050. CONCLUSION: Marital conflict and stress threaten healthiness of women who aged 56-65 years more prominently than does in males or younger patients. Regarding the effect of marital stress on recurrence of the disease and cardiac-related morbidity and mortality in women, providing effective education and interventions to this group of patients, especially older women and even their spouses could be one of the useful objectives of CR programs. 

  14. What is role of sex and age differences in marital conflict and stress of patients under Cardiac Rehabilitation Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasi, Saeid; Saeidi, Mozhgan

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the role of sex and age differences in marital conflict and stress of patients who were under cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program. The data of this cross-sectional study were collected from the database of the CR Department of Imam Ali Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran. The demographics and medical data of 683 persons were collected from January 2003 and January 2010 using medical records, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hudson's Index of Marital Stress, and the Structured Clinical Interview for axis I disorders. Data were analyzed through Analysis of Covariance and Bonferroni test. About 74.8% of the subjects were male. After adjustment for age, educational level, anxiety, and depression-the findings showed that women in CR program had a higher level of marital stress compared to men (54.75 ± 2.52 vs. 49.30 ± 0.89; P = 0.042). Furthermore, it was revealed that women who aged 56-65 years and more experienced higher level of marital stress compared to younger patients (P age groups in male patients (P > 0.050). Marital conflict and stress threaten healthiness of women who aged 56-65 years more prominently than does in males or younger patients. Regarding the effect of marital stress on recurrence of the disease and cardiac-related morbidity and mortality in women, providing effective education and interventions to this group of patients, especially older women and even their spouses could be one of the useful objectives of CR programs.

  15. Effects of ultrasound therapy with taping PNF training and PNF training with taping in treatment and rehabilitation of sports injuries of high ankle sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D L Charly Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: It was concluded that combining ultrasound with taping and PNF training with taping were found to be more beneficial in the treatment and rehabilitation of high ankle sprain injury. The combined effect of UT, PNF training, and taping may be explored by future researchers.

  16. Effects of cancer rehabilitation on problem-solving, anxiety and depression : a RCT comparing physical and cognitive-behavioural training versus physical training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstjens, Irene; Mesters, Ilse; May, Anne M; van Weert, Ellen; van den Hout, Johanna H C; Ros, Wynand; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E H M; van der Schans, Cees; van den Borne, Bart

    2011-01-01

    We tested the effects on problem-solving, anxiety and depression of 12-week group-based self-management cancer rehabilitation, combining comprehensive physical training (PT) and cognitive-behavioural problem-solving training (CBT), compared with PT. We expected that PT + CBT would outperform PT in

  17. Effects of cancer rehabilitation on problem-solving, anxiety and depression : A RCT comparing physical and cognitive-behavioural training versus physical training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstjens, Irene; Mesters, Ilse; May, Anne M.; van Weert, Ellen; van den Hout, Johanna H. C.; Ros, Wynand; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.; van der Schans, Cees P.; van den Borne, Bart

    2011-01-01

    We tested the effects on problem-solving, anxiety and depression of 12-week group-based self-management cancer rehabilitation, combining comprehensive physical training (PT) and cognitive-behavioural problem-solving training (CBT), compared with PT. We expected that PT + CBT would outperform PT in

  18. Aerobic exercise training promotes additional cardiac benefits better than resistance exercise training in postmenopausal rats with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteiro, Hugo; Buzin, Morgana; Conti, Filipe Fernandes; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Figueroa, Diego; Llesuy, Susana; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; Sanches, Iris Callado; De Angelis, Kátia

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise training or resistance exercise training on cardiac morphometric, functional, and oxidative stress parameters in rats with ovarian hormone deprivation and diabetes. Female Wistar rats (200-220 g) were divided into a sham-operated group (euglycemic sham-operated sedentary [ES]; n = 8) and three ovariectomized (bilateral removal of ovaries) and diabetic (streptozotocin 50 mg/kg IV) groups as follows: diabetic ovariectomized sedentary (DOS; n = 8), diabetic ovariectomized undergoing aerobic exercise training (DOTA; n = 8), and diabetic ovariectomized undergoing resistance exercise training (DOTR; n = 8). After 8 weeks of resistance (ladder) or aerobic (treadmill) exercise training, left ventricle function and morphometry were evaluated by echocardiography, whereas oxidative stress was evaluated at the left ventricle. The DOS group presented with increased left ventricle cavity in diastole and relative wall thickness (RWT), and these changes were attenuated in both DOTA and DOTR groups. Systolic and diastolic function was impaired in the DOS group compared with the ES group, and only the DOTA group was able to reverse this dysfunction. Lipoperoxidation and glutathione redox balance were improved in both trained groups compared with the DOS group. Glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase were higher in the DOTA group than in the other studied groups. Correlations were observed between lipoperoxidation and left ventricle cavity in diastole (r = 0.55), between redox balance and RWT (r = 0.62), and between lipoperoxidation and RWT (r = -0.60). Aerobic exercise training and resistance exercise training promote attenuation of cardiac morphometric dysfunction associated with a reduction in oxidative stress in an experimental model of diabetes and menopause. However, only dynamic aerobic exercise training is able to attenuate systolic and diastolic dysfunction under this condition.

  19. Body Image and quality of life of senior citizens included in a cardiac rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Vargas Amaral

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Most people who have to live with some kind of disease tend to adopt healthy habits and create new ways of seeing themselves. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between the index of quality of life and self perception of patients included in a cardiovascular rehabilitation program in Florianopolis/Brazil. The sample consists of 24 subjects of 62 ± 1.3 years of age, who have coronary artery disease. The Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ was used to assess the quality of life, and to identify the degree of body image discontentment the Stunkard and Sorensen questionnaire (1993 was applied. Statistical analysis was made through statistics programs and the software SPSS 11.0. The degree of association between variables was studied with Kendall test. It was verified that the higher the BMI and the current body shape, the greatest the degree of body image dissatisfaction. The emotional symptoms also appear to be significantly correlated with a desire for a smaller body shape and with indicators of lower quality of life (r = 0474 = 0735, p major 0.05. The physical symptoms were also considerably associated with the emotional symptoms. These results suggest that the variables concerning the quality of life are meaningful to significant body image and satisfaction, which seems to correlate with fewer emotional problems and better facing of the disease. Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Programs that implement physical activity in daily habits proves to be a suitable tool for improving these ailments in this post-acute phase

  20. The importance of daily physical activity for improved exercise tolerance in heart failure patients with limited access to centre-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Noriaki; Origuchi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Umpei; Takanaga, Yasuhiro; Mohri, Masahiro

    2012-09-01

    Supervised cardiac rehabilitation provided at dedicated centres ameliorates exercise intolerance in patients with chronic heart failure. To correlate the amount of physical activity outside the hospital with improved exercise tolerance in patients with limited access to centre-based programs. Forty patients (median age 69 years) with stable heart failure due to systolic left ventricular dysfunction participated in cardiac rehabilitation once per week for five months. Using a validated single-axial accelerometer, the number of steps and physical activity-related energy expenditures on nonrehabilitation days were determined. Median (interquartile range) peak oxygen consumption was increased from 14.4 mL/kg/min (range 12.9 mL/kg/min to 17.8 mL/kg/min) to 16.4 mL/kg/min (range 13.9 mL/kg/min to 19.1 mL/kg/min); Pdaily number of steps (Pexercise time per day and time spent for light (≤3 metabolic equivalents) exercise, but not with time spent for moderate/vigorous (>3 metabolic equivalents) exercise. The number of steps and energy expenditures outside the hospital were correlated with improved exercise capacity. An accelerometer may be useful for guiding home-based cardiac rehabilitation.

  1. Trunk Robot Rehabilitation Training with Active Stepping Reorganizes and Enriches Trunk Motor Cortex Representations in Spinal Transected Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Oza, Chintan S.; Giszter, Simon F.

    2015-01-01

    Trunk motor control is crucial for postural stability and propulsion after low thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) in animals and humans. Robotic rehabilitation aimed at trunk shows promise in SCI animal models and patients. However, little is known about the effect of SCI and robot rehabilitation of trunk on cortical motor representations. We previously showed reorganization of trunk motor cortex after adult SCI. Non-stepping training also exacerbated some SCI-driven plastic changes. Here we e...

  2. Family support and cardiac rehabilitation: a comparative study of the experiences of South Asian and White-European patients and their carer's living in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astin, Felicity; Atkin, Karl; Darr, Aliya

    2008-03-01

    Effective lifestyle modification facilitated by cardiac rehabilitation is known to reduce the occurrence of adverse coronary events and mortality. South Asians have poorer outcomes after a myocardial infarction than the general UK population, but little is known about their experiences of family support, cardiac rehabilitation and lifestyle change. To explore the nature of family support available to a sample of South Asian and White-European cardiac patients and to highlight similarities and differences between these groups with regard to cardiac rehabilitation and lifestyle modification. Using a qualitative approach, semi-structured interviews (in 1 of 6 languages) were conducted by researchers with; 45 South Asian patients and 37 carers and 20 White-European patients and 17 carers. Interviews were conducted in a home setting, up to eighteen months after discharge from hospital following myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass surgery or unstable angina. The main themes that emerged related to the provision of advice and information, family support and burden, dietary change and exercise regimes. Several cultural and ethnic differences were identified between patients and their families alongside similarities, irrespective of ethnicity. These may represent generic characteristics of recovery after a cardiac event. Health professionals should develop a cultural repertoire to engage with diversity and difference. Not every difficulty a person encounters as they try to access appropriate service delivery can be attributed to ethnic background. By improving services generally, support for South Asian populations can be improved. The challenge is to know when ethnicity makes a difference and mediates a person's relationship with service support and when it does not.

  3. Experiences from a communication training programme of paid carers in a residential rehabilitation centre for people with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behn, Nicholas; Togher, Leanne; Power, Emma

    2015-01-01

    To determine the impact of a communication training programme by exploring the experiences of paid carers who attended the programme in a residential rehabilitation centre for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Five paid carers attended a communication training programme which comprised 17 hours (across 8 weeks). Semi-structured interviews were conducted pre- and post-training. Analysis used a generic procedure with constant comparative analysis to identify categories across and within interview transcripts. Paid carers described improved knowledge and use of strategies, improved communication, positive emotional experiences and barriers and facilitators to consider for future communication training programmes. Training communication skills of paid carers in a residential rehabilitation centre had a positive impact on their conversations with people with TBI. These positive changes support quantitative findings for the effectiveness of communication training.

  4. Finding an optimal rehabilitation paradigm after stroke: Enhancing fiber growth and training of the brain at the right moment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Sophia eWahl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available After stroke the central nervous system reveals a spectrum of intrinsic capacities to react as a highly dynamic system which can change the properties of its circuits, form new contacts, erase others, and remap related cortical and spinal cord regions. This plasticity can lead to a surprising degree of spontaneous recovery. It includes the activation of neuronal molecular mechanisms of growth and of extrinsic growth promoting factors and guidance signals in the tissue. Rehabilitative training and pharmacological interventions may modify and boost these neuronal processes, but almost nothing is known on the optimal timing of the different processes and therapeutic interventions and on their detailed interactions. Finding optimal rehabilitation paradigms requires an optimal orchestration of the internal processes of re‐organization and the therapeutic interventions in accordance with defined plastic time windows.In this review we summarize the mechanisms of spontaneous plasticity after stroke and experimental interventions to enhance growth and plasticity, with an emphasis on anti‐Nogo‐A immunotherapy. We highlight critical time windows of growth and of rehabilitative training and consider different approaches of combinatorial rehabilitative schedules. Finally, we discuss potential future strategies for designing repair and rehabilitation paradigms by introducing a 3 step model: determination of the metabolic and plastic status of the brain, pharmacological enhancement of its plastic mechanisms, and stabilization of newly formed functional connections by rehabilitative training.

  5. Development and psychometric validation of a scale to assess information needs in cardiac rehabilitation: the INCR Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisi, Gabriela Lima de Melo; Grace, Sherry L; Thomas, Scott; Evans, Michael F; Oh, Paul

    2013-06-01

    To develop and psychometrically validate a tool to assess information needs in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) patients. After a literature search, 60 information items divided into 11 areas of needs were identified. To establish content validity, they were reviewed by an expert panel (N=10). Refined items were pilot-tested in 34 patients on a 5-point Likert-scale from 1 "really not helpful" to 5 "very important". A final version was generated and psychometrically tested in 203 CR patients. Test-retest reliability was assessed via the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), the internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha, and criterion validity was assessed with regard to patient's education and duration in CR. Five items were excluded after ICC analysis as well as one area of needs. All 10 areas were considered internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha>0.7). Criterion validity was supported by significant differences in mean scores by educational level (pinformation need. The INCR Tool was demonstrated to have good reliability and validity. This is an appropriate tool for application in clinical and research settings, assessing patients' needs during CR and as part of education programming. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Short-term effects of exercise and music on cognitive performance among participants in a cardiac rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Charles F; Hsiao, Evana T; Hill, Scott M; Frid, David J

    2003-01-01

    Exercise has been associated with improved cognitive performance among patients with coronary artery disease. Music listening has been associated with enhanced cognitive functioning among healthy adults. This study evaluated the combined influence of exercise and music listening on cognitive performance among patients in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Using a within-subjects repeated measures design, this study was conducted in an outpatient University-based CR facility. Thirty-three men and women (mean age = 62.6 +/- 10.5 years) participated in this study. Participants completed 1 exercise session accompanied by music and a second exercise session without music. Order of conditions was assigned randomly. Before and after each exercise session, participants completed a brief assessment of depression and anxiety, and a cognitive test of verbal fluency. The music condition was associated with significant improvements in verbal fluency, but the no-music control condition was not associated with cognitive change. The study provides preliminary evidence of the combined benefit of exercise and music listening for cognitive performance among patients in CR.

  7. Measurement of physical performance by field tests in programs of cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travensolo, Cristiane; Goessler, Karla; Poton, Roberto; Pinto, Roberta Ramos; Polito, Marcos Doederlein

    2018-04-13

    The literature concerning the effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on field tests results is inconsistent. To perform a systematic review with meta-analysis on field tests results after programs of CR. Studies published in PubMed and Web of Science databases until May 2016 were analyzed. The standard difference in means correct by bias (Hedges' g) was used as effect size (g) to measure que amount of modifications in performance of field tests after CR period. Potential differences between subgroups were analyzed by Q-test based on ANOVA. Fifteen studies published between 1996 e 2016 were included in the review, 932 patients and age ranged 54,4 - 75,3 years old. Fourteen studies used the six-minutes walking test to evaluate the exercise capacity and one study used the Shuttle Walk Test. The random Hedges's g was 0.617 (P<0.001), representing a drop of 20% in the performance of field test after CR. The meta-regression showed significantly association (P=0.01) to aerobic exercise duration, i.e., for each 1-min increase in aerobic exercise duration, there is a 0.02 increase in effect size for performance in the field test. Field tests can detect physical modification after CR, and the large duration of aerobic exercise during CR was associated with a better result. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety as Barriers to Participation in Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs Among Arab and Jewish Patients in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilchinsky, Noa; Reges, Orna; Leibowitz, Morton; Khaskia, Abdulrahim; Mosseri, Morris; Kark, Jeremy D

    2018-05-01

    Despite its proven efficacy, low participation rates in cardiac prevention and rehabilitation programs (CPRPs) prevail worldwide, especially among ethnic minorities. This is strongly evident in Israel's Arab minority. Since psychological distress has been found to be associated with CPRP participation and minorities are subjected to higher levels of distress, it is plausible that distress may be an important barrier for CPRP participation among minority patients. The current prospective study assessed the contribution of depression and anxiety symptoms to participation in a CPRP after acute coronary syndrome, both in the enrollment phase and when considering adherence over time, among Jewish (majority) and Arab (minority) patients in Israel. Patients were interviewed during hospitalization about their emotional status and at a 6-mo follow-up concerning participation in a CPRP. Analyses were performed on 397 patients. The Brief Symptom Inventory was used. Logistic regression modeling was applied. Symptoms of depression, but not anxiety, were frequently observed among Arab patients compared with their Jewish counterparts. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, having symptoms of anxiety was associated with less participation in a CPRP, evident for both Jews and Arabs; this association was less evident for symptoms of depression. Multivariable adjusted models did not show a significant association of symptoms of anxiety or depression with adherence in a CPRP. Accounting for psychological distress did not reduce the sharp difference between Jews and Arabs in CPRP participation. Symptoms of distress may serve as barriers to CPRP participation, regardless of ethnic origin.

  9. Motivation and participation in a phase III cardiac rehabilitation programme: an application of the health action process approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnke, Birte; Nowossadeck, Enno; Müller-Fahrnow, Werner

    2010-10-01

    This longitudinal study extends the previous research on low participation rates and high dropout rates in phase III cardiac rehabilitation (CR) exercise programmes. It examines the correlates of motivation and participation 6 months after inpatient phase II CR (T1) and the predictors of dropout 6 months later (T2) using the health action process approach (HAPA). Risk perception, outcome expectancies, self-efficacy, intention (at T1), and participation (at T1 and T2) in relation to phase III CR programmes was assessed in 456 patients. Based on intention and participation at T1, patients were classified as nonintenders (56%), intenders (13%), or actors (31%). Group differences were confirmed in outcome expectancies and self-efficacy. By T2, 21% of T1 actors had dropped out. Dropouts and maintainers differed in intention and self-efficacy (at T1). Results are in line with the HAPA and suggest a perspective for tailoring motivational counselling to improve participation in phase III CR programmes.

  10. Cardiac Rehabilitation for Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: A Practical Guide to Enhance Patient Outcomes Through Continuity of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Giuliano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a leading cause of disease burden worldwide. Referral to cardiac rehabilitation (CR is a class I recommendation for all patients with CAD based on findings that participation can reduce cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, as well as improve functional capacity and quality of life. However, programme uptake remains low, systematic progression through the traditional CR phases is often lacking, and communication between health care providers is frequently suboptimal, resulting in fragmented care. Only 30% to 50% of eligible patients are typically referred to outpatient CR and fewer still complete the programme. In contemporary models of CR, patients are no longer treated by a single practitioner, but rather by an array of health professionals, across multiples specialities and health care settings. The risk of fragmented care in CR may be great, and a concerted approach is required to achieve continuity and optimise patient outcomes. ‘Continuity of care’ has been described as the delivery of services in a coherent, logical, and timely fashion and which entails 3 specific domains: informational, management, and relational continuity. This is examined in the context of CR.

  11. Impact of a cardiac rehabilitation program and inflammatory state on endothelial progenitor cells in acute coronary syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, Francesca; Marcucci, Rossella; Gori, Anna Maria; Burgisser, Costanza; Francini, Sara; Sofi, Francesco; Gensini, Gian Franco; Abbate, Rosanna; Fattirolli, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Among the benefits of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program for patients after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is the mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). However not all patients respond to CR with an increase of EPC. We performed this study to identify the characteristics of patients who will not benefit from an increase of EPCs at the end of a CR program. 112 ACS patients were admitted to a four-week CR program. EPCs, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and NT-ProBNP levels were determined at the beginning (T1) and at the end (T2) of the CR program. All patients performed a cardiopulmonary exercise test at T1 and at T2. EPCs were defined as CD34+KDR+, CD133+KDR+ and CD34+CD133+KDR+. hsCRP and NT-ProBNP were measured by nephelometric and immunometric method, respectively. At T2, we observed a significant increase of EPCs (p=0.001), VO2 peak, Watt max HDL-cholesterol (pprogram. A CR program determines an increase of EPCs with a decrease of CRP and NT-ProBNP. A different trend for EPCs can be detected among patients correlated to CRP levels and exercise tolerance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Robust Redundant Input Reliable Tracking Control for Omnidirectional Rehabilitative Training Walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of robust reliable tracking control on the omnidirectional rehabilitative training walker is examined. The new nonlinear redundant input method is proposed when one wheel actuator fault occurs. The aim of the study is to design an asymptotically stable controller that can guarantee the safety of the user and ensure tracking on a training path planned by a physical therapist. The redundant degrees of freedom safety control and the asymptotically zero state detectable concept of the walker are presented, the model of redundant degree is constructed, and the property of center of gravity constant shift is obtained. A controller that can satisfy asymptotic stability is obtained using a common Lyapunov function for admissible uncertainties resulting from an actuator fault. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method and verify that the walker can provide safe sequential motion when one wheel actuator is at fault.

  13. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Training on Psychosocial Status and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    responsible for this benefit are not fully understood, exercise is known to have ... smokers, alcoholic, diabetic, other cardiac, renal, respiratory disease patients were ..... rehabilitation should feel confident in the use of this mode of training in the ...

  14. Optimized balance rehabilitation training strategy for the elderly through an evaluation of balance characteristics in response to dynamic motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, HoHyun; Chun, Keyoung Jin; Hong, Jaesoo; Lim, Dohyung

    2015-01-01

    Balance is important in daily activities and essential for maintaining an independent lifestyle in the elderly. Recent studies have shown that balance rehabilitation training can improve the balance ability of the elderly, and diverse balance rehabilitation training equipment has been developed. However, there has been little research into optimized strategies for balance rehabilitation training. To provide an optimized strategy, we analyzed the balance characteristics of participants in response to the rotation of a base plate on multiple axes. Seven male adults with no musculoskeletal or nervous system-related diseases (age: 25.5±1.7 years; height: 173.9±6.4 cm; body mass: 71.3±6.5 kg; body mass index: 23.6±2.4 kg/m2) were selected to investigate the balance rehabilitation training using customized rehabilitation equipment. Rotation of the base plate of the equipment was controlled to induce dynamic rotation of participants in the anterior–posterior, right-diagonal, medial–lateral, and left-diagonal directions. We used a three-dimensional motion capture system employing infrared cameras and the Pedar Flexible Insoles System to characterize the major lower-extremity joint angles, center of body mass, and center of pressure. We found statistically significant differences between the changes in joint angles in the lower extremities in response to dynamic rotation of the participants (P0.05). These results indicate that optimizing rotation control of the base plate of balance rehabilitation training equipment to induce anterior–posterior and medial–lateral dynamic rotation preferentially can lead to effective balance training. Additional tests with varied speeds and ranges of angles of base plate rotation are expected to be useful as well as an analysis of the balance characteristics considering a balance index that reflects the muscle activity and cooperative characteristics. PMID:26508847

  15. Improving the effectiveness of psychological interventions for depression and anxiety in the cardiac rehabilitation pathway using group-based metacognitive therapy (PATHWAY Group MCT): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Adrian; McNicol, Kirsten; Reeves, David; Salmon, Peter; Davies, Linda; Heagerty, Anthony; Doherty, Patrick; McPhillips, Rebecca; Anderson, Rebecca; Faija, Cintia; Capobianco, Lora; Morley, Helen; Gaffney, Hannah; Shields, Gemma; Fisher, Peter

    2018-04-03

    Anxiety and depression are prevalent among cardiac rehabilitation patients but pharmacological and psychological treatments have limited effectiveness in this group. Furthermore, psychological interventions have not been systematically integrated into cardiac rehabilitation services despite being a strategic priority for the UK National Health Service. A promising new treatment, metacognitive therapy, may be well-suited to the needs of cardiac rehabilitation patients and has the potential to improve outcomes. It is based on the metacognitive model, which proposes that a thinking style dominated by rumination, worry and threat monitoring maintains emotional distress. Metacognitive therapy is highly effective at reducing this thinking style and alleviating anxiety and depression in mental health settings. This trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of group-based metacognitive therapy for cardiac rehabilitation patients with elevated anxiety and/or depressive symptoms. The PATHWAY Group-MCT trial is a multicentre, two-arm, single-blind, randomised controlled trial comparing the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of group-based metacognitive therapy plus usual cardiac rehabilitation to usual cardiac rehabilitation alone. Cardiac rehabilitation patients (target sample n = 332) with elevated anxiety and/or depressive symptoms will be recruited across five UK National Health Service Trusts. Participants randomised to the intervention arm will receive six weekly sessions of group-based metacognitive therapy delivered by either cardiac rehabilitation professionals or research nurses. The intervention and control groups will both be offered the usual cardiac rehabilitation programme within their Trust. The primary outcome is severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms at 4-month follow-up measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale total score. Secondary outcomes are severity of anxiety/depression at 12-month follow-up, health

  16. An Internet- and mobile-based tailored intervention to enhance maintenance of physical activity after cardiac rehabilitation: short-term results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antypas, Konstantinos; Wangberg, Silje C

    2014-03-11

    An increase in physical activity for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cardiac rehabilitation has multiple therapeutic benefits, including decreased mortality. Internet- and mobile-based interventions for physical activity have shown promising results in helping users increase or maintain their level of physical activity in general and specifically in secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases and cardiac rehabilitation. One component related to the efficacy of these interventions is tailoring of the content to the individual. Our trial assessed the effect of a longitudinally tailored Internet- and mobile-based intervention for physical activity as an extension of a face-to-face cardiac rehabilitation stay. We hypothesized that users of the tailored intervention would maintain their physical activity level better than users of the nontailored version. The study population included adult participants of a cardiac rehabilitation program in Norway with home Internet access and a mobile phone. The participants were randomized in monthly clusters to a tailored or nontailored (control) intervention group. All participants had access to a website with information regarding cardiac rehabilitation, an online discussion forum, and an online activity calendar. Those using the tailored intervention received tailored content based on models of health behavior via the website and mobile fully automated text messages. The main outcome was self-reported level of physical activity, which was obtained using an online international physical activity questionnaire at baseline, at discharge, and at 1 month and 3 months after discharge from the cardiac rehabilitation program. Included in the study were 69 participants. One month after discharge, the tailored intervention group (n=10) had a higher median level of overall physical activity (median 2737.5, IQR 4200.2) than the control group (n=14, median 1650.0, IQR 2443.5), but the difference was not significant

  17. Stroke Rehabilitation in Frail Elderly with the Robotic Training Device ACRE: A Randomized Controlled Trial and Cost-Effectiveness Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schoone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ACRE (ACtive REhabilitation robotic device is developed to enhance therapeutic treatment of upper limbs after stroke. The aim of this study is to assess effects and costs of ACRE training for frail elderly patients and to establish if ACRE can be a valuable addition to standard therapy in nursing home rehabilitation. The study was designed as randomized controlled trial, one group receiving therapy as usual and the other receiving additional ACRE training. Changes in motor abilities, stroke impact, quality of life and emotional well-being were assessed. In total, 24 patients were included. In this small number no significant effects of the ACRE training were found. A large number of 136 patients were excluded. Main reasons for exclusion were lack of physiological or cognitive abilities. Further improvement of the ACRE can best be focused on making the system suitable for self-training and development of training software for activities of daily living.

  18. Soccer training improves cardiac function in men with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jakob Friis; Rostgaard Andersen, Thomas; Horton, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    training can counteract the early signs of diabetic heart disease. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of soccer training on cardiac function, exercise capacity and blood pressure in middle-aged men with T2DM. METHODS: Twenty-one men aged 49.8±1.7 yrs with T2DM and no history of cardiovascular disease......INTRODUCTION: Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease which is worsened by physical inactivity. Subclinical myocardial dysfunction is associated with increased risk of heart failure and impaired prognosis in T2DM; however, it is not clear if exercise...

  19. Positive affect moderates the effect of negative affect on cardiovascular disease-related hospitalizations and all-cause mortality after cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Fiorenza Angela; von Känel, Roland; Saner, Hugo; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Stauber, Stefanie

    2015-10-01

    Little is known as to whether negative emotions adversely impact the prognosis of patients who undergo cardiac rehabilitation. We prospectively investigated the predictive value of state negative affect (NA) assessed at discharge from cardiac rehabilitation for prognosis and the moderating role of positive affect (PA) on the effect of NA on outcomes. A total of 564 cardiac patients (62.49 ± 11.51) completed a comprehensive three-month outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program, filling in the Global Mood Scale (GMS) at discharge. The combined endpoint was cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related hospitalizations plus all-cause mortality at follow-up. Cox regression models estimated the predictive value of NA, as well as the moderating influence of PA on outcomes. Survival models were adjusted for sociodemographic factors, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and severity of disease. During a mean follow-up period of 3.4 years, 71 patients were hospitalized for a CVD-related event and 15 patients died. NA score (range 0-20) was a significant and independent predictor (hazard ratio (HR) 1.091, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.012-1.175; p = 0.023) with a three-point higher level in NA increasing the relative risk by 9.1%. Furthermore, PA interacted significantly with NA (p < 0.001). The relative risk of poor prognosis with NA was increased in patients with low PA (p = 0.012) but remained unchanged in combination with high PA (p = 0.12). The combination of NA with low PA was particularly predictive of poor prognosis. Whether reduction of NA and increase of PA, particularly in those with high NA, improves outcome needs to be tested. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  20. Balance and ambulation improvements in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury using locomotor training-based rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkema, Susan J; Schmidt-Read, Mary; Lorenz, Douglas J; Edgerton, V Reggie; Behrman, Andrea L

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of intensive locomotor training on balance and ambulatory function at enrollment and discharge during outpatient rehabilitation after incomplete SCI. Prospective observational cohort. Seven outpatient rehabilitation centers from the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation NeuroRecovery Network (NRN). Patients (N=196) with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade C or D SCI who received at least 20 locomotor training treatment sessions in the NRN. Intensive locomotor training, including step training using body-weight support and manual facilitation on a treadmill followed by overground assessment and community integration. Berg Balance Scale; Six-Minute Walk Test; 10-Meter Walk Test. Outcome measures at enrollment showed high variability between patients with AIS grades C and D. Significant improvement from enrollment to final evaluation was observed in balance and walking measures for patients with AIS grades C and D. The magnitude of improvement significantly differed between AIS groups for all measures. Time since SCI was not associated significantly with outcome measures at enrollment, but was related inversely to levels of improvement. Significant variability in baseline values of functional outcome measures is evident after SCI in individuals with AIS grades C and D and significant functional recovery can continue to occur even years after injury when provided with locomotor training. These results indicate that rehabilitation, which provides intensive activity-based therapy, can result in functional improvements in individuals with chronic incomplete SCI. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Description of a multifaceted rehabilitation program including overground gait training for a child with cerebral palsy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Elizabeth; Naber, Erin; Geigle, Paula

    2010-01-01

    This case describes the outcomes of a multifaceted rehabilitation program including body weight-supported overground gait training (BWSOGT) in a nonambulatory child with cerebral palsy (CP) and the impact of this treatment on the child's functional mobility. The patient is a nonambulatory 10-year-old female with CP who during an inpatient rehabilitation stay participated in direct, physical therapy 6 days per week for 5 weeks. Physical therapy interventions included stretching of her bilateral lower extremities, transfer training, bed mobility training, balance training, kinesiotaping, supported standing in a prone stander, two trials of partial weight-supported treadmill training, and for 4 weeks, three to five times per week, engaged in 30 minutes of BWSOGT using the Up n' go gait trainer, Lite Gait Walkable, and Rifton Pacer gait trainer. Following the multifaceted rehabilitation program, the patient demonstrated increased step initiation, increased weight bearing through bilateral lower extremities, improved bed mobility, and increased participation in transfers. The child's Gross Motor Functional Measure (GMFM) scores increased across four dimensions and her Physical Abilities and Mobility Scale (PAMS) increased significantly. This case report illustrates that a multifaceted rehabilitation program including BWSOGT was an effective intervention strategy to improve functional mobility in this nonambulatory child with CP.

  2. Trunk Robot Rehabilitation Training with Active Stepping Reorganizes and Enriches Trunk Motor Cortex Representations in Spinal Transected Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Chintan S.

    2015-01-01

    Trunk motor control is crucial for postural stability and propulsion after low thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) in animals and humans. Robotic rehabilitation aimed at trunk shows promise in SCI animal models and patients. However, little is known about the effect of SCI and robot rehabilitation of trunk on cortical motor representations. We previously showed reorganization of trunk motor cortex after adult SCI. Non-stepping training also exacerbated some SCI-driven plastic changes. Here we examine effects of robot rehabilitation that promotes recovery of hindlimb weight support functions on trunk motor cortex representations. Adult rats spinal transected as neonates (NTX rats) at the T9/10 level significantly improve function with our robot rehabilitation paradigm, whereas treadmill-only trained do not. We used intracortical microstimulation to map motor cortex in two NTX groups: (1) treadmill trained (control group); and (2) robot-assisted treadmill trained (improved function group). We found significant robot rehabilitation-driven changes in motor cortex: (1) caudal trunk motor areas expanded; (2) trunk coactivation at cortex sites increased; (3) richness of trunk cortex motor representations, as examined by cumulative entropy and mutual information for different trunk representations, increased; (4) trunk motor representations in the cortex moved toward more normal topography; and (5) trunk and forelimb motor representations that SCI-driven plasticity and compensations had caused to overlap were segregated. We conclude that effective robot rehabilitation training induces significant reorganization of trunk motor cortex and partially reverses some plastic changes that may be adaptive in non-stepping paraplegia after SCI. PMID:25948267

  3. Trunk robot rehabilitation training with active stepping reorganizes and enriches trunk motor cortex representations in spinal transected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Chintan S; Giszter, Simon F

    2015-05-06

    Trunk motor control is crucial for postural stability and propulsion after low thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) in animals and humans. Robotic rehabilitation aimed at trunk shows promise in SCI animal models and patients. However, little is known about the effect of SCI and robot rehabilitation of trunk on cortical motor representations. We previously showed reorganization of trunk motor cortex after adult SCI. Non-stepping training also exacerbated some SCI-driven plastic changes. Here we examine effects of robot rehabilitation that promotes recovery of hindlimb weight support functions on trunk motor cortex representations. Adult rats spinal transected as neonates (NTX rats) at the T9/10 level significantly improve function with our robot rehabilitation paradigm, whereas treadmill-only trained do not. We used intracortical microstimulation to map motor cortex in two NTX groups: (1) treadmill trained (control group); and (2) robot-assisted treadmill trained (improved function group). We found significant robot rehabilitation-driven changes in motor cortex: (1) caudal trunk motor areas expanded; (2) trunk coactivation at cortex sites increased; (3) richness of trunk cortex motor representations, as examined by cumulative entropy and mutual information for different trunk representations, increased; (4) trunk motor representations in the cortex moved toward more normal topography; and (5) trunk and forelimb motor representations that SCI-driven plasticity and compensations had caused to overlap were segregated. We conclude that effective robot rehabilitation training induces significant reorganization of trunk motor cortex and partially reverses some plastic changes that may be adaptive in non-stepping paraplegia after SCI. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357174-16$15.00/0.

  4. A Sit-to-Stand Training Robot and Its Performance Evaluation: Dynamic Analysis in Lower Limb Rehabilitation Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Enguo; Inoue, Yoshio; Liu, Tao; Shibata, Kyoko

    In many countries in which the phenomenon of population aging is being experienced, motor function recovery activities have aroused much interest. In this paper, a sit-to-stand rehabilitation robot utilizing a double-rope system was developed, and the performance of the robot was evaluated by analyzing the dynamic parameters of human lower limbs. For the robot control program, an impedance control method with a training game was developed to increase the effectiveness and frequency of rehabilitation activities, and a calculation method was developed for evaluating the joint moments of hip, knee, and ankle. Test experiments were designed, and four subjects were requested to stand up from a chair with assistance from the rehabilitation robot. In the experiments, body segment rotational angles, trunk movement trajectories, rope tensile forces, ground reaction forces (GRF) and centers of pressure (COP) were measured by sensors, and the moments of ankle, knee and hip joint were real-time calculated using the sensor-measured data. The experiment results showed that the sit-to-stand rehabilitation robot with impedance control method could maintain the comfortable training postures of users, decrease the moments of limb joints, and enhance training effectiveness. Furthermore, the game control method could encourage collaboration between the brain and limbs, and allow for an increase in the frequency and intensity of rehabilitation activities.

  5. Collaborative virtual reality based advanced cardiac life support training simulator using virtual reality principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Prabal; Vankipuram, Akshay; Ashby, Aaron; Vankipuram, Mithra; Gupta, Ashish; Drumm-Gurnee, Denise; Josey, Karen; Tinker, Linda; Smith, Marshall

    2014-10-01

    Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) is a series of team-based, sequential and time constrained interventions, requiring effective communication and coordination of activities that are performed by the care provider team on a patient undergoing cardiac arrest or respiratory failure. The state-of-the-art ACLS training is conducted in a face-to-face environment under expert supervision and suffers from several drawbacks including conflicting care provider schedules and high cost of training equipment. The major objective of the study is to describe, including the design, implementation, and evaluation of a novel approach of delivering ACLS training to care providers using the proposed virtual reality simulator that can overcome the challenges and drawbacks imposed by the traditional face-to-face training method. We compare the efficacy and performance outcomes associated with traditional ACLS training with the proposed novel approach of using a virtual reality (VR) based ACLS training simulator. One hundred and forty-eight (148) ACLS certified clinicians, translating into 26 care provider teams, were enrolled for this study. Each team was randomly assigned to one of the three treatment groups: control (traditional ACLS training), persuasive (VR ACLS training with comprehensive feedback components), or minimally persuasive (VR ACLS training with limited feedback components). The teams were tested across two different ACLS procedures that vary in the degree of task complexity: ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia (VFib/VTach) and pulseless electric activity (PEA). The difference in performance between control and persuasive groups was not statistically significant (P=.37 for PEA and P=.1 for VFib/VTach). However, the difference in performance between control and minimally persuasive groups was significant (P=.05 for PEA and P=.02 for VFib/VTach). The pre-post comparison of performances of the groups showed that control (P=.017 for PEA, P=.01 for VFib/VTach) and

  6. Remotely Delivered Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation: Design and Content Development of a Novel mHealth Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstorn, Jonathan C; Gant, Nicholas; Meads, Andrew; Warren, Ian; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-06-24

    Participation in traditional center-based cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs (exCR) is limited by accessibility barriers. Mobile health (mHealth) technologies can overcome these barriers while preserving critical attributes of center-based exCR monitoring and coaching, but these opportunities have not yet been capitalized on. We aimed to design and develop an evidence- and theory-based mHealth platform for remote delivery of exCR to any geographical location. An iterative process was used to design and develop an evidence- and theory-based mHealth platform (REMOTE-CR) that provides real-time remote exercise monitoring and coaching, behavior change education, and social support. The REMOTE-CR platform comprises a commercially available smartphone and wearable sensor, custom smartphone and Web-based applications (apps), and a custom middleware. The platform allows exCR specialists to monitor patients' exercise and provide individualized coaching in real-time, from almost any location, and provide behavior change education and social support. Intervention content incorporates Social Cognitive Theory, Self-determination Theory, and a taxonomy of behavior change techniques. Exercise components are based on guidelines for clinical exercise prescription. The REMOTE-CR platform extends the capabilities of previous telehealth exCR platforms and narrows the gap between existing center- and home-based exCR services. REMOTE-CR can complement center-based exCR by providing an alternative option for patients whose needs are not being met. Remotely monitored exCR may be more cost-effective than establishing additional center-based programs. The effectiveness and acceptability of REMOTE-CR are now being evaluated in a noninferiority randomized controlled trial.

  7. Trends and Predictors of Participation in Cardiac Rehabilitation Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: Data From the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Anthony E; Keeley, Ellen C

    2017-12-29

    Participation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute myocardial infarction has been proven to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. Historically, participation rates have been low, and although recent efforts have increased referral rates, current data on CR participation are limited. Utilizing data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System conducted by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we performed a population-based, cross-sectional analysis of CR post-acute myocardial infarction. Unadjusted participation from 2005 to 2015 was evaluated by univariable logistic regression. Multivariable logistic regression was performed with patient characteristic variables to determine adjusted trends and associations with participation in CR in more recent years from 2011 to 2015. Among the 32 792 survey respondents between 2005 and 2015, participation ranged from 35% in 2005 to 39% in 2009 ( P =0.005) and from 38% in 2011 to 32% in 2015 ( P =0.066). Between 2011 and 2015, participants were less likely to be female (odds ratio [OR] 0.763, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.646-0.903), black (OR 0.700, 95% CI 0.526-0.931), uninsured (OR 0.528, 95% CI 0.372-0.751), less educated (OR 0.471, 95% CI 0.367-0.605), current smokers (OR 0.758, 95% CI 0.576-0.999), and were more likely to be retired or self-employed (OR 1.393, 95% CI 1.124-1.726). Only one third of patients participate in CR following acute myocardial infarction despite the known health benefits. Participants are less likely to be female, black, and uneducated. Future studies should focus on methods to maximize the proportion of CR referrals converted into CR participation. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  8. The effects of cardiac rehabilitation program on exercise capacity and coronary risk factors in CABG Patients aged 45-65

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rahim Mirnasuri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are the most common cause of mortalily and inability. In Iran, one third of mortality causes are coronary heart diseases. So, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a Cardiac Rehabilitation program (CR on exercise capacity (VO2max and coronary risk factors in CABG patients aged 45-65 . Materials and Methods: Of 36 CABG patients randomly selected from Hamadan Shahid Beheshti hospital, 18 subjects as experimental group (with mean age 54.57±6.26 years and weight 72.14±10.83 kg participated in CR program, and 18 subjects as control group (with mean age 57.64±4.75 years and weight 76.5±12 kg without participation in any exercise and CR program participated in this study based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. CR program was an eight-week involving warm-up, aerobic exercises and cool-down. Variables including: anthropometrics measurements and exercise capacity (VO2max, and also coronary risk factors such as body mass index (BMI, waist-hip ratio (WHR, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, fasting blood sugar (FBS, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, LDL-HDL ratio (LHR, body fat percent (BFP were determined at the first and the last week of CR program in both groups. Results: Statistical analysis by independent t-test indicated that after program, there was a significant difference between 2 groups in VO2max, BMI, WHR, SBP, DBP, TC, TG, LDL, LHR (P<0.05, but there was no significant difference between the 2 groups in FBS, HDL, BFP. Conclusion: The CR program of the present study indicated a significant effect on exercise capacity and some coronary risk factors profile in CABG patients of 45-65 and can it be considered as a suitable program for CABG patients.

  9. Patient-specific cardiac phantom for clinical training and preprocedure surgical planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Justin; Moore, John; Vassallo, Reid; Bainbridge, Daniel; Drangova, Maria; Peters, Terry

    2018-04-01

    Minimally invasive mitral valve repair procedures including MitraClip ® are becoming increasingly common. For cases of complex or diseased anatomy, clinicians may benefit from using a patient-specific cardiac phantom for training, surgical planning, and the validation of devices or techniques. An imaging compatible cardiac phantom was developed to simulate a MitraClip ® procedure. The phantom contained a patient-specific cardiac model manufactured using tissue mimicking materials. To evaluate accuracy, the patient-specific model was imaged using computed tomography (CT), segmented, and the resulting point cloud dataset was compared using absolute distance to the original patient data. The result, when comparing the molded model point cloud to the original dataset, resulted in a maximum Euclidean distance error of 7.7 mm, an average error of 0.98 mm, and a standard deviation of 0.91 mm. The phantom was validated using a MitraClip ® device to ensure anatomical features and tools are identifiable under image guidance. Patient-specific cardiac phantoms may allow for surgical complications to be accounted for preoperative planning. The information gained by clinicians involved in planning and performing the procedure should lead to shorter procedural times and better outcomes for patients.

  10. Rehabilitative training of preterm children’s attention: a study on sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Perricone

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with the description of rehabilitative training aimed at severely and moderately preterm children at preschool age who display impairments of processes of selective attention, self-control and problem solving and who are at risk of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders. In line with a perspective of field study suggested by pediatric psychology, the treatment calls for the involvement of parents, teachers, neonatologists and children’s reference pediatricians. To be more precise, it is a study aimed at investigating the sustainability of the training path in terms of impact and transformative valence of the focalised processes. Involved in the study was a group of 55 healthy preterm children (35 moderately preterm children and 20 severely preterm children at mean age of 5.2 years attending the third year of infancy school; a group of 55 mothers; a group of 15 pediatricians; a group of 5 neonatologists and one of 10 teachers. Specific questionnaires (the IPDAG and IPDDAI were administered to parents and teachers before and after the training sessions to detect the transformation of the focalised processes. According to a modality of continuous observation during the activities, the trainer used techniques of narrative (the critical incident technique and descriptive (encoding scheme observation. A checklist to detect the participation of adults was used. It was structured as follows: presence, production and aftermath of the effects of the personal intervention with child. A telephone follow-up was performed three months after the end of training to detect the involved adults’ considerations about the stability of promoted changes. Data show good levels of sustainability of the proposed training.

  11. Intake Interview Skills for Rehabilitation Counselors: A Typescript Manual. Advanced Facilitative Case Management Series, Training Package I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Stanford E.; Farley, Roy C.

    This guide is the case study manual for the first in a series of instructor-assisted training modules for rehabilitation counselors, supervisors, and graduate students. This typescript manual for the first module focuses on basic intake interviewing skills consisting of: (1) systematic interview programming including attracting, planning and…

  12. How Prospective Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Trainees Rank Residency Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriemma, Michael J; Whitehair, Curtis L

    2018-03-01

    Since the inception of the National Resident Matching Program, multiple studies have investigated the factors applicants consider important to ranking prospective residency programs. However, only 2 previous studies focused on prospective physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) trainees, and the most recent of these studies was published in 1993. It is unknown whether these previous studies are reflective of current prospective PM&R residents. To assess various factors that contribute to prospective PM&R residents' decision making in choosing a residency program and compare these findings with previous studies. An anonymous, voluntary questionnaire. A single PM&R residency program. All applicants to a single PM&R residency program. All applicants to our PM&R residency program were invited to participate in a 44-item, 5-point Likert-based questionnaire. Applicants were asked to rate the importance of various factors as they related to constructing their residency rank list. Means and standard deviations were calculated for items included in the survey. A response rate of 26% was obtained, with the responses of 98 applicants (20%) ultimately analyzed. The highest rated factors included "perceived happiness of current residents," "opportunities for hands-on procedure training," "perceived camaraderie among current residents," "perceived camaraderie among faculty and current residents," "perceived quality of current residents," and "perceived work/life balance among current residents." Although male and female respondents demonstrated similar ranking preferences, an apparent difference was detected between how genders rated the importance of "whether the program projects a favorable environment for women" and "whether the program projects a favorable environment for minorities." As compared with previous PM&R applicants, current prospective trainees seem to place greater importance on skill acquisition over didactic teaching. Prospective PM&R residents highly value

  13. A Rehabilitation-Internet-of-Things in the Home to Augment Motor Skills and Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin, Bruce H

    2017-03-01

    Although motor learning theory has led to evidence-based practices, few trials have revealed the superiority of one theory-based therapy over another after stroke. Nor have improvements in skills been as clinically robust as one might hope. We review some possible explanations, then potential technology-enabled solutions. Over the Internet, the type, quantity, and quality of practice and exercise in the home and community can be monitored remotely and feedback provided to optimize training frequency, intensity, and progression at home. A theory-driven foundation of synergistic interventions for walking, reaching and grasping, strengthening, and fitness could be provided by a bundle of home-based Rehabilitation Internet-of-Things (RIoT) devices. A RIoT might include wearable, activity-recognition sensors and instrumented rehabilitation devices with radio transmission to a smartphone or tablet to continuously measure repetitions, speed, accuracy, forces, and temporal spatial features of movement. Using telerehabilitation resources, a therapist would interpret the data and provide behavioral training for self-management via goal setting and instruction to increase compliance and long-term carryover. On top of this user-friendly, safe, and conceptually sound foundation to support more opportunity for practice, experimental interventions could be tested or additions and replacements made, perhaps drawing from virtual reality and gaming programs or robots. RIoT devices continuously measure the actual amount of quality practice; improvements and plateaus over time in strength, fitness, and skills; and activity and participation in home and community settings. Investigators may gain more control over some of the confounders of their trials and patients will have access to inexpensive therapies.

  14. Effects of Growth Hormone on Cardiac Remodeling During Resistance Training in Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Adriana, E-mail: francispacagnelli@unoeste.br [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil); Cicogna, Antônio Carlos [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Campus Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Engel, Letícia Estevam; Aldá, Maiara Almeida [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil); Tomasi, Loreta Casquel de [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Campus Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Giuffrida, Rogério; Giometti, Inês Cristina [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil); Freire, Ana Paula Coelho Figueira [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil); Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Campus Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil); Aguiar, Andreo Fernando [Universidade do Norte do Paraná, UNOPAR, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    Although the beneficial effects of resistance training (RT) on the cardiovascular system are well established, few studies have investigated the effects of the chronic growth hormone (GH) administration on cardiac remodeling during an RT program. To evaluate the effects of GH on the morphological features of cardiac remodeling and Ca2+ transport gene expression in rats submitted to RT. Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 7 per group): control (CT), GH, RT and RT with GH (RTGH). The dose of GH was 0.2 IU/kg every other day for 30 days. The RT model used was the vertical jump in water (4 sets of 10 jumps, 3 bouts/wk) for 30 consecutive days. After the experimental period, the following variables were analyzed: final body weight (FBW), left ventricular weight (LVW), LVW/FBW ratio, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area (CSA), collagen fraction, creatine kinase muscle-brain fraction (CK-MB) and gene expressions of SERCA2a, phospholamban (PLB) and ryanodine (RyR). There was no significant (p > 0.05) difference among groups for FBW, LVW, LVW/FBW ratio, cardiomyocyte CSA, and SERCA2a, PLB and RyR gene expressions. The RT group showed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in collagen fraction compared to the other groups. Additionally, the trained groups (RT and RTGH) had greater CK-MB levels compared to the untrained groups (CT and GH). GH may attenuate the negative effects of RT on cardiac remodeling by counteracting the increased collagen synthesis, without affecting the gene expression that regulates cardiac Ca{sup 2+} transport.

  15. Yoga-based postoperative cardiac rehabilitation program for improving quality of life and stress levels: Fifth-year follow-up through a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraballi Amaravathi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was aimed to assess the efficacy of yoga-based lifestyle program (YLSP in improving quality of life (QOL and stress levels in patients after 5 years of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. Methodology: Three hundred patients posted for elective CABG in Narayana Hrudayalaya Super Speciality Hospital, Bengaluru, were randomized into two groups: YLSP and conventional lifestyle program (CLSP, and follow-up was done for 5 years. Intervention: In YLSP group, all practices of integrative approach of yoga therapy such as yama, niyama, asana, pranayama, and meditation were used as an add-on to conventional cardiac rehabilitation. The control group (CLSP continued conventional cardiac rehabilitation only. Outcome Measures: World Health Organization (WHO-QOL BREF Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS were assessed before surgery and at the end of the 5th year after CABG. As data were not normally distributed, Mann–Whitney U-test was used for between-group comparisons and Wilcoxon's signed-rank test was used for within-group comparisons. Results: At the end of 5 years, mental health (P = 0.05, perceived stress (P = 0.01, and negative affect (NA (P = 0.05 have shown significant improvements. WHO-QOL BREF score has shown improvements in physical health (P = 0.046, environmental health (P = 0.04, perceived stress (P = 0.001, and NA (P = 0.02 in YLSP than CLSP. Positive affect has significantly improved in CLSP than YLSP. Other domains of WHO-QOL-BREF, PANAS, and HADS did not reveal any significant between-group differences. Conclusion: Addition of long-term YLSP to conventional cardiac rehabilitation brings better improvements in QOL and reduction in stress levels at the end of 5 years after CABG.

  16. 77 FR 66959 - Request for Information on the Future Direction of the Rehabilitation Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    ... Individuals 10 1 0 10 3 with Mental Illnesses (H129H).. Rehabilitation Psychology 2 1 0 1 1 (H129J... State VR agencies and in community rehabilitation programs. The following questions are designed to...

  17. Ginsenoside Rg3 improves cardiac mitochondrial population quality: Mimetic exercise training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Mengwei [Key Laboratory of State General Administration of Sport, Shanghai Research Institute of Sports Science, Shanghai 200031 (China); Huang, Chenglin [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Jianheng; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Yangshu [Key Laboratory of State General Administration of Sport, Shanghai Research Institute of Sports Science, Shanghai 200031 (China); Chen, Hong, E-mail: hchen100@hotmail.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Shen, Weili, E-mail: weili_shen@hotmail.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Rg3 is an ergogenic aid. •Rg3 improves mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. •Rg3 regulates mitochondria dynamic remodeling. •Rg3 alone matches some the benefits of aerobic exercise. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates exercise training could mediate mitochondrial quality control through the improvement of mitochondrial dynamics. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is well known in herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative agent. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of Rg3 has been elusive. In the present study, we compared the effects of Rg3 administration with aerobic exercise on mitochondrial adaptation in cardiac muscle tissue of Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. Three groups of SD rats were studied: (1) sedentary control, (2) Rg3-treated and (3) aerobic exercise trained. Both aerobic exercise training and Rg3 supplementation enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels in cardiac muscle. The activation of PGC-1α led to increased mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1(Nrf1), these changes were accompanied by increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number and complex protein levels, while activation of Nrf2 increased levels of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1), superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase. Aerobic exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of beclin1 and autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7), these effects of aerobic exercise are comparable to that of Rg3. These results demonstrate that Rg3 mimics improved cardiac adaptations to exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quantity and quality of mitochondria.

  18. Ginsenoside Rg3 improves cardiac mitochondrial population quality: Mimetic exercise training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Mengwei; Huang, Chenglin; Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Jianheng; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Yangshu; Chen, Hong; Shen, Weili

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Rg3 is an ergogenic aid. •Rg3 improves mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. •Rg3 regulates mitochondria dynamic remodeling. •Rg3 alone matches some the benefits of aerobic exercise. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates exercise training could mediate mitochondrial quality control through the improvement of mitochondrial dynamics. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is well known in herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative agent. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of Rg3 has been elusive. In the present study, we compared the effects of Rg3 administration with aerobic exercise on mitochondrial adaptation in cardiac muscle tissue of Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. Three groups of SD rats were studied: (1) sedentary control, (2) Rg3-treated and (3) aerobic exercise trained. Both aerobic exercise training and Rg3 supplementation enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels in cardiac muscle. The activation of PGC-1α led to increased mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1(Nrf1), these changes were accompanied by increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number and complex protein levels, while activation of Nrf2 increased levels of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1), superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase. Aerobic exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of beclin1 and autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7), these effects of aerobic exercise are comparable to that of Rg3. These results demonstrate that Rg3 mimics improved cardiac adaptations to exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quantity and quality of mitochondria

  19. Goal Management Training for rehabilitation of executive functions: a systematic review of effectiveness in patients with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasny-Pacini, Agata; Chevignard, Mathilde; Evans, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    To determine if Goal Management Training (GMT) is effective for the rehabilitation of executive functions following brain injury when administered alone or in combination with other interventions. Systematic review, with quality appraisal specific to executive functions research and calculation of effect sizes. Twelve studies were included. Four studies were "Proof-of-principle" studies, testing the potential effectiveness of GMT and eight were rehabilitation studies. Effectiveness was greater when GMT was combined with other interventions. The most effective interventions appeared to be those combing GMT with: Problem Solving Therapy; personal goal setting; external cueing or prompting apply GMT to the current task; personal homework to increase patients' commitment and training intensity; ecological and daily life training activities rather than paper-and-pencil, office-type tasks. Level of support for GMT was higher for studies measuring outcome in terms of increases in participation in everyday activities rather than on measures of executive impairment. Comprehensive rehabilitation programs incorporating GMT, but integrating other approaches, are effective in executive function rehabilitation following brain injury in adults. There is insufficient evidence to support use of GMT as a stand-alone intervention.

  20. Rehabilitative skilled forelimb training enhances axonal remodeling in the corticospinal pathway but not the brainstem-spinal pathways after photothrombotic stroke in the primary motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Naohiko; Himi, Naoyuki; Maruyama-Nakamura, Emi; Hayashi, Norito; Narita, Kazuhiko; Miyamoto, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Task-specific rehabilitative training is commonly used for chronic stroke patients. Axonal remodeling is believed to be one mechanism underlying rehabilitation-induced functional recovery, and significant roles of the corticospinal pathway have previously been demonstrated. Brainstem-spinal pathways, as well as the corticospinal tract, have been suggested to contribute to skilled motor function and functional recovery after brain injury. However, whether axonal remodeling in the brainstem-spinal pathways is a critical component for rehabilitation-induced functional recovery is not known. In this study, rats were subjected to photothrombotic stroke in the caudal forelimb area of the primary motor cortex and received rehabilitative training with a skilled forelimb reaching task for 4 weeks. After completion of the rehabilitative training, the retrograde tracer Fast blue was injected into the contralesional lower cervical spinal cord. Fast blue-positive cells were counted in 32 brain areas located in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. Rehabilitative training improved motor performance in the skilled forelimb reaching task but not in the cylinder test, ladder walk test, or staircase test, indicating that rehabilitative skilled forelimb training induced task-specific recovery. In the histological analysis, rehabilitative training significantly increased the number of Fast blue-positive neurons in the ipsilesional rostral forelimb area and secondary sensory cortex. However, rehabilitative training did not alter the number of Fast blue-positive neurons in any areas of the brainstem. These results indicate that rehabilitative skilled forelimb training enhances axonal remodeling selectively in the corticospinal pathway, which suggests a critical role of cortical plasticity, rather than brainstem plasticity, in task-specific recovery after subtotal motor cortex destruction.

  1. Antivertiginous drug therapy does not hinder the efficacy of individualized vibrotactile neurofeedback training for vestibular rehabilitation - a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, Dietmar; Borsellino, Liliana; Ernst, Arne

    2017-12-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation using individualized vibrotactile neurofeedback training (IVNT) can lead to significant improvement in the postural stability of patients with vestibular symptoms of different origins. However, some of these patients have complex, severe dizziness, meaning that a pharmacological pretreatment or parallel (to vestibular rehabilitation) treatment can help them perform the rehabilitation exercises. Hence, the present study investigated the influence of a pharmacological treatment on the efficacy of vibrotactile neurofeedback training in patients with chronic, noncompensated vestibulopathies. All participants performed IVNT for ∼10 min each day for 2 weeks. In addition, every second participant was selected randomly to receive oral medication (20 mg cinnarizine and 40 mg dimenhydrinate per tablet), taking three tables per day. Trunk and ankle sway and postural stability were measured. In addition, the dizziness handicap inventory was evaluated immediately before training on the last day of training and 6 months after training. After the 10-day period of IVNT, both groups showed a statistically significant improvement in all parameters tested. A follow-up analysis after 6 months showed a long-term efficacy for the IVNT, that is, the patients remained significantly improved in their postural stability. The antivertiginous therapy did not hinder the efficacy of the IVNT. The present results indicate that IVNT even in combination with an antivertiginous drug therapy is an effective treatment regime for patients with disabling vertigo of different origins.

  2. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation and inspiratory muscle training as potential adjunctive rehabilitation options for patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ross; Pinkstaff, Sherry; Wheeler, Emma; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Guazzi, Marco; Myers, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic and resistance exercise training programs produce an abundance of physiologic and clinical benefits in patients with heart failure (HF). Improved maximal aerobic capacity, submaximal aerobic endurance, muscle force production, perceived quality of life, and skeletal muscle characteristics are among the more established outcomes resulting from these rehabilitation techniques. Moreover, both aerobic and resistance exercise training appear to portend a low risk to patients with HF when appropriate exercise prescription methods are followed. While the aforementioned training techniques will undoubtedly continue to be at the center of a well-formulated rehabilitation program, other adjunctive interventions, which are presently underutilized in clinical practice, may prove beneficial in patients with HF. Specifically, both neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) appear to significantly improve several physiologic, exercise, symptomatologic, and quality-of-life parameters. NMES targets skeletal muscle abnormalities, whereas IMT primarily targets the weakened respiratory musculature, both often encountered in patients with HF. A PubMed search using relevant key words identified 19 original investigations examining the impact of NMES (13 studies) and IMT (6 studies) training programs in patients with HF. The resultant review (1) provides a summary of the original research outcomes of both NMES and IMT in patients with HF; (2) addresses current research gaps, providing a direction for future investigations; and (3) provides clinical scenarios where NMES and IMT may prove to be beneficial during the rehabilitation of patients with HF.

  3. Communication partner training for health care professionals in an inpatient rehabilitation setting: A parallel randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Renee; O'Halloran, Robyn; McKinley, Kathryn

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if the E-Learning Plus communication partner training (CPT) programme is as effective as the Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA TM ) CPT programme in improving healthcare professionals' confidence and knowledge communicating with patients with aphasia. Forty-eight healthcare professionals working in inpatient rehabilitation participated. Participants were randomised to one of the CPT programmes. The three outcome measures were self-rating of confidence, self-rating of knowledge and a test of knowledge of aphasia. Measures were taken pre-, immediately post- and 3-4 months post-training. Data were analysed using mixed between within ANOVAs. Homogeneity of variance was adequate for self-rating of confidence and test of knowledge of aphasia data to continue analysis. There was a statistically significant difference in self-rating of confidence and knowledge of aphasia for both interventions across time. No statistically significant difference was found between the two interventions. Both CPT interventions were associated with an increase in health care professionals' confidence and knowledge of aphasia, but neither programme was superior. As the E-Learning Plus CPT programme is more accessible and sustainable in the Australian healthcare context, further work will continue on this CPT programme.

  4. Towards more effective robotic gait training for stroke rehabilitation: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pennycott Andrew

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is the most common cause of disability in the developed world and can severely degrade walking function. Robot-driven gait therapy can provide assistance to patients during training and offers a number of advantages over other forms of therapy. These potential benefits do not, however, seem to have been fully realised as of yet in clinical practice. Objectives This review determines ways in which robot-driven gait technology could be improved in order to achieve better outcomes in gait rehabilitation. Methods The literature on gait impairments caused by stroke is reviewed, followed by research detailing the different pathways to recovery. The outcomes of clinical trials investigating robot-driven gait therapy are then examined. Finally, an analysis of the literature focused on the technical features of the robot-based devices is presented. This review thus combines both clinical and technical aspects in order to determine the routes by which robot-driven gait therapy could be further developed. Conclusions Active subject participation in robot-driven gait therapy is vital to many of the potential recovery pathways and is therefore an important feature of gait training. Higher levels of subject participation and challenge could be promoted through designs with a high emphasis on robotic transparency and sufficient degrees of freedom to allow other aspects of gait such as balance to be incorporated.

  5. Improved performance of maternal-fetal medicine staff after maternal cardiac arrest simulation-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Nelli; Eisen, Lewis A; Bayya, Jyothshna V; Dulu, Alina; Bernstein, Peter S; Merkatz, Irwin R; Goffman, Dena

    2011-09-01

    To determine the impact of simulation-based maternal cardiac arrest training on performance, knowledge, and confidence among Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff. Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff (n = 19) participated in a maternal arrest simulation program. Based on evaluation of performance during initial simulations, an intervention was designed including: basic life support course, advanced cardiac life support pregnancy modification lecture, and simulation practice. Postintervention evaluative simulations were performed. All simulations included a knowledge test, confidence survey, and debriefing. A checklist with 9 pregnancy modification (maternal) and 16 critical care (25 total) tasks was used for scoring. Postintervention scores reflected statistically significant improvement. Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff demonstrated statistically significant improvement in timely initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (120 vs 32 seconds, P = .042) and cesarean delivery (240 vs 159 seconds, P = .017). Prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation initiation and pregnancy modifications application are critical in maternal and fetal survival during cardiac arrest. Simulation is a useful tool for Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff to improve skills, knowledge, and confidence in the management of this catastrophic event. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  6. Meaningful task-specific training (MTST) for stroke rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Kamal Narayan; Verma, Rajesh; Garg, R K; Sharma, V P; Agarwal, Monika; Aggarwal, G G

    2012-01-01

    The upper extremity motor deficit is one of the functional challenges in post stroke patients. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the meaningful task-specific training (MTST) on the upper extremity motor recovery during the subacute phase after a stroke. This was a randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial in the neurology department of a university hospital and occupational therapy unit of a rehabilitation institute. A convenience sample of 103 people, 4 to 24 weeks (mean, 12.15 weeks) after the stroke, was randomized into 2 groups (MTST, 51; standard training group, 52). Subjects in the Brunnstrom stage of arm recovery of 2 to 5 were included in the study. Ninety-five participants completed the 8-week follow-up. Participants were assigned to receive either the MTST or dose-matched standard training program based on the Brunnstrom stage and Bobath neurodevelopmental technique, 4 to 5 days a week for 4 weeks. Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Graded Wolf Motor Function Test (GWMFT), and Motor Activity Log (MAL) were outcome measures The MTST group showed a positive improvement in the mean scores on the outcome measures at post and follow-up assessments in comparison to the control group. Further, statistically significant differences were observed in changes between the groups at post and follow-up assessment for FMA, ARAT, GWMFT, and MAL. The MTST produced statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements in the upper extremity motor recovery of the patients who had a subacute stroke.

  7. Cardiac adaptations to high-intensity aerobic training in premenopausal and recent postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund, Jon; Jørgensen, Peter Godsk; Mandrup, Camilla M

    2017-01-01

    and after a 12-week period of high-intensity aerobic cycle training. LV internal diastolic diameter and LV mass were similar in the 2 groups at baseline and increased by ≈2% to 8% (P=0.04-0.0007) with training in both groups. Left atrial end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were similar for both groups......BACKGROUND: We examined the role of menopause on cardiac dimensions and function and assessed the efficacy of exercise training before and after menopause. METHODS AND RESULTS: Two groups of healthy premenopausal (n=36, 49.4±0.3 years) and postmenopausal (n=37, 53.5±0.5 years) women with no history...... and increased by 23% to 36% (P=0.0006-0.0001) with training. Systolic function assessed by mean global strain was similar in both groups at baseline and increased by ≈8% (P=0.0004) with training in the postmenopausal group. LV displacement increased by ≈3% (P=0.04) in the premenopausal women only. Diastolic...

  8. Effect of autogenic training on cardiac autonomic nervous activity in high-risk fire service workers for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Satoko; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sakamoto, Satoko; Shirakawa, Taro

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effect of autogenic training (AT) on cardiac autonomic nervous activity in fire services workers with the use of the questionnaire of the Japanese-language version of Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R-J) and indexes of heart rate variability. We studied 22 male fire services workers who were divided into posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related stress group (n=10) and control group (n=12). They underwent AT twice or three times a week for 2 months. Posttraumatic stress disorder-related stress group showed a significantly higher cardiac sympathetic nervous activity and a significantly lower cardiac parasympathetic nervous activity than control group at baseline. Autogenic training significantly decreased cardiac sympathetic nervous activity and significantly increased cardiac parasympathetic nervous activity in both groups. These changes were accompanied by a significant decrease in the total points of IES-R-J. Autogenic training is effective for ameliorating the disturbance of cardiac autonomic nervous activity and psychological issues secondary to PTSD.

  9. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure During Exercise Improves Walking Time in Patients Undergoing Inpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoni, Camila Bianca Falasco; Di Thommazo-Luporini, Luciana; Mendes, Renata Gonçalves; Caruso, Flávia Cristina Rossi; Mezzalira, Daniel; Arena, Ross; Amaral-Neto, Othon; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been used as an effective support to decrease the negative pulmonary effects of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. However, it is unknown whether CPAP can positively influence patients undergoing CABG during exercise. This study evaluated the effectiveness of CPAP on the first day of ambulation after CABG in patients undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Fifty-four patients after CABG surgery were randomly assigned to receive either inpatient CR and CPAP (CPG) or standard CR without CPAP (CG). Cardiac rehabilitation included walking and CPAP pressures were set between 10 to 12 cmH2O. Participants were assessed on the first day of walking at rest and during walking. Outcome measures included breathing pattern variables, exercise time in seconds (ETs), dyspnea/leg effort ratings, and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2). Twenty-seven patients (13 CPG vs 14 CG) completed the study. Compared with walking without noninvasive ventilation assistance, CPAP increased ETs by 43.4 seconds (P = .040) during walking, promoted better thoracoabdominal coordination, increased ventilation during walking by 12.5 L/min (P = .001), increased SpO2 values at the end of walking by 2.6% (P = .016), and reduced dyspnea ratings by 1 point (P = .008). Continuous positive airway pressure can positively influence exercise tolerance, ventilatory function, and breathing pattern in response to a single bout of exercise after CABG.

  10. Endurance training in the spontaneously hypertensive rat: conversion of pathological into physiological cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garciarena, Carolina D; Pinilla, Oscar A; Nolly, Mariela B; Laguens, Ruben P; Escudero, Eduardo M; Cingolani, Horacio E; Ennis, Irene L

    2009-04-01

    The effect of endurance training (swimming 90 min/d for 5 days a week for 60 days) on cardiac hypertrophy was investigated in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Sedentary SHRs (SHR-Cs) and normotensive Wistar rats were used as controls. Exercise training enhanced myocardial hypertrophy assessed by left ventricular weight/tibial length (228+/-7 versus 251+/-5 mg/cm in SHR-Cs and exercised SHRs [SHR-Es], respectively). Myocyte cross-sectional area increased approximately 40%, collagen volume fraction decreased approximately 50%, and capillary density increased approximately 45% in SHR-Es compared with SHR-Cs. The mRNA abundance of atrial natriuretic factor and myosin light chain 2 was decreased by the swimming routine (100+/-19% versus 41+/-10% and 100+/-8% versus 61+/-9% for atrial natriuretic factor and myosin light chain 2 in SHR-Cs and SHR-Es, respectively). The expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump was significantly augmented, whereas that of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger was unchanged (93+/-7% versus 167+/-8% and 158+/-13% versus 157+/-7%, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in SHR-Cs and SHR-Es, respectively; PEndurance training inhibited apoptosis, as reflected by a decrease in caspase 3 activation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 cleavage, and normalized calcineurin activity without inducing significant changes in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. The swimming routine improved midventricular shortening determined by echocardiography (32.4+/-0.9% versus 36.9+/-1.1% in SHR-Cs and SHR-Es, respectively; Pendurance training to convert pathological into physiological hypertrophy improving cardiac performance. The reduction of myocardial fibrosis and calcineurin activity plus the increase in capillary density represent factors to be considered in determining this beneficial effect.

  11. [Post-stroke speech disorder treated with acupuncture and psychological intervention combined with rehabilitation training: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Liu, Shao-ming; Liu, Min; Li, Bao-jun; Hui, Zhen-liang; Gao, Xiang

    2011-06-01

    To assess the clinical efficacy on post-stroke speech disorder treated with acupuncture and psychological intervention combined with rehabilitation training. The multi-central randomized controlled study was adopted. One hundred and twenty cases of brain stroke were divided into a speech rehabilitation group (control group), a speech rehabilitation plus acupuncture group (observation group 1) and a speech rehabilitation plus acupuncture combined with psychotherapy group (observation group 2), 40 cases in each one. The rehabilitation training was conducted by a professional speech trainer. In acupuncture treatment, speech function area in scalp acupuncture, Jinjin (EX-HN 12) and Yuye (EX-HN 13) in tongue acupuncture and Lianquan (CV 23) were the basic points. The supplementary points were selected according to syndrome differentiation. Bloodletting method was used in combination with acupuncture. Psychotherapy was applied by the physician in psychiatric department of the hospital. The corresponding programs were used in each group. Examination of Aphasia of Chinese of Beijing Hospital was adopted to observe the oral speech expression, listening comprehension and reading and writing ability. After 21-day treatment, the total effective rate was 92.5% (37/40) in observation group 1, 97.5% (39/40) in observation group 2 and 87.5% (35/40) in control group. The efficacies were similar in comparison among 3 groups. The remarkable effective rate was 15.0% (6/40) in observation group 1, 50.0% (20/40) in observation group 2 and 2.5% (1/40) in control group. The result in observation group 2 was superior to the other two groups (Prehabilitation training is obviously advantageous in the treatment of post-stroke speech disorder.

  12. Upper Limb Rehabilitation Robot Powered by PAMs Cooperates with FES Arrays to Realize Reach-to-Grasp Trainings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chen; Jiang, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    The reach-to-grasp activities play an important role in our daily lives. The developed RUPERT for stroke patients with high stiffness in arm flexor muscles is a low-cost lightweight portable exoskeleton rehabilitation robot whose joints are unidirectionally actuated by pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs). In order to expand the useful range of RUPERT especially for patients with flaccid paralysis, functional electrical stimulation (FES) is taken to activate paralyzed arm muscles. As both the exoskeleton robot driven by PAMs and the neuromuscular skeletal system under FES possess the highly nonlinear and time-varying characteristics, iterative learning control (ILC) is studied and is taken to control this newly designed hybrid rehabilitation system for reaching trainings. Hand function rehabilitation refers to grasping. Because of tiny finger muscles, grasping and releasing are realized by FES array electrodes and matrix scan method. By using the surface electromyography (EMG) technique, the subject's active intent is identified. The upper limb rehabilitation robot powered by PAMs cooperates with FES arrays to realize active reach-to-grasp trainings, which was verified through experiments. PMID:29065566

  13. Upper Limb Rehabilitation Robot Powered by PAMs Cooperates with FES Arrays to Realize Reach-to-Grasp Trainings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xikai Tu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The reach-to-grasp activities play an important role in our daily lives. The developed RUPERT for stroke patients with high stiffness in arm flexor muscles is a low-cost lightweight portable exoskeleton rehabilitation robot whose joints are unidirectionally actuated by pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs. In order to expand the useful range of RUPERT especially for patients with flaccid paralysis, functional electrical stimulation (FES is taken to activate paralyzed arm muscles. As both the exoskeleton robot driven by PAMs and the neuromuscular skeletal system under FES possess the highly nonlinear and time-varying characteristics, iterative learning control (ILC is studied and is taken to control this newly designed hybrid rehabilitation system for reaching trainings. Hand function rehabilitation refers to grasping. Because of tiny finger muscles, grasping and releasing are realized by FES array electrodes and matrix scan method. By using the surface electromyography (EMG technique, the subject’s active intent is identified. The upper limb rehabilitation robot powered by PAMs cooperates with FES arrays to realize active reach-to-grasp trainings, which was verified through experiments.

  14. Study protocol for the FITR Heart Study: Feasibility, safety, adherence, and efficacy of high intensity interval training in a hospital-initiated rehabilitation program for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jenna; Keating, Shelley E; Leveritt, Michael D; Holland, David J; Gomersall, Sjaan R; Coombes, Jeff S

    2017-12-01

    For decades, moderate intensity continuous training (MICT) has been the cornerstone of exercise prescription for cardiac rehabilitation (CR). High intensity interval training (HIIT) is now recognized in CR exercise guidelines as an appropriate and efficient modality for improving cardiorespiratory fitness, a strong predictor of mortality. However, the clinical application of HIIT in a real world CR setting, in terms of feasibility, safety, and long-term adherence, needs further investigation to address ongoing reservations. Furthermore, studies using objective measures of exercise intensity (such as heart rate; HR) have produced variable outcomes. Therefore we propose investigating the use of subjective measures (such as rating of perceived exertion (RPE)) for prescribing exercise intensity. One hundred adults with coronary artery disease (CAD) attending a hospital-initiated CR program will be randomized to 1) HIIT: 4 × 4 min high intensity intervals at 15-18 RPE interspersed with 3-min active recovery periods or 2) MICT: usual care exercise including 40 min continuous exercise at a moderate intensity corresponding to 11-13 RPE. Primary outcome is change in exercise capacity (peak VO 2 ) following 4 weeks of exercise training. Secondary outcome measures are: feasibility, safety, exercise adherence, body composition, vascular function, inflammatory markers, intrahepatic lipid, energy intake, and dietary behavior over 12-months; and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) following 12 weeks of exercise training. This study aims to address the ongoing concerns regarding the practicality and safety of HIIT in CR programs. We anticipate study findings will lead to the development of a standardized protocol to facilitate CR programs to incorporate HIIT as a standard exercise option for appropriate patients.

  15. Estimating cost-effectiveness of mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation training strategies to improve survival from cardiac arrest in private locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swor, Robert; Compton, Scott

    2004-01-01

    Most cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) trainees are young, and most cardiac arrests occur in private residences witnessed by older individuals. To estimate the cost-effectiveness of a CPR training program targeted at citizens over the age of 50 years compared with that of current nontargeted public CPR training. A model was developed using cardiac arrest and known demographic data from a single suburban zip code (population 36,325) including: local data (1997-1999) regarding cardiac arrest locations (public vs. private); incremental survival with CPR (historical survival rate 7.8%, adjusted odds ratio for CPR 2.0); arrest bystander demographics obtained from bystander telephone interviews; zip code demographics regarding population age and distribution; and 12.50 dollars per student for the cost of CPR training. Published rates of CPR training programs by age were used to estimate the numbers typically trained. Several assumptions were made: 1) there would be one bystander per. arrest; 2) the bystander would always perform CPR if trained; 3) cardiac arrest would be evenly distributed in the population; and 4) CPR training for a proportion of the population would proportionally increase CPR provision. Rates of arrest, bystanders by age, number of CPR trainees needed to result in increased arrest survival, and training cost per life saved for a one-year study period were calculated. There were 24.3 cardiac arrests per year, with 21.9 (90%) occurring in homes. In 66.5% of the home arrests, the bystander was more than 50 years old. To yield one additional survivor using the current CPR training strategy, 12,306 people needed to be trained (3,510 bystanders aged 50 years), which resulted in CPR provision to 7.14 additional patients. The training cost per life saved for a bystander aged 50 years was 785,040 dollars. Using a strategy of training only those cost of 53,383 dollars per life saved. Using these assumptions, current CPR training strategy is not a cost

  16. Ability to work in anaerobic condition is associated with physical performance on the six-minute walk test in older patients receiving cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Guido; Vannetti, Federica; Molino-Lova, Raffaele

    2015-05-01

    During maximal incremental exercise, the ability to work in the anaerobic condition, expressed by the respiratory exchange ratio, is associated with physical performance. Further, peak respiratory exchange ratio is regarded as the best non-invasive measure of a patient's actual exercise effort. This study examined whether ability to work in the anaerobic condition is also associated with physical performance in submaximal constant work rate exercise. A total of 75 older patients (51 men, 24 women), mean age 71.1 years (standard deviation 6.7 years), who had recently undergone cardiac surgery, performed cardiopulmonary exercise testing in a 6-min walk test before and after rehabilitation. The distance walked, steady-state oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output and respiratory exchange ratio increased significantly after rehabilitation (p work in the anaerobic condition is associated with physical performance in submaximal constant work rate exercises. Thus the steady-state respiratory exchange ratio might be regarded as a measure of the patient's actual exercise effort. This information may prove useful in customizing exercise prescription and assessing the effects of rehabilitation.

  17. Effects of active and passive training apparatus combined with rehabilitation training on lower limb function of stroke patients during recovery period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke patients always spontaneously do some learning and training of motor functions;however, learning and training are not prompt and right, while patients do not have enough activity amounts.Active and passive motor training apparatus is aimed directly at lower limb training so as to stimulate nerve function through stimulating muscular movement. Based on motor mileage, motor time, various power supplies and velocity of active and passive training apparatus, we can understand the training condition and adjust training program.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of grade-III rehabilitation training combining with active and passive training apparatus on lower limb function, muscle strength and activity of daily living (ADL) in stroke patients during recovery period.DESIGN: Contrast observation.SETTING: Department of Rehabilitation, Jilin Academic Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 80 patients with stroke-induced hemiplegia after stabilizing vital signs for 2 weeks were selected from Department of Rehabilitation, Jilin Academic Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine from January to June 2007. There were 47 males and 33 females, and their ages ranged from 41 to 75 years. All patients met the diagnostic criteria of the Fourth National Cerebrovascular Disease Academic Meeting in 1995 and were diagnosed as cerebral hemorrhage or cerebral infarction through CT or MRI examinations in clinic. Patients and their parents provided the confirmed consent. Based on therapeutic orders of hospitalization, patients were randomly divided into treatment group and control group with 40 patients in each group.METHODS: Patients in the control group received physical therapy and occupational therapy combining with rehabilitative treatment based on grade-Ⅲ rehabilitative treatment program, which was set by the National Cerebrovascular Disease Topic Group. In addition, patients in the treatment group were trained with active and passive

  18. Randomised controlled trial examining the effect of an outpatient exercise training programme on haemodynamics and cardiac MR parameters of right ventricular function in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: the ExPAH study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Karen S W; Faux, Steven G; Wong, Peter K K; Holloway, Cameron; Assareh, Hassan; McLachlan, Craig S; Kotlyar, Eugene

    2017-02-06

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a potentially life-threatening condition characterised by elevated pulmonary artery pressure. Early stage PH patients are often asymptomatic. Disease progression is associated with impairment of right ventricular function and progressive dyspnoea. Current guidelines recommend exercise training (grade IIa, level B). However, many questions remain regarding the mechanisms of improvement, intensity of supervision and optimal frequency, duration and intensity of exercise. This study will assess the effect of an outpatient rehabilitation programme on haemodynamics and cardiac right ventricular function in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a subgroup of PH. This randomised controlled trial involves both a major urban tertiary and smaller regional hospital in New South Wales, Australia. The intervention will compare an outpatient rehabilitation programme with a control group (home exercise programme). Participants will be stable on oral PAH-specific therapy. The primary outcome measure will be right ventricular ejection fraction measured by cardiac MRI. Secondary outcomes will include haemodynamics measured by right heart catheterisation, endurance, functional capacity, health-related quality of life questionnaires and biomarkers of cardiac function and inflammation. Ethical approval has been granted by St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney (HREC/14/SVH/341). Results of this study will be disseminated through presentation at scientific conferences and in scientific journals. ACTRN12615001041549; pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Exercise training starting at weaning age preserves cardiac pacemaker function in adulthood of diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho de Lima, Daniel; Guimarães, Juliana Bohnen; Rodovalho, Gisele Vieira; Silveira, Simonton Andrade; Haibara, Andrea Siqueira; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2014-08-01

    Peripheral sympathetic overdrive in young obese subjects contributes to further aggravation of insulin resistance, diabetes, and hypertension, thus inducing worsening clinical conditions in adulthood. Exercise training has been considered a strategy to repair obesity autonomic dysfunction, thereby reducing the cardiometabolic risk. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of early exercise training, starting immediately after weaning, on cardiac autonomic control in diet-induced obese rats. Male Wistar rats (weaning) were divided into four groups: (i) a control group (n = 6); (ii) an exercise-trained control group (n = 6); (iii) a diet-induced obesity group (n = 6); and (iv) an exercise-trained diet-induced obesity group (n = 6). The development of obesity was induced by 9 weeks of palatable diet intake, and the training program was implemented in a motor-driven treadmill (5 times per week) during the same period. After this period, animals were submitted to vein and artery catheter implantation to assess cardiac autonomic balance by methylatropine (3 mg/kg) and propranolol (4 mg/kg) administration. Exercise training increased running performance in both groups (p Exercise training also prevented the increased resting heart rate in obese rats, which seemed to be related to cardiac pacemaker activity preservation (p exercise program beginning at weaning age prevents cardiovascular dysfunction in obese rats, indicating that exercise training may be used as a nonpharmacological therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiometabolic diseases.

  20. Aerobic exercise training rescues cardiac protein quality control and blunts endoplasmic reticulum stress in heart failure rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozi, Luiz H M; Jannig, Paulo R; Rolim, Natale; Voltarelli, Vanessa A; Dourado, Paulo M M; Wisløff, Ulrik; Brum, Patricia C

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through accumulation of misfolded proteins plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases. In an attempt to reestablish ER homoeostasis, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated. However, if ER stress persists, sustained UPR activation leads to apoptosis. There is no available therapy for ER stress relief. Considering that aerobic exercise training (AET) attenuates oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and calcium imbalance, it may be a potential strategy to reestablish cardiac ER homoeostasis. We test the hypothesis that AET would attenuate impaired cardiac ER stress after myocardial infarction (MI). Wistar rats underwent to either MI or sham surgeries. Four weeks later, rats underwent to 8 weeks of moderate-intensity AET. Myocardial infarction rats displayed cardiac dysfunction and lung oedema, suggestin